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Sample records for abel inversion method

  1. Abel inversion method for cometary atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Benoit; Opitom, Cyrielle; Hutsemekers, Damien; Jehin, Emmanuel; Munhoven, Guy; Manfroid, Jean; Bisikalo, Dmitry V.; Shematovich, Valery I.

    2016-04-01

    Remote observation of cometary atmospheres produces a measurement of the cometary emissions integrated along the line of sight joining the observing instrument and the gas of the coma. This integration is the so-called Abel transform of the local emission rate. We develop a method specifically adapted to the inversion of the Abel transform of cometary emissions, that retrieves the radial profile of the emission rate of any unabsorbed emission, under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry of the coma. The method uses weighted least squares fitting and analytical results. A Tikhonov regularization technique is applied to reduce the possible effects of noise and ill-conditioning, and standard error propagation techniques are implemented. Several theoretical tests of the inversion techniques are carried out to show its validity and robustness, and show that the method is only weakly dependent on any constant offset added to the data, which reduces the dependence of the retrieved emission rate on the background subtraction. We apply the method to observations of three different comets observed using the TRAPPIST instrument: 103P/ Hartley 2, F6/ Lemmon and A1/ Siding spring. We show that the method retrieves realistic emission rates, and that characteristic lengths and production rates can be derived from the emission rate for both CN and C2 molecules. We show that the emission rate derived from the observed flux of CN emission at 387 nm and from the C2 emission at 514.1 nm of comet Siding Spring both present an easily-identifiable shoulder that corresponds to the separation between pre- and post-outburst gas. As a general result, we show that diagnosing properties and features of the coma using the emission rate is easier than directly using the observed flux. We also determine the parameters of a Haser model fitting the inverted data and fitting the line-of-sight integrated observation, for which we provide the exact analytical expression of the line-of-sight integration

  2. A new asymmetric Abel-inversion method for plasma interferometry in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1989-02-01

    In order to get precise local electron density information from chordal interferometric measurement of a tokamak plasma, a self- consistent and reliable inversion method is necessary. In this paper, a new asymmetric Abel-inversion method is introduced. This method includes flexible boundary conditions, application to a non-circular geometry, and estimation of the plasma in the scrape-off layer. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by comparison with other methods. This new inversion method is applied to a parametric study which includes dependence on the Shafranov shift and elongation of the profile. The inverted results are integrated along different views and compared with other density measurements. This new method can also be applied to plasma spectroscopy. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  3. A generalized Abel inversion method for gamma-ray imaging of thermonuclear plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.; Pavone, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Schoepf, K.; Yavorskij, V.

    2016-03-01

    A method to determine the gamma-ray emissivity profile from measurements along a few multiple collimated lines of sight in thermonuclear plasmas is presented. The algorithm is based on a generalisation of the known Abel inversion and takes into account the non circular shape of the plasma flux surfaces and the limited number of data points available. The method is applied to synthetic experimental measurements originating from parabolic and non parabolic JET gamma-ray emissivity profiles, where the aim is to compare the results of the inversion with the original, known input parameters. We find that profile parameters, such as the peak value, width and centre of the emissivity, are determined with an accuracy between 1 and 20% for parabolic and 2 to 25% for non parabolic profiles, respectively, which compare to an error at the 10% level for the input data. The results presented in this paper are primarily of relevance for the reconstruction of emissivity profiles from radiation measurements in tokamaks, but the method can also be applied to measurements along a sparse set of collimated lines of sight in general applications, provided that the surfaces at constant emissivity are known to have rotational simmetry.

  4. An efficient and flexible Abel-inversion method for noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhin, Igor I.

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient and flexible method for solving Abel integral equation of the first kind, frequently appearing in many fields of astrophysics, physics, chemistry, and applied sciences. This equation represents an ill-posed problem, thus solving it requires some kind of regularization. Our method is based on solving the equation on a so-called compact set of functions and/or using Tikhonov's regularization. A priori constraints on the unknown function, defining a compact set, are very loose and can be set using simple physical considerations. Tikhonov's regularization on itself does not require any explicit a priori constraints on the unknown function and can be used independently of such constraints or in combination with them. Various target degrees of smoothness of the unknown function may be set, as required by the problem at hand. The advantage of the method, apart from its flexibility, is that it gives uniform convergence of the approximate solution to the exact solution, as the errors of input data tend to zero. The method is illustrated on several simulated models with known solutions. An example of astrophysical application of the method is also given.

  5. Fast algorithm for computing the Abel inversion integral in broadband reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, F.D.

    1995-10-01

    The application of the Hansen--Jablokow recursive technique is proposed for the numerical computation of the Abel inversion integral which is used in ({ital O}-mode) frequency-modulated broadband reflectometry to evaluate plasma density profiles. Compared to the usual numerical methods the recursive algorithm allows substantial time savings that can be important when processing massive amounts of data aiming to control the plasma in real time. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. Improved Abel transform inversion: First application to COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon-Angel, A.; Hernandez-Pajares, M.; Juan, J.; Sanz, J.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the first results of Ionospheric Tomographic inversion are presented, using the Improved Abel Transform on the COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 constellation of 6 LEO satellites, carrying on-board GPS receivers.[- 4mm] The Abel transform inversion is a wide used technique which in the ionospheric context makes it possible to retrieve electron densities as a function of height based of STEC (Slant Total Electron Content) data gathered from GPS receivers on board of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellites. Within this precise use, the classical approach of the Abel inversion is based on the assumption of spherical symmetry of the electron density in the vicinity of an occultation, meaning that the electron content varies in height but not horizontally. In particular, one implication of this assumption is that the VTEC (Vertical Total Electron Content) is a constant value for the occultation region. This assumption may not always be valid since horizontal ionospheric gradients (a very frequent feature in some ionosphere problematic areas such as the Equatorial region) could significantly affect the electron profiles. [- 4mm] In order to overcome this limitation/problem of the classical Abel inversion, a studied improvement of this technique can be obtained by assuming separability in the electron density (see Hernández-Pajares et al. 2000). This means that the electron density can be expressed by the multiplication of VTEC data and a shape function which assumes all the height dependency in it while the VTEC data keeps the horizontal dependency. Actually, it is more realistic to assume that this shape fuction depends only on the height and to use VTEC information to take into account the horizontal variation rather than considering spherical symmetry in the electron density function as it has been carried out in the classical approach of the Abel inversion.[-4mm] Since the above mentioned improved Abel inversion technique has already been tested and proven to be a useful

  7. Comparison of four stable numerical methods for Abel's integral equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murio, Diego A.; Mejia, Carlos E.

    1991-01-01

    The 3-D image reconstruction from cone-beam projections in computerized tomography leads naturally, in the case of radial symmetry, to the study of Abel-type integral equations. If the experimental information is obtained from measured data, on a discrete set of points, special methods are needed in order to restore continuity with respect to the data. A new combined Regularized-Adjoint-Conjugate Gradient algorithm, together with two different implementations of the Mollification Method (one based on a data filtering technique and the other on the mollification of the kernal function) and a regularization by truncation method (initially proposed for 2-D ray sample schemes and more recently extended to 3-D cone-beam image reconstruction) are extensively tested and compared for accuracy and numerical stability as functions of the level of noise in the data.

  8. Seismic Inversion Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason

    2009-09-16

    With the rapid advances in sophisticated solar modeling and the abundance of high-quality solar pulsation data, efficient and robust inversion techniques are crucial for seismic studies. We present some aspects of an efficient Fourier Optimally Localized Averaging (OLA) inversion method with an example applied to time-distance helioseismology.

  9. Mathematics of Radiation Propagation in Planetary Atmospheres: Absorption, Refraction, Time Delay, Occultation, and Abel Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.

    Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths curved by refraction. The inverse problem, determining the altitude profile of mass density (index of refraction) or the concentration of an individual chemical species (absorption), from occultation data, also has its mathematically interesting (i.e., difficult) aspects. Now we automatically have noise and thus statistical analysis is just as important as calculus and numerical analysis. Here we will describe a new approach of least-squares fitting occultation data to an expansion over compact basis functions. This approach, which avoids numerical differentiation and singular integrals, was originally developed to analyze laboratory imaging data.Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths

  10. A Jacobi-Legendre polynomial-based method for the stable solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammari, Amara; Karoui, Abderrazek

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we build a stable scheme for the solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type. This scheme is obtained by further developing the orthogonal polynomial-based techniques for solving the Abel integral equation of Ammari and Karoui (2010 Inverse Problems 26 105005). More precisely, this method is based on the simultaneous use of the two families of orthogonal polynomials of the Legendre and Jacobi types. In particular, we provide an explicit formula for the computation of the Legendre expansion coefficients of the solution. This explicit formula is based on some known formulae for the exact computation of the integrals of the product of some Jacobi polynomials with the derivatives of the Legendre polynomials. Besides the explicit and the exact computation of the expansion coefficients of the solution, our proposed method has the advantage of ensuring the stability of the solution under a fairly weak condition on the functional space to which the data function belongs. Finally, we provide the reader with some numerical examples that illustrate the results of this work.

  11. Abel reconstruction of piecewise constant radial density profiles from x-ray radiographs.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, M; Notea, A; Pal, D

    1989-08-01

    We present a method for reconstructing the radial density profile of a cylindrically symmetric object from a single x-ray projection, when the profile consists of a number of different constant sections. A forward Abel transform based algorithm is employed whereby the profile is recovered recursively, onion peelinglike, starting from the outside diameter of the object and moving in. Distortions originating in the Gibbs phenomenon, unavoidable in most available Abel inversion methods, are completely eliminated. The method is simple enough to be carried out on a handheld calculator or a spreadsheet program on a personal computer, and no elaborate computer fits or application programming are required. The method is demonstrated by inverting a simulated three-section noisy set of data and is shown to yield results of a quality equal to that of a recent powerful Abel inversion method, based on full nonlinear least-squares computer fits. PMID:20555668

  12. A generalized inversion method: Simultaneous source localization and environmental inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Knobles, David P.

    2002-05-01

    The problem of localizing and tracking a source in the shallow ocean is often complicated by uncertainty in the environmental parameters. Likewise, the estimates of environmental parameters in the shallow ocean obtained by inversion methods can be degraded by incorrect information about the source location. To overcome both these common obstacles-environmental mismatch in matched field processing and incorrect source location in geoacoustic inversions-a generalized inversion scheme is developed that includes both source and environmental parameters as unknowns in the inversion. The new technique called systematic decoupling using rotated coordinates (SDRC) expands the original idea of rotated coordinates [M. D. Collins and L. Fishman, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 1637-1644 (1995)] by using multiple sets of coherent broadband rotated coordinates, each corresponding to a different set of bounds, to systematically decouple the unknowns in a series of simulated annealing inversions. The results of applying the SDRC inversion method to data from the Area Characterization Test II experiment performed on the New Jersey continental shelf are presented. [Work supported by ONR.

  13. Inversion methods for interpretation of asteroid lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko; Lamberg, L.; Lumme, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed methods of inversion that can be used in the determination of the three-dimensional shape or the albedo distribution of the surface of a body from disk-integrated photometry, assuming the shape to be strictly convex. In addition to the theory of inversion methods, we have studied the practical aspects of the inversion problem and applied our methods to lightcurve data of 39 Laetitia and 16 Psyche.

  14. An exact inverse method for subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daripa, Prabir

    1988-01-01

    A new inverse method for the aerodynamic design of airfoils is presented for subcritical flows. The pressure distribution in this method can be prescribed as a function of the arclength of the still unknown body. It is shown that this inverse problem is mathematically equivalent to solving only one nonlinear boundary value problem subject to known Dirichlet data on the boundary.

  15. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, C

    2004-02-05

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060.

  16. Statistical versus nonstatistical temperature inversion methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Fleming, H. E.

    1972-01-01

    Vertical temperature profiles are derived from radiation measurements by inverting the integral equation of radiative transfer. Because of the nonuniqueness of the solution, the particular temperature profile obtained depends on the numerical inversion technique used and the type of auxiliary information incorporated in the solution. The choice of an inversion algorithm depends on many factors; including the speed and size of computer, the availability of representative statistics, and the accuracy of initial data. Results are presented for a numerical study comparing two contrasting inversion methods: the statistical-matrix inversion method and the nonstatistical-iterative method. These were found to be the most applicable to the problem of determining atmospheric temperature profiles. Tradeoffs between the two methods are discussed.

  17. An improved inversion for FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC ionosphere electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.

    2015-10-01

    An improved method to retrieve electron density profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) data is presented and applied to Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) observations. The improved inversion uses a monthly grid of COSMIC F region peak densities (NmF2), which are obtained via the standard Abel inversion, to aid the Abel inversion by providing information on the horizontal gradients in the ionosphere. This lessens the impact of ionospheric gradients on the retrieval of GPS RO electron density profiles, reducing the dominant error source in the standard Abel inversion. Results are presented that demonstrate the NmF2 aided retrieval significantly improves the quality of the COSMIC electron density profiles. Improvements are most notable at E region altitudes, where the improved inversion reduces the artificial plasma cave that is generated by the Abel inversion spherical symmetry assumption at low latitudes during the daytime. Occurrence of unphysical negative electron densities at E region altitudes is also reduced. Furthermore, the NmF2 aided inversion has a positive impact at F region altitudes, where it results in a more distinct equatorial ionization anomaly. COSMIC electron density profiles inverted using our new approach are currently available through the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research COSMIC Data Analysis and Archive Center. Owing to the significant improvement in the results, COSMIC data users are encouraged to use electron density profiles based on the improved inversion rather than those inverted by the standard Abel inversion.

  18. NASA Inverse Methods/Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Third International Summer School on Inverse Methods and Data Assimilation which was conducted at Oregon State University from July 22 to August 2, 2002, is presented. Items listed include: a roster of attendees, a description of course content and talks given.

  19. An efficient method for inverse problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daripa, Prabir

    1987-01-01

    A new inverse method for aerodynamic design of subcritical airfoils is presented. The pressure distribution in this method can be prescribed in a natural way, i.e. as a function of arclength of the as yet unknown body. This inverse problem is shown to be mathematically equivalent to solving a single nonlinear boundary value problem subject to known Dirichlet data on the boundary. The solution to this problem determines the airfoil, the free stream Mach number M(sub x) and the upstream flow direction theta(sub x). The existence of a solution for any given pressure distribution is discussed. The method is easy to implement and extremely efficient. We present a series of results for which comparisons are made with the known airfoils.

  20. Regeneration of stochastic processes: an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, F.; Peinke, J.; Sahimi, M.; Rahimi Tabar, M. R.

    2005-10-01

    We propose a novel inverse method that utilizes a set of data to construct a simple equation that governs the stochastic process for which the data have been measured, hence enabling us to reconstruct the stochastic process. As an example, we analyze the stochasticity in the beat-to-beat fluctuations in the heart rates of healthy subjects as well as those with congestive heart failure. The inverse method provides a novel technique for distinguishing the two classes of subjects in terms of a drift and a diffusion coefficients which behave completely differently for the two classes of subjects, hence potentially providing a novel diagnostic tool for distinguishing healthy subjects from those with congestive heart failure, even at the early stages of the disease development.

  1. A Bayesian method for microseismic source inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-05-01

    Earthquake source inversion is highly dependent on location determination and velocity models. Uncertainties in both the model parameters and the observations need to be rigorously incorporated into an inversion approach. Here, we show a probabilistic Bayesian method that allows formal inclusion of the uncertainties in the moment tensor inversion. This method allows the combination of different sets of far-field observations, such as P-wave and S-wave polarities and amplitude ratios, into one inversion. Additional observations can be included by deriving a suitable likelihood function from the uncertainties. This inversion produces samples from the source posterior probability distribution, including a best-fitting solution for the source mechanism and associated probability. The inversion can be constrained to the double-couple space or allowed to explore the gamut of moment tensor solutions, allowing volumetric and other non-double-couple components. The posterior probability of the double-couple and full moment tensor source models can be evaluated from the Bayesian evidence, using samples from the likelihood distributions for the two source models, producing an estimate of whether or not a source is double-couple. Such an approach is ideally suited to microseismic studies where there are many sources of uncertainty and it is often difficult to produce reliability estimates of the source mechanism, although this can be true of many other cases. Using full-waveform synthetic seismograms, we also show the effects of noise, location, network distribution and velocity model uncertainty on the source probability density function. The noise has the largest effect on the results, especially as it can affect other parts of the event processing. This uncertainty can lead to erroneous non-double-couple source probability distributions, even when no other uncertainties exist. Although including amplitude ratios can improve the constraint on the source probability

  2. A Bayesian method for microseismic source inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquake source inversion is highly dependent on location determination and velocity models. Uncertainties in both the model parameters and the observations need to be rigorously incorporated into an inversion approach. Here, we show a probabilistic Bayesian method that allows formal inclusion of the uncertainties in the moment tensor inversion. This method allows the combination of different sets of far-field observations, such as P-wave and S-wave polarities and amplitude ratios, into one inversion. Additional observations can be included by deriving a suitable likelihood function from the uncertainties. This inversion produces samples from the source posterior probability distribution, including a best-fitting solution for the source mechanism and associated probability. The inversion can be constrained to the double-couple space or allowed to explore the gamut of moment tensor solutions, allowing volumetric and other non-double-couple components. The posterior probability of the double-couple and full moment tensor source models can be evaluated from the Bayesian evidence, using samples from the likelihood distributions for the two source models, producing an estimate of whether or not a source is double-couple. Such an approach is ideally suited to microseismic studies where there are many sources of uncertainty and it is often difficult to produce reliability estimates of the source mechanism, although this can be true of many other cases. Using full-waveform synthetic seismograms, we also show the effects of noise, location, network distribution and velocity model uncertainty on the source probability density function. The noise has the largest effect on the results, especially as it can affect other parts of the event processing. This uncertainty can lead to erroneous non-double-couple source probability distributions, even when no other uncertainties exist. Although including amplitude ratios can improve the constraint on the source probability

  3. Approximate inverse preconditioning of iterative methods for nonsymmetric linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Benzi, M.; Tuma, M.

    1996-12-31

    A method for computing an incomplete factorization of the inverse of a nonsymmetric matrix A is presented. The resulting factorized sparse approximate inverse is used as a preconditioner in the iterative solution of Ax = b by Krylov subspace methods.

  4. An inverse problem by boundary element method

    SciTech Connect

    Tran-Cong, T.; Nguyen-Thien, T.; Graham, A.L.

    1996-02-01

    Boundary Element Methods (BEM) have been established as useful and powerful tools in a wide range of engineering applications, e.g. Brebbia et al. In this paper, we report a particular three dimensional implementation of a direct boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation and its application to numerical simulations of practical polymer processing operations. In particular, we will focus on the application of the present boundary element technology to simulate an inverse problem in plastics processing.by extrusion. The task is to design profile extrusion dies for plastics. The problem is highly non-linear due to material viscoelastic behaviours as well as unknown free surface conditions. As an example, the technique is shown to be effective in obtaining the die profiles corresponding to a square viscoelastic extrudate under different processing conditions. To further illustrate the capability of the method, examples of other non-trivial extrudate profiles and processing conditions are also given.

  5. Abel's Theorem Simplifies Reduction of Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We give an alternative to the standard method of reduction or order, in which one uses one solution of a homogeneous, linear, second order differential equation to find a second, linearly independent solution. Our method, based on Abel's Theorem, is shorter, less complex and extends to higher order equations.

  6. Application of the least-squares inversion method: Fourier series versus waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Dong-Joo; Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo

    2015-11-01

    We describe an implicit link between waveform inversion and Fourier series based on inversion methods such as gradient, Gauss-Newton, and full Newton methods. Fourier series have been widely used as a basic concept in studies on seismic data interpretation, and their coefficients are obtained in the classical Fourier analysis. We show that Fourier coefficients can also be obtained by inversion algorithms, and compare the method to seismic waveform inversion algorithms. In that case, Fourier coefficients correspond to model parameters (velocities, density or elastic constants), whereas cosine and sine functions correspond to components of the Jacobian matrix, that is, partial derivative wavefields in seismic inversion. In the classical Fourier analysis, optimal coefficients are determined by the sensitivity of a given function to sine and cosine functions. In the inversion method for Fourier series, Fourier coefficients are obtained by measuring the sensitivity of residuals between given functions and test functions (defined as the sum of weighted cosine and sine functions) to cosine and sine functions. The orthogonal property of cosine and sine functions makes the full or approximate Hessian matrix become a diagonal matrix in the inversion for Fourier series. In seismic waveform inversion, the Hessian matrix may or may not be a diagonal matrix, because partial derivative wavefields correlate with each other to some extent, making them semi-orthogonal. At the high-frequency limits, however, the Hessian matrix can be approximated by either a diagonal matrix or a diagonally-dominant matrix. Since we usually deal with relatively low frequencies in seismic waveform inversion, it is not diagonally dominant and thus it is prohibitively expensive to compute the full or approximate Hessian matrix. By interpreting Fourier series with the inversion algorithms, we note that the Fourier series can be computed at an iteration step using any inversion algorithms such as the

  7. Quadratic function approaching method for magnetotelluric soundingdata inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Liangjun, Yan; Wenbao, Hu; Zhang, Keni

    2004-04-05

    The quadratic function approaching method (QFAM) is introduced for magnetotelluric sounding (MT) data inversion. The method takes the advantage of that quadratic function has single extreme value, which avoids leading to an inversion solution for local minimum and ensures the solution for global minimization of an objective function. The method does not need calculation of sensitivity matrix and not require a strict initial earth model. Examples for synthetic data and field measurement data indicate that the proposed inversion method is effective.

  8. Summability of trigonometric Fourier series at d-points and a generalization of the Abel-Poisson method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigub, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    We study the convergence of linear means of the Fourier series \\sumk=-∞+∞λk,\\varepsilon\\hat{f}_keikx of a function f\\in L1 \\lbrack -π,π \\rbrack to f(x) as \\varepsilon\\searrow0 at all points at which the derivative \\bigl(\\int_0^xf(t) dt\\bigr)' exists (i.e. at the d-points). Sufficient conditions for the convergence are stated in terms of the factors \\{λk,\\varepsilon\\} and, in the case of λk,\\varepsilon=\\varphi(\\varepsilon k), in terms of the condition that the functions \\varphi and x\\varphi'(x) belong to the Wiener algebra A( R). We also study a new problem concerning the convergence of means of the Abel-Poisson type, \\sumk=-∞^∞r\\psi(\\vert k\\vert)\\hat{f}_keikx, as r\

  9. Inverse scattering theory: Inverse scattering series method for one dimensional non-compact support potential

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jie; Lesage, Anne-Cécile; Hussain, Fazle; Bodmann, Bernhard G.; Kouri, Donald J.

    2014-12-15

    The reversion of the Born-Neumann series of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation is one of the standard ways to solve the inverse acoustic scattering problem. One limitation of the current inversion methods based on the reversion of the Born-Neumann series is that the velocity potential should have compact support. However, this assumption cannot be satisfied in certain cases, especially in seismic inversion. Based on the idea of distorted wave scattering, we explore an inverse scattering method for velocity potentials without compact support. The strategy is to decompose the actual medium as a known single interface reference medium, which has the same asymptotic form as the actual medium and a perturbative scattering potential with compact support. After introducing the method to calculate the Green’s function for the known reference potential, the inverse scattering series and Volterra inverse scattering series are derived for the perturbative potential. Analytical and numerical examples demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Besides, to ensure stability of the numerical computation, the Lanczos averaging method is employed as a filter to reduce the Gibbs oscillations for the truncated discrete inverse Fourier transform of each order. Our method provides a rigorous mathematical framework for inverse acoustic scattering with a non-compact support velocity potential.

  10. The clusters Abell 222 and Abell 223: a multi-wavelength view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Laganá, T. F.; Adami, C.; Bertin, E.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The Abell 222 and 223 clusters are located at an average redshift z ~ 0.21 and are separated by 0.26 deg. Signatures of mergers have been previously found in these clusters, both in X-rays and at optical wavelengths, thus motivating our study. In X-rays, they are relatively bright, and Abell 223 shows a double structure. A filament has also been detected between the clusters both at optical and X-ray wavelengths. Aims: We analyse the optical properties of these two clusters based on deep imaging in two bands, derive their galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs) and correlate these properties with X-ray characteristics derived from XMM-Newton data. Methods: The optical part of our study is based on archive images obtained with the CFHT Megaprime/Megacam camera, covering a total region of about 1 deg2, or 12.3 × 12.3 Mpc2 at a redshift of 0.21. The X-ray analysis is based on archive XMM-Newton images. Results: The GLFs of Abell 222 in the g' and r' bands are well fit by a Schechter function; the GLF is steeper in r' than in g'. For Abell 223, the GLFs in both bands require a second component at bright magnitudes, added to a Schechter function; they are similar in both bands. The Serna & Gerbal method allows to separate well the two clusters. No obvious filamentary structures are detected at very large scales around the clusters, but a third cluster at the same redshift, Abell 209, is located at a projected distance of 19.2 Mpc. X-ray temperature and metallicity maps reveal that the temperature and metallicity of the X-ray gas are quite homogeneous in Abell 222, while they are very perturbed in Abell 223. Conclusions: The Abell 222/Abell 223 system is complex. The two clusters that form this structure present very different dynamical states. Abell 222 is a smaller, less massive and almost isothermal cluster. On the other hand, Abell 223 is more massive and has most probably been crossed by a subcluster on its way to the northeast. As a consequence, the

  11. A method for obtaining coefficients of compositional inverse generating functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruchinin, Dmitry V.; Shablya, Yuriy V.; Kruchinin, Vladimir V.; Shelupanov, Alexander A.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how to obtain expressions for coefficients of compositional inverse generating functions in explicit way. The method is based on the Lagrange inversion theorem and composita of generating functions. Also we give a method of obtaining expressions for coefficients of reciprocal generating functions and consider some examples.

  12. An inverse design method for 2D airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi-Yong; Cui, Peng; Zhang, Gen-Bao

    2010-03-01

    The computational method for aerodynamic design of aircraft is applied more universally than before, in which the design of an airfoil is a hot problem. The forward problem is discussed by most relative papers, but inverse method is more useful in practical designs. In this paper, the inverse design of 2D airfoil was investigated. A finite element method based on the variational principle was used for carrying out. Through the simulation, it was shown that the method was fit for the design.

  13. An inverse method with regularity condition for transonic airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Ziqiang; Xia, Zhixun; Wu, Liyi

    1991-01-01

    It is known from Lighthill's exact solution of the incompressible inverse problem that in the inverse design problem, the surface pressure distribution and the free stream speed cannot both be prescribed independently. This implies the existence of a constraint on the prescribed pressure distribution. The same constraint exists at compressible speeds. Presented here is an inverse design method for transonic airfoils. In this method, the target pressure distribution contains a free parameter that is adjusted during the computation to satisfy the regularity condition. Some design results are presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the method.

  14. A Higher Order Iterative Method for Computing the Drazin Inverse

    PubMed Central

    Soleymani, F.; Stanimirović, Predrag S.

    2013-01-01

    A method with high convergence rate for finding approximate inverses of nonsingular matrices is suggested and established analytically. An extension of the introduced computational scheme to general square matrices is defined. The extended method could be used for finding the Drazin inverse. The application of the scheme on large sparse test matrices alongside the use in preconditioning of linear system of equations will be presented to clarify the contribution of the paper. PMID:24222747

  15. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  16. Geophysical Inversion With Multi-Objective Global Optimization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Bijani, Rodrigo; Farquharson, Colin

    2016-04-01

    We are investigating the use of Pareto multi-objective global optimization (PMOGO) methods to solve numerically complicated geophysical inverse problems. PMOGO methods can be applied to highly nonlinear inverse problems, to those where derivatives are discontinuous or simply not obtainable, and to those were multiple minima exist in the problem space. PMOGO methods generate a suite of solutions that minimize multiple objectives (e.g. data misfits and regularization terms) in a Pareto-optimal sense. This allows a more complete assessment of the possibilities and provides opportunities to calculate statistics regarding the likelihood of particular model features. We are applying PMOGO methods to four classes of inverse problems. The first are discrete-body problems where the inversion determines values of several parameters that define the location, orientation, size and physical properties of an anomalous body represented by a simple shape, for example a sphere, ellipsoid, cylinder or cuboid. A PMOGO approach can determine not only the optimal shape parameters for the anomalous body but also the optimal shape itself. Furthermore, when one expects several anomalous bodies in the subsurface, a PMOGO inversion approach can determine an optimal number of parameterized bodies. The second class of inverse problems are standard mesh-based problems where the physical property values in each cell are treated as continuous variables. The third class of problems are lithological inversions, which are also mesh-based but cells can only take discrete physical property values corresponding to known or assumed rock units. In the fourth class, surface geometry inversions, we consider a fundamentally different type of problem in which a model comprises wireframe surfaces representing contacts between rock units. The physical properties of each rock unit remain fixed while the inversion controls the position of the contact surfaces via control nodes. Surface geometry inversion can be

  17. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics. PMID:21939599

  18. The Filtered Abel Transform and Its Application in Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    Many non-intrusive combustion diagnosis methods generate line-of-sight projections of a flame field. To reconstruct the spatial field of the measured properties, these projections need to be deconvoluted. When the spatial field is axisymmetric, commonly used deconvolution method include the Abel transforms, the onion peeling method and the two-dimensional Fourier transform method and its derivatives such as the filtered back projection methods. This paper proposes a new approach for performing the Abel transform method is developed, which possesses the exactness of the Abel transform and the flexibility of incorporating various filters in the reconstruction process. The Abel transform is an exact method and the simplest among these commonly used methods. It is evinced in this paper that all the exact reconstruction methods for axisymmetric distributions must be equivalent to the Abel transform because of its uniqueness and exactness. Detailed proof is presented to show that the two dimensional Fourier methods when applied to axisymmetric cases is identical to the Abel transform. Discrepancies among various reconstruction method stem from the different approximations made to perform numerical calculations. An equation relating the spectrum of a set of projection date to that of the corresponding spatial distribution is obtained, which shows that the spectrum of the projection is equal to the Abel transform of the spectrum of the corresponding spatial distribution. From the equation, if either the projection or the distribution is bandwidth limited, the other is also bandwidth limited, and both have the same bandwidth. If the two are not bandwidth limited, the Abel transform has a bias against low wave number components in most practical cases. This explains why the Abel transform and all exact deconvolution methods are sensitive to high wave number noises. The filtered Abel transform is based on the fact that the Abel transform of filtered projection data is equal

  19. Minimization search method for data inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1975-01-01

    Technique has been developed for determining values of selected subsets of independent variables in mathematical formulations. Required computation time increases with first power of the number of variables. This is in contrast with classical minimization methods for which computational time increases with third power of the number of variables.

  20. Homogenization method based on the inverse problem

    SciTech Connect

    Tota, A.; Makai, M.

    2013-07-01

    We present a method for deriving homogeneous multi-group cross sections to replace a heterogeneous region's multi-group cross sections; providing that the fluxes and the currents on the external boundary, and the region averaged fluxes are preserved. The method is developed using diffusion approximation to the neutron transport equation in a symmetrical slab geometry. Assuming that the boundary fluxes are given, two response matrices (RMs) can be defined. The first derives the boundary current from the boundary flux, the second derives the flux integral over the region from the boundary flux. Assuming that these RMs are known, we present a formula which reconstructs the multi-group cross-section matrix and the diffusion coefficients from the RMs of a homogeneous slab. Applying this formula to the RMs of a slab with multiple homogeneous regions yields a homogenization method; which produce such homogenized multi-group cross sections and homogenized diffusion coefficients, that the fluxes and the currents on the external boundary, and the region averaged fluxes are preserved. The method is based on the determination of the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the RMs. We reproduce the four-group cross section matrix and the diffusion constants from the RMs in numerical examples. We give conditions for replacing a heterogeneous region by a homogeneous one so that the boundary current and the region-averaged flux are preserved for a given boundary flux. (authors)

  1. Use of ABIC and Invention of Inversion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukahata, Y.; Yagi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Bayesian inference is a powerful tool in inversion analyses of geophysical problems, because observed data are commonly inaccurate and insufficient in these problems. In Bayesian inference, we always encounter a problem in determining the relative weight between observed data and prior information. ABIC (Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion) gives a useful solution to this problem particularly for linear inverse problems, by maximizing the marginal likelihood for the relative weight. In general, we subjectively construct a Bayesian model, which consists of a family of parametric models with different values of the relative weight giving different parametric models; ABIC enables us to objectively select a specific model among the parametric models. In principle, ABIC gives us an inverse solution that mostly follows observed data when we have enough amount of data with good accuracy, and gives us an inverse solution that mostly follows prior information when observed data are insufficient and/or inaccurate (see the attached image). In inversion analyses using ABIC, we do not manually adjust the relative weight. Hence, we quite easily obtain geophysically unrealistic results. Because of that, someone may think that inversion analyses using ABIC is difficult in dealing with or even unreliable. However, this characteristic is an excellent point of ABIC. If we obtain a geophysically unrealistic result, this implies that some problems are hidden in the inversion method. In this talk, we show an example of the invention of inversion methods inspired by ABIC: the importance of covariance components including modeling errors. As shown by this example, we can get closer to the true solution not by manually adjusting the relative weight to obtain a seemingly good-looking result, but by determining the relative weight statistically. It is a harder way to determine the relative weight statistically, but we should pursue this way to understand geophysical problems more

  2. Hybrid optimization methods for Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, D.; Sen, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    FWI is slowly becoming the mainstream method to estimate velocity models of the subsurface from seismic data. Typically it makes use of a gradient descent approach in which a model update is computed by back propagating the residual seismograms and cross correlating with the forward propagating wavefields at each grid point in the subsurface model. FWI is a local optimization technique, which requires the starting model to be very close to the true model. Because the objective function is multimodal with many local minima, the requirement of good starting model becomes essential. A starting model is generated using travel time tomography. We propose two hybrid FWI algorithms one of which generates a very good starting model for a conventional FWI and the other, which works with a population of models uses gradient information from multiple starting locations in guiding the search. The first approach uses a sparse parameterization of model space using non-oscillatory splines, whose coeffiencts are estimated using an optimization algorithm like very fast simulated annealing (VFSA) by minimizing the misfit between the observed and synthetic data. The estimated velocity model is then used as a starting model for gradient-based FWI. This is done in the shot domain by converting the end-on marine geometry to a split spread geometry using the principle of reciprocity. The second approach is to uses an alternate global optimization algorithm called particle swarm optimization (PSO) where PSO update rules are applied. However, we employ a new gradient guided PSO that exploits the gradient information as well. This approach avoids the local minima and converges faster than a conventional PSO. We demonstrate our methods with application to 2D marine data sets from offshore India. Each line comprises over 1000 shots; our hybrid methods produce geologically meaningful velocity models fairly rapidly on a GPU cluster. We show that starting with the hybrid model gives a much

  3. A time domain sampling method for inverse acoustic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yukun; Hömberg, Dietmar; Hu, Guanghui; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    This work concerns the inverse scattering problems of imaging unknown/inaccessible scatterers by transient acoustic near-field measurements. Based on the analysis of the migration method, we propose efficient and effective sampling schemes for imaging small and extended scatterers from knowledge of time-dependent scattered data due to incident impulsive point sources. Though the inverse scattering problems are known to be nonlinear and ill-posed, the proposed imaging algorithms are totally "direct" involving only integral calculations on the measurement surface. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our methods. In particular, the proposed static imaging functionals enhance the performance of the total focusing method (TFM) and the dynamic imaging functionals show analogous behavior to the time reversal inversion but without solving time-dependent wave equations.

  4. A robust inverse inviscid method for airfoil design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaviaropoulos, P.; Dedoussis, V.; Papailiou, K. D.

    An irrotational inviscid compressible inverse design method for two-dimensional airfoil profiles is described. The method is based on the potential streamfunction formulation, where the physical space on which the boundaries of the airfoil are sought, is mapped onto the (phi, psi) space via a body-fitted coordinate transformation. A novel procedure based on differential geometry arguments is employed to derive the governing equations for the inverse problem, by requiring the curvature of the flat 2-D Euclidean space to be zero. An auxiliary coordinate transformation permits the definition of C-type computational grids on the (phi, psi) plane resulting to a more accurate description of the leading edge region. Geometry is determined by integrating Frenet equations along the grid lines. To validate the method inverse calculation results are compared to direct, `reproduction', calculation results. The design procedure of a new airfoil shape is also presented.

  5. A reduced basis Landweber method for nonlinear inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmatter, Dominik; Haasdonk, Bernard; Harrach, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    We consider parameter identification problems in parametrized partial differential equations (PDEs). These lead to nonlinear ill-posed inverse problems. One way of solving them is using iterative regularization methods, which typically require numerous amounts of forward solutions during the solution process. In this article we consider the nonlinear Landweber method and couple it with the reduced basis method as a model order reduction technique in order to reduce the overall computational time. In particular, we consider PDEs with a high-dimensional parameter space, which are known to pose difficulties in the context of reduced basis methods. We present a new method that is able to handle such high-dimensional parameter spaces by combining the nonlinear Landweber method with adaptive online reduced basis updates. It is then applied to the inverse problem of reconstructing the conductivity in the stationary heat equation.

  6. Solving inverse problems of identification type by optimal control methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S.; Protopopescu, V.; Yong, J.

    1997-05-01

    Inverse problems of identification type for nonlinear equations are considered within the framework of optimal control theory. The rigorous solution of any particular problem depends on the functional setting, type of equation, and unknown quantity (or quantities) to be determined. Here we present only the general articulations of the formalism. Compared to classical regularization methods (e.g. Tikhonov coupled with optimization schemes), our approach presents several advantages, namely: (i) a systematic procedure to solve inverse problems of identification type; (ii) an explicit expression for the approximations of the solution; and (iii) a convenient numerical solution of these approximations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Solving inverse problems of identification type by optimal control methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S.; Protopopescu, V.; Jiongmin Yong

    1997-06-01

    Inverse problems of identification type for nonlinear equations are considered within the framework of optimal control theory. The rigorous solution of any particular problem depends on the functional setting, type of equation, and unknown quantity (or quantities) to be determined. Here the authors present only the general articulations of the formalism. Compared to classical regularization methods (e.g. Tikhonov coupled with optimization schemes), their approach presents several advantages, namely: (i) a systematic procedure to solve inverse problems of identification type; (ii) an explicit expression for the approximations of the solution; and (iii) a convenient numerical solution of these approximations.

  8. Indium oxide inverse opal films synthesized by structure replication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Berghoff, Daniel; Nikitin, Andreas; Reichelt, Matthias; Wu, Xia; Meier, Torsten; Wagner, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    We present the synthesis of indium oxide (In2O3) inverse opal films with photonic stop bands in the visible range by a structure replication method. Artificial opal films made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres are utilized as template. The opal films are deposited via sedimentation facilitated by ultrasonication, and then impregnated by indium nitrate solution, which is thermally converted to In2O3 after drying. The quality of the resulting inverse opal film depends on many parameters; in this study the water content of the indium nitrate/PMMA composite after drying is investigated. Comparison of the reflectance spectra recorded by vis-spectroscopy with simulated data shows a good agreement between the peak position and calculated stop band positions for the inverse opals. This synthesis is less complex and highly efficient compared to most other techniques and is suitable for use in many applications.

  9. A finite-difference contrast source inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, A.; Hu, W.; van den Berg, P. M.; Habashy, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    We present a contrast source inversion (CSI) algorithm using a finite-difference (FD) approach as its backbone for reconstructing the unknown material properties of inhomogeneous objects embedded in a known inhomogeneous background medium. Unlike the CSI method using the integral equation (IE) approach, the FD-CSI method can readily employ an arbitrary inhomogeneous medium as its background. The ability to use an inhomogeneous background medium has made this algorithm very suitable to be used in through-wall imaging and time-lapse inversion applications. Similar to the IE-CSI algorithm the unknown contrast sources and contrast function are updated alternately to reconstruct the unknown objects without requiring the solution of the full forward problem at each iteration step in the optimization process. The FD solver is formulated in the frequency domain and it is equipped with a perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition. The FD operator used in the FD-CSI method is only dependent on the background medium and the frequency of operation, thus it does not change throughout the inversion process. Therefore, at least for the two-dimensional (2D) configurations, where the size of the stiffness matrix is manageable, the FD stiffness matrix can be inverted using a non-iterative inversion matrix approach such as a Gauss elimination method for the sparse matrix. In this case, an LU decomposition needs to be done only once and can then be reused for multiple source positions and in successive iterations of the inversion. Numerical experiments show that this FD-CSI algorithm has an excellent performance for inverting inhomogeneous objects embedded in an inhomogeneous background medium.

  10. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Emre Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  11. A fast inversion method for interpreting borehole electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Lee, K. H.; Wilt, M.

    2003-05-01

    A fast and stable inversion scheme has been developed using the localized nonlinear (LN) approximation to analyze electromagnetic fields obtained in a borehole. The medium is assumed to be cylindrically symmetric about the borehole, and to maintain the symmetry a vertical magnetic dipole is used as a source. The efficiency and robustness of an inversion scheme is very much dependent on the proper use of Lagrange multiplier, which is often provided manually to achieve a desired convergence. We utilize an automatic Lagrange multiplier selection scheme, which enhances the utility of the inversion scheme in handling field data. In this selection scheme, the integral equation (IE) method is quite attractive in speed because Green's functions, the most time consuming part in IE methods, are repeatedly re-usable throughout the selection procedure. The inversion scheme using the LN approximation has been tested to show its stability and efficiency using synthetic and field data. The inverted result from the field data is successfully compared with induction logging data measured in the same borehole.

  12. Inverse design of airfoils using a flexible membrane method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thinsurat, Kamon

    The Modified Garabedian Mc-Fadden (MGM) method is used to inversely design airfoils. The Finite Difference Method (FDM) for Non-Uniform Grids was developed to discretize the MGM equation for numerical solving. The Finite Difference Method (FDM) for Non-Uniform Grids has the advantage of being used flexibly with an unstructured grids airfoil. The commercial software FLUENT is being used as the flow solver. Several conditions are set in FLUENT such as subsonic inviscid flow, subsonic viscous flow, transonic inviscid flow, and transonic viscous flow to test the inverse design code for each condition. A moving grid program is used to create a mesh for new airfoils prior to importing meshes into FLUENT for the analysis of flows. For validation, an iterative process is used so the Cp distribution of the initial airfoil, the NACA0011, achieves the Cp distribution of the target airfoil, the NACA2315, for the subsonic inviscid case at M=0.2. Three other cases were carried out to validate the code. After the code validations, the inverse design method was used to design a shock free airfoil in the transonic condition and to design a separation free airfoil at a high angle of attack in the subsonic condition.

  13. A variational Bayesian method to inverse problems with impulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Bangti

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel numerical method for solving inverse problems subject to impulsive noises which possibly contain a large number of outliers. The approach is of Bayesian type, and it exploits a heavy-tailed t distribution for data noise to achieve robustness with respect to outliers. A hierarchical model with all hyper-parameters automatically determined from the given data is described. An algorithm of variational type by minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the true posteriori distribution and a separable approximation is developed. The numerical method is illustrated on several one- and two-dimensional linear and nonlinear inverse problems arising from heat conduction, including estimating boundary temperature, heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. The results show its robustness to outliers and the fast and steady convergence of the algorithm.

  14. History and evolution of methods for solving the inverse problem.

    PubMed

    van Oosterom, A

    1991-10-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the other articles in this issue devoted to the problem of the localization of neural generators. Elements of the theory of electric volume conduction are briefly introduced, as far as these apply to the interpretation of observed scalp potentials. First, some basic methods for display of the different aspects of the spatiotemporal information are described. Next, the most prominent source and volume conductor models that have been postulated for the involved forward problem are summarized. The problems of source identification and source localization, known as the inverse problem, are then formulated in terms of a parameter estimation procedure. The importance of introducing a priori information in the inverse problem, aimed at stabilizing (regularizing) the obtained solution, is emphasized. Methods for imposing such constraints are briefly outlined. PMID:1761703

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of Inverse Methods in Eddy Current Pit Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrin, John C.; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Knopp, Jeremy S.

    2010-02-01

    A sensitivity analysis was performed for a pit characterization problem to quantify the impact of potential sources for variation on the performance of inverse methods. Certain data processing steps, including careful feature extraction, background clutter removal and compensation for variation in the scan step size through the tubing, were found to be critical to achieve good estimates of the pit depth and diameter. Variance studied in model probe dimensions did not adversely affect performance.

  16. Determination of evaporation duct heights by an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douvenot, R.; Fabbro, V.; Bourlier, C.; Saillard, J.; Fuchs, H.-H.; Essen, H.; Förster, J.

    2007-10-01

    The detection and tracking of naval targets, including low RCS objects like inflatable boats requires a thorough knowledge of the propagation properties of the maritime boundary layer. Models are in existence, which allow a prediction of the propagation factor using the parabolic equation algorithm. As a necessary input the refractive index of the atmosphere has to be known. This parameter, however, is strongly influenced by the actual atmospheric conditions, characterized mainly by air-sea temperature difference, humidity and air pressure. An approach was initiated to retrieve the vertical profile of the refractive index from sea clutter data. The method is based on the LS-SVM (Least-Squares Support Vector Machines) theory and has already been validated on simulated data. Here an inversion method to determine propagation factors is presented based upon data measured during the Vampira campaign conducted as a multinational approach over a transmission path across the Baltic Sea. As the propagation factor has been measured on two reference reflectors mounted onboard a naval vessel at different heights, the results can be combined in order to increase the accuracy of the inversion system. The paper discusses results achieved with the inversion method.

  17. An analytic method for the inverse problem of MREPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamodov, V.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic resonance electric properties tomography (MREPT) is a medical imaging modality for visualizing the electrical tissue properties of the human body using radio-frequency magnetic fields. This method consists of reconstructing the admittivity distribution from the positive rotating component of the magnetic field. In the newest paper of Ammari et al (2015 Inverse Problems 31 105001) an approximate method of reconstruction of variable admittivity was proposed. In this paper a method for exact reconstruction of the admittivity from data of the positive rotating component of the field is given.

  18. Wavelets-regularization method for particle size inversion in photon correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yajing; Shen, Jin; Zheng, Gang; Liu, Wei

    2012-07-01

    For ill-posed inversion problem of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), a wavelet-regularization inversion method (WRIM) which combines wavelet multiscale inversion strategy with classical regularization inversion method (CRIM) was proposed. By using this method, the original inversion problem is decomposed into several subproblems on different multiscale spaces. As a result, we can successively obtain solution of original inversion problem according to the particle sizes inverted from the coarsest scale to the finest scale. The simulation and experimental data was respectively inverted by two methods. The inversion results demonstrate that WRIM has better global convergence, higher accuracy and more strong noise immunity than CRIM.

  19. An Efficient Inverse Aerodynamic Design Method For Subsonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, William E., II

    2000-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics based design methods are maturing to the point that they are beginning to be used in the aircraft design process. Many design methods however have demonstrated deficiencies in the leading edge region of airfoil sections. The objective of the present research is to develop an efficient inverse design method which is valid in the leading edge region. The new design method is a streamline curvature method, and a new technique is presented for modeling the variation of the streamline curvature normal to the surface. The new design method allows the surface coordinates to move normal to the surface, and has been incorporated into the Constrained Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (CDISC) design method. The accuracy and efficiency of the design method is demonstrated using both two-dimensional and three-dimensional design cases.

  20. An inverse method for rheometry of power-law fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemaka Bandulasena, H. C.; Zimmerman, William B.; Rees, Julia M.

    2011-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the determination of the constitutive viscous parameters of dilute solutions of xanthan gum by means of an inverse method used in conjunction with finite element modeling of the governing system of partial differential equations. At low concentrations xanthan gum behaves as a shear-thinning, power-law non-Newtonian fluid. Finite element modeling is used to simulate the pressure-driven flow of xanthan gum solutions in a microchannel T-junction. As the flow is forced to turn the corner of the T-junction a range of shear rates, and hence viscosities, is produced. It is shown that the statistical properties of the velocity field are sensitive to the constitutive parameters of the power-law model. The inverse method is shown to be stable and accurate, with measurement error in the velocity field translating to small errors in the rheological parameter estimation. Due to the particular structure of the inverse map, the error propagation is substantially less than the estimate from the Hadamard criterion.

  1. Inversion method based on stochastic optimization for particle sizing.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Escobar, Juan Jaime; Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana Ibeth; Vargas-Ubera, Javier; Aguilar-Valdés, Félix

    2016-08-01

    A stochastic inverse method is presented based on a hybrid evolutionary optimization algorithm (HEOA) to retrieve a monomodal particle-size distribution (PSD) from the angular distribution of scattered light. By solving an optimization problem, the HEOA (with the Fraunhofer approximation) retrieves the PSD from an intensity pattern generated by Mie theory. The analyzed light-scattering pattern can be attributed to unimodal normal, gamma, or lognormal distribution of spherical particles covering the interval of modal size parameters 46≤α≤150. The HEOA ensures convergence to the near-optimal solution during the optimization of a real-valued objective function by combining the advantages of a multimember evolution strategy and locally weighted linear regression. The numerical results show that our HEOA can be satisfactorily applied to solve the inverse light-scattering problem. PMID:27505357

  2. A broadband spectral inversion method for spatial heterodyne spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qisheng; Bin, Xiangli; Du, Shusong

    2014-11-01

    Spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS) is a Fourier-transform spectroscopic technique with many advantages, such as high throughput, good robustness (no moving parts), and high resolving power. However, in the basic theory of SHS, the relationship between the wavenumber and the frequency of the interferogram is approximated to be linear. This approximation limits the spectral range of a spatial heterodyne spectrometer to a narrow band near the Littrow wavenumber. Several methods have been developed to extend the spectral range of the SHS. They use echelle gratings or tunable pilot mirrors to make a SHS instrument work at multiple narrow spectral bands near different Littrow wavenumbers. These solutions still utilize the linear relationship between the wavenumber and the frequency of the interferogram. But they need to separate different spectral bands, and this will increase the difficulty of post processing and the complexity of the SHS system. Here, we solve this problem from another perspective: making a SHS system work at one broad spectral band instead of multiple narrow spectral bands. As in a broad spectral range, the frequency of the interferogram will not be linear with respect to the wavenumber anymore. According to this non-linear relationship, we propose a broadband spectral inversion method based on the stationary phase theory. At first, we describe the principles and the basic characters of SHS. Then, the narrow band limitation is analyzed and the broadband spectral inversion method is elaborated. In the end, we present a parameter design example of the SHS system according to a given spectral range, and the effectiveness of this method is validated with a spectral simulation example. This broadband spectral inversion method can be applied to the existing SHS system without changing or inserting any moving components. This method retains the advantages of SHS and there is almost no increase in complexity for post processing.

  3. On sky characterization of the BAORadio wide band digital backend. Search for HI emission in Abell85, Abell1205 and Abell2440 galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Campagne, J. E.; Colom, P.; Ferrari, C.; Magneville, Ch.; Martin, J. M.; Moniez, M.; Torrentó, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    We have observed regions of three galaxy clusters at z˜[0.06÷0.09] (Abell85, Abell1205, Abell2440) with the Nançay radiotelescope (NRT) to search for 21 cm emission and to fully characterize the FPGA based BAORadio digital backend. We have tested the new BAORadio data acquisition system by observing sources in parallel with the NRT standard correlator (ACRT) back-end over several months. BAORadio enables wide band instantaneous observation of the [1250,1500] MHz frequency range, as well as the use of powerful RFI mitigation methods thanks to its fine time sampling. A number of questions related to instrument stability, data processing and calibration are discussed. We have obtained the radiometer curves over the integration time range [0.01,10 000] seconds and we show that sensitivities of few mJy over most of the wide frequency band can be reached with the NRT. It is clearly shown that in blind line search, which is the context of H I intensity mapping for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, the new acquisition system and processing pipeline outperforms the standard one. We report a positive detection of 21 cm emission at 3 σ-level from galaxies in the outer region of Abell85 at ≃1352 MHz (14400 km/s) corresponding to a line strength of ≃0.8 Jy km/s. We also observe an excess power around ≃1318 MHz (21600 km/s), although at lower statistical significance, compatible with emission from Abell1205 galaxies. Detected radio line emissions have been cross matched with optical catalogs and we have derived hydrogen mass estimates.

  4. Spectrum reconstruction based on the constrained optimal linear inverse methods.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenyi; Zhang, Chunmin; Mu, Tingkui; Dai, Haishan

    2012-07-01

    The dispersion effect of birefringent material results in spectrally varying Nyquist frequency for the Fourier transform spectrometer based on birefringent prism. Correct spectral information cannot be retrieved from the observed interferogram if the dispersion effect is not appropriately compensated. Some methods, such as nonuniform fast Fourier transforms and compensation method, were proposed to reconstruct the spectrum. In this Letter, an alternative constrained spectrum reconstruction method is suggested for the stationary polarization interference imaging spectrometer (SPIIS) based on the Savart polariscope. In the theoretical model of the interferogram, the noise and the total measurement error are included, and the spectrum reconstruction is performed by using the constrained optimal linear inverse methods. From numerical simulation, it is found that the proposed method is much more effective and robust than the nonconstrained spectrum reconstruction method proposed by Jian, and provides a useful spectrum reconstruction approach for the SPIIS. PMID:22743461

  5. Determination of transient fluid temperature using the inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes an inverse method to obtain accurate measurements of the transient temperature of fluid. A method for unit step and linear rise of temperature is presented. For this purpose, the thermometer housing is modelled as a full cylindrical element (with no inner hole), divided into four control volumes. Using the control volume method, the heat balance equations can be written for each of the nodes for each of the control volumes. Thus, for a known temperature in the middle of the cylindrical element, the distribution of temperature in three nodes and heat flux at the outer surface were obtained. For a known value of the heat transfer coefficient the temperature of the fluid can be calculated using the boundary condition. Additionally, results of experimental research are presented. The research was carried out during the start-up of an experimental installation, which comprises: a steam generator unit, an installation for boiler feed water treatment, a tray-type deaerator, a blow down flashvessel for heat recovery, a steam pressure reduction station, a boiler control system and a steam header made of martensitic high alloy P91 steel. Based on temperature measurements made in the steam header using the inverse method, accurate measurements of the transient temperature of the steam were obtained. The results of the calculations are compared with the real temperature of the steam, which can be determined for a known pressure and enthalpy.

  6. Order preserving contact transformations and dynamical symmetries of scalar and coupled Riccati and Abel chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin Pradeep, R.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Mohanasubha, R.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-07-01

    We identify contact transformations which linearize the given equations in the Riccati and Abel chains of nonlinear scalar and coupled ordinary differential equations to the same order. The identified contact transformations are not of Cole-Hopf type and are new to the literature. The linearization of Abel chain of equations is also demonstrated explicitly for the first time. The contact transformations can be utilized to derive dynamical symmetries of the associated nonlinear ODEs. The wider applicability of identifying this type of contact transformations and the method of deriving dynamical symmetries by using them is illustrated through two dimensional generalizations of the Riccati and Abel chains as well.

  7. Estimates of tropical bromoform emissions using an inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashfold, M. J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Manning, A. J.; Robinson, A. D.; Warwick, N. J.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Bromine plays an important role in ozone chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. When measured by mass, bromoform (CHBr3) is thought to be the largest organic source of bromine to the atmosphere. While seaweed and phytoplankton are known to be dominant sources, the size and the geographical distribution of CHBr3 emissions remains uncertain. Particularly little is known about emissions from the Maritime Continent, which have usually been assumed to be large, and which appear to be especially likely to reach the stratosphere. In this study we aim to reduce this uncertainty by combining the first multi-annual set of CHBr3 measurements from this region, and an inversion process, to investigate systematically the distribution and magnitude of CHBr3 emissions. The novelty of our approach lies in the application of the inversion method to CHBr3. We find that local measurements of a short-lived gas like CHBr3 can be used to constrain emissions from only a relatively small, sub-regional domain. We then obtain detailed estimates of CHBr3 emissions within this area, which appear to be relatively insensitive to the assumptions inherent in the inversion process. We extrapolate this information to produce estimated emissions for the entire tropics (defined as 20° S-20° N) of 225 Gg CHBr3 yr-1. The ocean in the area we base our extrapolations upon is typically somewhat shallower, and more biologically productive, than the tropical average. Despite this, our tropical estimate is lower than most other recent studies, and suggests that CHBr3 emissions in the coastline-rich Maritime Continent may not be stronger than emissions in other parts of the tropics.

  8. Inverse method for estimating shear stress in machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, T. J.; Mates, S. P.; Rhorer, R. L.; Whitenton, E. P.; Basak, D.

    2016-01-01

    An inverse method is presented for estimating shear stress in the work material in the region of chip-tool contact along the rake face of the tool during orthogonal machining. The method is motivated by a model of heat generation in the chip, which is based on a two-zone contact model for friction along the rake face, and an estimate of the steady-state flow of heat into the cutting tool. Given an experimentally determined discrete set of steady-state temperature measurements along the rake face of the tool, it is shown how to estimate the corresponding shear stress distribution on the rake face, even when no friction model is specified.

  9. Estimates of tropical bromoform emissions using an inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashfold, M. J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Manning, A. J.; Robinson, A. D.; Warwick, N. J.; Pyle, J. A.

    2013-08-01

    Bromine plays an important role in ozone chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. When measured by mass, bromoform (CHBr3) is thought to be the largest organic source of bromine to the atmosphere. While seaweed and phytoplankton are known to be dominant sources, the size and the geographical distribution of CHBr3 emissions remains uncertain. Particularly little is known about emissions from the Maritime Continent, which have usually been assumed to be large, and which appear to be especially likely to reach the stratosphere. In this study we aim to use the first multi-annual set of CHBr3 measurements from this region, and an inversion method, to reduce this uncertainty. We find that local measurements of a short-lived gas like CHBr3 can only be used to constrain emissions from a relatively small, sub-regional domain. We then obtain detailed estimates of both the distribution and magnitude of CHBr3 emissions within this area. Our estimates appear to be relatively insensitive to the assumptions inherent in the inversion process. We extrapolate this information to produce estimated emissions for the entire tropics (defined as 20° S-20° N) of 225 GgCHBr3 y-1. This estimate is consistent with other recent studies, and suggests that CHBr3 emissions in the coastline-rich Maritime Continent may not be stronger than emissions in other parts of the tropics.

  10. The dynamics of Abell 2634

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkney, J.; Rhee, George F.; Burns, Jack O.; Batuski, D.; Hill, J. M.; Hintzen, P.; Oegerle, W.

    1993-01-01

    We have amassed a large sample of velocity data for the cluster of galaxies Abell 2634 which contains the wide-angle tail (WAT) radio source 3C 465. Robust indicators of location and scale and their confidence intervals are used to determine if the cD galaxy, containing the WAT, has a significant peculiar motion. We find a cD peculiar radial velocity of 219 plus or minus 98 km s(exp -1). Further dynamical analyses, including substructure and normality tests, suggest that A 2634 is an unrelaxed cluster whose radio source structure may be bent by the turbulent gas of a recent cluster-subcluster merger.

  11. Methodes entropiques appliquees au probleme inverse en magnetoencephalographie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapalme, Ervig

    2005-07-01

    This thesis is devoted to biomagnetic source localization using magnetoencephalography. This problem is known to have an infinite number of solutions. So methods are required to take into account anatomical and functional information on the solution. The work presented in this thesis uses the maximum entropy on the mean method to constrain the solution. This method originates from statistical mechanics and information theory. This thesis is divided into two main parts containing three chapters each. The first part reviews the magnetoencephalographic inverse problem: the theory needed to understand its context and the hypotheses for simplifying the problem. In the last chapter of this first part, the maximum entropy on the mean method is presented: its origins are explained and also how it is applied to our problem. The second part is the original work of this thesis presenting three articles; one of them already published and two others submitted for publication. In the first article, a biomagnetic source model is developed and applied in a theoretical con text but still demonstrating the efficiency of the method. In the second article, we go one step further towards a realistic modelization of the cerebral activation. The main priors are estimated using the magnetoencephalographic data. This method proved to be very efficient in realistic simulations. In the third article, the previous method is extended to deal with time signals thus exploiting the excellent time resolution offered by magnetoencephalography. Compared with our previous work, the temporal method is applied to real magnetoencephalographic data coming from a somatotopy experience and results agree with previous physiological knowledge about this kind of cognitive process.

  12. Comparison of optimal design methods in inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, H. T.; Holm, K.; Kappel, F.

    2011-07-01

    Typical optimal design methods for inverse or parameter estimation problems are designed to choose optimal sampling distributions through minimization of a specific cost function related to the resulting error in parameter estimates. It is hoped that the inverse problem will produce parameter estimates with increased accuracy using data collected according to the optimal sampling distribution. Here we formulate the classical optimal design problem in the context of general optimization problems over distributions of sampling times. We present a new Prohorov metric-based theoretical framework that permits one to treat succinctly and rigorously any optimal design criteria based on the Fisher information matrix. A fundamental approximation theory is also included in this framework. A new optimal design, SE-optimal design (standard error optimal design), is then introduced in the context of this framework. We compare this new design criterion with the more traditional D-optimal and E-optimal designs. The optimal sampling distributions from each design are used to compute and compare standard errors; the standard errors for parameters are computed using asymptotic theory or bootstrapping and the optimal mesh. We use three examples to illustrate ideas: the Verhulst-Pearl logistic population model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009 Mathematical and Experimental Modeling of Physical and Biological Processes (Boca Raton, FL: Chapman and Hall/CRC)), the standard harmonic oscillator model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009) and a popular glucose regulation model (Bergman R N, Ider Y Z, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1979 Am. J. Physiol. 236 E667-77 De Gaetano A and Arino O 2000 J. Math. Biol. 40 136-68 Toffolo G, Bergman R N, Finegood D T, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1980 Diabetes 29 979-90).

