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Sample records for abel inversion technique

  1. Abel inversion using fast Fourier transforms.

    PubMed

    Kalal, M; Nugent, K A

    1988-05-15

    A fast Fourier transform based Abel inversion technique is proposed. The method is faster than previously used techniques, potentially very accurate (even for a relatively small number of points), and capable of handling large data sets. The technique is discussed in the context of its use with 2-D digital interferogram analysis algorithms. Several examples are given.

  2. Smoothing Technique and Variance Propagation for Abel Inversion of Scattered Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-04-01

    42 42 44 44 46 46 26 27 29 32 33 35 36 37 39 4 AE DC-TR-76 -163 10, Input Data Defining a Curve with a Sudden...1.000000 E-02 -1.00O000 E-02 35 A E D C - T R - 7 6 - 1 6 3 As a further examination of the technique, the 31 ordinates generated from the function of...TI h -Ol 7. 889482 E-02 5. C~0000 K - 0 ) 7. ?15975 E - 0 I 5.531891 E-90 4 .59 .~ 35 E-C1 5.24~1~0 ~ -02 G. OO0000 E - 0 ) G. 78:933 E-OI -2

  3. Improved Abel transform inversion: First application to COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon-Angel, A.; Hernandez-Pajares, M.; Juan, J.; Sanz, J.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the first results of Ionospheric Tomographic inversion are presented, using the Improved Abel Transform on the COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 constellation of 6 LEO satellites, carrying on-board GPS receivers.[- 4mm] The Abel transform inversion is a wide used technique which in the ionospheric context makes it possible to retrieve electron densities as a function of height based of STEC (Slant Total Electron Content) data gathered from GPS receivers on board of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellites. Within this precise use, the classical approach of the Abel inversion is based on the assumption of spherical symmetry of the electron density in the vicinity of an occultation, meaning that the electron content varies in height but not horizontally. In particular, one implication of this assumption is that the VTEC (Vertical Total Electron Content) is a constant value for the occultation region. This assumption may not always be valid since horizontal ionospheric gradients (a very frequent feature in some ionosphere problematic areas such as the Equatorial region) could significantly affect the electron profiles. [- 4mm] In order to overcome this limitation/problem of the classical Abel inversion, a studied improvement of this technique can be obtained by assuming separability in the electron density (see Hernández-Pajares et al. 2000). This means that the electron density can be expressed by the multiplication of VTEC data and a shape function which assumes all the height dependency in it while the VTEC data keeps the horizontal dependency. Actually, it is more realistic to assume that this shape fuction depends only on the height and to use VTEC information to take into account the horizontal variation rather than considering spherical symmetry in the electron density function as it has been carried out in the classical approach of the Abel inversion.[-4mm] Since the above mentioned improved Abel inversion technique has already been tested and proven to be a useful

  4. Bayesian Abel Inversion in Quantitative X-Ray Radiography

    DOE PAGES

    Howard, Marylesa; Fowler, Michael; Luttman, Aaron; ...

    2016-05-19

    A common image formation process in high-energy X-ray radiography is to have a pulsed power source that emits X-rays through a scene, a scintillator that absorbs X-rays and uoresces in the visible spectrum in response to the absorbed photons, and a CCD camera that images the visible light emitted from the scintillator. The intensity image is related to areal density, and, for an object that is radially symmetric about a central axis, the Abel transform then gives the object's volumetric density. Two of the primary drawbacks to classical variational methods for Abel inversion are their sensitivity to the type andmore » scale of regularization chosen and the lack of natural methods for quantifying the uncertainties associated with the reconstructions. In this work we cast the Abel inversion problem within a statistical framework in order to compute volumetric object densities from X-ray radiographs and to quantify uncertainties in the reconstruction. A hierarchical Bayesian model is developed with a likelihood based on a Gaussian noise model and with priors placed on the unknown density pro le, the data precision matrix, and two scale parameters. This allows the data to drive the localization of features in the reconstruction and results in a joint posterior distribution for the unknown density pro le, the prior parameters, and the spatial structure of the precision matrix. Results of the density reconstructions and pointwise uncertainty estimates are presented for both synthetic signals and real data from a U.S. Department of Energy X-ray imaging facility.« less

  5. Serre duality, Abel's theorem, and Jacobi inversion for supercurves over a thick superpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothstein, Mitchell J.; Rabin, Jeffrey M.

    2015-04-01

    The principal aim of this paper is to extend Abel's theorem to the setting of complex supermanifolds of dimension 1 | q over a finite-dimensional local supercommutative C-algebra. The theorem is proved by establishing a compatibility of Serre duality for the supercurve with Poincaré duality on the reduced curve. We include an elementary algebraic proof of the requisite form of Serre duality, closely based on the account of the reduced case given by Serre in Algebraic groups and class fields, combined with an invariance result for the topology on the dual of the space of répartitions. Our Abel map, taking Cartier divisors of degree zero to the dual of the space of sections of the Berezinian sheaf, modulo periods, is defined via Penkov's characterization of the Berezinian sheaf as the cohomology of the de Rham complex of the sheaf D of differential operators. We discuss the Jacobi inversion problem for the Abel map and give an example demonstrating that if n is an integer sufficiently large that the generic divisor of degree n is linearly equivalent to an effective divisor, this need not be the case for all divisors of degree n.

  6. Inverting ion images without Abel inversion: maximum entropy reconstruction of velocity maps.

    PubMed

    Dick, Bernhard

    2014-01-14

    A new method for the reconstruction of velocity maps from ion images is presented, which is based on the maximum entropy concept. In contrast to other methods used for Abel inversion the new method never applies an inversion or smoothing to the data. Instead, it iteratively finds the map which is the most likely cause for the observed data, using the correct likelihood criterion for data sampled from a Poissonian distribution. The entropy criterion minimizes the information content in this map, which hence contains no information for which there is no evidence in the data. Two implementations are proposed, and their performance is demonstrated with simulated and experimental data: Maximum Entropy Velocity Image Reconstruction (MEVIR) obtains a two-dimensional slice through the velocity distribution and can be compared directly to Abel inversion. Maximum Entropy Velocity Legendre Reconstruction (MEVELER) finds one-dimensional distribution functions Q(l)(v) in an expansion of the velocity distribution in Legendre polynomials P((cos θ) for the angular dependence. Both MEVIR and MEVELER can be used for the analysis of ion images with intensities as low as 0.01 counts per pixel, with MEVELER performing significantly better than MEVIR for images with low intensity. Both methods perform better than pBASEX, in particular for images with less than one average count per pixel.

  7. Spatially-resolved velocities of thermally-produced spray droplets using a velocity-divided Abel inversion of photographed streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Yamagata, Y.; Miyazaki, F.; Yamasaki, M.; Muraoka, K.

    2017-10-01

    Droplet velocities of thermal spray are known to have profound effects on important coating qualities, such as adhesive strength, porosity, and hardness, for various applications. For obtaining the droplet velocities, therefore, the TOF (time-of-flight) technique has been widely used, which relies on observations of emitted radiation from the droplets, where all droplets along the line-of-sight contribute to signals. Because droplets at and near the flow axis mostly contribute coating layers, it has been hoped to get spatially resolved velocities. For this purpose, a velocity-divided Abel inversion was devised from CMOS photographic data. From this result, it has turned out that the central velocity is about 25% higher than that obtained from the TOF technique for the case studied (at the position 150 mm downstream of the plasma spray gun, where substrates for spray coatings are usually placed). Further implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  8. An ionospheric occultation inversion technique based on epoch difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Xiong, Jing; Zhu, Fuying; Yang, Jian; Qiao, Xuejun

    2013-09-01

    Of the ionospheric radio occultation (IRO) electron density profile (EDP) retrievals, the Abel based calibrated TEC inversion (CTI) is the most widely used technique. In order to eliminate the contribution from the altitude above the RO satellite, it is necessary to utilize the calibrated TEC to retrieve the EDP, which introduces the error due to the coplanar assumption. In this paper, a new technique based on the epoch difference inversion (EDI) is firstly proposed to eliminate this error. The comparisons between CTI and EDI have been done, taking advantage of the simulated and real COSMIC data. The following conclusions can be drawn: the EDI technique can successfully retrieve the EDPs without non-occultation side measurements and shows better performance than the CTI method, especially for lower orbit mission; no matter which technique is used, the inversion results at the higher altitudes are better than those at the lower altitudes, which could be explained theoretically.

  9. An efficient and flexible Abel-inversion method for noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhin, Igor I.

    2016-12-01

    We propose an efficient and flexible method for solving the Abel integral equation of the first kind, frequently appearing in many fields of astrophysics, physics, chemistry, and applied sciences. This equation represents an ill-posed problem, thus solving it requires some kind of regularization. Our method is based on solving the equation on a so-called compact set of functions and/or using Tikhonov's regularization. A priori constraints on the unknown function, defining a compact set, are very loose and can be set using simple physical considerations. Tikhonov's regularization in itself does not require any explicit a priori constraints on the unknown function and can be used independently of such constraints or in combination with them. Various target degrees of smoothness of the unknown function may be set, as required by the problem at hand. The advantage of the method, apart from its flexibility, is that it gives uniform convergence of the approximate solution to the exact solution, as the errors of input data tend to zero. The method is illustrated on several simulated models with known solutions. An example of astrophysical application of the method is also given.

  10. Point-source inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, Charles A.; Barker, Jeffrey S.; Pavlin, Gregory B.

    1982-11-01

    A variety of approaches for obtaining source parameters from waveform data using moment-tensor or dislocation point source models have been investigated and applied to long-period body and surface waves from several earthquakes. Generalized inversion techniques have been applied to data for long-period teleseismic body waves to obtain the orientation, time function and depth of the 1978 Thessaloniki, Greece, event, of the 1971 San Fernando event, and of several events associated with the 1963 induced seismicity sequence at Kariba, Africa. The generalized inversion technique and a systematic grid testing technique have also been used to place meaningful constraints on mechanisms determined from very sparse data sets; a single station with high-quality three-component waveform data is often sufficient to discriminate faulting type (e.g., strike-slip, etc.). Sparse data sets for several recent California earthquakes, for a small regional event associated with the Koyna, India, reservoir, and for several events at the Kariba reservoir have been investigated in this way. Although linearized inversion techniques using the moment-tensor model are often robust, even for sparse data sets, there are instances where the simplifying assumption of a single point source is inadequate to model the data successfully. Numerical experiments utilizing synthetic data and actual data for the 1971 San Fernando earthquake graphically demonstrate that severe problems may be encountered if source finiteness effects are ignored. These techniques are generally applicable to on-line processing of high-quality digital data, but source complexity and inadequacy of the assumed Green's functions are major problems which are yet to be fully addressed.

  11. Oil core microcapsules by inverse gelation technique.

    PubMed

    Martins, Evandro; Renard, Denis; Davy, Joëlle; Marquis, Mélanie; Poncelet, Denis

    2015-01-01

    A promising technique for oil encapsulation in Ca-alginate capsules by inverse gelation was proposed by Abang et al. This method consists of emulsifying calcium chloride solution in oil and then adding it dropwise in an alginate solution to produce Ca-alginate capsules. Spherical capsules with diameters around 3 mm were produced by this technique, however the production of smaller capsules was not demonstrated. The objective of this study is to propose a new method of oil encapsulation in a Ca-alginate membrane by inverse gelation. The optimisation of the method leads to microcapsules with diameters around 500 μm. In a search of microcapsules with improved diffusion characteristics, the size reduction is an essential factor to broaden the applications in food, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals areas. This work contributes to a better understanding of the inverse gelation technique and allows the production of microcapsules with a well-defined shell-core structure.

  12. Evaluation of Inversion Methods Applied to Ionospheric ro Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Caceres, Arq. Estela Alejandra; Rios, Victor Hugo; Guyot, Elia

    The new technique of radio-occultation can be used to study the Earth's ionosphere. The retrieval processes of ionospheric profiling from radio occultation observations usually assume spherical symmetry of electron density distribution at the locality of occultation and use the Abel integral transform to invert the measured total electron content (TEC) values. This pa-per presents a set of ionospheric profiles obtained from SAC-C satellite with the Abel inversion technique. The effects of the ionosphere on the GPS signal during occultation, such as bending and scintillation, are examined. Electron density profiles are obtained using the Abel inversion technique. Ionospheric radio occultations are validated using vertical profiles of electron con-centration from inverted ionograms , obtained from ionosonde sounding in the vicinity of the occultation. Results indicate that the Abel transform works well in the mid-latitudes during the daytime, but is less accurate during the night-time.

  13. A variational regularization of Abel transform for GPS radio occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Tae-Kwon

    2018-04-01

    In the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) technique, the inverse Abel transform of measured bending angle (Abel inversion, hereafter AI) is the standard means of deriving the refractivity. While concise and straightforward to apply, the AI accumulates and propagates the measurement error downward. The measurement error propagation is detrimental to the refractivity in lower altitudes. In particular, it builds up negative refractivity bias in the tropical lower troposphere. An alternative to AI is the numerical inversion of the forward Abel transform, which does not incur the integration of error-possessing measurement and thus precludes the error propagation. The variational regularization (VR) proposed in this study approximates the inversion of the forward Abel transform by an optimization problem in which the regularized solution describes the measurement as closely as possible within the measurement's considered accuracy. The optimization problem is then solved iteratively by means of the adjoint technique. VR is formulated with error covariance matrices, which permit a rigorous incorporation of prior information on measurement error characteristics and the solution's desired behavior into the regularization. VR holds the control variable in the measurement space to take advantage of the posterior height determination and to negate the measurement error due to the mismodeling of the refractional radius. The advantages of having the solution and the measurement in the same space are elaborated using a purposely corrupted synthetic sounding with a known true solution. The competency of VR relative to AI is validated with a large number of actual RO soundings. The comparison to nearby radiosonde observations shows that VR attains considerably smaller random and systematic errors compared to AI. A noteworthy finding is that in the heights and areas that the measurement bias is supposedly small, VR follows AI very closely in the mean refractivity

  14. Trimming and procrastination as inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, George E.

    1996-12-01

    By examining the processes of truncating and approximating the model space (trimming it), and by committing to neither the objectivist nor the subjectivist interpretation of probability (procrastinating), we construct a formal scheme for solving linear and non-linear geophysical inverse problems. The necessary prior information about the correct model xE can be either a collection of inequalities or a probability measure describing where xE was likely to be in the model space X before the data vector y0 was measured. The results of the inversion are (1) a vector z0 that estimates some numerical properties zE of xE; (2) an estimate of the error δz = z0 - zE. As y0 is finite dimensional, so is z0, and hence in principle inversion cannot describe all of xE. The error δz is studied under successively more specialized assumptions about the inverse problem, culminating in a complete analysis of the linear inverse problem with a prior quadratic bound on xE. Our formalism appears to encompass and provide error estimates for many of the inversion schemes current in geomagnetism, and would be equally applicable in geodesy and seismology if adequate prior information were available there. As an idealized example we study the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary, using satellite measurements of field elements at sites assumed to be almost uniformly distributed on a single spherical surface. Magnetospheric currents are neglected and the crustal field is idealized as a random process with rotationally invariant statistics. We find that an appropriate data compression diagonalizes the variance matrix of the crustal signal and permits an analytic trimming of the idealized problem.

  15. Flexion in Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, J. P.; Goldberg, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    We present the first flexion-focused gravitational lensing analysis of the Hubble Frontier Field observations of Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). We apply a modified Analytic Image Model technique to measure source galaxy flexion and shear values at a final number density of 82 arcmin-2. By using flexion data alone, we are able to identify the primary mass structure aligned along the heart of the cluster in addition to two major substructure peaks, including an NE component that corresponds to previous lensing work and a new peak detection offset 1.43 arcmin from the cluster core towards the east. We generate two types of non-parametric reconstructions: flexion aperture mass maps, which identify central core, E, and NE substructure peaks with mass signal-to-noise contours peaking at 3.5σ, 2.7σ, and 2.3σ, respectively; and convergence maps derived directly from the smoothed flexion field. For the primary peak, we find a mass of (1.62 ± 0.12) × 1014 h-1 M⊙ within a 33 arcsec (105 h-1 kpc) aperture, a mass of (2.92 ± 0.26) × 1013 h-1 M⊙ within a 16 arcsec (50 h-1 kpc) aperture for the north-eastern substructure, and (8.81 ± 0.52) × 1013 h-1 M⊙ within a 25 arcsec (80 h-1 kpc) aperture for the novel eastern substructure.

  16. Hubble Frontier Field Abell 2744

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-07

    This long-exposure image from NASA Hubble Space Telescope of massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 is the deepest ever made of any cluster of galaxies. Shown in the foreground is Abell 2744, located in the constellation Sculptor.

  17. Comparison of weighting techniques for acoustic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Gangwon; Hwang, Jongha; Min, Dong-Joo

    2017-12-01

    To reconstruct long-wavelength structures in full waveform inversion (FWI), the wavefield-damping and weighting techniques have been used to synthesize and emphasize low-frequency data components in frequency-domain FWI. However, these methods have some weak points. The application of wavefield-damping method on filtered data fails to synthesize reliable low-frequency data; the optimization formula obtained introducing the weighting technique is not theoretically complete, because it is not directly derived from the objective function. In this study, we address these weak points and present how to overcome them. We demonstrate that the source estimation in FWI using damped wavefields fails when the data used in the FWI process does not satisfy the causality condition. This phenomenon occurs when a non-causal filter is applied to data. We overcome this limitation by designing a causal filter. Also we modify the conventional weighting technique so that its optimization formula is directly derived from the objective function, retaining its original characteristic of emphasizing the low-frequency data components. Numerical results show that the newly designed causal filter enables to recover long-wavelength structures using low-frequency data components synthesized by damping wavefields in frequency-domain FWI, and the proposed weighting technique enhances the inversion results.

  18. Galaxy Cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Release Date: March 10, 2010 - Distant galaxy clusters mysteriously stream at a million miles per hour along a path roughly centered on the southern constellations Centaurus and Hydra. A new study led by Alexander Kashlinsky at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., tracks this collective motion -- dubbed the "dark flow" -- to twice the distance originally reported, out to more than 2.5 billion light-years. Abell 1689, redshift 0.181. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Scientific Visualization Studio/ESA/L. Bradley/JHU To learn more go to: www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/releases/2010/10-023.html To see other visualizations related to this story go to: svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?10580

  19. A comparison of techniques for inversion of radio-ray phase data in presence of ray bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallio, H. A.; Grossi, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Derivations are presented of the straight-line Abel transform and the seismological Herglotz-Wiechert transform (which takes ray bending into account) that are used in the reconstruction of refractivity profiles from radio-wave phase data. Profile inversion utilizing these approaches, performed in computer-simulated experiments, are compared for cases of positive, zero, and negative ray bending. For thin atmospheres and ionospheres, such as the Martian atmosphere and ionosphere, radio wave signals are shown to be inverted accurately with both methods. For dense media, such as the solar corona or the lower Venus atmosphere, the refractive recovered by the seismological Herglotz-Wiechert transform provide a significant improvement compared with the straight-line Abel transform.

  20. Review of inversion techniques using analysis of different tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaglichenko, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    Tomographic techniques are tools, which estimate the Earth's deep interior by inverting seismic data. Reliability of visualization provides adequate understanding of geodynamic processes for prediction of natural hazard and protection of environment. This presentation focuses on two interrelated factors, which affect on the reliability namely: particularities of geophysical medium and strategy for choice of inversion method. Three main techniques are under review. First, the standard LSQR algorithm is derived directly by the Lanczos algebraic application. The Double Difference tomography widely incorporates this algorithm and its expansion. Next, the CSSA technique, or method of subtraction has been introduced into seismology by Nikolaev et al. in 1985. This method got farther development in 2003 (Smaglichenko et al.) as the coordinate method of possible directions, which has been already known in the theory of numerical methods. And finally, the new Differentiated Approach (DA) tomography that has been recently developed by the author for seismology and introduced into applied mathematics as the modification of Gaussian elimination. Different test models are presented by detecting various properties of the medium and having a value for the mining sector as well for prediction of seismic activity. They are: 1) checker-board resolution test; 2) the single anomalous block surrounded by an uniform zone; 3) the large-size structure; 4) the most complicated case, when the model consist of contrast layers and the observation response is equal zero value. The geometry of experiment for all models is given in the note of Leveque et al., 1993. It was assumed that errors in experimental data are in limits of pre-assigned accuracy. The testing showed that LSQR is effective, when the small-size structure (1) is retrieved, while CSSA works faster under reconstruction of the separated anomaly (2). The large-size structure (3) can be reconstructed applying DA, which uses both

  1. Galaxy Cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Image release August 19, 2010 An international team of astronomers using gravitational lensing observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has taken an important step forward in the quest to solve the riddle of dark energy, a phenomenon which mysteriously appears to power the Universe's accelerating expansion. Their results appear in the 20 August 2010 issue of the journal Science. This image shows the galaxy cluster Abell 1689, with the mass distribution of the dark matter in the gravitational lens overlaid (in purple). The mass in this lens is made up partly of normal (baryonic) matter and partly of dark matter. Distorted galaxies are clearly visible around the edges of the gravitational lens. The appearance of these distorted galaxies depends on the distribution of matter in the lens and on the relative geometry of the lens and the distant galaxies, as well as on the effect of dark energy on the geometry of the Universe. Credit: NASA, ESA, E. Jullo (JPL/LAM), P. Natarajan (Yale) and J-P. Kneib (LAM). To view a video of this image go to: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/4909967467 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook To read more go to: www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic1014/?utm_source=feedburn...

  2. Inverse imaging of the breast with a material classification technique.

    PubMed

    Manry, C W; Broschat, S L

    1998-03-01

    In recent publications [Chew et al., IEEE Trans. Blomed. Eng. BME-9, 218-225 (1990); Borup et al., Ultrason. Imaging 14, 69-85 (1992)] the inverse imaging problem has been solved by means of a two-step iterative method. In this paper, a third step is introduced for ultrasound imaging of the breast. In this step, which is based on statistical pattern recognition, classification of tissue types and a priori knowledge of the anatomy of the breast are integrated into the iterative method. Use of this material classification technique results in more rapid convergence to the inverse solution--approximately 40% fewer iterations are required--as well as greater accuracy. In addition, tumors are detected early in the reconstruction process. Results for reconstructions of a simple two-dimensional model of the human breast are presented. These reconstructions are extremely accurate when system noise and variations in tissue parameters are not too great. However, for the algorithm used, degradation of the reconstructions and divergence from the correct solution occur when system noise and variations in parameters exceed threshold values. Even in this case, however, tumors are still identified within a few iterations.

  3. Mathematical Inversion of Lightning Data: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William

    2003-01-01

    A survey of some interesting mathematical inversion studies dealing with radio, optical, and electrostatic measurements of lightning are presented. A discussion of why NASA is interested in lightning, what specific physical properties of lightning are retrieved, and what mathematical techniques are used to perform the retrievals are discussed. In particular, a relatively new multi-station VHF time-of-arrival (TOA) antenna network is now on-line in Northern Alabama and will be discussed. The network, called the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), employs GPS timing and detects VHF radiation from discrete segments (effectively point emitters) that comprise the channel of lightning strokes within cloud and ground flashes. The LMA supports on-going ground-validation activities of the low Earth orbiting Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellite developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The LMA also provides detailed studies of the distribution and evolution of thunderstorms and lightning in the Tennessee Valley, and offers interesting comparisons with other meteorological/geophysical datasets. In order to take full advantage of these benefits, it is essential that the LMA channel mapping accuracy (in both space and time) be fully characterized and optimized. A new channel mapping retrieval algorithm is introduced for this purpose. To characterize the spatial distribution of retrieval errors, the algorithm has been applied to analyze literally tens of millions of computer-simulated lightning VHF point sources that have been placed at various ranges, azimuths, and altitudes relative to the LMA network. Statistical results are conveniently summarized in high-resolution, color-coded, error maps.

  4. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  5. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.

    2014-11-15

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at the Large Helical Device. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy andmore » tomographic inversion, XICS can provide profile measurements of the local emissivity, temperature, and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modified Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example, geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.« less

  6. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaksa)

    DOE PAGES

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; ...

    2014-08-08

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at LHD. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICSmore » can provide pro file measurements of the local emissivity, temperature and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modifi ed Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.« less

  7. Abel's theorem in the noncommutative case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitenberger, Frank

    2004-03-01

    We define noncommutative binary forms. Using the typical representation of Hermite we prove the fundamental theorem of algebra and we derive a noncommutative Cardano formula for cubic forms. We define quantized elliptic and hyperelliptic differentials of the first kind. Following Abel we prove Abel's theorem.

  8. Inverse-dispersion technique for assessing lagoon gas emissions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Measuring gas emissions from treatment lagoons and storage ponds poses challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques because of non-ideal wind conditions, such as those induced by trees and crops surrounding the lagoons, and lagoons with dimensions too small to establish equilib...

  9. Spectral line inversion for sounding of stratospheric minor constituents by infrared heterodyne technique from balloon altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Shapiro, G. L.; Allario, F.; Alvarez, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A combination of two different techniques for the inversion of infrared laser heterodyne measurements of tenuous gases in the stratosphere by solar occulation is presented which incorporates the advantages of each technique. An experimental approach and inversion technique are developed which optimize the retrieval of concentration profiles by incorporating the onion peel collection scheme into the spectral inversion technique. A description of an infrared heterodyne spectrometer and the mode of observations for solar occulation measurement is presented, and the results of inversions of some synthetic ClO spectral lines corresponding to solar occulation limb-scans of the stratosphere are examined. A comparison between the new techniques and one of the current techniques indicates that considerable improvement in the accuracy of the retrieved profiles can be achieved. It is found that noise affects the accuracy of both techniques but not in a straightforward manner since there is interaction between the noise level, noise propagation through inversion, and the number of scans leading to an optimum retrieval.

  10. Inverse Regional Modeling with Adjoint-Free Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaremchuk, M.; Martin, P.; Panteleev, G.; Beattie, C.

    2016-02-01

    The ongoing parallelization trend in computer technologies facilitates the use ensemble methods in geophysical data assimilation. Of particular interest are ensemble techniques which do not require the development of tangent linear numerical models and their adjoints for optimization. These ``adjoint-free'' methods minimize the cost function within the sequence of subspaces spanned by a carefully chosen sets perturbations of the control variables. In this presentation, an adjoint-free variational technique (a4dVar) is demonstrated in an application estimating initial conditions of two numerical models: the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM), and the surface wave model (WAM). With the NCOM, performance of both adjoint and adjoint-free 4dVar data assimilation techniques is compared in application to the hydrographic surveys and velocity observations collected in the Adriatic Sea in 2006. Numerical experiments have shown that a4dVar is capable of providing forecast skill similar to that of conventional 4dVar at comparable computational expense while being less susceptible to excitation of ageostrophic modes that are not supported by observations. Adjoint-free technique constrained by the WAM model is tested in a series of data assimilation experiments with synthetic observations in the southern Chukchi Sea. The types of considered observations are directional spectra estimated from point measurements by stationary buoys, significant wave height (SWH) observations by coastal high-frequency radars and along-track SWH observations by satellite altimeters. The a4dVar forecast skill is shown to be 30-40% better than the skill of the sequential assimilaiton method based on optimal interpolation which is currently used in operations. Prospects of further development of the a4dVar methods in regional applications are discussed.

  11. Magnetic resonance separation imaging using a divided inversion recovery technique (DIRT).

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, James W

    2010-04-01

    The divided inversion recovery technique is an MRI separation method based on tissue T(1) relaxation differences. When tissue T(1) relaxation times are longer than the time between inversion pulses in a segmented inversion recovery pulse sequence, longitudinal magnetization does not pass through the null point. Prior to additional inversion pulses, longitudinal magnetization may have an opposite polarity. Spatial displacement of tissues in inversion recovery balanced steady-state free-precession imaging has been shown to be due to this magnetization phase change resulting from incomplete magnetization recovery. In this paper, it is shown how this phase change can be used to provide image separation. A pulse sequence parameter, the time between inversion pulses (T180), can be adjusted to provide water-fat or fluid separation. Example water-fat and fluid separation images of the head, heart, and abdomen are presented. The water-fat separation performance was investigated by comparing image intensities in short-axis divided inversion recovery technique images of the heart. Fat, blood, and fluid signal was suppressed to the background noise level. Additionally, the separation performance was not affected by main magnetic field inhomogeneities.

  12. A Geophysical Inversion Model Enhancement Technique Based on the Blind Deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, B.; Hu, X.; Li, H.

    2011-12-01

    A model-enhancement technique is proposed to enhance the geophysical inversion model edges and details without introducing any additional information. Firstly, the theoretic correctness of the proposed geophysical inversion model-enhancement technique is discussed. An inversion MRM (model resolution matrix) convolution approximating PSF (Point Spread Function) method is designed to demonstrate the correctness of the deconvolution model enhancement method. Then, a total-variation regularization blind deconvolution geophysical inversion model-enhancement algorithm is proposed. In previous research, Oldenburg et al. demonstrate the connection between the PSF and the geophysical inverse solution. Alumbaugh et al. propose that more information could be provided by the PSF if we return to the idea of it behaving as an averaging or low pass filter. We consider the PSF as a low pass filter to enhance the inversion model basis on the theory of the PSF convolution approximation. Both the 1D linear and the 2D magnetotelluric inversion examples are used to analyze the validity of the theory and the algorithm. To prove the proposed PSF convolution approximation theory, the 1D linear inversion problem is considered. It shows the ratio of convolution approximation error is only 0.15%. The 2D synthetic model enhancement experiment is presented. After the deconvolution enhancement, the edges of the conductive prism and the resistive host become sharper, and the enhancement result is closer to the actual model than the original inversion model according the numerical statistic analysis. Moreover, the artifacts in the inversion model are suppressed. The overall precision of model increases 75%. All of the experiments show that the structure details and the numerical precision of inversion model are significantly improved, especially in the anomalous region. The correlation coefficient between the enhanced inversion model and the actual model are shown in Fig. 1. The figure

  13. Inversion technique for IR heterodyne sounding of stratospheric constituents from space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Shapiro, G. L.; Alvarez, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques which have been employed for inversion of IR heterodyne measurements for remote sounding of stratospheric trace constituents usually rely on either geometric effects based on limb-scan observations (i.e., onion peel techniques) or spectral effects by using weighting functions corresponding to different frequencies of an IR spectral line. An experimental approach and inversion technique are discussed which optimize the retrieval of concentration profiles by combining the geometric and the spectral effects in an IR heterodyne receiver. The results of inversions of some synthetic CIO spectral lines corresponding to solar occultation limb scans of the stratosphere are presented, indicating considerable improvement in the accuracy of the retrieved profiles. The effects of noise on the accuracy of retrievals are discussed for realistic situations.

  14. Inversion technique for IR heterodyne sounding of stratospheric constituents from space platforms.

    PubMed

    Abbas, M M; Shapiro, G L; Alvarez, J M

    1981-11-01

    The techniques which have been employed for inversion of IR heterodyne measurements for remote sounding of stratospheric trace constituents usually rely on either geometric effects based on limb-scan observations (i.e., onion peel techniques) or spectral effects by using weighting functions corresponding to different frequencies of an IR spectral line. An experimental approach and inversion technique are discussed which optimize the retrieval of concentration profiles by combining the geometric and the spectral effects in an IR heterodyne receiver. The results of inversions of some synthetic ClO spectral lines corresponding to solar occultation limb scans of the stratosphere are presented, indicating considerable improvement in the accuracy of the retrieved profiles. The effects of noise on the accuracy of retrievals are discussed for realistic situations.

  15. A technique for increasing the accuracy of the numerical inversion of the Laplace transform with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, B. S.; Duangudom, S.

    1973-01-01

    A technique is introduced which extends the range of useful approximation of numerical inversion techniques to many cycles of an oscillatory function without requiring either the evaluation of the image function for many values of s or the computation of higher-order terms. The technique consists in reducing a given initial value problem defined over some interval into a sequence of initial value problems defined over a set of subintervals. Several numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method.

  16. An approximate inverse scattering technique for reconstructing blockage profiles in water pipelines using acoustic transients.

    PubMed

    Jing, Liwen; Li, Zhao; Wang, Wenjie; Dubey, Amartansh; Lee, Pedro; Meniconi, Silvia; Brunone, Bruno; Murch, Ross D

    2018-05-01

    An approximate inverse scattering technique is proposed for reconstructing cross-sectional area variation along water pipelines to deduce the size and position of blockages. The technique allows the reconstructed blockage profile to be written explicitly in terms of the measured acoustic reflectivity. It is based upon the Born approximation and provides good accuracy, low computational complexity, and insight into the reconstruction process. Numerical simulations and experimental results are provided for long pipelines with mild and severe blockages of different lengths. Good agreement is found between the inverse result and the actual pipe condition for mild blockages.

  17. Reconstructing source terms from atmospheric concentration measurements: Optimality analysis of an inversion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbelin, Grégory; Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Issartel, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    In the event of an accidental or intentional contaminant release in the atmosphere, it is imperative, for managing emergency response, to diagnose the release parameters of the source from measured data. Reconstruction of the source information exploiting measured data is called an inverse problem. To solve such a problem, several techniques are currently being developed. The first part of this paper provides a detailed description of one of them, known as the renormalization method. This technique, proposed by Issartel (2005), has been derived using an approach different from that of standard inversion methods and gives a linear solution to the continuous Source Term Estimation (STE) problem. In the second part of this paper, the discrete counterpart of this method is presented. By using matrix notation, common in data assimilation and suitable for numerical computing, it is shown that the discrete renormalized solution belongs to a family of well-known inverse solutions (minimum weighted norm solutions), which can be computed by using the concept of generalized inverse operator. It is shown that, when the weight matrix satisfies the renormalization condition, this operator satisfies the criteria used in geophysics to define good inverses. Notably, by means of the Model Resolution Matrix (MRM) formalism, we demonstrate that the renormalized solution fulfils optimal properties for the localization of single point sources. Throughout the article, the main concepts are illustrated with data from a wind tunnel experiment conducted at the Environmental Flow Research Centre at the University of Surrey, UK.

  18. A comparative study of surface waves inversion techniques at strong motion recording sites in Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panagiotis C. Pelekis,; Savvaidis, Alexandros; Kayen, Robert E.; Vlachakis, Vasileios S.; Athanasopoulos, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Surface wave method was used for the estimation of Vs vs depth profile at 10 strong motion stations in Greece. The dispersion data were obtained by SASW method, utilizing a pair of electromechanical harmonic-wave source (shakers) or a random source (drop weight). In this study, three inversion techniques were used a) a recently proposed Simplified Inversion Method (SIM), b) an inversion technique based on a neighborhood algorithm (NA) which allows the incorporation of a priori information regarding the subsurface structure parameters, and c) Occam's inversion algorithm. For each site constant value of Poisson's ratio was assumed (ν=0.4) since the objective of the current study is the comparison of the three inversion schemes regardless the uncertainties resulting due to the lack of geotechnical data. A penalty function was introduced to quantify the deviations of the derived Vs profiles. The Vs models are compared as of Vs(z), Vs30 and EC8 soil category, in order to show the insignificance of the existing variations. The comparison results showed that the average variation of SIM profiles is 9% and 4.9% comparing with NA and Occam's profiles respectively whilst the average difference of Vs30 values obtained from SIM is 7.4% and 5.0% compared with NA and Occam's.

  19. Filtering techniques for efficient inversion of two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolotti, V.; Brizi, L.; Fantazzini, P.; Landi, G.; Zama, F.

    2017-10-01

    The inversion of two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data requires the solution of a first kind Fredholm integral equation with a two-dimensional tensor product kernel and lower bound constraints. For the solution of this ill-posed inverse problem, the recently presented 2DUPEN algorithm [V. Bortolotti et al., Inverse Problems, 33(1), 2016] uses multiparameter Tikhonov regularization with automatic choice of the regularization parameters. In this work, I2DUPEN, an improved version of 2DUPEN that implements Mean Windowing and Singular Value Decomposition filters, is deeply tested. The reconstruction problem with filtered data is formulated as a compressed weighted least squares problem with multi-parameter Tikhonov regularization. Results on synthetic and real 2D NMR data are presented with the main purpose to deeper analyze the separate and combined effects of these filtering techniques on the reconstructed 2D distribution.

  20. Simulation studies of phase inversion in agitated vessels using a Monte Carlo technique.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Leslie Y; Matar, Omar K; Perez de Ortiz, E Susana; Hewitt, Geoffrey F

    2002-04-15

    A speculative study on the conditions under which phase inversion occurs in agitated liquid-liquid dispersions is conducted using a Monte Carlo technique. The simulation is based on a stochastic model, which accounts for fundamental physical processes such as drop deformation, breakup, and coalescence, and utilizes the minimization of interfacial energy as a criterion for phase inversion. Profiles of the interfacial energy indicate that a steady-state equilibrium is reached after a sufficiently large number of random moves and that predictions are insensitive to initial drop conditions. The calculated phase inversion holdup is observed to increase with increasing density and viscosity ratio, and to decrease with increasing agitation speed for a fixed viscosity ratio. It is also observed that, for a fixed viscosity ratio, the phase inversion holdup remains constant for large enough agitation speeds. The proposed model is therefore capable of achieving reasonable qualitative agreement with general experimental trends and of reproducing key features observed experimentally. The results of this investigation indicate that this simple stochastic method could be the basis upon which more advanced models for predicting phase inversion behavior can be developed.

  1. Chandra and XMM-Newton Observations of the Abell 3395/Abell 3391 Intercluster Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Gabriella E.; Randall, Scott W.; Bourdin, Hervé; Jones, Christine; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly

    2018-05-01

    We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the Abell 3391/Abell 3395 intercluster filament. It has been suggested that the galaxy clusters Abell 3395, Abell 3391, and the galaxy group ESO-161 -IG 006 located between the two clusters, are in alignment along a large-scale intercluster filament. We find that the filament is aligned close to the plane of the sky, in contrast to previous results. We find a global projected filament temperature kT = {4.45}-0.55+0.89 keV, electron density {n}e={1.08}-0.05+0.06× {10}-4 cm‑3, and {M}gas}={2.7}-0.1+0.2 × {10}13 M ⊙. The thermodynamic properties of the filament are consistent with that of the intracluster medium (ICM) of Abell 3395 and Abell 3391, suggesting that the filament emission is dominated by ICM gas that has been tidally disrupted during an early stage merger between these two clusters. We present temperature, density, entropy, and abundance profiles across the filament. We find that the galaxy group ESO-161 may be undergoing ram-pressure-stripping in the low-density environment at or near the virial radius of both clusters, due to its rapid motion through the filament.

  2. Abel's Theorem Simplifies Reduction of Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We give an alternative to the standard method of reduction or order, in which one uses one solution of a homogeneous, linear, second order differential equation to find a second, linearly independent solution. Our method, based on Abel's Theorem, is shorter, less complex and extends to higher order equations.

  3. A robust spatial filtering technique for multisource localization and geoacoustic inversion.

    PubMed

    Stotts, S A

    2005-07-01

    Geoacoustic inversion and source localization using beamformed data from a ship of opportunity has been demonstrated with a bottom-mounted array. An alternative approach, which lies within a class referred to as spatial filtering, transforms element level data into beam data, applies a bearing filter, and transforms back to element level data prior to performing inversions. Automation of this filtering approach is facilitated for broadband applications by restricting the inverse transform to the degrees of freedom of the array, i.e., the effective number of elements, for frequencies near or below the design frequency. A procedure is described for nonuniformly spaced elements that guarantees filter stability well above the design frequency. Monitoring energy conservation with respect to filter output confirms filter stability. Filter performance with both uniformly spaced and nonuniformly spaced array elements is discussed. Vertical (range and depth) and horizontal (range and bearing) ambiguity surfaces are constructed to examine filter performance. Examples that demonstrate this filtering technique with both synthetic data and real data are presented along with comparisons to inversion results using beamformed data. Examinations of cost functions calculated within a simulated annealing algorithm reveal the efficacy of the approach.

  4. Comparative interpretations of renormalization inversion technique for reconstructing unknown emissions from measured atmospheric concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Kumar, Pramod; Rani, Raj; Turbelin, Grégory

    2017-04-01

    The study highlights a theoretical comparison and various interpretations of a recent inversion technique, called renormalization, developed for the reconstruction of unknown tracer emissions from their measured concentrations. The comparative interpretations are presented in relation to the other inversion techniques based on principle of regularization, Bayesian, minimum norm, maximum entropy on mean, and model resolution optimization. It is shown that the renormalization technique can be interpreted in a similar manner to other techniques, with a practical choice of a priori information and error statistics, while eliminating the need of additional constraints. The study shows that the proposed weight matrix and weighted Gram matrix offer a suitable deterministic choice to the background error and measurement covariance matrices, respectively, in the absence of statistical knowledge about background and measurement errors. The technique is advantageous since it (i) utilizes weights representing a priori information apparent to the monitoring network, (ii) avoids dependence on background source estimates, (iii) improves on alternative choices for the error statistics, (iv) overcomes the colocalization problem in a natural manner, and (v) provides an optimally resolved source reconstruction. A comparative illustration of source retrieval is made by using the real measurements from a continuous point release conducted in Fusion Field Trials, Dugway Proving Ground, Utah.