  13. Mass Substructure in Abell 3128

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleary, J.; dell'Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  14. Research on inverse methods and optimization in Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larocca, Francesco

    1991-01-01

    The research activities in Italy on inverse design and optimization are reviewed. The review is focused on aerodynamic aspects in turbomachinery and wing section design. Inverse design of blade rows and ducts of turbomachinery in subsonic and transonic regime are illustrated by the Politecnico di Torino and turbomachinery industry (FIAT AVIO).

  15. Inverse substructure method for model updating of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shun; Xia, Yong; Zhou, Xiao-Qing; Xu, You-Lin; Zhu, Hong-Ping

    2012-12-01

    Traditional model updating of large-scale structures is usually time-consuming because the global structural model needs to be repeatedly re-analyzed as a whole to match global measurements. This paper proposes a new substructural model updating method. The modal data measured on the global structure are disassembled to obtain the independent substructural dynamic flexibility matrices under force and displacement compatibility conditions. The method is extended to the case when the measurement is carried out at partial degrees-of-freedom of the structure. The extracted substructural flexibility matrices are then used as references for updating the corresponding substructural models. An orthogonal projector is employed on both the extracted substructural measurements and the substructural models to remove the rigid body modes of the free-free substructures. Compared with the traditional model updating at the global structure level, only the sub-models at the substructural level are re-analyzed in the proposed substructure-based model updating process, resulting in a rapid convergence of optimization. Moreover, only measurement on the local area corresponding to the concerned substructures is required, and those on other components can be avoided. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed substructuring method are verified through applications to a laboratory-tested frame structure and a large-scale 600 m tall Guangzhou New TV Tower. The present technique is referred to as the inverse substructuring model updating method as the measured global modal data are disassembled into the substructure level and then the updating is conducted on the substructures only. This differs from the substructuring model updating method previously proposed by the authors, in which the model updating is still conducted in the global level and the numerical global modal data are assembled from those of substructures. That can be referred to as the forward substructuring model

  16. A modified method of characteristics and its application in forward and inversion simulations of underwater explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengjiao; Li, Xiaojie; Yang, Chenchen

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces a modified method of characteristics and its application in forward and inversion simulations of underwater explosion. Compared with standard method of characteristics which is appropriate to homoentripic flow problem, the modified method can be also used to deal with isentropic flow problem such as underwater explosion. Underwater explosion of spherical TNT and composition B explosives are simulated by using the modified method, respectively. Peak pressures and flow field pressures are obtained, and they are coincident with those from empirical formulas. The comparison demonstrates the modified is feasible and reliable in underwater explosion simulation. Based on the modified method, inverse difference schemes and inverse method are introduced. Combined with the modified, the inverse schemes can be used to deal with gas-water interface inversion of underwater explosion. Inversion simulations of underwater explosion of the explosives are performed in water, and equation of state (EOS) of detonation product is not needed. The peak pressures from the forward simulations are provided as boundary conditions in the inversion simulations. Inversion interfaces are obtained and they are mainly in good agreement with those from the forward simulations in near field. The comparison indicates the inverse method and the inverse difference schemes are reliable and reasonable in interface inversion simulation.

  17. The New Method of Tsunami Source Reconstruction With r-Solution Inversion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronina, T. A.; Romanenko, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Application of the r- solution method to reconstructing the initial tsunami waveform is discussed. This methodology is based on the inversion of remote measurements of water-level data. The wave propagation is considered within the scope of a linear shallow-water theory. The ill-posed inverse problem in question is regularized by means of a least square inversion using the truncated Singular Value Decomposition method. As a result of the numerical process, an r-solution is obtained. The method proposed allows one to control the instability of a numerical solution and to obtain an acceptable result in spite of ill posedness of the problem. Implementation of this methodology to reconstructing of the initial waveform to 2013 Solomon Islands tsunami validates the theoretical conclusion for synthetic data and a model tsunami source: the inversion result strongly depends on data noisiness, the azimuthal and temporal coverage of recording stations with respect to the source area. Furthermore, it is possible to make a preliminary selection of the most informative set of the available recording stations used in the inversion process.

  18. Frequency-domain elastic full-waveform multiscale inversion method based on dual-level parallelism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Zhen-Chun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-12-01

    The complexity of an elastic wavefield increases the nonlinearity of inversion. To some extent, multiscale inversion decreases the nonlinearity of inversion and prevents it from falling into local extremes. A multiscale strategy based on the simultaneous use of frequency groups and layer stripping method based on damped wave field improves the stability of inversion. A dual-level parallel algorithm is then used to decrease the computational cost and improve practicability. The seismic wave modeling of a single frequency and inversion in a frequency group are computed in parallel by multiple nodes based on multifrontal massively parallel sparse direct solver and MPI. Numerical tests using an overthrust model show that the proposed inversion algorithm can effectively improve the stability and accuracy of inversion by selecting the appropriate inversion frequency and damping factor in lowfrequency seismic data.

  19. An optimal constrained linear inverse method for magnetic source imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hughett, P.

    1993-09-01

    Magnetic source imaging is the reconstruction of the current distribution inside an inaccessible volume from magnetic field measurements made outside the volume. If the unknown current distribution is expressed as a linear combination of elementary current distributions in fixed positions, then the magnetic field measurements are linear in the unknown source amplitudes and both the least square and minimum mean square reconstructions are linear problems. This offers several advantages: The problem is well understood theoretically and there is only a single, global minimum. Efficient and reliable software for numerical linear algebra is readily available. If the sources are localized and statistically uncorrelated, then a map of expected power dissipation is equivalent to the source covariance matrix. Prior geological or physiological knowledge can be used to determine such an expected power map and thus the source covariance matrix. The optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM) derived in this paper uses this prior knowledge to obtain a minimum mean square error estimate of the current distribution. OCLIM can be efficiently computed using the Cholesky decomposition, taking about a second on a workstation-class computer for a problem with 64 sources and 144 detectors. Any source and detector configuration is allowed as long as their positions are fixed a priori. Correlations among source and noise amplitudes are permitted. OCLIM reduces to the optimally weighted pseudoinverse method of Shim and Cho if the source amplitudes are independent and identically distributed and to the minimum-norm least squares estimate in the limit of no measurement noise or no prior knowledge of the source amplitudes. In the general case, OCLIM has better mean square error than either previous method. OCLIM appears well suited to magnetic imaging, since it exploits prior information, provides the minimum reconstruction error, and is inexpensive to compute.

  20. Noncommutative Inverse Scattering Method for the Kontsevich System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthamonov, Semeon

    2015-09-01

    We formulate an analog of Inverse Scattering Method for integrable systems on noncommutative associative algebras. In particular, we define Hamilton flows, Casimir elements and noncommutative analog of the Lax matrix. The noncommutative Lax element generates infinite family of commuting Hamilton flows on an associative algebra. The proposed approach to integrable systems on associative algebras satisfies certain universal property, in particular, it incorporates both classical and quantum integrable systems as well as provides a basis for further generalization. We motivate our definition by explicit construction of noncommutative analog of Lax matrix for a system of differential equations on associative algebra recently proposed by Kontsevich. First, we present these equations in the Hamilton form by defining a bracket of Loday type on the group algebra of the free group with two generators. To make the definition more constructive, we utilize (with certain generalizations) the Van den Bergh approach to Loday brackets via double Poisson brackets. We show that there exists an infinite family of commuting flows generated by the noncommutative Lax element.

  1. Gaining insight into food webs reconstructed by the inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kones, Julius K.; Soetaert, Karline; van Oevelen, Dick; Owino, John O.; Mavuti, Kenneth

    2006-04-01

    The use of the inverse method to analyze flow patterns of organic components in ecological systems has had wide application in ecological modeling. Through this approach, an infinite number of food web flows describing the food web and satisfying biological constraints are generated, from which one (parsimonious) solution is drawn. Here we address two questions: (1) is there justification for the use of the parsimonious solution or is there a better alternative and (2) can we use the infinitely many solutions that describe the same food web to give more insight into the system? We reassess two published food webs, from the Gulf of Riga in the Baltic Sea and the Takapoto Atoll lagoon in the South Pacific. A finite number of random food web solutions is first generated using the Monte Carlo simulation technique. Using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test, we cannot find significant differences in the parsimonious solution and the average values of the finite random solutions generated. However, as the food web composed of the average flows has more attractive properties, the choice of the parsimonious solution to describe underdetermined food webs is challenged. We further demonstrate the use of the factor analysis technique to characterize flows that are closely related in the food web. Through this process sub-food webs are extracted within the plausible set of food webs, a property that can be utilized to gain insight into the sampling strategy for further constraining of the model.

  2. Inverse scattering method and soliton double solution family for the general symplectic gravity model

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yajun

    2008-08-15

    A previously established Hauser-Ernst-type extended double-complex linear system is slightly modified and used to develop an inverse scattering method for the stationary axisymmetric general symplectic gravity model. The reduction procedures in this inverse scattering method are found to be fairly simple, which makes the inverse scattering method applied fine and effective. As an application, a concrete family of soliton double solutions for the considered theory is obtained.

  3. Nonlinear inversion of pre-stack seismic data using variable metric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fanchang; Dai, Ronghuo

    2016-06-01

    At present, the routine method to perform AVA (Amplitude Variation with incident Angle) inversion is based on the assumption that the ratio of S-wave velocity to P-wave velocity γ is a constant. However, this simplified assumption does not always hold, and it is necessary to use nonlinear inversion method to solve it. Based on Bayesian theory, the objective function for nonlinear AVA inversion is established and γ is considered as an unknown model parameter. Then, variable metric method with a strategy of periodically variational starting point is used to solve the nonlinear AVA inverse problem. The proposed method can keep the inverted reservoir parameters approach to the actual solution and has been performed on both synthetic and real data. The inversion results suggest that the proposed method can solve the nonlinear inverse problem and get accurate solutions even without the knowledge of γ.

  4. Computational methods for inverse problems in geophysics: inversion of travel time observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereyra, V.; Keller, H.B.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1980-01-01

    General ways of solving various inverse problems are studied for given travel time observations between sources and receivers. These problems are separated into three components: (a) the representation of the unknown quantities appearing in the model; (b) the nonlinear least-squares problem; (c) the direct, two-point ray-tracing problem used to compute travel time once the model parameters are given. Novel software is described for (b) and (c), and some ideas given on (a). Numerical results obtained with artificial data and an implementation of the algorithm are also presented. ?? 1980.

  5. Application of Abel-Plana Formula for Collapse and Revival of Rabi Oscillations in Jaynes-Cummings Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Hiroo

    In this paper, we give an analytical treatment to study the behavior of the collapse and the revival of the Rabi oscillations in the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM). The JCM is an exactly soluble quantum mechanical model, which describes the interaction between a two-level atom and a single cavity mode of the electromagnetic field. If we prepare the atom in the ground state and the cavity mode in a coherent state initially, the JCM causes the collapse and the revival of the Rabi oscillations many times in a complicated pattern in its time-evolution. In this phenomenon, the atomic population inversion is described with an intractable infinite series. (When the electromagnetic field is resonant with the atom, the nth term of this infinite series is given by a trigonometric function for √ {n} t, where t is a variable of the time.) According to Klimov and Chumakov's method, using the Abel-Plana formula, we rewrite this infinite series as a sum of two integrals. We examine the physical meanings of these two integrals and find that the first one represents the initial collapse (the semi-classical limit) and the second one represents the revival (the quantum correction) in the JCM. Furthermore, we evaluate the first- and second-order perturbations for the time-evolution of the JCM with an initial thermal coherent state for the cavity mode at low temperature, and write down their correction terms as sums of integrals by making use of the Abel-Plana formula.

  6. New Y-function based MOSFET parameter extraction method from weak to strong inversion range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, J. B.; Rafhay, Q.; Cros, A.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2016-09-01

    A new Y-function based MOSFET parameter extraction method is proposed. This method relies on explicit expressions of inversion charge and drain current versus Yc(=Qi√Cgc)-function and Y(=Id/√gm)-function, respectively, applicable from weak to strong inversion range. It enables a robust MOSFET parameter extraction even for low gate voltage overdrive, whereas conventional extraction techniques relying on strong inversion approximation fail.

  7. Compositing radar reflectivity observations with an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Sancho, Jordi; Berenguer, Marc; Sempere-Torres, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) has been one of the main applications of weather radars since its early stages. Nowadays, many advances have improved such estimates and radar networks have been deployed in many countries. In parallel, uncertainty in radar QPE has become a subject of interest by itself because of its significant role in the quality of estimates. When several radars cover the same area, some sources of uncertainty (e.g. path attenuation by intense precipitation, beam blockage or beam broadening), can be dealt using information from the least-affected radars instead of only reproducing a single radar approach in each one. So far, composites of radar observations are carried out through simple criteria (by picking the closest observation, the maximum value…) or quality indices -that need a priori definition of quality descriptors. This study proposes an alternative methodology to retrieve the 3-dimensional reflectivity field most compatible with the measurements from the different radars of the network. With this aim, the methodology uses a model that simulates the radar sampling of the atmosphere. The model settings consider the specific features of each radar such as the location, hardware parameters (frequency, beam width, pulse length…) and scanning strategy. The methodology follows the concept of an inverse method based on the minimization of a cost function that penalizes discrepancies between the simulated and actual observations for each radar of the network. It is worth noting that for radar at attenuating wavelengths, the proposed methodology implicitly corrects the effect of attenuation due to intense rainfall. The methodology has been applied on the network of C-band radars in the vicinity of Barcelona, Spain. The retrievals have been obtained for a 12 hours of rainfall with reflectivity observations of two radars; observations from a third independent radar have been used for verification at different heights. Conventional

  8. Combination of the LSQR method and a genetic algorithm for solving the electrocardiography inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingfeng; Xia, Ling; Shou, Guofa; Tang, Min

    2007-03-01

    Computing epicardial potentials from body surface potentials constitutes one form of ill-posed inverse problem of electrocardiography (ECG). To solve this ECG inverse problem, the Tikhonov regularization and truncated singular-value decomposition (TSVD) methods have been commonly used to overcome the ill-posed property by imposing constraints on the magnitudes or derivatives of the computed epicardial potentials. Such direct regularization methods, however, are impractical when the transfer matrix is large. The least-squares QR (LSQR) method, one of the iterative regularization methods based on Lanczos bidiagonalization and QR factorization, has been shown to be numerically more reliable in various circumstances than the other methods considered. This LSQR method, however, to our knowledge, has not been introduced and investigated for the ECG inverse problem. In this paper, the regularization properties of the Krylov subspace iterative method of LSQR for solving the ECG inverse problem were investigated. Due to the 'semi-convergence' property of the LSQR method, the L-curve method was used to determine the stopping iteration number. The performance of the LSQR method for solving the ECG inverse problem was also evaluated based on a realistic heart-torso model simulation protocol. The results show that the inverse solutions recovered by the LSQR method were more accurate than those recovered by the Tikhonov and TSVD methods. In addition, by combing the LSQR with genetic algorithms (GA), the performance can be improved further. It suggests that their combination may provide a good scheme for solving the ECG inverse problem.

  9. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    SciTech Connect

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion (d{sup 2}X)/(dt{sup 2}) +(dU)/(dX) =0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27–29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A=(1/√(π))∫{sub 0}{sup E}dU/√(E−U) is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = T{sub A}(E) + T{sub N}(E) where τ is a constant period, T{sub A}(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and T{sub N}(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function X{sub A}(U) is determined from T{sub A}(E) via the Abel-transform relation X{sub A}(U) ∝ A[T{sub A}(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential U{sub N}(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing

  10. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion {d^2X}/{dt^2} + {dU}/{dX} = 0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27-29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A = (1/sqrt{π })int 0E {dU}/sqrt{E-U} is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = TA(E) + TN(E) where τ is a constant period, TA(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and TN(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function XA(U) is determined from TA(E) via the Abel-transform relation XA(U) ∝ A[TA(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential UN(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing the isochronicity problem, there has been no attempt of N-type regions that are

  11. A new magnetotelluric inversion scheme using generalized RRI method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Kazunobu; Takasugi, Shinji; Lee, Ki Ha

    1996-09-01

    A new two-dimensional (2-D) magnetotelluric (MT) inversion scheme is proposed in this paper. This scheme is based on a locally 2-D analysis in order to minimize computational time and computer memory. The MT governing equation is linearized in terms of the magnetic field and electrical conductivity for the perturbation analysis. The perturbed equation is then multiplied by a test function and integrated over the cross-section. Integrating by parts and then substituting this test function with local magnetic fields, a new equation is obtained that is a 2-D variational integral for the electrical conductivity. The new equation is general in the sense that it can explicitly include the horizontal derivative of the magnetic field. If the horizontal derivative term is eliminated, the new equation becomes identical to the Rapid Relaxation Inversion (RRI) scheme proposed by Smith and Booker (J. Geophys. Res., 96: 3905-3922, 1991).

  12. Improving rotorcraft survivability to RPG attack using inverse methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D.; Thomson, D. G.

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation of optimal threat evasion strategies for improving the survivability of rotorcraft under attack by rocket propelled grenades (RPGs). The basis of this approach is the application of inverse simulation techniques pioneered for simulation of aggressive helicopter manoeuvres to the RPG engagement problem. In this research, improvements in survivability are achieved by computing effective evasive manoeuvres. The first step in this process uses the missile approach warning system camera (MAWS) on the aircraft to provide angular information of the threat. Estimates of the RPG trajectory and impact point are then estimated. For the current flight state an appropriate evasion response is selected then realised via inverse simulation of the platform dynamics. Results are presented for several representative engagements showing the efficacy of the approach.

  13. Dwarf busting in Abell 868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon

    1999-07-01

    We request 24 orbits to obtain a deep mosaic {6 * 4-orbit pointings} of the central region of A868, a rich Abell cluster which we have imaged comprehensively from the ground. The objective is to identify and characterise the morphological nature of the dwarf galaxy population{s} responsible for the steep upturn seen in this cluster's luminosity function. While similar upturns have been reported in many clusters, the specifics of the dwarf population remain unknown as these objects cannot be resolved from the ground. What type of dwarf galaxies are they ? Is there more than one population contributing ? How are they clustered ? By obtaining deep high-resolution HST WFPC2 imaging over a central field roughly 7.5' * 3.75' we will be able to measure morphologies, light- profiles and the clustering properties of the dwarf population{s} down to M_I = -16 mags {H_o=75kms^-1Mpc^-1}. Although we shall primarily concentrate on the dwarf galaxies, we will also recover the cluster's morphological luminosity distributions for elliptical, spirals and irregulars over a broad absolute magnitude range {-24 < M_I < -16 mags} as well as the more quantitative bivariate brightness distribution {- 24 < M_I < -16 mags, 17.0 < mu_e^I < 25 mags per sq arcsec}. Comparing these results to those recently derived for the general field will provide an insight into the environmental influences on morphology and surface brightness.

  14. Comparative study of inversion methods of three-dimensional NMR and sensitivity to fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Wang, Peng; Mao, Keyu

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (3D NMR) logging can simultaneously measure transverse relaxation time (T2), longitudinal relaxation time (T1), and diffusion coefficient (D). These parameters can be used to distinguish fluids in the porous reservoirs. For 3D NMR logging, the relaxation mechanism and mathematical model, Fredholm equation, are introduced, and the inversion methods including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD), and Global Inversion (GI) methods are studied in detail, respectively. During one simulation test, multi-echo CPMG sequence activation is designed firstly, echo trains of the ideal fluid models are synthesized, then an inversion algorithm is carried on these synthetic echo trains, and finally T2-T1-D map is built. Futhermore, SVD, BRD, and GI methods are respectively applied into a same fluid model, and the computing speed and inversion accuracy are compared and analyzed. When the optimal inversion method and matrix dimention are applied, the inversion results are in good aggreement with the supposed fluid model, which indicates that the inversion method of 3D NMR is applieable for fluid typing of oil and gas reservoirs. Additionally, the forward modeling and inversion tests are made in oil-water and gas-water models, respectively, the sensitivity to the fluids in different magnetic field gradients is also examined in detail. The effect of magnetic gradient on fluid typing in 3D NMR logging is stuied and the optimal manetic gradient is choosen.

  15. Methods of noninvasive electrophysiological heart examination basing on solution of inverse problem of electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2015-09-01

    The article represents the main noninvasive methods of heart electrical activity examination, theoretical bases of solution of electrocardiography inverse problem, application of different methods of heart examination in clinical practice, and generalized achievements in this sphere in global experience.

  16. A direct-inverse method for transonic and separated flows about airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1990-01-01

    A direct-inverse technique and computer program called TAMSEP that can be used for the analysis of the flow about airfoils at subsonic and low transonic freestream velocities is presented. The method is based upon a direct-inverse nonconservative full potential inviscid method, a Thwaites laminar boundary layer technique, and the Barnwell turbulent momentum integral scheme; and it is formulated using Cartesian coordinates. Since the method utilizes inverse boundary conditions in regions of separated flow, it is suitable for predicting the flow field about airfoils having trailing edge separated flow under high lift conditions. Comparisons with experimental data indicate that the method should be a useful tool for applied aerodynamic analyses.

  17. A direct-inverse method for transonic and separated flows about airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    A direct-inverse technique and computer program called TAMSEP that can be sued for the analysis of the flow about airfoils at subsonic and low transonic freestream velocities is presented. The method is based upon a direct-inverse nonconservative full potential inviscid method, a Thwaites laminar boundary layer technique, and the Barnwell turbulent momentum integral scheme; and it is formulated using Cartesian coordinates. Since the method utilizes inverse boundary conditions in regions of separated flow, it is suitable for predicing the flowfield about airfoils having trailing edge separated flow under high lift conditions. Comparisons with experimental data indicate that the method should be a useful tool for applied aerodynamic analyses.

  18. Rapid Inversion of Angular Deflection Data for Certain Axisymmetric Refractive Index Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R.; Greenberg, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Certain functions useful for representing axisymmetric refractive-index distributions are shown to have exact solutions for Abel transformation of the resulting angular deflection data. An advantage of this procedure over direct numerical Abel inversion is that least-squares curve fitting is a smoothing process that reduces the noise sensitivity of the computation

  19. Inverse rendering of Lambertian surfaces using subspace methods.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Q; Do, Minh N

    2014-12-01

    We propose a vector space approach for inverse rendering of a Lambertian convex object with distant light sources. In this problem, the texture of the object and arbitrary lightings are both to be recovered from multiple images of the object and its 3D model. Our work is motivated by the observation that all possible images of a Lambertian object lie around a low-dimensional linear subspace spanned by the first few spherical harmonics. The inverse rendering can therefore be formulated as a matrix factorization, in which the basis of the subspace is encoded in a spherical harmonic matrix S associated with the object’s geometry. A necessary and sufficient condition on S for unique factorization is derived with an introduction to a new notion of matrix rank called nonseparable full rank. A singular value decomposition-based algorithm for exact factorization in the noiseless case is introduced. In the presence of noise, two algorithms, namely, alternating and optimization based are proposed to deal with two different types of noise. A random sample consensus-based algorithm is introduced to reduce the size of the optimization problem, which is equal to the number of pixels in each image. Implementations of the proposed algorithms are done on a real data set. PMID:25373083

  20. Fast 3D inversion of airborne gravity-gradiometry data using Lanczos bidiagonalization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaohai; Li, Fengting; Zhang, Dailei; Xu, Xuechun; Huang, Danian

    2016-09-01

    We developed a new fast inversion method for to process and interpret airborne gravity gradiometry data, which was based on Lanczos bidiagonalization algorithm. Here, we describe the application of this new 3D gravity gradiometry inversion method to recover a subsurface density distribution model from the airborne measured gravity gradiometry anomalies. For this purpose, the survey area is divided into a large number of rectangular cells with each cell possessing a constant unknown density. It is well known that the solution of large linear gravity gradiometry is an ill-posed problem since using the smoothest inversion method is considerably time consuming. We demonstrate that the Lanczos bidiagonalization method can be an appropriate algorithm to solve a Tikhonov solver time cost function for resolving the large equations within a short time. Lanczos bidiagonalization is designed to make the very large gravity gradiometry forward modeling matrices to become low-rank, which will considerably reduce the running time of the inversion method. We also use a weighted generalized cross validation method to choose the appropriate Tikhonov parameter to improve inversion results. The inversion incorporates a model norm that allows us to attain the smoothing and depth of the solution; in addition, the model norm counteracts the natural decay of the kernels, which concentrate at shallow depths. The method is applied on noise-contaminated synthetic gravity gradiometry data to demonstrate its suitability for large 3D gravity gradiometry data inversion. The airborne gravity gradiometry data from the Vinton Salt Dome, USE, were considered as a case study. The validity of the new method on real data is discussed with reference to the Vinton Dome inversion result. The intermediate density values in the constructed model coincide well with previous results and geological information. This demonstrates the validity of the gravity gradiometry inversion method.

  1. Analysis and improvement for a linearized seafloor elastic parameter inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangting; Liu, Xuewei; Ning, Hongxiao

    2016-05-01

    AVO inversion is an effective seismic exploration method to predict elastic parameters. In this paper, we review and analyze the linearized AVO inversion method previously published for seafloor elastic parameters, and present a modification strategy. Before the linearized inversion is performed, a proper near-angle range in which the relationship between the reflection coefficient and sine-squared incidence angle is linear needs to be provided. However, the near-angle range is determined by the elastic parameters which are to be estimated by inversion. Therefore, only an approximated value of the near-angle range can be provided for the linearized inversion. Model tests show that a too large near-angle range may cause inversion fault, and a too small near-angle range may cause unreliable estimation. Further analysis shows that the estimation stability can be further improved even though the linearized inversion is performed under an exact near-angle range. To mitigate the strong dependence on the near-angle range, we use the seafloor elastic parameters estimated from the linearized method as the initial model for an unconstrained optimization method. Compared with the previously published method, the modified method is more robust to noisy data and shows less dependence on the near-angle range.

  2. Method for the preparation of metal colloids in inverse micelles and product preferred by the method

    DOEpatents

    Wilcoxon, Jess P.

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for preparing catalytic elemental metal colloidal particles (e.g. gold, palladium, silver, rhodium, iridium, nickel, iron, platinum, molybdenum) or colloidal alloy particles (silver/iridium or platinum/gold). A homogeneous inverse micelle solution of a metal salt is first formed in a metal-salt solvent comprised of a surfactant (e.g. a nonionic or cationic surfactant) and an organic solvent. The size and number of inverse micelles is controlled by the proportions of the surfactant and the solvent. Then, the metal salt is reduced (by chemical reduction or by a pulsed or continuous wave UV laser) to colloidal particles of elemental metal. After their formation, the colloidal metal particles can be stabilized by reaction with materials that permanently add surface stabilizing groups to the surface of the colloidal metal particles. The sizes of the colloidal elemental metal particles and their size distribution is determined by the size and number of the inverse micelles. A second salt can be added with further reduction to form the colloidal alloy particles. After the colloidal elemental metal particles are formed, the homogeneous solution distributes to two phases, one phase rich in colloidal elemental metal particles and the other phase rich in surfactant. The colloidal elemental metal particles from one phase can be dried to form a powder useful as a catalyst. Surfactant can be recovered and recycled from the phase rich in surfactant.

  3. An ionospheric occultation inversion technique based on epoch difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Xiong, Jing; Zhu, Fuying; Yang, Jian; Qiao, Xuejun

    2013-09-01

    Of the ionospheric radio occultation (IRO) electron density profile (EDP) retrievals, the Abel based calibrated TEC inversion (CTI) is the most widely used technique. In order to eliminate the contribution from the altitude above the RO satellite, it is necessary to utilize the calibrated TEC to retrieve the EDP, which introduces the error due to the coplanar assumption. In this paper, a new technique based on the epoch difference inversion (EDI) is firstly proposed to eliminate this error. The comparisons between CTI and EDI have been done, taking advantage of the simulated and real COSMIC data. The following conclusions can be drawn: the EDI technique can successfully retrieve the EDPs without non-occultation side measurements and shows better performance than the CTI method, especially for lower orbit mission; no matter which technique is used, the inversion results at the higher altitudes are better than those at the lower altitudes, which could be explained theoretically.

  4. Application of direct inverse analogy method (DIVA) and viscous design optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greff, E.; Forbrich, D.; Schwarten, H.

    1991-01-01

    A direct-inverse approach to the transonic design problem was presented in its initial state at the First International Conference on Inverse Design Concepts and Optimization in Engineering Sciences (ICIDES-1). Further applications of the direct inverse analogy (DIVA) method to the design of airfoils and incremental wing improvements and experimental verification are reported. First results of a new viscous design code also from the residual correction type with semi-inverse boundary layer coupling are compared with DIVA which may enhance the accuracy of trailing edge design for highly loaded airfoils. Finally, the capabilities of an optimization routine coupled with the two viscous full potential solvers are investigated in comparison to the inverse method.

  5. A boundary integral method for an inverse problem in thermal imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    An inverse problem in thermal imaging involving the recovery of a void in a material from its surface temperature response to external heating is examined. Uniqueness and continuous dependence results for the inverse problem are demonstrated, and a numerical method for its solution is developed. This method is based on an optimization approach, coupled with a boundary integral equation formulation of the forward heat conduction problem. Some convergence results for the method are proved, and several examples are presented using computationally generated data.

  6. A New High-Order Stable Numerical Method for Matrix Inversion

    PubMed Central

    Haghani, F. Khaksar; Soleymani, F.

    2014-01-01

    A stable numerical method is proposed for matrix inversion. The new method is accompanied by theoretical proof to illustrate twelfth-order convergence. A discussion of how to achieve the convergence using an appropriate initial value is presented. The application of the new scheme for finding Moore-Penrose inverse will also be pointed out analytically. The efficiency of the contributed iterative method is clarified on solving some numerical examples. PMID:24688436

  7. An adaptive subspace trust-region method for frequency-domain seismic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Li, Xiaofan; Song, Hanjie; Liu, Shaolin

    2015-05-01

    Full waveform inversion is currently considered as a promising seismic imaging method to obtain high-resolution and quantitative images of the subsurface. It is a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem, the main difficulty of which that prevents the full waveform inversion from widespread applying to real data is the sensitivity to incorrect initial models and noisy data. Local optimization theories including Newton's method and gradient method always lead the convergence to local minima, while global optimization algorithms such as simulated annealing are computationally costly. To confront this issue, in this paper we investigate the possibility of applying the trust-region method to the full waveform inversion problem. Different from line search methods, trust-region methods force the new trial step within a certain neighborhood of the current iterate point. Theoretically, the trust-region methods are reliable and robust, and they have very strong convergence properties. The capability of this inversion technique is tested with the synthetic Marmousi velocity model and the SEG/EAGE Salt model. Numerical examples demonstrate that the adaptive subspace trust-region method can provide solutions closer to the global minima compared to the conventional Approximate Hessian approach and the L-BFGS method with a higher convergence rate. In addition, the match between the inverted model and the true model is still excellent even when the initial model deviates far from the true model. Inversion results with noisy data also exhibit the remarkable capability of the adaptive subspace trust-region method for low signal-to-noise data inversions. Promising numerical results suggest this adaptive subspace trust-region method is suitable for full waveform inversion, as it has stronger convergence and higher convergence rate.

  8. Identification of an unknown material in a radiation shield using the schwinger inverse method.

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, J. A.; Bledsoe, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    The Schwinger method for solving inverse gamma-ray transport problems was proposed in a previous paper. The method is iterative and requires a set of uncoupled forward and adjoint transport calculations in each iteration. In this paper, the Schwinger inverse method is applied to the problem of identifying an unknown material in a radiation shield by calculating its total macroscopic photon cross sections. The gamma source is known and the total (angle-independent) gamma leakage is measured. In numerical one-dimensional spherical and slab test problems, the Schwinger inverse method successfully calculated the photon cross sections of an unknown material. Material identification was successfully achieved by comparing the calculated cross sections with those in a precomputed material cross section library, although there was some ambiguity when realistic measurements were used. The Schwinger inverse method compared very favorably with the standard single energy transmission technique (SET).

  9. [A hyperspectral subpixel target detection method based on inverse least squares method].

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Bo; Nie, Xin; Zhang, Guang-Jun

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, an inverse least square (ILS) method combined with the Mahalanobis distance outlier detection method is discussed to detect the subpixel target from the hyperspectral image. Firstly, the inverse model for the target spectrum and all the pixel spectra was established, in which the accurate target spectrum was obtained previously, and then the SNV algorithm was employed to preprocess each original pixel spectra separately. After the pretreatment, the regressive coefficient of ILS was calculated with partial least square (PLS) algorithm. Each point in the vector of regressive coefficient corresponds to a pixel in the image. The Mahalanobis distance was calculated with each point in the regressive coefficient vector. Because Mahalanobis distance stands for the extent to which samples deviate from the total population, the point with Mahalanobis distance larger than the 3sigma was regarded as the subpixel target. In this algorithm, no other prior information such as representative background spectrum or modeling of background is required, and only the target spectrum is needed. In addition, the result of the detection is insensitive to the complexity of background. This method was applied to AVIRIS remote sensing data. For this simulation experiment, AVIRIS remote sensing data was free downloaded from the NASA official websit, the spectrum of a ground object in the AVIRIS hyperspectral image was picked up as the target spectrum, and the subpixel target was simulated though a linear mixed method. The comparison of the subpixel detection result of the method mentioned above with that of orthogonal subspace projection method (OSP) was performed. The result shows that the performance of the ILS method is better than the traditional OSP method. The ROC (receive operating characteristic curve) and SNR were calculated, which indicates that the ILS method possesses higher detection accuracy and less computing time than the OSP algorithm. PMID:19385196

  10. A new bound constraints method for 3-D potential field data inversion using Lagrangian multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Yan, Jianguo; Li, Fei; Chen, Chao; Mei, Bao; Jin, Shuanggen; Dohm, James H.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present a method for incorporating prior geological information into potential field data inversion problem. As opposed to the traditional inverse algorithm, our proposed method takes full advantage of prior geological information as a constraint and thus obtains a new objective function for inversion by adding Lagrangian multipliers and slack variables to the traditional inversion method. These additional parameters can be easily solved during iterations. We used both synthetic and observed data sets to test the stability and validity of the proposed method. Our results using synthetic gravity data show that our new method predicts depth and density anomalies more efficiently and accurately than the traditional inversion method that does not include prior geological constraints. Then using observed gravity data in the Three Gorges area and geological constraint information, we obtained the density distribution of the upper and middle crust in this area thus revealing its geological structure. These results confirm the proposed method's validity and indicate its potential application for magnetism data inversion and exploration of geological structures.

  11. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied aerodynamic design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1988-01-01

    Several inverse methods have been compared and initial results indicate that differences in results are primarily due to coordinate systems and fuselage representations and not to design procedures. Further, results from a direct-inverse method that includes 3-D wing boundary layer effects, wake curvature, and wake displacement are presented. These results show that boundary layer displacements must be included in the design process for accurate results.

  12. Inverting geodetic time series with a principal component analysis-based inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kositsky, A. P.; Avouac, J.-P.

    2010-03-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) system now makes it possible to monitor deformation of the Earth's surface along plate boundaries with unprecedented accuracy. In theory, the spatiotemporal evolution of slip on the plate boundary at depth, associated with either seismic or aseismic slip, can be inferred from these measurements through some inversion procedure based on the theory of dislocations in an elastic half-space. We describe and test a principal component analysis-based inversion method (PCAIM), an inversion strategy that relies on principal component analysis of the surface displacement time series. We prove that the fault slip history can be recovered from the inversion of each principal component. Because PCAIM does not require externally imposed temporal filtering, it can deal with any kind of time variation of fault slip. We test the approach by applying the technique to synthetic geodetic time series to show that a complicated slip history combining coseismic, postseismic, and nonstationary interseismic slip can be retrieved from this approach. PCAIM produces slip models comparable to those obtained from standard inversion techniques with less computational complexity. We also compare an afterslip model derived from the PCAIM inversion of postseismic displacements following the 2005 8.6 Nias earthquake with another solution obtained from the extended network inversion filter (ENIF). We introduce several extensions of the algorithm to allow statistically rigorous integration of multiple data sources (e.g., both GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar time series) over multiple timescales. PCAIM can be generalized to any linear inversion algorithm.

  13. Resampling: An optimization method for inverse planning in robotic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikard, Achim; Schlaefer, Alexander; Adler, John R. Jr.

    2006-11-15

    By design, the range of beam directions in conventional radiosurgery are constrained to an isocentric array. However, the recent introduction of robotic radiosurgery dramatically increases the flexibility of targeting, and as a consequence, beams need be neither coplanar nor isocentric. Such a nonisocentric design permits a large number of distinct beam directions to be used in one single treatment. These major technical differences provide an opportunity to improve upon the well-established principles for treatment planning used with GammaKnife or LINAC radiosurgery. With this objective in mind, our group has developed over the past decade an inverse planning tool for robotic radiosurgery. This system first computes a set of beam directions, and then during an optimization step, weights each individual beam. Optimization begins with a feasibility query, the answer to which is derived through linear programming. This approach offers the advantage of completeness and avoids local optima. Final beam selection is based on heuristics. In this report we present and evaluate a new strategy for utilizing the advantages of linear programming to improve beam selection. Starting from an initial solution, a heuristically determined set of beams is added to the optimization problem, while beams with zero weight are removed. This process is repeated to sample a set of beams much larger compared with typical optimization. Experimental results indicate that the planning approach efficiently finds acceptable plans and that resampling can further improve its efficiency.

  14. Application of Carbonate Reservoir using waveform inversion and reverse-time migration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Kim, H.; Min, D.; Keehm, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Recent exploration targets of oil and gas resources are deeper and more complicated subsurface structures, and carbonate reservoirs have become one of the attractive and challenging targets in seismic exploration. To increase the rate of success in oil and gas exploration, it is required to delineate detailed subsurface structures. Accordingly, migration method is more important factor in seismic data processing for the delineation. Seismic migration method has a long history, and there have been developed lots of migration techniques. Among them, reverse-time migration is promising, because it can provide reliable images for the complicated model even in the case of significant velocity contrasts in the model. The reliability of seismic migration images is dependent on the subsurface velocity models, which can be extracted in several ways. These days, geophysicists try to obtain velocity models through seismic full waveform inversion. Since Lailly (1983) and Tarantola (1984) proposed that the adjoint state of wave equations can be used in waveform inversion, the back-propagation techniques used in reverse-time migration have been used in waveform inversion, which accelerated the development of waveform inversion. In this study, we applied acoustic waveform inversion and reverse-time migration methods to carbonate reservoir models with various reservoir thicknesses to examine the feasibility of the methods in delineating carbonate reservoir models. We first extracted subsurface material properties from acoustic waveform inversion, and then applied reverse-time migration using the inverted velocities as a background model. The waveform inversion in this study used back-propagation technique, and conjugate gradient method was used in optimization. The inversion was performed using the frequency-selection strategy. Finally waveform inversion results showed that carbonate reservoir models are clearly inverted by waveform inversion and migration images based on the

  15. The use of the inverse Monte Carlo method in nuclear engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method was introduced in 1981 in an attempt to apply Monte Carlo to the solution of inverse problems. It was argued that if direct Monte Carlo could be used to estimate expected values, which in the continuous case assume the form of definite integrals, then perhaps a variant could be used to solve inverse problems of the type that are posed as integral equations. The IMC method actually converts the inverse problem, through a noniterative simulation technique, into a system of algebraic equations that can be solved by standard analytical or numerical techniques. The principal merits of IMC are that, like direct Monte Carlo, the method can be applied to complex and multivariable problems, and variance reduction procedures can be applied.

  16. Comparing Balance and Inverse Methods on Learning Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge in Equation Solving: A Cognitive Load Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Phan, Huy Phuong

    2016-01-01

    We examined the use of balance and inverse methods in equation solving. The main difference between the balance and inverse methods lies in the operational line (e.g. +2 on both sides vs -2 becomes +2). Differential element interactivity favours the inverse method because the interaction between elements occurs on both sides of the equation for…

  17. FOREWORD: 5th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourc'h, Eric; Rodet, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific research presented during the 5th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2015 (http://complement.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2015.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, on May 29, 2015. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of ValueTools Conference, in May 2011, and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012, May 2013 and May 2014. The New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP) workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed, inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, Kernel methods, learning methods

  18. FOREWORD: 4th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 4th International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2014 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2014.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, on May 23, 2014. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/), and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012 and May 2013, (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2012.html), (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2013.html). The New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP) Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed, inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the

  19. Efficiency of Pareto joint inversion of 2D geophysical data using global optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, Katarzyna; Bogacz, Adrian; Kozubal, Adam; Danek, Tomasz; Wojdyła, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Pareto joint inversion of two or more sets of data is a promising new tool of modern geophysical exploration. In the first stage of our investigation we created software enabling execution of forward solvers of two geophysical methods (2D magnetotelluric and gravity) as well as inversion with possibility of constraining solution with seismic data. In the algorithm solving MT forward solver Helmholtz's equations, finite element method and Dirichlet's boundary conditions were applied. Gravity forward solver was based on Talwani's algorithm. To limit dimensionality of solution space we decided to describe model as sets of polygons, using Sharp Boundary Interface (SBI) approach. The main inversion engine was created using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm adapted to handle two or more target functions and to prevent acceptance of solutions which are non - realistic or incompatible with Pareto scheme. Each inversion run generates single Pareto solution, which can be added to Pareto Front. The PSO inversion engine was parallelized using OpenMP standard, what enabled execution code for practically unlimited amount of threads at once. Thereby computing time of inversion process was significantly decreased. Furthermore, computing efficiency increases with number of PSO iterations. In this contribution we analyze the efficiency of created software solution taking under consideration details of chosen global optimization engine used as a main joint minimization engine. Additionally we study the scale of possible decrease of computational time caused by different methods of parallelization applied for both forward solvers and inversion algorithm. All tests were done for 2D magnetotelluric and gravity data based on real geological media. Obtained results show that even for relatively simple mid end computational infrastructure proposed solution of inversion problem can be applied in practice and used for real life problems of geophysical inversion and interpretation.

  20. Parallel full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain by the Gauss-Newton method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain. We first test the inversion ability of three numerical optimization methods, i.e., the steepest-descent method, the Newton-CG method and the Gauss- Newton method, for a simple model. The results show that the Gauss-Newton method performs well and efficiently. Then numerical computations for a benchmark model named Marmousi model by the Gauss-Newton method are implemented. Parallel algorithm based on message passing interface (MPI) is applied as the inversion is a typical large-scale computational problem. Numerical computations show that the Gauss-Newton method has good ability to reconstruct the complex model.

  1. a method of gravity and seismic sequential inversion and its GPU implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Meng, X.

    2011-12-01

    In this abstract, we introduce a gravity and seismic sequential inversion method to invert for density and velocity together. For the gravity inversion, we use an iterative method based on correlation imaging algorithm; for the seismic inversion, we use the full waveform inversion. The link between the density and velocity is an empirical formula called Gardner equation, for large volumes of data, we use the GPU to accelerate the computation. For the gravity inversion method , we introduce a method based on correlation imaging algorithm,it is also a interative method, first we calculate the correlation imaging of the observed gravity anomaly, it is some value between -1 and +1, then we multiply this value with a little density ,this value become the initial density model. We get a forward reuslt with this initial model and also calculate the correaltion imaging of the misfit of observed data and the forward data, also multiply the correaltion imaging result a little density and add it to the initial model, then do the same procedure above , at last ,we can get a inversion density model. For the seismic inveron method ,we use a mothod base on the linearity of acoustic wave equation written in the frequency domain,with a intial velociy model, we can get a good velocity result. In the sequential inversion of gravity and seismic , we need a link formula to convert between density and velocity ,in our method , we use the Gardner equation. Driven by the insatiable market demand for real time, high-definition 3D images, the programmable NVIDIA Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) as co-processor of CPU has been developed for high performance computing. Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) is a parallel programming model and software environment provided by NVIDIA designed to overcome the challenge of using traditional general purpose GPU while maintaining a low learn curve for programmers familiar with standard programming languages such as C. In our inversion processing

  2. LensPerfect Analysis of Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan A.

    2007-12-01

    I present the first massmap to perfectly reproduce the position of every gravitationally-lensed multiply-imaged galaxy detected to date in ACS images of Abell 1689. This massmap was obtained using a powerful new technique made possible by a recent advance in the field of Mathematics. It is the highest resolution assumption-free Dark Matter massmap to date, with the resolution being limited only by the number of multiple images detected. We detect 8 new multiple image systems and identify multiple knots in individual galaxies to constrain a grand total of 168 knots within 135 multiple images of 42 galaxies. No assumptions are made about mass tracing light, and yet the brightest visible structures in A1689 are reproduced in our massmap, a few with intriguing positional offsets. Our massmap probes radii smaller than that resolvable in current Dark Matter simulations of galaxy clusters. And at these radii, we observe slight deviations from the NFW and Sersic profiles which describe simulated Dark Matter halos so well. While we have demonstrated that our method is able to recover a known input massmap (to limited resolution), further tests are necessary to determine the uncertainties of our mass profile and positions of massive subclumps. I compile the latest weak lensing data from ACS, Subaru, and CFHT, and attempt to fit a single profile, either NFW or Sersic, to both the observed weak and strong lensing. I confirm the finding of most previous authors, that no single profile fits extremely well to both simultaneously. Slight deviations are revealed, with the best fits slightly over-predicting the mass profile at both large and small radius. Our easy-to-use software, called LensPerfect, will be made available soon. This research was supported by the European Commission Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant 017288-BPZ and the PNAYA grant AYA2005-09413-C02.

  3. A full potential inverse method based on a density linearization scheme for wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.

    1982-01-01

    A mixed analysis inverse procedure based on the full potential equation in conservation form was developed to recontour a given base wing to produce density linearization scheme in applying the pressure boundary condition in terms of the velocity potential. The FL030 finite volume analysis code was modified to include the inverse option. The new surface shape information, associated with the modified pressure boundary condition, is calculated at a constant span station based on a mass flux integration. The inverse method is shown to recover the original shape when the analysis pressure is not altered. Inverse calculations for weakening of a strong shock system and for a laminar flow control (LFC) pressure distribution are presented. Two methods for a trailing edge closure model are proposed for further study.

  4. A numerical adjoint parabolic equation (PE) method for tomography and geoacoustic inversion in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermand, Jean-Pierre; Berrada, Mohamed; Meyer, Matthias; Asch, Mark

    2005-09-01

    Recently, an analytic adjoint-based method of optimal nonlocal boundary control has been proposed for inversion of a waveguide acoustic field using the wide-angle parabolic equation [Meyer and Hermand, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 2937-2948 (2005)]. In this paper a numerical extension of this approach is presented that allows the direct inversion for the geoacoustic parameters which are embedded in a spectral integral representation of the nonlocal boundary condition. The adjoint model is generated numerically and the inversion is carried out jointly across multiple frequencies. The paper further discusses the application of the numerical adjoint PE method for ocean acoustic tomography. To show the effectiveness of the implemented numerical adjoint, preliminary inversion results of water sound-speed profile and bottom acoustic properties will be shown for the YELLOW SHARK '94 experimental conditions.

  5. The discovery of diffuse steep spectrum sources in Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Intema, H. T.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Clarke, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Hierarchical galaxy formation models indicate that during their lifetime galaxy clusters undergo several mergers. An example of such a merging cluster is Abell 2256. Here we report on the discovery of three diffuse radio sources in the periphery of Abell 2256, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Aims: The aim of the observations was to search for diffuse ultra-steep spectrum radio sources within the galaxy cluster Abell 2256. Methods: We have carried out GMRT 325 MHz radio continuum observations of Abell 2256. V, R and I band images of the cluster were taken with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). Results: We have discovered three diffuse elongated radio sources located about 1 Mpc from the cluster center. Two are located to the west of the cluster center, and one to the southeast. The sources have a measured physical extent of 170, 140 and 240 kpc, respectively. The two western sources are also visible in deep low-resolution 115-165 MHz Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) images, although they are blended into a single source. For the combined emission of the blended source we find an extreme spectral index (α) of -2.05 ± 0.14 between 140 and 351 MHz. The extremely steep spectral index suggests these two sources are most likely the result of adiabatic compression of fossil radio plasma due to merger shocks. For the source to the southeast, we find that {α < -1.45} between 1369 and 325 MHz. We did not find any clear optical counterparts to the radio sources in the WHT images. Conclusions: The discovery of the steep spectrum sources implies the existence of a population of faint diffuse radio sources in (merging) clusters with such steep spectra that they have gone unnoticed in higher frequency (⪆1 GHz) observations. Simply considering the timescales related to the AGN activity, synchrotron losses, and the presence of shocks, we find that most massive clusters should possess similar sources. An exciting possibility

  6. Adjoint methods for external beam inverse treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalok, Michael E.

    Forward and adjoint radiation transport methods may both be used to determine the dosimetric relationship between source parameters and voxel elements of a phantom. Forward methods consider one specific tuple of source parameters and calculate the response in all voxels of interest. This response is often cast as the dose delivered per unit source-weight. Adjoint transport methods, conversely, consider one particular voxel and calculate the response of that voxel in relation to all possible source parameters. In this regard, adjoint methods provide an "adjoint function" in addition to a dose value. Although the dose is for a single voxel only, the adjoint function illustrates the source parameters, (e.g. beam positions and directions) that are most important to delivering the dose to that voxel. In this regard, adjoint methods of analysis lend themselves in a natural way to optimization problems and perturbation studies. This work investigates the utility of adjoint analytic methods for treatment planning and for Monte Carlo dose calculations. Various methods for implementing this approach are discussed, along with their strengths and weaknesses. The complementary nature of adjoint and forward techniques is illustrated and exploited. Also, several features of the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and MCNPX are reviewed for treatment planning applications.

  7. An inverse method for computation of structural stiffness distributions of aeroelastically optimized wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An inverse method has been developed to compute the structural stiffness properties of wings given a specified wing loading and aeroelastic twist distribution. The method directly solves for the bending and torsional stiffness distribution of the wing using a modal representation of these properties. An aeroelastic design problem involving the use of a computational aerodynamics method to optimize the aeroelastic twist distribution of a tighter wing operating at maneuver flight conditions is used to demonstrate the application of the method. This exercise verifies the ability of the inverse scheme to accurately compute the structural stiffness distribution required to generate a specific aeroelastic twist under a specified aeroelastic load.

  8. An inverse method for computation of structural stiffness distributions of aeroelastically optimized wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1993-04-01

    An inverse method has been developed to compute the structural stiffness properties of wings given a specified wing loading and aeroelastic twist distribution. The method directly solves for the bending and torsional stiffness distribution of the wing using a modal representation of these properties. An aeroelastic design problem involving the use of a computational aerodynamics method to optimize the aeroelastic twist distribution of a tighter wing operating at maneuver flight conditions is used to demonstrate the application of the method. This exercise verifies the ability of the inverse scheme to accurately compute the structural stiffness distribution required to generate a specific aeroelastic twist under a specified aeroelastic load.

  9. A direct and inverse boundary layer method for subsonic flow over delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodson, S. H.; Dejarnette, F. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new inverse boundary layer method is developed and applied to incompressible flows with laminar separation and reattachment. Test cases for two dimensional flows are computed and the results are compared with those of other inverse methods. One advantage of the present method is that the calculation of the inviscid velocities may be determined at each marching step without having to iterate. The inverse method was incorporated with the direct method to calculate the incompressible, conical flow over a slender delta wing at incidence. The location of the secondary separation line on the leeward surface of the wing is determined and compared with experiment for a unit aspect ratio wing at 20.5 deg incidence. The viscous flow in the separated region was calculated using prescribed skin friction coefficients.

  10. Full configuration-interaction calculations with the simplest iterative complement method: Merit of the inverse Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2011-12-15

    The simplest iterative complement (SIC) calculations starting from Hartree-Fock and giving full configuration interaction (CI) at convergence were performed using regular and inverse Hamiltonians. Each iteration step is variational and involves only one variable. The convergence was slow when we used the regular Hamiltonian, but became very fast when we used the inverse Hamiltonian. This difference is due to the Coulomb singularity problem inherent in the regular Hamiltonian; the inverse Hamiltonian does not have such a problem. For this reason, the merit of the inverse Hamiltonian over the regular one becomes even more dramatic when we use a better-quality basis set. This was seen by comparing the calculations due to the minimal and double-{zeta} basis sets. Similar problematic situations exist in the Krylov sequence and in the Lanczos and Arnoldi methods.

  11. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  12. Diffuse interface methods for inverse problems: case study for an elliptic Cauchy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Martin; Løseth Elvetun, Ole; Schlottbom, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Many inverse problems have to deal with complex, evolving and often not exactly known geometries, e.g. as domains of forward problems modeled by partial differential equations. This makes it desirable to use methods which are robust with respect to perturbed or not well resolved domains, and which allow for efficient discretizations not resolving any fine detail of those geometries. For forward problems in partial differential equations methods based on diffuse interface representations have gained strong attention in the last years, but so far they have not been considered systematically for inverse problems. In this work we introduce a diffuse domain method as a tool for the solution of variational inverse problems. As a particular example we study ECG inversion in further detail. ECG inversion is a linear inverse source problem with boundary measurements governed by an anisotropic diffusion equation, which naturally cries for solutions under changing geometries, namely the beating heart. We formulate a regularization strategy using Tikhonov regularization and, using standard source conditions, we prove convergence rates. A special property of our approach is that not only operator perturbations are introduced by the diffuse domain method, but more important we have to deal with topologies which depend on a parameter \\varepsilon in the diffuse domain method, i.e. we have to deal with \\varepsilon -dependent forward operators and \\varepsilon -dependent norms. In particular the appropriate function spaces for the unknown and the data depend on \\varepsilon . This prevents the application of some standard convergence techniques for inverse problems, in particular interpreting the perturbations as data errors in the original problem does not yield suitable results. We consequently develop a novel approach based on saddle-point problems. The numerical solution of the problem is discussed as well and results for several computational experiments are reported. In

  13. Numerical Methods for Forward and Inverse Problems in Discontinuous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, Timothy P.

    2011-03-08

    The research emphasis under this grant's funding is in the area of algebraic multigrid methods. The research has two main branches: 1) exploring interdisciplinary applications in which algebraic multigrid can make an impact and 2) extending the scope of algebraic multigrid methods with algorithmic improvements that are based in strong analysis.The work in interdisciplinary applications falls primarily in the field of biomedical imaging. Work under this grant demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of multigrid for solving linear systems that result from highly heterogeneous finite element method models of the human head. The results in this work also give promise to medical advances possible with software that may be developed. Research to extend the scope of algebraic multigrid has been focused in several areas. In collaboration with researchers at the University of Colorado, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory, the PI developed an adaptive multigrid with subcycling via complementary grids. This method has very cheap computing costs per iterate and is showing promise as a preconditioner for conjugate gradient. Recent work with Los Alamos National Laboratory concentrates on developing algorithms that take advantage of the recent advances in adaptive multigrid research. The results of the various efforts in this research could ultimately have direct use and impact to researchers for a wide variety of applications, including, astrophysics, neuroscience, contaminant transport in porous media, bi-domain heart modeling, modeling of tumor growth, and flow in heterogeneous porous media. This work has already led to basic advances in computational mathematics and numerical linear algebra and will continue to do so into the future.

  14. Lithological and Surface Geometry Joint Inversions Using Multi-Objective Global Optimization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Bijani, Rodrigo; Farquharson, Colin

    2016-04-01

    surfaces are set to a priori values. The inversion is tasked with calculating the geometry of the contact surfaces instead of some piecewise distribution of properties in a mesh. Again, no coupling measure is required and joint inversion is simplified. Both of these inverse problems involve high nonlinearity and discontinuous or non-obtainable derivatives. They can also involve the existence of multiple minima. Hence, one can not apply the standard descent-based local minimization methods used to solve typical minimum-structure inversions. Instead, we are applying Pareto multi-objective global optimization (PMOGO) methods, which generate a suite of solutions that minimize multiple objectives (e.g. data misfits and regularization terms) in a Pareto-optimal sense. Providing a suite of models, as opposed to a single model that minimizes a weighted sum of objectives, allows a more complete assessment of the possibilities and avoids the often difficult choice of how to weight each objective. While there are definite advantages to PMOGO joint inversion approaches, the methods come with significantly increased computational requirements. We are researching various strategies to ameliorate these computational issues including parallelization and problem dimension reduction.

  15. Direct and inverse methods for ocean-wave imaging by SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotheram, S.; Macklin, J. T.

    1984-08-01

    The direct and inverse problems for ocean-wave imaging by SAR for the image and its power spectrum are discussed. The direct problem is reasonably well understood, but the inverse methods are not complete or optimum. However, they represent the first steps in the development of such methods, and they confirm aspects of imaging theory. Other aspects, particularly for the power spectrum, remain to be completed. Once this is done, optimum methods could be developed using Bacchus-Gilbert theory to provide the required tradeoff between resolution and speckle.

  16. The inversion method in measuring noise emitted by machines in opencast mines of rock material.

    PubMed

    Pleban, Dariusz; Piechowicz, Janusz; Kosała, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    The inversion method was used to test vibroacoustic processes in large-size machines used in opencast mines of rock material. When this method is used, the tested machine is replaced with a set of substitute sources, whose acoustic parameters are determined on the basis of sound pressure levels and phase shift angles of acoustic signals, measured with an array of 24 microphones. This article presents test results of a combine unit comprising a crusher and a vibrating sieve, for which an acoustic model of 7 substitute sources was developed with the inversion method. PMID:23759201

  17. Statistical method for resolving the photon-photoelectron-counting inversion problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jinlong; Li Tiejun; Peng, Xiang; Guo Hong

    2011-02-01

    A statistical inversion method is proposed for the photon-photoelectron-counting statistics in quantum key distribution experiment. With the statistical viewpoint, this problem is equivalent to the parameter estimation for an infinite binomial mixture model. The coarse-graining idea and Bayesian methods are applied to deal with this ill-posed problem, which is a good simple example to show the successful application of the statistical methods to the inverse problem. Numerical results show the applicability of the proposed strategy. The coarse-graining idea for the infinite mixture models should be general to be used in the future.

  18. Magnetic anomaly inversion using magnetic dipole reconstruction based on the pipeline section segmentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qi; Liu, De-Jun; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Fang, Hua-Feng; Feng, Mu-Qun

    2016-06-01

    In the model of a horizontal straight pipeline of finite length, the segmentation of the pipeline elements is a significant factor in the accuracy and rapidity of the forward modeling and inversion processes, but the existing pipeline segmentation method is very time-consuming. This paper proposes a section segmentation method to study the characteristics of pipeline magnetic anomalies—and the effect of model parameters on these magnetic anomalies—as a way to enhance computational performance and accelerate the convergence process of the inversion. Forward models using the piece segmentation method and section segmentation method based on magnetic dipole reconstruction (MDR) are established for comparison. The results show that the magnetic anomalies calculated by these two segmentation methods are almost the same regardless of different measuring heights and variations of the inclination and declination of the pipeline. In the optimized inversion procedure the results of the simulation data calculated by these two methods agree with the synthetic data from the original model, and the inversion accuracies of the burial depths of the two methods are approximately equal. The proposed method is more computationally efficient than the piece segmentation method—in other words, the section segmentation method can meet the requirements for precision in the detection of pipelines by magnetic anomalies and reduce the computation time of the whole process.

  19. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Métayer, Olivier; Saurel, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOS named "Noble Abel stiffened gas," this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular "Stiffened Gas (SG)" EOS. It is a combination of the so-called "Noble-Abel" and "stiffened gas" equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.

  20. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasadia, S.; Sun, M.; Sarazin, C.; Morandi, A.; Markevitch, M.; Wik, D.; Feretti, L.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    Deep (103 ks) Chandra observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of M = 3.0 ± 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell 665 the second cluster, after the Bullet cluster, where a strong merger shock of M ≈ 3 has been detected. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 ± 0.7) × 103 km s-1. The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the re-acceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  1. The X-ray cluster Abell 744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gioia, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray and optical observations of the cluster of galaxies Abell 744 are presented. The X-ray flux (assuming H(0) = 100 km/s per Mpc) is about 9 x 10 to the 42nd erg/s. The X-ray source is extended, but shows no other structure. Photographic photometry (in Kron-Cousins R), calibrated by deep CCD frames, is presented for all galaxies brighter than 19th magnitude within 0.75 Mpc of the cluster center. The luminosity function is normal, and the isopleths show little evidence of substructure near the cluster center. The cluster has a dominant central galaxy, which is classified as a normal brightest-cluster elliptical on the basis of its luminosity profile. New redshifts were obtained for 26 galaxies in the vicinity of the cluster center; 20 appear to be cluster members. The spatial distribution of redshifts is peculiar; the dispersion within the 150 kpc core radius is much greater than outside. Abell 744 is similar to the nearby cluster Abell 1060.

  2. A comparison of techniques for inversion of radio-ray phase data in presence of ray bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallio, H. A.; Grossi, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Derivations are presented of the straight-line Abel transform and the seismological Herglotz-Wiechert transform (which takes ray bending into account) that are used in the reconstruction of refractivity profiles from radio-wave phase data. Profile inversion utilizing these approaches, performed in computer-simulated experiments, are compared for cases of positive, zero, and negative ray bending. For thin atmospheres and ionospheres, such as the Martian atmosphere and ionosphere, radio wave signals are shown to be inverted accurately with both methods. For dense media, such as the solar corona or the lower Venus atmosphere, the refractive recovered by the seismological Herglotz-Wiechert transform provide a significant improvement compared with the straight-line Abel transform.

  3. Integro-differential method of solving the inverse coefficient heat conduction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. L.; Zasyad'Ko, A. A.; Frolov, G. A.

    2010-03-01

    On the basis of differential transformations, a stable integro-differential method of solving the inverse heat conduction problem is suggested. The method has been tested on the example of determining the thermal diffusivity on quasi-stationary fusion and heating of a quartz glazed ceramics specimen.

  4. Numerical solution of 2D-vector tomography problem using the method of approximate inverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetov, Ivan; Maltseva, Svetlana; Polyakova, Anna

    2016-08-01

    We propose a numerical solution of reconstruction problem of a two-dimensional vector field in a unit disk from the known values of the longitudinal and transverse ray transforms. The algorithm is based on the method of approximate inverse. Numerical simulations confirm that the proposed method yields good results of reconstruction of vector fields.