  5. Determining the metallicity of the solar envelope using seismic inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldgen, G.; Salmon, S. J. A. J.; Noels, A.; Scuflaire, R.; Dupret, M. A.; Reese, D. R.

    2017-11-01

    The solar metallicity issue is a long-lasting problem of astrophysics, impacting multiple fields and still subject to debate and uncertainties. While spectroscopy has mostly been used to determine the solar heavy elements abundance, helioseismologists attempted providing a seismic determination of the metallicity in the solar convective envelope. However, the puzzle remains since two independent groups provided two radically different values for this crucial astrophysical parameter. We aim at providing an independent seismic measurement of the solar metallicity in the convective envelope. Our main goal is to help provide new information to break the current stalemate amongst seismic determinations of the solar heavy element abundance. We start by presenting the kernels, the inversion technique and the target function of the inversion we have developed. We then test our approach in multiple hare-and-hounds exercises to assess its reliability and accuracy. We then apply our technique to solar data using calibrated solar models and determine an interval of seismic measurements for the solar metallicity. We show that our inversion can indeed be used to estimate the solar metallicity thanks to our hare-and-hounds exercises. However, we also show that further dependencies in the physical ingredients of solar models lead to a low accuracy. Nevertheless, using various physical ingredients for our solar models, we determine metallicity values between 0.008 and 0.014.

  6. Advanced Multivariate Inversion Techniques for High Resolution 3D Geophysical Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Rowe, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    We focus on the development and application of advanced multivariate inversion techniques to generate a realistic, comprehensive, and high-resolution 3D model of the seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle that satisfies several independent geophysical datasets. Building on previous efforts of joint invesion using surface wave dispersion measurements, gravity data, and receiver functions, we have added a fourth dataset, seismic body wave P and S travel times, to the simultaneous joint inversion method. We present a 3D seismic velocity model of the crust and upper mantle of northwest China resulting from the simultaneous, joint inversion of these four data types. Surface wave dispersion measurements are primarily sensitive to seismic shear-wave velocities, but at shallow depths it is difficult to obtain high-resolution velocities and to constrain the structure due to the depth-averaging of the more easily-modeled, longer-period surface waves. Gravity inversions have the greatest resolving power at shallow depths, and they provide constraints on rock density variations. Moreover, while surface wave dispersion measurements are primarily sensitive to vertical shear-wave velocity averages, body wave receiver functions are sensitive to shear-wave velocity contrasts and vertical travel-times. Addition of the fourth dataset, consisting of seismic travel-time data, helps to constrain the shear wave velocities both vertically and horizontally in the model cells crossed by the ray paths. Incorporation of both P and S body wave travel times allows us to invert for both P and S velocity structure, capitalizing on empirical relationships between both wave types’ seismic velocities with rock densities, thus eliminating the need for ad hoc assumptions regarding the Poisson ratios. Our new tomography algorithm is a modification of the Maceira and Ammon joint inversion code, in combination with the Zhang and Thurber TomoDD (double-difference tomography) program.

  7. Rapid Inversion of Angular Deflection Data for Certain Axisymmetric Refractive Index Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R.; Greenberg, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Certain functions useful for representing axisymmetric refractive-index distributions are shown to have exact solutions for Abel transformation of the resulting angular deflection data. An advantage of this procedure over direct numerical Abel inversion is that least-squares curve fitting is a smoothing process that reduces the noise sensitivity of the computation

  8. Uncertainty estimates of a GRACE inversion modelling technique over Greenland using a simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don

    2013-07-01

    The low spatial resolution of GRACE causes leakage, where signals in one location spread out into nearby regions. Because of this leakage, using simple techniques such as basin averages may result in an incorrect estimate of the true mass change in a region. A fairly simple least squares inversion technique can be used to more specifically localize mass changes into a pre-determined set of basins of uniform internal mass distribution. However, the accuracy of these higher resolution basin mass amplitudes has not been determined, nor is it known how the distribution of the chosen basins affects the results. We use a simple `truth' model over Greenland as an example case, to estimate the uncertainties of this inversion method and expose those design parameters which may result in an incorrect high-resolution mass distribution. We determine that an appropriate level of smoothing (300-400 km) and process noise (0.30 cm2 of water) gets the best results. The trends of the Greenland internal basins and Iceland can be reasonably estimated with this method, with average systematic errors of 3.5 cm yr-1 per basin. The largest mass losses found from GRACE RL04 occur in the coastal northwest (-19.9 and -33.0 cm yr-1) and southeast (-24.2 and -27.9 cm yr-1), with small mass gains (+1.4 to +7.7 cm yr-1) found across the northern interior. Acceleration of mass change is measurable at the 95 per cent confidence level in four northwestern basins, but not elsewhere in Greenland. Due to an insufficiently detailed distribution of basins across internal Canada, the trend estimates of Baffin and Ellesmere Islands are expected to be incorrect due to systematic errors caused by the inversion technique.

  9. A Modified Normalization Technique for Frequency-Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Jeong, G.; Min, D. J.; KIM, S.; Heo, J. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique to estimate subsurface material properties minimizing the misfit function built with residuals between field and modeled data. To achieve computational efficiency, FWI has been performed in the frequency domain by carrying out modeling in the frequency domain, whereas observed data (time-series data) are Fourier-transformed.One of the main drawbacks of seismic FWI is that it easily gets stuck in local minima because of lacking of low-frequency data. To compensate for this limitation, damped wavefields are used, as in the Laplace-domain waveform inversion. Using damped wavefield in FWI plays a role in generating low-frequency components and help recover long-wavelength structures. With these newly generated low-frequency components, we propose a modified frequency-normalization technique, which has an effect of boosting contribution of low-frequency components to model parameter update.In this study, we introduce the modified frequency-normalization technique which effectively amplifies low-frequency components of damped wavefields. Our method is demonstrated for synthetic data for the SEG/EAGE salt model. AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning(KETEP) and the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy(MOTIE) of the Republic of Korea (No. 20168510030830) and by the Dual Use Technology Program, granted financial resource from the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy, Republic of Korea.

  10. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasadia, S.; Sun, M.; Sarazin, C.; Morandi, A.; Markevitch, M.; Wik, D.; Feretti, L.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.

    2016-01-01

    Deep (103 ks) Chandra observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of M =?3.0 +/- 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell 665 the second cluster, after the Bullet cluster, where a strong merger shock of M is approximately 3 has been detected. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 +/- 0.7) × 10(exp 3) km s(exp -1). The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the reacceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  11. The X-ray cluster Abell 744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gioia, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray and optical observations of the cluster of galaxies Abell 744 are presented. The X-ray flux (assuming H(0) = 100 km/s per Mpc) is about 9 x 10 to the 42nd erg/s. The X-ray source is extended, but shows no other structure. Photographic photometry (in Kron-Cousins R), calibrated by deep CCD frames, is presented for all galaxies brighter than 19th magnitude within 0.75 Mpc of the cluster center. The luminosity function is normal, and the isopleths show little evidence of substructure near the cluster center. The cluster has a dominant central galaxy, which is classified as a normal brightest-cluster elliptical on the basis of its luminosity profile. New redshifts were obtained for 26 galaxies in the vicinity of the cluster center; 20 appear to be cluster members. The spatial distribution of redshifts is peculiar; the dispersion within the 150 kpc core radius is much greater than outside. Abell 744 is similar to the nearby cluster Abell 1060.

  12. A gEUD-based inverse planning technique for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Giantsoudi, D.; Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02114; Baltas, D.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of a new inverse planning technique based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose for image-guided high dose rate (HDR) prostate cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional dose-volume based optimization. Methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO (Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization) is compared with alternative plans, which were produced through inverse planning using the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). All the common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk were considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the differentmore » dose distributions was investigated by comparing dose volume histogram and gEUD evaluators. Results: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of gEUD-based inverse planning in HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate. A statistically significant decrease in D{sub 10} or/and final gEUD values for the organs at risk (urethra, bladder, and rectum) was found while improving dose homogeneity or dose conformity of the target volume. Conclusions: Following the promising results of gEUD-based optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment optimization, as reported in the literature, the implementation of a similar model in HDR brachytherapy treatment plan optimization is suggested by this study. The potential of improved sparing of organs at risk was shown for various gEUD-based optimization parameter protocols, which indicates the ability of this method to adapt to the user's preferences.« less

  13. ROSAT HRI images of Abell 85 and Abell 496: Evidence for inhomogeneities in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Guimond, Stephen J.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Joy, Marshall

    1995-01-01

    We present ROSAT high-resolution images of two clusters of galaxies with cooling flows, Abell 496 and Abell 85. In these clusters, X-ray emission on small scales above the general cluster emission is significant at the 3 sigma level. There is no evidence for optical counterparts. If real, the enhancements may be associated with clumps of gas at a lower temperature and higher density than the ambient medium, or hotter, denser gas perhaps compressed by magnetic fields. These observations can be used to test models of how thermal instabilities form and evolve in cooling flows.

  14. ROSAT HRI images of Abell 85 and Abell 496: Evidence for inhomogeneities in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Guimond, Stephen J.; Luginbuhl, Christian; Joy, Marshall

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT HRI images of two clusters of galaxies with cooling flows, Abell 496 and Abell 85. In these clusters, x-ray emission on small scales above the general cluster emission is significant at the 3 sigma level. There is no evidence for optical counterparts. The enhancements may be associated with lumps of gas at a lower temperature and higher density than the ambient medium, or hotter, denser gas perhaps compressed by magnetic fields. These observations can be used to test models of how thermal instabilities form and evolve in cooling flows.

  15. A forward model and conjugate gradient inversion technique for low-frequency ultrasonic imaging.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Koen W A; Wright, William M D

    2006-10-01

    Emerging methods of hyperthermia cancer treatment require noninvasive temperature monitoring, and ultrasonic techniques show promise in this regard. Various tomographic algorithms are available that reconstruct sound speed or contrast profiles, which can be related to temperature distribution. The requirement of a high enough frequency for adequate spatial resolution and a low enough frequency for adequate tissue penetration is a difficult compromise. In this study, the feasibility of using low frequency ultrasound for imaging and temperature monitoring was investigated. The transient probing wave field had a bandwidth spanning the frequency range 2.5-320.5 kHz. The results from a forward model which computed the propagation and scattering of low-frequency acoustic pressure and velocity wave fields were used to compare three imaging methods formulated within the Born approximation, representing two main types of reconstruction. The first uses Fourier techniques to reconstruct sound-speed profiles from projection or Radon data based on optical ray theory, seen as an asymptotical limit for comparison. The second uses backpropagation and conjugate gradient inversion methods based on acoustical wave theory. The results show that the accuracy in localization was 2.5 mm or better when using low frequencies and the conjugate gradient inversion scheme, which could be used for temperature monitoring.

  16. Three-Dimensional Inverse Transport Solver Based on Compressive Sensing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuxiong; Wu, Hongchun; Cao, Liangzhi; Zheng, Youqi

    2013-09-01

    According to the direct exposure measurements from flash radiographic image, a compressive sensing-based method for three-dimensional inverse transport problem is presented. The linear absorption coefficients and interface locations of objects are reconstructed directly at the same time. It is always very expensive to obtain enough measurements. With limited measurements, compressive sensing sparse reconstruction technique orthogonal matching pursuit is applied to obtain the sparse coefficients by solving an optimization problem. A three-dimensional inverse transport solver is developed based on a compressive sensing-based technique. There are three features in this solver: (1) AutoCAD is employed as a geometry preprocessor due to its powerful capacity in graphic. (2) The forward projection matrix rather than Gauss matrix is constructed by the visualization tool generator. (3) Fourier transform and Daubechies wavelet transform are adopted to convert an underdetermined system to a well-posed system in the algorithm. Simulations are performed and numerical results in pseudo-sine absorption problem, two-cube problem and two-cylinder problem when using compressive sensing-based solver agree well with the reference value.

  17. Eversion-Inversion Labral Repair and Reconstruction Technique for Optimal Suction Seal.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Brett; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Chadayamurri, Vivek; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2015-12-01

    Labral tears are a significant cause of hip pain and are currently the most common indication for hip arthroscopy. Compared with labral debridement, labral repair has significantly better outcomes in terms of both daily activities and athletic pursuits in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement. The classic techniques described in the literature for labral repair all use loop or pass-through intrasubstance labral sutures to achieve a functional hip seal. This hip seal is important for hip stability and optimal joint biomechanics, as well as in the prevention of long-term osteoarthritis. We describe a novel eversion-inversion intrasubstance suturing technique for labral repair and reconstruction that can assist in restoration of the native labrum position by re-creating an optimal seal around the femoral head.

  18. Comparison of four stable numerical methods for Abel's integral equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murio, Diego A.; Mejia, Carlos E.

    1991-01-01

    The 3-D image reconstruction from cone-beam projections in computerized tomography leads naturally, in the case of radial symmetry, to the study of Abel-type integral equations. If the experimental information is obtained from measured data, on a discrete set of points, special methods are needed in order to restore continuity with respect to the data. A new combined Regularized-Adjoint-Conjugate Gradient algorithm, together with two different implementations of the Mollification Method (one based on a data filtering technique and the other on the mollification of the kernal function) and a regularization by truncation method (initially proposed for 2-D ray sample schemes and more recently extended to 3-D cone-beam image reconstruction) are extensively tested and compared for accuracy and numerical stability as functions of the level of noise in the data.

  19. Tauberian theorems for Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Enes; ćoşkun, Hüsamettin

    2015-09-01

    We give some conditions under which Abel summable sequences of fuzzy numbers are convergent. As corollaries we obtain the results given in [E. Yavuz, Ö. Talo, Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers, Soft computing 2014, doi: 10.1007/s00500-014-1563-7].

  20. Sodium ion conducting polymer electrolyte membrane prepared by phase inversion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshlata, Mishra, Kuldeep; Rai, D. K.

    2018-04-01

    A mechanically stable porous polymer membrane of Poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) has been prepared by phase inversion technique using steam as a non-solvent. The membrane possesses semicrystalline network with enhanced amorphicity as observed by X-ray diffraction. The membrane has been soaked in an electrolyte solution of 0.5M NaPF6 in Ethylene Carbonate/Propylene Carbonate (1:1) to obtain the gel polymer electrolyte. The porosity and electrolyte uptake of the membrane have been found to be 67% and 220% respectively. The room temperature ionic conductivity of the membrane has been obtained as ˜ 0.3 mS cm-1. The conductivity follows Arrhenius behavior with temperature and gives activation energy as 0.8 eV. The membrane has been found to possess significantly large electrochemical stability window of 5.0 V.

  1. Eigenproblem solution by a combined Sturm sequence and inverse iteration technique.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an efficient and numerically stable algorithm, along with a complete listing of the associated computer program, developed for the accurate computation of specified roots and associated vectors of the eigenvalue problem Aq = lambda Bq with band symmetric A and B, B being also positive-definite. The desired roots are first isolated by the Sturm sequence procedure; then a special variant of the inverse iteration technique is applied for the individual determination of each root along with its vector. The algorithm fully exploits the banded form of relevant matrices, and the associated program written in FORTRAN V for the JPL UNIVAC 1108 computer proves to be most significantly economical in comparison to similar existing procedures. The program may be conveniently utilized for the efficient solution of practical engineering problems, involving free vibration and buckling analysis of structures. Results of such analyses are presented for representative structures.

  2. Favorable toxicity and biochemical control using real-time inverse optimization technique for prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Raben, Adam; Rusthoven, Kyle E; Sarkar, Abrihup; Glick, Andrew; Benge, Bruce; Jacobs, Dayee; Raben, David

    2009-01-01

    Favorable dosimetric results have been reported using intraoperative inverse optimization (IO) for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The clinical implications of these improvements in dosimetry are unclear. We review toxicity and early biochemical outcomes for patients implanted using IO technique. Between 2001 and 2007, 165 patients received permanent prostate implants using real-time IO and had >/=3 months of followup. Dose constraints for inverse planning were: the prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose [prostate V(100)] was >95%; the dose received by 90% of the gland [prostate D(90)] was within the 140-180 by dose range; the volume of urethra receiving 150% of the prescription dose [urethra V(150)] was <30%; and the volume of rectal wall receiving 110% of the prescription dose [rectal V(110)] was <1.0 cc. Toxicity was prospectively scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity scale and the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire. Biochemical control was determined using the nadir + 2 ng/mL definition. Mean followup was 30 months (range, 6-63 months). Risk classification was low risk in 89% and intermediate risk in 11%. Iodine-125 sources were used for 161 implants and palladium-103 sources for four implants. The median number of seeds and total activity implanted were 61 and 999 MBq, respectively, for a median prostate volume of 33.6 cc. Late GU and GI morbidity was uncommon. Among patients with at least 24 months followup, 16% had persistent Grade 2-3 urinary morbidity. Grade 2 rectal bleeding occurred in 1 patient (0.6%). Biochemical failure has occurred in only 4 patients at last followup. IO technique for prostate brachytherapy is associated with low rates of late morbidity and excellent early biochemical control. Additionally, the number of seeds and total implanted activity required to achieve a high-quality implant are lower compared with historical controls.

  3. Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of a bLS inverse-dispersion technique for measuring gas emissions from livestock operations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) inverse-dispersion technique has been used to measure fugitive gas emissions from livestock operations. The accuracy of the bLS technique, as indicated by the percentages of gas recovery in various tracer-release experiments, has generally been within ± 10% o...

  4. Inverse Function: Pre-Service Teachers' Techniques and Meanings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paoletti, Teo; Stevens, Irma E.; Hobson, Natalie L. F.; Moore, Kevin C.; LaForest, Kevin R.

    2018-01-01

    Researchers have argued teachers and students are not developing connected meanings for function inverse, thus calling for a closer examination of teachers' and students' inverse function meanings. Responding to this call, we characterize 25 pre-service teachers' inverse function meanings as inferred from our analysis of clinical interviews. After…

  5. The cluster Abell 780: an optical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Slezak, E.; Adami, C.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The Abell 780 cluster, better known as the Hydra A cluster, has been thouroughly analyzed in X-rays. However, little is known about its optical properties. Aims: We propose to derive the galaxy luminosity function (GLF) in this apparently relaxed cluster and to search for possible environmental effects by comparing the GLFs in various regions and by looking at the galaxy distribution at large scale around Abell 780. Methods: Our study is based on optical images obtained with the ESO 2.2m telescope and WFI camera in the B and R bands, covering a total region of 67.22 × 32.94 arcmin^2, or 4.235 × 2.075 Mpc2 for a cluster redshift of 0.0539. Results: In a region of 500 kpc radius around the cluster center, the GLF in the R band shows a double structure, with a broad and flat bright part and a flat faint end that can be fit by a power law with an index α ~ - 0.85 ± 0.12 in the 20.25 ≤ R ≤ 21.75 interval. If we divide this 500 kpc radius region in north+south or east+west halves, we find no clear difference between the GLFs in these smaller regions. No obvious large-scale structure is apparent within 5 Mpc from the cluster, based on galaxy redshifts and magnitudes collected from the NED database in a much larger region than that covered by our data, suggesting that there is no major infall of material in any preferential direction. However, the Serna-Gerbal method reveals a gravitationally bound structure of 27 galaxies, which includes the cD, and of a more strongly gravitationally bound structure of 14 galaxies. Conclusions: These optical results agree with the overall relaxed structure of Abell 780 previously derived from X-ray analyses. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, program ESO 68.A-0084(A), P. I. E. Slezak. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED), which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics

  6. Improving 130nm node patterning using inverse lithography techniques for an analog process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Can; Jessen, Scott; Ziger, David; Watanabe, Mizuki; Prins, Steve; Ho, Chi-Chien; Shu, Jing

    2018-03-01

    Developing a new lithographic process routinely involves usage of lithographic toolsets and much engineering time to perform data analysis. Process transfers between fabs occur quite often. One of the key assumptions made is that lithographic settings are equivalent from one fab to another and that the transfer is fluid. In some cases, that is far from the truth. Differences in tools can change the proximity effect seen in low k1 imaging processes. If you use model based optical proximity correction (MBOPC), then a model built in one fab will not work under the same conditions at another fab. This results in many wafers being patterned to try and match a baseline response. Even if matching is achieved, there is no guarantee that optimal lithographic responses are met. In this paper, we discuss the approach used to transfer and develop new lithographic processes and define MBOPC builds for the new lithographic process in Fab B which was transferred from a similar lithographic process in Fab A. By using PROLITHTM simulations to match OPC models for each level, minimal downtime in wafer processing was observed. Source Mask Optimization (SMO) was also used to optimize lithographic processes using novel inverse lithography techniques (ILT) to simultaneously optimize mask bias, depth of focus (DOF), exposure latitude (EL) and mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) for critical designs for each level.