  5. Inverse planning optimization method for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yihua; Ren, Haozheng; Li, Cunhua; Min, Zhifang; Wan, Jinxin; Ma, Jianxin; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    In order to facilitate the leaf sequencing process in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and design of a practical leaf sequencing algorithm, it is an important issue to smooth the planned fluence maps. The objective is to achieve both high-efficiency and high-precision dose delivering by considering characteristics of leaf sequencing process. The key factor which affects total number of monitor units for the leaf sequencing optimization process is the max flow value of the digraph which formulated from the fluence maps. Therefore, we believe that one strategy for compromising dose conformity and total number of monitor units in dose delivery is to balance the dose distribution function and the max flow value mentioned above. However, there are too many paths in the digraph, and we don't know the flow value of which path is the maximum. The maximum flow value among the horizontal paths was selected and used in the objective function of the fluence map optimization to formulate the model. The model is a traditional linear constrained quadratic optimization model which can be solved by interior point method easily. We believe that the smoothed maps from this model are more suitable for leaf sequencing optimization process than other smoothing models. A clinical head-neck case and a prostate case were tested and compared using our proposed model and the smoothing model which is based on the minimization of total variance. The optimization results with the same level of total number of monitor units (TNMU) show that the fluence maps obtained from our model have much better dose performance for the target/non-target region than the maps from total variance based on the smoothing model. This indicates that our model achieves better dose distribution when the algorithm suppresses the TNMU at the same level. Although we have just used the max flow value of the horizontal paths in the diagraph in the objective function, a good balance has been achieved between

  6. ROSAT HRI images of Abell 85 and Abell 496: Evidence for inhomogeneities in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Guimond, Stephen J.; Luginbuhl, Christian; Joy, Marshall

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT HRI images of two clusters of galaxies with cooling flows, Abell 496 and Abell 85. In these clusters, x-ray emission on small scales above the general cluster emission is significant at the 3 sigma level. There is no evidence for optical counterparts. The enhancements may be associated with lumps of gas at a lower temperature and higher density than the ambient medium, or hotter, denser gas perhaps compressed by magnetic fields. These observations can be used to test models of how thermal instabilities form and evolve in cooling flows.

  7. A combined direct/inverse three-dimensional transonic wing design method for vector computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weed, R. A.; Carlson, L. A.; Anderson, W. K.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional transonic-wing design algorithm for vector computers is developed, and the results of sample computations are presented graphically. The method incorporates the direct/inverse scheme of Carlson (1975), a Cartesian grid system with boundary conditions applied at a mean plane, and a potential-flow solver based on the conservative form of the full potential equation and using the ZEBRA II vectorizable solution algorithm of South et al. (1980). The accuracy and consistency of the method with regard to direct and inverse analysis and trailing-edge closure are verified in the test computations.

  8. Practical use of three-dimensional inverse method for compressor blade design

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, S.; Dang, T.; Stringham, J.; Razinsky, E.

    1999-04-01

    The practical utility of a three-dimensional inverse viscous method is demonstrated by carrying out a design modification of a first-stage rotor in an industrial compressor. In this design modification study, the goal is to improve the efficiency of the original blade while retaining its overall aerodynamic, structural, and manufacturing characteristics. By employing a simple modification to the blade pressure loading distribution (which is the prescribed flow quantity in this inverse method), the modified blade geometry is predicted to perform better than the original design over a wide range of operating points, including an improvement in choke margin.

  9. The cluster of galaxies Abell 2670

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shambrook, Anouk Aimee

    2001-10-01

    The rich cluster of galaxies Abell 2670 provides a laboratory in which to observe how galaxy properties change as a function of environment. Though initially considered a relaxed cluster, Abell 2670 exhibits substructure in optical, x-ray, and radio 21 cm H I line data. The cluster hosts a plethora of elliptical galaxies as well as spiral galaxies including galaxies rich in cold gas (some with more than 1010 Msolar in H I), and K+A galaxies. A group of galaxies rich in cold gas may be entering the cluster environment for the first time, making Abell 2670 a valuable case study. This thesis presents a catalog of UBV RI colors for objects located in an area 1° x 1° centered on Abell 2670, based on observations using the CTIO 0.9-m Schmidt telescope. Follow up observations using the Keck II 10-m and the CTIO 4-m telescopes will enable the classification of galaxy morphology. Using evolutionary synthesis models by Poggianti and Barbaro, a photometric redshift analysis yields a best- fit redshift and spectral energy distribution for each galaxy. The results are checked with galaxies observed by Sharples, Ellis, and Gray, which are known cluster members. Radial density profiles of cluster and field galaxies are modeled by King and uniform distributions respectively. A set of simulated galaxies, drawn from a combination of the two models, is compared to the data; for each redshift classification (based on the photometric redshift analysis), Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests characterize the probable fraction of cluster galaxies relative to the total. For the galaxies classified by the photometric redshift analysis as E, Sa, and Sc, an overdensity value is calculated, quantifying the density-morphology relation for this sample. A detailed study of this low redshift (z = 0.076) cluster may inform future studies of high redshift clusters. The optical UBV RI catalog is an important part of a multiwavelength set of data on Abell 2670 which in the future will probably lend itself well

  10. Freezing Time Estimation for a Cylindrical Food Using an Inverse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yao Xing; Mihori, Tomoo; Watanabe, Hisahiko

    Most of the published methods for estimating the freezing time require thermal properties of the product and any relevant heat transfer coefficients between the product and the cooling medium. However, the difficulty of obtaining thermal data for use in industrial freezing system of food has been pointed out. We have developed a new procedure for estimating the time to freeze a food of a slab by using the inverse method, which does not require the knowledge of thermal properties of the food being frozen. The method of applying inverse method to estimation of freezing time depends on the shape of the body to be frozen. In this paper, we explored the method of applying inverse method to the food body of cylindrical shape, using selected explicit expressions to describe the temperature profile. The temperature profile was found to be successfully approximated by a logarithmic function, with which an approximate equation to describe the freezing time was derived. An inversion procedure of estimating freezing time associated with the approximate equation, was validated via a numerical experiment.

  11. The inversion method of Matrix mineral bulk modulus based on Gassmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, L.; He, X.; Zhang, Z. H.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, seismic rock physics has played an important role in oil and gas exploration. The seismic rock physics model can quantitatively describe the reservoir characteristics, such as lithologic association, pore structure, geological processes and so on. But the classic rock physics models need to determine the background parameter, that is, matrix mineral bulk modulus. An inaccurate inputs greatly influence the prediction reliability. By introducing different rock physics parameters, Gassmann equation is used to derive a reasonable modification. Two forms of Matrix mineral bulk modulus inversion methods including the linear regression method and Self-adapting inversion method are proposed. They effectively solve the value issues of Matrix mineral bulk modulus in different complex parameters conditions. Based on laboratory tests data, compared with the conventional method, the linear regression method is more simple and accurate. Meanwhile Self-adapting inversion method also has higher precision in the known rich rock physics parameters. Consequently, the modulus value was applied to reservoir fluid substitution, porosity inversion and S-wave velocity prediction. The introduction of Matrix mineral modulus base on Gassmann equations can effectively improve the reliability of the fluid impact prediction, and computational efficiency.

  12. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a meshmore » adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.« less

  13. Material Symmetries from Ultrasonic Velocity Measurements: A Genetic Algorithm Based Blind Inversion Method

    SciTech Connect

    Vardhan, J. Vishnu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2007-03-21

    The determination of material symmetries and principle plane orientations of anisotropic plates, whose planes of symmetries are not known apriori, were calculated using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) based blind inversion method. The ultrasonic phase velocity profiles were used as input data to the inversion. The assumption of a general anisotropy was imposed during the start of each blind inversion. The multi-parameter solution space of the Genetic Algorithm was exploited to identify the 'statistically significant' solution sets of elastic moduli in the geometric coordinate system of the plate, by thresholding the coefficients-of-variation (Cv). Using these ''statistically significant'' elastic moduli, the unknown material symmetry and the principle planes (angles between the geometrical coordinates and the material symmetry coordinates) were evaluated using the method proposed by Cowin and Mehrabadi. This procedure was verified using simulated ultrasonic velocity data sets on material with orthotropic symmetry. Experimental validation was also performed on unidirectional Graphite Epoxy [0]7s fiber reinforced composite plate.

  14. Solutions of the Schrödinger equation with inversely quadratic Hellmann plus inversely quadratic potential using Nikiforov-Uvarov method

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, B. I.

    2014-11-12

    By using the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method, the Schrödinger equation has been solved for the interaction of inversely quadratic Hellmann (IQHP) and inversely quadratic potential (IQP) for any angular momentum quantum number, l. The energy eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenfunctions have been obtained in terms of Laguerre polynomials. Special cases of the sum of these potentials have been considered and their energy eigenvalues also obtained.

  15. Full waveform inversion in the frequency domain using direct iterative T-matrix methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Morten; Ursin, Bjørn

    2015-06-01

    We present two direct iterative solutions to the nonlinear seismic waveform inversion problem that are based on volume integral equation methods for seismic forward modelling in the acoustic approximation. The solutions are presented in the frequency domain, where accurate inversion results can often be obtained using a relatively low number of frequency components. Our inverse scattering approach effectively replaces an ill-posed nonlinear inverse problem with a series of linear ill-posed inverse problems, for which there already exist efficient (regularized) solution methods. Both these solutions update the wavefield within the scattering domain after each iteration. The main difference is that the background medium Green functions are kept fixed in the first solution, but updated after each iteration in the second solution. This means that our solutions are very similar to the Born iterative (BI) and the distorted Born iterative (DBI) methods that are commonly used in acoustic and electromagnetic inverse scattering. However, we have eliminated the need to perform a full forward simulation (or to invert a huge matrix) at each iteration via the use of an iterative T-matrix method for fixed background media for the BI method and a variational T-matrix method for dynamic background media for the DBI method. The T-matrix (variation) is linearly related with the seismic wavefield data (residuals), but related with the unknown scattering potential model parameter (updates) in a non-linear manner, which is independent of the source-receiver configuration. This mathematical structure, which allows one to peel off the effects of the source-receiver configuration, is very attractive when dealing with multiple (simultaneous) sources, and is also compatible with the (future) use of renormalization methods for dealing with local minima problems. To illustrate the performance and potential of the two direct iterative methods for FWI, we performed a series of numerical

  16. Iterative solution of a Dirac equation with an inverse Hamiltonian method

    SciTech Connect

    Hagino, K.; Tanimura, Y.

    2010-11-15

    We solve a singe-particle Dirac equation with Woods-Saxon potentials using an iterative method in the coordinate space representation. By maximizing the expectation value of the inverse of the Dirac Hamiltonian, this method avoids the variational collapse in which an iterative solution dives into the Dirac sea. We demonstrate that this method works efficiently, reproducing the exact solutions of the Dirac equation.

  17. Singular solutions of the KdV equation and the inverse scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Arkad'ev, V.A.; Pogrebkov, A.K.; Polivanov, M.K.

    1985-12-20

    The paper is devoted to the construction of singular solutions of the KdV equation. The presentation is based on a variant of the inverse scattering method for singular solutions of nonlinear equations developed in previous works of the authors.

  18. Towards "Inverse" Character Tables? A One-Step Method for Decomposing Reducible Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquemal, J.-Y.; Losno, R.; Ancian, B.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of group theory, a new procedure is described for a one-step automated reduction of reducible representations. The matrix inversion tool, provided by standard spreadsheet software, is applied to the central part of the character table that contains the characters of the irreducible representation. This method is not restricted to…

  19. Development of direct-inverse 3-D method for applied aerodynamic design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1987-01-01

    The primary tasks performed were the continued development of inverse design procedures for the TAWFIVE code, the development of corresponding relofting and trailing edge closure procedures, and the testing of the methods for a variety of cases. The period from July 1, 1986 through December 31, 1986 is covered.

  20. Studies of Trace Gas Chemical Cycles Using Observations, Inverse Methods and Global Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    2001-01-01

    For interpreting observational data, and in particular for use in inverse methods, accurate and realistic chemical transport models are essential. Toward this end we have, in recent years, helped develop and utilize a number of three-dimensional models including the Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH).

  1. Generalization of the relaxation method for the inverse solution of nonlinear and linear transfer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1977-01-01

    A mapping transformation is derived for the inverse solution of nonlinear and linear integral equations of the types encountered in remote sounding studies. The method is applied to the solution of specific problems for the determination of the thermal and composition structure of planetary atmospheres from a knowledge of their upwelling radiance.

  2. Analytical and numerical analysis of inverse optimization problems: conditions of uniqueness and computational methods

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the key problems of motor control is the redundancy problem, in particular how the central nervous system (CNS) chooses an action out of infinitely many possible. A promising way to address this question is to assume that the choice is made based on optimization of a certain cost function. A number of cost functions have been proposed in the literature to explain performance in different motor tasks: from force sharing in grasping to path planning in walking. However, the problem of uniqueness of the cost function(s) was not addressed until recently. In this article, we analyze two methods of finding additive cost functions in inverse optimization problems with linear constraints, so-called linear-additive inverse optimization problems. These methods are based on the Uniqueness Theorem for inverse optimization problems that we proved recently (Terekhov et al., J Math Biol 61(3):423–453, 2010). Using synthetic data, we show that both methods allow for determining the cost function. We analyze the influence of noise on the both methods. Finally, we show how a violation of the conditions of the Uniqueness Theorem may lead to incorrect solutions of the inverse optimization problem. PMID:21311907

  3. Analytical and numerical analysis of inverse optimization problems: conditions of uniqueness and computational methods.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Alexander V; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2011-02-01

    One of the key problems of motor control is the redundancy problem, in particular how the central nervous system (CNS) chooses an action out of infinitely many possible. A promising way to address this question is to assume that the choice is made based on optimization of a certain cost function. A number of cost functions have been proposed in the literature to explain performance in different motor tasks: from force sharing in grasping to path planning in walking. However, the problem of uniqueness of the cost function(s) was not addressed until recently. In this article, we analyze two methods of finding additive cost functions in inverse optimization problems with linear constraints, so-called linear-additive inverse optimization problems. These methods are based on the Uniqueness Theorem for inverse optimization problems that we proved recently (Terekhov et al., J Math Biol 61(3):423-453, 2010). Using synthetic data, we show that both methods allow for determining the cost function. We analyze the influence of noise on the both methods. Finally, we show how a violation of the conditions of the Uniqueness Theorem may lead to incorrect solutions of the inverse optimization problem. PMID:21311907

  4. Tauberian theorems for Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Enes; ćoşkun, Hüsamettin

    2015-09-01

    We give some conditions under which Abel summable sequences of fuzzy numbers are convergent. As corollaries we obtain the results given in [E. Yavuz, Ö. Talo, Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers, Soft computing 2014, doi: 10.1007/s00500-014-1563-7].

  5. New Modified Band Limited Impedance (BLIMP) Inversion Method Using Envelope Attribute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, Z. L.; Saputro, O. D.; Latief, F. D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Earth attenuates high frequencies from seismic wavelet. Low frequency seismics cannot be obtained by low quality geophone. The low frequencies (0-10 Hz) that are not present in seismic data are important to obtain a good result in acoustic impedance (AI) inversion. AI is important to determine reservoir quality by converting AI to reservoir properties like porosity, permeability and water saturation. The low frequencies can be supplied from impedance log (AI logs), velocity analysis, and from the combination of both data. In this study, we propose that the low frequencies could be obtained from the envelope seismic attribute. This new proposed method is essentially a modified BLIMP (Band Limited Impedance) inversion method, in which the AI logs for BLIMP substituted with the envelope attribute. In low frequency domain (0-10 Hz), the envelope attribute produces high amplitude. This low frequency from the envelope attribute is utilized to replace low frequency from AI logs in BLIMP. Linear trend in this method is acquired from the AI logs. In this study, the method is applied on synthetic seismograms created from impedance log from well ‘X’. The mean squared error from the modified BLIMP inversion is 2-4% for each trace (variation in error is caused by different normalization constant), lower than the conventional BLIMP inversion which produces error of 8%. The new method is also applied on Marmousi2 dataset and show promising result. The modified BLIMP inversion result from Marmousi2 by using one log AI is better than the one produced from the conventional method.

  6. An inverse finite element method for beam shape sensing: theoretical framework and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Shape sensing, i.e., reconstruction of the displacement field of a structure from surface-measured strains, has relevant implications for the monitoring, control and actuation of smart structures. The inverse finite element method (iFEM) is a shape-sensing methodology shown to be fast, accurate and robust. This paper aims to demonstrate that the recently presented iFEM for beam and frame structures is reliable when experimentally measured strains are used as input data. The theoretical framework of the methodology is first reviewed. Timoshenko beam theory is adopted, including stretching, bending, transverse shear and torsion deformation modes. The variational statement and its discretization with C0-continuous inverse elements are briefly recalled. The three-dimensional displacement field of the beam structure is reconstructed under the condition that least-squares compatibility is guaranteed between the measured strains and those interpolated within the inverse elements. The experimental setup is then described. A thin-walled cantilevered beam is subjected to different static and dynamic loads. Measured surface strains are used as input data for shape sensing at first with a single inverse element. For the same test cases, convergence is also investigated using an increasing number of inverse elements. The iFEM-recovered deflections and twist rotations are then compared with those measured experimentally. The accuracy, convergence and robustness of the iFEM with respect to unavoidable measurement errors, due to strain sensor locations, measurement systems and geometry imperfections, are demonstrated for both static and dynamic loadings.

  7. Odor emission rate estimation of indoor industrial sources using a modified inverse modeling method.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Tingting; Sattayatewa, Chakkrid; Venkatesan, Dhesikan; Noll, Kenneth E; Pagilla, Krishna R; Moschandreas, Demetrios J

    2011-08-01

    Odor emission rates are commonly measured in the laboratory or occasionally estimated with inverse modeling techniques. A modified inverse modeling approach is used to estimate source emission rates inside of a postdigestion centrifuge building of a water reclamation plant. Conventionally, inverse modeling methods divide an indoor environment in zones on the basis of structural design and estimate source emission rates using models that assume homogeneous distribution of agent concentrations within a zone and experimentally determined link functions to simulate airflows among zones. The modified approach segregates zones as a function of agent distribution rather than building design and identifies near and far fields. Near-field agent concentrations do not satisfy the assumption of homogeneous odor concentrations; far-field concentrations satisfy this assumption and are the only ones used to estimate emission rates. The predictive ability of the modified inverse modeling approach was validated with measured emission rate values; the difference between corresponding estimated and measured odor emission rates is not statistically significant. Similarly, the difference between measured and estimated hydrogen sulfide emission rates is also not statistically significant. The modified inverse modeling approach is easy to perform because it uses odor and odorant field measurements instead of complex chamber emission rate measurements. PMID:21874959

  8. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multi-resolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2015-04-29

    Atmospheric inversions are frequently used to estimate fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases (e.g., biospheric CO2 flux fields) at Earth's surface. These inversions typically assume that flux departures from a prior model are spatially smoothly varying, which are then modeled using a multi-variate Gaussian. When the field being estimated is spatially rough, multi-variate Gaussian models are difficult to construct and a wavelet-based field model may be more suitable. Unfortunately, such models are very high dimensional and are most conveniently used when the estimation method can simultaneously perform data-driven model simplification (removal of model parameters that cannot be reliably estimated) and fitting.more » Such sparse reconstruction methods are typically not used in atmospheric inversions. In this work, we devise a sparse reconstruction method, and illustrate it in an idealized atmospheric inversion problem for the estimation of fossil fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the USA. Our new method is based on stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), a method used to reconstruct compressively sensed images. Our adaptations bestow three properties to the sparse reconstruction procedure which are useful in atmospheric inversions. We have modified StOMP to incorporate prior information on the emission field being estimated and to enforce non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, though based on wavelets, our method allows for the estimation of fields in non-rectangular geometries, e.g., emission fields inside geographical and political boundaries. Our idealized inversions use a recently developed multi-resolution (i.e., wavelet-based) random field model developed for ffCO2 emissions and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also

  9. Cycle-Based Cluster Variational Method for Direct and Inverse Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtlehner, Cyril; Decelle, Aurélien

    2016-08-01

    Large scale inference problems of practical interest can often be addressed with help of Markov random fields. This requires to solve in principle two related problems: the first one is to find offline the parameters of the MRF from empirical data (inverse problem); the second one (direct problem) is to set up the inference algorithm to make it as precise, robust and efficient as possible. In this work we address both the direct and inverse problem with mean-field methods of statistical physics, going beyond the Bethe approximation and associated belief propagation algorithm. We elaborate on the idea that loop corrections to belief propagation can be dealt with in a systematic way on pairwise Markov random fields, by using the elements of a cycle basis to define regions in a generalized belief propagation setting. For the direct problem, the region graph is specified in such a way as to avoid feed-back loops as much as possible by selecting a minimal cycle basis. Following this line we are led to propose a two-level algorithm, where a belief propagation algorithm is run alternatively at the level of each cycle and at the inter-region level. Next we observe that the inverse problem can be addressed region by region independently, with one small inverse problem per region to be solved. It turns out that each elementary inverse problem on the loop geometry can be solved efficiently. In particular in the random Ising context we propose two complementary methods based respectively on fixed point equations and on a one-parameter log likelihood function minimization. Numerical experiments confirm the effectiveness of this approach both for the direct and inverse MRF inference. Heterogeneous problems of size up to 10^5 are addressed in a reasonable computational time, notably with better convergence properties than ordinary belief propagation.

  10. The Wing-Body Aeroelastic Analyses Using the Inverse Design Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Im, Dong-Kyun; Lee, In; Kwon, Jang-Hyuk

    Flutter phenomenon is one of the most dangerous problems in aeroelasticity. When it occurs, the aircraft structure can fail in a few second. In recent aeroelastic research, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques become important means to predict the aeroelastic unstable responses accurately. Among various flow equations like Navier-Stokes, Euler, full potential and so forth, the transonic small disturbance (TSD) theory is widely recognized as one of the most efficient theories. However, the small disturbance assumption limits the applicable range of the TSD theory to the thin wings. For a missile which usually has small aspect ratio wings, the influence of body aerodynamics on the wing surface may be significant. Thus, the flutter stability including the body effect should be verified. In this research an inverse design method is used to complement the aerodynamic deficiency derived from the fuselage. MGM (modified Garabedian-McFadden) inverse design method is used to optimize the aerodynamic field of a full aircraft model. Furthermore, the present TSD aeroelastic analyses do not require the grid regeneration process. The MGM inverse design method converges faster than other conventional aerodynamic theories. Consequently, the inverse designed aeroelastic analyses show that the flutter stability has been lowered by the body effect.

  11. A new gravity inversion method for multiple subhorizontal discontinuity interfaces and shallow basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, A. G.; FernáNdez, J.; Gottsmann, J.

    2011-02-01

    We present a method for 3-D gravity inversion designed to obtain density contrast models described by subhorizontal layers limited by irregular discontinuity interfaces and models constituted by shallow basins with light infill. It is based on a previously published inversion method that provides, in a nearly automatic approach, the 3-D geometry of isolated anomalous bodies. The basic adjustment constraints are model fitness (fitting the anomaly data) and model smoothness (minimizing the total anomalous mass). For models corresponding to subhorizontal layers, we consider an additional minimization condition: the proximity to prescribed horizontal interfaces. This condition is arranged by including an additional weighting (inverse proportional to the distance to the interface) in the covariance matrix for model parameters. The approach works, according a growth process that increases, step by step, the volume of the adjusted anomalous bodies. Some advantages of the method are simultaneous adjustment of a (linear) regional gravity trend, possibility of including simultaneously positive and negative anomalous structures in the model, and unified inversion approach for isolated bodies, basins, and subhorizontal interface structures. We include several simulation examples and an application case (layered model for the volcanic island of Tenerife).

  12. Implement Method for Automated Testing of Markov Chain Convergence into INVERSE for ORNL12-RS-108J: Advanced Multi-Dimensional Forward and Inverse Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bledsoe, Keith C.

    2015-04-01

    The DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) method is a powerful optimization/uncertainty quantification tool used to solve inverse transport problems in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s INVERSE code system. The DREAM method has been shown to be adept at accurate uncertainty quantification, but it can be very computationally demanding. Previously, the DREAM method in INVERSE performed a user-defined number of particle transport calculations. This placed a burden on the user to guess the number of calculations that would be required to accurately solve any given problem. This report discusses a new approach that has been implemented into INVERSE, the Gelman-Rubin convergence metric. This metric automatically detects when an appropriate number of transport calculations have been completed and the uncertainty in the inverse problem has been accurately calculated. In a test problem with a spherical geometry, this method was found to decrease the number of transport calculations (and thus time required) to solve a problem by an average of over 90%. In a cylindrical test geometry, a 75% decrease was obtained.

  13. The parameter optimization in the inverse distance method by genetic algorithm for estimating precipitation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ling; Lo, Shang-Lien; Yu, Shaw-L

    2006-06-01

    The inverse distance method, one of the commonly used methods for analyzing spatial variation of rainfall, is flexible if the order of distances in the method is adjustable. By applying the genetic algorithm (GA), the optimal order of distances can be found to minimize the difference between estimated and measured precipitation data. A case study of the Feitsui reservoir watershed in Taiwan is described in the present paper. The results show that the variability of the order of distances is small when the topography of rainfall stations is uniform. Moreover, when rainfall characteristic is uniform, the horizontal distance between rainfall stations and interpolated locations is the major factor influencing the order of distances. The results also verify that the variable-order inverse distance method is more suitable than the arithmetic average method and the Thiessen Polygons method in describing the spatial variation of rainfall. The efficiency and reliability of hydrologic modeling and hence of general water resource management can be significantly improved by more accurate rainfall data interpolated by the variable-order inverse distance method. PMID:16917704

  14. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    An inverse wing design method was developed around an existing transonic wing analysis code. The original analysis code, TAWFIVE, has as its core the numerical potential flow solver, FLO30, developed by Jameson and Caughey. Features of the analysis code include a finite-volume formulation; wing and fuselage fitted, curvilinear grid mesh; and a viscous boundary layer correction that also accounts for viscous wake thickness and curvature. The development of the inverse methods as an extension of previous methods existing for design in Cartesian coordinates is presented. Results are shown for inviscid wing design cases in super-critical flow regimes. The test cases selected also demonstrate the versatility of the design method in designing an entire wing or discontinuous sections of a wing.

  15. Multiple Frequency Contrast Source Inversion Method for Vertical Electromagnetic Profiling: 2D Simulation Results and Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinghe; Song, Linping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous multiple frequency contrast source inversion (CSI) method is applied to reconstructing hydrocarbon reservoir targets in a complex multilayered medium in two dimensions. It simulates the effects of a salt dome sedimentary formation in the context of reservoir monitoring. In this method, the stabilized biconjugate-gradient fast Fourier transform (BCGS-FFT) algorithm is applied as a fast solver for the 2D volume integral equation for the forward computation. The inversion technique with CSI combines the efficient FFT algorithm to speed up the matrix-vector multiplication and the stable convergence of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI in the iteration process. As a result, this method is capable of making quantitative conductivity image reconstruction effectively for large-scale electromagnetic oil exploration problems, including the vertical electromagnetic profiling (VEP) survey investigated here. A number of numerical examples have been demonstrated to validate the effectiveness and capacity of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI method for a limited array view in VEP.

  16. Fast Dynamic Meshing Method Based on Delaunay Graph and Inverse Distance Weighting Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yibin; Qin, Ning; Zhao, Ning

    2016-06-01

    A novel mesh deformation technique is developed based on the Delaunay graph mapping method and the inverse distance weighting (IDW) interpolation. The algorithm maintains the advantages of the efficiency of Delaunay-graph-mapping mesh deformation while possess the ability for better controlling the near surface mesh quality. The Delaunay graph is used to divide the mesh domain into a number of sub-domains. On each of the sub-domains, the inverse distance weighting interpolation is applied to build a much smaller sized translation matrix between the original mesh and the deformed mesh, resulting a similar efficiency for the mesh deformation as compared to the fast Delaunay graph mapping method. The paper will show how the near-wall mesh quality is controlled and improved by the new method while the computational time is compared with the original Delaunay graph mapping method.

  17. FOREWORD: 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2013-10-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2013 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2013.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 22 May 2013, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/), and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2012.html). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational

  18. FOREWORD: 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, (NCMIP 2012). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 15 May 2012, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The first edition of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finance. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, kernel methods, learning methods, convex optimization, free discontinuity problems, metamodels, proper orthogonal decomposition

  19. X-ray morphologies of Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. L. W.; Kowalski, M. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented for X-ray measurements made with the Einstein Observatory's IPC for a sample of 49 Abell clusters, which were used to determine quantitative measures of two morphological parameters of these clusters, the orientation and ellipticity. Consideration is given to the techniques used for estimating and removing background noise in the images and for determining the variation of these parameters with the flux level of a cluster. It was found that most clusters are clearly flattened; for 20 of these clusters, the orientation was unambiguously determined. A catalog of cluster properties is presented.

  20. A Stochastic Inversion Method for Potential Field Data: Ant Colony Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Hu, Xiangyun; Liu, Tianyou

    2014-07-01

    Simulating natural ants' foraging behavior, the ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm performs excellently in combinational optimization problems, for example the traveling salesman problem and the quadratic assignment problem. However, the ACO is seldom used to inverted for gravitational and magnetic data. On the basis of the continuous and multi-dimensional objective function for potential field data optimization inversion, we present the node partition strategy ACO (NP-ACO) algorithm for inversion of model variables of fixed shape and recovery of physical property distributions of complicated shape models. We divide the continuous variables into discrete nodes and ants directionally tour the nodes by use of transition probabilities. We update the pheromone trails by use of Gaussian mapping between the objective function value and the quantity of pheromone. It can analyze the search results in real time and promote the rate of convergence and precision of inversion. Traditional mapping, including the ant-cycle system, weaken the differences between ant individuals and lead to premature convergence. We tested our method by use of synthetic data and real data from scenarios involving gravity and magnetic anomalies. The inverted model variables and recovered physical property distributions were in good agreement with the true values. The ACO algorithm for binary representation imaging and full imaging can recover sharper physical property distributions than traditional linear inversion methods. The ACO has good optimization capability and some excellent characteristics, for example robustness, parallel implementation, and portability, compared with other stochastic metaheuristics.

  1. Parallelized Three-Dimensional Resistivity Inversion Using Finite Elements And Adjoint State Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, Ralf; Gross, Lutz; Du Plessis, Jaco

    2015-04-01

    The resistivity method is one of the oldest geophysical exploration methods, which employs one pair of electrodes to inject current into the ground and one or more pairs of electrodes to measure the electrical potential difference. The potential difference is a non-linear function of the subsurface resistivity distribution described by an elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) of the Poisson type. Inversion of measured potentials solves for the subsurface resistivity represented by PDE coefficients. With increasing advances in multichannel resistivity acquisition systems (systems with more than 60 channels and full waveform recording are now emerging), inversion software require efficient storage and solver algorithms. We developed the finite element solver Escript, which provides a user-friendly programming environment in Python to solve large-scale PDE-based problems (see https://launchpad.net/escript-finley). Using finite elements, highly irregular shaped geology and topography can readily be taken into account. For the 3D resistivity problem, we have implemented the secondary potential approach, where the PDE is decomposed into a primary potential caused by the source current and the secondary potential caused by changes in subsurface resistivity. The primary potential is calculated analytically, and the boundary value problem for the secondary potential is solved using nodal finite elements. This approach removes the singularity caused by the source currents and provides more accurate 3D resistivity models. To solve the inversion problem we apply a 'first optimize then discretize' approach using the quasi-Newton scheme in form of the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method (see Gross & Kemp 2013). The evaluation of the cost function requires the solution of the secondary potential PDE for each source current and the solution of the corresponding adjoint-state PDE for the cost function gradients with respect to the subsurface

  2. Estimation of biological parameters of marine organisms using linear and nonlinear acoustic scattering model-based inversion methods.

    PubMed

    Chu, Dezhang; Lawson, Gareth L; Wiebe, Peter H

    2016-05-01

    The linear inversion commonly used in fisheries and zooplankton acoustics assumes a constant inversion kernel and ignores the uncertainties associated with the shape and behavior of the scattering targets, as well as other relevant animal parameters. Here, errors of the linear inversion due to uncertainty associated with the inversion kernel are quantified. A scattering model-based nonlinear inversion method is presented that takes into account the nonlinearity of the inverse problem and is able to estimate simultaneously animal abundance and the parameters associated with the scattering model inherent to the kernel. It uses sophisticated scattering models to estimate first, the abundance, and second, the relevant shape and behavioral parameters of the target organisms. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the abundance, size, and behavior (tilt angle) parameters of marine animals (fish or zooplankton) can be accurately inferred from the inversion by using multi-frequency acoustic data. The influence of the singularity and uncertainty in the inversion kernel on the inversion results can be mitigated by examining the singular values for linear inverse problems and employing a non-linear inversion involving a scattering model-based kernel. PMID:27250181

  3. Mapping the intracluster medium of Abell 3627

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, Julie; Koribalski, Baerbel; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Wong, O. Ivy; Serra, Paolo; Schnitzeler, Dominic; Dehghan, Siamak

    2013-10-01

    Galaxy clusters are among the largest structures in the Universe. They provide a high density environment where galaxies undergo high-speed collisions, ram pressure stripping, and tidal interactions. The resulting debris can sometimes be detected in the form of neutral or ionised intergalactic filaments. Abell 3627 lies at a distance of ~66kpc right in the heart of the Great Attractor and is one of the most massive clusters known. We propose to map an area of 1 sq. deg. around Abell 3627 at 1 - 3 GHz to study the polarised emission in and between cluster members and search for HI absorption of neutral intracluster gas. We will be able to: (1) test cluster magnetic field turbulence on very small scales; (2) examine rotation measure (RM) spectra to understand the effect of radio sources in cluster environments; (3) detect the intracluster medium (ICM) magnetic field; (4) determine the magnetic field strength of the cluster and place upper limits on the age; and (5) constrain the HI column density in the ICM. All of these goals together will provide information to understand how the large-scale structure of the Universe evolves.

  4. A fast inverse consistent deformable image registration method based on symmetric optical flow computation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Low, Daniel A; Deasy, Joseph O; Naqa, Issam El

    2014-01-01

    Deformable image registration is widely used in various radiation therapy applications including daily treatment planning adaptation to map planned tissue or dose to changing anatomy. In this work, a simple and efficient inverse consistency deformable registration method is proposed with aims of higher registration accuracy and faster convergence speed. Instead of registering image I to a second image J, the two images are symmetrically deformed toward one another in multiple passes, until both deformed images are matched and correct registration is therefore achieved. In each pass, a delta motion field is computed by minimizing a symmetric optical flow system cost function using modified optical flow algorithms. The images are then further deformed with the delta motion field in the positive and negative directions respectively, and then used for the next pass. The magnitude of the delta motion field is forced to be less than 0.4 voxel for every pass in order to guarantee smoothness and invertibility for the two overall motion fields that are accumulating the delta motion fields in both positive and negative directions, respectively. The final motion fields to register the original images I and J, in either direction, are calculated by inverting one overall motion field and combining the inversion result with the other overall motion field. The final motion fields are inversely consistent and this is ensured by the symmetric way that registration is carried out. The proposed method is demonstrated with phantom images, artificially deformed patient images and 4D-CT images. Our results suggest that the proposed method is able to improve the overall accuracy (reducing registration error by 30% or more, compared to the original and inversely inconsistent optical flow algorithms), reduce the inverse consistency error (by 95% or more) and increase the convergence rate (by 100% or more). The overall computation speed may slightly decrease, or increase in most cases

  5. Inverse airfoil design procedure using a multigrid Navier-Stokes method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, J. B.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Modified Garabedian McFadden (MGM) design procedure was incorporated into an existing 2-D multigrid Navier-Stokes airfoil analysis method. The resulting design method is an iterative procedure based on a residual correction algorithm and permits the automated design of airfoil sections with prescribed surface pressure distributions. The new design method, Multigrid Modified Garabedian McFadden (MG-MGM), is demonstrated for several different transonic pressure distributions obtained from both symmetric and cambered airfoil shapes. The airfoil profiles generated with the MG-MGM code are compared to the original configurations to assess the capabilities of the inverse design method.

  6. Inversion methods for fast-ion velocity-space tomography in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, A. S.; Stagner, L.; Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Thomsen, H.; Weiland, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-04-01

    Velocity-space tomography has been used to infer 2D fast-ion velocity distribution functions. Here we compare the performance of five different tomographic inversion methods: truncated singular value decomposition, maximum entropy, minimum Fisher information and zeroth- and first-order Tikhonov regularization. The inversion methods are applied to fast-ion {{\\text{D}}α} measurements taken just before and just after a sawtooth crash in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak as well as to synthetic measurements from different test distributions. We find that the methods regularizing by penalizing steep gradients or maximizing entropy perform best. We assess the uncertainty of the calculated inversions taking into account photon noise, uncertainties in the forward model as well as uncertainties introduced by the regularization which allows us to distinguish regions of high and low confidence in the tomographies. In high confidence regions, all methods agree that ions with pitch values close to zero, as well as ions with large pitch values, are ejected from the plasma center by the sawtooth crash, and that this ejection depletes the ion population with large pitch values more strongly.

  7. Inverse scattering solutions by a sinc basis, multiple source, moment method--Part I: Theory.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S A; Tracy, M L

    1983-10-01

    A new method for solving the inverse scattering problem for the scalar, inhomogeneous, exact, Helmholtz wave equation is presented. No perturbation approximations are used and the method is applicable even for many cases where weak to moderate attenuation and moderate to strong refraction of incident fields occur. The ill-posed nature of the inverse scattering problem for a single monochromatic source is known. However, the use of multiple sources, the collection of redundant (i.e., overdetermined) data, and the constraining of the fields and complex refractive index to be spatially band limited constitutes a new problem. The cases we have tested by computer simulation indicate that the new problem is well posed, a unique solution, and is stable with noisy data. The method is an application of the well-known method of moments with sinc basis and delta testing functions to discretize the problem. The inverse scattering solution may be obtained by solving the resulting set of simultaneous, quadratic, multivariate equations. Several algorithms for solving these equations are given. PMID:6686901

  8. Multiply scattered aerosol lidar returns: inversion method and comparison with in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, L R; Hutt, D L

    1995-10-20

    A novel aerosol lidar inversion method based on the use of multiple-scattering contributions measured by a multiple-field-of-view receiver is proposed. The method requires assumptions that restrict applications to aerosol particles large enough to give rise to measurable multiple scattering and depends on parameters that must be specified empirically but that have an uncertainty range of much less than the boundary value and the backscatter-to-extinction ratio of the conventional single-scattering inversion methods. The proposed method is applied to cloud measurements. The solutions obtained are the profiles of the scattering coefficient and the effective diameter of the cloud droplets. With mild assumptions on the form of the function, the full-size distribution is estimated at each range position from which the extinction coefficient at any visible and infrared wavelength and the liquid water content can be determined. Typical results on slant-path-integrated optical depth, vertical extinction profiles, and fluctuation statistics are compared with in situ data obtained in two field experiments. The inversion works well in all cases reported here, i.e., for water clouds at optical depths between ~0.1 and ~4. PMID:21060558

  9. Performance evaluation of the inverse dynamics method for optimal spacecraft reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Jacopo; Romano, Marcello; Walter, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the application of the inverse dynamics in the virtual domain method to Euler angles, quaternions, and modified Rodrigues parameters for rapid optimal attitude trajectory generation for spacecraft reorientation maneuvers. The impact of the virtual domain and attitude representation is numerically investigated for both minimum time and minimum energy problems. Owing to the nature of the inverse dynamics method, it yields sub-optimal solutions for minimum time problems. Furthermore, the virtual domain improves the optimality of the solution, but at the cost of more computational time. The attitude representation also affects solution quality and computational speed. For minimum energy problems, the optimal solution can be obtained without the virtual domain with any considered attitude representation.

  10. Structural Anomaly Detection Using Fiber Optic Sensors and Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alex; Moore, Jason P.; Cooper, Eric G.; Spangler, Jan. L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating a variety of techniques for mitigating aircraft accidents due to structural component failure. One technique under consideration combines distributed fiber optic strain sensing with an inverse finite element method for detecting and characterizing structural anomalies anomalies that may provide early indication of airframe structure degradation. The technique identifies structural anomalies that result in observable changes in localized strain but do not impact the overall surface shape. Surface shape information is provided by an Inverse Finite Element Method that computes full-field displacements and internal loads using strain data from in-situ fiberoptic sensors. This paper describes a prototype of such a system and reports results from a series of laboratory tests conducted on a test coupon subjected to increasing levels of damage.

  11. A fully three-dimensional inverse method for turbomachinery blading in transonic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, T.Q. )

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents a procedure to extend a recently developed fully three-dimensional inverse method for highly loaded turbomachine blades into the transonic-flow regime. In this inverse method, the required three-dimensional blade profile to produce a prescribed swirl schedule is determined iteratively using the blade boundary conditions. In the present implementation, the flow is assumed to be inviscid and the blades are assumed to be infinitely thin. The relevant equations are solved in the conservative forms and are discretized in all three directions using a finite-volume technique. Calculations are carried out for the design of high-pressure axial- and centrifugal-compressor rotors. These examples include prescribed swirl schedules corresponding to blade designs that are shock-free and blade designs that have rapid compression regions in the blade passage.

  12. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  13. A comparison of global optimisation methods for near-offset VSP inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Steve; MacBeth, Colin

    1998-07-01

    Three global optimisation algorithms are applied to the problem of geophysical inversion. We describe and test the methods of Tabu Search, Genetic Algorithms and Simulated Annealing. These techniques are used to invert observations of shear-wave splitting from near-offset Vertical Seismic Profiles. Each search shows distinct advantages and disadvantages so that no particular algorithm can be clearly recommended. Nonetheless, we can recommend that a global optimisation be followed by a local search.

  14. Spectroscopic Studies of Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Michael Joseph

    The objectives of this work are to use spectroscopic techniques to accurately categorize galaxies as either HII region star forming galaxies or as Active Galactic Nuclei powered via a black hole, and to use radial velocities and projected positions of galaxies in clusters to obtain the total cluster mass and its distribution. The masses and distributions compare well to X-ray mass measurements. The commonly used Dressler, A., Thompson, I. & Shectman, S. 1985, ApJ, 288, 481 technique for discriminating between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies uses the measurement of the equivalent width of the emission lines (OII) 3727 A, H/beta, and (OIII) 5007 A. High quality spectra from 42 galaxies were taken and it is shown that their method is not capable of distinguishing between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. The emission line flux from H/beta, (OIII) 5007 A, (OI) 6300 A, Hα, (NII) 6583 A, and (SII) 6716+6731 A in combination with the method of Veilleux, S. & Osterbrock, D. E. 1987, ApJS, 63, 295 must be used to accurately distinguish between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. Galaxy radial velocities from spectroscopic data and their projected 2-D positions in clusters are used to obtain robust estimates of the total mass and mass distribution in two clusters. The total mass is calculated using the Virial theorem after removing substructure. The mass distribution is estimated via several robust statistical tests for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structure. It is shown that the derived mass estimates agree well with those found independently from hot X-ray gas emission in clusters.

  15. Are Abell Clusters Correlated with Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Laros, J.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A recent study has presented marginal statistical evidence that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources are correlated with Abell clusters, based on analyses of bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog. Using precise localization information from the Third Interplanetary Network, we have reanalyzed this possible correlation. We find that most of the Abell clusters that are in the relatively large 3B error circles are not in the much smaller IPN/BATSE error regions. We believe that this argues strongly against an Abell cluster-GRB correlation.

  16. Interpretation of Trace Gas Data Using Inverse Methods and Global Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    1997-01-01

    This is a theoretical research project aimed at: (1) development, testing, and refining of inverse methods for determining regional and global transient source and sink strengths for long lived gases important in ozone depletion and climate forcing, (2) utilization of inverse methods to determine these source/sink strengths which use the NCAR/Boulder CCM2-T42 3-D model and a global 3-D Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH) which is based on analyzed observed wind fields (developed in collaboration by MIT and NCAR/Boulder), (3) determination of global (and perhaps regional) average hydroxyl radical concentrations using inverse methods with multiple titrating gases, and, (4) computation of the lifetimes and spatially resolved destruction rates of trace gases using 3-D models. Important goals include determination of regional source strengths of methane, nitrous oxide, and other climatically and chemically important biogenic trace gases and also of halocarbons restricted by the Montreal Protocol and its follow-on agreements and hydrohalocarbons used as alternatives to the restricted halocarbons.

  17. An efficient Bayesian inference approach to inverse problems based on an adaptive sparse grid collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiang; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    A new approach to modeling inverse problems using a Bayesian inference method is introduced. The Bayesian approach considers the unknown parameters as random variables and seeks the probabilistic distribution of the unknowns. By introducing the concept of the stochastic prior state space to the Bayesian formulation, we reformulate the deterministic forward problem as a stochastic one. The adaptive hierarchical sparse grid collocation (ASGC) method is used for constructing an interpolant to the solution of the forward model in this prior space which is large enough to capture all the variability/uncertainty in the posterior distribution of the unknown parameters. This solution can be considered as a function of the random unknowns and serves as a stochastic surrogate model for the likelihood calculation. Hierarchical Bayesian formulation is used to derive the posterior probability density function (PPDF). The spatial model is represented as a convolution of a smooth kernel and a Markov random field. The state space of the PPDF is explored using Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms to obtain statistics of the unknowns. The likelihood calculation is performed by directly sampling the approximate stochastic solution obtained through the ASGC method. The technique is assessed on two nonlinear inverse problems: source inversion and permeability estimation in flow through porous media.

  18. Studies of Trace Gas Chemical Cycles Using Inverse Methods and Global Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    2003-01-01

    We report progress in the first year, and summarize proposed work for the second year of the three-year dynamical-chemical modeling project devoted to: (a) development, testing, and refining of inverse methods for determining regional and global transient source and sink strengths for long lived gases important in ozone depletion and climate forcing, (b) utilization of inverse methods to determine these source/sink strengths using either MATCH (Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry) which is based on analyzed observed wind fields or back-trajectories computed from these wind fields, (c) determination of global (and perhaps regional) average hydroxyl radical concentrations using inverse methods with multiple titrating gases, and (d) computation of the lifetimes and spatially resolved destruction rates of trace gases using 3D models. Important goals include determination of regional source strengths of methane, nitrous oxide, methyl bromide, and other climatically and chemically important biogenic/anthropogenic trace gases and also of halocarbons restricted by the Montreal protocol and its follow-on agreements and hydrohalocarbons now used as alternatives to the restricted halocarbons.

  19. Design of Aspirated Compressor Blades Using Three-dimensional Inverse Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dang, T. Q.; Rooij, M. Van; Larosiliere, L. M.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional viscous inverse method is extended to allow blading design with full interaction between the prescribed pressure-loading distribution and a specified transpiration scheme. Transpiration on blade surfaces and endwalls is implemented as inflow/outflow boundary conditions, and the basic modifications to the method are outlined. This paper focuses on a discussion concerning an application of the method to the design and analysis of a supersonic rotor with aspiration. Results show that an optimum combination of pressure-loading tailoring with surface aspiration can lead to a minimization of the amount of sucked flow required for a net performance improvement at design and off-design operations.

  20. A modification of the factorization method for the classical acoustic inverse scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, Andreas; Liu, Xiaodong

    2014-03-01

    It is well-known that sampling type methods for solving inverse scattering problems fail if the wave number is an eigenvalue of a corresponding interior eigenvalue problem. By adding the far field patterns corresponding to an artificial ball lying within the obstacle and imposing an impedance boundary condition on the boundary of this ball we propose a modification of the factorization method which provides the characterization of the unknown obstacle for all wave numbers. Some numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our method.

  1. 3D CSEM data inversion using Newton and Halley class methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, M.; Hansen, K. R.; Morten, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    For the first time in 3D controlled source electromagnetic data inversion, we explore the use of the Newton and the Halley optimization methods, which may show their potential when the cost function has a complex topology. The inversion is formulated as a constrained nonlinear least-squares problem which is solved by iterative optimization. These methods require the derivatives up to second order of the residuals with respect to model parameters. We show how Green's functions determine the high-order derivatives, and develop a diagrammatical representation of the residual derivatives. The Green's functions are efficiently calculated on-the-fly, making use of a finite-difference frequency-domain forward modelling code based on a multi-frontal sparse direct solver. This allow us to build the second-order derivatives of the residuals keeping the memory cost in the same order as in a Gauss-Newton (GN) scheme. Model updates are computed with a trust-region based conjugate-gradient solver which does not require the computation of a stabilizer. We present inversion results for a synthetic survey and compare the GN, Newton, and super-Halley optimization schemes, and consider two different approaches to set the initial trust-region radius. Our analysis shows that the Newton and super-Halley schemes, using the same regularization configuration, add significant information to the inversion so that the convergence is reached by different paths. In our simple resistivity model examples, the convergence speed of the Newton and the super-Halley schemes are either similar or slightly superior with respect to the convergence speed of the GN scheme, close to the minimum of the cost function. Due to the current noise levels and other measurement inaccuracies in geophysical investigations, this advantageous behaviour is at present of low consequence, but may, with the further improvement of geophysical data acquisition, be an argument for more accurate higher-order methods like those

  2. Characterization of uncertainties in atmospheric trace gas inversions using hierarchical Bayesian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, A. L.; Rigby, M.; Zammit-Mangion, A.; Manning, A. J.; Prinn, R. G.; Fraser, P. J.; Harth, C. M.; Kim, K.-R.; Krummel, P. B.; Li, S.; Mühle, J.; O'Doherty, S. J.; Park, S.; Salameh, P. K.; Steele, L. P.; Weiss, R. F.

    2014-04-01

    We present a hierarchical Bayesian method for atmospheric trace gas inversions. This method is used to estimate emissions of trace gases as well as "hyper-parameters" that characterize the probability density functions (PDFs) of the a priori emissions and model-measurement covariances. By exploring the space of "uncertainties in uncertainties", we show that the hierarchical method results in a more complete estimation of emissions and their uncertainties than traditional Bayesian inversions, which rely heavily on expert judgment. We present an analysis that shows the effect of including hyper-parameters, which are themselves informed by the data, and show that this method can serve to reduce the effect of errors in assumptions made about the a priori emissions and model-measurement uncertainties. We then apply this method to the estimation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) emissions over 2012 for the regions surrounding four Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) stations. We find that improper accounting of model representation uncertainties, in particular, can lead to the derivation of emissions and associated uncertainties that are unrealistic and show that those derived using the hierarchical method are likely to be more representative of the true uncertainties in the system. We demonstrate through this SF6 case study that this method is less sensitive to outliers in the data and to subjective assumptions about a priori emissions and model-measurement uncertainties than traditional methods.

  3. Characterization of uncertainties in atmospheric trace gas inversions using hierarchical Bayesian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, A. L.; Rigby, M.; Zammit-Mangion, A.; Manning, A. J.; Prinn, R. G.; Fraser, P. J.; Harth, C. M.; Kim, K.-R.; Krummel, P. B.; Li, S.; Mühle, J.; O'Doherty, S. J.; Park, S.; Salameh, P. K.; Steele, L. P.; Weiss, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    We present a hierarchical Bayesian method for atmospheric trace gas inversions. This method is used to estimate emissions of trace gases as well as "hyper-parameters" that characterize the probability density functions (PDF) of the a priori emissions and model-measurement covariances. By exploring the space of "uncertainties in uncertainties", we show that the hierarchical method results in a more complete estimation of emissions and their uncertainties than traditional Bayesian inversions, which rely heavily on expert judgement. We present an analysis that shows the effect of including hyper-parameters, which are themselves informed by the data, and show that this method can serve to reduce the effect of errors in assumptions made about the a priori emissions and model-measurement uncertainties. We then apply this method to the estimation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) emissions over 2012 for the regions surrounding four Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) stations. We find that improper accounting of model representation uncertainties, in particular, can lead to the derivation of emissions and associated uncertainties that are unrealistic and show that those derived using the hierarchical method are likely to be more representative of the true uncertainties in the system. We demonstrate through this SF6 case study that this method is less sensitive to outliers in the data and to subjective assumptions about a priori emissions and model-measurement uncertainties, than traditional methods.

  4. Depth-weighted Inverse and Imaging methods to study the Earth's Crust in Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, M.

    2012-04-01

    Inversion means solving a set of geophysical equations for a spatial distribution of parameters (or functions) which could have produced an observed set of measurements. Imaging is instead a transformation of magnetometric data into a scaled 3D model resembling the true geometry of subsurface geologic features. While inversion theory allows many additional constraints, such as depth weighting, positivity, physical property bounds, smoothness, focusing, imaging methods of magnetic data derived under different theories are all found to reduce to either simple upward continuation or a depth-weighted upward continuation, with weights expressed in the general form of a power law of the altitude, with the half of the structural index as exponent. Note however that specifying the appropriate level of depth weighting is not just a problem in these imaging techniques but should also be considered in standard inversion methods. We will also investigate the relationship between imaging methods and multiscale methods. A multiscale analysis is well suitable to study potential fields because the way potential fields convey source information is strictly related to the scale of analysis. The stability of multiscale methods results from mixing, in a single operator, the wavenumber low-pass behaviour of the upward continuation transformation of the field with the enhancement high-pass properties of n-order derivative transformations. So, the complex reciprocal interference of several field components may be efficiently faced at several scales of the analysis and the depth to the sources may be estimated together with the homogeneity degrees of the field. We will describe the main aspects of both the kinds of interpretation under the study of multi-source models and apply either inversion or imaging techniques to the magnetic data of complex crustal areas of Southern Italy, such as the Campanian volcanic district and the Southern Apennines. The studied area includes a Pleistocene

  5. Dynamic Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Frame Structures Using the Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A robust and efficient computational method for reconstructing the three-dimensional displacement field of truss, beam, and frame structures, using measured surface-strain data, is presented. Known as shape sensing , this inverse problem has important implications for real-time actuation and control of smart structures, and for monitoring of structural integrity. The present formulation, based on the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM), uses a least-squares variational principle involving strain measures of Timoshenko theory for stretching, torsion, bending, and transverse shear. Two inverse-frame finite elements are derived using interdependent interpolations whose interior degrees-of-freedom are condensed out at the element level. In addition, relationships between the order of kinematic-element interpolations and the number of required strain gauges are established. As an example problem, a thin-walled, circular cross-section cantilevered beam subjected to harmonic excitations in the presence of structural damping is modeled using iFEM; where, to simulate strain-gauge values and to provide reference displacements, a high-fidelity MSC/NASTRAN shell finite element model is used. Examples of low and high-frequency dynamic motion are analyzed and the solution accuracy examined with respect to various levels of discretization and the number of strain gauges.

  6. A multi-point inverse airfoil design method based on conformal mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, Michael S.; Maughmer, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    An exact method of multipoint inverse airfoil design for incompressible flow is presented. Multipoint design is handled by dividing the airfoil into a number of desired segments. For each segment the velocity distribution is prescribed together with an angle of attack at which the prescribed velocity distribution is to be achieved. In this manner, multipoint design objectives can be taken into account in the initial specification of the velocity distribution. In order for the multipoint inverse airfoil design problem to be well posed, three integral constraints and several conditions arise which must be satisfied. Further restrictions are imposed if the airfoil is to have a specified pitching moment, thickness ratio, or other constraints. The system of equations is solved partly as a linear system and partly through multidimensional Newton iteration. Since the velocity distribution is prescribed about the circle in the angular coordinate, specification of the velocity in terms of arc length is handled through the multidimensional Newton iteration as well. The current formulation sets the stage for a more general multipoint inverse airfoil design method in which it will be possible to specify the velocity distribution, some boundary-layer development, or the surface geometry along a segment.

  7. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Sampling Methods for 1D Seismic and EM Data Inversion

    2008-09-22

    This software provides several Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods for the Bayesian model developed for inverting 1D marine seismic and controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. The current software can be used for individual inversion of seismic AVO and CSEM data and for joint inversion of both seismic and EM data sets. The structure of the software is very general and flexible, and it allows users to incorporate their own forward simulation codes and rockmore » physics model codes easily into this software. Although the softwae was developed using C and C++ computer languages, the user-supplied codes can be written in C, C++, or various versions of Fortran languages. The software provides clear interfaces for users to plug in their own codes. The output of this software is in the format that the R free software CODA can directly read to build MCMC objects.« less

  8. Localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using ray based matched field inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongho; Seong, Woojae; Choo, Youngmin; Lee, Jeunghoon

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation of marine propeller is one of the main contributing factors of broadband radiated ship noise. In this research, an algorithm for the source localization of incipient vortex cavitation is suggested. Incipient cavitation is modeled as monopole type source and matched-field inversion method is applied to find the source position by comparing the spatial correlation between measured and replicated pressure fields at the receiver array. The accuracy of source localization is improved by broadband matched-field inversion technique that enhances correlation by incoherently averaging correlations of individual frequencies. Suggested localization algorithm is verified through known virtual source and model test conducted in Samsung ship model basin cavitation tunnel. It is found that suggested localization algorithm enables efficient localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using a few pressure data measured on the outer hull above the propeller and practically applicable to the typically performed model scale experiment in a cavitation tunnel at the early design stage.

  9. Slip distribution of the 2010 Mentawai earthquake from GPS observation using least squares inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaluddin, Moehammad; Yuwono, Bambang Darmo; Puspita, Yolanda Adya

    2016-05-01

    Continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) observations showed significant crustal displacements as a result of the 2010 Mentawai earthquake. The Least Square Inversion method of Mentawai earthquake slip distribution from SuGAR observations yielded in an optimum value of slip distribution by giving a weight of smoothing constraint and a weight of slip value constraint = 0 at the edge of the earthquake rupture area. A maximum coseismic slip of the inversion calculation was 1.997 m and concentrated around stations PRKB (Pagai Island). In addition, the values of dip-slip direction tend to be more dominant. The seismic moment calculated from the slip distribution was 6.89 × 10E+20 Nm, which is equivalent to a magnitude of 7.8.

  10. Using informative priors in facies inversion: The case of C-ISR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valakas, G.; Modis, K.

    2016-08-01

    Inverse problems involving the characterization of hydraulic properties of groundwater flow systems by conditioning on observations of the state variables are mathematically ill-posed because they have multiple solutions and are sensitive to small changes in the data. In the framework of McMC methods for nonlinear optimization and under an iterative spatial resampling transition kernel, we present an algorithm for narrowing the prior and thus producing improved proposal realizations. To achieve this goal, we cosimulate the facies distribution conditionally to facies observations and normal scores transformed hydrologic response measurements, assuming a linear coregionalization model. The approach works by creating an importance sampling effect that steers the process to selected areas of the prior. The effectiveness of our approach is demonstrated by an example application on a synthetic underdetermined inverse problem in aquifer characterization.

  11. Toward Optimal and Scalable Dimension Reduction Methods for large-scale Bayesian Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Many inverse problems in geophysics are solved within the Bayesian framework, in which a prior probability density function of a quantity of interest is optimally updated using newly available observations. A maximum likelihood of the posterior probability density function is estimated using a model of the physics that relates the variables to be optimized to the observations. However, in many practical situations the number of observations is much smaller than the number of variables estimated, which leads to an ill-posed problem. In practice, this means that the data are informative only in a subspace of the initial space. It is both of theoretical and practical interest to characterize this "data-informed" subspace, since it allows a simple interpretation of the inverse solution and its uncertainty, but can also dramatically reduce the computational cost of the optimization by reducing the size of the problem. In this presentation the formalism of dimension reduction in Bayesian methods will be introduced, and different optimality criteria will be discussed (e.g., minimum error variances, maximum degree of freedom for signal). For each criterion, an optimal design for the reduced Bayesian problem will be proposed and compared with other suboptimal approaches. A significant advantage of our method is its high scalability owing to an efficient parallel implementation, making it very attractive for large-scale inverse problems. Numerical results from an Observation Simulation System Experiment (OSSE) consisting of a high spatial resolution (0.5°x0.7°) source inversion of methane over North America using observations from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) instrument and the GEOS-Chem chemistry-transport model will illustrate the computational efficiency of our approach. Although only linear models are considered in this study, possible extensions to the non-linear case will also be discussed

  12. Full Waveform Inversion Methods for Source and Media Characterization before and after SPE5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips-Alonge, K. E.; Knox, H. A.; Ober, C.; Abbott, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) was designed to advance our understanding of explosion-source phenomenology and subsequent wave propagation through the development of innovative physics-based models. Ultimately, these models will be used for characterizing explosions, which can occur with a variety of yields, depths of burial, and in complex media. To accomplish this, controlled chemical explosions were conducted in a granite outcrop at the Nevada Nuclear Security Test Site. These explosions were monitored with extensive seismic and infrasound instrumentation both in the near and far-field. Utilizing this data, we calculate predictions before the explosions occur and iteratively improve our models after each explosion. Specifically, we use an adjoint-based full waveform inversion code that employs discontinuous Galerkin techniques to predict waveforms at station locations prior to the fifth explosion in the series (SPE5). The full-waveform inversions are performed using a realistic geophysical model based on local 3D tomography and inversions for media properties using previous shot data. The code has capabilities such as unstructured meshes that align with material interfaces, local polynomial refinement, and support for various physics and methods for implicit and explicit time-integration. The inversion results we show here evaluate these different techniques, which allows for model fidelity assessment (acoustic versus elastic versus anelastic, etc.). In addition, the accuracy and efficiency of several time-integration methods can be determined. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multiresolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a sparse reconstruction scheme that can also be used to ensure non-negativity when fitting wavelet-based random field models to limited observations in non-rectangular geometries. The method is relevant when multiresolution fields are estimated using linear inverse problems. Examples include the estimation of emission fields for many anthropogenic pollutants using atmospheric inversion or hydraulic conductivity in aquifers from flow measurements. The scheme is based on three new developments. Firstly, we extend an existing sparse reconstruction method, Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP), to incorporate prior information on the target field. Secondly, we develop an iterative method that uses StOMP tomore » impose non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, we devise a method, based on compressive sensing, to limit the estimated field within an irregularly shaped domain. We demonstrate the method on the estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the US. The application uses a recently developed multiresolution random field model and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces the overall computational cost by a factor of two. Further, the sparse reconstruction scheme imposes non-negativity without introducing strong nonlinearities, such as those introduced by employing log-transformed fields, and thus reaps the benefits of simplicity and computational speed that are characteristic of linear inverse problems.« less

  14. Simple method for inference in inverse Ising problem using full data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiwata, Hirohito

    2015-10-01

    We consider inference in the inverse Ising problem using full data, which means incorporating sets of spin configurations. We approximate the Boltzmann distribution of the system to generate a frequency distribution derived from the given data. Then, the ratio between two Boltzmann distributions with different spin configurations eliminates the partition function and we obtain linear equations which can be solved to yield statistical parameters. Our method is applicable to cases where the absolute values of the coupling parameters and external fields are large. Compared to pseudolikelihood maximization, the accuracy of the inference obtained from our method is similar, although our approach is less labor intensive.

  15. A comparison of three gravity inversion methods for crustal thickness modelling in Tibet plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherbandi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Crustal thickness can be determined by gravimetric methods based on different assumptions, e.g. by isostatic hypotheses. Here we compare three gravimetric inversion methods to estimate the Moho depth. Two Moho models based on the Vening Meinesz-Moritz hypothesis and one by using Parker-Oldenburg's algorithm, which are investigated in Tibet plateau. The results are compared with CRUST2.0, and it will be presented that the estimated Moho depths from the Vening Meinesz-Moritz model will be better than the Parker-Oldenburg's algorithm.

  16. A regularizing iterative ensemble Kalman method for PDE-constrained inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Marco A.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a derivative-free computational framework for approximating solutions to nonlinear PDE-constrained inverse problems. The general aim is to merge ideas from iterative regularization with ensemble Kalman methods from Bayesian inference to develop a derivative-free stable method easy to implement in applications where the PDE (forward) model is only accessible as a black box (e.g. with commercial software). The proposed regularizing ensemble Kalman method can be derived as an approximation of the regularizing Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) scheme (Hanke 1997 Inverse Problems 13 79-95) in which the derivative of the forward operator and its adjoint are replaced with empirical covariances from an ensemble of elements from the admissible space of solutions. The resulting ensemble method consists of an update formula that is applied to each ensemble member and that has a regularization parameter selected in a similar fashion to the one in the LM scheme. Moreover, an early termination of the scheme is proposed according to a discrepancy principle-type of criterion. The proposed method can be also viewed as a regularizing version of standard Kalman approaches which are often unstable unless ad hoc fixes, such as covariance localization, are implemented. The aim of this paper is to provide a detailed numerical investigation of the regularizing and convergence properties of the proposed regularizing ensemble Kalman scheme; the proof of these properties is an open problem. By means of numerical experiments, we investigate the conditions under which the proposed method inherits the regularizing properties of the LM scheme of (Hanke 1997 Inverse Problems 13 79-95) and is thus stable and suitable for its application in problems where the computation of the Fréchet derivative is not computationally feasible. More concretely, we study the effect of ensemble size, number of measurements, selection of initial ensemble and tunable parameters on the performance of the method

  17. Quantification of Substructure in Nearby Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriessler, J. R.; Beers, T. C.; Odewahn, S. C.

    1995-05-01

    Theory, as well as numerical simulations, suggests that Omega_o may be observationally constrained by the amount of substructure observed in present-day clusters of galaxies. We have therefore begun a study of the 116 Abell clusters with richness class greater than or equal to 1 and distance class less than or equal to 4, the so-called ``volume-limited'' sample of Hoessel, Gunn, & Thuan 1980 (ApJ 241, 486) to determine the prevalence of substructure in the clusters' projected galaxy positions. We use positions of galaxies identified by the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner to obtain contour plots of the available clusters using an adaptive kernel routine. Significance of substructure is evaluated using the 2-D Lee test as well as a likelihood-ratio test on fits made with mixtures of two-dimensional gaussians. We also present nonparametric density profile estimates obtained with the program MAPEL (Merritt and Tremblay 1994, AJ 108, 514).

  18. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21(sub -0.47 sup +0.43) on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36(sub -0.17 sup +0.46).

  19. Reconstruction of multiple gastric electrical wave fronts using potential-based inverse methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H. K.; Pullan, A. J.; Cheng, L. K.

    2012-08-01

    One approach for non-invasively characterizing gastric electrical activity, commonly used in the field of electrocardiography, involves solving an inverse problem whereby electrical potentials on the stomach surface are directly reconstructed from dense potential measurements on the skin surface. To investigate this problem, an anatomically realistic torso model and an electrical stomach model were used to simulate potentials on stomach and skin surfaces arising from normal gastric electrical activity. The effectiveness of the Greensite-Tikhonov or the Tikhonov inverse methods were compared under the presence of 10% Gaussian noise with either 84 or 204 body surface electrodes. The stability and accuracy of the Greensite-Tikhonov method were further investigated by introducing varying levels of Gaussian signal noise or by increasing or decreasing the size of the stomach by 10%. Results showed that the reconstructed solutions were able to represent the presence of propagating multiple wave fronts and the Greensite-Tikhonov method with 204 electrodes performed best (correlation coefficients of activation time: 90%; pacemaker localization error: 3 cm). The Greensite-Tikhonov method was stable with Gaussian noise levels up to 20% and 10% change in stomach size. The use of 204 rather than 84 body surface electrodes improved the performance; however, for all investigated cases, the Greensite-Tikhonov method outperformed the Tikhonov method.

  20. A Hybrid Optimization Method for Solving Bayesian Inverse Problems under Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Zengfei; Zhang, Liming; Yao, Jun; Yan, Xia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the application of a new method, the Finite Difference and Stochastic Gradient (Hybrid method), for history matching in reservoir models. History matching is one of the processes of solving an inverse problem by calibrating reservoir models to dynamic behaviour of the reservoir in which an objective function is formulated based on a Bayesian approach for optimization. The goal of history matching is to identify the minimum value of an objective function that expresses the misfit between the predicted and measured data of a reservoir. To address the optimization problem, we present a novel application using a combination of the stochastic gradient and finite difference methods for solving inverse problems. The optimization is constrained by a linear equation that contains the reservoir parameters. We reformulate the reservoir model’s parameters and dynamic data by operating the objective function, the approximate gradient of which can guarantee convergence. At each iteration step, we obtain the relatively ‘important’ elements of the gradient, which are subsequently substituted by the values from the Finite Difference method through comparing the magnitude of the components of the stochastic gradient, which forms a new gradient, and we subsequently iterate with the new gradient. Through the application of the Hybrid method, we efficiently and accurately optimize the objective function. We present a number numerical simulations in this paper that show that the method is accurate and computationally efficient. PMID:26252392

  1. Advancing Inverse Sensitivity/Uncertainty Methods for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, Goran; Williams, Mark L; Leal, Luiz C; Dunn, Michael E; Khuwaileh, Bassam A.; Wang, C; Abdel-Khalik, Hany

    2015-01-01

    The inverse sensitivity/uncertainty quantification (IS/UQ) method has recently been implemented in the Inverse Sensitivity/UnceRtainty Estimiator (INSURE) module of the AMPX system [1]. The IS/UQ method aims to quantify and prioritize the cross section measurements along with uncertainties needed to yield a given nuclear application(s) target response uncertainty, and doing this at a minimum cost. Since in some cases the extant uncertainties of the differential cross section data are already near the limits of the present-day state-of-the-art measurements, requiring significantly smaller uncertainties may be unrealistic. Therefore we have incorporated integral benchmark experiments (IBEs) data into the IS/UQ method using the generalized linear least-squares method, and have implemented it in the INSURE module. We show how the IS/UQ method could be applied to systematic and statistical uncertainties in a self-consistent way. We show how the IS/UQ method could be used to optimize uncertainties of IBEs and differential cross section data simultaneously.

  2. A hybrid differential evolution/Levenberg-Marquardt method for solving inverse transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bledsoe, Keith C; Favorite, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the Differential Evolution (DE) optimization method was applied to solve inverse transport problems in finite cylindrical geometries and was shown to be far superior to the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method at finding a global optimum for problems with several unknowns. However, while extremely adept at finding a global optimum solution, the DE method often requires a large number (hundreds or thousands) of transport calculations, making it much slower than the Levenberg-Marquardt method. In this paper, a hybridization of the Differential Evolution and Levenberg-Marquardt approaches is presented. This hybrid method takes advantage of the robust search capability of the Differential Evolution method and the speed of the Levenberg-Marquardt technique.

  3. Earthquake source tensor inversion with the gCAP method and 3D Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Zhu, L.; Ross, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We develop and apply a method to invert earthquake seismograms for source properties using a general tensor representation and 3D Green's functions. The method employs (i) a general representation of earthquake potency/moment tensors with double couple (DC), compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD), and isotropic (ISO) components, and (ii) a corresponding generalized CAP (gCap) scheme where the continuous wave trains are broken into Pnl and surface waves (Zhu & Ben-Zion, 2013). For comparison, we also use the waveform inversion method of Zheng & Chen (2012) and Ammon et al. (1998). Sets of 3D Green's functions are calculated on a grid of 1 km3 using the 3-D community velocity model CVM-4 (Kohler et al. 2003). A bootstrap technique is adopted to establish robustness of the inversion results using the gCap method (Ross & Ben-Zion, 2013). Synthetic tests with 1-D and 3-D waveform calculations show that the source tensor inversion procedure is reasonably reliable and robust. As initial application, the method is used to investigate source properties of the March 11, 2013, Mw=4.7 earthquake on the San Jacinto fault using recordings of ~45 stations up to ~0.2Hz. Both the best fitting and most probable solutions include ISO component of ~1% and CLVD component of ~0%. The obtained ISO component, while small, is found to be a non-negligible positive value that can have significant implications for the physics of the failure process. Work on using higher frequency data for this and other earthquakes is in progress.

  4. A New Self-Constrained Inversion Method of Potential Fields Based on Probability Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S.; Chen, C.; WANG, H.; Wang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The self-constrained inversion method of potential fields uses a priori information self-extracted from potential field data. Differing from external a priori information, the self-extracted information are generally parameters derived exclusively from the analysis of the gravity and magnetic data (Paoletti et al., 2013). Here we develop a new self-constrained inversion method based on probability tomography. Probability tomography doesn't need any priori information, as well as large inversion matrix operations. Moreover, its result can describe the sources, especially the distribution of which is complex and irregular, entirely and clearly. Therefore, we attempt to use the a priori information extracted from the probability tomography results to constrain the inversion for physical properties. The magnetic anomaly data was taken as an example in this work. The probability tomography result of magnetic total field anomaly(ΔΤ) shows a smoother distribution than the anomalous source and cannot display the source edges exactly. However, the gradients of ΔΤ are with higher resolution than ΔΤ in their own direction, and this characteristic is also presented in their probability tomography results. So we use some rules to combine the probability tomography results of ∂ΔΤ⁄∂x, ∂ΔΤ⁄∂y and ∂ΔΤ⁄∂z into a new result which is used for extracting a priori information, and then incorporate the information into the model objective function as spatial weighting functions to invert the final magnetic susceptibility. Some magnetic synthetic examples incorporated with and without a priori information extracted from the probability tomography results were made to do comparison, results of which show that the former are more concentrated and with higher resolution of the source body edges. This method is finally applied in an iron mine in China with field measured ΔΤ data and performs well. ReferencesPaoletti, V., Ialongo, S., Florio, G., Fedi, M

  5. A limb atmospheric radiance inversion method based on a sun-synchronous orbit satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yucui; Chen, Fansheng; Wang, Yun; Su, Xiaofeng; Wang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    It is always affected by the influence of limb atmosphere when the space-based remote sensing systems detect spatial targets using limb observation mode. In this paper, the characteristics of the limb atmosphere and the impact of limb atmosphere to target observation are theoretical modeled. Based on the model, we propose an algorithm to compute the vertical structure of atmosphere radiance through the image of limb atmosphere as well as the star image. Realization of atmosphere radiance under similar situation can then be computed based on inversion algorithm proposed in the paper. The stellar images of different areas including areas over Antarctic and Equator are captured by in-orbit space borne camera. The method of how to inverse from the gray image to atmosphere limb radiance in engineering applications is described in detail and statistical analysis of the result of inversion to limb atmosphere radiance is conducted whose trend is consistent with simulation result of MODTRAN which increases at lower altitude to a peak value then drop to zero slowly while there are two peaks in the statistical radiance distribution curves illustrating the polar light over Antarctic.

  6. Stochastic inversion of ocean color data using the cross-entropy method.

    PubMed

    Salama, Mhd Suhyb; Shen, Fang

    2010-01-18

    Improving the inversion of ocean color data is an ever continuing effort to increase the accuracy of derived inherent optical properties. In this paper we present a stochastic inversion algorithm to derive inherent optical properties from ocean color, ship and space borne data. The inversion algorithm is based on the cross-entropy method where sets of inherent optical properties are generated and converged to the optimal set using iterative process. The algorithm is validated against four data sets: simulated, noisy simulated in-situ measured and satellite match-up data sets. Statistical analysis of validation results is based on model-II regression using five goodness-of-fit indicators; only R2 and root mean square of error (RMSE) are mentioned hereafter. Accurate values of total absorption coefficient are derived with R2 > 0.91 and RMSE, of log transformed data, less than 0.55. Reliable values of the total backscattering coefficient are also obtained with R2 > 0.7 (after removing outliers) and RMSE < 0.37. The developed algorithm has the ability to derive reliable results from noisy data with R2 above 0.96 for the total absorption and above 0.84 for the backscattering coefficients. The algorithm is self contained and easy to implement and modify to derive the variability of chlorophyll-a absorption that may correspond to different phytoplankton species. It gives consistently accurate results and is therefore worth considering for ocean color global products. PMID:20173868

  7. Advancing Inverse Sensitivity/Uncertainty Methods for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbanas, G.; Williams, M. L.; Leal, L. C.; Dunn, M. E.; Khuwaileh, B. A.; Wang, C.; Abdel-Khalik, H.

    2015-01-01

    The inverse sensitivity/uncertainty quantification (IS/UQ) method has recently been implemented in the Inverse Sensitivity/UnceRtainty Estimator (INSURE) module of the AMPX cross section processing system [M.E. Dunn and N.M. Greene, "AMPX-2000: A Cross-Section Processing System for Generating Nuclear Data for Criticality Safety Applications," Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 86, 118-119 (2002)]. The IS/UQ method aims to quantify and prioritize the cross section measurements along with uncertainties needed to yield a given nuclear application(s) target response uncertainty, and doing this at a minimum cost. Since in some cases the extant uncertainties of the differential cross section data are already near the limits of the present-day state-of-the-art measurements, requiring significantly smaller uncertainties may be unrealistic. Therefore, we have incorporated integral benchmark experiments (IBEs) data into the IS/UQ method using the generalized linear least-squares method, and have implemented it in the INSURE module. We show how the IS/UQ method could be applied to systematic and statistical uncertainties in a self-consistent way and how it could be used to optimize uncertainties of IBEs and differential cross section data simultaneously. We itemize contributions to the cost of differential data measurements needed to define a realistic cost function.

  8. Robust contrast source inversion method with automatic choice rule of regularization parameters for ultrasound waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hongxiang; Azuma, Takashi; Qu, Xiaolei; Takagi, Shu

    2016-07-01

    We consider ultrasound waveform tomography using an ultrasound prototype equipped with the ring-array transducers. For this purpose, we use robust contrast source inversion (robust CSI), viz extended contrast source inversion, to reconstruct the sound-speed image from the wave-field data. The robust CSI method is implemented by the alternating minimization method. An automatic choice rule is employed into the alternating minimization method in order to heuristically determine a suitable regularization parameter while iterating. We prove the convergence of this algorithm. The numerical examples show that the robust CSI method with the automatic choice rule improves the spatial resolution of medical images and enhances the robustness, even when the wave-field data of a wavelength of 6.16 mm contaminated by 5% noise are used. The numerical results also show that the images reconstructed by the proposed method yield a spatial resolution of approximately half the wavelength that may be adequate for imaging a breast tumor at Stage I.

  9. Advancing Inverse Sensitivity/Uncertainty Methods for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, G.; Williams, M.L.; Leal, L.C.; Dunn, M.E.; Khuwaileh, B.A.; Wang, C.; Abdel-Khalik, H.

    2015-01-15

    The inverse sensitivity/uncertainty quantification (IS/UQ) method has recently been implemented in the Inverse Sensitivity/UnceRtainty Estimator (INSURE) module of the AMPX cross section processing system [M.E. Dunn and N.M. Greene, “AMPX-2000: A Cross-Section Processing System for Generating Nuclear Data for Criticality Safety Applications,” Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 86, 118–119 (2002)]. The IS/UQ method aims to quantify and prioritize the cross section measurements along with uncertainties needed to yield a given nuclear application(s) target response uncertainty, and doing this at a minimum cost. Since in some cases the extant uncertainties of the differential cross section data are already near the limits of the present-day state-of-the-art measurements, requiring significantly smaller uncertainties may be unrealistic. Therefore, we have incorporated integral benchmark experiments (IBEs) data into the IS/UQ method using the generalized linear least-squares method, and have implemented it in the INSURE module. We show how the IS/UQ method could be applied to systematic and statistical uncertainties in a self-consistent way and how it could be used to optimize uncertainties of IBEs and differential cross section data simultaneously. We itemize contributions to the cost of differential data measurements needed to define a realistic cost function.

  10. The magnitude-redshift relation for 561 Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.; Henry, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble diagram for the 561 Abell clusters with measured redshifts has been examined using Abell's (1958) corrected photo-red magnitudes for the tenth-ranked cluster member (m10). After correction for the Scott effect and K dimming, the data are in good agreement with a linear magnitude-redshift relation with a slope of 0.2 out to z = 0.1. New redshift data are also presented for 20 Abell clusters. Abell's m10 is suitable for redshift estimation for clusters with m10 of no more than 16.5. At fainter m10, the number of foreground galaxies expected within an Abell radius is large enough to make identification of the tenth-ranked galaxy difficult. Interlopers bias the estimated redshift toward low values at high redshift. Leir and van den Bergh's (1977) redshift estimates suffer from this same bias but to a smaller degree because of the use of multiple cluster parameters. Constraints on deviations of cluster velocities from the mean cosmological flow require greater photometric accuracy than is provided by Abell's m10 magnitudes.

  11. Emulation of higher-order tensors in manifold Monte Carlo methods for Bayesian Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Shiwei; Bui-Thanh, Tan; Christie, Mike; Girolami, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The Bayesian approach to Inverse Problems relies predominantly on Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods for posterior inference. The typical nonlinear concentration of posterior measure observed in many such Inverse Problems presents severe challenges to existing simulation based inference methods. Motivated by these challenges the exploitation of local geometric information in the form of covariant gradients, metric tensors, Levi-Civita connections, and local geodesic flows have been introduced to more effectively locally explore the configuration space of the posterior measure. However, obtaining such geometric quantities usually requires extensive computational effort and despite their effectiveness affects the applicability of these geometrically-based Monte Carlo methods. In this paper we explore one way to address this issue by the construction of an emulator of the model from which all geometric objects can be obtained in a much more computationally feasible manner. The main concept is to approximate the geometric quantities using a Gaussian Process emulator which is conditioned on a carefully chosen design set of configuration points, which also determines the quality of the emulator. To this end we propose the use of statistical experiment design methods to refine a potentially arbitrarily initialized design online without destroying the convergence of the resulting Markov chain to the desired invariant measure. The practical examples considered in this paper provide a demonstration of the significant improvement possible in terms of computational loading suggesting this is a promising avenue of further development.

  12. Integration of Multiple Field Methods in Characterizing a Field Site with Bayesian Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoy, H.; Dietrich, P.; Osorio-Murillo, C. A.; Kalbacher, T.; Kolditz, O.; Ames, D. P.; Rubin, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A hydraulic property of a field can be expressed as a space random function (SRF), and the parameters of that SRF can be constrained by the Method of Anchored Distributions (MAD). MAD is a general Bayesian inverse modeling technique that quantifies the uncertainty of SRF parameters by integrating various direct local data along with indirect non-local data. An example is given with a high-resolution 3D aquifer analog with known hydraulic conductivity (K) and porosity (n) at every location. MAD is applied using different combinations of simulated measurements of K, n, and different scales of hydraulic head that represent different field methods. The ln(K) and n SRF parameters are characterized with each of the method combinations to assess the influence of the methods on the SRFs and their implications. The forward modeling equations are solved by the numerical modeling software OpenGeoSys (opengeosys.org) and MAD is applied with the software MAD# (mad.codeplex.com). The inverse modeling results are compared to the aquifer analog for success evaluation. The goal of the study is to show how integrating combinations of multi-scale and multi-type measurements from the field via MAD can be used to reduce the uncertainty in field-scale SRFs, as well as point values, of hydraulic properties.

  13. FOREWORD: 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, (NCMIP 2012). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 15 May 2012, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The first edition of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finance. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, kernel methods, learning methods, convex optimization, free discontinuity problems, metamodels, proper orthogonal decomposition

  14. FOREWORD: 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2013-10-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2013 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2013.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 22 May 2013, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/), and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2012.html). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational

  15. Separating the BL Lac and cluster X-ray emissions in Abell 689 with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, P. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Lancaster, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a Chandra observation of the galaxy cluster Abell 689 (z = 0.279). Abell 689 is one of the most luminous clusters detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS), but was flagged as possibly including significant point source contamination. The small point spread function of the Chandra telescope allows us to confirm this and separate the point source from the extended cluster X-ray emission. For the cluster, we determine a bolometric luminosity of Lbol= (3.3 ± 0.3) × 1044 erg s-1 and a temperature of kT = 5.1+2.2- 1.3 keV when including a physically motivated background model. We compare our measured luminosity for A689 to that quoted in the RASS, and find L0.1-2.4 keV= 2.8 × 1044 erg s-1, a value ˜10 times lower than the ROSAT measurement. Our analysis of the point source shows evidence for significant pile-up, with a pile-up fraction of ≃60 per cent. Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images lead us to the conclusion that the point source within Abell 689 is a BL Lac object. Using radio and optical observations from the Very Large Array and HST archives, we determine αro= 0.50, αox= 0.77 and αrx= 0.58 for the BL Lac, which would classify it as being of 'high-energy peak BL Lac' type. Spectra extracted of A689 show a hard X-ray excess at energies above 6 keV that we interpret as inverse-Compton emission from aged electrons that may have been transported into the cluster from the BL Lac.

  16. Inverse Heat Conduction Methods in the CHAR Code for Aerothermal Flight Data Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A Brandon; Amar, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of flight aerothermal environments often requires the solution of an inverse heat transfer problem, which is an ill-posed problem of specifying boundary conditions from discrete measurements in the interior of the domain. This paper will present the algorithms implemented in the CHAR code for use in reconstruction of EFT-1 flight data and future testing activities. Implementation nuances will be discussed, and alternative hybrid-methods that are permitted by the implementation will be described. Results will be presented for a number of one-dimensional and multi-dimensional problems

  17. Inverse Heat Conduction Methods in the CHAR Code for Aerothermal Flight Data Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. Brandon; Amar, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of flight aerothermal environments often requires the solution of an inverse heat transfer problem, which is an ill-posed problem of determining boundary conditions from discrete measurements in the interior of the domain. This paper will present the algorithms implemented in the CHAR code for use in reconstruction of EFT-1 flight data and future testing activities. Implementation details will be discussed, and alternative hybrid-methods that are permitted by the implementation will be described. Results will be presented for a number of problems.

  18. A comparative study of minimum norm inverse methods for MEG imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, R.M.; Mosher, J.C.; Phillips, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    The majority of MEG imaging techniques currently in use fall into the general class of (weighted) minimum norm methods. The minimization of a norm is used as the basis for choosing one from a generally infinite set of solutions that provide an equally good fit to the data. This ambiguity in the solution arises from the inherent non- uniqueness of the continuous inverse problem and is compounded by the imbalance between the relatively small number of measurements and the large number of source voxels. Here we present a unified view of the minimum norm methods and describe how we can use Tikhonov regularization to avoid instabilities in the solutions due to noise. We then compare the performance of regularized versions of three well known linear minimum norm methods with the non-linear iteratively reweighted minimum norm method and a Bayesian approach.

  19. An inverse problem design method for branched and unbranched axially symmetrical ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. D.; Yang, T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper concerns the potential flow design of axially symmetrical ducts of both circular and annular cross section with or without wall suction or blowing slots. The objective of the work was to develop a method by which such ducts could be designed with directly prescribed wall pressure variation. Previous axially symmetrical design methods applied only to circular cross sectional ducts and required that the pressure distribution be prescribed along the duct centerline and not along the duct wall. The present method uses an inverse problem approach which extends the method of Stanitz to the axially symmetrical case, and an approximation is used to account for the stagnation point in branched duct designs. Two examples of successful designs of diffusers with suction slots are presented.

  20. Complex Seismic Source Inversion Method with the Data Covariance Matrix: Application to the 2010 Haiti Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, A.; Yagi, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In the finite fault source inversion, seismic source area has usually been approximated by simple fault plane model for simplicity. This approximation, however, may generate the correlated modeling errors originated from the focal mechanism variation in a rupture process, which contributed to biased results in the seismic waveform analysis. This effect becomes predominant for analysis of seismic data around the nodal planes. From CMT inversion analysis, the January 12, 2010 Haiti earthquake may accompany both strike and dip slip on different fault planes (Nettles and Hjörleifsdóttir, 2010, GJI). In addition, one single fault plane model cannot explain teleseismic body wave well due to complex source process and existence of many mechanism-sensitive stations. For waveform analysis of this earthquake, we developed inversion method that estimates moment tensor component for each space knot in seismic source area and applied it to teleseismic P-wave data recorded at FDSN network stations and Global Seismograph Network stations. In general, such high flexibility source model had caused the unstable and unrealistic result. To avoid this problem, we applied new formulation that considers the data covariance components of observed errors and modeling errors originated from uncertainty of Green's function (Yagi and Fukahata, 2010, AGU). It has already been shown that the new formulation can derive plausible solution without non-negative constraint. For inversion, we arranged space knots on the plane of which strike and dip are same as that of the USGS finite fault model. We confirmed that result is robust against change of strike, dip and knot interval. The result shows that P-axes in main rupture area are north-south direction, which is consistent with stress field of the region. Main rupture area can be divided into 3 patches, near the hypocenter, east and west side of the hypocenter patch, which have different focal mechanisms. Reverse fault is dominant in the

  1. Multiple Moment Tensor Inversions For the December 26, 2004 Sumatra Earthquake Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Liu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    We present multiple moment-tensor solution of the December 26, 2004 Sumatra earthquake based upon adjoint methods. An objective function Φ that measures the goodness of waveform fit between data and synthetics is minimized. Synthetics are calculated by spectral-element simulations (SPECFEM3D_GLOBE) in a 3D global earth model S362ANI to reduce the effect of heterogeneous structures. The Fréchet derivatives of Φ in the form δΦ = ∫T ∫VI(ɛ †ij)(x,T-t) δ(m_dot)ij(x,t)d3xdt, where δmij is the perturbation of moment density function and I(ɛ†ij)(x,T-t) denotes the time-integrated adjoint strain tensor, are calculated based upon adjoint methods implemented in SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. Our initial source model is obtained by monitoring the time-integrated adjoint strain tensors in the vicinity of the presumed source region. Source model parameters are iteratively updated by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient method to iteratively utilizing the calculated Φ and δΦ values. Our final inversion results show both similarities to and differences from previous source inversion results based on 1D background models.

  2. Multiple Moment Tensor Inversions For the December 26, 2004 Sumatra Earthquake Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Liu, Q.; Hjörleifsdóttir, V.

    2010-12-01

    We present multiple moment-tensor solution of the Dec 26, 2004 Sumatra earthquake based upon the adjoint methods. An objective function Φ(m), where m is the multiple source model, measures the goodness of waveform fit between data and synthetics. The Fréchet derivatives of Φ in the form δΦ = ∫∫I(ɛ†)(x,T-t)δmij_dot(x,t)dVdt, where δmij is the source model perturbation and I(ɛ†)(x,T-t) denotes the time-integrated adjoint strain tensor, are calculated based upon adjoint methods and spectral-element simulations (SPECFEM3D_GLOBE) in a 3D global earth model S362ANI. Our initial source model is obtained independently by monitoring the time-integrated adjoint strain tensors around the presumed source region. We then utilize the Φ and δΦ calculations in a conjugate-gradient method to iteratively invert for the source model. Our final inversion results show both similarities with and differences to previous source inversion results based on 1D earth models.

  3. Accelerated projected steepest descent method for nonlinear inverse problems with sparsity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, Gerd; Borries, Claudia

    2010-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the construction of an iterative algorithm to solve nonlinear inverse problems with an ell1 constraint on x. One extensively studied method to obtain a solution of such an ell1 penalized problem is iterative soft-thresholding. Regrettably, such iteration schemes are computationally very intensive. A subtle alternative to iterative soft-thresholding is the projected gradient method that was quite recently proposed by Daubechies et al (2008 J. Fourier Anal. Appl. 14 764-92). The authors have shown that the proposed scheme is indeed numerically much thriftier. However, its current applicability is limited to linear inverse problems. In this paper we provide an extension of this approach to nonlinear problems. Adequately adapting the conditions on the (variable) thresholding parameter to the nonlinear nature, we can prove convergence in norm for this projected gradient method, with and without acceleration. A numerical verification is given in the context of nonlinear and non-ideal sensing. For this particular recovery problem we can achieve an impressive numerical performance (when comparing it to non-accelerated procedures).

  4. A new method for the inversion of atmospheric parameters of A/Am stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebran, M.; Farah, W.; Paletou, F.; Monier, R.; Watson, V.

    2016-04-01

    Context. We present an automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H], and equatorial projected rotational velocity vsini for "normal" A and Am stars. The procedure is based on the principal component analysis (PCA) inversion method, which we published in a recent paper . Aims: A sample of 322 high-resolution spectra of F0-B9 stars, retrieved from the Polarbase, SOPHIE, and ELODIE databases, were used to test this technique with real data. We selected the spectral region from 4400-5000 Å as it contains many metallic lines and the Balmer Hβ line. Methods: Using three data sets at resolving powers of R = 42 000, 65 000 and 76 000, about ~6.6 × 106 synthetic spectra were calculated to build a large learning database. The online power iteration algorithm was applied to these learning data sets to estimate the principal components (PC). The projection of spectra onto the few PCs offered an efficient comparison metric in a low-dimensional space. The spectra of the well-known A0- and A1-type stars, Vega and Sirius A, were used as control spectra in the three databases. Spectra of other well-known A-type stars were also employed to characterize the accuracy of the inversion technique. Results: We inverted all of the observational spectra and derived the atmospheric parameters. After removal of a few outliers, the PCA-inversion method appeared to be very efficient in determining Teff, [Fe/H], and vsini for A/Am stars. The derived parameters agree very well with previous determinations. Using a statistical approach, deviations of around 150 K, 0.35 dex, 0.15 dex, and 2 km s-1 were found for Teff, log g, [Fe/H], and vsini with respect to literature values for A-type stars. Conclusions: The PCA inversion proves to be a very fast, practical, and reliable tool for estimating stellar parameters of FGK and A stars and for deriving effective temperatures of M stars. Based on data retrieved from the

  5. A new method for the inversion of atmospheric parameters of A/Am stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebran, M.; Farah, W.; Paletou, F.; Monier, R.; Watson, V.

    2016-05-01

    Context. We present an automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H], and equatorial projected rotational velocity vsini for "normal" A and Am stars. The procedure is based on the principal component analysis (PCA) inversion method, which we published in a recent paper . Aims: A sample of 322 high-resolution spectra of F0-B9 stars, retrieved from the Polarbase, SOPHIE, and ELODIE databases, were used to test this technique with real data. We selected the spectral region from 4400-5000 Å as it contains many metallic lines and the Balmer Hβ line. Methods: Using three data sets at resolving powers of R = 42 000, 65 000 and 76 000, about ~6.6 × 106 synthetic spectra were calculated to build a large learning database. The online power iteration algorithm was applied to these learning data sets to estimate the principal components (PC). The projection of spectra onto the few PCs offered an efficient comparison metric in a low-dimensional space. The spectra of the well-known A0- and A1-type stars, Vega and Sirius A, were used as control spectra in the three databases. Spectra of other well-known A-type stars were also employed to characterize the accuracy of the inversion technique. Results: We inverted all of the observational spectra and derived the atmospheric parameters. After removal of a few outliers, the PCA-inversion method appeared to be very efficient in determining Teff, [Fe/H], and vsini for A/Am stars. The derived parameters agree very well with previous determinations. Using a statistical approach, deviations of around 150 K, 0.35 dex, 0.15 dex, and 2 km s-1 were found for Teff, log g, [Fe/H], and vsini with respect to literature values for A-type stars. Conclusions: The PCA inversion proves to be a very fast, practical, and reliable tool for estimating stellar parameters of FGK and A stars and for deriving effective temperatures of M stars. Based on data retrieved from the

  6. A neural network based error correction method for radio occultation electron density retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Viet-Cuong; Juang, Jyh-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Abel inversion techniques have been widely employed to retrieve electron density profiles (EDPs) from radio occultation (RO) measurements, which are available by observing Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites from low-earth-orbit (LEO) satellites. It is well known that the ordinary Abel inversion might introduce errors in the retrieval of EDPs when the spherical symmetry assumption is violated. The error, however, is case-dependent; therefore it is desirable to associate an error index or correction coefficient with respect to each retrieved EDP. Several error indices have been proposed but they only deal with electron density at the F2 peak and suffer from some drawbacks. In this paper we propose an artificial neural network (ANN) based error correction method for EDPs obtained by the ordinary Abel inversion. The ANN is first trained to learn the relationship between vertical total electron content (TEC) measurements and retrieval errors at the F2 peak, 220 km and 110 km altitudes; correction coefficients are then estimated to correct the retrieved EDPs at these three altitudes. Experiments using the NeQuick2 model and real FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC RO geometry show that the proposed method outperforms existing ones. Real incoherent scatter radar (ISR) measurements at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory and the global TEC map provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS) are also used to valid the proposed method.

  7. Extending and Merging the Purple Crow Lidar Temperature Climatologies Using the Inversion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Ali; Sica, R. J.; Argall, P. S.

    2016-06-01

    Rayleigh and Raman scatter measurements from The University of Western Ontario Purple Crow Lidar (PCL) have been used to develop temperature climatologies for the stratosphere, mesosphere, and thermosphere using data from 1994 to 2013 (Rayleigh system) and from 1999 to 2013 (vibrational Raman system). Temperature retrievals from Rayleigh-scattering lidar measurements have been performed using the methods by Hauchecorne and Chanin (1980; henceforth HC) and Khanna et al. (2012). Argall and Sica (2007) used the HC method to compute a climatology of the PCL measurements from 1994 to 2004 for 35 to 110 km, while Iserhienrhien et al. (2013) applied the same technique from 1999 to 2007 for 10 to 35 km. Khanna et al. (2012) used the inversion technique to retrieve atmospheric temperature profiles and found that it had advantages over the HC method. This paper presents an extension of the PCL climatologies created by Argall and Sica (2007) and Iserhienrhien et al. (2013). Both the inversion and HC methods were used to form the Rayleigh climatology, while only the latter was adopted for the Raman climatology. Then, two different approaches were used to merge the climatologies from 10 to 110 km. Among four different functional identities, a trigonometric hyperbolic relation results in the best choice for merging temperature profiles between the Raman and Low level Rayleigh channels, with an estimated uncertainty of 0.9 K for merging temperatures. Also, error function produces best result with uncertainty of 0.7 K between the Low Level Rayleigh and High Level Rayleigh channels. The results show that the temperature climatologies produced by the HC method when using a seed pressure are comparable to the climatologies produced by the inversion method. The Rayleigh extended climatology is slightly warmer below 80 km and slightly colder above 80 km. There are no significant differences in temperature between the extended and the previous Raman channel climatologies. Through out

  8. A Monte Carlo simulation based inverse propagation method for stochastic model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Nuo; Wang, Chunjie

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an efficient stochastic model updating method based on statistical theory. Significant parameters have been selected implementing the F-test evaluation and design of experiments, and then the incomplete fourth-order polynomial response surface model (RSM) has been developed. Exploiting of the RSM combined with Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), reduces the calculation amount and the rapid random sampling becomes possible. The inverse uncertainty propagation is given by the equally weighted sum of mean and covariance matrix objective functions. The mean and covariance of parameters are estimated synchronously by minimizing the weighted objective function through hybrid of particle-swarm and Nelder-Mead simplex optimization method, thus the better correlation between simulation and test is achieved. Numerical examples of a three degree-of-freedom mass-spring system under different conditions and GARTEUR assembly structure validated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Systematic method of generating new integrable systems via inverse Miura maps

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, Takayuki

    2011-05-15

    We provide a new natural interpretation of the Lax representation for an integrable system; that is, the spectral problem is the linearized form of a Miura transformation between the original system and a modified version of it. On the basis of this interpretation, we formulate a systematic method of identifying modified integrable systems that can be mapped to a given integrable system by Miura transformations. Thus, this method can be used to generate new integrable systems from known systems through inverse Miura maps; it can be applied to both continuous and discrete systems in 1 + 1 dimensions as well as in 2 + 1 dimensions. The effectiveness of the method is illustrated using examples such as the nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) system, the Zakharov-Ito system (two-component KdV), the three-wave interaction system, the Yajima-Oikawa system, the Ablowitz-Ladik lattice (integrable space-discrete NLS), and two (2 + 1)-dimensional NLS systems.

  10. Accelerating the weighted histogram analysis method by direct inversion in the iterative subspace

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Lai, Chun-Liang; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2016-01-01

    The weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) for free energy calculations is a valuable tool to produce free energy differences with the minimal errors. Given multiple simulations, WHAM obtains from the distribution overlaps the optimal statistical estimator of the density of states, from which the free energy differences can be computed. The WHAM equations are often solved by an iterative procedure. In this work, we use a well-known linear algebra algorithm which allows for more rapid convergence to the solution. We find that the computational complexity of the iterative solution to WHAM and the closely-related multiple Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR) method can be improved by using the method of direct inversion in the iterative subspace. We give examples from a lattice model, a simple liquid and an aqueous protein solution. PMID:27453632

  11. Review on applications of 3D inverse design method for pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Junlian; Wang, Dezhong

    2014-05-01

    The 3D inverse design method, which methodology is far superior to the conventional design method that based on geometrical description, is gradually applied in pump blade design. However, no complete description about the method is outlined. Also, there are no general rules available to set the two important input parameters, blade loading distribution and stacking condition. In this sense, the basic theory and the mechanism why the design method can suppress the formation of secondary flow are summarized. And also, several typical pump design cases with different specific speeds ranging from centrifugal pump to axial pump are surveyed. The results indicates that, for centrifugal pump and mixed pump or turbine, the ratio of blade loading on the hub to that on the shroud is more than unit in the fore part of the blade, whereas in the aft part, the ratio is decreased to satisfy the same wrap angle for hub and shroud. And the choice of blade loading type depends on the balancing of efficiency and cavitation. If the cavitation is more weighted, the better choice is aft-loaded, otherwise, the fore-loaded or mid-loaded is preferable to improve the efficiency. The stacking condition, which is an auxiliary to suppress the secondary flow, can have great effect on the jet-wake outflow and the operation range for pump. Ultimately, how to link the design method to modern optimization techniques is illustrated. With the know-how design methodology and the know-how systematic optimization approach, the application of optimization design is promising for engineering. This paper summarizes the 3D inverse design method systematically.

  12. The seismoelectric method: underlying theory in saturated and unsaturated conditions, forward and inverse modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2009-12-01

    We will present new developments in the seismoelectric method in the case of porous media saturated by one Newtonian fluid, two immiscible Newtonian fluids, or one viscoelastic fluid like heavy oil. Rather than using the classical approach based on the zeta potential, our approach rely on a volumetric charge density of the pore volume, which is in turn related to the permeability. We will show how seismoelectric propoerties can be derived from an analysis of the complex conductivity in porous rocks and the analysis of self-potential signals of electrokientic nature. The connection between spectral induced polarization, streaming potential, and seismoelectric properties will be made in the case of a sand saturated by a simple supporting electrolyte. The seismoelectric field equations are solved with Comsol Multiphysics 3.5. We will present various applications of the seimoelectric methods to detect interface like the water table and to remotely determine the material properties of oil and gas reservoirs or DNAPL plumes. In each application, we will discss both the co-seismic signals and the seismoelectric conversions. In the case of a porous material saturated by a viscoelastic fluid, we will show that the resonance of the fluid can lead to a huge amplification of the seismoelectric response. Inverse modeling can be done with a variety of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Several cases will be discussed regarding the inversion of material properties and boundaries.

  13. On inverting gravity changes with the harmonic inversion method: Teide (Tenerife) case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohánka, Vladimír; Vajda, Peter; Pánisová, Jaroslava

    2015-06-01

    Here we investigate the applicability of the harmonic inversion method to time-lapse gravity changes observed in volcanic areas. We carry out our study on gravity changes occured over the period of 2004-2005 during the unrest of the Central Volcanic Complex on Tenerife, Canary Islands. The harmonic inversion method is unique in that it calculates the solution of the form of compact homogeneous source bodies via the mediating 3-harmonic function called quasigravitation. The latter is defined in the whole subsurface domain and it is a linear integral transformation of the surface gravity field. At the beginning the seeds of the future source bodies are introduced: these are quasi-spherical bodies located at the extrema of the quasigravitation (calculated from the input gravity data) and their differential densities are free parameters preselected by the interpreter. In the following automatic iterative process the source bodies change their size and shape according to the local values of quasigravitation (calculated in each iterative step from the residual surface gravity field); the process stops when the residual surface gravity field is sufficiently small. In the case of inverting temporal gravity changes, the source bodies represent the volumetric domains of temporal mass-density changes. The focus of the presented work is to investigate the dependence of the size and shape of the found source bodies on their differential densities. We do not aim here (yet) at interpreting the found solutions in terms of volcanic processes associated with intruding or rejuvenating magma and/or migrating volatiles.

  14. Inverse methods for estimating primary input signals from time-averaged isotope profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Cerling, Thure E.; Schuster, Gerard T.; Robinson, Todd F.; Roeder, Beverly L.; Krueger, Stephen K.

    2005-08-01

    Mammalian teeth are invaluable archives of ancient seasonality because they record along their growth axes an isotopic record of temporal change in environment, plant diet, and animal behavior. A major problem with the intra-tooth method is that intra-tooth isotope profiles can be extremely time-averaged compared to the actual pattern of isotopic variation experienced by the animal during tooth formation. This time-averaging is a result of the temporal and spatial characteristics of amelogenesis (tooth enamel formation), and also results from laboratory sampling. This paper develops and evaluates an inverse method for reconstructing original input signals from time-averaged intra-tooth isotope profiles. The method requires that the temporal and spatial patterns of amelogenesis are known for the specific tooth and uses a minimum length solution of the linear system Am = d, where d is the measured isotopic profile, A is a matrix describing temporal and spatial averaging during amelogenesis and sampling, and m is the input vector that is sought. Accuracy is dependent on several factors, including the total measurement error and the isotopic structure of the measured profile. The method is shown to accurately reconstruct known input signals for synthetic tooth enamel profiles and the known input signal for a rabbit that underwent controlled dietary changes. Application to carbon isotope profiles of modern hippopotamus canines reveals detailed dietary histories that are not apparent from the measured data alone. Inverse methods show promise as an effective means of dealing with the time-averaging problem in studies of intra-tooth isotopic variation.

  15. A geometric calibration method for inverse geometry computed tomography using P-matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagowski, Jordan M.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Hatt, Charles R.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and artifact free reconstruction of tomographic images requires precise knowledge of the imaging system geometry. This work proposes a novel projection matrix (P-matrix) based calibration method to enable C-arm inverse geometry CT (IGCT). The method is evaluated for scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX), a C-arm mounted inverse geometry fluoroscopic technology. A helical configuration of fiducials is imaged at each gantry angle in a rotational acquisition. For each gantry angle, digital tomosynthesis is performed at multiple planes and a composite image analogous to a cone-beam projection is generated from the plane stack. The geometry of the C-arm, source array, and detector array is determined at each angle by constructing a parameterized 3D-to-2D projection matrix that minimizes the sum-of-squared deviations between measured and projected fiducial coordinates. Simulations were used to evaluate calibration performance with translations and rotations of the source and detector. In a geometry with 1 mm translation of the central ray relative to the axis-of-rotation and 1 degree yaw of the detector and source arrays, the maximum error in the recovered translational parameters was 0.4 mm and maximum error in the rotation parameter was 0.02 degrees. The relative rootmean- square error in a reconstruction of a numerical thorax phantom was 0.4% using the calibration method, versus 7.7% without calibration. Changes in source-detector-distance were the most challenging to estimate. Reconstruction of experimental SBDX data using the proposed method eliminated double contour artifacts present in a non-calibrated reconstruction. The proposed IGCT geometric calibration method reduces image artifacts when uncertainties exist in system geometry.

  16. Global approach for transient shear wave inversion based on the adjoint method: a comprehensive 2D simulation study.

    PubMed

    Arnal, B; Pinton, G; Garapon, P; Pernot, M; Fink, M; Tanter, M

    2013-10-01

    Shear wave imaging (SWI) maps soft tissue elasticity by measuring shear wave propagation with ultrafast ultrasound acquisitions (10 000 frames s(-1)). This spatiotemporal data can be used as an input for an inverse problem that determines a shear modulus map. Common inversion methods are local: the shear modulus at each point is calculated based on the values of its neighbour (e.g. time-of-flight, wave equation inversion). However, these approaches are sensitive to the information loss such as noise or the lack of the backscattered signal. In this paper, we evaluate the benefits of a global approach for elasticity inversion using a least-squares formulation, which is derived from full waveform inversion in geophysics known as the adjoint method. We simulate an acoustic waveform in a medium with a soft and a hard lesion. For this initial application, full elastic propagation and viscosity are ignored. We demonstrate that the reconstruction of the shear modulus map is robust with a non-uniform background or in the presence of noise with regularization. Compared to regular local inversions, the global approach leads to an increase of contrast (∼+3 dB) and a decrease of the quantification error (∼+2%). We demonstrate that the inversion is reliable in the case when there is no signal measured within the inclusions like hypoechoic lesions which could have an impact on medical diagnosis. PMID:24018867

  17. A PC-based inverse design method for radial and mixed flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoe, Ivar Helge

    1991-01-01

    An Inverse Design Method suitable for radial and mixed flow turbomachinery is presented. The codes are based on the streamline curvature concept; therefore, it is applicable for current personal computers from the 286/287 range. In addition to the imposed aerodynamic constraints, mechanical constraints are imposed during the design process to ensure that the resulting geometry satisfies production consideration and that structural considerations are taken into account. By the use of Bezier Curves in the geometric modeling, the same subroutine is used to prepare input for both aero and structural files since it is important to ensure that the geometric data is identical to both structural analysis and production. To illustrate the method, a mixed flow turbine design is shown.

  18. Effective simulation for robust inverse lithography using convolution-variation separation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wen; Liu, Shiyuan; Zhou, Xinjiang; Wei, Haiqing

    2014-03-01

    As critical dimension shrinks, pattern density of integrated circuits gets much denser and lithographic process variations become more pronounced. In order to synthesize masks that are robust to process variations, the average wafer performance with respect to process fluctuations is optimized. This approach takes into account process variations explicitly. However, it needs to calculate a large number of optical images under different process variations during its optimizing process and thus significantly increases the computational burden. Most recently, we proposed a convolutionvariation separation (CVS) method for modeling of optical lithography, which separates process variables from the coordinate system and hence enables fast computation of optical images through a wide range of process variations. In this work, we detail the formulation of robust inverse lithography making use of the CVS method, and further investigate the impacts of arbitrary statistical distribution of process variations on the synthesized mask patterns.

  19. A method for computing synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from hydrodynamic simulations of supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obergaulinger, M.; Chimeno, J. M.; Mimica, P.; Aloy, M. A.; Iyudin, A.

    2015-12-01

    The observational signature of supernova remnants (SNRs) is very complex, in terms of both their geometrical shape and their spectral properties, dominated by non-thermal synchrotron and inverse-Compton scattering. We propose a post-processing method to analyse the broad-band emission of SNRs based on three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. From the hydrodynamical data, we estimate the distribution of non-thermal electrons accelerated at the shock wave and follow the subsequent evolution as they lose or gain energy by adiabatic expansion or compression and emit energy by radiation. As a first test case, we use a simulation of a bipolar supernova expanding into a cloudy medium. We find that our method qualitatively reproduces the main observational features of typical SNRs and produces fluxes that agree with observations to within a factor of a few allowing for further use in more extended sets of models.

  20. A boundary identification method for an inverse heat conduction problem with an application in ironmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredman, T. P.

    2004-12-01

    A boundary identification problem in inverse heat conduction is studied, based on data from internal measurement of temperature and heat flux. Formulated as a sideways heat conduction equation, a spatial continuation technique is applied to extend the solution to a known boundary condition at the desired boundary position. Recording the positions traversed in the continuation for each time instant yields the boundary position trajectory and hence the solution of the identification problem. A prospective application of the method can be found in the ironmaking blast furnace, where it is desired to monitor the thickness of the accreted refractory wall based on measurement of its internal state. Simulations featuring noisy measurement data demonstrate the feasibility of the identification method for blast furnace wall thickness estimation.

  1. Determination of thermal load in film cooled bipropellant thrust chambers by an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckel, J. N.; Savonov, R. I.; Patire, H.

    2013-03-01

    A method to obtain the heat load on the internal wall of a rocket thrust chamber using an inverse problem approach is described. According to the "classical" approach, the heat load on the internal wall of the chamber is assumed as the product of a heat transfer coefficient and the temperature difference of adiabatic wall temperature and local wall surface temperature. The time-dependent temperature distribution of the external wall of the thruster chamber is used to obtain empirical curve fittings to the temperature profile of the near wall flow field (adiabatic wall temperature) and the heat transfer coefficient profile. The applicability of the method is verified by applying it to three different problems; a model problem, an analytical solution, and a set of experimental data.

  2. The merging cluster Abell 1758: an optical and dynamical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro-Oliveira, Rogerio; Serra Cypriano, Eduardo; Machado, Rubens; Lima Neto, Gastao B.

    2015-08-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 1758-North (z=0.28) is a binary system composed by the sub-structures NW and NE. This is supposed to be a post-merging cluster due to observed detachment between the NE BCG and the respective X-ray emitting hot gas clump in a scenario very close to the famous Bullet Cluster. On the other hand, the projected position of the NW BCG coincides with the local hot gas peak. This system was been targeted previously by several studies, using multiple wavelengths and techniques, but there is still no clear picture of the scenario that could have caused this unusual configuration. To help solving this complex puzzle we added some pieces: firstly, we have used deep B, RC and z' Subaru images to perform both weak lensing shear and magnification analysis of A1758 (including here the South component that is not in interaction with A1758-North) modeling each sub-clump as an NFW profile in order to constrain masses and its center positions through MCMC methods; the second piece is the dynamical analysis using radial velocities available in the literature (143) plus new Gemini-GMOS/N measurements (68 new redshifts).From weak lensing we found that independent shear and magnification mass determinations are in excellent agreement between them and combining both we could reduce mass error bar by ~30% compared to shear alone. By combining this two weak-lensing probes we found that the position of both Northern BCGs are consistent with the masses centers within 2σ and and the NE hot gas peak to be offseted of the respective mass peak (M200=5.5 X 1014 M⊙) with very high significance. The most massive structure is NW (M200=7.95 X 1014 M⊙ ) where we observed no detachment between gas, DM and BCG.We have calculated a low line-of-sight velocity difference (<300 km/s) between A1758 NW and NE. We have combined it with the projected velocity of 1600 km/s which was estimated by previous X-ray analysis (David & Kempner 2004) and we have obtained a small angle between

  3. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Cooray, Asantha R.; Holzappel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect toward the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas distribution to be strongly aspherical, as do the X-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction in two ways. We first compare the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deprojecting the three-dimensional gas density distribution and deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods and find that they agree within the errors of the measurement. We discuss the possible system- atic errors in the gas mass fraction measurement and the constraints it places on the matter density parameter, Omega(sub M).

  4. Chandra View of Galaxy Cluster Abell 2554

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kıyami Erdim, Muhammed; Hudaverdi, Murat

    2016-07-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 2554 at z = 0.11, which is a member of Aquarius Super cluster using the Chandra archival data. The X-ray peak coincides with a bright elliptical cD galaxy. Slightly elongated X-ray plasma has an average temperature and metal abundance values of ˜6 keV and 0.28 solar, respectively. We observe small-scale temperature variations in the ICM. There is a significantly hot wall-like structure with 9 keV at the SE and also radio-lope locates at the tip of this hot region. A2554 is also part of a trio-cluster. Its close neighbors A2550 (at SW) and A2556 (at SE) have only 2 Mpc and 1.5 Mpc separations with A2554. Considering the temperature fluctuations and the dynamical environment of super cluster, we examine the possible ongoing merger scenarios within A2554.

  5. Abell 1033: birth of a radio phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperin, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Dawson, W. A.; Brüggen, M.; Bonafede, A.; Simionescu, A.

    2015-04-01

    Extended steep-spectrum radio emission in a galaxy cluster is usually associated with a recent merger. However, given the complex scenario of galaxy cluster mergers, many of the discovered sources hardly fit into the strict boundaries of a precise taxonomy. This is especially true for radio phoenixes that do not have very well defined observational criteria. Radio phoenixes are aged radio galaxy lobes whose emission is reactivated by compression or other mechanisms. Here, we present the detection of a radio phoenix close to the moment of its formation. The source is located in Abell 1033, a peculiar galaxy cluster which underwent a recent merger. To support our claim, we present unpublished Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Chandra observations together with archival data from the Very Large Array and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We discover the presence of two subclusters displaced along the N-S direction. The two subclusters probably underwent a recent merger which is the cause of a moderately perturbed X-ray brightness distribution. A steep-spectrum extended radio source very close to an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is proposed to be a newly born radio phoenix: the AGN lobes have been displaced/compressed by shocks formed during the merger event. This scenario explains the source location, morphology, spectral index, and brightness. Finally, we show evidence of a density discontinuity close to the radio phoenix and discuss the consequences of its presence.

  6. Joining direct and indirect inverse calibration methods to characterize karst, coastal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippis, Giovanna; Foglia, Laura; Giudici, Mauro; Mehl, Steffen; Margiotta, Stefano; Negri, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Parameter estimation is extremely relevant for accurate simulation of groundwater flow. Parameter values for models of large-scale catchments are usually derived from a limited set of field observations, which can rarely be obtained in a straightforward way from field tests or laboratory measurements on samples, due to a number of factors, including measurement errors and inadequate sampling density. Indeed, a wide gap exists between the local scale, at which most of the observations are taken, and the regional or basin scale, at which the planning and management decisions are usually made. For this reason, the use of geologic information and field data is generally made by zoning the parameter fields. However, pure zoning does not perform well in the case of fairly complex aquifers and this is particularly true for karst aquifers. In fact, the support of the hydraulic conductivity measured in the field is normally much smaller than the cell size of the numerical model, so it should be upscaled to a scale consistent with that of the numerical model discretization. Automatic inverse calibration is a valuable procedure to identify model parameter values by conditioning on observed, available data, limiting the subjective evaluations introduced with the trial-and-error technique. Many approaches have been proposed to solve the inverse problem. Generally speaking, inverse methods fall into two groups: direct and indirect methods. Direct methods allow determination of hydraulic conductivities from the groundwater flow equations which relate the conductivity and head fields. Indirect methods, instead, can handle any type of parameters, independently from the mathematical equations that govern the process, and condition parameter values and model construction on measurements of model output quantities, compared with the available observation data, through the minimization of an objective function. Both approaches have pros and cons, depending also on model complexity. For

  7. Probing single biomolecules in solution using the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Goldsmith, Randall H; Jiang, Yan; Bockenhauer, Samuel D; Moerner, W E

    2012-11-20

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements allow researchers to study asynchronous dynamics and expose molecule-to-molecule structural and behavioral diversity, which contributes to the understanding of biological macromolecules. To provide measurements that are most consistent with the native environment of biomolecules, researchers would like to conduct these measurements in the solution phase if possible. However, diffusion typically limits the observation time to approximately 1 ms in many solution-phase single-molecule assays. Although surface immobilization is widely used to address this problem, this process can perturb the system being studied and contribute to the observed heterogeneity. Combining the technical capabilities of high-sensitivity single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, real-time feedback control and electrokinetic flow in a microfluidic chamber, we have developed a device called the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap to significantly prolong the observation time of single biomolecules in solution. We have applied the ABEL trap method to explore the photodynamics and enzymatic properties of a variety of biomolecules in aqueous solution and present four examples: the photosynthetic antenna allophycocyanin, the chaperonin enzyme TRiC, a G protein-coupled receptor protein, and the blue nitrite reductase redox enzyme. These examples illustrate the breadth and depth of information which we can extract in studies of single biomolecules with the ABEL trap. When confined in the ABEL trap, the photosynthetic antenna protein allophycocyanin exhibits rich dynamics both in its emission brightness and its excited state lifetime. As each molecule discontinuously converts from one emission/lifetime level to another in a primarily correlated way, it undergoes a series of state changes. We studied the ATP binding stoichiometry of the multi-subunit chaperonin enzyme TRiC in the ABEL trap by counting the number of hydrolyzed Cy3-ATP using stepwise

  8. An inverse method to estimate the flow through a levee breach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oria, Marco; Mignosa, Paolo; Tanda, Maria Giovanna

    2015-08-01

    We propose a procedure to estimate the flow through a levee breach based on water levels recorded in river stations downstream and/or upstream of the failure site. The inverse problem is solved using a Bayesian approach and requires the execution of several forward unsteady flow simulations. For this purpose, we have used the well-known 1-D HEC-RAS model, but any unsteady flow model could be adopted in the same way. The procedure has been tested using four synthetic examples. Levee breaches with different characteristics (free flow, flow with tailwater effects, etc.) have been simulated to collect the synthetic level data used at a later stage in the inverse procedure. The method was able to accurately reproduce the flow through the breach in all cases. The practicability of the procedure was then confirmed applying it to the inundation of the Polesine Region (Northern Italy) which occurred in 1951 and was caused by three contiguous and almost simultaneous breaches on the left embankment of the Po River.

  9. Shape and Stress Sensing of Multilayered Composite and Sandwich Structures Using an Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerracchio, Priscilla; Gherlone, Marco; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The marked increase in the use of composite and sandwich material systems in aerospace, civil, and marine structures leads to the need for integrated Structural Health Management systems. A key capability to enable such systems is the real-time reconstruction of structural deformations, stresses, and failure criteria that are inferred from in-situ, discrete-location strain measurements. This technology is commonly referred to as shape- and stress-sensing. Presented herein is a computationally efficient shape- and stress-sensing methodology that is ideally suited for applications to laminated composite and sandwich structures. The new approach employs the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM) as a general framework and the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) as the underlying plate theory. A three-node inverse plate finite element is formulated. The element formulation enables robust and efficient modeling of plate structures instrumented with strain sensors that have arbitrary positions. The methodology leads to a set of linear algebraic equations that are solved efficiently for the unknown nodal displacements. These displacements are then used at the finite element level to compute full-field strains, stresses, and failure criteria that are in turn used to assess structural integrity. Numerical results for multilayered, highly heterogeneous laminates demonstrate the unique capability of this new formulation for shape- and stress-sensing.

  10. Global Scale Exploration Seismics: Mapping Mantle Discontinuities with Inverse Scattering Methods and Millions of Seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hilst, R. D.; de Hoop, M. V.; Shim, S. H.; Shang, X.; Wang, P.; Cao, Q.

    2012-04-01

    Over the past three decades, tremendous progress has been made with the mapping of mantle heterogeneity and with the understanding of these structures in terms of, for instance, the evolution of Earth's crust, continental lithosphere, and thermo-chemical mantle convection. Converted wave imaging (e.g., receiver functions) and reflection seismology (e.g. SS stacks) have helped constrain interfaces in crust and mantle; surface wave dispersion (from earthquake or ambient noise signals) characterizes wavespeed variations in continental and oceanic lithosphere, and body wave and multi-mode surface wave data have been used to map trajectories of mantle convection and delineate mantle regions of anomalous elastic properties. Collectively, these studies have revealed substantial ocean-continent differences and suggest that convective flow is strongly influenced by but permitted to cross the upper mantle transition zone. Many questions have remained unanswered, however, and further advances in understanding require more accurate depictions of Earth's heterogeneity at a wider range of length scales. To meet this challenge we need new observations—more, better, and different types of data—and methods that help us extract and interpret more information from the rapidly growing volumes of broadband data. The huge data volumes and the desire to extract more signal from them means that we have to go beyond 'business as usual' (that is, simplified theory, manual inspection of seismograms, …). Indeed, it inspires the development of automated full wave methods, both for tomographic delineation of smooth wavespeed variations and the imaging (for instance through inverse scattering) of medium contrasts. Adjoint tomography and reverse time migration, which are closely related wave equation methods, have begun to revolutionize seismic inversion of global and regional waveform data. In this presentation we will illustrate this development - and its promise - drawing from our work

  11. Love wave tomography in southern Africa from a two-plane-wave inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aibing; Li, Lun

    2015-08-01

    Array measurements of surface wave phase velocity can be biased by multipath arrivals. A two-plane-wave (TPW) inversion method, in which the incoming wavefield is represented by the interference of two plane waves, is able to account for the multipath effect and solve for laterally varying phase velocity. Despite broad applications of the TPW method, its usage has been limited to Rayleigh waves. In this study, we have modified the TPW approach and applied it to Love waves. Main modifications include decomposing Love wave amplitude on the transverse component to x and y components in a local Cartesian system for each earthquake and using both components in the inversion. Such decomposition is also applied to the two plane waves to predict the incoming wavefield of an earthquake. We utilize fundamental mode Love wave data recorded at 85 broad-band stations from 69 distant earthquakes and solved for phase velocity in nine frequency bands with centre periods ranging from 34 to 100 s. The average phase velocity in southern Africa increases from 4.30 km s-1 at 34 s to 4.87 km s-1 at 100 s. Compared with predicted Love wave phase velocities from the published 1-D SV velocity model and radial anisotropy model in the region, these values are compatible from 34 to 50 s and slightly higher beyond 50 s, indicating radial anisotropy of VSH > VSV in the shallow upper mantle. A high Love wave velocity anomaly is imaged in the central and southern Kaapvaal craton at all periods, reflecting a cold and depleted cratonic lithosphere. A low velocity anomaly appears in the Bushveld Complex from 34 to 50 s, which can be interpreted as being caused by high iron content from an intracratonic magma intrusion. The modified TPW method provides a new way to measure Love wave phase velocities in a regional array, which are essential in developing radial anisotropic models and understanding the Earth structure in the crust and upper mantle.