  7. Understanding Methane Emission from Natural Gas Activities Using Inverse Modeling Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdioskouei, M.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas (NG) has been promoted as a bridge fuel that can smooth the transition from fossil fuels to zero carbon energy sources by having lower carbon dioxide emission and lower global warming impacts in comparison to other fossil fuels. However, the uncertainty around the estimations of methane emissions from NG systems can lead to underestimation of climate and environmental impacts of using NG as a replacement for coal. Accurate estimates of methane emissions from NG operations is crucial for evaluation of environmental impacts of NG extraction and at larger scale, adoption of NG as transitional fuel. However there is a great inconsistency within the current estimates. Forward simulation of methane from oil and gas operation sites for the US is carried out based on NEI-2011 using the WRF-Chem model. Simulated values are compared against measurements of observations from different platforms such as airborne (FRAPPÉ field campaign) and ground-based measurements (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory). A novel inverse modeling technique is used in this work to improve the model fit to the observation values and to constrain methane emission from oil and gas extraction sites.

  8. Estimating rainfall time series and model parameter distributions using model data reduction and inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Ashley J.; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.

    2017-08-01

    Floods are devastating natural hazards. To provide accurate, precise, and timely flood forecasts, there is a need to understand the uncertainties associated within an entire rainfall time series, even when rainfall was not observed. The estimation of an entire rainfall time series and model parameter distributions from streamflow observations in complex dynamic catchments adds skill to current areal rainfall estimation methods, allows for the uncertainty of entire rainfall input time series to be considered when estimating model parameters, and provides the ability to improve rainfall estimates from poorly gauged catchments. Current methods to estimate entire rainfall time series from streamflow records are unable to adequately invert complex nonlinear hydrologic systems. This study aims to explore the use of wavelets in the estimation of rainfall time series from streamflow records. Using the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) to reduce rainfall dimensionality for the catchment of Warwick, Queensland, Australia, it is shown that model parameter distributions and an entire rainfall time series can be estimated. Including rainfall in the estimation process improves streamflow simulations by a factor of up to 1.78. This is achieved while estimating an entire rainfall time series, inclusive of days when none was observed. It is shown that the choice of wavelet can have a considerable impact on the robustness of the inversion. Combining the use of a likelihood function that considers rainfall and streamflow errors with the use of the DWT as a model data reduction technique allows the joint inference of hydrologic model parameters along with rainfall.

  9. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21(sub -0.47 sup +0.43) on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36(sub -0.17 sup +0.46).

  10. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21-0.47+0.43 on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36-0.17+0.46.

  11. Objective quantification of perturbations produced with a piecewise PV inversion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fita, L.; Romero, R.; Ramis, C.

    2007-11-01

    PV inversion techniques have been widely used in numerical studies of severe weather cases. These techniques can be applied as a way to study the sensitivity of the responsible meteorological system to changes in the initial conditions of the simulations. Dynamical effects of a collection of atmospheric features involved in the evolution of the system can be isolated. However, aspects, such as the definition of the atmospheric features or the amount of change in the initial conditions, are largely case-dependent and/or subjectively defined. An objective way to calculate the modification of the initial fields is proposed to alleviate this problem. The perturbations are quantified as the mean absolute variations of the total energy between the original and modified fields, and an unique energy variation value is fixed for all the perturbations derived from different PV anomalies. Thus, PV features of different dimensions and characteristics introduce the same net modification of the initial conditions from an energetic point of view. The devised quantification method is applied to study the high impact weather case of 9-11 November 2001 in the Western Mediterranean basin, when a deep and strong cyclone was formed. On the Balearic Islands 4 people died, and sustained winds of 30 ms-1 and precipitation higher than 200 mm/24 h were recorded. Moreover, 700 people died in Algiers during the first phase of the event. The sensitivities to perturbations in the initial conditions of a deep upper level trough, the anticyclonic system related to the North Atlantic high and the surface thermal anomaly related to the baroclinicity of the environment are determined. Results reveal a high influence of the upper level trough and the surface thermal anomaly and a minor role of the North Atlantic high during the genesis of the cyclone.

  12. An Innovations-Based Noise Cancelling Technique on Inverse Kepstrum Whitening Filter and Adaptive FIR Filter in Beamforming Structure

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jinsoo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an acoustic noise cancelling technique using an inverse kepstrum system as an innovations-based whitening application for an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR) filter in beamforming structure. The inverse kepstrum method uses an innovations-whitened form from one acoustic path transfer function between a reference microphone sensor and a noise source so that the rear-end reference signal will then be a whitened sequence to a cascaded adaptive FIR filter in the beamforming structure. By using an inverse kepstrum filter as a whitening filter with the use of a delay filter, the cascaded adaptive FIR filter estimates only the numerator of the polynomial part from the ratio of overall combined transfer functions. The test results have shown that the adaptive FIR filter is more effective in beamforming structure than an adaptive noise cancelling (ANC) structure in terms of signal distortion in the desired signal and noise reduction in noise with nonminimum phase components. In addition, the inverse kepstrum method shows almost the same convergence level in estimate of noise statistics with the use of a smaller amount of adaptive FIR filter weights than the kepstrum method, hence it could provide better computational simplicity in processing. Furthermore, the rear-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure has shown less signal distortion in the desired signal than the front-end kepstrum method and the front-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure. PMID:22163987

  13. Imaging subsurface density structure in Luynnier volcanic field, Saudi Arabia, using 3D gravity inversion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-shrief, Adel; Alqahtani, Faisal; Mogren, Saad

    2017-04-01

    On 19 May, 2009, an earthquake of magnitude (M=5.4) shocked the most volcanically active recent basaltic fields, Luynnier volcanic field, northwestern Saudi Arabia. This event was the largest recorded one since long time ago. Government evacuated the surrounding residents around the epicenter for over 3 months away from any future volcanic activity. The seismic event caused damages to buildings in the village around the epicenter and resulted in surface fissure trending in NNW-SSE direction with about 8 km length. Seismologists from Saudi Geological Survey (SGS) worked out on locating the epicenter and the cause of this earthquake. They collected seismic data from Saudi Geological Surveys Station Network as well as installed broadband seismic stations around the region of the earthquake. They finally concluded that the main cause of the M=5.4 event is dike intrusion at depth of about 5 km (not reached to the surface). In the present work, we carried out detailed ground/airborne gravity survey around the surficial fissure to image the subsurface volcanic structure where about 380 gravity stations were recorded covering the main fissure in an area of 600 km2. Gravity data was analyzed using CET edge detection tools and 3D inversion technique. The results revealed that, there is a magma chamber/body beneath the surface at 5-20 km depth and the main reason for the M=5.4 earthquake is tectonic settings of the Red Sea. Additionally, the area is characterized by set of faults trending in NW direction, parallel to the Red Sea, and most of the volcanic cones were located on faults/contacts implying that, they are structurally controlled. The 8-km surficial crack is extended SE underneath the surface.

  14. The merging cluster Abell 1758: an optical and dynamical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro-Oliveira, Rogerio; Serra Cypriano, Eduardo; Machado, Rubens; Lima Neto, Gastao B.

    2015-08-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 1758-North (z=0.28) is a binary system composed by the sub-structures NW and NE. This is supposed to be a post-merging cluster due to observed detachment between the NE BCG and the respective X-ray emitting hot gas clump in a scenario very close to the famous Bullet Cluster. On the other hand, the projected position of the NW BCG coincides with the local hot gas peak. This system was been targeted previously by several studies, using multiple wavelengths and techniques, but there is still no clear picture of the scenario that could have caused this unusual configuration. To help solving this complex puzzle we added some pieces: firstly, we have used deep B, RC and z' Subaru images to perform both weak lensing shear and magnification analysis of A1758 (including here the South component that is not in interaction with A1758-North) modeling each sub-clump as an NFW profile in order to constrain masses and its center positions through MCMC methods; the second piece is the dynamical analysis using radial velocities available in the literature (143) plus new Gemini-GMOS/N measurements (68 new redshifts).From weak lensing we found that independent shear and magnification mass determinations are in excellent agreement between them and combining both we could reduce mass error bar by ~30% compared to shear alone. By combining this two weak-lensing probes we found that the position of both Northern BCGs are consistent with the masses centers within 2σ and and the NE hot gas peak to be offseted of the respective mass peak (M200=5.5 X 1014 M⊙) with very high significance. The most massive structure is NW (M200=7.95 X 1014 M⊙ ) where we observed no detachment between gas, DM and BCG.We have calculated a low line-of-sight velocity difference (<300 km/s) between A1758 NW and NE. We have combined it with the projected velocity of 1600 km/s which was estimated by previous X-ray analysis (David & Kempner 2004) and we have obtained a small angle between

  15. Verification of the helioseismology travel-time measurement technique and the inversion procedure for sound speed using artificial data

    SciTech Connect

    Parchevsky, K. V.; Zhao, J.; Hartlep, T.

    We performed three-dimensional numerical simulations of the solar surface acoustic wave field for the quiet Sun and for three models with different localized sound-speed perturbations in the interior with deep, shallow, and two-layer structures. We used the simulated data generated by two solar acoustics codes that employ the same standard solar model as a background model, but utilize different integration techniques and different models of stochastic wave excitation. Acoustic travel times were measured using a time-distance helioseismology technique, and compared with predictions from ray theory frequently used for helioseismic travel-time inversions. It is found that the measured travel-time shifts agreemore » well with the helioseismic theory for sound-speed perturbations, and for the measurement procedure with and without phase-speed filtering of the oscillation signals. This testing verifies the whole measuring-filtering-inversion procedure for static sound-speed anomalies with small amplitude inside the Sun outside regions of strong magnetic field. It is shown that the phase-speed filtering, frequently used to extract specific wave packets and improve the signal-to-noise ratio, does not introduce significant systematic errors. Results of the sound-speed inversion procedure show good agreement with the perturbation models in all cases. Due to its smoothing nature, the inversion procedure may overestimate sound-speed variations in regions with sharp gradients of the sound-speed profile.« less

  16. Anisotropic three-dimensional inversion of CSEM data using finite-element techniques on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feiyan; Morten, Jan Petter; Spitzer, Klaus

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we present a recently developed anisotropic 3-D inversion framework for interpreting controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data in the frequency domain. The framework integrates a high-order finite-element forward operator and a Gauss-Newton inversion algorithm. Conductivity constraints are applied using a parameter transformation. We discretize the continuous forward and inverse problems on unstructured grids for a flexible treatment of arbitrarily complex geometries. Moreover, an unstructured mesh is more desirable in comparison to a single rectilinear mesh for multisource problems because local grid refinement will not significantly influence the mesh density outside the region of interest. The non-uniform spatial discretization facilitates parametrization of the inversion domain at a suitable scale. For a rapid simulation of multisource EM data, we opt to use a parallel direct solver. We further accelerate the inversion process by decomposing the entire data set into subsets with respect to frequencies (and transmitters if memory requirement is affordable). The computational tasks associated with each data subset are distributed to different processes and run in parallel. We validate the scheme using a synthetic marine CSEM model with rough bathymetry, and finally, apply it to an industrial-size 3-D data set from the Troll field oil province in the North Sea acquired in 2008 to examine its robustness and practical applicability.

  17. Joint inversion of geophysical data using petrophysical clustering and facies deformation wth the level set technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2015-12-01

    Geological expertise and petrophysical relationships can be brought together to provide prior information while inverting multiple geophysical datasets. The merging of such information can result in more realistic solution in the distribution of the model parameters, reducing ipse facto the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. We consider two level of heterogeneities: facies, described by facies boundaries and heteroegenities inside each facies determined by a correlogram. In this presentation, we pose the geophysical inverse problem in terms of Gaussian random fields with mean functions controlled by petrophysical relationships and covariance functions controlled by a prior geological cross-section, including the definition of spatial boundaries for the geological facies. The petrophysical relationship problem is formulated as a regression problem upon each facies. The inversion of the geophysical data is performed in a Bayesian framework. We demonstrate the usefulness of this strategy using a first synthetic case for which we perform a joint inversion of gravity and galvanometric resistivity data with the stations located at the ground surface. The joint inversion is used to recover the density and resistivity distributions of the subsurface. In a second step, we consider the possibility that the facies boundaries are deformable and their shapes are inverted as well. We use the level set approach to perform such deformation preserving prior topological properties of the facies throughout the inversion. With the help of prior facies petrophysical relationships and topological characteristic of each facies, we make posterior inference about multiple geophysical tomograms based on their corresponding geophysical data misfits. The method is applied to a second synthetic case showing that we can recover the heterogeneities inside the facies, the mean values for the petrophysical properties, and, to some extent, the facies boundaries using the 2D joint inversion of

  18. Abell 1033: birth of a radio phoenix

    DOE PAGES

    de Gasperin, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; ...

    2015-02-26

    We report that extended steep-spectrum radio emission in a galaxy cluster is usually associated with a recent merger. However, given the complex scenario of galaxy cluster mergers, many of the discovered sources hardly fit into the strict boundaries of a precise taxonomy. This is especially true for radio phoenixes that do not have very well defined observational criteria. Radio phoenixes are aged radio galaxy lobes whose emission is reactivated by compression or other mechanisms. Here in this paper, we present the detection of a radio phoenix close to the moment of its formation. The source is located in Abell 1033,more » a peculiar galaxy cluster which underwent a recent merger. To support our claim, we present unpublished Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Chandra observations together with archival data from the Very Large Array and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We discover the presence of two subclusters displaced along the N–S direction. The two subclusters probably underwent a recent merger which is the cause of a moderately perturbed X-ray brightness distribution. A steep-spectrum extended radio source very close to an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is proposed to be a newly born radio phoenix: the AGN lobes have been displaced/compressed by shocks formed during the merger event. This scenario explains the source location, morphology, spectral index, and brightness. Finally, we show evidence of a density discontinuity close to the radio phoenix and discuss the consequences of its presence.« less

  19. Cool Core Disruption in Abell 1763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Edmund; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Randall, Scott W.; Edwards, Louise O. V.; Sabry, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    We present the analysis of a 20 ksec Chandra archival observation of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1763. A model-subtracted image highlighting excess cluster emission reveals a large spiral structure winding outward from the core to a radius of ~950 kpc. We measure the gas of the inner spiral to have significantly lower entropy than non-spiral regions at the same radius. This is consistent with the structure resulting from merger-induced motion of the cluster’s cool core, a phenomenon seen in many systems. Atypical of spiral-hosting clusters, an intact cool core is not detected. Its absence suggests the system has experienced significant disruption since the initial dynamical encounter that set the sloshing core in motion. Along the major axis of the elongated ICM distribution we detect thermal features consistent with the merger event most likely responsible for cool core disruption. The merger-induced transition towards non-cool core status will be discussed. The interaction between the powerful (P1.4 ~ 1026 W Hz-1) cluster-center WAT radio source and its ICM environment will also be discussed.

  20. Research and application of spectral inversion technique in frequency domain to improve resolution of converted PS-wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen-Hua; Li, Ya-Lin; Li, Rui; He, Guamg-Ming; Li, Zhong

    2017-06-01

    Multi-wave exploration is an effective means for improving precision in the exploration and development of complex oil and gas reservoirs that are dense and have low permeability. However, converted wave data is characterized by a low signal-to-noise ratio and low resolution, because the conventional deconvolution technology is easily affected by the frequency range limits, and there is limited scope for improving its resolution. The spectral inversion techniques is used to identify λ/8 thin layers and its breakthrough regarding band range limits has greatly improved the seismic resolution. The difficulty associated with this technology is how to use the stable inversion algorithm to obtain a high-precision reflection coefficient, and then to use this reflection coefficient to reconstruct broadband data for processing. In this paper, we focus on how to improve the vertical resolution of the converted PS-wave for multi-wave data processing. Based on previous research, we propose a least squares inversion algorithm with a total variation constraint, in which we uses the total variance as a priori information to solve under-determined problems, thereby improving the accuracy and stability of the inversion. Here, we simulate the Gaussian fitting amplitude spectrum to obtain broadband wavelet data, which we then process to obtain a higher resolution converted wave. We successfully apply the proposed inversion technology in the processing of high-resolution data from the Penglai region to obtain higher resolution converted wave data, which we then verify in a theoretical test. Improving the resolution of converted PS-wave data will provide more accurate data for subsequent velocity inversion and the extraction of reservoir reflection information.

  1. The Filtered Abel Transform and Its Application in Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    Many non-intrusive combustion diagnosis methods generate line-of-sight projections of a flame field. To reconstruct the spatial field of the measured properties, these projections need to be deconvoluted. When the spatial field is axisymmetric, commonly used deconvolution method include the Abel transforms, the onion peeling method and the two-dimensional Fourier transform method and its derivatives such as the filtered back projection methods. This paper proposes a new approach for performing the Abel transform method is developed, which possesses the exactness of the Abel transform and the flexibility of incorporating various filters in the reconstruction process. The Abel transform is an exact method and the simplest among these commonly used methods. It is evinced in this paper that all the exact reconstruction methods for axisymmetric distributions must be equivalent to the Abel transform because of its uniqueness and exactness. Detailed proof is presented to show that the two dimensional Fourier methods when applied to axisymmetric cases is identical to the Abel transform. Discrepancies among various reconstruction method stem from the different approximations made to perform numerical calculations. An equation relating the spectrum of a set of projection date to that of the corresponding spatial distribution is obtained, which shows that the spectrum of the projection is equal to the Abel transform of the spectrum of the corresponding spatial distribution. From the equation, if either the projection or the distribution is bandwidth limited, the other is also bandwidth limited, and both have the same bandwidth. If the two are not bandwidth limited, the Abel transform has a bias against low wave number components in most practical cases. This explains why the Abel transform and all exact deconvolution methods are sensitive to high wave number noises. The filtered Abel transform is based on the fact that the Abel transform of filtered projection data is equal

  2. In-depth study of 16CygB using inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldgen, G.; Salmon, S. J. A. J.; Reese, D. R.; Dupret, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Context. The 16Cyg binary system hosts the solar-like Kepler targets with the most stringent observational constraints. Indeed, we benefit from very high quality oscillation spectra, as well as spectroscopic and interferometric observations. Moreover, this system is particularly interesting since both stars are very similar in mass but the A component is orbited by a red dwarf, whereas the B component is orbited by a Jovian planet and thus could have formed a more complex planetary system. In our previous study, we showed that seismic inversions of integrated quantities could be used to constrain microscopic diffusion in the A component. In this study, we analyse the B component in the light of a more regularised inversion. Aims: We wish to analyse independently the B component of the 16Cyg binary system using the inversion of an indicator dedicated to analyse core conditions, denoted tu. Using this independent determination, we wish to analyse any differences between both stars due to the potential influence of planetary formation on stellar structure and/or their respective evolution. Methods: First, we recall the observational constraints for 16CygB and the method we used to generate reference stellar models of this star. We then describe how we improved the inversion and how this approach could be used for future targets with a sufficient number of observed frequencies. The inversion results were then used to analyse the differences between the A and B components. Results: The inversion of the tu indicator for 16CygB shows a disagreement with models including microscopic diffusion and sharing the chemical composition previously derived for 16CygA. We show that small changes in chemical composition are insufficient to solve the problem but that extra mixing can account for the differences seen between both stars. We use a parametric approach to analyse the impact of extra mixing in the form of turbulent diffusion on the behaviour of the tu values. We conclude on

  3. The investigation of advanced remote sensing, radiative transfer and inversion techniques for the measurement of atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, Adarsh; Wang, Pi-Huan

    1985-01-01

    The research program is documented for developing space and ground-based remote sensing techniques performed during the period from December 15, 1977 to March 15, 1985. The program involved the application of sophisticated radiative transfer codes and inversion methods to various advanced remote sensing concepts for determining atmospheric constituents, particularly aerosols. It covers detailed discussions of the solar aureole technique for monitoring columnar aerosol size distribution, and the multispectral limb scattered radiance and limb attenuated radiance (solar occultation) techniques, as well as the upwelling scattered solar radiance method for determining the aerosol and gaseous characteristics. In addition, analytical models of aerosol size distribution and simulation studies of the limb solar aureole radiance technique and the variability of ozone at high altitudes during satellite sunrise/sunset events are also described in detail.

  4. Advanced Multivariate Inversion Techniques for High Resolution 3D Geophysical Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    of seismic ambient noise – has been used to image crustal Vs variation with a lateral resolution upward of 100 km either on regional or on sub...to East Africa, we solve for velocity structure in an area with less lateral heterogeneity but great tectonic complexity. To increase the...demonstrate correlation with crustal geology. Figure 1 shows the 3D S-wave velocity model obtained from the joint inversion. The low-velocity anomaly

  5. The Mass Function of Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Huchra, J. P.; McNamara, B. R.; Mader, J.

    1998-12-01

    The velocity dispersion and mass functions for rich clusters of galaxies provide important constraints on models of the formation of Large-Scale Structure (e.g., Frenk et al. 1990). However, prior estimates of the velocity dispersion or mass function for galaxy clusters have been based on either very small samples of clusters (Bahcall and Cen 1993; Zabludoff et al. 1994) or large but incomplete samples (e.g., the Girardi et al. (1998) determination from a sample of clusters with more than 30 measured galaxy redshifts). In contrast, we approach the problem by constructing a volume-limited sample of Abell clusters. We collected individual galaxy redshifts for our sample from two major galaxy velocity databases, the NASA Extragalactic Database, NED, maintained at IPAC, and ZCAT, maintained at SAO. We assembled a database with velocity information for possible cluster members and then selected cluster members based on both spatial and velocity data. Cluster velocity dispersions and masses were calculated following the procedures of Danese, De Zotti, and di Tullio (1980) and Heisler, Tremaine, and Bahcall (1985), respectively. The final velocity dispersion and mass functions were analyzed in order to constrain cosmological parameters by comparison to the results of N-body simulations. Our data for the cluster sample as a whole and for the individual clusters (spatial maps and velocity histograms) in our sample is available on-line at http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/ huchra/clusters. This website will be updated as more data becomes available in the master redshift compilations, and will be expanded to include more clusters and large groups of galaxies.

  6. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial edema using a short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique: Diagnostic accuracy of visual and semi-quantitative assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique has been used to visualize myocardial edema, and thus to differentiate acute from chronic myocardial lesions. However, some cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) groups have reported variable image quality, and hence the diagnostic value of STIR in routine clinical practice has been put into question. The aim of our study was to analyze image quality and diagnostic performance of STIR using a set of pulse sequence parameters dedicated to edema detection, and to discuss possible factors that influence image quality. We hypothesized that STIR imaging is an accurate and robust way of detecting myocardial edema in non-selected patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods Forty-six consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction underwent CMR (day 4.5, +/- 1.6) including STIR for the assessment of myocardial edema and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for quantification of myocardial necrosis. Thirty of these patients underwent a follow-up CMR at approximately six months (195 +/- 39 days). Both STIR and LGE images were evaluated separately on a segmental basis for image quality as well as for presence and extent of myocardial hyper-intensity, with both visual and semi-quantitative (threshold-based) analysis. LGE was used as a reference standard for localization and extent of myocardial necrosis (acute) or scar (chronic). Results Image quality of STIR images was rated as diagnostic in 99.5% of cases. At the acute stage, the sensitivity and specificity of STIR to detect infarcted segments on visual assessment was 95% and 78% respectively, and on semi-quantitative assessment was 99% and 83%, respectively. STIR differentiated acutely from chronically infarcted segments with a sensitivity of 95% by both methods and with a specificity of 99% by visual assessment and 97% by semi-quantitative assessment. The extent of hyper-intense areas on acute STIR images was 85% larger than

  7. A 1400-MHz survey of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. N.; White, R. A.; Hilldrup, K. C.; Hanisch, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies with the NRAO 91-m telescope at 1400 MHz are reported. The measured beam shape was deconvolved from the measured source Gaussian fits in order to estimate the source size and position angle. All detected sources within 0.5 corrected Abell cluster radii are listed, including the cluster number, richness class, distance class, magnitude of the tenth brightest galaxy, redshift estimate, corrected cluster radius in arcmin, right ascension and error, declination and error, total flux density and error, and angular structure for each source.

  8. Deconvolving regional and fault-driven uplift in Calabria using drainage inversion techniques and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quye-Sawyer, Jennifer; Whittaker, Alexander; Roberts, Gareth; Rood, Dylan

    2017-04-01

    A key challenge in the Earth Sciences is to understand the timing and extent of the coupling between geodynamics, tectonics, and surface processes. In principle, the landscape adjusts to surface uplift or tectonic events, and present-day topography records a convolution of these processes. The inverse problem, the ability to find the 'best fit' theoretical scenario to match present day observations, is particularly desirable as it makes use of real data, encompasses the complexity of natural systems and quantifies model uncertainty through misfit. The region of Calabria, Italy, is known to have experienced geologically rapid uplift ( 1 mm/yr) since the Early Pleistocene, inferred from widespread marine terraces (ca. 1 Myr old) at elevations greater than 1 km. In addition, this is a tectonically active area of normal faulting with several highly destructive earthquakes in recent centuries. Since there has been some debate about the relative magnitudes of the uplift caused by regional processes or by faulting, the ability to model these effects on a regional scale may help resolve this problem. Therefore, Calabria is both a suitable and important site to model large magnitude recent geomorphic change. 1368 river longitudinal profiles have been generated from satellite digital elevation models (DEMs). These longitudinal profiles were compared to aerial photography to confirm the accuracy of this automated process. The longitudinal profiles contain numerous non-lithologically controlled knickpoints. Field observations support the presence of knickpoints extracted from the DEM and measurements of pebble imbrication from fluvial terraces suggest the planform stability of the drainage network in the last 1 Myr. By assuming fluvial erosion obeys stream power laws with an exponent of upstream area of 0.5 ± 0.1, the evolution of the landscape is computed using a linearized joint inversion of the longitudinal profiles. This has produced a spatially and temporally continuous

  9. The application of the least squares finite element method to Abel's integral equation. [with application to glow discharge problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Norrie, D. H.; De Vries, G.

    1979-01-01

    Abel's integral equation is the governing equation for certain problems in physics and engineering, such as radiation from distributed sources. The finite element method for the solution of this non-linear equation is presented for problems with cylindrical symmetry and the extension to more general integral equations is indicated. The technique was applied to an axisymmetric glow discharge problem and the results show excellent agreement with previously obtained solutions

  10. Inversion of calcite twin data for paleostress (1) : improved Etchecopar technique tested on numerically-generated and natural data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlangeau, Camille; Lacombe, Olivier; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Schueller, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    Inversion of calcite twin data are known to be a powerful tool to reconstruct the past-state of stress in carbonate rocks of the crust, especially in fold-and-thrust belts and sedimentary basins. This is of key importance to constrain results of geomechanical modelling. Without proposing a new inversion scheme, this contribution reports some recent improvements of the most efficient stress inversion technique to date (Etchecopar, 1984) that allows to reconstruct the 5 parameters of the deviatoric paleostress tensors (principal stress orientations and differential stress magnitudes) from monophase and polyphase twin data sets. The improvements consist in the search of the possible tensors that account for the twin data (twinned and untwinned planes) and the aid to the user to define the best stress tensor solution, among others. We perform a systematic exploration of an hypersphere in 4 dimensions by varying different parameters, Euler's angles and the stress ratio. We first record all tensors with a minimum penalization function accounting for 20% of the twinned planes. We then define clusters of tensors following a dissimilarity criterion based on the stress distance between the 4 parameters of the reduced stress tensors and a degree of disjunction of the related sets of twinned planes. The percentage of twinned data to be explained by each tensor is then progressively increased and tested using the standard Etchecopar procedure until the best solution that explains the maximum number of twinned planes and the whole set of untwinned planes is reached. This new inversion procedure is tested on monophase and polyphase numerically-generated as well as natural calcite twin data in order to more accurately define the ability of the technique to separate more or less similar deviatoric stress tensors applied in sequence on the samples, to test the impact of strain hardening through the change of the critical resolved shear stress for twinning as well as to evaluate the

  11. 128Xe Lifetime Measurement Using the Coulex-Plunger Technique in Inverse Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinopoulos, T.; Lagoyannis, A.; Harissopulos, S.; Dewald, A.; Rother, W.; Ilie, G.; Jones, P.; Rakhila, P.; Greenlees, P.; Grahn, T.; Julin, R.; Balabanski, D. L.

    2008-05-01

    The lifetimes of the lowest collective yrast and non-yrast states in 128Xe were measured in a Coulomb excitation experiment using the recoil distance method (RDM) in inverse kinematics. Hereby, the Cologne plunger apparatus was employed together with the JUROGAM spectrometer. Excited states in 128Xe were populated using a 128Xe beam impinging on a natFe target with E(128Xe)~525 MeV. Recoils were detected by means of an array of solar cells placed at forward angles. Recoil-gated γ-spectra were measured at different plunger distances.

  12. Comparing inversion techniques for constraining CO2 fluxes in the Brazilian Amazon Basin with aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, V. Y.; Gerbig, C.; Longo, M.; Koch, F.; Nehrkorn, T.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Ceballos, J. C.; Longo, K.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia (BARCA) aircraft program spanned the dry to wet and wet to dry transition seasons in November 2008 & May 2009 respectively. It resulted in ~150 vertical profiles covering the Brazilian Amazon Basin (BAB). With the data we attempt to estimate a carbon budget for the BAB, to determine if regional aircraft experiments can provide strong constraints for a budget, and to compare inversion frameworks when optimizing flux estimates. We use a LPDM to integrate satellite-, aircraft-, & surface-data with mesoscale meteorological fields to link bottom-up and top-down models to provide constraints and error bounds for regional fluxes. The Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model driven by meteorological fields from BRAMS, ECMWF, and WRF are coupled to a biosphere model, the Vegetation Photosynthesis Respiration Model (VPRM), to determine regional CO2 fluxes for the BAB. The VPRM is a prognostic biosphere model driven by MODIS 8-day EVI and LSWI indices along with shortwave radiation and temperature from tower measurements and mesoscale meteorological data. VPRM parameters are tuned using eddy flux tower data from the Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere experiment. VPRM computes hourly CO2 fluxes by calculating Gross Ecosystem Exchange (GEE) and Respiration (R) for 8 different vegetation types. The VPRM fluxes are scaled up to the BAB by using time-averaged drivers (shortwave radiation & temperature) from high-temporal resolution runs of BRAMS, ECMWF, and WRF and vegetation maps from SYNMAP and IGBP2007. Shortwave radiation from each mesoscale model is validated using surface data and output from GL 1.2, a global radiation model based on GOES 8 visible imagery. The vegetation maps are updated to 2008 and 2009 using landuse scenarios modeled by Sim Amazonia 2 and Sim Brazil. A priori fluxes modeled by STILT-VPRM are optimized using data from BARCA, eddy covariance sites, and flask measurements. The

  13. Tackling missing radiographic progression data: multiple imputation technique compared with inverse probability weights and complete case analysis.

    PubMed

    Descalzo, Miguel Á; Garcia, Virginia Villaverde; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Carbonell, Jordi; Balsa, Alejandro; Sanmartí, Raimon; Lisbona, Pilar; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentín; Jiménez-Garcia, Rodrigo; Carmona, Loreto

    2013-02-01

    To describe the results of different statistical ways of addressing radiographic outcome affected by missing data--multiple imputation technique, inverse probability weights and complete case analysis--using data from an observational study. A random sample of 96 RA patients was selected for a follow-up study in which radiographs of hands and feet were scored. Radiographic progression was tested by comparing the change in the total Sharp-van der Heijde radiographic score (TSS) and the joint erosion score (JES) from baseline to the end of the second year of follow-up. MI technique, inverse probability weights in weighted estimating equation (WEE) and CC analysis were used to fit a negative binomial regression. Major predictors of radiographic progression were JES and joint space narrowing (JSN) at baseline, together with baseline disease activity measured by DAS28 for TSS and MTX use for JES. Results from CC analysis show larger coefficients and s.e.s compared with MI and weighted techniques. The results from the WEE model were quite in line with those of MI. If it seems plausible that CC or MI analysis may be valid, then MI should be preferred because of its greater efficiency. CC analysis resulted in inefficient estimates or, translated into non-statistical terminology, could guide us into inaccurate results and unwise conclusions. The methods discussed here will contribute to the use of alternative approaches for tackling missing data in observational studies.

  14. Retrieval Performance and Indexing Differences in ABELL and MLAIB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Vince

    2012-01-01

    Searches for 117 British authors are compared in the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (ABELL) and the Modern Language Association International Bibliography (MLAIB). Authors are organized by period and genre within the early modern era. The number of records for each author was subdivided by format, language of publication,…

  15. Comparison of data inversion techniques for remotely sensed wide-angle observations of Earth emitted radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The shape factor, parameter estimation, and deconvolution data analysis techniques were applied to the same set of Earth emitted radiation measurements to determine the effects of different techniques on the estimated radiation field. All three techniques are defined and their assumptions, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed. Their results are compared globally, zonally, regionally, and on a spatial spectrum basis. The standard deviations of the regional differences in the derived radiant exitance varied from 7.4 W-m/2 to 13.5 W-m/2.

  16. Dynamic model inversion techniques for breath-by-breath measurement of carbon dioxide from low bandwidth sensors.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Shyam; Rajamani, Rajesh; Johnson, Bruce D

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory CO(2) measurement (capnography) is an important diagnosis tool that lacks inexpensive and wearable sensors. This paper develops techniques to enable use of inexpensive but slow CO(2) sensors for breath-by-breath tracking of CO(2) concentration. This is achieved by mathematically modeling the dynamic response and using model-inversion techniques to predict input CO(2) concentration from the slow-varying output. Experiments are designed to identify model-dynamics and extract relevant model-parameters for a solidstate room monitoring CO(2) sensor. A second-order model that accounts for flow through the sensor's filter and casing is found to be accurate in describing the sensor's slow response. The resulting estimate is compared with a standard-of-care respiratory CO(2) analyzer and shown to effectively track variation in breath-by-breath CO(2) concentration. This methodology is potentially useful for measuring fast-varying inputs to any slow sensor.

  17. Application of stepwise multiple regression techniques to inversion of Nimbus 'IRIS' observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohring, G.

    1972-01-01

    Exploratory studies with Nimbus-3 infrared interferometer-spectrometer (IRIS) data indicate that, in addition to temperature, such meteorological parameters as geopotential heights of pressure surfaces, tropopause pressure, and tropopause temperature can be inferred from the observed spectra with the use of simple regression equations. The technique of screening the IRIS spectral data by means of stepwise regression to obtain the best radiation predictors of meteorological parameters is validated. The simplicity of application of the technique and the simplicity of the derived linear regression equations - which contain only a few terms - suggest usefulness for this approach. Based upon the results obtained, suggestions are made for further development and exploitation of the stepwise regression analysis technique.

  18. A comparison of solute-transport solution techniques based on inverse modelling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Five common numerical techniques (finite difference, predictor-corrector, total-variation-diminishing, method-of-characteristics, and modified-method-of-characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using randomly distributed homogeneous blocks of five sand types. This experimental model provides an outstanding opportunity to compare the solution techniques because of the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution of known structure, and the availability of detailed measurements with which to compare simulated concentrations. The present work uses this opportunity to investigate how three common types of results-simulated breakthrough curves, sensitivity analysis, and calibrated parameter values-change in this heterogeneous situation, given the different methods of simulating solute transport. The results show that simulated peak concentrations, even at very fine grid spacings, varied because of different amounts of numerical dispersion. Sensitivity analysis results were robust in that they were independent of the solution technique. They revealed extreme correlation between hydraulic conductivity and porosity, and that the breakthrough curve data did not provide enough information about the dispersivities to estimate individual values for the five sands. However, estimated hydraulic conductivity values are significantly influenced by both the large possible variations in model dispersion and the amount of numerical dispersion present in the solution technique.Five common numerical techniques (finite difference, predictor-corrector, total-variation-diminishing, method-of-characteristics, and modified-method-of-characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using randomly

  19. A model-assisted radio occultation data inversion method based on data ingestion into NeQuick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, M. M.; Nava, B.; Kashcheyev, A.

    2017-01-01

    Inverse Abel transform is the most common method to invert radio occultation (RO) data in the ionosphere and it is based on the assumption of the spherical symmetry for the electron density distribution in the vicinity of an occultation event. It is understood that this 'spherical symmetry hypothesis' could fail, above all, in the presence of strong horizontal electron density gradients. As a consequence, in some cases wrong electron density profiles could be obtained. In this work, in order to incorporate the knowledge of horizontal gradients, we have suggested an inversion technique based on the adaption of the empirical ionospheric model, NeQuick2, to RO-derived TEC. The method relies on the minimization of a cost function involving experimental and model-derived TEC data to determine NeQuick2 input parameters (effective local ionization parameters) at specific locations and times. These parameters are then used to obtain the electron density profile along the tangent point (TP) positions associated with the relevant RO event using NeQuick2. The main focus of our research has been laid on the mitigation of spherical symmetry effects from RO data inversion without using external data such as data from global ionospheric maps (GIM). By using RO data from Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC) mission and manually scaled peak density data from a network of ionosondes along Asian and American longitudinal sectors, we have obtained a global improvement of 5% with 7% in Asian longitudinal sector (considering the data used in this work), in the retrieval of peak electron density (NmF2) with model-assisted inversion as compared to the Abel inversion. Mean errors of NmF2 in Asian longitudinal sector are calculated to be much higher compared to American sector.

  20. Advanced Multivariate Inversion Techniques for High Resolution 3D Geophysical Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    crustal structures. But short periods are difficult to measure, especially in tectonically and geologically complex areas. On the other hand, gravity...East Africa Rift System Knowledge of crustal and upper mantle structure is of importance for understanding East Africa’s geodynamic evolution and for...area with less lateral heterogeneity but great tectonic complexity. To increase the effectiveness of the technique in this region, we explore gravity

  1. Mesoporous CeO2 nanoparticles synthesized by an inverse miniemulsion technique and their catalytic properties in methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabih, Nermeen; Schiller, Renate; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Kockrick, Emanuel; Frind, Robert; Kaskel, Stefan; Weiss, Clemens K.; Landfester, Katharina

    2011-04-01

    Cerium(IV) oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using an inverse miniemulsion technique with cerium nitrate hexahydrate as precursor. The resulting nanocrystallites are as small as 5 nm with a specific surface area of 158 m2 g - 1 after calcination at 400 °C. With the addition of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide)) triblock copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO) as template in the miniemulsion droplets, the specific surface area can be increased up to 255 m2 g - 1. The miniemulsions were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and the obtained oxides were examined by x-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen sorption (BET and BJH), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The catalytic activity of the resulting ceria was investigated for the temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) of methane.

  2. Effects of process variables on the encapsulation of oil in ca-alginate capsules using an inverse gelation technique.

    PubMed

    Abang, Sariah; Chan, Eng-Seng; Poncelet, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of process variables on the encapsulation of oil in a calcium alginate membrane using an inverse gelation technique. A dispersion of calcium chloride solution in sunflower oil (water-in-oil emulsion) was added dropwise to the alginate solution. The migration of calcium ions to the alginate solution initiates the formation of a ca-alginate membrane around the emulsion droplets. The membrane thickness of wet capsules and the elastic modulus of dry capsules increased following first-order kinetics with an increasing curing time. An increase in the calcium chloride concentration increased the membrane thickness of wet capsules and the elastic modulus of dry capsules. An increase in the alginate concentration decreased the mean diameter of wet capsules but increased the elastic modulus of dry capsules.

  3. Emissions of organic compounds from produced water ponds II: Evaluation of flux chamber measurements with inverse-modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huy N Q; Lyman, Seth N; Mansfield, Marc L; O'Neil, Trevor; Bowers, Richard L; Smith, Ann P; Keslar, Cara

    2018-07-01

    In this study, the authors apply two different dispersion models to evaluate flux chamber measurements of emissions of 58 organic compounds, including C2-C11 hydrocarbons and methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol from oil- and gas-produced water ponds in the Uintah Basin. Field measurement campaigns using the flux chamber technique were performed at a limited number of produced water ponds in the basin throughout 2013-2016. Inverse-modeling results showed significantly higher emissions than were measured by the flux chamber. Discrepancies between the two methods vary across hydrocarbon compounds and are largest in alcohols due to their physical chemistries. This finding, in combination with findings in a related study using the WATER9 wastewater emission model, suggests that the flux chamber technique may underestimate organic compound emissions, especially alcohols, due to its limited coverage of the pond area and alteration of environmental conditions, especially wind speed. Comparisons of inverse-model estimations with flux chamber measurements varied significantly with the complexity of pond facilities and geometries. Both model results and flux chamber measurements suggest significant contributions from produced water ponds to total organic compound emission from oil and gas productions in the basin. This research is a component of an extensive study that showed significant amount of hydrocarbon emissions from produced water ponds in the Uintah Basin, Utah. Such findings have important meanings to air quality management agencies in developing control strategies for air pollution in oil and gas fields, especially for the Uintah Basin in which ozone pollutions frequently occurred in winter seasons.