  12. Third-order symplectic integration method with inverse time dispersion transform for long-term simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yingjie; Zhang, Jinhai; Yao, Zhenxing

    2016-06-01

    The symplectic integration method is popular in high-accuracy numerical simulations when discretizing temporal derivatives; however, it still suffers from time-dispersion error when the temporal interval is coarse, especially for long-term simulations and large-scale models. We employ the inverse time dispersion transform (ITDT) to the third-order symplectic integration method to reduce the time-dispersion error. First, we adopt the pseudospectral algorithm for the spatial discretization and the third-order symplectic integration method for the temporal discretization. Then, we apply the ITDT to eliminate time-dispersion error from the synthetic data. As a post-processing method, the ITDT can be easily cascaded in traditional numerical simulations. We implement the ITDT in one typical exiting third-order symplectic scheme and compare its performances with the performances of the conventional second-order scheme and the rapid expansion method. Theoretical analyses and numerical experiments show that the ITDT can significantly reduce the time-dispersion error, especially for long travel times. The implementation of the ITDT requires some additional computations on correcting the time-dispersion error, but it allows us to use the maximum temporal interval under stability conditions; thus, its final computational efficiency would be higher than that of the traditional symplectic integration method for long-term simulations. With the aid of the ITDT, we can obtain much more accurate simulation results but with a lower computational cost.

  13. Seismic small-scale discontinuity sparsity-constraint inversion method using a penalty decomposition algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingtao; Peng, Suping; Du, Wenfeng

    2016-02-01

    We consider sparsity-constraint inversion method for detecting seismic small-scale discontinuities, such as edges, faults and cavities, which provide rich information about petroleum reservoirs. However, where there is karstification and interference caused by macro-scale fault systems, these seismic small-scale discontinuities are hard to identify when using currently available discontinuity-detection methods. In the subsurface, these small-scale discontinuities are separately and sparsely distributed and their seismic responses occupy a very small part of seismic image. Considering these sparsity and non-smooth features, we propose an effective L 2-L 0 norm model for improvement of their resolution. First, we apply a low-order plane-wave destruction method to eliminate macro-scale smooth events. Then, based the residual data, we use a nonlinear structure-enhancing filter to build a L 2-L 0 norm model. In searching for its solution, an efficient and fast convergent penalty decomposition method is employed. The proposed method can achieve a significant improvement in enhancing seismic small-scale discontinuities. Numerical experiment and field data application demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method in studying the relevant geology of these reservoirs.

  14. Inverse scattering solutions by a sinc basis, multiple source, moment method--Part III: Fast algorithms.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S A; Zhou, Y; Tracy, M K; Berggren, M J; Stenger, F

    1984-01-01

    olving the inverse scattering problem for the Helmholtz wave equation without employing the Born or Rytov approximations is a challenging problem, but some slow iterative methods have been proposed. One such method suggested by us is based on solving systems of nonlinear algebraic equations that are derived by applying the method of moments to a sinc basis function expansion of the fields and scattering potential. In the past, we have solved these equations for a 2-D object of n by n pixels in a time proportional to n5. In the present paper, we demonstrate a new method based on FFT convolution and the concept of backprojection which solves these equations in time proportional to n3 X log(n). Several numerical examples are given for images up to 7 by 7 pixels in size. Analogous algorithms to solve the Riccati wave equation in n3 X log(n) time are also suggested, but not verified. A method is suggested for interpolating measurements from one detector geometry to a new perturbed detector geometry whose measurement points fall on a FFT accessible, rectangular grid and thereby render many detector geometrics compatible for use by our fast methods. PMID:6540908

  15. An inverse method for flue gas shielded metal surface temperature measurement based on infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Xu, C. L.; Wang, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The infrared temperature measurement technique has been applied in various fields, such as thermal efficiency analysis, environmental monitoring, industrial facility inspections, and remote temperature sensing. In the problem of infrared measurement of the metal surface temperature of superheater surfaces, the outer wall of the metal pipe is covered by radiative participating flue gas. This means that the traditional infrared measurement technique will lead to intolerable measurement errors due to the absorption and scattering of the flue gas. In this paper, an infrared measurement method for a metal surface in flue gas is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The spectral emissivity of the metal surface, and the spectral absorption and scattering coefficients of the radiative participating flue gas are retrieved simultaneously using an inverse method called quantum particle swarm optimization. Meanwhile, the detected radiation energy simulated using a forward simulation method (named the source multi-flux method) is set as the input of the retrieval. Then, the temperature of the metal surface detected by an infrared CCD camera is modified using the source multi-flux method in combination with these retrieved physical properties. Finally, an infrared measurement system for metal surface temperature is built to assess the proposed method. Experimental results show that the modified temperature is closer to the true value than that of the direct measured temperature.

  16. Infrared observations of gravitational lensing in Abell 2219 with CIRSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Meghan E.; Ellis, Richard S.; Refregier, Alexandre; Bézecourt, Jocelyn; McMahon, Richard G.; Beckett, Martin G.; Mackay, Craig D.; Hoenig, Michael D.

    2000-10-01

    We present the first detection of a gravitational depletion signal at near-infrared wavelengths, based on deep panoramic images of the cluster Abell 2219 (z=0.22) taken with the Cambridge Infrared Survey Instrument (CIRSI) at the prime focus of the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. Infrared studies of gravitational depletion offer a number of advantages over similar techniques applied at optical wavelengths, and can provide reliable total masses for intermediate-redshift clusters. Using the maximum-likelihood technique developed by Schneider, King & Erben, we detect the gravitational depletion at the 3σ confidence level. By modelling the mass distribution as a singular isothermal sphere and ignoring the uncertainty in the unlensed number counts, we find an Einstein radius of θE ~= 13.7+3.9-4.2 arcsec (66per cent confidence limit). This corresponds to a projected velocity dispersion of σv~800kms-1, in agreement with constraints from strongly lensed features. For a Navarro, Frenk & White mass model, the radial dependence observed indicates a best-fitting halo scalelength of 125h-1kpc. We investigate the uncertainties arising from the observed fluctuations in the unlensed number counts, and show that clustering is the dominant source of error. We extend the maximum-likelihood method to include the effect of incompleteness, and discuss the prospects of further systematic studies of lensing in the near-infrared band.

  17. Inverse atmospheric radiative transfer problems - A nonlinear minimization search method of solution. [aerosol pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper studies the inversion of the radiative transfer equation describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atmospheric aerosols. The interaction can be considered as the propagation in the aerosol medium of two light beams: the direct beam in the line-of-sight attenuated by absorption and scattering, and the diffuse beam arising from scattering into the viewing direction, which propagates more or less in random fashion. The latter beam has single scattering and multiple scattering contributions. In the former case and for single scattering, the problem is reducible to first-kind Fredholm equations, while for multiple scattering it is necessary to invert partial integrodifferential equations. A nonlinear minimization search method, applicable to the solution of both types of problems has been developed, and is applied here to the problem of monitoring aerosol pollution, namely the complex refractive index and size distribution of aerosol particles.

  18. The general circulation and meridional heat transport of the subtropical South Atlantic determined by inverse methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L.-L.

    1981-01-01

    The circulation and meridional heat transport of the subtropical South Atlantic Ocean are determined through the application of the inverse method of Wunsch (1978) to hydrographic data from the IGY and METEOR expeditions. Meridional circulation results of the two data sets agree on a northward mass transport of about 20 million metric tons/sec for waters above the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), and a comparable southward transport of deep waters. Additional gross features held in common are the Benguela, South Equatorial and North Brazilian Coastal currents' northward transport of the Surface Water, and the deflection of the southward-flowing NADW from the South American Coast into the mid ocean by a seamount chain near 20 deg S. Total heat transport is equatorward, with a magnitude of 0.8 X 10 to the 15th W near 30 deg S and indistinguishable from zero near 8 deg S.

  19. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in the direct-inverse wing design method in curvilinear coordinates has been made. This includes the remedying of a spanwise oscillation problem and the assessment of grid skewness, viscous interaction, and the initial airfoil section on the final design. It was found that, in response to the spanwise oscillation problem that designing at every other spanwise station produced the best results for the cases presented, a smoothly varying grid is especially needed for the accurate design at the wing tip, the boundary layer displacement thicknesses must be included in a successful wing design, the design of high and medium aspect ratio wings is possible with this code, and the final airfoil section designed is fairly independent of the initial section.

  20. The method of functional representations in the solution of inverse problems of gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobrunov, A. I.

    2015-07-01

    The paper describes the method for solving the inverse problems of gravimetry based on the functional representations, which follow from the variational principles in the uniform metrics with respect to density models of the geological medium. The functional representations are obtained for both the linear problem (which study local density distributions) and nonlinear problem (which study a system of structural models). The explicit formulas for calculating density models are derived for the particular cases based on the introduced functional representations of the obtained solutions. In the general case, the converging iterative processes providing the solution for both the density distribution models and structural models are constructed. The relationship is established between the functional representations implementing the variational principle in the uniform metric and linear integral representations corresponding to the optimization in the quadratic norm, on one hand, and the other known density models, on the other hand.

  1. FEMSECT: An inverse section model based on the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losch, M.; Sidorenko, D.; Beszczynska-MöLler, A.

    2005-12-01

    A new inverse model is presented for the analysis of hydrographic section data in conjunction with velocity measurements. The model offers advantages over commonly applied interpolation techniques because it combines data and physical assumptions such as geostrophic balance in the framework of a finite element discretization. Specifically, a quadratic objective function of model-data misfits is minimized to give estimates of transports together with formal error estimates. The finite element method allows the accurate representation of highly irregular bottom topography and ensures consistent interpolation of model variables to measurement points. The model is called Finite Element Method Section model (FEMSECT). FEMSECT also gives improved flexibility and performance over standard box models by allowing dynamic adjustment of the model variables temperature and salinity. Idealized test cases illustrate that the finite element methods solve the thermal wind equations far more accurately than standard finite difference methods, especially in the presence of steep topography. For a more realistic test, FEMSECT is applied to hydrographic conductivity-temperature-depth section data and moored instrument current meter measurements from an array in the Fram Strait. Transport estimates by FEMSECT prove to be more robust and less sensitive to the spatial data resolution than estimates by a conventional interpolation method that only uses information from moored instruments. FEMSECT is available as a highly portable Matlab code and can be run on an ordinary desktop computer.

  2. Application of the Method of Fundamental Solutions to Potential-based Inverse Electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    Potential-based inverse electrocardiography is a method for the noninvasive computation of epicardial potentials from measured body surface electrocardiographic data. From the computed epicardial potentials, epicardial electrograms and isochrones (activation sequences), as well as repolarization patterns can be constructed. We term this noninvasive procedure Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI). The method of choice for computing epicardial potentials has been the Boundary Element Method (BEM) which requires meshing the heart and torso surfaces and optimizing the mesh, a very time-consuming operation that requires manual editing. Moreover, it can introduce mesh-related artifacts in the reconstructed epicardial images. Here we introduce the application of a meshless method, the Method of Fundamental Solutions (MFS) to ECGI. This new approach that does not require meshing is evaluated on data from animal experiments and human studies, and compared to BEM. Results demonstrate similar accuracy, with the following advantages: 1. Elimination of meshing and manual mesh optimization processes, thereby enhancing automation and speeding the ECGI procedure. 2. Elimination of mesh-induced artifacts. 3. Elimination of complex singular integrals that must be carefully computed in BEM. 4. Simpler implementation. These properties of MFS enhance the practical application of ECGI as a clinical diagnostic tool. PMID:16807788

  3. Inverse dispersion method for calculation of complex photonic band diagram and PT symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-04-01

    We suggest an inverse dispersion method for calculating a photonic band diagram for materials with arbitrary frequency-dependent dielectric functions. The method is able to calculate the complex wave vector for a given frequency by solving the eigenvalue problem with a non-Hermitian operator. The analogy with PT -symmetric Hamiltonians reveals that the operator corresponds to the momentum as a physical quantity, and the singularities at the band edges are related to the branch points and responses for the features on the band edges. The method is realized using a plane wave expansion technique for a two-dimensional periodic structure in the case of TE and TM polarizations. We illustrate the applicability of the method by the calculation of the photonic band diagrams of an infinite two-dimensional square lattice composed of dielectric cylinders using the measured frequency-dependent dielectric functions of different materials (amorphous hydrogenated carbon, silicon, and chalcogenide glass). We show that the method allows one to distinguish unambiguously between Bragg and Mie gaps in the spectra.

  4. Stress field in central Japan estimated by multiple inverse method from focal mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, A.; Otsubo, M.; Ishi, T.

    2008-12-01

    In central Japan, active faults with strike-slip type are dominated. In addition small fractions of reverse faults are observed in Nigata Kobe Tectonic Zone (NKTZ) and other places. However large part of focal mechanism solutions in this region shows reverse fault type. Thus relation between existent fault and stress field are essentially important problem. To obtain precise heterogeneous stress field, we apply multiple inverse method (Otsubo et al., in press) and K-means clustering (Otsubo el al., 2006) to the shallower focal mechanism solutions (NIED F-net focal mechanisms catalogue: depth <30km) in this region. The multiple inverse method can treat heterogeneous stress field and have no requirement for strict a priori data selection which can be assumed under homogeneous stress field. First we extract two stress solutions within each 1° × 1° (lat, lon) region. Most of the stress solutions show strike-slip or reverse fault type with stress ratio (φ) between 0 and 0.66. Then we divide input fault parameters into four groups using misfit angles between the observed and computed slip directions for detected stress solutions in each region. The misfit angle is 30°. We estimated the spatial changes of stress field from the focal mechanisms of which observed slip directions are consistent with only one stress solution. These selected dataset are useful to map spatial heterogeneity of the stress field. Solutions with medium stress ratio (φ = 0.33 to 0.66) and strike-slip regime appear in central Japan enclosed by Itoigawa Shizuoka Tectonic Line and Median Tectonic Line. Stress solution with reverse fault regime and medium stress ratio are seen in northeast region and Japan Sea side. In contrast, solutions with low stress ratio (φ) between 0.00 and 0.33 (s1 >> s2=s3) appears along high strain rate zone (NKTZ). It may show that the high strain rate zone correspond to stress concentrated region toward Shmax direction.

  5. Large-scale three-dimensional inversion of EarthScope MT data using the integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.; Green, A.; Gribenko, A.; Cuma, M.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we apply 3D inversion to MT data collected in the Northwestern United States as a part of the EarthScope project. By the end of 2009 MT data had been collected from 262 stations located throughout Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and most of Montana and Wyoming. We used data from 139 MT stations in this analysis. We developed fully parallelized rigorous 3D MT inversion software based on the integral equation method with variable background conductivity. We also implemented a receiver footprint approach which considerably reduced the computational resources needed to invert the large volumes of data covering vast areas. The data set used in the inversion was obtained through the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). The inversion domain was divided into 2.7 M cells. The inverted electrical conductivity distribution agrees reasonably well with geological features of the region.

  6. Large-scale 3D inversion of marine controlled source electromagnetic data using the integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.; Cuma, M.; Black, N.; Wilson, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    The marine controlled source electromagnetic (MCSEM) method has become widely used in offshore oil and gas exploration. Interpretation of MCSEM data is still a very challenging problem, especially if one would like to take into account the realistic 3D structure of the subsurface. The inversion of MCSEM data is complicated by the fact that the EM response of a hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir is very weak in comparison with the background EM fields generated by an electric dipole transmitter in complex geoelectrical structures formed by a conductive sea-water layer and the terranes beneath it. In this paper, we present a review of the recent developments in the area of large-scale 3D EM forward modeling and inversion. Our approach is based on using a new integral form of Maxwell’s equations allowing for an inhomogeneous background conductivity, which results in a numerically effective integral representation for 3D EM field. This representation provides an efficient tool for the solution of 3D EM inverse problems. To obtain a robust inverse model of the conductivity distribution, we apply regularization based on a focusing stabilizing functional which allows for the recovery of models with both smooth and sharp geoelectrical boundaries. The method is implemented in a fully parallel computer code, which makes it possible to run large-scale 3D inversions on grids with millions of inversion cells. This new technique can be effectively used for active EM detection and monitoring of the subsurface targets.

  7. A 1400-MHz survey of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. N.; White, R. A.; Hilldrup, K. C.; Hanisch, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies with the NRAO 91-m telescope at 1400 MHz are reported. The measured beam shape was deconvolved from the measured source Gaussian fits in order to estimate the source size and position angle. All detected sources within 0.5 corrected Abell cluster radii are listed, including the cluster number, richness class, distance class, magnitude of the tenth brightest galaxy, redshift estimate, corrected cluster radius in arcmin, right ascension and error, declination and error, total flux density and error, and angular structure for each source.

  8. A novel artificial neural network method for biomedical prediction based on matrix pseudo-inversion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Binghuang; Jiang, Xia

    2014-04-01

    Biomedical prediction based on clinical and genome-wide data has become increasingly important in disease diagnosis and classification. To solve the prediction problem in an effective manner for the improvement of clinical care, we develop a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) method based on Matrix Pseudo-Inversion (MPI) for use in biomedical applications. The MPI-ANN is constructed as a three-layer (i.e., input, hidden, and output layers) feed-forward neural network, and the weights connecting the hidden and output layers are directly determined based on MPI without a lengthy learning iteration. The LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator) method is also presented for comparative purposes. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) simulated data and real breast cancer data are employed to validate the performance of the MPI-ANN method via 5-fold cross validation. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the developed MPI-ANN for disease classification and prediction, in view of the significantly superior accuracy (i.e., the rate of correct predictions), as compared with LASSO. The results based on the real breast cancer data also show that the MPI-ANN has better performance than other machine learning methods (including support vector machine (SVM), logistic regression (LR), and an iterative ANN). In addition, experiments demonstrate that our MPI-ANN could be used for bio-marker selection as well. PMID:24361387

  9. A novel model for diffusion based release kinetics using an inverse numerical method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Herzog, Walter

    2011-10-01

    We developed and analyzed an inverse numerical model based on Fick's second law on the dynamics of drug release. In contrast to previous models which required two state descriptions of diffusion for long- and short-term release processes, our model is valid for the entire release process. The proposed model may be used for identifying and reducing experimental errors associated with measurements of diffusion based release kinetics. Knowing the initial and boundary conditions, and assuming Fick's second law to be appropriate, we use the methods of Lagrange multiplier along with least-square algorithms to define a cost function which is discretized using finite difference methods and is optimized so as to minimize errors. Our model can describe diffusion based release kinetics for static and dynamic conditions as accurately as finite element methods, but results are obtained in a fraction of CPU time. Our method can be widely used for drug release procedures and for tissue engineering/repair applications where oxygenation of cells residing within a matrix is important. PMID:21382735

  10. Inversion of potential field data using the finite element method on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, L.; Altinay, C.; Shaw, S.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present a formulation of the joint inversion of potential field anomaly data as an optimization problem with partial differential equation (PDE) constraints. The problem is solved using the iterative Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) method with the Hessian operator of the regularization and cross-gradient component of the cost function as preconditioner. We will show that each iterative step requires the solution of several PDEs namely for the potential fields, for the adjoint defects and for the application of the preconditioner. In extension to the traditional discrete formulation the BFGS method is applied to continuous descriptions of the unknown physical properties in combination with an appropriate integral form of the dot product. The PDEs can easily be solved using standard conforming finite element methods (FEMs) with potentially different resolutions. For two examples we demonstrate that the number of PDE solutions required to reach a given tolerance in the BFGS iteration is controlled by weighting regularization and cross-gradient but is independent of the resolution of PDE discretization and that as a consequence the method is weakly scalable with the number of cells on parallel computers. We also show a comparison with the UBC-GIF GRAV3D code.

  11. Radio Galaxies in Abell Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, M. J.

    1994-05-01

    We have defined a complete sample of radio galaxies chosen from Abell's northern catalog consisting of all clusters with measured redshifts < 0.09. This sample consists of nearly 300 clusters. A multiwavelength survey including optical CCD R-Band imaging, optical spectroscopy, and VLA 20 cm radio maps has been compiled. I have used this database to study the optical/radio properties of radio galaxies in the cluster environment. In particular, optical properties have been compared to a radio-quiet selected sample to look for optical signatures which may distinguish radio galaxies from normal radio-quiet ellipticals. The correlations between radio morphology and galaxy type, the optical dependence of the FR I/II break, and the univariate and bivariate luminosity functions have been examined for this sample. This study is aimed at understanding radio galaxies as a population and examining their status in the AGN heirarchy. The results of this work will be applied to models of radio source evolution. The results from the optical data analysis suggest that radio galaxies, as a class, cannot be distinguished from non-radio selected elliptical galaxies. The magnitude/size relationship, the surface-brightness profiles, the fundamental plane, and the intrinsic shape of the radio galaxies are consistent between our radio galaxy and control sample. The radio galaxies also trace the elliptical galaxy optical luminosity function in clusters very well; with many more L(*) galaxies than brightest cluster members. Combined with the results of the spectroscopy, the data are consistent with the idea that all elliptical galaxies may at some point in their lifetimes become radio sources. In conclusion, I present a new observational picture for radio galaxies and discuss the important properties which may determine the evolution of individual sources.

  12. The Merger Dynamics of Abell 2061

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Avery; Sarazin, Craig L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Hogge, Taylor; Wik, Daniel R.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnsworth, Damon; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brown, Shea

    2016-04-01

    Abell 2061, a galaxy cluster at a redshift of z=.0784 in the Corona Borealis Supercluster, displays features in both the X-ray and radio indicative of merger activity. Observations by the GBT and the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) have indicated the presence of an extended, central radio halo/relic coincident with the cluster's main X-ray emission and a bright radio relic to the SW of the center of the cluster. Previous observations by ROSAT, Beppo-SAX, and Chandra show an elongated structure (referred to as the ‘Plume’), emitting in the soft X-ray and stretching to the NE of the cluster’s center. The Beppo-SAX and Chandra observations also suggest the presence of a hard X-ray shock slightly NE of the cluster’s center. Here we present the details of an August 2013 XMM-Newton observation of A2061 which has greater field of view and longer exposure (48.6 ks) than the previous Chandra observation. We present images displaying the cluster’s soft and hard X-ray emission and also a temperature map of the cluster. This temperature map highlights the presence of a previously unseen cool region of the cluster which we hypothesize to be the cool core of one of the subclusters involved in this merger. We also discuss the structural similarity of this cluster with a simulated high mass-ratio offset cluster merger taken from the Simulation Library of Astrophysical cluster Mergers (SLAM). This simulation would suggest that the Plume is gas from the cool core of a subcluster which is now falling back into the center of the cluster after initial core passage.

  13. Evaluation of a Heterogeneity Preserving Inversion Method for Subsurface Unsaturated Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Schaap, M. G.; Neuman, S. P.; Guadagnini, A.; Riva, M.

    2013-12-01

    is embedded in the inversion method through textural information. Our results show the benefit of our inverse modeling approach, assessed through minimization of the difference between observed and simulated water content dynamics, when compared against traditional zonation, with mean squared residual (MSR) decreasing by about 35% and Pearson correlation coefficient increasing from 0.9395 to 0.9612.

  14. Extracting physical parameters from marine seismic data: New methods in seismic oceanography and velocity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Will F. J.

    The utility and meaning of a geophysical dataset is dependent on good interpretation informed by high-quality data, processing, and attribute examination via technical methodologies. Active source marine seismic reflection data contains a great deal of information in the location, phase, and amplitude of both pre- and post-stack seismic reflections. Using pre- and post-stack data, this work has extracted useful information from marine reflection seismic data in novel ways in both the oceanic water column and the sub-seafloor geology. In chapter 1 we develop a new method for estimating oceanic turbulence from a seismic image. This method is tested on synthetic seismic data to show the method's ability to accurately recover both distribution and levels of turbulent diffusivity. Then we apply the method to real data offshore Costa Rica where we observe lee waves. Our results find elevated diffusivities near the seafloor as well as above the lee waves five times greater than surrounding waters and 50 times greater than open ocean diffusivities. Chapter 2 investigates subsurface geology in the Cascadia Subduction Zone and outlines a workflow for using pre-stack waveform inversion to produce highly detailed velocity models and seismic images. Using a newly developed inversion code, we achieve better imaging results as compared to the product of a standard, user-intensive method for building a velocity model. Our results image the subduction interface ~30 km farther landward than previous work and better images faults and sedimentary structures above the oceanic plate as well as in the accretionary prism. The resultant velocity model is highly detailed, inverted every 6.25 m with ~20 m vertical resolution, and will be used to examine the role of fluids in the subduction system. These results help us to better understand the natural hazards risks associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Chapter 3 returns to seismic oceanography and examines the dynamics of nonlinear

  15. Inverse problem for a one-dimensional dynamical Dirac system (BC-method)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belishev, M. I.; Mikhailov, V. S.

    2014-12-01

    A forward problem for the Dirac system is to find u=≤ft( \\begin{array}{ccccccccccccccc} {{u}1}(x,t) \\\\ {{u}2}(x,t) \\\\ \\end{array} \\right) obeying i{{u}t}+≤ft( \\begin{array}{ccccccccccccccc} 0 & 1 \\\\ -1 & 0 \\\\ \\end{array} \\right){{u}x}+≤ft( \\begin{array}{ccccccccccccccc} p & q \\\\ q & -p \\\\ \\end{array} \\right)u=0 for x\\gt 0, t\\gt 0; u(x,0)=≤ft( \\begin{array}{ccccccccccccccc} 0 \\\\ 0 \\\\ \\end{array} \\right) for x≥slant 0, and {{u}1}(0,t)=f(t) for t\\gt 0, with the real p=p(x),q=q(x). An input-output map R:{{u}1}(0,\\cdot )\\mapsto {{u}2}(0,\\cdot ) is of the convolution form Rf=if+r*f, where r=r(t) is a response function. By hyperbolicity of the system, for any T\\gt 0, function r{{|}0≤slant t≤slant 2T} is determined by p,q{{|}0≤slant x≤slant T}. An inverse problem is the following: for an (arbitrary) fixed T\\gt 0, given r{{|}0≤slant t≤slant 2T}, to recover p,q{{|}0≤slant x≤slant T}. The procedure that determines p,q is proposed, and the characteristic solvability conditions on r are provided. Our approach is purely time domain and is based on studying the controllability properties of the Dirac system. In itself the system is not controllable: the local completeness of states does not hold, but its relevant extension gains controllability. This is the fact that enables one to apply the boundary control method for solving the inverse problem.

  16. Estimates of European emissions of methyl chloroform using a Bayesian inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maione, M.; Graziosi, F.; Arduini, J.; Furlani, F.; Giostra, U.; Blake, D. R.; Bonasoni, P.; Fang, X.; Montzka, S. A.; O'Doherty, S. J.; Reimann, S.; Stohl, A.; Vollmer, M. K.

    2014-09-01

    Methyl chloroform (MCF) is a man-made chlorinated solvent contributing to the destruction of stratospheric ozone and is controlled under the "Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer" and its amendments, which called for its phase-out in 1996 in developed countries and 2015 in developing countries. Long-term, high-frequency observations of MCF carried out at three European sites show a constant decline in the background mixing ratios of MCF. However, we observe persistent non-negligible mixing ratio enhancements of MCF in pollution episodes, suggesting unexpectedly high ongoing emissions in Europe. In order to identify the source regions and to give an estimate of the magnitude of such emissions, we have used a Bayesian inversion method and a point source analysis, based on high-frequency long-term observations at the three European sites. The inversion identified southeastern France (SEF) as a region with enhanced MCF emissions. This estimate was confirmed by the point source analysis. We performed this analysis using an 11-year data set, from January 2002 to December 2012. Overall, emissions estimated for the European study domain decreased nearly exponentially from 1.1 Gg yr-1 in 2002 to 0.32 Gg yr-1 in 2012, of which the estimated emissions from the SEF region accounted for 0.49 Gg yr-1 in 2002 and 0.20 Gg yr-1 in 2012. The European estimates are a significant fraction of the total semi-hemisphere (30-90° N) emissions, contributing a minimum of 9.8% in 2004 and a maximum of 33.7% in 2011, of which on average 50% are from the SEF region. On the global scale, the SEF region is thus responsible for a minimum of 2.6% (in 2003) and a maximum of 10.3% (in 2009) of the global MCF emissions.

  17. Estimates of European emissions of methyl chloroform using a Bayesian inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maione, M.; Graziosi, F.; Arduini, J.; Furlani, F.; Giostra, U.; Blake, D. R.; Bonasoni, P.; Fang, X.; Montzka, S. A.; O'Doherty, S. J.; Reimann, S.; Stohl, A.; Vollmer, M. K.

    2014-03-01

    Methyl chloroform (MCF) is a man-made chlorinated solvent contributing to the destruction of stratospheric ozone and is controlled under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. Long-term, high-frequency observations of MCF carried out at three European sites show a constant decline of the background mixing ratios of MCF. However, we observe persistent non-negligible mixing ratio enhancements of MCF in pollution episodes suggesting unexpectedly high ongoing emissions in Europe. In order to identify the source regions and to give an estimate of the magnitude of such emissions, we have used a Bayesian inversion method and a point source analysis, based on high-frequency long-term observations at the three European sites. The inversion identified south-eastern France (SEF) as a region with enhanced MCF emissions. This estimate was confirmed by the point source analysis. We performed this analysis using an eleven-year data set, from January 2002 to December 2012. Overall emissions estimated for the European study domain decreased nearly exponentially from 1.1 Gg yr-1 in 2002 to 0.32 Gg yr-1 in 2012, of which the estimated emissions from the SEF region accounted for 0.49 Gg yr-1 in 2002 and 0.20 Gg yr-1 in 2012. The European estimates are a significant fraction of the total semi-hemisphere (30-90° N) emissions, contributing a minimum of 9.8% in 2004 and a maximum of 33.7% in 2011, of which on average 50% are from the SEF region. On the global scale, the SEF region is thus responsible from a minimum of 2.6% (in 2003) to a maximum of 10.3% (in 2009) of the global MCF emissions.

  18. Solving spatial inverse problems using the probability perturbation method: An S-GEMS implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Caers, Jef

    2008-09-01

    The probability perturbation method (PPM) is introduced as a flexible and efficient sampling technique for generating inverse solutions under a given prior geological constraint (prior model). In this paper, we present a methodology for producing software code that runs PPM within a public domain geostatistical software called the Stanford Geostatistical Earth Modeling Software (S-GEMS). The challenge in creating such code lies in the great diversity of forward models as well as prior models that can be handled by the PPM. Therefore, our software solution must be highly flexible and extensible such that it can be tailored to the various applications at hand. Our implementation has two main objectives: (1) to create an integrated working environment which provides users easy access to functionalities of the PPM through a general user interface as well as visualize results; (2) allow the users to plug-in their application specific code into the PPM algorithm workflow. We provide a two-part solution. The first part, which is hard-coded in S-GEMS as a plug-in module, runs the Dekker-Brent optimization algorithm to control the parameter perturbation needed for the inversion. It generates the PPM user interface and allows visualization of the spatial domain of interest using S-GEMS graphics capability. The second part is coded in object-oriented Python scripts and is used to control the PPM execution in S-GEMS. Users can program their particular needs in scripts and load them into S-GEMS as part of the PPM workflow. The same mechanism can be used to extend the capabilities of PPM itself by implementing new PPM variants in Python and making them a part of the base class hierarchy. Case studies are used to demonstrate the flexibility of our code. This approach requires the user to adapt only a small amount of python code, without modifying, or re-compiling the core S-GEMS code.

  19. Local Derivative-Free Parallel Computing Method for Solving the Inverse Problem in Groundwater Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, H. V.; Elshall, A. S.; Tsai, F. T.; Yan, L.

    2012-12-01

    The inverse problem in groundwater modeling deals with a rugged (i.e. ill-conditioned and multimodal), nonseparable and noisy function since it involves solving second order nonlinear partial deferential equations with forcing terms. Derivative-based optimization algorithms may fail to reach a near global solution due to their stagnation at a local minimum solution. To avoid entrapment in a local optimum and enhance search efficiency, this study introduces the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy (CMA-ES) as a local derivative-free optimization method. In the first part of the study, we compare CMA-ES with five commonly used heuristic methods and the traditional derivative-based Gauss-Newton method on a hypothetical problem. This problem involves four different cases to allow a rigorous assessment against ten criterions: ruggedness in terms of nonsmooth and multimodal, ruggedness in terms of ill-conditioning and high nonlinearity, nonseparablity, high dimensionality, noise, algorithm adaptation, algorithm tuning, performance, consistency, parallelization (scaling with number of cores) and invariance (solution vector and function values). The CMA-ES adapts a covariance matrix representing the pair-wise dependency between decision variables, which approximates the inverse of the Hessian matrix up to a certain factor. The solution is updated with the covariance matrix and an adaptable step size, which are adapted through two conjugates that implement heuristic control terms. The covariance matrix adaptation uses information from the current population of solutions and from the previous search path. Since such an elaborate search mechanism is not common in the other heuristic methods, CMA-ES proves to be more robust than other population-based heuristic methods in terms of reaching a near-optimal solution for a rugged, nonseparable and noisy inverse problem. Other favorable properties that the CMA-ES exhibits are the consistency of the solution for repeated

  20. Application of inverse methods to the estimation of boundary conditions and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaz, M.; Desbiolles, J.L.; Drezet, J.M.; Gandin, C.A.; Jacot, A.; Thevoz, P.

    1995-12-31

    Inverse methods can be used in solidification and related processes for the estimation of boundary conditions or physical properties of materials. For heat flow problems, these methods are based upon a minimization of the errors between calculated and measured temperatures at given locations and times of the space-time domain, the calculated values being obtained from a numerical solution of the heat flow equation. In the present case, a maximum a posteriori technique has been implemented into a finite element code. This method is then applied to several situations for the determination of: (1) the time-dependent heat-transfer coefficient at the surface of a steel rod which has been water-cooled after induction heating (non-stationary situation); (2) the space-dependent heat flow at the surface of a direct chill cast aluminum slab (stationary situation); and (3) the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of aluminum-silicon alloys. In this latter case, the influence of the silicon concentration on the thermal conductivity is clearly revealed.

  1. Identification of strain-rate and thermal sensitive material model with an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroni, L.; Scapin, M.; Peroni, M.

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a numerical inverse method to extract material strength parameters from the experimental data obtained via mechanical tests at different strainrates and temperatures. It will be shown that this procedure is particularly useful to analyse experimental results when the stress-strain fields in the specimen cannot be correctly described via analytical models. This commonly happens in specimens with no regular shape, in specimens with a regular shape when some instability phenomena occur (for example the necking phenomena in tensile tests that create a strongly heterogeneous stress-strain fields) or in dynamic tests (where the strain-rate field is not constant due to wave propagation phenomena). Furthermore the developed procedure is useful to take into account thermal phenomena generally affecting high strain-rate tests due to the adiabatic overheating related to the conversion of plastic work. The method presented requires strong effort both from experimental and numerical point of view, anyway it allows to precisely identify the parameters of different material models. This could provide great advantages when high reliability of the material behaviour is necessary. Applicability of this method is particularly indicated for special applications in the field of aerospace engineering, ballistic, crashworthiness studies or particle accelerator technologies, where materials could be submitted to strong plastic deformations at high-strain rate in a wide range of temperature. Thermal softening effect has been investigated in a temperature range between 20°C and 1000°C.

  2. An inverse inviscid method for the design of quasi-three dimensional rotating turbomachinery cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonataki, E.; Chaviaropoulos, P.; Papailiou, K. D.

    1991-01-01

    A new inverse inviscid method suitable for the design of rotating blade sections lying on an arbitrary axisymmetric stream-surface with varying streamtube width is presented. The geometry of the axisymmetric stream-surface and the streamtube width variation with meridional distance, the number of blades, the inlet flow conditions, the rotational speed and the suction and pressure side velocity distributions as functions of the normalized arc-length are given. The flow is considered irrotational in the absolute frame of reference and compressible. The output of the computation is the blade section that satisfies the above data. The method solves the flow equations on a (phi 1, psi) potential function-streamfunction plane for the velocity modulus, W and the flow angle beta; the blade section shape can then be obtained as part of the physical plane geometry by integrating the flow angle distribution along streamlines. The (phi 1, psi) plane is defined so that the monotonic behavior of the potential function is guaranteed, even in cases with high peripheral velocities. The method is validated on a rotating turbine case and used to design new blades. To obtain a closed blade, a set of closure conditions were developed and referred.

  3. Inverse Method for Estimating the Spatial Variability of Soil Particle Size Distribution from Observed Soil Moisture

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feifei; Peters-lidard, Christa D.; King, Anthony Wayne

    2010-11-01

    Soil particle size distribution (PSD) (i.e., clay, silt, sand, and rock contents) information is one of critical factors for understanding water cycle since it affects almost all of water cycle processes, e.g., drainage, runoff, soil moisture, evaporation, and evapotranspiration. With information about soil PSD, we can estimate almost all soil hydraulic properties (e.g., saturated soil moisture, field capacity, wilting point, residual soil moisture, saturated hydraulic conductivity, pore-size distribution index, and bubbling capillary pressure) based on published empirical relationships. Therefore, a regional or global soil PSD database is essential for studying water cycle regionally or globally. At the present stage, three soil geographic databases are commonly used, i.e., the Soil Survey Geographic database, the State Soil Geographic database, and the National Soil Geographic database. Those soil data are map unit based and associated with great uncertainty. Ground soil surveys are a way to reduce this uncertainty. However, ground surveys are time consuming and labor intensive. In this study, an inverse method for estimating mean and standard deviation of soil PSD from observed soil moisture is proposed and applied to Throughfall Displacement Experiment sites in Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. This method is based on the relationship between spatial mean and standard deviation of soil moisture. The results indicate that the suggested method is feasible and has potential for retrieving soil PSD information globally from remotely sensed soil moisture data.

  4. Inverse Method for Identification of Material Parameters Directly from Milling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurel, A.; Michel, G.; Thibaud, S.; Fontaine, M.; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-04-01

    An identification procedure for the determination of material parameters that are used for the FEM simulation of High Speed Machining processes is proposed. This procedure is based on the coupling of a numerical identification procedure and FEM simulations of milling operations. The experimental data result directly from measurements performed during milling experiments. A special device has been instrumented and calibrated to perform force and torque measures, directly during machining experiments in using a piezoelectric dynamometer and a high frequency charge amplifier. The forces and torques are stored and low pass filtered if necessary, and these data provide the main basis for the identification procedure which is based on coupling 3D FEM simulations of milling and optimization/identification algorithms. The identification approach is mainly based on the Surfaces Response Method in the material parameters space, coupled to a sensitivity analysis. A Moving Least Square Approximation method is used to accelerate the identification process. The material behaviour is described from Johnson-Cook law. A fracture model is also added to consider chip formation and separation. The FEM simulations of milling are performed using explicit ALE based FEM code. The inverse method of identification is here applied on a 304L stainless steel and the first results are presented.

  5. Inverse Method for Identification of Material Parameters Directly from Milling Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, A.; Michel, G.; Thibaud, S.; Fontaine, M.; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-04-07

    An identification procedure for the determination of material parameters that are used for the FEM simulation of High Speed Machining processes is proposed. This procedure is based on the coupling of a numerical identification procedure and FEM simulations of milling operations. The experimental data result directly from measurements performed during milling experiments. A special device has been instrumented and calibrated to perform force and torque measures, directly during machining experiments in using a piezoelectric dynamometer and a high frequency charge amplifier. The forces and torques are stored and low pass filtered if necessary, and these data provide the main basis for the identification procedure which is based on coupling 3D FEM simulations of milling and optimization/identification algorithms. The identification approach is mainly based on the Surfaces Response Method in the material parameters space, coupled to a sensitivity analysis. A Moving Least Square Approximation method is used to accelerate the identification process. The material behaviour is described from Johnson-Cook law. A fracture model is also added to consider chip formation and separation. The FEM simulations of milling are performed using explicit ALE based FEM code. The inverse method of identification is here applied on a 304L stainless steel and the first results are presented.

  6. Inverse transfer method using polymers with various functional groups for controllable graphene doping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Kyu; Yang, Jae Won; Kim, Hyun Ho; Jo, Sae Byeok; Kang, Boseok; Bong, Hyojin; Lee, Hyo Chan; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S; Cho, Kilwon

    2014-08-26

    The polymer-supported transfer of chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene provides large-area and high-quality graphene on a target substrate; however, the polymer and organic solvent residues left by the transfer process hinder the application of CVD-grown graphene in electronic and photonic devices. Here, we describe an inverse transfer method (ITM) that permits the simultaneous transfer and doping of graphene without generating undesirable residues by using polymers with different functional groups. Unlike conventional wet transfer methods, the polymer supporting layer used in the ITM serves as a graphene doping layer placed at the interface between the graphene and the substrate. Polymers bearing functional groups can induce n-doping or p-doping into the graphene depending on the electron-donating or -withdrawing characteristics of functional groups. Theoretical models of dipole layer-induced graphene doping offered insights into the experimentally measured change in the work function and the Dirac point of the graphene. Finally, the electrical properties of pentacene field effect transistors prepared using graphene electrodes could be enhanced by employing the ITM to introduce a polymer layer that tuned the work function of graphene. The versatility of polymer functional groups suggests that the method developed here will provide valuable routes to the development of applications of CVD-grown graphene in organic electronic devices. PMID:25050634

  7. Inverse Monte Carlo method in a multilayered tissue model for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2012-04-01

    Model based data analysis of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy data enables the estimation of optical and structural tissue parameters. The aim of this study was to present an inverse Monte Carlo method based on spectra from two source-detector distances (0.4 and 1.2 mm), using a multilayered tissue model. The tissue model variables include geometrical properties, light scattering properties, tissue chromophores such as melanin and hemoglobin, oxygen saturation and average vessel diameter. The method utilizes a small set of presimulated Monte Carlo data for combinations of different levels of epidermal thickness and tissue scattering. The path length distributions in the different layers are stored and the effect of the other parameters is added in the post-processing. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of tissue-like models containing discrete blood vessels, evaluating blood tissue fraction and oxygenation. It was also compared to a homogeneous model. The multilayer model performed better than the homogeneous model and all tissue parameters significantly improved spectral fitting. Recorded in vivo spectra were fitted well at both distances, which we previously found was not possible with a homogeneous model. No absolute intensity calibration is needed and the algorithm is fast enough for real-time processing. PMID:22559695

  8. Inverse PCR-based method for isolating novel SINEs from genome.

    PubMed

    Han, Yawei; Chen, Liping; Guan, Lihong; He, Shunping

    2014-04-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are moderately repetitive DNA sequences in eukaryotic genomes. Although eukaryotic genomes contain numerous SINEs copy, it is very difficult and laborious to isolate and identify them by the reported methods. In this study, the inverse PCR was successfully applied to isolate SINEs from Opsariichthys bidens genome in Eastern Asian Cyprinid. A group of SINEs derived from tRNA(Ala) molecular had been identified, which were named Opsar according to Opsariichthys. SINEs characteristics were exhibited in Opsar, which contained a tRNA(Ala)-derived region at the 5' end, a tRNA-unrelated region, and AT-rich region at the 3' end. The tRNA-derived region of Opsar shared 76 % sequence similarity with tRNA(Ala) gene. This result indicated that Opsar could derive from the inactive or pseudogene of tRNA(Ala). The reliability of method was tested by obtaining C-SINE, Ct-SINE, and M-SINEs from Ctenopharyngodon idellus, Megalobrama amblycephala, and Cyprinus carpio genomes. This method is simpler than the previously reported, which successfully omitted many steps, such as preparation of probes, construction of genomic libraries, and hybridization. PMID:24122282

  9. A Blind Test Experiment in Volcano Geodesy: a Benchmark for Inverse Methods of Ground Deformation and Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, Luca; Fernandez, Jose; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Rivalta, Eleonora; Camacho, Antonio; Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The inversion of ground deformation and gravity data is affected by an intrinsic ambiguity because of the mathematical formulation of the inverse problem. Current methods for the inversion of geodetic data rely on both parametric (i.e. assuming a source geometry) and non-parametric approaches. The former are able to catch the fundamental features of the ground deformation source but, if the assumptions are wrong or oversimplified, they could provide misleading results. On the other hand, the latter class of methods, even if not relying on stringent assumptions, could suffer from artifacts, especially when dealing with poor datasets. In the framework of the EC-FP7 MED-SUV project we aim at comparing different inverse approaches to verify how they cope with basic goals of Volcano Geodesy: determining the source depth, the source shape (size and geometry), the nature of the source (magmatic/hydrothermal) and hinting the complexity of the source. Other aspects that are important in volcano monitoring are: volume/mass transfer toward shallow depths, propagation of dikes/sills, forecasting the opening of eruptive vents. On the basis of similar experiments already done in the fields of seismic tomography and geophysical imaging, we have devised a bind test experiment. Our group was divided into one model design team and several inversion teams. The model design team devised two physical models representing volcanic events at two distinct volcanoes (one stratovolcano and one caldera). They provided the inversion teams with: the topographic reliefs, the calculated deformation field (on a set of simulated GPS stations and as InSAR interferograms) and the gravity change (on a set of simulated campaign stations). The nature of the volcanic events remained unknown to the inversion teams until after the submission of the inversion results. Here we present the preliminary results of this comparison in order to determine which features of the ground deformation and gravity source

  10. A Blind Test Experiment in Volcano Geodesy: a Benchmark for Inverse Methods of Ground Deformation and Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, L.; Fernandez, J.; Puglisi, G.; Rivalta, E.; Camacho, A. G.; Nikkhoo, M.; Walter, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    The inversion of ground deformation and gravity data is affected by an intrinsic ambiguity because of the mathematical formulation of the inverse problem. Current methods for the inversion of geodetic data rely on both parametric (i.e. assuming a source geometry) and non-parametric approaches. The former are able to catch the fundamental features of the ground deformation source but, if the assumptions are wrong or oversimplified, they could provide misleading results. On the other hand, the latter class of methods, even if not relying on stringent assumptions, could suffer from artifacts, especially when dealing with poor datasets. In the framework of the EC-FP7 MED-SUV project we aim at comparing different inverse approaches to verify how they cope with basic goals of Volcano Geodesy: determining the source depth, the source shape (size and geometry), the nature of the source (magmatic/hydrothermal) and hinting the complexity of the source. Other aspects that are important in volcano monitoring are: volume/mass transfer toward shallow depths, propagation of dikes/sills, forecasting the opening of eruptive vents. On the basis of similar experiments already done in the fields of seismic tomography and geophysical imaging, we have devised a bind test experiment. Our group was divided into one model design team and several inversion teams. The model design team devised two physical models representing volcanic events at two distinct volcanoes (one stratovolcano and one caldera). They provided the inversion teams with: the topographic reliefs, the calculated deformation field (on a set of simulated GPS stations and as InSAR interferograms) and the gravity change (on a set of simulated campaign stations). The nature of the volcanic events remained unknown to the inversion teams until after the submission of the inversion results. Here we present the preliminary results of this comparison in order to determine which features of the ground deformation and gravity source

  11. Mass Profile of Abell 2204 An X-Ray Analysis of Abell 2204 using XMM-Newton Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Travis

    2003-09-05

    The vast majority of the matter in the universe is of an unknown type. This matter is called dark matter by astronomers. The dark matter manifests itself only through gravitational interaction and is otherwise undetectable. The distribution of this matter in can be better understood by studying the mass profile of galaxy clusters. The X-ray emissions of the galaxy cluster Abell 2204 were analyzed using archived data from the XMM-Newton space telescope. We analyze a 40ks observation of Abell 2204 and present a radial temperature and radial mass profile based on hydrostatic equilibrium calculations.

  12. Study on Fault Diagnostics of a Turboprop Engine Using Inverse Performance Model and Artificial Intelligent Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Changduk; Lim, Semyeong

    2011-12-01

    Recently, the health monitoring system of major gas path components of gas turbine uses mostly the model based method like the Gas Path Analysis (GPA). This method is to find quantity changes of component performance characteristic parameters such as isentropic efficiency and mass flow parameter by comparing between measured engine performance parameters such as temperatures, pressures, rotational speeds, fuel consumption, etc. and clean engine performance parameters without any engine faults which are calculated by the base engine performance model. Currently, the expert engine diagnostic systems using the artificial intelligent methods such as Neural Networks (NNs), Fuzzy Logic and Genetic Algorithms (GAs) have been studied to improve the model based method. Among them the NNs are mostly used to the engine fault diagnostic system due to its good learning performance, but it has a drawback due to low accuracy and long learning time to build learning data base if there are large amount of learning data. In addition, it has a very complex structure for finding effectively single type faults or multiple type faults of gas path components. This work builds inversely a base performance model of a turboprop engine to be used for a high altitude operation UAV using measured performance data, and proposes a fault diagnostic system using the base engine performance model and the artificial intelligent methods such as Fuzzy logic and Neural Network. The proposed diagnostic system isolates firstly the faulted components using Fuzzy Logic, then quantifies faults of the identified components using the NN leaned by fault learning data base, which are obtained from the developed base performance model. In leaning the NN, the Feed Forward Back Propagation (FFBP) method is used. Finally, it is verified through several test examples that the component faults implanted arbitrarily in the engine are well isolated and quantified by the proposed diagnostic system.

  13. An inverse method to determine the mechanical properties of the iris in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanical properties of the iris can help to have an insight into the eye diseases with abnormalities of the iris morphology. Material parameters of the iris were simply calculated relying on the ex vivo experiment. However, the mechanical response of the iris in vivo is different from that ex vivo, therefore, a method was put forward to determine the material parameters of the iris using the optimization method in combination with the finite element method based on the in vivo experiment. Material and methods Ocular hypertension was induced by rapid perfusion to the anterior chamber, during perfusion intraocular pressures in the anterior and posterior chamber were record by sensors, images of the anterior segment were captured by the ultrasonic system. The displacement of the characteristic points on the surface of the iris was calculated. A finite element model of the anterior chamber was developed using the ultrasonic image before perfusion, the multi-island genetic algorithm was employed to determine the material parameters of the iris by minimizing the difference between the finite element simulation and the experimental measurements. Results Material parameters of the iris in vivo were identified as the iris was taken as a nearly incompressible second-order Ogden solid. Values of the parameters μ1, α1, μ2 and α2 were 0.0861 ± 0.0080 MPa, 54.2546 ± 12.7180, 0.0754 ± 0.0200 MPa, and 48.0716 ± 15.7796 respectively. The stability of the inverse finite element method was verified, the sensitivity of the model parameters was investigated. Conclusion Material properties of the iris in vivo could be determined using the multi-island genetic algorithm coupled with the finite element method based on the experiment. PMID:24886660

  14. Reconstruction of ecosystem flows using inverse methods: how well do they work?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vézina, Alain F.; Pahlow, Markus

    2003-04-01

    Inverse modelling is used to synthesize multivariate observations from marine and freshwater ecosystems into descriptions of mass flows among ecological and biogeochemical components. However, the conditions that affect the accuracy of these analyses remain poorly understood. In particular, it is suspected that the steady-state assumption often used in these analyses and the flow minimization principle that underlie inverse modelling introduce distortions into the reconstructions of ecosystem flows, but these potential biases have not been quantitatively investigated. Simulated inverse experiments were conducted to shed some light on these issues. In these experiments, inverse analyses are run on 'artificial' observations generated from a mechanistic ecological-biogeochemical model. The simulated experiments indicate that the steady-state assumption has little impact on the accuracy of inverse reconstructions of ecosystem flows. Inverse analyses run on observations from simulations of transient states are as accurate as analyses run on observations from simulations at steady state. The accuracy of inverse reconstructions is related to structural and dynamic features of the ecosystem. Inverse reconstructions on simulated ecosystems with weak nutrient recycling (dependent mostly on external nutrients) or with simple food webs show little bias. Reconstructions of simulated ecosystems with strong recycling or complex food webs show significantly more bias, with a tendency to overestimate small flows and to underestimate large flows. Despite these biases, inverse reconstructions were successful at detecting changes in flow structure associated with changes in simulated ecosystem properties. The simulations also indicate that the inverse analyses based on simultaneous accounting of more than one currency (e.g. carbon+nitrogen) should be preferred over analyses based on balancing only one currency (e.g. carbon or nitrogen).

  15. An estimate of the terrestrial carbon budget of Russia using inventory-based, eddy covariance and inversion methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolman, A. J.; Shvidenko, A.; Schepaschenko, D.; Ciais, P.; Tchebakova, N.; Chen, T.; van der Molen, M. K.; Belelli Marchesini, L.; Maximov, T. C.; Maksyutov, S.; Schulze, E.-D.

    2012-12-01

    We determine the net land to atmosphere flux of carbon in Russia, including Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan, using inventory-based, eddy covariance, and inversion methods. Our high boundary estimate is -342 Tg C yr-1 from the eddy covariance method, and this is close to the upper bounds of the inventory-based Land Ecosystem Assessment and inverse models estimates. A lower boundary estimate is provided at -1350 Tg C yr-1 from the inversion models. The average of the three methods is -613.5 Tg C yr-1. The methane emission is estimated separately at 41.4 Tg C yr-1. These three methods agree well within their respective error bounds. There is thus good consistency between bottom-up and top-down methods. The forests of Russia primarily cause the net atmosphere to land flux (-692 Tg C yr-1 from the LEA. It remains however remarkable that the three methods provide such close estimates (-615, -662, -554 Tg C yr-1) for net biome production (NBP), given the inherent uncertainties in all of the approaches. The lack of recent forest inventories, the few eddy covariance sites and associated uncertainty with upscaling and undersampling of concentrations for the inversions are among the prime causes of the uncertainty. The dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) suggest a much lower uptake at -91 Tg C yr-1, and we argue that this is caused by a high estimate of heterotrophic respiration compared to other methods.

  16. Application of Adjoint Method and Spectral-Element Method to Tomographic Inversion of Regional Seismological Structure Beneath Japanese Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, S.; Miyoshi, T.; Obayashi, M.; Tono, Y.; Ando, K.

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in large scale computing by using waveform modeling technique and high performance computing facility has demonstrated possibilities to perform full-waveform inversion of three dimensional (3D) seismological structure inside the Earth. We apply the adjoint method (Liu and Tromp, 2006) to obtain 3D structure beneath Japanese Islands. First we implemented Spectral-Element Method to K-computer in Kobe, Japan. We have optimized SPECFEM3D_GLOBE (Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002) by using OpenMP so that the code fits hybrid architecture of K-computer. Now we could use 82,134 nodes of K-computer (657,072 cores) to compute synthetic waveform with about 1 sec accuracy for realistic 3D Earth model and its performance was 1.2 PFLOPS. We use this optimized SPECFEM3D_GLOBE code and take one chunk around Japanese Islands from global mesh and compute synthetic seismograms with accuracy of about 10 second. We use GAP-P2 mantle tomography model (Obayashi et al., 2009) as an initial 3D model and use as many broadband seismic stations available in this region as possible to perform inversion. We then use the time windows for body waves and surface waves to compute adjoint sources and calculate adjoint kernels for seismic structure. We have performed several iteration and obtained improved 3D structure beneath Japanese Islands. The result demonstrates that waveform misfits between observed and theoretical seismograms improves as the iteration proceeds. We now prepare to use much shorter period in our synthetic waveform computation and try to obtain seismic structure for basin scale model, such as Kanto basin, where there are dense seismic network and high seismic activity. Acknowledgements: This research was partly supported by MEXT Strategic Program for Innovative Research. We used F-net seismograms of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention.

  17. Acoustic method for defining the stress state of a rock massif based on solution of the seismic inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, L. A.; Nazarova, L. A.; Romenskii, E. I.; Tcheverda, V. A.; Epov, M. I.

    2016-02-01

    A method for estimating the stress-strain state of a rock massif in the vicinity of underground facilities is substantiated. This method is based on solution of the boundary inverse problem of defining the components of an external stress field from the acoustic sounding data. The acoustic sounding data used are the arrival times of diving head longitudinal waves, recorded in a long mine shaft. Numerical experiments have revealed the optimal arrangement of the recording network and the limited relative error in the input data, which, taken together, provide for solvability of the inverse problem.

  18. Feasibility of determining surface emissions of trace gases using an inverse method in a three-dimensional chemical transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Dana; Prinn, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    The paper investigates the feasibility of using an inverse method based on a linear Kalman filter in a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model, for the determination of regional surface fluxes with rapid convergence, using data from a finite number of observation sites. It was found that the inverse method used was capable to accurately determine regional surface fluxes using the present ALE/GALE sites, and to converge to the correct solution within a year or two, using initial conditions very different from the final solution.

  19. Asteroid orbital inversion using a virtual-observation Markov-chain Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muinonen, Karri; Granvik, Mikael; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara; Pieniluoma, Tuomo; Pentikäinen, Hanna

    2012-12-01

    A novel virtual-observation Markov-chain Monte Carlo method (MCMC) is presented for the asteroid orbital inverse problem posed by small to moderate numbers of astrometric observations. In the method, the orbital-element proposal probability density is chosen to mimic the convolution of the a posteriori density by itself: first, random errors are simulated for each observation, resulting in a set of virtual observations; second, least-squares orbital elements are derived for the virtual observations using the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method; third, repeating the procedure gives a difference between two sets of what can be called virtual least-squares elements; and, fourth, the difference obtained constitutes a symmetric proposal in a random-walk Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, avoiding the explicit computation of the proposal density. In practice, the proposals are based on a large number of pre-computed sets of orbital elements. Virtual-observation MCMC is thus based on the characterization of the phase-space volume of solutions before the actual MCMC sampling. Virtual-observation MCMC is compared to MCMC orbital ranging, a random-walk Metropolis-Hastings algorithm based on sampling with the help of Cartesian positions at two observation dates, in the case of the near-Earth asteroid (85640) 1998 OX4. In the present preliminary comparison, the methods yield similar results for a 9.1-day observational time interval extracted from the full current astrometry of the asteroid. In the future, both of the methods are to be applied to the astrometric observations of the Gaia mission.

  20. Aquifer characterization and uncertainty assessment: an ensemble-based pattern matching inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Srinivasan, S.; Zhou, H.; Gómez-Hernández, J.

    2013-12-01

    In complex geological systems such as fluvial aquifers, carbonate systems and naturally fractured aquifers, multiple-point statistics (MPS) based modeling methods are required to characterize complex, curvilinear features. History matching with MPS calls for an effective inverse method that can not only honor the observed dynamic data, but also preserve the curvilinear geologic features that impact the aquifer remediation. We introduce a novel pattern matching based approach to history matching that uses an ensemble of prior of models capturing the prior uncertainty in geology. In the developed method, multiple point pattern-search is implemented not only to identify the pattern of conductivity variability in the neighborhood of a simulation node but also the pattern of state (for example, piezometric head) variables. The unknown parameter and state values are simultaneously and sequentially simulated by pattern searching through an ensemble of realizations rather than by optimizing an objective function. In order to accelerate the computational efficiency, pattern-search is applied only at the predefined pilot point locations. Subsequently, a fast MPS method is employed to extrapolate the spatial patterns away from the pilot points. The pattern search algorithm also utilizes a flexible search radius that can be optimized for the estimation of either large-scale or short-scale structures. The algorithm is evaluated for both categorical and continuous conductivity fields by continuous conditioning to the observed dynamic data. The results show that the measured conductivity and head data can be updated in a continuous fashion as dynamic data becomes available and flow predictions are more accurate. Furthermore, curvilinear geologic structures are preserved after data integration. The significant advantages of this method are: (1) parameter and state variable do not have to be modeled using the multi-Gaussian distribution; (2) the relationship between parameters and

  1. Constraining the solutions of an inverse method of stellar population synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moultaka, J.; Boisson, C.; Joly, M.; Pelat, D.