  4. Optimization of the Inverse Algorithm for Estimating the Optical Properties of Biological Materials Using Spatially-resolved Diffuse Reflectance Technique

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Determination of the optical properties from intact biological materials based on diffusion approximation theory is a complicated inverse problem, and it requires proper implementation of inverse algorithm, instrumentation, and experiment. This work was aimed at optimizing the procedure of estimatin...

  5. General Matrix Inversion Technique for the Calibration of Electric Field Sensor Arrays on Aircraft Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, D. M.; Koshak, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    A matrix calibration procedure has been developed that uniquely relates the electric fields measured at the aircraft with the external vector electric field and net aircraft charge. The calibration method can be generalized to any reasonable combination of electric field measurements and aircraft. A calibration matrix is determined for each aircraft that represents the individual instrument responses to the external electric field. The aircraft geometry and configuration of field mills (FMs) uniquely define the matrix. The matrix can then be inverted to determine the external electric field and net aircraft charge from the FM outputs. A distinct advantage of the method is that if one or more FMs need to be eliminated or deemphasized [e.g., due to a malfunction), it is a simple matter to reinvert the matrix without the malfunctioning FMs. To demonstrate the calibration technique, data are presented from several aircraft programs (ER-2, DC-8, Altus, and Citation).

  6. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    PubMed

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination.

  7. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics

    PubMed Central

    Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the “core team”, facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  8. Profile inversion in presence of ray bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallio, H. A.; Grossi, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Inversion of radio occultation data for planetary atmospheres and ionospheres has been performed using the seismological Herglotz-Wiechert method, as adapted by Phinney and Anderson to the radio-occultation case. Profile reconstruction performed in computer simulated experiments with this approach have been compared with the ones obtained with the straight-ray Abel transform. For a thin atmosphere and ionosphere, like the ones encountered on Mars, microwave occultation data can be inverted accurately with both methods. For a dense ionosphere like the sun's corona, ray bending of microwaves is severe, and recovered refractivity by the Herglotz-Wiechert method provides significant improvement over the straight-ray Abel transform: the error reduces from more than 60% to less than 20% at a height of 60,000 km above the base of the corona.

  9. Aircraft automatic-flight-control system with inversion of the model in the feed-forward path using a Newton-Raphson technique for the inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. A.; Meyer, G.; Nordstrom, M.

    1986-01-01

    A new automatic flight control system concept suitable for aircraft with highly nonlinear aerodynamic and propulsion characteristics and which must operate over a wide flight envelope was investigated. This exact model follower inverts a complete nonlinear model of the aircraft as part of the feed-forward path. The inversion is accomplished by a Newton-Raphson trim of the model at each digital computer cycle time of 0.05 seconds. The combination of the inverse model and the actual aircraft in the feed-forward path alloys the translational and rotational regulators in the feedback path to be easily designed by linear methods. An explanation of the model inversion procedure is presented. An extensive set of simulation data for essentially the full flight envelope for a vertical attitude takeoff and landing aircraft (VATOL) is presented. These data demonstrate the successful, smooth, and precise control that can be achieved with this concept. The trajectory includes conventional flight from 200 to 900 ft/sec with path accelerations and decelerations, altitude changes of over 6000 ft and 2g and 3g turns. Vertical attitude maneuvering as a tail sitter along all axes is demonstrated. A transition trajectory from 200 ft/sec in conventional flight to stationary hover in the vertical attitude includes satisfactory operation through lift-cure slope reversal as attitude goes from horizontal to vertical at constant altitude. A vertical attitude takeoff from stationary hover to conventional flight is also demonstrated.

  10. RADIO AND DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISTURBED COOL CORE CLUSTER ABELL 133

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, S. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.

    2010-10-10

    We present results based on new Chandra and multi-frequency radio observations of the disturbed cool core cluster Abell 133. The diffuse gas has a complex bird-like morphology, with a plume of emission extending from two symmetric wing-like features. The plume is capped with a filamentary radio structure that has been previously classified as a radio relic. X-ray spectral fits in the region of the relic indicate the presence of either high-temperature gas or non-thermal emission, although the measured photon index is flatter than would be expected if the non-thermal emission is from inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave backgroundmore » by the radio-emitting particles. We find evidence for a weak elliptical X-ray surface brightness edge surrounding the core, which we show is consistent with a sloshing cold front. The plume is consistent with having formed due to uplift by a buoyantly rising radio bubble, now seen as the radio relic, and has properties consistent with buoyantly lifted plumes seen in other systems (e.g., M87). Alternatively, the plume may be a gas sloshing spiral viewed edge-on. Results from spectral analysis of the wing-like features are inconsistent with the previous suggestion that the wings formed due to the passage of a weak shock through the cool core. We instead conclude that the wings are due to X-ray cavities formed by displacement of X-ray gas by the radio relic. The central cD galaxy contains two small-scale cold gas clumps that are slightly offset from their optical and UV counterparts, suggestive of a galaxy-galaxy merger event. On larger scales, there is evidence for cluster substructure in both optical observations and the X-ray temperature map. We suggest that the Abell 133 cluster has recently undergone a merger event with an interloping subgroup, initialing gas sloshing in the core. The torus of sloshed gas is seen close to edge-on, leading to the somewhat ragged appearance of the elliptical surface brightness edge

  11. COST Action TU1208 - Working Group 3 - Electromagnetic modelling, inversion, imaging and data-processing techniques for Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Sesnic, Silvestar; Randazzo, Andrea; Lambot, Sébastien; Benedetto, Francesco; Economou, Nikos

    2017-04-01

    opportunity of testing and validating, against reliable data, their electromagnetic-modelling, inversion, imaging and processing algorithms. One of the most interesting dataset comes from the IFSTTAR Geophysical Test Site, in Nantes (France): this is an open-air laboratory including a large and deep area, filled with various materials arranged in horizontal compacted slices, separated by vertical interfaces and water-tighted in surface; several objects as pipes, polystyrene hollows, boulders and masonry are embedded in the field. Data were collected by using nine different GPR systems and at different frequencies ranging from 200 MHz to 1 GHz. Moreover, some sections of this test site were modelled by using gprMax and the commercial software CST Microwave Studio. Hence, both experimental and synthetic data are available. Further interesting datasets were collected on roads, bridges, concrete cells, columns - and more. (v) WG3 contributed to the TU1208 Education Pack, an open educational package conceived to teach GPR in University courses. (vi) WG3 was very active in offering training activities. The following courses were successfully organised: Training School (TS) "Microwave Imaging and Diagnostics" (in cooperation with the European School of Antennas; 1st edition: Madonna di Campiglio, Italy, March 2014, 2nd edition: Taormina, Italy, October 2016); TS "Numerical modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar using gprMax" (Thessaloniki, Greece, November 2015); TS "Electromagnetic Modelling Techniques for Ground Penetrating Radar" (Split, Croatia, November 2016). Moreover, WG3 organized a workshop on "Electromagnetic modelling with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain technique" (Nantes, France, February 2014) and a workshop on "Electromagnetic modelling and inversion techniques for GPR" (Davos, Switzerland, April 2016) within the 2016 European Conference on Antennas and Propagation (EuCAP). Acknowledgement: The Authors are deeply grateful to COST (European COoperation in Science and

  12. Near-infrared optical properties of ex vivo human uterus determined by the Monte Carlo inversion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, P. M.; Laufer, J. G.; Gordon, A. D.; Connell, R. J.; Bown, S. G.

    1999-10-01

    The optical properties, absorption (µa) and reduced scattering coefficient (µs´), of ex vivo human myometrium and leiomyoma (fibroid) have been determined by the Monte Carlo inversion technique over the wavelength range 600 - 1000 nm. This region is currently of interest for new, minimal-access, surgical laser procedures such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) for abnormalities of the uterus, and interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) for the thermal ablation of fibroids. In the region 630 - 675 nm (corresponding to PDT), the optical coefficients of myometrium are µa = 0.041±0.012 mm-1 and µs´ = 1.37±0.19 mm-1. For the wavelength range 800-1000 nm (associated with infrared lasers for ILP), the optical coefficients of fibroid were found to be µa = 0.020±0.003 mm-1 and µs´ = 0.56±0.03 mm-1. Overall, the optical properties of fibroid were found to be lower than myometrium, and this was attributed to the differences in both anatomy and vascularity. The results show that PDT for ablation of the uterine endometrium is most unlikely to affect any tissues beyond the myometrium, and that the region around 800 nm is the most effective for ablation of fibroids using ILP as the penetration depth of light is greatest at this wavelength.

  13. Inverse estimation of the spheroidal particle size distribution using Ant Colony Optimization algorithms in multispectral extinction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Wang, Yuqing; Ruan, Liming

    2014-10-01

    Four improved Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithms, i.e. the probability density function based ACO (PDF-ACO) algorithm, the Region ACO (RACO) algorithm, Stochastic ACO (SACO) algorithm and Homogeneous ACO (HACO) algorithm, are employed to estimate the particle size distribution (PSD) of the spheroidal particles. The direct problems are solved by the extended Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA) and the Lambert-Beer law. Three commonly used monomodal distribution functions i.e. the Rosin-Rammer (R-R) distribution function, the normal (N-N) distribution function, and the logarithmic normal (L-N) distribution function are estimated under dependent model. The influence of random measurement errors on the inverse results is also investigated. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm is more accurate than the other three ACO algorithms and can be used as an effective technique to investigate the PSD of the spheroidal particles. Furthermore, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution functions to retrieve the PSD of spheroidal particles using PDF-ACO algorithm. The investigation shows a reasonable agreement between the original distribution function and the general distribution function when only considering the variety of the length of the rotational semi-axis.

  14. Microscopy and Chemical Inversing Techniques to Determine the Photonic Crystal Structure of Iridescent Beetle Scales in the Cerambycidae Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Lauren; Gardner, John; Standing, Michael; Jorgensen, Matthew; Bartl, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are periodic structures that manipulate electromagnetic waves by defining allowed and forbidden frequency bands known as photonic band gaps. Despite production of PC structures operating at infrared wavelengths, visible counterparts are difficult to fabricate because periodicities must satisfy the diffraction criteria. As part of an ongoing search for naturally occurring PCs [1], a three-dimensional array of nanoscopic spheres in the iridescent scales of the Cerambycidae insects A. elegans and G. celestis has been found. Such arrays are similar to opal gemstones and self-assembled colloidal spheres which can be chemically inverted to create a lattice-like PC. Through a chemical replication process [2], scanning electron microscopy analysis, sequential focused ion beam slicing and three-dimensional modeling, we analyzed the structural arrangement of the nanoscopic spheres. The study of naturally occurring structures and their inversing techniques into PCs allows for diversity in optical PC fabrication. [1] J.W. Galusha et al., Phys. Rev. E 77 (2008) 050904. [2] J.W. Galusha et al., J. Mater. Chem. 20 (2010) 1277.

  15. Investigation of Dynamic Properties of Water-Saturated Sand by the Results of the Inverse Experiment Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragov, A. M.; Balandin, Vl. V.; Kotov, V. L.; Balandin, Vl. Vl.

    2018-04-01

    We present new experimental results on the investigation of the dynamic properties of sand soil on the basis of the inverse experiment technique using a measuring rod with a flat front-end face. A limited applicability has been shown of the method using the procedure for correcting the shape of the deformation pulse due to dispersion during its propagation in the measuring rod. Estimates of the pulse maximum have been obtained and the results of comparison of numerical calculations with experimental data are given. The sufficient accuracy in determining the drag force during the quasi-stationary stage of penetration has been established. The parameters of dynamic compressibility and resistance to shear of water-saturated sand have been determined in the course of the experimental-theoretical analysis of the maximum values of the drag force and its values at the quasi-stationary stage of penetration. It has been shown that with almost complete water saturation of sand its shear properties are reduced but remain significant in the practically important range of penetration rates.

  16. Non-thermal pressure in the outskirts of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco-Femiano, Roberto; Lapi, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    Clumping and turbulence are expected to affect the matter accreted on to the outskirts of galaxy clusters. To determine their impact on the thermodynamic properties of Abell 2142, we perform an analysis of the X-ray temperature data from XMM-Newton via our SuperModel, a state-of-the-art tool for investigating the astrophysics of the intracluster medium already tested on many individual clusters (since Cavaliere, Lapi & Fusco-Femiano 2009). Using the gas density profile corrected for clumpiness derived by Tchernin et al. (2016), we find evidence for the presence of a non-thermal pressure component required to sustain gravity in the cluster outskirts of Abell 2142, that amounts to about 30 per cent of the total pressure at the virial radius. The presence of the non-thermal component implies the gas fraction to be consistent with the universal value at the virial radius and the electron thermal pressure profile to be in good agreement with that inferred from the SZ data. Our results indicate that the presence of gas clumping and of a non-thermal pressure component are both necessary to recover the observed physical properties in the cluster outskirts. Moreover, we stress that an alternative method often exploited in the literature (included Abell 2142) to determine the temperature profile kBT = Pe/ne basing on a combination of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) pressure Pe and of the X-ray electron density ne does not allow us to highlight the presence of non-thermal pressure support in the cluster outskirts.

  17. Weak Gravitational Lensing by the Nearby Cluster Abell 3667.

    PubMed

    Joffre; Fischer; Frieman; McKay; Mohr; Nichol; Johnston; Sheldon; Bernstein

    2000-05-10

    We present two weak lensing reconstructions of the nearby (zcl=0.055) merging cluster Abell 3667, based on observations taken approximately 1 yr apart under different seeing conditions. This is the lowest redshift cluster with a weak lensing mass reconstruction to date. The reproducibility of features in the two mass maps demonstrates that weak lensing studies of low-redshift clusters are feasible. These data constitute the first results from an X-ray luminosity-selected weak lensing survey of 19 low-redshift (z<0.1) southern clusters.

  18. Study of the technique of stellar occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Graves, M. E.; Roble, R. G.; Shah, A. N.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of a study of the stellar occultation technique for measuring the composition of the atmosphere. The intensity of starlight was monitored during the occultation using the Wisconsin stellar ultraviolet photometers aboard the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-A2). A schematic diagram of an occultation is shown where the change in intensity at a given wavelength is illustrated. The vertical projection of the attenuation region is typically 60 km deep for molecular oxygen and 30 km deep for ozone. Intensity profiles obtained during various occultations were analyzed by first determining the tangential columm density of the absorbing gases, and then Abel inverting the column densities to obtain the number density profile. Errors are associated with each step in the inversion scheme and have been considered as an integral part of this study.

  19. Integrating sampling techniques and inverse virtual screening: toward the discovery of artificial peptide-based receptors for ligands.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Germán M; Salomón, Luis A; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A; de la Vega, José M García; Mascini, Marcello

    2016-05-01

    A novel heuristic using an iterative select-and-purge strategy is proposed. It combines statistical techniques for sampling and classification by rigid molecular docking through an inverse virtual screening scheme. This approach aims to the de novo discovery of short peptides that may act as docking receptors for small target molecules when there are no data available about known association complexes between them. The algorithm performs an unbiased stochastic exploration of the sample space, acting as a binary classifier when analyzing the entire peptides population. It uses a novel and effective criterion for weighting the likelihood of a given peptide to form an association complex with a particular ligand molecule based on amino acid sequences. The exploratory analysis relies on chemical information of peptides composition, sequence patterns, and association free energies (docking scores) in order to converge to those peptides forming the association complexes with higher affinities. Statistical estimations support these results providing an association probability by improving predictions accuracy even in cases where only a fraction of all possible combinations are sampled. False positives/false negatives ratio was also improved with this method. A simple rigid-body docking approach together with the proper information about amino acid sequences was used. The methodology was applied in a retrospective docking study to all 8000 possible tripeptide combinations using the 20 natural amino acids, screened against a training set of 77 different ligands with diverse functional groups. Afterward, all tripeptides were screened against a test set of 82 ligands, also containing different functional groups. Results show that our integrated methodology is capable of finding a representative group of the top-scoring tripeptides. The associated probability of identifying the best receptor or a group of the top-ranked receptors is more than double and about 10 times higher

  20. Embedded spiral patterns in the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1835

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, S.; Kitayama, T.; Dotani, T.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the central region of the massive galaxy cluster, Abell 1835, obtained with the data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We find distinctive spiral patterns in the cool core in the residual image of the X-ray surface brightness after its nominal profile is subtracted. The spiral patterns consist of two arms. One of them appears as positive, and the other appears as negative excesses in the residual image. Their sizes are ˜ 70 kpc and their morphologies are consistent with each other. We find that the spiral patterns extend from the cool core out to the hotter surrounding ICM. We analyze the X-ray spectra extracted from both regions. We obtain that the ICM properties are similar to those expected by gas sloshing. We also find that the ICM in the two regions of spiral patterns is near or is in pressure equilibrium. Abell 1835 may now be experiencing gas sloshing induced by an off-axis minor merger. These results have been already published (Ueda, Kitayama, & Dotani 2017, ApJ, 837, 34).

  1. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Métayer, Olivier; Saurel, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOS named "Noble Abel stiffened gas," this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular "Stiffened Gas (SG)" EOS. It is a combination of the so-called "Noble-Abel" and "stiffened gas" equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.

  2. Hierarchical Velocity Structure in the Core of Abell 2597

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, Martin; Mushotzky, Richard

    2004-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton RGS and EPIC data of the putative cooling flow cluster Abell 2597. Velocities of the low-ionization emission lines in the spectrum are blue shifted with respect to the high-ionization lines by 1320 (sup +660) (sub -210) kilometers per second, which is consistent with the difference in the two peaks of the galaxy velocity distribution and may be the signature of bulk turbulence, infall, rotation or damped oscillation in the cluster. A hierarchical velocity structure such as this could be the direct result of galaxy mergers in the cluster core, or the injection of power into the cluster gas from a central engine. The uniform X-ray morphology of the cluster, the absence of fine scale temperature structure and the random distribution of the the galaxy positions, independent of velocity, suggests that our line of sight is close to the direction of motion. These results have strong implications for cooling flow models of the cluster Abell 2597. They give impetus to those models which account for the observed temperature structure of some clusters using mergers instead of cooling flows.

  3. Error analysis applied to several inversion techniques used for the retrieval of middle atmospheric constituents from limb-scanning MM-wave spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puliafito, E.; Bevilacqua, R.; Olivero, J.; Degenhardt, W.

    1992-01-01

    The formal retrieval error analysis of Rodgers (1990) allows the quantitative determination of such retrieval properties as measurement error sensitivity, resolution, and inversion bias. This technique was applied to five numerical inversion techniques and two nonlinear iterative techniques used for the retrieval of middle atmospheric constituent concentrations from limb-scanning millimeter-wave spectroscopic measurements. It is found that the iterative methods have better vertical resolution, but are slightly more sensitive to measurement error than constrained matrix methods. The iterative methods converge to the exact solution, whereas two of the matrix methods under consideration have an explicit constraint, the sensitivity of the solution to the a priori profile. Tradeoffs of these retrieval characteristics are presented.

  4. Top-down estimates of methane and nitrogen oxide emissions from shale gas production regions using aircraft measurements and a mesoscale Bayesian inversion system together with a flux ratio inversion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Brioude, J. F.; Angevine, W. M.; McKeen, S. A.; Henze, D. K.; Bousserez, N.; Liu, Z.; McDonald, B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Frost, G. J.; Trainer, M.

    2016-12-01

    Production of unconventional natural gas grew rapidly during the past ten years in the US which led to an increase in emissions of methane (CH4) and, depending on the shale region, nitrogen oxides (NOx). In terms of radiative forcing, CH4 is the second most important greenhouse gas after CO2. NOx is a precursor of ozone (O3) in the troposphere and nitrate particles, both of which are regulated by the US Clean Air Act. Emission estimates of CH4 and NOx from the shale regions are still highly uncertain. We present top-down estimates of CH4 and NOx surface fluxes from the Haynesville and Fayetteville shale production regions using aircraft data collected during the Southeast Nexus of Climate Change and Air Quality (SENEX) field campaign (June-July, 2013) and the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign (March-May, 2015) within a mesoscale inversion framework. The inversion method is based on a mesoscale Bayesian inversion system using multiple transport models. EPA's 2011 National CH4 and NOx Emission Inventories are used as prior information to optimize CH4 and NOx emissions. Furthermore, the posterior CH4 emission estimates are used to constrain NOx emission estimates using a flux ratio inversion technique. Sensitivity of the posterior estimates to the use of off-diagonal terms in the error covariance matrices, the transport models, and prior estimates is discussed. Compared to the ground-based in-situ observations, the optimized CH4 and NOx inventories improve ground level CH4 and O3 concentrations calculated by the Weather Research and Forecasting mesoscale model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem).

  5. Preliminary Analysis of Low-Thrust Gravity Assist Trajectories by An Inverse Method and a Global Optimization Technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pascale, P.; Vasile, M.; Casotto, S.

    The design of interplanetary trajectories requires the solution of an optimization problem, which has been traditionally solved by resorting to various local optimization techniques. All such approaches, apart from the specific method employed (direct or indirect), require an initial guess, which deeply influences the convergence to the optimal solution. The recent developments in low-thrust propulsion have widened the perspectives of exploration of the Solar System, while they have at the same time increased the difficulty related to the trajectory design process. Continuous thrust transfers, typically characterized by multiple spiraling arcs, have a broad number of design parameters and thanks to the flexibility offered by such engines, they typically turn out to be characterized by a multi-modal domain, with a consequent larger number of optimal solutions. Thus the definition of the first guesses is even more challenging, particularly for a broad search over the design parameters, and it requires an extensive investigation of the domain in order to locate the largest number of optimal candidate solutions and possibly the global optimal one. In this paper a tool for the preliminary definition of interplanetary transfers with coast-thrust arcs and multiple swing-bys is presented. Such goal is achieved combining a novel methodology for the description of low-thrust arcs, with a global optimization algorithm based on a hybridization of an evolutionary step and a deterministic step. Low thrust arcs are described in a 3D model in order to account the beneficial effects of low-thrust propulsion for a change of inclination, resorting to a new methodology based on an inverse method. The two-point boundary values problem (TPBVP) associated with a thrust arc is solved by imposing a proper parameterized evolution of the orbital parameters, by which, the acceleration required to follow the given trajectory with respect to the constraints set is obtained simply through

  6. The cD galaxy in Abell cluster 1775

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. J. E.; Bhattacharya, B.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, a number of workers have studied the multiple nuclei cD galaxy in the rich Abell cluster 1775, trying to discover its nature. In all the cases though, very little has been published concerning its morphology. The majority of arguments about the nature of this object have been based on the relative radial velocities of the 2 components with each other and with the other galaxies in the cluster, or its radio morphology. Very little work has been done on the optical morphology. To rectify that lack of data, the authors have obtained charge coupled device (CCD) images of the cD. The authors find from the CCD data that the cD is unlikely to be a bound object and that there is strong evidence for a collision.

  7. Shocking Tails in the Major Merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare "jellyfish" galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging "Bullet-like" subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  8. Evolution of the UV upturn in cluster galaxies: Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S. S.; Bremer, M. N.; Phillipps, S.; De Propris, R.

    2018-05-01

    We have measured the strength of the UV upturn for red sequence galaxies in the Abell 1689 cluster at z = 0.18, reaching to or below the L* level and therefore probing the general evolution of the upturn phenomenon. We find that the range of UV upturn strengths in the population as a whole has not declined over the past 2.2 Gyrs. This is consistent with a model where hot horizontal branch stars, produced by a Helium-enriched population, provide the required UV flux. Based on local counterparts, this interpretation of the result implies Helium abundances of at least 1.5 times the primordial value for this HB population, along with high formation and assembly redshifts for the galaxies and at least a subset of their stellar populations.

  9. SHOCKING TAILS IN THE MAJOR MERGER ABELL 2744

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.

    We identify four rare 'jellyfish' galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging 'Bullet-like' subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-raymore » images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.« less

  10. Suzaku observations of low surface brightness cluster Abell 1631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babazaki, Yasunori; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ota, Naomi; Sasaki, Shin; Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Pratt, Gabriel W.; Matsumoto, Hironori

    2018-04-01

    We present analysis results for a nearby galaxy cluster Abell 1631 at z = 0.046 using the X-ray observatory Suzaku. This cluster is categorized as a low X-ray surface brightness cluster. To study the dynamical state of the cluster, we conduct four-pointed Suzaku observations and investigate physical properties of the Mpc-scale hot gas associated with the A 1631 cluster for the first time. Unlike relaxed clusters, the X-ray image shows no strong peak at the center and an irregular morphology. We perform spectral analysis and investigate the radial profiles of the gas temperature, density, and entropy out to approximately 1.5 Mpc in the east, north, west, and south directions by combining with the XMM-Newton data archive. The measured gas density in the central region is relatively low (a few ×10-4 cm-3) at the given temperature (˜2.9 keV) compared with X-ray-selected clusters. The entropy profile and value within the central region (r < 0.1 r200) are found to be flatter and higher (≳400 keV cm2). The observed bolometric luminosity is approximately three times lower than that expected from the luminosity-temperature relation in previous studies of relaxed clusters. These features are also observed in another low surface brightness cluster, Abell 76. The spatial distributions of galaxies and the hot gas appear to be different. The X-ray luminosity is relatively lower than that expected from the velocity dispersion. A post-merger scenario may explain the observed results.

  11. Suzaku observations of low surface brightness cluster Abell 1631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babazaki, Yasunori; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ota, Naomi; Sasaki, Shin; Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Pratt, Gabriel W.; Matsumoto, Hironori

    2018-06-01

    We present analysis results for a nearby galaxy cluster Abell 1631 at z = 0.046 using the X-ray observatory Suzaku. This cluster is categorized as a low X-ray surface brightness cluster. To study the dynamical state of the cluster, we conduct four-pointed Suzaku observations and investigate physical properties of the Mpc-scale hot gas associated with the A 1631 cluster for the first time. Unlike relaxed clusters, the X-ray image shows no strong peak at the center and an irregular morphology. We perform spectral analysis and investigate the radial profiles of the gas temperature, density, and entropy out to approximately 1.5 Mpc in the east, north, west, and south directions by combining with the XMM-Newton data archive. The measured gas density in the central region is relatively low (a few ×10-4 cm-3) at the given temperature (˜2.9 keV) compared with X-ray-selected clusters. The entropy profile and value within the central region (r < 0.1 r200) are found to be flatter and higher (≳400 keV cm2). The observed bolometric luminosity is approximately three times lower than that expected from the luminosity-temperature relation in previous studies of relaxed clusters. These features are also observed in another low surface brightness cluster, Abell 76. The spatial distributions of galaxies and the hot gas appear to be different. The X-ray luminosity is relatively lower than that expected from the velocity dispersion. A post-merger scenario may explain the observed results.

  12. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20–25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M.more » Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.« less

  13. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1482156 is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  14. The wonderful apparatus of John Jacob Abel called the "artificial kidney".

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2009-01-01

    Hemodialysis, which now provides life-saving therapy to millions of individuals, began as an exploratory attempt to sustain the lives of selected patients in the 1950s. That was a century after the formulation of the concept and determination of the laws governing dialysis. The first step in the translation of the laboratory principles of dialysis to living animals was the "vividiffusion" apparatus developed by John Jacob Abel (1859-1938), dubbed the "artificial kidney" in the August 11, 1913 issue of The Times of London reporting the demonstration of vividiffusion by Abel at University College. The detailed article in the January 18, 1914 of the New York Times, reproduced here, is based on the subsequent medical reports published by Abel et al. Tentative attempts of human dialysis in the decade that followed based on the vividiffusion apparatus of Abel and his materials (collodion, hirudin, and glass) met with failure and had to be abandoned. Practical dialysis became possible in the 1940s and thereafter after cellophane, heparin, and teflon became available. Abel worked in an age of great progress and experimental work in the basic sciences that laid the foundations of science-driven medicine. It was a "Heroic Age of Medicine," when medical discoveries and communicating them to the public were assuming increasing importance. This article provides the cultural, social, scientific, and medical background in which Abel worked, developed and reported his wonderful apparatus called the "artificial kidney."

  15. Electromagnetic modelling, inversion and data-processing techniques for GPR: ongoing activities in Working Group 3 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Giannopoulos, Antonis; van der Kruk, Jan

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 3 (WG3) 'EM methods for near-field scattering problems by buried structures; data processing techniques' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. WG3 is structured in four Projects. Project 3.1 deals with 'Electromagnetic modelling for GPR applications.' Project 3.2 is concerned with 'Inversion and imaging techniques for GPR applications.' The topic of Project 3.3 is the 'Development of intrinsic models for describing near-field antenna effects, including antenna-medium coupling, for improved radar data processing using full-wave inversion.' Project 3.4 focuses on 'Advanced GPR data-processing algorithms.' Electromagnetic modeling tools that are being developed and improved include the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique and the spectral domain Cylindrical-Wave Approach (CWA). One of the well-known freeware and versatile FDTD simulators is GprMax that enables an improved realistic representation of the soil/material hosting the sought structures and of the GPR antennas. Here, input/output tools are being developed to ease the definition of scenarios and the visualisation of numerical results. The CWA expresses the field scattered by subsurface two-dimensional targets with arbitrary cross-section as a sum of cylindrical waves. In this way, the interaction is taken into account of multiple scattered fields within the medium hosting the sought targets. Recently, the method has been extended to deal with through-the-wall scenarios. One of the

  16. Suzaku observations of the outskirts of the galaxy cluster Abell 3395, including a filament toward Abell 3391

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Yuuki; Takizawa, Motokazu; Itahana, Madoka; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Fujita, Yutaka; Ohashi, Takaya; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka

    2017-12-01

    The results of Suzaku observations of the outskirts of Abell 3395, including a large-scale structure filament toward Abell 3391, are presented. We measured temperature and abundance distributions from the southern outskirt of A 3395 to the north at the virial radius, where a filament structure has been found in the former X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect observations between A 3391 and A 3395. The overall temperature structure is consistent with the universal profile proposed by Okabe, N., et al. 2014, PASJ, 66, 99 for relaxed clusters, except for the filament region. A hint of intracluster medium heating is found between the two clusters, which might be due to their interaction in the early phase of a cluster merger. Although we obtained a relatively low metal abundance of Z=0.169^{+0.164+0.009+0.018}_{-0.150-0.004-0.015} solar, where the first, second, and third errors are statistical, cosmic X-ray background systematic, and non-X-ray background systematic, respectively, at the virial radius in the filament, our results are still consistent with previous results for other clusters (Z ˜ 0.3 solar) within errors. Therefore, our results are also consistent with the early enrichment scenario. We estimated Compton y parameters only from X-ray results in the region between A 3391 and A 3395 assuming a simple geometry. They are smaller than the previous SZ results with the Planck satellite. The difference could be attributed to a more elaborate geometry such as a filament inclined to the line-of-sight direction, or underestimation of the X-ray temperature because of the unresolved multi-temperature structures or undetected hot X-ray emission of the shock-heated gas.

  17. Mass Mapping Abell 2261 with Kinematic Weak Lensing: A Pilot Study for NASAs WFIRST mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eifler, Tim

    2015-02-01

    We propose to investigate a new method to extract cosmological information from weak gravitational lensing in the context of the mission design and requirements of NASAs Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). In a recent paper (Huff, Krause, Eifler, George, Schlegel 2013) we describe a new method for reducing the shape noise in weak lensing measurements by an order of magnitude. Our method relies on spectroscopic measurements of disk galaxy rotation and makes use of the well-established Tully-Fisher (TF) relation in order to control for the intrinsic orientations of galaxy disks. Whereas shape noise is one of the major limitations for current weak lensing experiments it ceases to be an important source of statistical error in our new proposed technique. Specifically, we propose a pilot study that maps the projected mass distribution in the massive cluster Abell 2261 (z=0.225) to infer whether this promising technique faces systematics that prohibit its application to WFIRST. In addition to the cosmological weak lensing prospects, these measurements will also allow us to test kinematic lensing in the context of cluster mass reconstruction with a drastically improved signal-to-noise (S/N) per galaxy.

  18. DISENTANGLING THE ICL WITH THE CHEFs: ABELL 2744 AS A CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Dupke, R., E-mail: yojite@iaa.es

    Measurements of the intracluster light (ICL) are still prone to methodological ambiguities, and there are multiple techniques in the literature to address them, mostly based on the binding energy, the local density distribution, or the surface brightness. A common issue with these methods is the a priori assumption of a number of hypotheses on either the ICL morphology, its surface brightness level, or some properties of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). The discrepancy in the results is high, and numerical simulations just place a boundary on the ICL fraction in present-day galaxy clusters in the range 10%–50%. We developed amore » new algorithm based on the Chebyshev–Fourier functions to estimate the ICL fraction without relying on any a priori assumption about the physical or geometrical characteristics of the ICL. We are able to not only disentangle the ICL from the galactic luminosity but mark out the limits of the BCG from the ICL in a natural way. We test our technique with the recently released data of the cluster Abell 2744, observed by the Frontier Fields program. The complexity of this multiple merging cluster system and the formidable depth of these images make it a challenging test case to prove the efficiency of our algorithm. We found a final ICL fraction of 19.17 ± 2.87%, which is very consistent with numerical simulations.« less

  19. Statistical atmospheric inversion of local gas emissions by coupling the tracer release technique and local-scale transport modelling: a test case with controlled methane emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ars, Sébastien; Broquet, Grégoire; Yver Kwok, Camille; Roustan, Yelva; Wu, Lin; Arzoumanian, Emmanuel; Bousquet, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    This study presents a new concept for estimating the pollutant emission rates of a site and its main facilities using a series of atmospheric measurements across the pollutant plumes. This concept combines the tracer release method, local-scale atmospheric transport modelling and a statistical atmospheric inversion approach. The conversion between the controlled emission and the measured atmospheric concentrations of the released tracer across the plume places valuable constraints on the atmospheric transport. This is used to optimise the configuration of the transport model parameters and the model uncertainty statistics in the inversion system. The emission rates of all sources are then inverted to optimise the match between the concentrations simulated with the transport model and the pollutants' measured atmospheric concentrations, accounting for the transport model uncertainty. In principle, by using atmospheric transport modelling, this concept does not strongly rely on the good colocation between the tracer and pollutant sources and can be used to monitor multiple sources within a single site, unlike the classical tracer release technique. The statistical inversion framework and the use of the tracer data for the configuration of the transport and inversion modelling systems should ensure that the transport modelling errors are correctly handled in the source estimation. The potential of this new concept is evaluated with a relatively simple practical implementation based on a Gaussian plume model and a series of inversions of controlled methane point sources using acetylene as a tracer gas. The experimental conditions are chosen so that they are suitable for the use of a Gaussian plume model to simulate the atmospheric transport. In these experiments, different configurations of methane and acetylene point source locations are tested to assess the efficiency of the method in comparison to the classic tracer release technique in coping with the distances

  20. The solar occultation technique for remote sensing of particulates in the earth's atmosphere. I - The inversion of horizon radiances from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerman, D. W.; Giovane, F.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The aerosol scattering coefficient as a function of height can be recovered from a direct inversion of the single-scattering horizon radiance provided the sun is above the horizon and an independent measurement of extinction as a function of height is made. Aerosol detection is effected by means of spacecraft measurements of the horizon radiance made during periods of spacecraft twilight. A solar occultation technique which allows the twilight measurements to be made when the sun is still above the horizon greatly reduces the complexity of the inversion problem. The second part of the paper reports on the use of a coronograph aboard Skylab to photograph the horizon just before spacecraft twilight in order to monitor the aerosol component above the tropopause. The coronograph picture, centered on 26.5 degrees E longitude and 63.0 degrees S latitude, shows that the aerosol layer peaks at a height of 48 plus or minus 1 km.

  1. Experimental investigation of an inversion technique for the determination of broadband duct mode amplitudes by the use of near-field sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Castres, Fabrice O; Joseph, Phillip F

    2007-08-01

    This paper is an experimental investigation of an inverse technique for deducing the amplitudes of the modes radiated from a turbofan engine, including schemes for stablizing the solution. The detection of broadband modes generated by a laboratory-scaled fan inlet is performed using a near-field array of microphones arranged in a geodesic geometry. This array geometry is shown to allow a robust and accurate modal inversion. The sound power radiated from the fan inlet and the coherence function between different modal amplitudes are also presented. The knowledge of such modal content is useful in helping to characterize the source mechanisms of fan broadband noise generation, for determining the most appropriate mode distribution model for duct liner predictions, and for making sound power measurements of the radiated sound field.

  2. Tomography and the Herglotz-Wiechert inverse formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, Robert L.

    1990-04-01

    In this paper, linearized tomography and the Herglotz-Wiechert inverse formulation are compared. Tomographic inversions for 2-D or 3-D velocity structure use line integrals along rays and can be written in terms of Radon transforms. For radially concentric structures, Radon transforms are shown to reduce to Abel transforms. Therefore, for straight ray paths, the Abel transform of travel-time is a tomographic algorithm specialized to a one-dimensional radially concentric medium. The Herglotz-Wiechert formulation uses seismic travel-time data to invert for one-dimensional earth structure and is derived using exact ray trajectories by applying an Abel transform. This is of historical interest since it would imply that a specialized tomographic-like algorithm has been used in seismology since the early part of the century (see Herglotz, 1907; Wiechert, 1910). Numerical examples are performed comparing the Herglotz-Wiechert algorithm and linearized tomography along straight rays. Since the Herglotz-Wiechert algorithm is applicable under specific conditions, (the absence of low velocity zones) to non-straight ray paths, the association with tomography may prove to be useful in assessing the uniqueness of tomographic results generalized to curved ray geometries.

  3. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; ...

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH 4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO 2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH 4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH 4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use themore » FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research and Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH 4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R 2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH 4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH 4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH 4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH 4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH 4/h in the SoCAB.« less

  4. An off-axis galaxy cluster merger: Abell 0141

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar, Turgay

    2018-04-01

    We present structural analysis results of Abell 0141 (z = 0.23) based on X-ray data. The X-ray luminosity map demonstrates that Abell 0141 (A0141) is a bimodal galaxy cluster, which is separated on the sky by ˜0.65 Mpc with an elongation along the north-south direction. The optical galaxy density map also demonstrates this bimodality. We estimate sub-cluster ICM temperatures of 5.17^{+0.20}_{-0.19} keV for A0141N and 5.23^{+0.24}_{-0.23} keV for A0141S. We obtain X-ray morphological parameters w = 0.034 ± 0.004, c = 0.113 ± 0.004, and w = 0.039 ± 0.004, c = 0.104 ± 0.005 for A0141N and A0141S, respectively. The resulting X-ray morphological parameters indicate that both sub-clusters are moderately disturbed non-cool core structures. We find a slight brightness jump in the bridge region, and yet, there is still an absence of strong X-ray emitting gas between sub-clusters. We discover a significantly hotspot (˜10 keV) between sub-clusters, and a Mach number M = 1.69^{+0.40}_{-0.37} is obtained by using the temperature jump condition. However, we did not find direct evidence for shock-heating between sub-clusters. We estimate the sub-clusters' central entropies as K0 > 100 keV cm2, which indicates that the sub-clusters are not cool cores. We find some evidence that the system undergoes an off-axis collision; however, the cores of each sub-clusters have not yet been destroyed. Due to the orientation of X-ray tails of sub-clusters, we suggest that the northern sub-cluster moves through the south-west direction, and the southern cluster moves through the north-east direction. In conclusion, we are witnessing an earlier phase of close core passage between sub-clusters.

  5. Oil encapsulation in core-shell alginate capsules by inverse gelation II: comparison between dripping techniques using W/O or O/W emulsions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Evandro; Poncelet, Denis; Rodrigues, Ramila Cristiane; Renard, Denis

    2017-09-01

    In the first part of this article, it was described an innovative method of oil encapsulation from dripping-inverse gelation using water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions. It was noticed that the method of oil encapsulation was quite different depending on the emulsion type (W/O or oil-in-water (O/W)) used and that the emulsion structure (W/O or O/W) had a high impact on the dripping technique and the capsules characteristics. The objective of this article was to elucidate the differences between the dripping techniques using both emulsions and compare the capsule properties (mechanical resistance and release of actives). The oil encapsulation using O/W emulsions was easier to perform and did not require the use of emulsion destabilisers. However, capsules produced from W/O emulsions were more resistant to compression and showed the slower release of actives over time. The findings detailed here widened the knowledge of the inverse gelation and gave opportunities to develop new techniques of oil encapsulation.

  6. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Spectrum of Abell 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaRoque, S. J.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Reese, E. D.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Joy, M.; Grego, L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present an interferometric measurement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) at 1 cm for the galaxy cluster Abell 2163. We combine this data point with previous measurements at 1.1, 1.4, and 2.1 mm from the SuZIE experiment to construct the most complete SZE spectrum to date. The intensity in four wavelength bands is fit to determine the Compton y-parameter (y(sub 0)) and the peculiar velocity (v(sub p)) for this cluster. Our results are y(sub 0) = 3.56((sup +0.41+0.27)(sub -0.41-0.19)) X 10(exp -4) and v(sub p) = 410((sup +1030+460) (sub -850-440)) km s(exp -1) where we list statistical and systematic uncertainties, respectively, at 68% confidence. These results include corrections for contamination by Galactic dust emission. We find less contamination by dust emission than previously reported. The dust emission is distributed over much larger angular scales than the cluster signal and contributes little to the measured signal when the details of the SZE observing strategy are taken into account.