    2004-06-01

    In three previous papers (Pelat \\cite{Pelat97}, MNRAS, 284, 365; Pelat \\cite{Pelat98}, MNRAS, 299, 877; Moultaka & Pelat \\cite{Moultaka00}, MNRAS, 314, 409), we set out an inverse stellar population synthesis method that uses a database of stellar spectra. Unlike other methods, this one provides full knowledge of all possible solutions as well as a good estimation of their stability; moreover, it provides the unique approximate solution, when the problem is overdetermined, using a rigorous minimization procedure. In Boisson et al. (\\cite{Boisson00}, A&A, 357, 850), this method was applied to 10 active and 2 normal galaxies. In this paper we analyse the results of the method after constraining the solutions. Adding {a priori} physical conditions to the solutions constitutes a good way to regularize the synthesis problem. As an illustration we introduce physical constraints on the relative number of stars taking into account our present knowledge of the initial mass function in galaxies. To avoid biases on the solutions due to such constraints, we use constraints involving only inequalities between the number of stars, after dividing the H-R diagram into various groups of stellar masses. We discuss the results for a well-known globular cluster of the galaxy M 31 and discuss some of the galaxies studied in Boisson et al. (\\cite{Boisson00}, A&A, 357, 850). We find that, given the spectral resolution and the spectral domain, the method is very stable according to such constraints (i.e. the constrained solutions are almost the same as the unconstrained one). However, additional information can be derived about the evolutionary stage of the last burst of star formation, but the precise age of this particular burst seems to be questionable. Appendix A, Figs. 2-5 and Tables 4-6 are only available in electronique form at http://www.edpsciences.org moultaka@ph1.uni-koeln.de

  2. Systematic hierarchical coarse-graining with the inverse Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Naômé, Aymeric; Vercauteren, Daniel P; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-12-28

    We outline our coarse-graining strategy for linking micro- and mesoscales of soft matter and biological systems. The method is based on effective pairwise interaction potentials obtained in detailed ab initio or classical atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, which can be used in simulations at less accurate level after scaling up the size. The effective potentials are obtained by applying the inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method [A. P. Lyubartsev and A. Laaksonen, Phys. Rev. E 52(4), 3730-3737 (1995)] on a chosen subset of degrees of freedom described in terms of radial distribution functions. An in-house software package MagiC is developed to obtain the effective potentials for arbitrary molecular systems. In this work we compute effective potentials to model DNA-protein interactions (bacterial LiaR regulator bound to a 26 base pairs DNA fragment) at physiological salt concentration at a coarse-grained (CG) level. Normally the IMC CG pair-potentials are used directly as look-up tables but here we have fitted them to five Gaussians and a repulsive wall. Results show stable association between DNA and the model protein as well as similar position fluctuation profile. PMID:26723605

  3. Identifying the dynamic compressive stiffness of a prospective biomimetic elastomer by an inverse method.

    PubMed

    Mates, Steven P; Forster, Aaron M; Hunston, Donald; Rhorer, Richard; Everett, Richard K; Simmonds, Kirth E; Bagchi, Amit

    2012-10-01

    Soft elastomeric materials that mimic real soft human tissues are sought to provide realistic experimental devices to simulate the human body's response to blast loading to aid the development of more effective protective equipment. The dynamic mechanical behavior of these materials is often measured using a Kolsky bar because it can achieve both the high strain rates (>100s(-1)) and the large strains (>20%) that prevail in blast scenarios. Obtaining valid results is challenging, however, due to poor dynamic equilibrium, friction, and inertial effects. To avoid these difficulties, an inverse method was employed to determine the dynamic response of a soft, prospective biomimetic elastomer using Kolsky bar tests coupled with high-speed 3D digital image correlation. Individual tests were modeled using finite elements, and the dynamic stiffness of the elastomer was identified by matching the simulation results with test data using numerical optimization. Using this method, the average dynamic response was found to be nearly equivalent to the quasi-static response measured with stress-strain curves at compressive strains up to 60%, with an uncertainty of ±18%. Moreover, the behavior was consistent with the results in stress relaxation experiments and oscillatory tests although the latter were performed at lower strain levels. PMID:22982958

  4. Modified Inverse First Order Reliability Method (I-FORM) for Predicting Extreme Sea States.

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-09-01

    Environmental contours describing extreme sea states are generated as the input for numerical or physical model simulation s as a part of the stand ard current practice for designing marine structure s to survive extreme sea states. Such environmental contours are characterized by combinations of significant wave height ( ) and energy period ( ) values calculated for a given recurrence interval using a set of data based on hindcast simulations or buoy observations over a sufficient period of record. The use of the inverse first - order reliability method (IFORM) i s standard design practice for generating environmental contours. In this paper, the traditional appli cation of the IFORM to generating environmental contours representing extreme sea states is described in detail and its merits and drawbacks are assessed. The application of additional methods for analyzing sea state data including the use of principal component analysis (PCA) to create an uncorrelated representation of the data under consideration is proposed. A reexamination of the components of the IFORM application to the problem at hand including the use of new distribution fitting techniques are shown to contribute to the development of more accurate a nd reasonable representations of extreme sea states for use in survivability analysis for marine struc tures. Keywords: In verse FORM, Principal Component Analysis , Environmental Contours, Extreme Sea State Characteri zation, Wave Energy Converters

  5. Highly stable concentrated nanoemulsions by the phase inversion composition method at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lijie; Li, Chao; Xu, Jian; Hao, Jingcheng; Sun, Dejun

    2012-10-16

    Oil-in-water nanoemulsions were produced in the system water/Span 80-Tween 80/paraffin oil via the phase inversion composition (PIC) method at elevated temperature. With the increase of preparation temperature from 20 to 70 °C, we found that the emulsion droplet diameter decreases from 10.3 μm to 51 nm, proving the formation of nanoemulsions. The viscosity of nanoemulsions clearly increases with droplet volume fraction, φ, but the droplet size changes less. Significantly, at φ ≤ 0.5, the size distribution of nanoemulsions can be kept unchangeable more than 5 months. These results proved that the highly viscous paraffin oil can hardly be dispersed by the PIC method at 25 °C, but the increase in preparation temperature makes it possible for producing monodisperse nanoemulsions. Once the nanoemulsion is produced, the stability against Ostwald ripening is outstanding due to the extremely low solubility of the paraffin oil in the continuous phase. The highly stable nanoemulsions are of great importance in practical applications. PMID:22985401

  6. Bulk Modulus of Spherical Palladium Nanoparticles by Chen-Mobius Lattice Inversion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Hafidh, Esam

    2015-03-01

    Palladium is a precious and rare element that belongs to the Platinum group metals (PGMS) with the lowest density and melting point. Numerous uses of Pd in dentistry, medicine and industrial applications attracted considerable investment. Preparation and characterization of palladium nanoparticles have been conducted by many researchers, but very little effort has taken place on the study of Pd physical properties, such as, mechanical, optical, and electrical. In this study, Chen-Mobius lattice inversion method is used to calculate the cohesive energy and modulus of palladium. The method was employed to calculate the cohesive energy by summing over all pairs of atoms within palladium spherical nanoparticles. The modulus is derived from the cohesive energy curve as a function of particles' sizes. The cohesive energy has been calculated using the potential energy function proposed by (Rose et al., 1981). The results are found to be comparable with previous predictions of metallic nanoparticles. This work is supported by the Royal commission at Yanbu- Saudi Arabia.

  7. Determination of optical properties in dental restorative biomaterials using the inverse-adding-doubling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function, the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). By means of the inverse-adding-doubling (IAD) method, transmittance and reflectance measurements lead to the determination of the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient. The additional measurement of the phase function performed by goniometry allows the separation of the reduced scattering coefficient into the scattering coefficient and the scattering anisotropy factor. The majority of techniques, such as the one utilized in this work, involve the use of integrating spheres to measure total transmission and reflection. We have employed an integrating sphere setup to measure the total transmittance and reflectance of dental biomaterials used in restorative dentistry. Dental biomaterials are meant to replace dental tissues, such as enamel and dentine, in irreversibly diseased teeth. In previous works we performed goniometric measurements in order to evaluate the scattering anisotropy factor for these kinds of materials. In the present work we have used the IAD method to combine the measurements performed using the integrating sphere setup with the results of the previous goniometric measurements. The aim was to optically characterize the dental biomaterials analyzed, since whole studies to assess the appropriate material properties are required in medical applications. In this context, complete optical characterizations play an important role in achieving the fulfillment of optimal quality and the final success of dental biomaterials used in restorative dentistry.

  8. Conditionals by inversion provide a universal method for the generation of conditional alleles

    PubMed Central

    Economides, Aris N.; Frendewey, David; Yang, Peter; Dominguez, Melissa G.; Dore, Anthony T.; Lobov, Ivan B.; Persaud, Trikaldarshi; Rojas, Jose; McClain, Joyce; Lengyel, Peter; Droguett, Gustavo; Chernomorsky, Rostislav; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; DeChiara, Thomas M.; Pouyemirou, William; Cruz, Joseph M.; Feeley, Kieran; Mellis, Ian A.; Yasenchack, Jason; Hatsell, Sarah J.; Xie, LiQin; Latres, Esther; Huang, Lily; Zhang, Yuhong; Pefanis, Evangelos; Skokos, Dimitris; Deckelbaum, Ron A.; Croll, Susan D.; Davis, Samuel; Valenzuela, David M.; Gale, Nicholas W.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Yancopoulos, George D.

    2013-01-01

    Conditional mutagenesis is becoming a method of choice for studying gene function, but constructing conditional alleles is often laborious, limited by target gene structure, and at times, prone to incomplete conditional ablation. To address these issues, we developed a technology termed conditionals by inversion (COIN). Before activation, COINs contain an inverted module (COIN module) that lies inertly within the antisense strand of a resident gene. When inverted into the sense strand by a site-specific recombinase, the COIN module causes termination of the target gene’s transcription and simultaneously provides a reporter for tracking this event. COIN modules can be inserted into natural introns (intronic COINs) or directly into coding exons as part of an artificial intron (exonic COINs), greatly simplifying allele design and increasing flexibility over previous conditional KO approaches. Detailed analysis of over 20 COIN alleles establishes the reliability of the method and its broad applicability to any gene, regardless of exon–intron structure. Our extensive testing provides rules that help ensure success of this approach and also explains why other currently available conditional approaches often fail to function optimally. Finally, the ability to split exons using the COIN’s artificial intron opens up engineering modalities for the generation of multifunctional alleles. PMID:23918385

  9. Systematic hierarchical coarse-graining with the inverse Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Naômé, Aymeric; Vercauteren, Daniel P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-12-01

    We outline our coarse-graining strategy for linking micro- and mesoscales of soft matter and biological systems. The method is based on effective pairwise interaction potentials obtained in detailed ab initio or classical atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, which can be used in simulations at less accurate level after scaling up the size. The effective potentials are obtained by applying the inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method [A. P. Lyubartsev and A. Laaksonen, Phys. Rev. E 52(4), 3730-3737 (1995)] on a chosen subset of degrees of freedom described in terms of radial distribution functions. An in-house software package MagiC is developed to obtain the effective potentials for arbitrary molecular systems. In this work we compute effective potentials to model DNA-protein interactions (bacterial LiaR regulator bound to a 26 base pairs DNA fragment) at physiological salt concentration at a coarse-grained (CG) level. Normally the IMC CG pair-potentials are used directly as look-up tables but here we have fitted them to five Gaussians and a repulsive wall. Results show stable association between DNA and the model protein as well as similar position fluctuation profile.

  10. Systematic hierarchical coarse-graining with the inverse Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Naômé, Aymeric; Vercauteren, Daniel P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-12-28

    We outline our coarse-graining strategy for linking micro- and mesoscales of soft matter and biological systems. The method is based on effective pairwise interaction potentials obtained in detailed ab initio or classical atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, which can be used in simulations at less accurate level after scaling up the size. The effective potentials are obtained by applying the inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method [A. P. Lyubartsev and A. Laaksonen, Phys. Rev. E 52(4), 3730–3737 (1995)] on a chosen subset of degrees of freedom described in terms of radial distribution functions. An in-house software package MagiC is developed to obtain the effective potentials for arbitrary molecular systems. In this work we compute effective potentials to model DNA-protein interactions (bacterial LiaR regulator bound to a 26 base pairs DNA fragment) at physiological salt concentration at a coarse-grained (CG) level. Normally the IMC CG pair-potentials are used directly as look-up tables but here we have fitted them to five Gaussians and a repulsive wall. Results show stable association between DNA and the model protein as well as similar position fluctuation profile.

  11. AGES Observations of Abell1367 and its Outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Minchin, R. F.; Auld, R. R.; Davies, J. I.; Catinella, B.; Momjian, E.; Rosenberg, J. L.; O'Neil, K.

    2007-05-01

    The Arecibo Galactic Environment Survey (AGES) will map over the next years ˜200 square degrees using the ALFA feed array at the 305-m Arecibo Telescope. AGES is specifically designed to investigate various galactic environments from local voids to interacting groups and cluster of galaxies. AGES will map 20 square degrees in the Coma-Abell1367 supercluster covering all the Abell cluster 1367 and its outskirts (˜2 virial radii). In Spring 2006 we nearly completed the observations of 5 square degrees in the range (11:34Abell1367 (˜92 Mpc). An HI selected sample has been extracted from the datacube obtaining a complete catalogue of fluxes, recessional velocities, positions and velocity widths. We will present a preliminary analysis of the properties of the HI sources and report the discovery of HI diffuse features within interacting groups at the periphery of Abell1367.

  12. Retrieval Performance and Indexing Differences in ABELL and MLAIB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Vince

    2012-01-01

    Searches for 117 British authors are compared in the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (ABELL) and the Modern Language Association International Bibliography (MLAIB). Authors are organized by period and genre within the early modern era. The number of records for each author was subdivided by format, language of publication,…

  13. The Morphological Decomposition of Abell 868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, S. P.; Odewahn, S. C.; Echevarria, L.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Phillipps, S.; Couch, W. J.

    2003-12-01

    We report on the morphological luminosity functions (LFs) and radial profiles derived for the galaxy population within the rich cluster Abell 868 (z=0.153) based purely on Hubble Space Telescope imaging in F606W. We recover Schechter functions (-24.0

  14. Fully three-dimensional and viscous semi-inverse method for axial/radial turbomachine blade design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Min

    2008-10-01

    A fully three-dimensional viscous semi-inverse method for the design of turbomachine blades is presented in this work. Built on a time marching Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver, the inverse scheme is capable of designing axial/radial turbomachinery blades in flow regimes ranging from very low Mach number to transonic/supersonic flows. In order to solve flow at all-speed conditions, the preconditioning technique is incorporated into the basic JST time-marching scheme. The accuracy of the resulting flow solver is verified with documented experimental data and commercial CFD codes. The level of accuracy of the flow solver exhibited in those verification cases is typical of CFD analysis employed in the design process in industry. The inverse method described in the present work takes pressure loading and blade thickness as prescribed quantities and computes the corresponding three-dimensional blade camber surface. In order to have the option of imposing geometrical constraints on the designed blade shapes, a new inverse algorithm is developed to solve the camber surface at specified spanwise pseudo stream-tubes (i.e. along grid lines), while the blade geometry is constructed through ruling (e.g. straight-line element) at the remaining spanwise stations. The new inverse algorithm involves re-formulating the boundary condition on the blade surfaces as a hybrid inverse/analysis boundary condition, preserving the full three-dimensional nature of the flow. The new design procedure can be interpreted as a fully three-dimensional viscous semi-inverse method. The ruled surface design ensures the blade surface smoothness and mechanical integrity as well as achieves cost reduction for the manufacturing process. A numerical target shooting experiment for a mixed flow impeller shows that the semi-inverse method is able to accurately recover the target blade composed of straightline element from a different initial blade. The semi-inverse method is proved to work well with

  15. Site Effects Estimation by a Transfer-Station Generalized Inversion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Yu, Xiangwei

    2016-04-01

    Site effect is one of the essential factors in characterizing strong ground motion as well as in earthquake engineering design. In this study, the generalized inversion technique (GIT) is applied to estimate site effects. Moreover, the GIT is modified to improve its analytical ability.GIT needs a reference station as a standard. Ideally the reference station is located at a rock site, and its site effect is considered to be a constant. For the same earthquake, the record spectrum of an interested station is divided by that of the reference station, and the source term is eliminated. Thus site effects and the attenuation can be acquired. In the GIT process, the amount of earthquake data available in analysis is limited to that recorded by the reference station, and the stations of which site effects can be estimated are also restricted to those stations which recorded common events with the reference station. In order to improve the limitation of the GIT, a modified GIT is put forward in this study, namely, the transfer-station generalized inversion method (TSGI). Comparing with the GIT, this modified GIT can be used to enlarge data set and increase the number of stations whose site effects can be analyzed. And this makes solution much more stable. To verify the results of GIT, a non-reference method, the genetic algorithms (GA), is applied to estimate absolute site effects. On April 20, 2013, an earthquake with magnitude of MS 7.0 occurred in the Lushan region, China. After this event, more than several hundred aftershocks with ML<3.0 occurred in this region. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the site effects and Q factor for this area based on the aftershock strong motion records from the China National Strong Motion Observation Network System. Our results show that when the TSGI is applied instead of the GIT, the total number of events used in the inversion increases from 31 to 54 and the total number of stations whose site effect can be estimated

  16. Preliminary results of 3D inversion of the EarthScope Oregon MT data using the integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A.; Gribenko, A.; Cuma, M.; Zhdanov, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we apply 3D inversion to MT data collected in Oregon as a part of the EarthScope project. We use the integral equation method as a forward modeling engine. Quasi-analytical approximation with a variable background (QAVB) method of Frechet derivative calculation is applied. This technique allows us to simplify the inversion algorithm and to use just one forward modeling on every iteration step. The receiver footprint approach considerably reduces the computational resources needed to invert the large volumes of data covering vast areas. The data set, which was used in the inversion, was obtained through the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). The long-period MT data was collected in Eastern Oregon in 2006. The inverted electrical conductivity distribution agrees reasonably well with geological features of the region as well as with 3D MT inversion results obtained by other researchers. The geoelectrical model of the Oregon deep interior produced by 3D inversion indicates several lithospheres' electrical conductivity anomalies, including a linear zone marked by low-high conductivity transition along the Klamath Blue Mountain Lineament associated with a linear trend of gravity minima. High electrical conductivity values occur in the upper crust under the accreted terrains in the Blue Mountains region.

  17. Generalized Uncertainty Quantification for Linear Inverse Problems in X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Michael James

    2014-04-25

    In industrial and engineering applications, X-ray radiography has attained wide use as a data collection protocol for the assessment of material properties in cases where direct observation is not possible. The direct measurement of nuclear materials, particularly when they are under explosive or implosive loading, is not feasible, and radiography can serve as a useful tool for obtaining indirect measurements. In such experiments, high energy X-rays are pulsed through a scene containing material of interest, and a detector records a radiograph by measuring the radiation that is not attenuated in the scene. One approach to the analysis of these radiographs is to model the imaging system as an operator that acts upon the object being imaged to produce a radiograph. In this model, the goal is to solve an inverse problem to reconstruct the values of interest in the object, which are typically material properties such as density or areal density. The primary objective in this work is to provide quantitative solutions with uncertainty estimates for three separate applications in X-ray radiography: deconvolution, Abel inversion, and radiation spot shape reconstruction. For each problem, we introduce a new hierarchical Bayesian model for determining a posterior distribution on the unknowns and develop efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for sampling from the posterior. A Poisson likelihood, based on a noise model for photon counts at the detector, is combined with a prior tailored to each application: an edge-localizing prior for deconvolution; a smoothing prior with non-negativity constraints for spot reconstruction; and a full covariance sampling prior based on a Wishart hyperprior for Abel inversion. After developing our methods in a general setting, we demonstrate each model on both synthetically generated datasets, including those from a well known radiation transport code, and real high energy radiographs taken at two U. S. Department of Energy

  18. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Holzapfel, William L.; Cooray, Asantha K.

    1999-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect towards the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas is strongly aspherical, on agreement with the morphology revealed by x-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction by comparing the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods. The Hubble constant derived for this cluster, when the known systematic uncertainties are included, has a very wide range of values and therefore does not provide additional constraints on the validity of the assumptions. We examine carefully the possible systematic errors in the gas fraction measurement. The gas fraction is a lower limit to the cluster's baryon fraction and so we compare the gas mass fraction, calibrated by numerical simulations to approximately the virial radius, to measurements of the global mass fraction of baryonic matter, OMEGA(sub B)/OMEGA(sub matter). Our lower limit to the cluster baryon fraction is f(sub B) = (0.043 +/- 0.014)/h (sub 100). From this, we derive an upper limit to the universal matter density, OMEGA(sub matter) <= 0.72/h(sub 100), and a likely value of OMEGA(sub matter) <= (0.44(sup 0.15, sub -0.12)/h(sub 100).

  19. Methods to control phase inversions and enhance mass transfer in liquid-liquid dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Tsouris, Constantinos; Dong, Junhang

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effects of applied electric fields on liquid-liquid dispersions. In general, the present invention is directed to the control of phase inversions in liquid-liquid dispersions. Because of polarization and deformation effects, coalescence of aqueous drops is facilitated by the application of electric fields. As a result, with an increase in the applied voltage, the ambivalence region is narrowed and shifted toward higher volume fractions of the dispersed phase. This permits the invention to be used to ensure that the aqueous phase remains continuous, even at a high volume fraction of the organic phase. Additionally, the volume fraction of the organic phase may be increased without causing phase inversion, and may be used to correct a phase inversion which has already occurred. Finally, the invention may be used to enhance mass transfer rates from one phase to another through the use of phase inversions.

  20. A proposed through-flow inverse method for the design of mixed-flow pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borges, Joao Eduardo

    1991-01-01

    A through-flow (hub-to-shroud) truly inverse method is proposed and described. It uses an imposition of mean swirl, i.e., radius times mean tangential velocity, given throughout the meridional section of the turbomachine as an initial design specification. In the present implementation, it is assumed that the fluid is inviscid, incompressible, and irrotational at inlet and that the blades are supposed to have zero thickness. Only blade rows that impart to the fluid a constant work along the space are considered. An application of this procedure to design the rotor of a mixed-flow pump is described in detail. The strategy used to find a suitable mean swirl distribution and the other design inputs is also described. The final blade shape and pressure distributions on the blade surface are presented, showing that it is possible to obtain feasible designs using this technique. Another advantage of this technique is the fact that it does not require large amounts of CPU time.

  1. Inverse method predicting spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field measurements.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Serge

    2005-02-01

    In the study the inverse problem of deducing the modal structure of the acoustic field generated by a ducted turbofan is addressed using conventional farfield directivity measurements. The final objective is to make input data available for predicting noise radiation in other configurations that would not have been tested. The present paper is devoted to the analytical part of that study. The proposed method is based on the equations governing ducted sound propagation and free-field radiation. It leads to fast computations checked on Rolls-Royce tests made in the framework of previous European projects. Results seem to be reliable although the system of equations to be solved is generally underdetermined (more propagating modes than acoustic measurements). A limited number of modes are thus selected according to any a priori knowledge of the sources. A first guess of the source amplitudes is obtained by adjusting the calculated maximum of radiation of each mode to the measured sound pressure level at the same angle. A least squares fitting gives the final solution. A simple correction can be made to take account of the mean flow velocity inside the nacelle which shifts the directivity patterns. It consists of modifying the actual frequency to keep the cut-off ratios unchanged. PMID:15759694

  2. Inverse method predicting spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, Serge

    2005-02-01

    In the study the inverse problem of deducing the modal structure of the acoustic field generated by a ducted turbofan is addressed using conventional farfield directivity measurements. The final objective is to make input data available for predicting noise radiation in other configurations that would not have been tested. The present paper is devoted to the analytical part of that study. The proposed method is based on the equations governing ducted sound propagation and free-field radiation. It leads to fast computations checked on Rolls-Royce tests made in the framework of previous European projects. Results seem to be reliable although the system of equations to be solved is generally underdetermined (more propagating modes than acoustic measurements). A limited number of modes are thus selected according to any a priori knowledge of the sources. A first guess of the source amplitudes is obtained by adjusting the calculated maximum of radiation of each mode to the measured sound pressure level at the same angle. A least squares fitting gives the final solution. A simple correction can be made to take account of the mean flow velocity inside the nacelle which shifts the directivity patterns. It consists of modifying the actual frequency to keep the cut-off ratios unchanged. .

  3. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-15

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination.

  4. Direct band gap silicon crystals predicted by an inverse design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Young Jun; Lee, In-Ho; Lee, Jooyoung; Kim, Sunghyun; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-03-01

    Cubic diamond silicon has an indirect band gap and does not absorb or emit light as efficiently as other semiconductors with direct band gaps. Thus, searching for Si crystals with direct band gaps around 1.3 eV is important to realize efficient thin-film solar cells. In this work, we report various crystalline silicon allotropes with direct and quasi-direct band gaps, which are predicted by the inverse design method which combines a conformation space annealing algorithm for global optimization and first-principles density functional calculations. The predicted allotropes exhibit energies less than 0.3 eV per atom and good lattice matches, compared with the diamond structure. The structural stability is examined by performing finite-temperature ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and calculating the phonon spectra. The absorption spectra are obtained by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation together with the quasiparticle G0W0 approximation. For several allotropes with the band gaps around 1 eV, photovoltaic efficiencies are comparable to those of best-known photovoltaic absorbers such as CuInSe2. This work is supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (2005-0093845 and 2008-0061987), Samsung Science and Technology Foundation (SSTF-BA1401-08), KIAS Center for Advanced Computation, and KISTI (KSC-2013-C2-040).

  5. A nonlinear anisotropic inverse method for computational dissection of inhomogeneous planar tissues.

    PubMed

    Witzenburg, Colleen M; Barocas, Victor H

    2016-11-01

    Quantification of the mechanical behavior of soft tissues is challenging due to their anisotropic, heterogeneous, and nonlinear nature. We present a method for the 'computational dissection' of a tissue, by which we mean the use of computational tools both to identify and to analyze regions within a tissue sample that have different mechanical properties. The approach employs an inverse technique applied to a series of planar biaxial experimental protocols. The aggregated data from multiple protocols provide the basis for (1) segmentation of the tissue into regions of similar properties, (2) linear analysis for the small-strain behavior, assuming uniform, linear, anisotropic behavior within each region, (3) subsequent nonlinear analysis following each individual experimental protocol path and using local linear properties, and (4) construction of a strain energy data set W(E) at every point in the material by integrating the differential stress-strain functions along each strain path. The approach has been applied to simulated data and captures not only the general nonlinear behavior but also the regional differences introduced into the simulated tissue sample. PMID:27140845

  6. Efficient methods for large-scale linear inversion using a geostatistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibaba, Arvind K.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2012-05-01

    In geophysical inverse problems, such as estimating the unknown parameter field from noisy observations of dependent quantities, e.g., hydraulic conductivity from head observations, stochastic Bayesian and geostatistical approaches are frequently used. To obtain best estimates and conditional realizations it is required to perform several matrix-matrix computations involving the covariance matrix of the discretized field of the parameters. In realistic three-dimensional fields that are finely discretized, these operations as performed in conventional algorithms become extremely expensive and even prohibitive in terms of memory and computational requirements. Using Hierarchical Matrices, we show how to reduce the complexity of forming approximate matrix-vector products involving the Covariance matrices in log linear complexity for an arbitrary distribution of points and a wide variety of generalized covariance functions. The resulting system of equations is solved iteratively using a matrix-free Krylov subspace approach. Furthermore, we show how to generate unconditional realizations using an approximation to the square root of the covariance matrix using Chebyshev matrix polynomials and use the above to generate conditional realizations. We demonstrate the efficiency of our method on a few standard test problems, such as interpolation from noisy observations and contaminant source identification.

  7. An efficient method of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion using a finite-difference injection method for time-lapse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Dmitry; Singh, Satish C.; Fuji, Nobuaki

    2015-09-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is an objective method to estimate elastic properties of the subsurface and is an important area of research, particularly in seismic exploration community. It is a data-fitting approach, where the difference between observed and synthetic data is minimized iteratively. Due to a very high computational cost, the practical implementation of waveform inversion has so far been restricted to a 2-D geometry with different levels of physics incorporated in it (e.g. elasticity/viscoelasticity) or to a 3-D geometry but using an acoustic approximation. However, the earth is three-dimensional, elastic and heterogeneous and therefore a full 3-D elastic inversion is required in order to obtain more accurate and valuable models of the subsurface. Despite the recent increase in computing power, the application of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion to real-scale problems remains quite challenging on the current computer architecture. Here, we present an efficient method to perform 3-D elastic full waveform inversion for time-lapse seismic data using a finite-difference injection method. In this method, the wavefield is computed in the whole model and is stored on a surface above a finite volume where the model is perturbed and localized inversion is performed. Comparison of the final results using the 3-D finite-difference injection method and conventional 3-D inversion performed within the whole volume shows that our new method provides significant reductions in computational time and memory requirements without any notable loss in accuracy. Our approach shows a big potential for efficient reservoir monitoring in real time-lapse experiments.

  8. Local poloidal and toroidal plasma rotation velocities and ion temperature in a tokamak plasma obtained with a matrix inversion method considering asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condrea, I.; Haddad, E.; Gregory, B. C.; Abel, G.

    2000-09-01

    An inversion technique is presented for the local poloidal and toroidal rotation velocities and for the ion temperature from line integrated measurements performed on Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) [R. Decoste and TdeV Team, Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Seville, 1994 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995) IAEA-CN-60/A4-11]. The velocity is obtained using two matrix inversions; the first for the emissivity and the second with the velocity weighted emissivity. The temperature is obtained with three matrix inversions: emissivity, temperature weighted emissivity and rotation velocity squared. The effect of the rotation velocity represents up to 16% in the ion temperature for TdeV plasmas. The local values obtained using the lengths matrix with the magnetic flux lines from the equilibrium code are compared with those obtained by a standard Abel inversion with circular flux lines. Differences up to 20% are observed between the emissivities deduced with circular and real flux lines, whereas the rotation velocity and the ion temperature are very similar. The technique was applied for the poloidal and toroidal geometry to determine the poloidal and toroidal velocities and the emission asymmetries. Top poloidal and toroidal emissivities present strong asymmetries due to the divertor plates and the X point whereas bottom poloidal and toroidal emissivities show an inner-outer symmetry, making the inversion more reliable in this region. A first approach to model the strong asymmetry was made assuming that the emissivity has both a radial and a poloidal dependence. The best result was obtained using a radial dependence and a peaked function of the poloidal angle for the poloidal asymmetric part of the emissivity. Both emissivity and velocity asymmetries are present in the upper part of the plasma implying that the X point behaves as a source. Examples of emissivities, rotation velocities and

  9. The merging cluster Abell 1758 revisited: multi-wavelength observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Laganá, T. F.; Haider, M.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Cluster properties can be more distinctly studied in pairs of clusters, where we expect the effects of interactions to be strong. Aims: We here discuss the properties of the double cluster Abell 1758 at a redshift z ~ 0.279. These clusters show strong evidence for merging. Methods: We analyse the optical properties of the North and South cluster of Abell 1758 based on deep imaging obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) archive Megaprime/Megacam camera in the g' and r' bands, covering a total region of about 1.05 × 1.16 deg2, or 16.1 × 17.6 Mpc2. Our X-ray analysis is based on archive XMM-Newton images. Numerical simulations were performed using an N-body algorithm to treat the dark-matter component, a semi-analytical galaxy-formation model for the evolution of the galaxies and a grid-based hydrodynamic code with a parts per million (PPM) scheme for the dynamics of the intra-cluster medium. We computed galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs) and 2D temperature and metallicity maps of the X-ray gas, which we then compared to the results of our numerical simulations. Results: The GLFs of Abell 1758 North are well fit by Schechter functions in the g' and r' bands, but with a small excess of bright galaxies, particularly in the r' band; their faint-end slopes are similar in both bands. In contrast, the GLFs of Abell 1758 South are not well fit by Schechter functions: excesses of bright galaxies are seen in both bands; the faint-end of the GLF is not very well defined in g'. The GLF computed from our numerical simulations assuming a halo mass-luminosity relation agrees with those derived from the observations. From the X-ray analysis, the most striking features are structures in the metal distribution. We found two elongated regions of high metallicity in Abell 1758 North with two peaks towards the centre. In contrast, Abell 1758 South shows a deficit of metals in its central regions. Comparing observational results to those derived from numerical

  10. Sensitivity of temporal moments calculated by the adjoint-state method and joint inversing of head and tracer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirpka, Olaf A.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    Including tracer data into geostatistically based methods of inverse modeling is computationally very costly when all concentration measurements are used and the sensitivities of many observations are calculated by the direct differentiation approach. Harvey and Gorelick (Water Resour Res 1995;31(7):1615-26) have suggested the use of the first temporal moment instead of the complete concentration record at a point. We derive a computationally efficient adjoint-state method for the sensitivities of the temporal moments that require the solution of the steady-state flow equation and two steady-state transport equations for the forward problem and the same number of equations for each first-moment measurement. The efficiency of the method makes it feasible to evaluate the sensitivity matrix many times in large domains. We incorporate our approach for the calculation of sensitivities in the quasi-linear geostatistical method of inversing ("iterative cokriging"). The application to an artificial example of a tracer introduced into an injection well shows good convergence behavior when both head and first-moment data are used for inversing, whereas inversing of arrival times alone is less stable.

  11. An Inverse Method of Teaching Specialised Manufacturing Subjects: Decomposing a Focal Representative Product to Sustain Analysis and Interaction of Details

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axinte, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents an "inverse" method to teach specialist manufacturing processes by identifying a focal representative product (RP) from which, key specialist manufacturing (KSM) processes are analysed and interrelated to assess the capability of integrated manufacturing routes. In this approach, RP should: comprise KSM processes; involve…

  12. 3D near-to-surface conductivity reconstruction by inversion of VETEM data using the distorted Born iterative method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, G.L.; Chew, W.C.; Cui, T.J.; Aydiner, A.A.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) subsurface imaging by using inversion of data obtained from the very early time electromagnetic system (VETEM) was discussed. The study was carried out by using the distorted Born iterative method to match the internal nonlinear property of the 3D inversion problem. The forward solver was based on the total-current formulation bi-conjugate gradient-fast Fourier transform (BCCG-FFT). It was found that the selection of regularization parameter follow a heuristic rule as used in the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm so that the iteration is stable.

  13. Improved inverse and probabilistic methods for geophysical applications of GRACE gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Blom, Ronald G.; Ivins, Erik R.; Oyafuso, Fabiano A.; Zhong, Min

    2009-06-01

    Mapping time-varying gravity via satellite-to-satellite tracking systems holds great potential as a new way to monitor the Earth's global climate system. Measurement noises and systematic deficiencies in sampling, both in time and space, cause global geoid or surface mass solutions to have a structured spherical harmonic error spectrum, with strong degree and order dependences and cross-correlations. To extract average values of geoid or surface mass variations around global gridpoints on Earth's surface and over various geographic regions, both the shape of the averaging kernel and the resulting average uncertainties must be considered quantitatively and statistically. We investigate two methods of the Backus and Gilbert continuous geophysical inverse formalism for optimal averages around points on Earth's surface. The first averaging kernel optimally approximates the Dirac-δ function. With an equivalent measure of deviation from the Dirac-δ function, the optimal average has greater (up to 2.6 times) accuracy than does the most widely used isotropic Gaussian filter for GRACE analysis. The second method was crafted to decrease the kernel weight as the distance from the point of interest increases. A new method is presented to use a modified Gaussian averaging kernel that reduces average uncertainties with minimum loss of resolution. The modified method has some advantages over using the kernel that optimally approximates the Dirac-δ function. Both methods are computationally efficient and are applied to simulated and real GRACE data to compute improved averages around fine-resolution global gridpoints and used with non-diagonal covariance matrices to intelligently reduce effects of correlated errors. The optimal probabilistic method of least squares with a priori information is discussed in the spherical harmonic domain. The property of optimality will be preserved when the estimates are mapped to the geographic domain for spatial averages. A regionally

  14. Geological modeling and infiltration pattern of a karstic system based upon crossed geophysical methods and image-guided inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Lea; Jardani, Abderrahim; Fournier, Matthieu; Massei, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Karstic aquifers represent an important part of the water resources worldwide. Though they have been widely studied on many aspects, their geological and hydrogeological modeling is still complex. Geophysical methods can provide useful subsurface information for the characterization and mapping of karstic systems, especially when not accessible by speleology. The site investigated in this study is a sinkhole-spring system, with small diameter conduits that run within a chalk aquifer (Norville, in Upper Normandy, France). This site was investigated using several geophysical methods: electrical tomography, self-potential, mise-à-la-masse methods, and electromagnetic method (EM34). Coupling those results with boreholes data, a 3D geological model of the hydrogeological basin was established, including tectonic features as well as infiltration structures (sinkhole, covered dolines). The direction of the karstic conduits near the main sinkhole could be established, and the major fault was shown to be a hydraulic barrier. Also the average concentration of dolines on the basin could be estimated, as well as their depth. At last, several hypotheses could be made concerning the location of the main conduit network between the sinkhole and the spring, using previous hydrodynamic study of the site along with geophysical data. In order to validate the 3D geological model, an image-guided inversion of the apparent resistivity data was used. With this approach it is possible to use geological cross sections to constrain the inversion of apparent resistivity data, preserving both discontinuities and coherences in the inversion of the resistivity data. This method was used on the major fault, enabling to choose one geological interpretation over another (fault block structure near the fault, rather than important folding). The constrained inversion was also applied on covered dolines, to validate the interpretation of their shape and depth. Key words: Magnetic and electrical

  15. 3-D linear inversion of gravity data: method and application to Basse-Terre volcanic island, Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnoud, Anne; Coutant, Olivier; Bouligand, Claire; Gunawan, Hendra; Deroussi, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    We use a Bayesian formalism combined with a grid node discretization for the linear inversion of gravimetric data in terms of 3-D density distribution. The forward modelling and the inversion method are derived from seismological inversion techniques in order to facilitate joint inversion or interpretation of density and seismic velocity models. The Bayesian formulation introduces covariance matrices on model parameters to regularize the ill-posed problem and reduce the non-uniqueness of the solution. This formalism favours smooth solutions and allows us to specify a spatial correlation length and to perform inversions at multiple scales. We also extract resolution parameters from the resolution matrix to discuss how well our density models are resolved. This method is applied to the inversion of data from the volcanic island of Basse-Terre in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles. A series of synthetic tests are performed to investigate advantages and limitations of the methodology in this context. This study results in the first 3-D density models of the island of Basse-Terre for which we identify: (i) a southward decrease of densities parallel to the migration of volcanic activity within the island, (ii) three dense anomalies beneath Petite Plaine Valley, Beaugendre Valley and the Grande-Découverte-Carmichaël-Soufrière Complex that may reflect the trace of former major volcanic feeding systems, (iii) shallow low-density anomalies in the southern part of Basse-Terre, especially around La Soufrière active volcano, Piton de Bouillante edifice and along the western coast, reflecting the presence of hydrothermal systems and fractured and altered rocks.

  16. Model-based inverse methods for sizing surface-breaking discontinuities with eddy current probe variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrin, John C.; Shell, Eric B.; Oneida, Erin K.; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Sabbagh, Elias; Murphy, R. Kim; Mazdiyasni, Siamack; Lindgren, Eric A.

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate and validate model-based inversion techniques to characterize length, depth, width and orientation of surface-breaking cracks using eddy current NDE under varying probe conditions. A series of parametric studies of probe characteristics are presented for a fixed set of well-characterized flaws with varying length, depth, opening width and orientation angle. Results show inversion performance differences between probes with the same design specifications. Inversion results were also evaluated for a probe that was selectively controlled for varying probe liftoff, varying tilt in two directions, and orientation. Certain levels of probe tilt and liftoff were found to degrade the performance of the inversion technique. By using a model calibration process that incorporates the matching probe calibration data, better inversion results can be achieved, to a limited degree. There is a need to more appropriately adapt the model through the calibration fit to compensate for varying probe tilt and liftoff. Results are presented for a model transform approach, evaluating scale and phase terms based on the best model fit with the calibration data. The results for certain severe cases of liftoff were improved using the transformed model; however, it does not address all probe conditions. Future work is proposed to use a full model-based transformation approach using more comprehensive meta-model representations.

  17. A new hybrid inversion method for parametric curved faults and its application to the 2008 Wenchuan (China) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhi; Xu, Caijun; Wen, Yangmao; Jiang, Guoyan; Fan, Qingbiao; Liu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Planar faults are widely adopted during inversions to determine slip distributions and fault geometries using geodetic observations; however, little research has been conducted with respect to curved faults. We attribute this to the lack of an appropriate parameterized modelling method. In this paper, we present a curved-fault modelling method (CFMM) that describes a curved fault according to specific parameters, and we also develop a corresponding hybrid iterative inversion algorithm (HIIA) to perform inversions for parametric curved-fault geometries and slips. The results of the strike-component and dip-component synthetic tests show that a complex S-shaped fault surface and a circular slip distribution are successfully recovered, indicating the strong performance of the CFMM and HIIA methods. In addition, we describe and verify a scenario for determining the number of necessary geometrical parameters for the HIIA and examine the case study of the Wenchuan earthquake, which occurred on a complex listric fault surface. During the iteration process of the HIIA, both the fault geometry and slip distribution of the Beichuan and Pengguan faults converge to optimal values, indicating a Beichuan fault (BCF) model with a continuous listric shape and gradual steepening from the southwest to the northeast, which is highly consistent with geological survey results. Both the synthetic and real-world case studies show that the HIIA and the CMFF are superior to the conventional fault modelling method based on rectangular planes and that these models have the potential for use in more integrated research involving inversion studies, such as joint slip/curved-fault-geometry inversions that take into account data resolving power.

  18. Three-dimension Cole-Cole model inversion of induced polarization data based on regularized conjugate gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhengwei

    Modeling of induced polarization (IP) phenomena is important for developing effective methods for remote sensing of subsurface geology and is widely used in mineral exploration. However, the quantitative interpretation of IP data in a complex 3D environment is still a challenging problem of applied geophysics. In this dissertation I use the regularized conjugate gradient method to determine the 3D distribution of the four parameters of the Cole-Cole model based on surface induced polarization (IP) data. This method takes into account the nonlinear nature of both electromagnetic induction (EMI) and IP phenomena. The solution of the 3D IP inverse problem is based on the regularized smooth inversion only. The method was tested on synthetic models with DC conductivity, intrinsic chargeability, time constant, and relaxation parameters, and it was also applied to the practical 3D IP survey data. I demonstrate that the four parameters of the Cole-Cole model, DC electrical resistivity, rho 0 , chargeability, eta time constant, tau and the relaxation parameter, C, can be recovered from the observed IP data simultaneously. There are four Cole-Cole parameters involved in the inversion, in other words, within each cell, there are DC conductivity (sigma0 ), chargeability (eta), time parameters (tau), and relaxation parameters (C) compared to conductivity only, used in EM only inversion. In addition to more inversion parameters used in IP survey, dipole-dipole configuration which requires more sources and receivers. One the other hand, calculating Green tensor and Frechet matrix time consuming and storing them requires a lot of memory. So, I develop parallel computation using MATLAB parallel tool to speed up the calculation.

  19. A new hybrid inversion method for parametric curved faults and its application to the 2008 Wenchuan (China) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhi; Xu, Caijun; Wen, Yangmao; Jiang, Guoyan; Fan, Qingbiao; Liu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Planar faults are widely adopted during inversions to determine slip distributions and fault geometries using geodetic observations; however, little research has been conducted with respect to curved faults. We attribute this to the lack of an appropriate parameterized modeling method. In this paper, we present a curved-fault modeling method (CFMM) that describes a curved fault according to specific parameters, and we also develop a corresponding hybrid iterative inversion algorithm (HIIA) to perform inversions for parametric curved-fault geometries and slips. The results of the strike-component and dip-component synthetic tests show that a complex S-shaped fault surface and a circular slip distribution are successfully recovered, indicating the strong performance of the CFMM and HIIA methods. In addition, we describe and verify a scenario for determining the number of necessary geometrical parameters for the HIIA and examine the case study of the Wenchuan earthquake, which occurred on a complex listric fault surface. During the iteration process of the HIIA, both the fault geometry and slip distribution of the Beichuan and Pengguan faults converge to optimal values, indicating a Beichuan fault (BCF) model with a continuous listric shape and gradual steepening from the southwest to the northeast, which is highly consistent with geological survey results. Both the synthetic and real-world case studies show that the HIIA and the CMFF are superior to the conventional fault modeling method based on rectangular planes and that these models have the potential for use in more integrated research involving inversion studies, such as joint slip/curved-fault-geometry inversions that take into account data resolving power.

  20. Three-dimensional full waveform inversion of short-period teleseismic wavefields based upon the SEM-DSM hybrid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, Vadim; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Wang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    We present a method for high-resolution imaging of lithospheric structures based on full waveform inversion of teleseismic waveforms. We model the propagation of seismic waves using our recently developed direct solution method/spectral-element method hybrid technique, which allows us to simulate the propagation of short-period teleseismic waves through a regional 3-D model. We implement an iterative quasi-Newton method based upon the L-BFGS algorithm, where the gradient of the misfit function is computed using the adjoint-state method. Compared to gradient or conjugate-gradient methods, the L-BFGS algorithm has a much faster convergence rate. We illustrate the potential of this method on a synthetic test case that consists of a crustal model with a crustal discontinuity at 25 km depth and a sharp Moho jump. This model contains short- and long-wavelength heterogeneities along the lateral and vertical directions. The iterative inversion starts from a smooth 1-D model derived from the IASP91 reference Earth model. We invert both radial and vertical component waveforms, starting from long-period signals filtered at 10 s and gradually decreasing the cut-off period down to 1.25 s. This multiscale algorithm quickly converges towards a model that is very close to the true model, in contrast to inversions involving short-period waveforms only, which always get trapped into a local minimum of the cost function.

  1. Basin mass dynamic changes in China from GRACE based on a multibasin inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuang; Wang, Qiuyu; Sun, Wenke

    2016-05-01

    Complex landforms, miscellaneous climates, and enormous populations have influenced various geophysical phenomena in China, which range from water depletion in the underground to retreating glaciers on high mountains and have attracted abundant scientific interest. This paper, which utilizes gravity observations during 2003-2014 from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), intends to comprehensively estimate the mass status in 16 drainage basins in the region. We propose a multibasin inversion method that features resistance to stripe noise and an ability to alleviate signal attenuation from the truncation and smoothing of GRACE data. The results show both positive and negative trends. Tremendous mass accumulation has occurred from the Tibetan Plateau (12.1 ± 0.6 Gt/yr) to the Yangtze River (7.7 ± 1.3 Gt/yr) and southeastern coastal areas, which is suggested to involve an increase in the groundwater storage, lake and reservoir water volume, and the flow of materials from tectonic processes. Additionally, mass loss has occurred in the Huang-Huai-Hai-Liao River Basin (-10.2 ± 0.9 Gt/yr), the Brahmaputra-Nujiang-Lancang River Basin (-15.0 ± 1.1 Gt/yr), and Tienshan Mountain (-4.1 ± 0.3 Gt/yr), a result of groundwater pumping and glacier melting. Areas with groundwater depletion are consistent with the distribution of cities with land subsidence in North China. We find that intensified precipitation can alter the local water supply and that GRACE can adequately capture these dynamics, which could be instructive for China's South-to-North Water Diversion hydrologic project.

  2. Full-Waveform Inversion Method for Data Measured by the CONSERT Instrument aboard Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statz, C.; Plettemeier, D.; Herique, A.; Kofman, W. W.

    2014-12-01

    The primary scientific objective of the Comet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radiowave Transmission (CONSERT) aboard Rosetta is to perform a dielectric characterization of comet 67P/Chuyurmov-Gerasimenko's nucleus by means of a bi-static sounding between the lander Philae launched onto the comet's surface and the orbiter Rosetta. For the sounding the lander part of CONSERT will receive and process the radio signal emitted by the orbiter part of the instrument and transmit a signal to the orbiter to be received by CONSERT. With data measured during the first science phase, a three-dimensional model of the material distribution with regard to the complex dielectric permittivity of the comet's nucleus is to be reconstructed. In order to perform the 3D characterization of the nucleus we employ a full-waveform least-squares based inversion in time-domain. The reconstruction is performed on the envelope of the received signal. The direct problem of simulating the wave-propagation inside the comet's nucleus is modelled using a wideband nonstandard finite-differences in time-domain approach and a compensation method to account for the differences in free-space path-loss due to the removal of the carrier in the simulation. This approach will yield an approximation of the permittivity distribution including features large compared to the bandwith of the sounding signal. In order to account for restrictions on the measurement positions by the orbitography and limitations on the instrument dynamic range we employ a regularization technique where the permittivity distribution and the gradient with regard to the permittivity is projected in a domain defined by a viable model of the spatial material distribution. The least-squares optimization step of the reconstruction is performed in such domain on a reduced set of parameters. To demonstrate the viability of the proposed approaches we provide reconstruction results based on simulation data and scale-model laboratory

  3. Inverse Methods for Organic Matter Decay: From Multiple Pools to a Lognormal Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D.

    2011-12-01

    The decomposition of plant matter is difficult to model because we lack fundamental constitutive relations between decay rates, litter composition and ecosystems. Because decay slows down with time, and organic matter is compositionally heterogeneous, models of decomposition typically consist of multiple components (pools) which decay exponentially at different rates. Yet, it is unclear how the rates, sizes, and number of these pools vary with organic matter type and ecosystem. Here, we assume that degradation is described by a continuous superposition of first order decay rates. We use an inversion technique to identify the best fitting distributions of rates associated with the LIDET litter decay study [1]. This approach directly identifies the best multi-pool solution for each dataset. However, we find that the multi-pool solution is over-parameterized and not robust to the levels of noise in the decay datasets. We therefore implement a method of regularization to identify the distribution of first order decay rates which best fits the data but not the noise. This approach reveals that the distribution is characteristically lognormal on average across all data sets. To evaluate the validity of this result, we compare decays from a lognormal rate distribution to standard multi-pool models via the Akaike Information Criterion (AICc). The AICc indicates the lognormal distribution of rates contains significantly more information about litter decomposition than multi-pool models. These results suggest that the lognormal framework for analyzing and visualizing decay rates is a valuable tool to better understand the constitutive relations between decay dynamics, composition, ecosystems, and climate. [1] Harmon, M. 2007. LTER Intersite Fine Litter Decomposition Experiment (LIDET). Forest Science Data Bank, Corvallis, OR. [Database]. Available: http://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/data/abstract.cfm?dbcode=TD023

  4. Large-scale three-dimensional inversion of EarthScope MT data using the integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.; Gribenko, A.; Green, M.; Cuma, M.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed fully parallelized rigorous 3D MT inversion software based on the integral equation method with variable background conductivity. We have also implemented a receiver footprint approach which considerably reduces the computational resources needed to invert the large volumes of data covering vast areas. We apply 3D inversion to MT data collected in the western United States as a part of the EarthScope project. The data set used in the inversion was obtained through the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). We have inverted two large datasets: one with the EarthScope MT stations located in the northwestern United States over Washington, Oregon, Montana, and Idaho; another one with the locations of the EarthScope MT stations over Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming, including Yellowstone National Park area. The inversion domains were divided into millions of discretization cells. The geoelectrical model of the northwestern U.S. deep interior produced by 3D inversion indicated several electrical conductivity anomalies in the lithosphere including highly conductive anomalies in the upper mantle in parts of Oregon and Idaho. We can also see an indication of a plume associated with the hot conductive material rising from the mantle toward Yellowstone volcano. The conductive body identified in these images is west-dipping in a similar way as the low-velocity body shown in P-wave seismic tomography image data (Smith et al., 2009). We observe a similarity of the images of the Yellowstone plume produced independently by seismic tomography and 3D MT inversion.

  5. Inversion of lunar regolith layer thickness with CELMS data using BPNN method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhiguo; Xu, Yi; Zheng, Yongchun; Zhu, Yongchao; Jia, Yu; Chen, Shengbo

    2014-10-01

    Inversion of the lunar regolith layer thickness is one of the scientific objectives of current Moon research. In this paper, the global lunar regolith layer thickness is inversed with the back propagation neural network (BPNN) technique. First, the radiative transfer simulation is employed to study the relationship between the lunar regolith layer thickness d and the observed brightness temperature TB's. The simulation results show that the parameters such as the surface roughness σ, slope θs and the (FeO+TiO2) abundance S have strong influence on the observed TB's. Therefore, TB's, σ, θs and S are selected as the inputs of the BPNN network. Next, the four-layer BPNN network with seven-dimension input and two hidden layers is constructed by taking nonlinearity into account with sigmoid functions. Then, BPNN network is trained with the corresponding parameters collected in Apollo landing sites. To tackle issues introduced by the small number of the training samples, the six-dimension similarity degree is introduced to indicate similarities of the inversion results to the correspondent training samples. Thus, the output lunar regolith layer thickness is defined as the sum of the product of the similarity degree and the thickness at the corresponding landing site. Once training phase finishes, the lunar regolith layer thickness can be inversed speedily with the four-channel TB's concluded from the CELMS data, σ and θs estimated from LOLA data and S derived from Clementine UV/vis data. the inversed thickness agrees well with the values estimated by ground-based radar data in low latitude regions. The results indicate that the thickness in the maria varies from about 0.5 m to 12 m, and the mean is about 6.52 m; while the thickness in highlands is a bit thicker than the previous estimation, where the thickness varies widely from 10 m to 31.5 m, and the mean thickness is about 16.8 m. In addition, the relation between the ages, the (FeO+TiO2) abundance and the

  6. Solving the inverse Ising problem by mean-field methods in a clustered phase space with many states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decelle, Aurélien; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-07-01

    In this work we explain how to properly use mean-field methods to solve the inverse Ising problem when the phase space is clustered, that is, many states are present. The clustering of the phase space can occur for many reasons, e.g., when a system undergoes a phase transition, but also when data are collected in different regimes (e.g., quiescent and spiking regimes in neural networks). Mean-field methods for the inverse Ising problem are typically used without taking into account the eventual clustered structure of the input configurations and may lead to very poor inference (e.g., in the low-temperature phase of the Curie-Weiss model). In this work we explain how to modify mean-field approaches when the phase space is clustered and we illustrate the effectiveness of our method on different clustered structures (low-temperature phases of Curie-Weiss and Hopfield models).

  7. Solving the inverse Ising problem by mean-field methods in a clustered phase space with many states.

    PubMed

    Decelle, Aurélien; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-07-01

    In this work we explain how to properly use mean-field methods to solve the inverse Ising problem when the phase space is clustered, that is, many states are present. The clustering of the phase space can occur for many reasons, e.g., when a system undergoes a phase transition, but also when data are collected in different regimes (e.g., quiescent and spiking regimes in neural networks). Mean-field methods for the inverse Ising problem are typically used without taking into account the eventual clustered structure of the input configurations and may lead to very poor inference (e.g., in the low-temperature phase of the Curie-Weiss model). In this work we explain how to modify mean-field approaches when the phase space is clustered and we illustrate the effectiveness of our method on different clustered structures (low-temperature phases of Curie-Weiss and Hopfield models). PMID:27575082

  8. [Research on Accuracy and Stability of Inversing Vegetation Chlorophyll Content by Spectral Index Method].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-ling; Yang, Hang; Chen, Xiao-ping; Wang, Shu-dong; Li, Xue-ke; Liu, Kai; Cen, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Spectral index method was widely applied to the inversion of crop chlorophyll content. In the present study, PSR3500 spectrometer and SPAD-502 chlorophyll fluorometer were used to acquire the spectrum and relative chlorophyll content (SPAD value) of winter wheat leaves on May 2nd 2013 when it was at the jointing stage of winter wheat. Then the measured spectra were resampled to simulate TM multispectral data and Hyperion hyperspectral data respectively, using the Gaussian spectral response function. We chose four typical spectral indices including normalized difference vegetation index (NDVD, triangle vegetation index (TVI), the ratio of modified transformed chlorophyll absorption ratio index (MCARI) to optimized soil adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI) (MCARI/OSAVI) and vegetation index based on universal pattern decomposition (VIUPD), which were constructed with the feature bands sensitive to the vegetation chlorophyll. After calculating these spectral indices based on the resampling TM and Hyperion data, the regression equation between spectral indices and chlorophyll content was established. For TM, the result indicates that VIUPD has the best correlation with chlorophyll (R2 = 0.819 7) followed by NDVI (R2 = 0.791 8), while MCARI/OSAVI and TVI also show a good correlation with R2 higher than 0.5. For the simulated Hyperion data, VIUPD again ranks first with R2 = 0.817 1, followed by MCARI/OSAVI (R2 = 0.658 6), while NDVI and TVI show very low values with R2 less than 0.2. It was demonstrated that VIUPD has the best accuracy and stability to estimate chlorophyll of winter wheat whether using simulated TM data or Hyperion data, which reaffirms that VIUPD is comparatively sensor independent. The chlorophyll estimation accuracy and stability of MCARI/OSAVI also works well, partly because OSAVI could reduce the influence of backgrounds. Two broadband spectral indices NDVI and TVI are weak for the chlorophyll estimation of simulated Hyperion data mainly because of

  9. Er3+-activated silica inverse opals synthesized by the solgel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, A.; Armellini, C.; Chiasera, A.; Jestin, Y.; Ferrari, M.; Mattarelli, M.; Montagna, M.; Moser, E.; Tosello, C.; Zampedri, L.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Almeida, R. M.; Righini, G. C.

    2007-05-01

    We present the details of the sol-gel processing used to realize inverse silica opal, where the silica was activated with 0.3 mol% of Er3+ ions. The template (direct opal) was obtained assembling polystyrene spheres of the dimensions of 260 nm by means of a vertical deposition technique. The Er3+-activated silica inverse opal was obtained infiltrating, into the void of the template, the silica sol doped with Er3+ ions and subsequently removing the polystyrene spheres by means of calcinations. Scanning electron microscope showed that the inverse opals possess a fcc structure with a air hollows of about 210 nm and a photonic band gap, in the visible range, was observed from reflectance measurements. Spectroscopic properties of Er3+-activated silica inverse opal were investigated by luminescence spectroscopy, where, upon excitation at 514.5 nm, an emission of 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 of Er3+ ions transition with a 21 nm bandwidth was observed. Moreover the 4I13/2 level decay curve presents a single-exponential profile, with a measured lifetime of 18 ms, corresponding a high quantum efficiency of the system.

  10. X-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Abell 1835

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Kaastra, J. S.; Arnaud, M.; Reiprich T. H.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Jernigan, J. G.; Sakelliou, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopy results of the observation of Abell 1835 using the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton observatory. Abell 1835 is a luminous (10(exp 46)ergs/s), medium redshift (z = 0.2523), X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. The observations support the interpretation that large amounts of cool gas are present in a multi-phase medium surrounded by a hot (kT(sub e) = 8.2 keV) outer envelope. We detect O VIII Ly(alpha) and two Fe XXIV complexes in the RGS spectrum. The emission measure of the cool gas below kT(sub e) = 2.7 keV is much lower than expected from standard cooling-flow models, suggesting either a more complicated cooling process than simple isobaric radiative cooling or differential cold absorption of the cooler gas.

  11. GPU-accelerated inverse identification of radiative properties of particle suspensions in liquid by the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. Y.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.; Zhang, L.; Li, X. C.; Jiang, B. C.

    2016-03-01

    Inverse identification of radiative properties of participating media is usually time consuming. In this paper, a GPU accelerated inverse identification model is presented to obtain the radiative properties of particle suspensions. The sample medium is placed in a cuvette and a narrow light beam is irradiated normally from the side. The forward three-dimensional radiative transfer problem is solved using a massive parallel Monte Carlo method implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU), and particle swarm optimization algorithm is applied to inversely identify the radiative properties of particle suspensions based on the measured bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF). The GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo simulation significantly reduces the solution time of the radiative transfer simulation and hence greatly accelerates the inverse identification process. Hundreds of speedup is achieved as compared to the CPU implementation. It is demonstrated using both simulated BSDF and experimentally measured BSDF of microalgae suspensions that the radiative properties of particle suspensions can be effectively identified based on the GPU-accelerated algorithm with three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling.

  12. Estimation of the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere using inverse spectral methods: The state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Jon F.

    2014-09-01

    The effective elastic thickness (Te) is a geometric measure of the flexural rigidity of the lithosphere, which describes the resistance to bending under the application of applied, vertical loads. As such, it is likely that its magnitude has a major role in governing the tectonic evolution of both continental and oceanic plates. Of the several ways to estimate Te, one has gained popularity in the 40 years since its development because it only requires gravity and topography data, both of which are now readily available and provide excellent coverage over the Earth and even the rocky planets and moons of the solar system. This method, the ‘inverse spectral method’, develops measures of the relationship between observed gravity and topography data in the spatial frequency (wavenumber) domain, namely the admittance and coherence. The observed measures are subsequently inverted against the predictions of thin, elastic plate models, giving estimates of Te and other lithospheric parameters. This article provides a review of inverse spectral methodology and the studies that have used it. It is not, however, concerned with the geological or geodynamic significance or interpretation of Te, nor does it discuss and compare Te results from different methods in different provinces. Since the three main aspects of the subject are thin elastic plate flexure, spectral analysis, and inversion methods, the article broadly follows developments in these. The review also covers synthetic plate modelling, and concludes with a summary of the controversy currently surrounding inverse spectral methods, whether or not the large Te values returned in cratonic regions are artefacts of the method, or genuine observations.

  13. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    PubMed

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  14. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics

    PubMed Central

    Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the “core team”, facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  15. Inversion of synthetic and experimental acoustical scattering data for the comparison of two reconstruction methods employing the Born approximation.

    PubMed

    Guillermin, R; Lasaygues, P; Sessarego, J P; Wirgin, A

    2001-03-01

    This work is concerned with the reconstruction, from measured (synthetic or real) data, of a 2D penetrable fluid-like object of arbitrary cross-section embedded in a fluid of infinite extent and insonified by a plane acoustic wave. Green's theorem is used to provide a domain integral representation of the scattered field. The introduction therein of the Born approximation gives rise to a linearized form of the inverse problem. The actual inversion is carried out by two methods. The first diffraction tomography (DT), exhibits the contrast function very conveniently and explicitly in the form of a wave number/incident angle Fourier transform of the far backscattered field and thus requires measurements of this field for incident waves all around the object and at all frequencies. The second discretized domain integral equation with Born approximation method, is numerically more intensive, but enables a wider choice of configurations and requires less measurements (one or several frequencies, one or several incident waves, choice of measurement points) than the DT method. A comparison of the two methods is carried out by inversion of both simulated and experimental scattered field data. PMID:11270630

  16. An inverse finite element method for determining the tissue compressibility of human left ventricular wall during the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Hassaballah, Abdallah I; Hassan, Mohsen A; Mardi, Azizi N; Hamdi, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the myocardium's tissue properties is important in constructing functional finite element (FE) models of the human heart. To obtain accurate properties especially for functional modeling of a heart, tissue properties have to be determined in vivo. At present, there are only few in vivo methods that can be applied to characterize the internal myocardium tissue mechanics. This work introduced and evaluated an FE inverse method to determine the myocardial tissue compressibility. Specifically, it combined an inverse FE method with the experimentally-measured left ventricular (LV) internal cavity pressure and volume versus time curves. Results indicated that the FE inverse method showed good correlation between LV repolarization and the variations in the myocardium tissue bulk modulus K (K = 1/compressibility), as well as provided an ability to describe in vivo human myocardium material behavior. The myocardium bulk modulus can be effectively used as a diagnostic tool of the heart ejection fraction. The model developed is proved to be robust and efficient. It offers a new perspective and means to the study of living-myocardium tissue properties, as it shows the variation of the bulk modulus throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:24367544

  17. A modified initial in-situ Stress Inversion Method based on FLAC3D with an engineering application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Guo, Yunhua; Zhu, Weishen; Li, Shucai; Zhou, Hao

    2015-12-01

    To improve the accuracy of an initial in-situ stress field determined by inversion, we describe a modi fied initial in-situ stress inversion method that uses partial least-squares regression based on FLAC3D. First, each stress component is regressed to improve the fitting accuracy of locally abnormal stress regions, and then the relationship between element stress and unbalanced node force is analyzed according to the computational principles of FLAC3D. The initial in-situ stresses obtained from these regression calculations are added to a numerical model, and the unbalanced node forces are recalculated. An external force equal to the recalculated unbalanced node force is then exerted on the node in the direction opposing the original unbalanced node force to satisfy the equilibrium condition. For the in-situ stresses of elements that do not satisfy the strength conditions, they are modi fied by assuming the average stress is constant and reducing the partial stress to satisfy the equilibrium and strength conditions, which also resolves the unreasonable distribution of the boundary nodal forces and results in good regression estimates. A three-dimensional hypersurface spline interpolation method is developed to calculate the in-situ stress tensor at arbitrary coordinates. Finally, we apply this method to an underground engineering project, and the results are shown to agree well with those obtained from field monitoring. Therefore, it is concluded that this modified in-situ stress inversion method could effectively improve the fitting accuracy of locally abnormal stress regions.

  18. An Inverse Finite Element Method for Determining the Tissue Compressibility of Human Left Ventricular Wall during the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hassaballah, Abdallah I.; Hassan, Mohsen A.; Mardi, Azizi N.; Hamdi, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the myocardium’s tissue properties is important in constructing functional finite element (FE) models of the human heart. To obtain accurate properties especially for functional modeling of a heart, tissue properties have to be determined in vivo. At present, there are only few in vivo methods that can be applied to characterize the internal myocardium tissue mechanics. This work introduced and evaluated an FE inverse method to determine the myocardial tissue compressibility. Specifically, it combined an inverse FE method with the experimentally-measured left ventricular (LV) internal cavity pressure and volume versus time curves. Results indicated that the FE inverse method showed good correlation between LV repolarization and the variations in the myocardium tissue bulk modulus K (K = 1/compressibility), as well as provided an ability to describe in vivo human myocardium material behavior. The myocardium bulk modulus can be effectively used as a diagnostic tool of the heart ejection fraction. The model developed is proved to be robust and efficient. It offers a new perspective and means to the study of living-myocardium tissue properties, as it shows the variation of the bulk modulus throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:24367544

  19. Dark matter distribution in the merging cluster Abell 2163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucail, G.

    2012-04-01

    Context. The cluster Abell 2163 is a merging system of several subclusters with complex dynamics. It presents exceptional X-rays properties (high temperature and luminosity), suggesting that it is a very massive cluster. Recent 2D analysis of the gas distribution has revealed a complex and multiphase structure. Aims: This paper presents a wide-field weak lensing study of the dark matter distribution in the cluster in order to provide an alternative vision of the merging status of the cluster. The 2D mass distribution was built and compared to the galaxies and gas distributions. Methods: A Bayesian method, implemented in the Im2shape software, was used to fit the shape parameters of the faint background galaxies and to correct for PSF smearing. A careful color selection on the background galaxies was applied to retrieve the weak lensing signal. Shear signal was measured out to more than 2 Mpc (≃12' from the center). The radial shear profile was fit with different parametric mass profiles. The 2D mass map was built from the shear distribution and used to identify the different mass components. Results: The 2D mass map agrees with the galaxy distribution, while the total mass inferred from weak lensing shows a strong discrepancy to the X-ray deduced mass. Regardless of the method used, the virial mass M200 falls in the range 8 to 14 × 1014 h70-1 M⊙, a value that is two times less than the mass deduced from X-rays. The central mass clump appears bimodal in the dark matter distribution, with a mass ratio ~3:1 between the two components. The infalling clump A2163-B is detected in weak lensing as an independent entity. All these results are interpreted in the context of a multiple merger seen less than 1 Gyr after the main crossover. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of

  20. An inversion method for retrieving soil moisture information from satellite altimetry observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebbing, Bernd; Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen; Braakmann-Folgmann, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture represents an important component of the terrestrial water cycle that controls., evapotranspiration and vegetation growth. Consequently, knowledge on soil moisture variability is essential to understand the interactions between land and atmosphere. Yet, terrestrial measurements are sparse and their information content is limited due to the large spatial variability of soil moisture. Therefore, over the last two decades, several active and passive radar and satellite missions such as ERS/SCAT, AMSR, SMOS or SMAP have been providing backscatter information that can be used to estimate surface conditions including soil moisture which is proportional to the dielectric constant of the upper (few cm) soil layers . Another source of soil moisture information are satellite radar altimeters, originally designed to measure sea surface height over the oceans. Measurements of Jason-1/2 (Ku- and C-Band) or Envisat (Ku- and S-Band) nadir radar backscatter provide high-resolution along-track information (~ 300m along-track resolution) on backscatter every ~10 days (Jason-1/2) or ~35 days (Envisat). Recent studies found good correlation between backscatter and soil moisture in upper layers, especially in arid and semi-arid regions, indicating the potential of satellite altimetry both to reconstruct and to monitor soil moisture variability. However, measuring soil moisture using altimetry has some drawbacks that include: (1) the noisy behavior of the altimetry-derived backscatter (due to e.g., existence of surface water in the radar foot-print), (2) the strong assumptions for converting altimetry backscatters to the soil moisture storage changes, and (3) the need for interpolating between the tracks. In this study, we suggest a new inversion framework that allows to retrieve soil moisture information from along-track Jason-2 and Envisat satellite altimetry data, and we test this scheme over the Australian arid and semi-arid regions. Our method consists of: (i

  1. Non-linear inversion of controlled source multi-receiver electromagnetic induction data for unexploded ordnance using a continuation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, A.; Everett, M. E.

    2007-03-01

    This work adopts a continuation approach, based on path tracking in model space, to solve the non-linear least-squares problem for discrimination of unexploded ordnance (UXO) using multi-receiver electromagnetic induction (EMI) data. The forward model corresponds to a stretched-exponential decay of eddy currents induced in a magnetic spheroid. We formulate an over-determined, or under-parameterized, inverse problem. An example using synthetic multi-receiver EMI responses illustrates the efficiency of the method. The fast inversion of actual field multi-receiver EMI responses of inert, buried ordnances is also shown. Software based on the continuation method could be installed within a multi-receiver EMI sensor and used for near-real-time UXO decision-making purposes without the need for a highly-trained operator.

  2. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  3. RADIO AND DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISTURBED COOL CORE CLUSTER ABELL 133

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, S. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Owers, M. S.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2010-10-10

    We present results based on new Chandra and multi-frequency radio observations of the disturbed cool core cluster Abell 133. The diffuse gas has a complex bird-like morphology, with a plume of emission extending from two symmetric wing-like features. The plume is capped with a filamentary radio structure that has been previously classified as a radio relic. X-ray spectral fits in the region of the relic indicate the presence of either high-temperature gas or non-thermal emission, although the measured photon index is flatter than would be expected if the non-thermal emission is from inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background by the radio-emitting particles. We find evidence for a weak elliptical X-ray surface brightness edge surrounding the core, which we show is consistent with a sloshing cold front. The plume is consistent with having formed due to uplift by a buoyantly rising radio bubble, now seen as the radio relic, and has properties consistent with buoyantly lifted plumes seen in other systems (e.g., M87). Alternatively, the plume may be a gas sloshing spiral viewed edge-on. Results from spectral analysis of the wing-like features are inconsistent with the previous suggestion that the wings formed due to the passage of a weak shock through the cool core. We instead conclude that the wings are due to X-ray cavities formed by displacement of X-ray gas by the radio relic. The central cD galaxy contains two small-scale cold gas clumps that are slightly offset from their optical and UV counterparts, suggestive of a galaxy-galaxy merger event. On larger scales, there is evidence for cluster substructure in both optical observations and the X-ray temperature map. We suggest that the Abell 133 cluster has recently undergone a merger event with an interloping subgroup, initialing gas sloshing in the core. The torus of sloshed gas is seen close to edge-on, leading to the somewhat ragged appearance of the elliptical surface brightness edge. We show

  4. Gradient Correlation Method for the Stabilization of Inversion Results of Aerosol Microphysical Properties Retrieved from Profiles of Optical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolgotin, Alexei; Müller, Detlef; Romanov, Anton; Chemyakin, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    Correlation relationships between aerosol microphysical parameters and optical data are investigated. The results show that surface-area concentrations and extinction coefficients are linearly correlated with a correlation coefficient above 0.99 for arbitrary particle size distribution. The correlation relationships that we obtained can be used as constraints in our inversion of optical lidar data. Simulation studies demonstrate a significant stabilization of aerosol microphysical data products if we apply the gradient correlation method in our traditional regularization technique.

  5. Subspace inverse power method and polynomial chaos representation for the modal frequency responses of random mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnacco, E.; de Cursi, E. Souza; Sampaio, R.

    2016-04-01

    This study concerns the computation of frequency responses of linear stochastic mechanical systems through a modal analysis. A new strategy, based on transposing standards deterministic deflated and subspace inverse power methods into stochastic framework, is introduced via polynomial chaos representation. Applicability and effectiveness of the proposed schemes is demonstrated through three simple application examples and one realistic application example. It is shown that null and repeated-eigenvalue situations are addressed successfully.

  6. Waveform Inversion of OBS Data and Illumination/Resolution Analyses on Marine Seismic Data Acquisitions by the Adjoint Wavefield Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Li, K.

    2012-12-01

    We applied a wave-equation based adjoint wavefield method for seismic illumination/resolution analyses and full waveform inversion. A two-way wave-equation is used to calculate directional and diffracted energy fluxes for waves propagating between sources and receivers to the subsurface target. The first-order staggered-grid pressure-velocity formulation, which lacks the characteristic of being self-adjoint is further validated and corrected to render the modeling operator before its practical application. Despite most published papers on synthetic kernel research, realistic applications to two field experiments are demonstrated and emphasize its practical needs. The Fréchet sensitivity kernels are used to quantify the target illumination conditions. For realistic illumination measurements and resolution analyses, two completely different survey geometries and nontrivial pre-conditioning strategies based on seismic data type are demonstrated and compared. From illumination studies, particle velocity responses are more sensitive to lateral velocity variations than pressure records. For waveform inversion, the more accurately estimated velocity model obtained the deeper the depth of investigation would be reached. To achieve better resolution and illumination, closely spaced OBS receiver interval is preferred. Based on the results, waveform inversion is applied for a gas hydrate site in Taiwan for shallow structure and BSR detection. Full waveform approach potentially provides better depth resolution than ray approach. The quantitative analyses, a by-product of full waveform inversion, are useful for quantifying seismic processing and depth migration strategies.llumination/resolution analysis for a 3D MCS/OBS survey in 2008. Analysis of OBS data shows that pressure (top), horizontal (middle) and vertical (bottom) velocity records produce different resolving power for gas hydrate exploration. ull waveform inversion of 8 OBS data along Yuan-An Ridge in SW Taiwan

  7. State-transition-matrix method for inverse scattering in one-dimensional inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Zarifi, Davoud; Soleimani, Mohammad; Abdolali, Ali

    2014-11-01

    This study presents an analytical approach for the electromagnetic characterization of one-dimensional inhomogeneous media. The proposed approach provides the permittivity profile of the medium in terms of the reflection and transmission coefficients. The inverse solution of the permittivity profile is obtained with the help of the state-transition matrix (STM) and its properties, which are presented and proved. The advantage of using this analytic reconstruction technique is its ability to remove complexity and nonlinearity of the inverse problem. Several examples have been considered for validation of the proposed technique and, in each case, quite good agreement has been found between the original and reconstructed profiles. It has been established from the obtained results that when the scattering parameters are combined with the properties of STM, a robust and reliable technique is provided for the electromagnetic characterization of one-dimensional inhomogeneous media. PMID:25493896

  8. Stellar populations of BCGs, close companions and intracluster light in Abell 85, Abell 2457 and IIZw108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. O. V.; Alpert, H. S.; Trierweiler, I. L.; Abraham, T.; Beizer, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first results from an integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey of a ˜75 kpc region around three brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), combining over 100 IFU fibres to study the intracluster light (ICL). We fit population synthesis models to estimate age and metallicity. For Abell 85 and Abell 2457, the ICL is best-fit with a fraction of old, metal-rich stars like in the BCG, but requires 30-50 per cent young and metal-poor stars, a component not found in the BCGs. This is consistent with the ICL having been formed by a combination of interactions with less massive, younger, more metal-poor cluster members in addition to stars that form the BCG. We find that the three galaxies are in different stages of evolution and may be the result of different formation mechanisms. The BCG in Abell 85 is near a relatively young, metal-poor galaxy, but the dynamical friction time-scale is long and the two are unlikely to be undergoing a merger. The outer regions of Abell 2457 show a higher relative fraction of metal-poor stars, and we find one companion, with a higher fraction of young, metal-poor stars than the BCG, which is likely to merge within a gigayear. Several luminous red galaxies are found at the centre of the cluster IIZw108, with short merger time-scales, suggesting that the system is about to embark on a series of major mergers to build up a dominant BCG. The young, metal-poor component found in the ICL is not found in the merging galaxies.

  9. Stellar Populations of BCGs, Close Companions and Intracluster Light in Abell 85, Abell 2457 and IIZw108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. O. V.; Alpert, H. S.; Trierweiler, I. L.; Abraham, T.; Beizer, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first results from an integral field (IFU) spectroscopic survey of a ˜75 kpc region around three Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs), combining over 100 IFU fibres to study the intracluster light (ICL). We fit population synthesis models to estimate age and metallicity. For Abell 85 and Abell 2457, the ICL is best-fit with a fraction of old, metal-rich stars like in the BCG, but requires 30-50% young and metal-poor stars, a component not found in the BCGs. This is consistent with the ICL having been formed by a combination of interactions with less massive, younger, more metal-poor cluster members in addition to stars that form the BCG. We find that the three galaxies are in different stages of evolution and may be the result of different formation mechanisms. The BCG in Abell 85 is near a relatively young, metal-poor galaxy, but the dynamical friction timescale is long and the two are unlikely to be undergoing a merger. The outer regions of Abell 2457 show a higher relative fraction of metal-poor stars, and we find one companion, with a higher fraction of young, metal-poor stars than the BCG, which is likely to merge within a gigayear. Several luminous red galaxies are found at the centre of the cluster IIZw108, with short merger timescales, suggesting the system is about to embark on a series of major mergers to build up a dominant BCG. The young, metal-poor component found in the ICL is not found in the merging galaxies.

  10. A weak-lensing analysis of the Abell 383 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Radovich, M.; Grado, A.; Puddu, E.; Romano, A.; Limatola, L.; Fu, L.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We use deep CFHT and SUBARU uBVRIz archival images of the Abell 383 cluster (z = 0.187) to estimate its mass by weak-lensing. Methods: To this end, we first use simulated images to check the accuracy provided by our Kaiser-Squires-Broadhurst (KSB) pipeline. These simulations include shear testing programme (STEP) 1 and 2 simulations, as well as more realistic simulations of the distortion of galaxy shapes by a cluster with a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. From these simulations we estimate the effect of noise on shear measurement and derive the correction terms. The R-band image is used to derive the mass by fitting the observed tangential shear profile with an NFW mass profile. Photometric redshifts are computed from the uBVRIz catalogs. Different methods for the foreground/background galaxy selection are implemented, namely selection by magnitude, color, and photometric redshifts, and the results are compared. In particular, we developed a semi-automatic algorithm to select the foreground galaxies in the color-color diagram, based on the observed colors. Results: Using color selection or photometric redshifts improves the correction of dilution from foreground galaxies: this leads to higher signals in the inner parts of the cluster. We obtain a cluster mass Mvir = 7.5+2.7_{-1.9 × 1014} M⊙: this value is 20% higher than previous estimates and is more consistent the mass expected from X-ray data. The R-band luminosity function of the cluster is computed and gives a total luminosity Ltot = (2.14 ± 0.5) × 1012 L⊙ and a mass-to-luminosity ratio M/L 300 M⊙/L⊙. Based on: data collected with the Subaru Telescope (University of Tokyo) and obtained from the SMOKA, which is operated by the Astronomy Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada

  11. Parametric design of a Francis turbine runner by means of a three-dimensional inverse design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshkah, K.; Zangeneh, M.

    2010-08-01

    The present paper describes the parametric design of a Francis turbine runner. The runner geometry is parameterized by means of a 3D inverse design method, while CFD analyses were performed to assess the hydrodymanic and suction performance of different design configurations that were investigated. An initial runner design was first generated and used as baseline for parametric study. The effects of several design parameter, namely stacking condition and blade loading was then investigated in order to determine their effect on the suction performance. The use of blade parameterization using the inverse method lead to a major advantage for design of Francis turbine runners, as the three-dimensional blade shape is describe by parameters that closely related to the flow field namely blade loading and stacking condition that have a direct impact on the hydrodynamics of the flow field. On the basis of this study, an optimum configuration was designed which results in a cavitation free flow in the runner, while maintaining a high level of hydraulic efficiency. The paper highlights design guidelines for application of inverse design method to Francis turbine runners. The design guidelines have a general validity and can be used for similar design applications since they are based on flow field analyses and on hydrodynamic design parameters.

  12. Studying the Transient Thermal Contact Conductance Between the Exhaust Valve and Its Seat Using the Inverse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhad, Mohsen Motahari; Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hassan; Shahraki, Saeid

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the experiments aimed at analyzing thermally the exhaust valve in an air-cooled internal combustion engine and estimating the thermal contact conductance in fixed and periodic contacts. Due to the nature of internal combustion engines, the duration of contact between the valve and its seat is too short, and much time is needed to reach the quasi-steady state in the periodic contact between the exhaust valve and its seat. Using the methods of linear extrapolation and the inverse solution, the surface contact temperatures and the fixed and periodic thermal contact conductance were calculated. The results of linear extrapolation and inverse methods have similar trends, and based on the error analysis, they are accurate enough to estimate the thermal contact conductance. Moreover, due to the error analysis, a linear extrapolation method using inverse ratio is preferred. The effects of pressure, contact frequency, heat flux, and cooling air speed on thermal contact conductance have been investigated. The results show that by increasing the contact pressure the thermal contact conductance increases substantially. In addition, by increasing the engine speed the thermal contact conductance decreases. On the other hand, by boosting the air speed the thermal contact conductance increases, and by raising the heat flux the thermal contact conductance reduces. The average calculated error equals to 12.9 %.

  13. The optimized gradient method for full waveform inversion and its spectral implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-06-01

    At the heart of the full waveform inversion (FWI) implementation is wavefield extrapolation, and specifically its accuracy and cost. To obtain accurate, dispersion free wavefields, the extrapolation for modelling is often expensive. Combining an efficient extrapolation with a novel gradient preconditioning can render an FWI implementation that efficiently converges to an accurate model. We, specifically, recast the extrapolation part of the inversion in terms of its spectral components for both data and gradient calculation. This admits dispersion free wavefields even at large extrapolation time steps, which improves the efficiency of the inversion. An alternative spectral representation of the depth axis in terms of sine functions allows us to impose a free surface boundary condition, which reflects our medium boundaries more accurately. Using a newly derived perfectly matched layer formulation for this spectral implementation, we can define a finite model with absorbing boundaries. In order to reduce the nonlinearity in FWI, we propose a multiscale conditioning of the objective function through combining the different directional components of the gradient to optimally update the velocity. Through solving a simple optimization problem, it specifically admits the smoothest approximate update while guaranteeing its ascending direction. An application to the Marmousi model demonstrates the capability of the proposed approach and justifies our assertions with respect to cost and convergence.

  14. The Optimized Gradient Method for Full Waveform Inversion and its Spectral Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-03-01

    At the heart of the full waveform inversion (FWI) implementation is wavefield extrapolation, and specifically its accuracy and cost. To obtain accurate, dispersion free wavefields, the extrapolation for modeling is often expensive. Combining an efficient extrapolation with a novel gradient preconditioning can render an FWI implementation that efficiently converges to an accurate model. We, specifically, recast the extrapolation part of the inversion in terms of its spectral components for both data and gradient calculation. This admits dispersion free wavefields even at large extrapolation time steps, which improves the efficiency of the inversion. An alternative spectral representation of the depth axis in terms of sine functions allows us to impose a free surface boundary condition, which reflects our medium boundaries more accurately. Using a newly derived perfectly matched layer formulation for this spectral implementation, we can define a finite model with absorbing boundaries. In order to reduce the nonlinearity in FWI, we propose a multi-scale conditioning of the objective function through combining the different directional components of the gradient to optimally update the velocity. Through solving a simple optimization problem, it specifically admits the smoothest approximate update while guaranteeing its ascending direction. An application to the Marmousi model demonstrates the capability of the proposed approach, and justifies our assertions with respect to cost and convergence.

  15. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, B; Ruiz, C L

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution. PMID:23902066

  16. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1482156 is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  17. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-15

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20–25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  18. Determining the strength of rotating broadband sources in ducts by inverse methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowis, C. R.; Joseph, P. F.

    2006-08-01

    Aeroengine broadband fan noise is a major contributor to the community noise exposure from aircraft. It is currently believed that the dominant broadband noise mechanisms are due to interaction of the turbulent wake from the rotor with the stator, and interaction of the turbulent boundary layers on the rotor blades with their trailing edges. Currently there are no measurement techniques that allow the localisation and quantification of rotor-based broadband noise sources. This paper presents an inversion technique for estimating the broadband acoustic source strength distribution over a ducted rotor using pressure measurements made at the duct wall. It is shown that the rotation of acoustic sources in a duct prevents the use of standard acoustic inversion techniques. A new technique is presented here for inverting the strength of rotating broadband sources that makes use of a new Green function taking into account the effect of source rotation. The new Green function is used together with a modal decomposition technique to remove the effect of source rotation, thereby allowing an estimation of the rotor-based source strengths in the rotating reference frame. It is shown that the pressure measured at the sensors after application of this technique is identical to that measured by sensors rotating at the same speed as the rotor. Results from numerical simulations are presented to investigate the resolution limits of the inversion technique. The azimuthal resolution limit, namely the ability of the measurement technique to discriminate between sources on adjacent blades, is shown to improve as the speed of rotation increases. To improve the robustness of the inversion technique, a simplifying assumption is made whereby the sources on different blades are assumed to be identical. It is also shown that the accuracy and robustness of the inversion procedure improve as the axial separation between the rotor and sensors decreases. Simulation results demonstrate that for a

  19. MUSE observations of the lensing cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, D.; Pelló, R.; Richard, J.; Lewis, J.; Patrício, V.; Cantalupo, S.; Herenz, E. C.; Soto, K.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Bacon, R.; Vernet, J. D. R.; Wisotzki, L.; Clément, B.; Cuby, J. G.; Lagattuta, D. J.; Soucail, G.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-05-01

    Context. This paper presents the results obtained with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) for the core of the lensing cluster Abell 1689, as part of MUSE's commissioning at the ESO Very Large Telescope. Aims: Integral-field observations with MUSE provide a unique view of the central 1 × 1 arcmin2 region at intermediate spectral resolution in the visible domain, allowing us to conduct a complete census of both cluster galaxies and lensed background sources. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of all sources found in the MUSE data cube. Two hundred and eighty-two objects were systematically extracted from the cube based on a guided-and-manual approach. We also tested three different tools for the automated detection and extraction of line emitters. Cluster galaxies and lensed sources were identified based on their spectral features. We investigated the multiple-image configuration for all known sources in the field. Results: Previous to our survey, 28 different lensed galaxies displaying 46 multiple images were known in the MUSE field of view, most of them were detected through photometric redshifts and lensing considerations. Of these, we spectroscopically confirm 12 images based on their emission lines, corresponding to 7 different lensed galaxies between z = 0.95 and 5.0. In addition, 14 new galaxies have been spectroscopically identified in this area thanks to MUSE data, with redshifts ranging between 0.8 and 6.2. All background sources detected within the MUSE field of view correspond to multiple-imaged systems lensed by A1689. Seventeen sources in total are found at z ≥ 3 based on their Lyman-α emission, with Lyman-α luminosities ranging between 40.5 ≲ log (Lyα) ≲ 42.5 after correction for magnification. This sample is particularly sensitive to the slope of the luminosity function toward the faintest end. The density of sources obtained in this survey is consistent with a steep value of α ≤ -1.5, although this result still

  20. Estimation of hydrologic properties of heterogeneous geologic media with an inverse method based on iterated function systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.A.

    1996-05-01

    The hydrologic properties of heterogeneous geologic media are estimated by simultaneously inverting multiple observations from well-test data. A set of pressure transients observed during one or more interference tests is compared to the corresponding values obtained by numerically simulating the tests using a mathematical model. The parameters of the mathematical model are varied and the simulation repeated until a satisfactory match to the observed pressure transients is obtained, at which point the model parameters are accepted as providing a possible representation of the hydrologic property distribution. Restricting the search to parameters that represent fractal hydrologic property distributions can improve the inversion process. Far fewer parameters are needed to describe heterogeneity with a fractal geometry, improving the efficiency and robustness of the inversion. Additionally, each parameter set produces a hydrologic property distribution with a hierarchical structure, which mimics the multiple scales of heterogeneity often seen in natural geological media. Application of the IFS inverse method to synthetic interference-test data shows that the method reproduces the synthetic heterogeneity successfully for idealized heterogeneities, for geologically-realistic heterogeneities, and when the pressure data includes noise.

  1. Energy exchange between a laser beam and charged particles using inverse transition radiation and method for its use

    DOEpatents

    Kimura, Wayne D.; Romea, Richard D.; Steinhauer, Loren C.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for exchanging energy between relativistic charged particles and laser radiation using inverse diffraction radiation or inverse transition radiation. The beam of laser light is directed onto a particle beam by means of two optical elements which have apertures or foils through which the particle beam passes. The two apertures or foils are spaced by a predetermined distance of separation and the angle of interaction between the laser beam and the particle beam is set at a specific angle. The separation and angle are a function of the wavelength of the laser light and the relativistic energy of the particle beam. In a diffraction embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the diffraction effect due to the apertures in the optical elements. In a transition embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the transition effect due to pieces of foil placed in the particle beam path.

  2. EDITORIAL: Introduction to the special issue on electromagnetic inverse problems: emerging methods and novel applications Introduction to the special issue on electromagnetic inverse problems: emerging methods and novel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, O.; Lesselier, D.

    2010-07-01

    Inverse problems in electromagnetics have a long history and have stimulated exciting research over many decades. New applications and solution methods are still emerging, providing a rich source of challenging topics for further investigation. The purpose of this special issue is to combine descriptions of several such developments that are expected to have the potential to fundamentally fuel new research, and to provide an overview of novel methods and applications for electromagnetic inverse problems. There have been several special sections published in Inverse Problems over the last decade addressing fully, or partly, electromagnetic inverse problems. Examples are: Electromagnetic imaging and inversion of the Earth's subsurface (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and T Habashy) October 2000 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data (Guest Editors: K Belkebir and M Saillard) December 2001 Electromagnetic and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and J Bowler) December 2002 Electromagnetic characterization of buried obstacles (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and W C Chew) December 2004 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: inhomogeneous targets (Guest Editors: K Belkebir and M Saillard) December 2005 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: 3D targets (Guest Editors: A Litman and L Crocco) February 2009 In a certain sense, the current issue can be understood as a continuation of this series of special sections on electromagnetic inverse problems. On the other hand, its focus is intended to be more general than previous ones. Instead of trying to cover a well-defined, somewhat specialized research topic as completely as possible, this issue aims to show the broad range of techniques and applications that are relevant to electromagnetic imaging nowadays, which may serve as a source of inspiration and encouragement for all those entering this active and rapidly developing research area. Also, the

  3. Rosetta Consert Radio Sounding Experiment: A Numerical Method for the Inverse Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiet, M.; Herique, A.; Rogez, Y.; Douté, S.; Kofman, W. W.

    2014-12-01

    Rosetta's module Philae will soon land on 67P CG nucleus, giving unprecedented insight about a comet nucleus, its composition and interior. The CONSERT instrument is one of the 20 scientific instruments of the mission. It's a bistatic two-modules radar, one on the orbiter, one on the lander. They generate EM waves that are transmitted through the nucleus. The signal is therefore delayed and attenuated by the nucleus materials and possible inhomogeneities. An accurate measurement and processing of these signals, repeated along the orbit, will allow us to perform a tomography, and for the first time, map the dielectric properties of a comet nucleus internal structures .Our approach for the resolution of this inverse problem is to use a custom built software called SIMSERT, which simulates the end-to-end experiment, using a ray-tracing algorithm. This tool is the key to prepare CONSERT operation and perform signal analysis. Given a comet shape and a landing site, we have conducted simulations to understand, quantify and get rid of the biases due to the discretization of the shape model.The first inversion using the comet shape model given by OSIRIS and NavCam teams , will assume a propagation in an homogeneous medium. The first goal is to identify and correct artefacts due to the surface interface. The second goal is to evaluate the coherency of the different permittivity estimations given by inverting the latter model on the signal measured at different positions along the orbit. Then it is likely that, based on the first investigations, more sophisticated models (rubble pile, strata) and inversions will be required. A comparative approach between the simulated data and the CONSERT data, will lead to permittivity maps of the nucleus, that are coherent with the observation, with a certain probability. These maps, the first of this type, will provide unprecedented information about the internal structure, the accretion history and the nucleus time evolution.

  4. Approximation methods for the solution of inverse problems in lake and sea sediment core analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical model employing one-dimensional (depth) transport equations to describe vertical redistribution of ocean-floor and lake-floor sediment (particulates, volcanic ash, microtektites, or radioactive tracers) by episodic and nonepisodic events including bioturbation is developed analytically and demonstrated. The principles underlying the model are explained; the model equations are derived; the inverse problem of identifying the depth-dependent bioturbation coefficient is addressed; two approximation theorems are presented; and numerical results for two sample problems are presented graphically. It is suggested that compatification, porosity effects, and depth-dependent sedimentation be taken into account when formulating future models.

  5. The impact of the choice of radiative transfer model and inversion method on the OSIRIS ozone and nitrogen dioxide retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Craig; McLinden, Chris; Sioris, Christopher; Brohede, Samuel

    Key to the retrieval of stratospheric minor species information from limb-scatter measurements are the selections of a radiative transfer model (RTM) and inversion method (solver). Here we assess the impact of choice of RTM and solver on the retrievals of stratospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide from the OSIRIS instrument using the ‘Ozone Triplet' and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) techniques that are used in the operational Level 2 processing algorithms. The RTMs assessed are LIMBTRAN, VECTOR, SCIARAYS, and SASKTRAN. The solvers studied include the Maximum A Posteriori (MAP), Maximum Likelihood (ML), Iterative Least Squares (ILS), and Chahine methods.

  6. Parallel three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion using adaptive finite-element method. Part I: theory and synthetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a distributed magnetotelluric inversion scheme based on adaptive finite-element method (FEM). The key novel aspect of the introduced algorithm is the use of automatic mesh refinement techniques for both forward and inverse modelling. These techniques alleviate tedious and subjective procedure of choosing a suitable model parametrization. To avoid overparametrization, meshes for forward and inverse problems were decoupled. For calculation of accurate electromagnetic (EM) responses, automatic mesh refinement algorithm based on a goal-oriented error estimator has been adopted. For further efficiency gain, EM fields for each frequency were calculated using independent meshes in order to account for substantially different spatial behaviour of the fields over a wide range of frequencies. An automatic approach for efficient initial mesh design in inverse problems based on linearized model resolution matrix was developed. To make this algorithm suitable for large-scale problems, it was proposed to use a low-rank approximation of the linearized model resolution matrix. In order to fill a gap between initial and true model complexities and resolve emerging 3-D structures better, an algorithm for adaptive inverse mesh refinement was derived. Within this algorithm, spatial variations of the imaged parameter are calculated and mesh is refined in the neighborhoods of points with the largest variations. A series of numerical tests were performed to demonstrate the utility of the presented algorithms. Adaptive mesh refinement based on the model resolution estimates provides an efficient tool to derive initial meshes which account for arbitrary survey layouts, data types, frequency content and measurement uncertainties. Furthermore, the algorithm is capable to deliver meshes suitable to resolve features on multiple scales while keeping number of unknowns low. However, such meshes exhibit dependency on an initial model guess. Additionally, it is demonstrated

  7. Cybernetic group method of data handling (GMDH) statistical learning for hyperspectral remote sensing inverse problems in coastal ocean optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, Anthony Matthew

    For complex systems, sufficient a priori knowledge is often lacking about the mathematical or empirical relationship between cause and effect or between inputs and outputs of a given system. Automated machine learning may offer a useful solution in such cases. Coastal marine optical environments represent such a case, as the optical remote sensing inverse problem remains largely unsolved. A self-organizing, cybernetic mathematical modeling approach known as the group method of data handling (GMDH), a type of statistical learning network (SLN), was used to generate explicit spectral inversion models for optically shallow coastal waters. Optically shallow water light fields represent a particularly difficult challenge in oceanographic remote sensing. Several algorithm-input data treatment combinations were utilized in multiple experiments to automatically generate inverse solutions for various inherent optical property (IOP), bottom optical property (BOP), constituent concentration, and bottom depth estimations. The objective was to identify the optimal remote-sensing reflectance Rrs(lambda) inversion algorithm. The GMDH also has the potential of inductive discovery of physical hydro-optical laws. Simulated data were used to develop generalized, quasi-universal relationships. The Hydrolight numerical forward model, based on radiative transfer theory, was used to compute simulated above-water remote-sensing reflectance Rrs(lambda) psuedodata, matching the spectral channels and resolution of the experimental Naval Research Laboratory Ocean PHILLS (Portable Hyperspectral Imager for Low-Light Spectroscopy) sensor. The input-output pairs were for GMDH and artificial neural network (ANN) model development, the latter of which was used as a baseline, or control, algorithm. Both types of models were applied to in situ and aircraft data. Also, in situ spectroradiometer-derived Rrs(lambda) were used as input to an optimization-based inversion procedure. Target variables

  8. Geodetic Inversion Analysis Method of Coseismic Slip Distribution Using a Three-dimensional Finite Element High-fidelity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agata, R.; Ichimura, T.; Hirahara, K.; Hori, T.; Hyodo, M.; Hori, M.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have focused on geodetic inversion analysis method of coseismic slip distribution with combination of observation data of coseismic crustal deformation on the ground and simplified crustal models such like analytical solution in elastic half-space (Okada, 1985). On the other hand, displacements on the seafloor or near trench axes due to actual earthquakes has been observed by seafloor observatories (e.g. the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake (Tohoku Earthquake) (Sato et. al. 2011) (Kido et. al. 2011)). Also, some studies on tsunamis due to the Tohoku Earthquake indicate that large fault slips near the trench axis may have occurred. Those facts suggest that crustal models considering complex geometry and heterogeneity of the material property near the trench axis should be used for geodetic inversion analysis. Therefore, our group has developed a mesh generation method for finite element models of the Japanese Islands of higher fidelity and a fast crustal deformation analysis method for the models. Degree-of-freedom of the models generated by this method is about 150 million. In this research, the method is extended for inversion analyses of coseismic slip distribution. Since inversion analyses need computation of hundreds of slip response functions due to a unit fault slip assigned for respective divided cells on the fault, parallel computing environment is used. Plural crustal deformation analyses are simultaneously run in a Message Passing Interface (MPI) job. In the job, dynamic load balancing is implemented so that a better parallel efficiency is obtained. Submitting the necessary number of serial job of our previous method is also possible, but the proposed method needs less computation time, places less stress on file systems, and allows simpler job management. A method for considering the fault slip right near the trench axis is also developed. As the displacement distribution of unit fault slip for computing response function, 3rd order B

  9. Complementary Bandwidth Extension Method Using Analog Forward and Digital Inverse Filters and Its Application to Noncontact ECG Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowada, Daisuke; Ueno, Akinori

    In this paper, we propose a novel method for extending bandwidth of ECG measuring device without deteriorating the baseline tolerance for body motion. The proposed method is realized by synthesizing a two-stage analog forward filter with two different corner frequencies and a digital inverse filter having a corner frequency identical with the higher one of the analog filter. We applied the method to bed-type capacitive ECG sensor which can detect electrocardiographic potential non-intrusively and indirectly. The results demonstrated that the proposed method could precisely recover low-frequency components like T-wave. Furthermore, we confirmed that QTc (corrected QT interval) could be estimated from the recovered wave and that the QTc correlated 0.81 on the average with that obtained from Lead II ECG for seven subjects. These results indicate that the proposed method is useful to screening of long QT syndrome by combining the method with the bed-type capacitive ECG sensor.

  10. An estimate of the terrestrial carbon budget of Russia using inventory based, eddy covariance and inversion methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolman, A. J.; Shvidenko, A.; Schepaschenko, D.; Ciais, P.; Tchebakova, N.; Chen, T.; van der Molen, M. K.; Belelli Marchesini, L.; Maximov, T. C.; Maksyutov, S.; Schulze, E.-D.

    2012-06-01

    We determine the carbon balance of Russia, including Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan using inventory based, eddy covariance, Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVM), and inversion methods. Our current best estimate of the net biosphere to atmosphere flux is -0.66 Pg C yr-1. This sink is primarily caused by forests that using two independent methods are estimated to take up -0.69 Pg C yr-1. Using inverse models yields an average net biopshere to atmosphere flux of the same value with a interannual variability of 35 % (1σ). The total estimated biosphere to atmosphere flux from eddy covariance observations over a limited number of sites amounts to -1 Pg C yr-1. Fires emit 137 to 121 Tg C yr-1 using two different methods. The interannual variability of fire emissions is large, up to a factor 0.5 to 3. Smaller fluxes to the ocean and inland lakes, trade are also accounted for. Our best estimate for the Russian net biosphere to atmosphere flux then amounts to -659 Tg C yr-1 as the average of the inverse models of -653 Tg C yr-1, bottom up -563 Tg C yr-1 and the independent landscape approach of -761 Tg C yr-1. These three methods agree well within their error bounds, so there is good consistency between bottom up and top down methods. The best estimate of the net land to atmosphere flux, including the fossil fuel emissions is -145 to -73 Tg C yr-1. Estimated methane emissions vary considerably with one inventory-based estimate providing a net land to atmosphere flux of 12.6 Tg C-CH4yr -1 and an independent model estimate for the boreal and Arctic zones of Eurasia of 27.6 Tg C-CH4 yr-1.

  11. Inversion Method for Early Detection of ARES-1 Case Breach Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan M.; Kulikov, Igor K.; Bajwa, Anupa; Berg, Peter; Smelyanskiy, Vadim

    2010-01-01

    A document describes research into the problem of detecting a case breach formation at an early stage of a rocket flight. An inversion algorithm for case breach allocation is proposed and analyzed. It is shown how the case breach can be allocated at an early stage of its development by using the rocket sensor data and the output data from the control block of the rocket navigation system. The results are simulated with MATLAB/Simulink software. The efficiency of an inversion algorithm for a case breach location is discussed. The research was devoted to the analysis of the ARES-l flight during the first 120 seconds after the launch and early prediction of case breach failure. During this time, the rocket is propelled by its first-stage Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). If a breach appears in SRB case, the gases escaping through it will produce the (side) thrust directed perpendicular to the rocket axis. The side thrust creates torque influencing the rocket attitude. The ARES-l control system will compensate for the side thrust until it reaches some critical value, after which the flight will be uncontrollable. The objective of this work was to obtain the start time of case breach development and its location using the rocket inertial navigation sensors and GNC data. The algorithm was effective for the detection and location of a breach in an SRB field joint at an early stage of its development.

  12. Estimating the Hydraulic Properties of Mountainous Podzol Soils Using Inverse Modeling Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraz, Michal; Jacka, Lukas; Havlicek, Vojtech; Pavlasek, Jirka; Pech, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this research is an evaluation of the soil hydraulic parameters (SHP) for a mountainous podzolic soil profile. The SHPs for the lower layers can be identified using standard approaches - a single ring (SR) infiltration experiment and a Guelph permeameter (GP) measurement. However, the thickness of the top soil layer is often much lower than the depth required to embed an SR or GP device, and the SHP for the top soil layer exhibits large temporal and spatial changes due to changes in vegetation activity during the seasons and a distinct alternation of wetting and drying cycles. SHPs for the top soil layer are therefore very difficult to measure directly. The SHPs for the top soil layer were therefore identified here by inverse modeling of the SR infiltration process, where, especially, the initial unsteady part of the experiment can provide very useful data for evaluating the retention curve parameters and the saturated hydraulic conductivity. This inverse analysis is the main topic of this paper. We discuss issues in assigning the initial and boundary condition setup, and the influence of spatial and temporal discretization on the values of the identified SHPs. Since the infiltration process is a typical case of a model that describes the progressive breakthrough of the wetting curve, we made use of adaptive domain decomposition (dd-adaptivity) described by Kuraz et al. (2013, 2014, 2015) for sequential activation and deactivation of the segments of our computational domain. Finally, we conducted a sensitivity analysis of our objective function on the SHP set.

  13. Best Basis Methods for the Modelling and Inversion of Potential Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Volker; Telschow, Roger

    2016-04-01

    There are many trial functions (e.g. on the sphere) available which can be used for the modelling of a potential field. Among them are orthogonal polynomials such as spherical harmonics and radial basis functions such as spline or wavelet basis functions. We present an algorithm, the Regularized Functional Matching Pursuit (RFMP), and an enhancement (the ROFMP), which construct a kind of a best basis out of trial functions of different kinds. This basis is tailored for the particular problem and the given data set. The objective of the optimization is the minimization of the Tikhonov-regularized data misfit. One main advantage is that the constructed approximation inherits the advantages of the different basis systems. By including spherical harmonics, coarse global structures can be represented in a sparse way. However, the additional use of spline basis functions allows a stable handling of scattered data grids. Furthermore, the inclusion of wavelets and scaling functions yields a multiscale analysis of the potential. In addition, ill-posed inverse problems (like a downward continuation or the inverse gravimetric problem) can be regularized with the algorithm. We show some numerical examples to demonstrate the possibilities which the algorithms provide.

  14. A new reconstruction method for the inverse source problem from partial boundary measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelas, Alfredo; Laurain, Antoine; Novotny, Antonio A.

    2015-07-01

    The inverse source problem consists of reconstructing a mass distribution in a geometrical domain from boundary measurements of the associated potential and its normal derivative. In this paper the inverse source problem is reformulated as a topology optimization problem, where the support of the mass distribution is the unknown variable. The Kohn-Vogelius functional is minimized. It measures the misfit between the solutions of two auxiliary problems containing information about the boundary measurements. The Newtonian potential is used to complement the unavailable information on the hidden boundary. The resulting topology optimization algorithm is based on an analytic formula for the variation of the Kohn-Vogelius functional with respect to a class of mass distributions consisting of a finite number of ball-shaped trial anomalies. The proposed reconstruction algorithm is non-iterative and very robust with respect to noisy data. Finally, in order to show the effectiveness of the devised reconstruction algorithm, some numerical experiments in two and three spatial dimensions are presented.

  15. Dynamic characterization of viscoelastic porous foams used in vehicles based on an inverse finite element method.

    PubMed

    Finnveden, Svante; Hörlin, Nils-Erik; Barbagallo, Mathias

    2014-04-01

    Viscoelastic properties of porous materials, typical of those used in vehicles for noise insulation and absorption, are estimated from measurements and inverse finite element procedures. The measurements are taken in a near vacuum and cover a broad frequency range: 20 Hz to 1 kHz. The almost cubic test samples were made of 25 mm foam covered by a "heavy layer" of rubber. They were mounted in a vacuum chamber on an aluminum table, which was excited in the vertical and horizontal directions with a shaker. Three kinds of response are measured allowing complete estimates of the viscoelastic moduli for isotropic materials and also providing some information on the degree of material anisotropicity. First, frequency independent properties are estimated, where dissipation is described by constant loss factors. Then, fractional derivative models that capture the variation with frequency of the stiffness and damping are adapted. The measurement setup is essentially two-dimensional and calculations are three-dimensional and for a state of plane strain. The good agreement between measured and calculated response provides some confidence in the presented procedures. If, however, the material model cannot fit the measurements well, the inverse procedure yields a certain degree of arbitrariness to the parameter estimation. PMID:25234982

  16. An Inverse Interpolation Method Utilizing In-Flight Strain Measurements for Determining Loads and Structural Response of Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shkarayev, S.; Krashantisa, R.; Tessler, A.

    2004-01-01

    An important and challenging technology aimed at the next generation of aerospace vehicles is that of structural health monitoring. The key problem is to determine accurately, reliably, and in real time the applied loads, stresses, and displacements experienced in flight, with such data establishing an information database for structural health monitoring. The present effort is aimed at developing a finite element-based methodology involving an inverse formulation that employs measured surface strains to recover the applied loads, stresses, and displacements in an aerospace vehicle in real time. The computational procedure uses a standard finite element model (i.e., "direct analysis") of a given airframe, with the subsequent application of the inverse interpolation approach. The inverse interpolation formulation is based on a parametric approximation of the loading and is further constructed through a least-squares minimization of calculated and measured strains. This procedure results in the governing system of linear algebraic equations, providing the unknown coefficients that accurately define the load approximation. Numerical simulations are carried out for problems involving various levels of structural approximation. These include plate-loading examples and an aircraft wing box. Accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed method are discussed in detail. The experimental validation of the methodology by way of structural testing of an aircraft wing is also discussed.

  17. A Peak Power Reduction Method with Adaptive Inversion of Clustered Parity-Carriers in BCH-Coded OFDM Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muta, Osamu; Akaiwa, Yoshihiko

    In this paper, we propose a simple peak power reduction (PPR) method based on adaptive inversion of parity-check block of codeword in BCH-coded OFDM system. In the proposed method, the entire parity-check block of the codeword is adaptively inversed by multiplying weighting factors (WFs) so as to minimize PAPR of the OFDM signal, symbol-by-symbol. At the receiver, these WFs are estimated based on the property of BCH decoding. When the primitive BCH code with single error correction such as (31,26) code is used, to estimate the WFs, the proposed method employs a significant bit protection method which assigns a significant bit to the best subcarrier selected among all possible subcarriers. With computer simulation, when (31,26), (31,21) and (32,21) BCH codes are employed, PAPR of the OFDM signal at the CCDF (Complementary Cumulative Distribution Function) of 10-4 is reduced by about 1.9, 2.5 and 2.5dB by applying the PPR method, while achieving the BER performance comparable to the case with the perfect WF estimation in exponentially decaying 12-path Rayleigh fading condition.

  18. An inverse method for determining the spatially resolved properties of viscoelastic–viscoplastic three-dimensional printed materials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.; Ashcroft, I. A.; Wildman, R. D.; Tuck, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    A method using experimental nanoindentation and inverse finite-element analysis (FEA) has been developed that enables the spatial variation of material constitutive properties to be accurately determined. The method was used to measure property variation in a three-dimensional printed (3DP) polymeric material. The accuracy of the method is dependent on the applicability of the constitutive model used in the inverse FEA, hence four potential material models: viscoelastic, viscoelastic–viscoplastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and nonlinear viscoelastic–viscoplastic were evaluated, with the latter enabling the best fit to experimental data. Significant changes in material properties were seen in the depth direction of the 3DP sample, which could be linked to the degree of cross-linking within the material, a feature inherent in a UV-cured layer-by-layer construction method. It is proposed that the method is a powerful tool in the analysis of manufacturing processes with potential spatial property variation that will also enable the accurate prediction of final manufactured part performance. PMID:26730216

  19. Initialization of a full-Stokes finite element model of the Greenland ice-sheet using inverse methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Gagliardini, O.; Nodet, M.; Ritz, C.; Durand, G.; Zwinger, T.; Seddik, H.; Greve, R.

    2010-12-01

    About a third of the current sea level rise is attributed to the release of Greenland and Antarctic ice, and their respective contribution is continuously increasing since the first diagnostic of the acceleration of their coastal outlet glaciers, a decade ago. Due to their related societal implications, good scenario of the ice sheets evolutions are needed to constrain the sea level rise forecast in the coming centuries. The quality of the model predictions depend primary on the good description of the physical processes involved and on a good initial state reproducing the main present observations (geometry, surface velocities and ideally the trend in elevation change). We model ice dynamics on the whole Greenland ice sheet using the full-Stokes finite element code Elmer. The finite element mesh is generated using the anisotropic mesh adaptation tool YAMS, and shows a high density around the major ice streams. For the initial state, we use an iterative procedure to compute the ice velocities, the temperature field, and the basal sliding coefficient field. The basal sliding coefficient is obtained with an inverse method by minimizing a cost function that measures the misfit between the present day surface velocities and the modelled surface velocities. We use two inverse methods for this: an inverse Robin problem recently proposed by Arthern and Gudmundsson (J. Glaciol. 2010), and a control method taking advantage of the fact that the Stokes equations are self adjoint in the particular case of a Newtonian rheology. From the initial states obtained by these two methods, we run transient simulations to evaluate the impact of the initial state of the Greenland ice sheet onto its related contribution to sea level rise for the next centuries.

  20. Stress inversion of heterogeneous fault-slip data with unknown slip sense: An objective function algorithm contouring method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, John-Are; Bergh, Steffen G.; Osmundsen, Per Terje; Redfield, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method for stress inversion and separation of principal stress states from heterogeneous fault-slip data. The method is semi-automatic, and is based on the moment method of stress inversion (Fry 1999) in combination with the objective function algorithm (OFA) for stress separation (Shan et al 2003). In the presented routine we randomly partition the heterogeneous fault-slip dataset into subsets ranging between one and six. The number of subsets K represents the number of possible mixed stress states in the fault-slip dataset. For each partition number K, we run the OFA 1000 times. Following this we plot and contour the principal stress axes, corresponding to the minimum value of the objective function for each run, in a stereonet. By evaluating how solution clusters of principal stress axes change with increasing number of subsets K, we are able to determine the number of mixed stress states and their optimal solutions for heterogeneous fault-slip datasets. While the numbers of subsets are underestimated, solution-clusters of principal stress axes represent average stress states. However, once the correct number of subsets is reached, solution clusters align with the slip-generating principal stress axes. The solution clusters then become stable, and overestimating the number of subsets does not significantly alter their orientation. The partition number K when stability is obtained thus determines the number of mixed stress states in the heterogeneous dataset, while the corresponding highest density solution clusters give the best estimate of the slip-generating principal stress axes and corresponding stress shape ratios. The inversion routine is tested and confirmed using synthetic data and fault-slip data from the Gullkista fault in Northern Norway. Because the stress calculation is based on the moment method, the inversion routine is insensitive to the correct assessment of slip sense, and only requires the slip vector and orientation of the

  1. Gyrokinetic equations and full f solution method based on Dirac's constrained Hamiltonian and inverse Kruskal iteration

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J. A.; Nora, M.

    2011-02-15

    Gyrokinetic equations of motion, Poisson equation, and energy and momentum conservation laws are derived based on the reduced-phase-space Lagrangian and inverse Kruskal iteration introduced by Pfirsch and Correa-Restrepo [J. Plasma Phys. 70, 719 (2004)]. This formalism, together with the choice of the adiabatic invariant J= as one of the averaging coordinates in phase space, provides an alternative to the standard gyrokinetics. Within second order in gyrokinetic parameter, the new equations do not show explicit ponderomotivelike or polarizationlike terms. Pullback of particle information with an iterated gyrophase and field dependent gyroradius function from the gyrocenter position defined by gyroaveraged coordinates allows direct numerical integration of the gyrokinetic equations in particle simulation of the field and particles with full distribution function. As an example, gyrokinetic systems with polarization drift either present or absent in the equations of motion are considered.

  2. Modeling heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs with inverse methods based on iterated function systems

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.C.S.; Doughty, C.; Hestir, K.; Martel, S.

    1992-05-01

    Fractured and heterogeneous reservoirs are complex and difficult to characterize. In many cases, the modeling approaches used for making predictions of behavior in such reservoirs have been unsatisfactory. In this paper we describe a new modeling approach which results in a model that has fractal-like qualities. This is an inverse approach which uses observations of reservoir behavior to create a model that can reproduce observed behavior. The model is described by an iterated function system (IFS) that creates a fractal-like object that can be mapped into a conductivity distribution. It may be possible to identify subclasses of Iterated Function Systems which describe geological facies. By limiting the behavior-based search for an IFS to the geologic subclasses, we can condition the reservoir model on geologic information. This technique is under development, but several examples provide encouragement for eventual application to reservoir prediction.

  3. A variational inverse method for the reconstruction of general circulation fields in the Northern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, Pierre P.

    1991-03-01

    The knowledge of the dynamical structures associated with the general circulation in the Northern Bering Sea and Bering Strait is improving as numerical models together with in situ observing systems become more and more sophisticated. The ultimate objective being the design of a realistic model, it is fundamental to confront the results stemming from numerical simulations with the extensive set of hydrographic data collected since the beginning of the century. A variational inverse model has been developed for the study of continental seas with the aim of reconstructing, on the basis of local measurements (such as CTD profiles carried out at isolated hydrographic stations), continuous fields of the state variables representative of the general circulation. A numerical inverse methodology based on a variational principle and a finite element discretization has been designed to generate dynamically consistent patterns, providing a practical tool for the visualization and the mathematical interpretation of observations. Horizontal distributions of temperature, salinity, nutrients, chlorophyll and other chemical tracers, as well as the horizontal transport of water are reconstructed by using synoptic data collected from the ISHTAR NSF Research Project. Among the three water masses that can be distinguished in the region, the Anadyr Stream is obviously the main source of nutrients for the whole basin. The trace of a permanent upwelling located close to the Siberian coast can be detected on a series of general circulation patterns representative of various tracers. The strong vertical motions resulting from this upwelling allow an intensive primary productivity and determine the particularly fertile conditions for the development of the ecosystem in the Chukchi Sea.

  4. Disentangling Structures in the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 133

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamical analysis of the structure of the cluster of galaxies Abell 133 will be presented using multi-wavelength data combined from multiple space and earth based observations. New and familiar statistical clustering techniques are used in combination in an attempt to gain a fully consistent picture of this interesting nearby cluster of galaxies. The type of analysis presented should be typical of cluster studies in the future, especially those to come from the surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2DF.

  5. Buoyant Bubbles and the Disturbed Cool Core of Abell 133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, T.; Nulsen, P.; Owers, M.; Sarazin, C.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    2010-03-01

    X-ray cavities, often filled with radio-emitting plasma, are routinely observed in the intracluster medium of clusters of galaxies. These cavities, or "bubbles", are evacuated by jets from central AGN and subsequently rise buoyantly, playing a vital role in the "AGN feedback" model now commonly evoked to explain the balance between heating and radiative cooling in cluster cores. As the bubbles rise, they can displace cool central gas, promoting mixing and the redistribution of metals. I will show a few examples of buoyant bubbles, then argue that the peculiar morphology of the Abell 133 is due to buoyant lifting of cool central gas by a radio-filled bubble.

  6. Small scale seismic measurement bench to assess imaging methods - application to Full Waveform Inversion of a shallow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leparoux, D.; Bretaudeau, F.; Brossier, R.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic imaging of subsurface is useful for civil engineering and landscape management topics. The usual methods use surface waves phase velocities or first arrival times of body waves. However, for complex structures, such methods can be inefficient and Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) promises relevant performances because all the signal is taken into account. FWI has been originally developed for deep explorations (Pratt et al. 1999). Heterogeneities and strong attenuation in the near surface make difficult the adaptation of the FWI to shallower media (Bretaudeau et al. 2009). For this reason, we have developed a physical modeling measurement bench that performs small scale seismic recording in well controlled contexts (Bretaudeau et al. 2011). In this paper we assess the capacity of the FWI method (Brossier 2010) for imaging a subsurface structure including a low velocity layer and a lateral variation of interfaces. The analog model is a 180mm long and 50mm thick layered epoxy resin block (fig. 1). Seismic data generated with a punctual piezoelectric source emitting a 120KHz Ricker wavelet at the medium surface were collected by an heterodyne laser interferometer. The laser allows recording the absolute normal particle displacement without contact, avoiding disturbances caused by coupling. The laser interferometer and the piezoelectric source were attached to automated arms that could be moved over the model surface to a precision of 0.01mm (fig. 1). The acquisition survey includes 241 receiver and 37 source positions respectively spaced at 1 and 5 mm. Figure 2 shows 2D maps of the Vs parameter after inversion of data sequentially processed with 13 frequencies. The geometry of the sloped interface is recovered. A low velocity zone is imaged but with a thickness thinner than expected. Moreover, artifacts appear in the near surface. Experimental modeling results showed the capacity of the FWI in this case and provided key issues for further works about inversion by

  7. DERIVATION OF THE ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J1713.7-3946 VIA A SPECTRAL INVERSION METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hui; Chen Yang; Liu Siming

    2011-11-20

    We show that the radio, X-ray, and {gamma}-ray spectrum of the supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946 can be accounted for with the simplest emission model, where all of these emissions are attributed to a population of relativistic electrons interacting with the cosmic microwave background radiation, IR interstellar photons, and a background magnetic field. Using a spectral inversion method, the parent electron distribution and its uncertainties are derived from the observed photon spectrum. These results are independent of the model of particle acceleration and strongly support the leptonic scenario for the TeV emission.

  8. Inverse image alignment method for image mosaicing and video stabilization in fundus indocyanine green angiography under confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongjin; Xue, Hui; Wan, Mingxi

    2003-01-01

    An efficient image registration algorithm, the Inverse Compositional image alignment method based on minimization of Sum of Squared Differences of images, is applied in fundus blood vessel angiography under confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope, to build image mosaics which have larger field of view without loss of resolution to assist diagnosis. Furthermore, based on similar technique, the angiography video stabilization algorithm is implemented for fundus documenting. The actual underlying models of motion between images and corresponding convergence criteria are also discussed. The experiment results in fundus images demonstrate the effectiveness of the registration scheme. PMID:14575786

  9. Constrained eigenfunction method for the inversion of remote sensing data - Application to particle size determination from light scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Bill P.

    1989-04-01

    The Fredholm equation representing light scattering by an ensemble of uniform dielectric spheres is inverted to obtain the particle size distribution responsible for the scattering features. The method of deconvolution involves a constrained expansion of the solution in Schmidt-Hilbert eigenfunctions of the scattering kernels. That solution is obtained which minimizes the sum of the squared residual errors subject to a trial function constraint. The method is, thus, dualistic to the well-known Phillips-Twomey method of constrained linear inversion for the solution by matrix techniques of a Fredholm equation of the first kind in the presence of error. The method is implemented in doubly iterative fashion, and test deconvolutions containing various levels of error are presented.

  10. The photometric properties of brightest cluster galaxies. I - Absolute magnitudes in 116 nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, J. G.; Gunn, J. E.; Thuan, T. X.

    1980-01-01

    Two-color aperture photometry of the brightest galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters is presented. The results are used to anchor the bright end of the Hubble diagram; essentially the entire formal error for this method is then due to the sample of distant clusters used. New determinations of the systematic trend of galaxy absolute magnitude with the cluster properties of richness and Bautz-Morgan type are derived. When these new results are combined with the Gunn and Oke (1975) data on high-redshift clusters, a formal value (without accounting for any evolution) of q sub 0 = -0.55 + or - 0.45 (1 standard deviations) is found.

  11. An Approximation to the Periodic Solution of a Differential Equation of Abel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    2011-10-01

    The Abel equation, in canonical form, is y^' = sint- y^3 (*) and corresponds to the singular (ɛ --> 0) limit of the nonlinear, forced oscillator ɛy^'' + y^' + y^3 = sint, ɛ-> 0. (**) Equation (*) has the property that it has a unique periodic solution defined on (-∞,∞). Further, as t increases, all solutions are attracted into the strip |y| < 1 and any two different solutions y1(t) and y2(t) satisfy the condition Lim [y1(t) - y2(t)] = 0, (***) t --> ∞ and for t negatively decreasing, each solution, except for the periodic solution, becomes unbounded.ootnotetextU. Elias, American Mathematical Monthly, vol.115, (Feb. 2008), pps. 147-149. Our purpose is to calculate an approximation to the unique periodic solution of Eq. (*) using the method of harmonic balance. We also determine an estimation for the blow-up time of the non-periodic solutions.

  12. USING THE LEVENBERG-MARQUARDT METHOD FOR SOLUTIONS OF INVERSE TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ONE- AND TWO-DIMENSIONAL GEOMETRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Aldemir, Tunc

    2011-01-01

    Determining the components of a radioactive source/shield system using the system's radiation signature, a type of inverse transport problem, is one of great importance in homeland security, material safeguards, and waste management. Here, the Levenberg-Marquardt (or simply 'Marquardt') method, a standard gradient-based optimization technique, is applied to the inverse transport problems of interface location identification, shield material identification, source composition identification, and material mass density identification (both separately and combined) in multilayered radioactive source/shield systems. One-dimensional spherical problems using leakage measurements of neutron-induced gamma-ray lines and two-dimensional cylindrical problems using flux measurements of uncollided passive gamma-ray lines are considered. Gradients are calculated using an adjoint-based differentiation technique that is more efficient than difference formulas. The Marquardt method is iterative and directly estimates unknown interface locations, source isotope weight fractions, and material mass densities, while the unknown shield material is identified by estimating its macroscopic gamma-ray cross sections. Numerical test cases illustrate the utility of the Marquardt method using both simulated data that are perfectly consistent with the optimization process and realistic data simulated by Monte Carlo.

  13. A three-step Maximum-A-Posterior probability method for InSAR data inversion of coseismic rupture with application to four recent large earthquakes in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Shen, Z.; Burgmann, R.; Liang, F.

    2012-12-01

    We develop a three-step Maximum-A-Posterior probability (MAP) method for coseismic rupture inversion, which aims at maximizing the a posterior probability density function (PDF) of elastic solutions of earthquake rupture. The method originates from the Fully Bayesian Inversion (FBI) and the Mixed linear-nonlinear Bayesian inversion (MBI) methods , shares the same a posterior PDF with them and keeps most of their merits, while overcoming its convergence difficulty when large numbers of low quality data are used and improving the convergence rate greatly using optimization procedures. A highly efficient global optimization algorithm, Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA), is used to search for the maximum posterior probability in the first step. The non-slip parameters are determined by the global optimization method, and the slip parameters are inverted for using the least squares method without positivity constraint initially, and then damped to physically reasonable range. This step MAP inversion brings the inversion close to 'true' solution quickly and jumps over local maximum regions in high-dimensional parameter space. The second step inversion approaches the 'true' solution further with positivity constraints subsequently applied on slip parameters using the Monte Carlo Inversion (MCI) technique, with all parameters obtained from step one as the initial solution. Then the slip artifacts are eliminated from slip models in the third step MAP inversion with fault geometry parameters fixed. We first used a designed model with 45 degree dipping angle and oblique slip, and corresponding synthetic InSAR data sets to validate the efficiency and accuracy of method. We then applied the method on four recent large earthquakes in Asia, namely the 2010 Yushu, China earthquake, the 2011 Burma earthquake, the 2011 New Zealand earthquake and the 2008 Qinghai, China earthquake, and compared our results with those results from other groups. Our results show the effectiveness of

  14. Developing a Method for Resolving NOx Emission Inventory Biases Using Discrete Kalman Filter Inversion, Direct Sensitivities, and Satellite-Based Columns

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inverse method was developed to integrate satellite observations of atmospheric pollutant column concentrations and direct sensitivities predicted by a regional air quality model in order to discern biases in the emissions of the pollutant precursors.

  15. Bayesian Inversion of Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Interactions for an Oak-Savanna Ecosystem Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Rubin, Y.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between soil, plant, and the atmosphere under water-stressed conditions is important for ecosystems where water availability is limited. In such ecosystems, the amount of water transferred from the soil to the atmosphere is controlled not only by weather conditions and vegetation type but also by soil water availability. Although researchers have proposed different approaches to model the impact of soil moisture on plant activities, the parameters involved are difficult to measure. However, using measurements of observed latent heat and carbon fluxes, as well as soil moisture data, Bayesian inversion methods can be employed to estimate the various model parameters. In our study, actual Evapotranspiration (ET) of an ecosystem is approximated by the Priestley-Taylor relationship, with the Priestley-Taylor coefficient modeled as a function of soil moisture content. Soil moisture limitation on root uptake is characterized in a similar manner as the Feddes' model. The inference of Bayesian inversion is processed within the framework of graphical theories. Due to the difficulty of obtaining exact inference, the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method is implemented using a free software package, BUGS (Bayesian inference Using Gibbs Sampling). The proposed methodology is applied to a Mediterranean Oak-Savanna FLUXNET site in California, where continuous measurements of actual ET are obtained from eddy-covariance technique and soil moisture contents are monitored by several time domain reflectometry probes located within the footprint of the flux tower. After the implementation of Bayesian inversion, the posterior distributions of all the parameters exhibit enhancement in information compared to the prior distributions. The generated samples based on data in year 2003 are used to predict the actual ET in year 2004 and the prediction uncertainties are assessed in terms of confidence intervals. Our tests also reveal the usefulness of various

  16. The ZH ratio method for long-period seismic data: inversion for S-wave velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Tomoko; Tanimoto, T.; Rivera, L.

    2009-10-01

    The particle motion of surface waves, in addition to phase and group velocities, can provide useful information for S-wave velocity structure in the crust and upper mantle. In this study, we applied a new method to retrieve velocity structure using the ZH ratio, the ratio between vertical and horizontal surface amplitudes of Rayleigh waves. Analysing data from the GEOSCOPE network, we measured the ZH ratios for frequencies between 0.004 and 0.05 Hz (period between 20 and 250s) and inverted them for S-wave velocity structure beneath each station. Our analysis showed that the resolving power of the ZH ratio is limited and final solutions display dependence on starting models; in particular, the depth of the Moho in the starting model is important in order to get reliable results. Thus, initial models for the inversion need to be carefully constructed. We chose PREM and CRUST2.0 in this study as a starting model for all but one station (ECH). The eigenvalue analysis of the least-squares problem that arises for each step of the iterative process shows a few dominant eigenvalues which explains the cause of the inversion's initial-model dependence. However, the ZH ratio is unique in having high sensitivity to near-surface structure and thus provides complementary information to phase and group velocities. Application of this method to GEOSCOPE data suggest that low velocity zones may exist beneath some stations near hotspots. Our tests with different starting models show that the models with low-velocity anomalies fit better to the ZH ratio data. Such low velocity zones are seen near Hawaii (station KIP), Crozet Island (CRZF) and Djibuti (ATD) but not near Reunion Island (RER). It is also found near Echery (ECH) which is in a geothermal area. However, this method has a tendency to produce spurious low velocity zones and resolution of the low velocity zones requires further careful study. We also performed simultaneous inversions for volumetric perturbation and

  17. Mesh parameterization opens the door to FEM-based inverse methods for estimating nonlinear source parameters of volcano deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J.; Masterlark, T.; Feigl, K.

    2010-12-01

    Migration of magma within an active volcano produces a deformation signature at the Earth’s surface. The internal structure of a volcano and specific movements of the magma control the actual deformation that we observe. Relatively simple models that simulate magma injection as a pressurized body embedded in a half-space with uniform elastic properties (e.g., Mogi) describe the characteristic radially-symmetric deformation patterns that are commonly observed for episodes of volcano inflation or deflation. Inverse methods based on Mogi-type models can precisely and efficiently estimate the non-linear parameters that describe the geometry (position and shape) of the deformation source, as well as the linear parameter that describes the strength (pressure) of the deformation source. Although such models mimic the observed deformation, they assume a rheologic structure that drastically oversimplifies the plumbing beneath a volcano. This incompatibility can lead to biases in estimating the parameters of the model. Alternatively, Finite Element Models (FEMs) can simulate a pressurized body embedded in a problem domain having an arbitrary distribution of material properties that better corresponds to the internal structure of an active volcano. FEMs have been used in inverse methods for estimating linear deformation source parameters, such as the source pressure. However, perturbations of the non-linear parameters that describe the geometry of the source require automated re-meshing of the problem domain -a significant obstacle to implementing FEM-based nonlinear inverse methods in volcano deformation studies. We present a parametric executable (C++ source code), which automatically generates Abaqus FEMs that simulate a pressurized ellipsoid embedded in an axisymmetric problem domain, having an a priori distribution of material properties. We demonstrate this executable by analyzing InSAR-observed deformation of the 1997 eruption of Okmok Volcano, Alaska as an example

  18. Do inverse ecosystem models accurately reconstruct plankton trophic flows? Comparing two solution methods using field data from the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukel, Michael R.; Landry, Michael R.; Ohman, Mark D.; Goericke, Ralf; Samo, Ty; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2012-03-01

    Despite the increasing use of linear inverse modeling techniques to elucidate fluxes in undersampled marine ecosystems, the accuracy with which they estimate food web flows has not been resolved. New Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) solution methods have also called into question the biases of the commonly used L2 minimum norm (L 2MN) solution technique. Here, we test the abilities of MCMC and L 2MN methods to recover field-measured ecosystem rates that are sequentially excluded from the model input. For data, we use experimental measurements from process cruises of the California Current Ecosystem (CCE-LTER) Program that include rate estimates of phytoplankton and bacterial production, micro- and mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from eight study sites varying from rich coastal upwelling to offshore oligotrophic conditions. Both the MCMC and L 2MN methods predicted well-constrained rates of protozoan and mesozooplankton grazing with reasonable accuracy, but the MCMC method overestimated primary production. The MCMC method more accurately predicted the poorly constrained rate of vertical carbon export than the L 2MN method, which consistently overestimated export. Results involving DOC and bacterial production were equivocal. Overall, when primary production is provided as model input, the MCMC method gives a robust depiction of ecosystem processes. Uncertainty in inverse ecosystem models is large and arises primarily from solution under-determinacy. We thus suggest that experimental programs focusing on food web fluxes expand the range of experimental measurements to include the nature and fate of detrital pools, which play large roles in the model.

  19. Monitoring CO2 sequestration with a network inversion InSAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabus, B.; Ghuman, P.; MacDonald, B.

    2009-05-01

    The capture, containment and long-term storage of CO2 is increasingly discussed as an important means to counter climate change resulting from the ongoing release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. This CO2 sequestration often requires the pumping of the gas into deep saline aquifers. However, before sequestration can be regarded as a longterm solution it is necessary to investigate under which conditions permanent and leakless capture of the CO2 is achieved in the substrate. We demonstrate that a combination of spaceborne synthetic aperture interferometry (InSAR) and ground based measurements of ground uplift caused by the underground release and spreading of the CO2 can be forged into a powerful tool to monitor sequsetration. We use a novel InSAR approach, which combines the benefits of a point-based persistent scatterer algorithm with a network inversion approach, and an additional temporal filter to remove atmospheric disturbances also at smaller scales down to 1 km and less. Using case studies from several injection wells we show that InSAR and ground based data in conjunction with geological and structural information above the aquifer, as well as detailed injection logs, allow to monitor the volumetric spread of CO2 at the mm per year level. For the majority of the studied wells CO2 appears to approach a stable sequestration state, however, in at least one case our results suggest leakage outside the aquifer.

  20. Nondestructive damage characterization of complex aircraft structures by inverse methods: Advances in multiscale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Zhou, Liming; Bernacchi, William; Aldrin, John C.; Forsyth, David; Lindgren, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The use of coupled integral equations and anomalous currents allows us to efficiently remove `background effects' in either forward or inverse modeling. This is especially true when computing the change in impedance due to a small flaw in the presence of a larger background anomaly. It is more accurate than simply computing the response with and without the flaw and then subtracting the two nearly equal values to obtain the small difference due to the flaw. The problem that we address in this paper involves a 'SplitD' probe that includes complex, noncircular coils, as well as ferrite cores, inserted within a bolt hole, and exciting both the bolt hole and an adjacent flaw. This introduces three coupled anomalies, each with its on 'scale.' The largest, of course, is the bolt hole, followed (generally) by the probe, and then the flaw. The overall system is represented mathematically by three coupled volume-integral equations. We describe the development of the model and its code, which is a part of the general eddy-current modeling code, VIC-3D®. We present initial validation results, as well as a number of model computations with flaws located at various places within the bolt hole.

  1. Mass, heat and nutrient fluxes in the Atlantic Ocean determined by inverse methods. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1988-01-01

    Inverse methods are applied to historical hydrographic data to address two aspects of the general circulation of the Atlantic Ocean. The method allows conservation statements for mass and other properties, along with a variety of other constraints, to be combined in a dynamically consistent way to estimate the absolute velocity field and associated property transports. The method was first used to examine the exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins. The second problem addressed concerns the circulation and property fluxes across the 24 and 36 deg N in the subtropical North Atlantic. Conservation statements are considered for the nutrients as well as mass, and the nutrients are found to contribute significant information independent of temperature and salinity.

  2. Measurements of mantle wave velocities and inversion for lateral heterogeneity and anisotropy. II - Analysis by the single-station method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakanishi, I.; Anderson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    In the present investigation, the single-station method reported by Brune et al. (1960) is utilized for an analysis of long-period Love(G) and Rayleigh(R) waves recorded on digital seismic networks. The analysis was conducted to study the lateral heterogeneity of surface wave velocities. The data set is examined, and a description is presented of the single-station method. Attention is given to an error analysis for velocity measurements, the estimation of geographical distribution of surface wave velocities, the global distribution of surface wave velocities, and the correlation between the surface wave velocities and the heat flow on the geoid. The conducted measurements and inversions of surface wave velocities are used as a basis to derive certain conclusions. It is found that the application of the single-station method to long-period surface waves recorded on digital networks makes it possible to reach an accuracy level comparable to great circle velocity measurements.

  3. Hierarchical Velocity Structure in the Core of Abell 2597

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, Martin; Mushotzky, Richard

    2004-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton RGS and EPIC data of the putative cooling flow cluster Abell 2597. Velocities of the low-ionization emission lines in the spectrum are blue shifted with respect to the high-ionization lines by 1320 (sup +660) (sub -210) kilometers per second, which is consistent with the difference in the two peaks of the galaxy velocity distribution and may be the signature of bulk turbulence, infall, rotation or damped oscillation in the cluster. A hierarchical velocity structure such as this could be the direct result of galaxy mergers in the cluster core, or the injection of power into the cluster gas from a central engine. The uniform X-ray morphology of the cluster, the absence of fine scale temperature structure and the random distribution of the the galaxy positions, independent of velocity, suggests that our line of sight is close to the direction of motion. These results have strong implications for cooling flow models of the cluster Abell 2597. They give impetus to those models which account for the observed temperature structure of some clusters using mergers instead of cooling flows.

  4. Pre-processing method to improve optical parameters estimation in Monte Carlo-based inverse problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodtsova, Maria N.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Daul, Christian; Blondel, Walter

    2014-05-01

    Determining the optical properties of biological tissues in vivo from spectral intensity measurements performed at their surface is still a challenge. Based on spectroscopic data acquired, the aim is to solve an inverse problem, where the optical parameter values of a forward model are to be estimated through optimization procedure of some cost function. In many cases it is an ill-posed problem because of small numbers of measures, errors on experimental data, nature of a forward model output data, which may be affected by statistical noise in the case of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation or approximated values for short inter-fibre distances (for Diffusion Equation Approximation (DEA)). In case of optical biopsy, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is one simple technique that uses various excitation-toemission fibre distances to probe tissue in depths. The aim of the present contribution is to study the characteristics of some classically used cost function, optimization methods (Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm) and how it is reaching global minimum when using MC and/or DEA approaches. Several methods of smoothing filters and fitting were tested on the reflectance curves, I(r), gathered from MC simulations. It was obtained that smoothing the initial data with local regression weighted second degree polynomial and then fitting the data with double exponential decay function decreases the probability of the inverse algorithm to converge to local minima close to the initial point of first guess.

  5. Improving the reliability of POD curves in NDI methods using a Bayesian inversion approach for uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Abdessalem, A.; Jenson, F.; Calmon, P.

    2016-02-01

    This contribution provides an example of the possible advantages of adopting a Bayesian inversion approach to uncertainty quantification in nondestructive inspection methods. In such problem, the uncertainty associated to the random parameters is not always known and needs to be characterised from scattering signal measurements. The uncertainties may then correctly propagated in order to determine a reliable probability of detection curve. To this end, we establish a general Bayesian framework based on a non-parametric maximum likelihood function formulation and some priors from expert knowledge. However, the presented inverse problem is time-consuming and computationally intensive. To cope with this difficulty, we replace the real model by a surrogate one in order to speed-up the model evaluation and to make the problem to be computationally feasible for implementation. The least squares support vector regression is adopted as metamodelling technique due to its robustness to deal with non-linear problems. We illustrate the usefulness of this methodology through the control of tube with enclosed defect using ultrasonic inspection method.

  6. Radio occultation data analysis by the radioholographic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocke, K.; Pavelyev, A. G.; Yakovlev, O. I.; Barthes, L.; Jakowski, N.

    1999-10-01

    The radioholographic method is briefly described and tested by using data of 4 radio occultation events observed by the GPS/MET experiment on 9 February 1997. The central point of the radioholographic method (Pavelyev, 1998) is the generation of a radiohologram along the LEO satellite trajectory which allows the calculation of angular spectra of the received GPS radio wave field at the LEO satellite. These spectra are promising in view of detection, analysis and reduction of multipath/diffraction effects, study of atmospheric irregularities and estimation of bending angle error. Initial analysis of angular spectra calculated by the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) method gives evidence that considerable multibeam propagation occurs at ray perigee heights below 20 km and at heights around 80-120 km for the 4 GPS/MET occultation events. Temperature profiles obtained by our analysis (radioholographic method, Abel inversion) are compared with those of the traditional retrieval by the UCAR GPS/MET team (bending angle from slope of phase front, Abel inversion). In 3 of 4 cases we found good agreement (standard deviation σT~1.5°K between both retrievals at heights 0-30 km).

  7. Mapping regions of equifinality in the parameter space - A method to evaluate inverse estimates and to plan experimental boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrer, Markus; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2010-05-01

    Only the combination of physical models and experiments can elucidate the processes of reactive transport in porous media. Column scale percolation experiments offer a great opportunity to identify and quantify processes of reactive transport. In contrast to batch experiments, approximately natural flow dynamics can be realized. However, due to the complexity of interactions and wide range of parameters the experiment can be insensitive to the wanted process and misinterpretation of the results is likely. In the proposed talk we want to show how numerical tools can be applied for thorough planning and evaluation of experiments. The central tool are maps of regions of equifinality, which are gained by a thorough sensitivity analysis of the parameter space. This tool can help on the one hand to plan the experimental boundary conditions such that the results are sensitive to the wanted process. On the other hand, they provide information on the reliability of inversely gained parameters of flow and transport. In the proposed talk we want to show from all three phases of the method. In the first phase the equifinality maps are used to choose an appropriate boundary condition for the experiment. In the second phase, the according column experiments are conducted and simulated inversely. We show break-through curves from such experiments with materials from different soils, sites and materials (Coke oven sites, abandoned industrial sites, destruction debris, municipal waste incineration ash). The columns were subjected to multiple flow interruptions and different flow velocities and parameters of reactive transport were gained in inverse simulations. The third phase consisted of an evaluation of the reliability of the parameters applying again maps of equifinality. Some drawbacks of the model could be identified and gave valuable hints on the actual processes.

  8. Large full band gaps for photonic crystals in two dimensions computed by an inverse method with multigrid acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, R. L.; Chang, C. Chung; Chang, Chien C.; Hwang, R. R.

    2003-08-01

    In this study, two fast and accurate methods of inverse iteration with multigrid acceleration are developed to compute band structures of photonic crystals of general shape. In particular, we report two-dimensional photonic crystals of silicon air with an optimal full band gap of gap-midgap ratio Δω/ωmid=0.2421, which is 30% larger than ever reported in the literature. The crystals consist of a hexagonal array of circular columns, each connected to its nearest neighbors by slender rectangular rods. A systematic study with respect to the geometric parameters of the photonic crystals was made possible with the present method in drawing a three-dimensional band-gap diagram with reasonable computing time.

  9. Large full band gaps for photonic crystals in two dimensions computed by an inverse method with multigrid acceleration.

    PubMed

    Chern, R L; Chang, C Chung; Chang, Chien C; Hwang, R R

    2003-08-01

    In this study, two fast and accurate methods of inverse iteration with multigrid acceleration are developed to compute band structures of photonic crystals of general shape. In particular, we report two-dimensional photonic crystals of silicon air with an optimal full band gap of gap-midgap ratio Deltaomega/omega(mid)=0.2421, which is 30% larger than ever reported in the literature. The crystals consist of a hexagonal array of circular columns, each connected to its nearest neighbors by slender rectangular rods. A systematic study with respect to the geometric parameters of the photonic crystals was made possible with the present method in drawing a three-dimensional band-gap diagram with reasonable computing time. PMID:14525145

  10. Recent surface temperature trends in the interior of East Antarctica from borehole firn temperature measurements and geophysical inverse methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muto, A.; Scambos, T.A.; Steffen, K.; Slater, A.G.; Clow, G.D.

    2011-01-01

    We use measured firn temperatures down to depths of 80 to 90 m at four locations in the interior of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica to derive surface temperature histories spanning the past few decades using two different inverse methods. We find that the mean surface temperatures near the ice divide (the highest-elevation ridge of East Antarctic Ice Sheet) have increased approximately 1 to 1.5 K within the past ???50 years, although the onset and rate of this warming vary by site. Histories at two locations, NUS07-5 (78.65S, 35.64E) and NUS07-7 (82.07S, 54.89E), suggest that the majority of this warming took place in the past one or two decades. Slight cooling to no change was indicated at one location, NUS08-5 (82.63S, 17.87E), off the divide near the Recovery Lakes region. In the most recent decade, inversion results indicate both cooler and warmer periods at different sites due to high interannual variability and relatively high resolution of the inverted surface temperature histories. The overall results of our analysis fit a pattern of recent climate trends emerging from several sources of the Antarctic temperature reconstructions: there is a contrast in surface temperature trends possibly related to altitude in this part of East Antarctica. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Identification of mercury emissions from forest fires, lakes, regional and local sources using measurements in Milwaukee and an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Foy, B.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Schauer, J. J.

    2012-05-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury is a global pollutant that can lead to serious health concerns via deposition to the biosphere and bio-accumulation in the food chain. Hourly measurements between June 2004 and May 2005 in an urban site (Milwaukee, WI) show elevated levels of mercury in the atmosphere with numerous short-lived peaks as well as longer-lived episodes. The measurements are analyzed with an inverse model to obtain information about mercury emissions. The model is based on high resolution meteorological simulations (WRF), hourly back-trajectories (WRF-FLEXPART) and forward grid simulations (CAMx). The hybrid formulation combining back-trajectories and grid simulations is used to identify potential source regions as well as the impacts of forest fires and lake surface emissions. Uncertainty bounds are estimated using a bootstrap method on the inversions. Comparison with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory (NEI) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) shows that emissions from coal-fired power plants are properly characterized, but emissions from local urban sources, waste incineration and metal processing could be significantly under-estimated. Emissions from the lake surface and from forest fires were found to have significant impacts on mercury levels in Milwaukee, and to be underestimated by a factor of two or more.

  12. Estimation of mercury emissions from forest fires, lakes, regional and local sources using measurements in Milwaukee and an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Foy, B.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Schauer, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury is a global pollutant that can lead to serious health concerns via deposition to the biosphere and bio-accumulation in the food chain. Hourly measurements between June 2004 and May 2005 in an urban site (Milwaukee, WI) show elevated levels of mercury in the atmosphere with numerous short-lived peaks as well as longer-lived episodes. The measurements are analyzed with an inverse model to obtain information about mercury emissions. The model is based on high resolution meteorological simulations (WRF), hourly back-trajectories (WRF-FLEXPART) and a chemical transport model (CAMx). The hybrid formulation combining back-trajectories and Eulerian simulations is used to identify potential source regions as well as the impacts of forest fires and lake surface emissions. Uncertainty bounds are estimated using a bootstrap method on the inversions. Comparison with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory (NEI) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) shows that emissions from coal-fired power plants are properly characterized, but emissions from local urban sources, waste incineration and metal processing could be significantly under-estimated. Emissions from the lake surface and from forest fires were found to have significant impacts on mercury levels in Milwaukee, and to be underestimated by a factor of two or more.

  13. Iterative Inversion Method for Eddy Current Evaluation of Near-Surface Residual Stress Profile in Surface-Treated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.; Nagy, Peter B.

    2007-03-21

    Because of their frequency-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping the near-surface depth profile of the electric conductivity. This technique can be used to nondestructively characterize the subsurface residual stress distribution in certain types of shot-peened metals, e.g., in nickel-base superalloys. To predict the depth-dependent, but frequency-independent, intrinsic electric conductivity from the frequency-dependent apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC), a highly convergent iterative inversion procedure is presented. The proposed technique exploits three specific features of the subsurface electric conductivity variation caused by near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened metals. First, compressive residual stresses are limited to a shallow surface region of depth much less than typical probe coil diameters. Second, the change in electric conductivity due to residual stresses is always very small, typically less than 1%. Third, the electric conductivity profile is fairly smooth and continuous. The accuracy of the proposed iterative inversion procedure is one order of magnitude better than that of the previously developed simpler method (J. Appl. Phys. 96, 1257 2004)

  14. On the use of the resting potential and level set methods for identifying ischemic heart disease: An inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik; Lysaker, Marius; Tveito, Aslak

    2007-01-01

    The electrical activity in the heart is modeled by a complex, nonlinear, fully coupled system of differential equations. Several scientists have studied how this model, referred to as the bidomain model, can be modified to incorporate the effect of heart infarctions on simulated ECG (electrocardiogram) recordings. We are concerned with the associated inverse problem; how can we use ECG recordings and mathematical models to identify the position, size and shape of heart infarctions? Due to the extreme CPU efforts needed to solve the bidomain equations, this model, in its full complexity, is not well-suited for this kind of problems. In this paper we show how biological knowledge about the resting potential in the heart and level set techniques can be combined to derive a suitable stationary model, expressed in terms of an elliptic PDE, for such applications. This approach leads to a nonlinear ill-posed minimization problem, which we propose to regularize and solve with a simple iterative scheme. Finally, our theoretical findings are illuminated through a series of computer simulations for an experimental setup involving a realistic heart in torso geometry. More specifically, experiments with synthetic ECG recordings, produced by solving the bidomain model, indicate that our method manages to identify the physical characteristics of the ischemic region(s) in the heart. Furthermore, the ill-posed nature of this inverse problem is explored, i.e. several quantitative issues of our scheme are explored.

  15. Influence of fat on liver T 1 measurements using modified Look–Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) methods at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Tunnicliffe, Elizabeth M.; Pavlides, Michael; Robson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the effect of fat on modified Look–Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) T 1 maps of the liver. The balanced steady‐state free precession (bSSFP) sequence causes water and fat signals to have opposite phase when repetition time (TR) = 2.3 msec at 3T. In voxels that contain both fat and water, the MOLLI T 1 measurement is influenced by the choice of TR. Materials and Methods MOLLI T 1 measurements of the liver were simulated using the Bloch equations while varying the hepatic lipid content (HLC). Phantom scans were performed on margarine phantoms, using both MOLLI and spin echo inversion recovery sequences. MOLLI T 1 at 3T and HLC were determined in patients (n = 8) before and after bariatric surgery. Results At 3T, with HLC in the 0–35% range, higher fat fraction values lead to longer MOLLI T 1 values when TR = 2.3 msec. Patients were found to have higher MOLLI T 1 at elevated HLC (T 1 = 929 ± 97 msec) than at low HLC (T 1 = 870 ± 44 msec). Conclusion At 3T, MOLLI T 1 values are affected by HLC, substantially changing MOLLI T 1 in a clinically relevant range of fat content. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:105–111. PMID:26762615

  16. Inverse avalanches on Abelian sandpiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, H.F. Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801-3080 )

    1994-11-01

    A simple and computationally efficient way of finding inverse avalanches for Abelian sandpiles, called the inverse particle addition operator, is presented. In addition, the method is shown to be optimal in the sense that it requires the minimum amount of computation among methods of the same kind. The method is also conceptually succinct because avalanche and inverse avalanche are placed in the same footing.

  17. Inverse transonic airfoil design methods including boundary layer and viscous interaction effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    The development and incorporation into TRANDES of a fully conservative analysis method utilizing the artificial compressibility approach is described. The method allows for lifting cases and finite thickness airfoils and utilizes a stretched coordinate system. Wave drag and massive separation studies are also discussed.

  18. A new sparse Bayesian learning method for inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging via exploiting cluster patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jun; Zhang, Lizao; Duan, Huiping; Huang, Lei; Li, Hongbin

    2016-05-01

    The application of sparse representation to SAR/ISAR imaging has attracted much attention over the past few years. This new class of sparse representation based imaging methods present a number of unique advantages over conventional range-Doppler methods, the basic idea behind these works is to formulate SAR/ISAR imaging as a sparse signal recovery problem. In this paper, we propose a new two-dimensional pattern-coupled sparse Bayesian learning(SBL) method to capture the underlying cluster patterns of the ISAR target images. Based on this model, an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is developed to infer the maximum a posterior (MAP) estimate of the hyperparameters, along with the posterior distribution of the sparse signal. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to achieve a substantial performance improvement over existing algorithms, including the conventional SBL method.

  19. Comparison of three methods of solution to the inverse problem of groundwater hydrology for multiple pumping stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudici, Mauro; Casabianca, Davide; Comunian, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    The basic classical inverse problem of groundwater hydrology aims at determining aquifer transmissivity (T ) from measurements of hydraulic head (h), estimates or measures of source terms and with the least possible knowledge on hydraulic transmissivity. The theory of inverse problems shows that this is an example of ill-posed problem, for which non-uniqueness and instability (or at least ill-conditioning) might preclude the computation of a physically acceptable solution. One of the methods to reduce the problems with non-uniqueness, ill-conditioning and instability is a tomographic approach, i.e., the use of data corresponding to independent flow situations. The latter might correspond to different hydraulic stimulations of the aquifer, i.e., to different pumping schedules and flux rates. Three inverse methods have been analyzed and tested to profit from the use of multiple sets of data: the Differential System Method (DSM), the Comparison Model Method (CMM) and the Double Constraint Method (DCM). DSM and CMM need h all over the domain and thus the first step for their application is the interpolation of measurements of h at sparse points. Moreover, they also need the knowledge of the source terms (aquifer recharge, well pumping rates) all over the aquifer. DSM is intrinsically based on the use of multiple data sets, which permit to write a first-order partial differential equation for T , whereas CMM and DCM were originally proposed to invert a single data set and have been extended to work with multiple data sets in this work. CMM and DCM are based on Darcy's law, which is used to update an initial guess of the T field with formulas based on a comparison of different hydraulic gradients. In particular, the CMM algorithm corrects the T estimate with ratio of the observed hydraulic gradient and that obtained with a comparison model which shares the same boundary conditions and source terms as the model to be calibrated, but a tentative T field. On the other hand

  20. Inverse methods-based estimation of plate coupling in a plate motion model governed by mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnaswamy, V.; Stadler, G.; Gurnis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Plate motion is primarily controlled by buoyancy (slab pull) which occurs at convergent plate margins where oceanic plates undergo deformation near the seismogenic zone. Yielding within subducting plates, lateral variations in viscosity, and the strength of seismic coupling between plate margins likely have an important control on plate motion. Here, we wish to infer the inter-plate coupling for different subduction zones, and develop a method for inferring it as a PDE-constrained optimization problem, where the cost functional is the misfit in plate velocities and is constrained by the nonlinear Stokes equation. The inverse models have well resolved slabs, plates, and plate margins in addition to a power law rheology with yielding in the upper mantle. Additionally, a Newton method is used to solve the nonlinear Stokes equation with viscosity bounds. We infer plate boundary strength using an inexact Gauss-Newton method with line search for backtracking. Each inverse model is applied to two simple 2-D scenarios (each with three subduction zones), one with back-arc spreading and one without. For each case we examine the sensitivity of the inversion to the amount of surface velocity used: 1) full surface velocity data and 2) surface velocity data simplified using a single scalar average (2-D equivalent to an Euler pole) for each plate. We can recover plate boundary strength in each case, even in the presence of highly nonlinear flow with extreme variations in viscosity. Additionally, we ascribe an uncertainty in each plate's velocity and perform an uncertainty quantification (UQ) through the Hessian of the misfit in plate velocities. We find that as plate boundaries become strongly coupled, the uncertainty in the inferred plate boundary strength decreases. For very weak, uncoupled subduction zones, the uncertainty of inferred plate margin strength increases since there is little sensitivity between plate margin strength and plate velocity. This result is significant

  1. [Estimation of location and size of myocardial infarction from body surface potentials using the ECG inverse solution method].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Hirayanagi, K; Aoki, T; Ihara, T; Yamanoi, N; Furukawa, T

    1985-09-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive mathematical method for estimating the locations and sizes of myocardial infarction using body surface electrocardiographic mappings. The inverse calculation is the theoretical basis of our method of estimation. First, the boundary integral equations were used to relate body surface and epicardial potential distributions. Next, a spherical harmonic expansion was used to solve the equations in order to obtain the epicardial potentials from the body surface potentials. The validity of the method was assessed by animal experiments and the clinical application. Body surface potentials were recorded using a 128 channel electrocardiographic mapping device equipped with a 16 bit microprocessor. In the animal study, the epicardial potentials were recorded by another potential mapping device simultaneously with body surface potential recordings. In the animal study, 60 epicardial electrodes and a freezing unit were mounted on a elastic fabric sack and attached to the heart. After completion of open chest surgery, freezing myocardial injury was incurred by perfusing -50 degrees C acetone-dry ice cryogen into the freezing unit. Twenty minutes after the start of freezing, ST elevations of the body surface and epicardial potentials were simultaneously recorded. An ST subtraction map was compiled as the difference between the maps before and after the myocardial freezing injury. Then, an inverse calculation was applied to the ST subtraction potentials to estimate the epicardial ST elevation. The geometric parameters of each electrode were determined from stereometry using two-dimensional X-ray images. In the clinical study, the body surface potentials of a patient with old myocardial infarction were recorded. The abnormal Q subtraction map was calculated as the difference between the measured and standard potentials of a normal subject. In the inverse calculation, the geometric shape of the heart and the body surface were determined from cross

  2. Fabrication and characterization of anode-supported micro-tubular solide oxide fuel cell by phase inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Cong

    Nowadays, the micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs), especially the anode supported MT-SOFCs have been extensively developed to be applied for SOFC stacks designation, which can be potentially used for portable power sources and vehicle power supply. To prepare MT-SOFCs with high electrochemical performance, one of the main strategies is to optimize the microstructure of the anode support. Recently, a novel phase inversion method has been applied to prepare the anode support with a unique asymmetrical microstructure, which can improve the electrochemical performance of the MT-SOFCs. Since several process parameters of the phase inversion method can influence the pore formation mechanism and final microstructure, it is essential and necessary to systematically investigate the relationship between phase inversion process parameters and final microstructure of the anode supports. The objective of this study is aiming at correlating the process parameters and microstructure and further preparing MT-SOFCs with enhanced electrochemical performance. Non-solvent, which is used to trigger the phase separation process, can significantly influence the microstructure of the anode support fabricated by phase inversion method. To investigate the mechanism of non-solvent affecting the microstructure, water and ethanol/water mixture were selected for the NiO-YSZ anode supports fabrication. The presence of ethanol in non-solvent can inhibit the growth of the finger-like pores in the tubes. With the increasing of the ethanol concentration in the non-solvent, a relatively dense layer can be observed both in the outside and inside of the tubes. The mechanism of pores growth and morphology obtained by using non-solvent with high concentration ethanol was explained based on the inter-diffusivity between solvent and non-solvent. Solvent and non-solvent pair with larger Dm value is benefit for the growth of finger-like pores. Three cells with different anode geometries was

  3. Inversion Method for Evapotranspiration from 2D Measurements of Water Vapor Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, W. E.; Barnhart, B. L.; Plenner, S.; Thompson, A.; Winsky, B.

    2011-12-01

    A method has been developed to use 2D measurements of water vapor concentration to make spatial estimates of evapotranspiration. The method is based on theoretical solutions to the conservation of water vapor equation (similar to Sutton, Sienfeld) and is related to methods used to generate footprints. The method uses a diffusion coefficient to close the conservation equation and assumes uniformity of the surface with respect to turbulent processes. This solution allows the development of a transfer coefficient between each location at the surface and each of the water vapor measurements. The problem has been constrained to two dimensions for development, but is easily expanded to three. The method assumes water vapor concentration measurements in a plane at arbitrary positions above the field. Evapotranspiration is allowed to vary in increments across the field. This geometry and the transfer coefficients allow the water vapor concentration at each of the measured locations to be expressed as the sum of the contributions from the entire surface. A least squares solution is found that estimates the evapotranspiration across the field as a function of position. To evaluate the accuracy of the approach in solving for evaporation rates two artificial data sets of water vapor concentration (with varying amounts of artificial noise added) for known evaporation rates were generated and used to estimate the surface evaporation. The method is sensitive to the assumptions made near the edges of field. Results and details of the methods used to resolve edge effects will be shown.

  4. The application of inverse-dispersion and gradient methods to estimate ammonia emissions from a penguin colony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theobald, Mark R.; Crittenden, Peter D.; Tang, Y. Sim; Sutton, Mark A.

    2013-12-01

    Penguin colonies represent some of the most concentrated sources of ammonia emissions to the atmosphere in the world. The ammonia emitted into the atmosphere can have a large influence on the nitrogen cycling of ecosystems near the colonies. However, despite the ecological importance of the emissions, no measurements of ammonia emissions from penguin colonies have been made. The objective of this work was to determine the ammonia emission rate of a penguin colony using inverse-dispersion modelling and gradient methods. We measured meteorological variables and mean atmospheric concentrations of ammonia at seven locations near a colony of Adélie penguins in Antarctica to provide input data for inverse-dispersion modelling. Three different atmospheric dispersion models (ADMS, LADD and a Lagrangian stochastic model) were used to provide a robust emission estimate. The Lagrangian stochastic model was applied both in ‘forwards’ and ‘backwards’ mode to compare the difference between the two approaches. In addition, the aerodynamic gradient method was applied using vertical profiles of mean ammonia concentrations measured near the centre of the colony. The emission estimates derived from the simulations of the three dispersion models and the aerodynamic gradient method agreed quite well, giving a mean emission of 1.1 g ammonia per breeding pair per day (95% confidence interval: 0.4-2.5 g ammonia per breeding pair per day). This emission rate represents a volatilisation of 1.9% of the estimated nitrogen excretion of the penguins, which agrees well with that estimated from a temperature-dependent bioenergetics model. We found that, in this study, the Lagrangian stochastic model seemed to give more reliable emission estimates in ‘forwards’ mode than in ‘backwards’ mode due to the assumptions made.

  5. Accounting for propagation outside of the model boundaries in regional full waveform inversion based on adjoint methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Y.; Pierre, C.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Yuan et al. (2013) developed a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave model of North America (NA) upper mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. In this model, synthetic seismograms associated with regional events (i.e. events located inside in the region imaged NA) were computed exactly using the Spectral Element method (Cupillard et al., 2012), while, synthetic seismograms associated with teleseismic events were performed approximately using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Both the regional and the teleseismic dataset have been inverted using approximate sensitivity kernels based upon normal mode theory. Our objective is to improve our current model and to build the next generation model of NA by introducing new methodological developments (Masson et al., 2014) that allow us to compute exact synthetic seismograms as well as adjoint sensitivity kernels associated with teleseismic events, using mostly regional computations of wave propagation. The principle of the method is to substitute a teleseismic source (i.e. an earthquake) by an "equivalent" set of seismic sources acting on the boundaries of the region to be imaged that is producing exactly the same wavefield. Computing the equivalent set of sources associated with each one of the teleseismic events requires a few global simulations of the seismic wavefield that can be done once for all, prior to the regional inversion. Then, the regional full waveform inversion can be preformed using regional simulations only. We present a 3D model of NA demonstrating the advantages of the proposed method.

  6. A problem-specific inverse method for two-dimensional doping profile determination from capacitance-voltage measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouwerling, G. J. L.

    1991-02-01

    The nondestructive and experimentally straightforward capacitance-voltage method for doping profile determination has always been impaired by certain weakness. The abrupt depletion approximation introduces error for steep profiles; the required differentiation of the measurement data causes a considerable noise sensitivity. More fundamentally, the method is restricted to one spatial dimension, perpendicular to the wafer surface. To overcome these limitations, in this paper the use of a numerical inverse method for the interpretation of the measurement data is presented. The method inspired by the use of similar methods for material profiling problems in biophysics and geophysics. It is specific for doping profiling problems and involves the iterative solution of a linear least squares system of equations. In this system, the known vector is formed by the measured capacitance values, and the unknown vector by the discretization of the doping profile on a grid in the measurement device. The matrix elements are found by the solution of Poisson's equation for each measurement bias case. To resolve possible ill-posedness, the system is solved by singular value decomposition of the least squares matrix. The validity of the method is verified and its error sensitivity studied by applying it to the reconstruction of both one- and two-dimensional doping profiles from synthetic measurement data. A test structure suitable for two-dimensional doping profiling, the Trimos device, is proposed and investigated by numerical experiments.

  7. E-coil: an inverse boundary element method for a quasi-static problem.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Clemente Cobos; Garcia, Salvador Gonzalez; Power, Henry

    2010-06-01

    Boundary element methods represent a valuable approach for designing gradient coils; these methods are based on meshing the current carrying surface into an array of boundary elements. The temporally varying magnetic fields produced by gradient coils induce electric currents in conducting tissues and so the exposure of human subjects to these magnetic fields has become a safety concern, especially with the increase in the strength of the field gradients used in magnetic resonance imaging. Here we present a boundary element method for the design of coils that minimize the electric field induced in prescribed conducting systems. This work also details some numerical examples of the application of this coil design method. The reduction of the electric field induced in a prescribed region inside the coils is also evaluated. PMID:20463375

  8. A new multistage groundwater transport inverse method: Presentation, evaluation, and implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, E.R.; Hill, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    More computationally efficient methods of using concentration data are needed to estimate groundwater flow and transport parameters. This work introduces and evaluates a three-stage nonlinear-regression-based iterative procedure in which trial advective-front locations link decoupled flow and transport models. Method accuracy and efficiency are evaluated by comparing results to those obtained when flow- and transport-model parameters are estimated simultaneously. The new method is evaluated as conclusively as possible by using a simple test case that includes distinct flow and transport parameters, but does not include any approximations that are problem dependent. The test case is analytical; the only flow parameter is a constant velocity, and the transport parameters are longitudinal and transverse dispersivity. Any difficulties detected using the new method in this ideal situation are likely to be exacerbated in practical problems. Monte-Carlo analysis of observation error ensures that no specific error realization obscures the results. Results indicate that, while this, and probably other, multistage methods do not always produce optimal parameter estimates, the computational advantage may make them useful in some circumstances, perhaps as a precursor to using a simultaneous method.

  9. Inversion methods for the measurements of MHD-like density fluctuations by Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaquias, A.; Henriques, R. B.; Nedzelsky, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report here on the recent developments in the deconvolution of the path integral effects for the study of MHD pressure-like fluctuations measured by Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic. In particular, we develop improved methods to account for and remove the path integral effect on the determination of the ionization generation factors, including the double ionization of the primary beam. We test the method using the HIBD simulation code which computes the real beam trajectories and attenuations due to electron impact ionization for any selected synthetic profiles of plasma current, plasma potential, electron temperature and density. Simulations have shown the numerical method to be highly effective in ISTTOK within an overall accuracy of a few percent (< 3%). The method here presented can effectively reduce the path integral effects and may serve as the basis to develop improved retrieving techniques for plasma devices working even in higher density ranges. The method is applied to retrieve the time evolution and spatial structure of m=1 and m=2 modes. The 2D MHD mode-like structure is reconstructed by means of a spatial projection of all 1D measurements obtained during one full rotation of the mode. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  10. Joint inversion of seismic velocities and source location without rays using the truncated Newton and the adjoint-state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, J.; Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2013-12-01

    Simultaneous inversion of seismic velocities and source parameters have been a long standing challenge in seismology since the first attempts to mitigate trade-off between very different parameters influencing travel-times (Spencer and Gubbins 1980, Pavlis and Booker 1980) since the early development in the 1970s (Aki et al 1976, Aki and Lee 1976, Crosson 1976). There is a strong trade-off between earthquake source positions, initial times and velocities during the tomographic inversion: mitigating these trade-offs is usually carried empirically (Lemeur et al 1997). This procedure is not optimal and may lead to errors in the velocity reconstruction as well as in the source localization. For a better simultaneous estimation of such multi-parametric reconstruction problem, one may take benefit of improved local optimization such as full Newton method where the Hessian influence helps balancing between different physical parameter quantities and improving the coverage at the point of reconstruction. Unfortunately, the computation of the full Hessian operator is not easily computed in large models and with large datasets. Truncated Newton (TCN) is an alternative optimization approach (Métivier et al. 2012) that allows resolution of the normal equation H Δm = - g using a matrix-free conjugate gradient algorithm. It only requires to be able to compute the gradient of the misfit function and Hessian-vector products. Traveltime maps can be computed in the whole domain by numerical modeling (Vidale 1998, Zhao 2004). The gradient and the Hessian-vector products for velocities can be computed without ray-tracing using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state methods for the cost of 1 and 2 additional modeling step (Plessix 2006, Métivier et al. 2012). Reciprocity allows to compute accurately the gradient and the full Hessian for each coordinates of the sources and for their initial times. Then the resolution of the problem is done through two nested loops. The model update Δm is

  11. Rheology of the Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, Inferred from Satellite Radar Interferometry Data using an Inverse Control Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larour, E.; Rignot, E.; Joughin, I.; Aubry, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Antarctic Ice Sheet is surrounded by large floating ice shelves that spread under their own weight into the ocean. Ice shelf rigidity depends on ice temperature and fabrics, and is influenced by ice flow and the delicate balance between bottom and surface accumulation. Here, we use an inverse control method to infer the rigidity of the Ronne Ice Shelf that best matches observations of ice velocity from satellite radar interferometry. Ice rigidity, or flow law parameter B, is shown to vary between 300 and 900 kPa a(sup 1/3). Ice is softer along the side margins due to frictional heating, and harder along the outflow of large glaciers, which advect cold continental ice. Melting at the bottom surface of the ice shelf increases its rigidity, while freezing decreases it. Accurate numerical modelling of ice shelf flow must account for this spatial variability in mechanical characteristics.

  12. Development of the highly loaded axial flow turbine airfoils, making use of the improved inverse channel flow design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K.

    1985-11-01

    To reduce the number of the turbine airfoils or the solidity as far as possible without increasing energy loss, a study of highly loaded turbine airfoils was conducted. These airfoils were designed for the typical velocity diagrams of the first and second stages of a jet engine low pressure turbine. With regard to the design procedures, an improved inverse method, and also a boundary layer analysis technique were employed to optimize the airfoil shapes. These airfoils, and state-of-the-art aft loaded conventional airfoils designed for almost equivalent velocity diagrams were tested in the high speed cascade wind tunnel. The airfoils showed lower kinetic energy loss coefficient characteristics and wider useful incidence ranges over the wider range extended to the high subsonic regime compared with the aft loaded ones, in spite of their higher loading. In addition to some main parts of the design procedures, theoretical and experimental results are discussed.

  13. Temporal and spatial PM10 concentration distribution using an inverse distance weighted method in Klang Valley, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarmizi, S. N. M.; Asmat, A.; Sumari, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    PM10 is one of the air contaminants that can be harmful to human health. Meteorological factors and changes of monsoon season may affect the distribution of these particles. The objective of this study is to determine the temporal and spatial particulate matter (PM10) concentration distribution in Klang Valley, Malaysia by using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) method at different monsoon season and meteorological conditions. PM10 and meteorological data were obtained from the Malaysian Department of Environment (DOE). Particles distribution data were added to the geographic database on a seasonal basis. Temporal and spatial patterns of PM10 concentration distribution were determined by using ArcGIS 9.3. The higher PM10 concentrations are observed during Southwest monsoon season. The values are lower during the Northeast monsoon season. Different monsoon seasons show different meteorological conditions that effect PM10 distribution.

  14. Brig. Gen. Richard F. Abel and Col. Natan J. Lindsay answering questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Brigadier General Richard F. Abel, right, director of public affairs for the Air Force, and Colonel Nathan J. Lindsay of the USAF's space division, answer questions concerning STS-4 during a press conference at JSC on May 20, 1982.

  15. Predicting welding distortion in a panel structure with longitudinal stiffeners using inherent deformations obtained by inverse analysis method.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Welding-induced deformation not only negatively affects dimension accuracy but also degrades the performance of product. If welding deformation can be accurately predicted beforehand, the predictions will be helpful for finding effective methods to improve manufacturing accuracy. Till now, there are two kinds of finite element method (FEM) which can be used to simulate welding deformation. One is the thermal elastic plastic FEM and the other is elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory. The former only can be used to calculate welding deformation for small or medium scale welded structures due to the limitation of computing speed. On the other hand, the latter is an effective method to estimate the total welding distortion for large and complex welded structures even though it neglects the detailed welding process. When the elastic FEM is used to calculate the welding-induced deformation for a large structure, the inherent deformations in each typical joint should be obtained beforehand. In this paper, a new method based on inverse analysis was proposed to obtain the inherent deformations for weld joints. Through introducing the inherent deformations obtained by the proposed method into the elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory, we predicted the welding deformation of a panel structure with two longitudinal stiffeners. In addition, experiments were carried out to verify the simulation results. PMID:25276856

  16. A non-rigid registration method for cerebral DSA images based on forward and inverse stretching - avoiding bilinear interpolation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Bingbing; Wan, Chao; Dong, Yihuan

    2014-01-01

    In order to reduce the motion artifact caused by the patient in cerebral DSA images, a non-rigid registration method based on stretching transformation is presented in this paper. Unlike other traditional methods, it does not need bilinear interpolation which is rather time-consuming and even produce 'originally non-existent gray value'. By this method, the mask image is rasterized to generate appropriate control points. The Energy of Histogram of Differences criterion is adopted as similarity measurement, and the Powell algorithm is utilized for acceleration. A forward stretching transformation is used to complete motion estimation and an inverse stretching transformation to generate target image by pixel mapping strategy. This method is effective to maintain the topological relationships of the gray value before and after the image deformation. The mask image remains clear and accurate contours, and the quality of the subtraction image after the registration is favorable. This method can provide support for clinical treatment and diagnosis of cerebral disease. PMID:24212008

  17. Predicting Welding Distortion in a Panel Structure with Longitudinal Stiffeners Using Inherent Deformations Obtained by Inverse Analysis Method

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wei; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Welding-induced deformation not only negatively affects dimension accuracy but also degrades the performance of product. If welding deformation can be accurately predicted beforehand, the predictions will be helpful for finding effective methods to improve manufacturing accuracy. Till now, there are two kinds of finite element method (FEM) which can be used to simulate welding deformation. One is the thermal elastic plastic FEM and the other is elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory. The former only can be used to calculate welding deformation for small or medium scale welded structures due to the limitation of computing speed. On the other hand, the latter is an effective method to estimate the total welding distortion for large and complex welded structures even though it neglects the detailed welding process. When the elastic FEM is used to calculate the welding-induced deformation for a large structure, the inherent deformations in each typical joint should be obtained beforehand. In this paper, a new method based on inverse analysis was proposed to obtain the inherent deformations for weld joints. Through introducing the inherent deformations obtained by the proposed method into the elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory, we predicted the welding deformation of a panel structure with two longitudinal stiffeners. In addition, experiments were carried out to verify the simulation results. PMID:25276856

  18. SHOCKING TAILS IN THE MAJOR MERGER ABELL 2744

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare 'jellyfish' galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging 'Bullet-like' subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  19. Large Scale Diffuse X-ray Emission from Abell 3571

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the Luman alpha forest suggest that there are many more baryons at high redshift than we can find in the Universe nearby. The largest known concentration of baryons in the nearby Universe is the Shapley supercluster. We scanned the Shapley supercluster to search for large scale diffuse emission with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and found some evidence for such emission. Large scale diffuse emission may be associated to the supercluster, or the clusters of galaxies within the supercluster. In this paper we present results of scans near Abell 3571. We found that the sum of a cooling flow and an isothermal beta model adequately describes the X-ray emission from the cluster. Our results suggest that diffuse emission from A3571 extends out to about two virial radii. We briefly discuss the importance of the determination of the cut off radius of the beta model.

  20. The cD galaxy in Abell cluster 1775

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. J. E.; Bhattacharya, B.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, a number of workers have studied the multiple nuclei cD galaxy in the rich Abell cluster 1775, trying to discover its nature. In all the cases though, very little has been published concerning its morphology. The majority of arguments about the nature of this object have been based on the relative radial velocities of the 2 components with each other and with the other galaxies in the cluster, or its radio morphology. Very little work has been done on the optical morphology. To rectify that lack of data, the authors have obtained charge coupled device (CCD) images of the cD. The authors find from the CCD data that the cD is unlikely to be a bound object and that there is strong evidence for a collision.

  1. Shocking Tails in the Major Merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare "jellyfish" galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging "Bullet-like" subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  2. Diffuse Radio Emission in the Galaxy Cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a low frequency (<1.4GHz) study of the diffuse radio halo and relic emission in the galaxy cluster Abell 0754. Images at 150 MHz made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) revealed 4 diffuse features; 3 of which are new. Images at 330 and 1363 MHz were created using archival data from the GMRT and the VLA respectively. These yield synchrotron spectral indices, α (S ∝ν-α), steeper than 2 for the new features. Adiabatic compression of fossil radio galaxy cocoon by shocks can lead to the formation of radio relics (Ensslin & Gopal-Krishna, 2001). In the framework of this model we find that the relic in A754 can be explained as a lurking cocoon of a radio galaxy; no shock compression is required to produce this emission. The implications of this result to the merger scenario in A754 are discussed.

  3. A shock front at the radio relic of Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.; Jauzac, M.; Vazza, F.; Owers, M. S.; Kneib, J.-P.; Tchernin, C.; Intema, H.; Knowles, K.

    2016-09-01

    Radio relics are Mpc-scale diffuse radio sources at the peripheries of galaxy clusters which are thought to trace outgoing merger shocks. We present XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.306), which reveal the presence of a shock front 1.5 Mpc east of the cluster core. The surface-brightness jump coincides with the position of a known radio relic. Although the surface-brightness jump indicates a weak shock with a Mach number M=1.7_{-0.3}^{+0.5}, the plasma in the post-shock region has been heated to a very high temperature (˜13 keV) by the passage of the shock wave. The low-acceleration efficiency expected from such a weak shock suggests that mildly relativistic electrons have been re-accelerated by the passage of the shock front.

  4. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts. PMID:17082451

  5. Single florescent nanodiamond in a three dimensional ABEL trap

    PubMed Central

    Kayci, Metin; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional single particle trapping and manipulation is an outstanding challenge in various fields ranging from basic physics to life sciences. By monitoring the response of a trapped particle to a designed environment one can extract its characteristics. In addition, quantum dynamics of a spatially scanned well-known particle can provide environmental information. Precise tracking and positioning of such a particle in aqueous environment is crucial task for achieving nano-scale resolution. Here we experimentally demonstrate three dimensional ABEL trap operating at high frequency by employing a hybrid approach in particle tracking. The particle location in the transverse plane is detected via a scanning laser beam while the axial position is determined by defocused imaging. The scanning of the trapped particle is accomplished through a nano positioning stage integrated to the trap platform. PMID:26559890

  6. The central star of the planetary nebula Abell 78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaler, J. B.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The ultraviolet spectrum of the nucleus of Abell 78, one of the two planetaries known to contain zones of nearly pure helium, is studied. The line spectrum and wind velocities are examined, the determination of interstellar extinction for assessing circumstellar dust is improved, and the temperature, luminosity, and core mass are derived. The results for A78 are compared with results for A30, and it is concluded that the dust distributions around the two central stars are quite different. The temperature of the A78 core is not as high as previously believed, and almost certainly lies between 67,000 K and 130,000 K. The most likely temperature range is 77,000-84,000 K. The core mass lies between 0.56 and 0.70 solar mass, with the most likely values between 0.56 and 0.58 solar mass.

  7. An inverse method for the design of bodies of revolution by boundary integral modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, R. I.

    A surface vorticity boundary integral method is presented for the design of bodies of revolution in axisymmetric flow. The analysis finds the desired body shape to deliver a prescribed surface potential flow velocity or pressure distribution. To achieve this the body surface is simulated by a flexible vorticity sheet of prescribed strength. Starting from an arbitrary first guess for the body shape, normally an ellipsoid, the flexible vortex sheet is successively realigned with its own self-induced flow field during an iterative process which converges accurately onto the desired shape. A well-proven analysis method is also presented for back-checking the final design.

  8. An online model correction method based on an inverse problem: Part I—Model error estimation by iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Haile; Shen, Xueshun; Chou, Jifan

    2015-10-01

    Errors inevitably exist in numerical weather prediction (NWP) due to imperfect numeric and physical parameterizations. To eliminate these errors, by considering NWP as an inverse problem, an unknown term in the prediction equations can be estimated inversely by using the past data, which are presumed to represent the imperfection of the NWP model (model error, denoted as ME). In this first paper of a two-part series, an iteration method for obtaining the MEs in past intervals is presented, and the results from testing its convergence in idealized experiments are reported. Moreover, two batches of iteration tests were applied in the global forecast system of the Global and Regional Assimilation and Prediction System (GRAPES-GFS) for July-August 2009 and January-February 2010. The datasets associated with the initial conditions and sea surface temperature (SST) were both based on NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) FNL (final) data. The results showed that 6th h forecast errors were reduced to 10% of their original value after a 20-step iteration. Then, off-line forecast error corrections were estimated linearly based on the 2-month mean MEs and compared with forecast errors. The estimated error corrections agreed well with the forecast errors, but the linear growth rate of the estimation was steeper than the forecast error. The advantage of this iteration method is that the MEs can provide the foundation for online correction. A larger proportion of the forecast errors can be expected to be canceled out by properly introducing the model error correction into GRAPES-GFS.

  9. Properties of the Blue Galaxy Population in Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rix, H.-W.; Caldwell, N.

    2000-12-01

    Do star-forming spirals accreted recently by massive clusters evolve in a few Gyrs. into smooth disk galaxies with little or no current star formation? Hierarchical models of large-scale structure and the observed effect of the cluster environment on galaxy morphologies and star formation rates have given rise to many theories predicting such cluster galaxy evolution. Depending on the star formation truncation mechanism timescale, the more recent cluster arrivals should still have relatively young stellar populations and thus bluer colors (esp. in U-V) than the older, red early-types (E/S0) that define the cluster color-magnitude relation. Yet to date no significant population of bluer S0's has been found in local clusters, though we note previous studies have concentrated on the inner regions (R<0.5Mpc) of nearby clusters, which are expected to be dominated by older members. Therefore, we have obtained wide-field (R>0.6/h Mpc) UVI imaging for 10 local (z<0.06) Abell clusters, with 100's of spectroscopically confirmed members, to search the cluster outskirts for bluer S0's which may be recently accreted spirals. From our detailed photometry, we have measured structural parameters for a sample of over 300 U-band selected, spectroscopically confirmed members, by fitting each galaxy surface brightness profile with a PSF-convolved, de Vaucouleur's bulge plus exponential disk model. We have found a population of blue, disk-dominated galaxies, that are predominately in the outskirts (>0.75/h Mpc projected radius) of our first analyzed cluster, Abell 754 at z=0.053. We present the photometric and structural properties of this blue population.

  10. The distribution of dark and luminous matter in the unique galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lindsay J.; Clowe, Douglas I.; Coleman, Joseph E.; Russell, Helen R.; Santana, Rebecca; White, Jacob A.; Canning, Rebecca E. A.; Deering, Nicole J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Lee, Brandyn E.; Li, Baojiu; McNamara, Brian R.

    2016-06-01

    Abell 2146 (z = 0.232) consists of two galaxy clusters undergoing a major merger. The system was discovered in previous work, where two large shock fronts were detected using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, consistent with a merger close to the plane of the sky, caught soon after first core passage. A weak gravitational lensing analysis of the total gravitating mass in the system, using the distorted shapes of distant galaxies seen with Advanced Camera for Surveys - Wide Field Channel on Hubble Space Telescope, is presented. The highest peak in the reconstruction of the projected mass is centred on the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 2146-A. The mass associated with Abell 2146-B is more extended. Bootstrapped noise mass reconstructions show the mass peak in Abell 2146-A to be consistently centred on the BCG. Previous work showed that BCG-A appears to lag behind an X-ray cool core; although the peak of the mass reconstruction is centred on the BCG, it is also consistent with the X-ray peak given the resolution of the weak lensing mass map. The best-fitting mass model with two components centred on the BCGs yields M200 = 1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.4} × 1015 and 3^{+1}_{-2} × 1014 M⊙ for Abell 2146-A and Abell 2146-B, respectively, assuming a mass concentration parameter of c = 3.5 for each cluster. From the weak lensing analysis, Abell 2146-A is the primary halo component, and the origin of the apparent discrepancy with the X-ray analysis where Abell 2146-B is the primary halo is being assessed using simulations of the merger.

  11. The improved ET calculation for semiarid region based on an innovative aerodynamic roughness inversion method using multi-source remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Qiang; Wu, Bingfang; Zhu, Weiwei

    2014-03-01

    The aerodynamic roughness is one of the major parameters in describing the turbulent exchange process between terrestrial and atmosphere. Remote Sensing is recognized as an effective way to inverse this parameter at the regional scale. However, in the long time the inversion method is either dependent on the lookup table for different land covers or the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) factor only, which plays a very limited role in describing the spatial heterogeneity of this parameter and the evapotranspiration (ET) for different land covers. In fact, the aerodynamic roughness is influenced by different factors at the same time, including the roughness unit for hard surfaces, the vegetation dynamic growth and the undulating terrain. Therefore, this paper aims at developing an innovative aerodynamic roughness inversion method based on multi-source remote sensing data in a semiarid region, within the upper and middle reaches of Heihe River Basin. The radar backscattering coefficient was used to inverse the micro-relief of the hard surface. The NDVI was utilized to reflect the dynamic change of vegetated surface. Finally, the slope extracted from SRTM DEM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Digital Elevation Model) was used to correct terrain influence. The inversed aerodynamic roughness was imported into ETWatch system to validate the availability. The inversed and tested results show it plays a significant role in improving the spatial heterogeneity of the aerodynamic roughness and related ET for the experimental site.

  12. [Calculation and analysis of arc temperature field of pulsed TIG welding based on Fowler-Milne