  7. A series of shocks and edges in Abell 2219

    DOE PAGES

    Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; ...

    2016-09-22

    Here, we present deep, 170 ks, Chandra X-ray observations of Abell 2219 (z = 0.23), one of the hottest and most X-ray luminous clusters known, and which is experiencing a major merger event. We discover a ‘horseshoe’ of high-temperature gas surrounding the ram-pressure-stripped, bright, hot, X-ray cores. We confirm an X-ray shock front located north-west of the X-ray centroid and along the projected merger axis. We also find a second shock front to the south-east of the X-ray centroid making this only the second cluster where both the shock and reverse shock are confirmed with X-ray temperature measurements. We alsomore » present evidence for a possible sloshing cold front in the ‘remnant tail’ of one of the sub-cluster cores. The cold front and north-west shock front geometrically bound the radio halo and appear to be directly influencing the radio properties of the cluster.« less

  8. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Cooray, Asantha R.; Holzappel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect toward the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas distribution to be strongly aspherical, as do the X-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction in two ways. We first compare the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deprojecting the three-dimensional gas density distribution and deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods and find that they agree within the errors of the measurement. We discuss the possible system- atic errors in the gas mass fraction measurement and the constraints it places on the matter density parameter, Omega(sub M).

  9. Inversion of calcite twin data for paleostress orientations and magnitudes: A new technique tested and calibrated on numerically-generated and natural data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlangeau, Camille; Lacombe, Olivier; Schueller, Sylvie; Daniel, Jean-Marc

    2018-01-01

    The inversion of calcite twin data is a powerful tool to reconstruct paleostresses sustained by carbonate rocks during their geological history. Following Etchecopar's (1984) pioneering work, this study presents a new technique for the inversion of calcite twin data that reconstructs the 5 parameters of the deviatoric stress tensors from both monophase and polyphase twin datasets. The uncertainties in the parameters of the stress tensors reconstructed by this new technique are evaluated on numerically-generated datasets. The technique not only reliably defines the 5 parameters of the deviatoric stress tensor, but also reliably separates very close superimposed stress tensors (30° of difference in maximum principal stress orientation or switch between σ3 and σ2 axes). The technique is further shown to be robust to sampling bias and to slight variability in the critical resolved shear stress. Due to our still incomplete knowledge of the evolution of the critical resolved shear stress with grain size, our results show that it is recommended to analyze twin data subsets of homogeneous grain size to minimize possible errors, mainly those concerning differential stress values. The methodological uncertainty in principal stress orientations is about ± 10°; it is about ± 0.1 for the stress ratio. For differential stresses, the uncertainty is lower than ± 30%. Applying the technique to vein samples within Mesozoic limestones from the Monte Nero anticline (northern Apennines, Italy) demonstrates its ability to reliably detect and separate tectonically significant paleostress orientations and magnitudes from naturally deformed polyphase samples, hence to fingerprint the regional paleostresses of interest in tectonic studies.

  10. Stabilization of the total force in multi-finger pressing tasks studied with the ‘inverse piano’ technique

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J.R.; Budgeon, M.K.; Zatsiorsky, V.M.; Latash, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    When one finger changes its force, other fingers of the hand can show unintended force changes in the same direction (enslaving) and in the opposite direction (error compensation). We tested a hypothesis that externally imposed changes in finger force predominantly lead to error compensation effects in other fingers thus stabilizing the total force. A novel device, the “inverse piano”, was used to impose controlled displacements to one of the fingers over different magnitudes and at different rates. Subjects (n =10) pressed with four fingers at a constant force level and then one of the fingers was unexpectedly raised. The subjects were instructed not to interfere with possible changes in the finger forces. Raising a finger caused an increase in its force and a drop in the force of the other three fingers. Overall, total force showed a small increase. Larger force drops were seen in neighbors of the raised finger (proximity effect). The results show that multi-finger force stabilizing synergies dominate during involuntary reactions to externally imposed finger force changes. Within the referent configuration hypothesis, the data suggest that the instruction “not to interfere” leads to adjustments of the referent coordinates of all the individual fingers. PMID:21450360

  11. Redshifts in the Southern Abell Redshift Survey Clusters. I. The Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, M. J.; Quintana, H.; Infante, L.; Lambas, D. G.; Muriel, H.

    2005-11-01

    The Southern Abell Redshift Survey (SARS) contains 39 clusters of galaxies with redshifts in the range 0.021h (while avoiding the LMC and SMC), with |b|>40°. Cluster locations were chosen from the Abell and Abell-Corwin-Olowin catalogs, while galaxy positions were selected from the Automatic Plate Measuring Facility galaxy catalog with extinction-corrected magnitudes in the range 15<=bJ<19. SARS used the Las Campanas 2.5 m du Pont telescope, observing either 65 or 128 objects concurrently over a 1.5 deg2 field. New redshifts for 3440 galaxies are reported in the fields of these 39 clusters of galaxies.

  12. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of Camellia oleifera Abel components.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiaomei; He, Liangmei; Chen, Yayun; Wu, Longhuo; Wang, Lin; Liu, Zhiping

    2017-11-01

    Camellia oleifera Abel is a member of Camellia, and its seeds are used to extract Camellia oil, which is generally used as cooking oil in the south of China. Camellia oil consists of unsaturated fatty acids, tea polyphenol, squalene, saponin, carrot element and vitamins, etc. The seed remains after oil extraction of C. oleifera Abel are by-products of oil production, named as Camellia oil cake. Its extracts contain bioactive compounds including sasanquasaponin, flavonoid and tannin. Major components from Camellia oil and its cake have been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antimicrobial and antitumor activities. In this review, we will summarize the latest advance in the studies on anti-inflammatory or antioxidative effects of C. oleifera products, thus providing valuable reference for the future research and development of C. oleifera Abel.

  13. The determination of solubility and diffusion coefficient for solids in liquids by an inverse measurement technique using cylinders of amorphous glucose as a model compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chengyao; Huang, Pei

    2011-05-01

    The importance of sugar and sugar-containing materials is well recognized nowadays, owing to their application in industrial processes, particularly in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Because of the large numbers of those compounds involved and the relatively small number of solubility and/or diffusion coefficient data for each compound available, it is highly desirable to measure the solubility and/or diffusion coefficient as efficiently as possible and to be able to improve the accuracy of the methods used. In this work, a new technique was developed for the measurement of the diffusion coefficient of a stationary solid solute in a stagnant solvent which simultaneously measures solubility based on an inverse measurement problem algorithm with the real-time dissolved amount profile as a function of time. This study differs from established techniques in both the experimental method and the data analysis. The experimental method was developed in which the dissolved amount of solid solute in quiescent solvent was investigated using a continuous weighing technique. In the data analysis, the hybrid genetic algorithm is used to minimize an objective function containing a calculated and a measured dissolved amount with time. This is measured on a cylindrical sample of amorphous glucose in methanol or ethanol. The calculated dissolved amount, that is a function of the unknown physical properties of the solid solute in the solvent, is calculated by the solution of the two-dimensional nonlinear inverse natural convection problem. The estimated values of the solubility of amorphous glucose in methanol and ethanol at 293 K were respectively 32.1 g/100 g methanol and 1.48 g/100 g ethanol, in agreement with the literature values, and support the validity of the simultaneously measured diffusion coefficient. These results show the efficiency and the stability of the developed technique to simultaneously estimate the solubility and diffusion coefficient. Also

  14. Limit on graviton mass from galaxy cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shantanu

    2018-02-01

    To date, the only limit on graviton mass using galaxy clusters was obtained by Goldhaber and Nieto in 1974, using the fact that the orbits of galaxy clusters are bound and closed, and extend up to 580 kpc. From positing that only a Newtonian potential gives rise to such stable bound orbits, a limit on the graviton mass m_g<10^{-29} eV was obtained (PRD 9,1119, 1974). Recently, it has been shown that one can obtain closed bound orbits for Yukawa potential (arXiv:1705.02444), thus invalidating the main ansatz used in Goldhaber and Nieto to obtain the graviton mass bound. In order to obtain a revised estimate using galaxy clusters, we use dynamical mass models of the Abell 1689 (A1689) galaxy cluster to check their compatibility with a Yukawa gravitational potential. We assume mass models for the gas, dark matter, and galaxies for A1689 from arXiv:1703.10219 and arXiv:1610.01543, who used this cluster to test various alternate gravity theories, which dispense with the need for dark matter. We quantify the deviations in the acceleration profile using these mass models assuming a Yukawa potential and that obtained assuming a Newtonian potential by calculating the χ^2 residuals between the two profiles. Our estimated bound on the graviton mass (m_g) is thereby given by, m_g < 1.37 × 10^{-29} eV or in terms of the graviton Compton wavelength of, λ_g>9.1 × 10^{19} km at 90% confidence level.

  15. Gone with the Wind: Watching Galaxy Transformation in Abell 2125

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keel, W.; Owen, F.; Ledlow, M.; Wang, D.

    2003-12-01

    Dense environments clearly foster the transformation of galaxies, but it has proven difficult to untangle the roles of various processes in cluster environments. We have found a uniquely strong case for ongoing stripping of gas from the galaxy C153 in Abell 2125. The cluster, at z=0.25, includes merging subsystems with a relative line-of-sight velocity near 2000 km/s. C153, identified using the VLA as a strong radio source powered by star formation, is the brightest cluster member with activity of this kind, and part of the less populous blueshifted grouping. Several lines of evidence indicate that it is being swept by a stripping event. (1) A tail of ionized gas is seen in [O II] emission, which extends at least 70 kpc toward the cluster core, coinciding with a soft X-ray feature seen in the Chandra observations reported by Wang et al. (2) HST WFPC2 images reveal disturbed and clumpy morphology, including luminous star-forming complexes and chaotic dust features. (3) The spectral energy distribution and Gemini GMOS absorption-line spectrum indicate a massive burst of star formation ≈ 108 years ago superimposed on an older and much fainter population. (4) The stellar and gas kinematics are decoupled, with multiple gas velocity systems including counter-rotating components. The large velocity difference between the galaxy and (most of the) intracluster medium may contribute to the signatures being more prominent than hitherto seen. The starburst age is consistent with estimates of the time since the closest encounter of the major subsystems during the cluster-level merger. We continue to explore whether a starburst outflow or tidal damage has added to the role of stripping by the ICM, and how star formation has proceeded in the gas after leaving the galaxy disk. This work was supported by NASA through HST grant GO-07279.01-96A, and by the NSF through facilities at NRAO, Kitt Peak, and Gemini-North.

  16. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Le Métayer, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.lemetayer@univ-amu.fr; Saurel, Richard, E-mail: richard.saurel@univ-amu.fr; RS2N, 371 Chemin de Gaumin, 83640 Saint-Zacharie

    2016-04-15

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOSmore » named “Noble Abel stiffened gas,” this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular “Stiffened Gas (SG)” EOS. It is a combination of the so-called “Noble-Abel” and “stiffened gas” equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.« less

  17. Dynamical history of a binary cluster: Abell 3653

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar, Turgay; Hudaverdi, Murat

    2017-12-01

    We study the dynamical structure of a bimodal galaxy cluster Abell 3653 at z = 0.1089 using optical and X-ray data. Observations include archival data from the Anglo-Australian Telescope, X-ray observatories XMM-Newton and Chandra. We draw a global picture for A3653 using galaxy density, X-ray luminosity and temperature maps. The galaxy distribution has a regular morphological shape at the 3 Mpc size. The galaxy density map shows an elongation in the east-west direction, which perfectly aligns with the extended diffuse X-ray emission. We detect two dominant groups around the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). BCG1 (z = 0.1099) can be associated with the main cluster A3653E, and a foreground subcluster A3653W is concentrated at BCG2 (z = 0.1075). Both X-ray peaks are dislocated from the BCGs by ∼35 kpc, which suggest an ongoing merger process. We measure the subcluster gas temperatures of 4.67 and 3.66 keV, respectively. Two-body dynamical analysis shows that A3653E and A3653W are very likely gravitationally bound (93.5 per cent probability). The highly favoured scenario suggests that the two subclusters have a mass ratio of 1.4 and are colliding close to the plane of sky (α = 17.61°) at 2400 km s-1, and will undergo core passage in 380 Myr. The temperature map also significantly shows a shock-heated gas (6.16 keV) between the subclusters, which confirms the supersonic infalling scenario.

  18. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Holzapfel, William L.; Cooray, Asantha K.

    1999-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect towards the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas is strongly aspherical, on agreement with the morphology revealed by x-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction by comparing the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods. The Hubble constant derived for this cluster, when the known systematic uncertainties are included, has a very wide range of values and therefore does not provide additional constraints on the validity of the assumptions. We examine carefully the possible systematic errors in the gas fraction measurement. The gas fraction is a lower limit to the cluster's baryon fraction and so we compare the gas mass fraction, calibrated by numerical simulations to approximately the virial radius, to measurements of the global mass fraction of baryonic matter, OMEGA(sub B)/OMEGA(sub matter). Our lower limit to the cluster baryon fraction is f(sub B) = (0.043 +/- 0.014)/h (sub 100). From this, we derive an upper limit to the universal matter density, OMEGA(sub matter) <= 0.72/h(sub 100), and a likely value of OMEGA(sub matter) <= (0.44(sup 0.15, sub -0.12)/h(sub 100).

  19. A comparison of solute-transport solution techniques and their effect on sensitivity analysis and inverse modeling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Five common numerical techniques for solving the advection-dispersion equation (finite difference, predictor corrector, total variation diminishing, method of characteristics, and modified method of characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using discrete, randomly distributed, homogeneous blocks of five sand types. This experimental model provides an opportunity to compare the solution techniques: the heterogeneous hydraulic-conductivity distribution of known structure can be accurately represented by a numerical model, and detailed measurements can be compared with simulated concentrations and total flow through the tank. The present work uses this opportunity to investigate how three common types of results - simulated breakthrough curves, sensitivity analysis, and calibrated parameter values - change in this heterogeneous situation given the different methods of simulating solute transport. The breakthrough curves show that simulated peak concentrations, even at very fine grid spacings, varied between the techniques because of different amounts of numerical dispersion. Sensitivity-analysis results revealed: (1) a high correlation between hydraulic conductivity and porosity given the concentration and flow observations used, so that both could not be estimated; and (2) that the breakthrough curve data did not provide enough information to estimate individual values of dispersivity for the five sands. This study demonstrates that the choice of assigned dispersivity and the amount of numerical dispersion present in the solution technique influence estimated hydraulic conductivity values to a surprising degree.

  20. U(1)-invariant membranes: The geometric formulation, Abel, and pendulum differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltukhin, A. A.; Fysikum, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm; NORDITA, Roslagstullsbacken 23, 106 91 Stockholm

    The geometric approach to study the dynamics of U(1)-invariant membranes is developed. The approach reveals an important role of the Abel nonlinear differential equation of the first type with variable coefficients depending on time and one of the membrane extendedness parameters. The general solution of the Abel equation is constructed. Exact solutions of the whole system of membrane equations in the D=5 Minkowski space-time are found and classified. It is shown that if the radial component of the membrane world vector is only time dependent, then the dynamics is described by the pendulum equation.

  1. ParallABEL: an R library for generalized parallelization of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Sangket, Unitsa; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chantratita, Wasun; Tandayya, Pichaya; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2010-04-29

    Genome-Wide Association (GWA) analysis is a powerful method for identifying loci associated with complex traits and drug response. Parts of GWA analyses, especially those involving thousands of individuals and consuming hours to months, will benefit from parallel computation. It is arduous acquiring the necessary programming skills to correctly partition and distribute data, control and monitor tasks on clustered computers, and merge output files. Most components of GWA analysis can be divided into four groups based on the types of input data and statistical outputs. The first group contains statistics computed for a particular Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP), or trait, such as SNP characterization statistics or association test statistics. The input data of this group includes the SNPs/traits. The second group concerns statistics characterizing an individual in a study, for example, the summary statistics of genotype quality for each sample. The input data of this group includes individuals. The third group consists of pair-wise statistics derived from analyses between each pair of individuals in the study, for example genome-wide identity-by-state or genomic kinship analyses. The input data of this group includes pairs of SNPs/traits. The final group concerns pair-wise statistics derived for pairs of SNPs, such as the linkage disequilibrium characterisation. The input data of this group includes pairs of individuals. We developed the ParallABEL library, which utilizes the Rmpi library, to parallelize these four types of computations. ParallABEL library is not only aimed at GenABEL, but may also be employed to parallelize various GWA packages in R. The data set from the North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium (NARAC) includes 2,062 individuals with 545,080, SNPs' genotyping, was used to measure ParallABEL performance. Almost perfect speed-up was achieved for many types of analyses. For example, the computing time for the identity-by-state matrix was

  2. ParallABEL: an R library for generalized parallelization of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-Wide Association (GWA) analysis is a powerful method for identifying loci associated with complex traits and drug response. Parts of GWA analyses, especially those involving thousands of individuals and consuming hours to months, will benefit from parallel computation. It is arduous acquiring the necessary programming skills to correctly partition and distribute data, control and monitor tasks on clustered computers, and merge output files. Results Most components of GWA analysis can be divided into four groups based on the types of input data and statistical outputs. The first group contains statistics computed for a particular Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP), or trait, such as SNP characterization statistics or association test statistics. The input data of this group includes the SNPs/traits. The second group concerns statistics characterizing an individual in a study, for example, the summary statistics of genotype quality for each sample. The input data of this group includes individuals. The third group consists of pair-wise statistics derived from analyses between each pair of individuals in the study, for example genome-wide identity-by-state or genomic kinship analyses. The input data of this group includes pairs of SNPs/traits. The final group concerns pair-wise statistics derived for pairs of SNPs, such as the linkage disequilibrium characterisation. The input data of this group includes pairs of individuals. We developed the ParallABEL library, which utilizes the Rmpi library, to parallelize these four types of computations. ParallABEL library is not only aimed at GenABEL, but may also be employed to parallelize various GWA packages in R. The data set from the North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium (NARAC) includes 2,062 individuals with 545,080, SNPs' genotyping, was used to measure ParallABEL performance. Almost perfect speed-up was achieved for many types of analyses. For example, the computing time for the identity

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abell 315 spectroscopic dataset (Biviano+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biviano, A.; Popesso, P.; Dietrich, J. P.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Erfanianfar, G.; Romaniello, M.; Sartoris, B.

    2017-03-01

    Abell 315 was observed at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) with the VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph (VIMOS). The VIMOS data were acquired using 8 separate pointings, plus 2 additional pointings required to provide the needed redundancy within the central region and to cover the gaps between the VIMOS quadrants. Catalog of galaxies with redshifts in the region of the cluster Abell 315, with flags indicating whether these galaxies are members of the cluster, members of substructures within the cluster, and with probabilities for the cluster members to belong to the main cluster structure. (1 data file).

  4. Using the dGEMRIC technique to evaluate cartilage health in the presence of surgical hardware at 3T: comparison of inversion recovery and saturation recovery approaches.

    PubMed

    d'Entremont, Agnes G; Kolind, Shannon H; Mädler, Burkhard; Wilson, David R; MacKay, Alexander L

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of metal artifact reduction techniques on dGEMRIC T(1) calculation with surgical hardware present. We examined the effect of stainless-steel and titanium hardware on dGEMRIC T(1) maps. We tested two strategies to reduce metal artifact in dGEMRIC: (1) saturation recovery (SR) instead of inversion recovery (IR) and (2) applying the metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS), in a gadolinium-doped agarose gel phantom and in vivo with titanium hardware. T(1) maps were obtained using custom curve-fitting software and phantom ROIs were defined to compare conditions (metal, MARS, IR, SR). A large area of artifact appeared in phantom IR images with metal when T(I) ≤ 700 ms. IR maps with metal had additional artifact both in vivo and in the phantom (shifted null points, increased mean T(1) (+151 % IR ROI(artifact)) and decreased mean inversion efficiency (f; 0.45 ROI(artifact), versus 2 for perfect inversion)) compared to the SR maps (ROI(artifact): +13 % T(1) SR, 0.95 versus 1 for perfect excitation), however, SR produced noisier T(1) maps than IR (phantom SNR: 118 SR, 212 IR). MARS subtly reduced the extent of artifact in the phantom (IR and SR). dGEMRIC measurement in the presence of surgical hardware at 3T is possible with appropriately applied strategies. Measurements may work best in the presence of titanium and are severely limited with stainless steel. For regions near hardware where IR produces large artifacts making dGEMRIC analysis impossible, SR-MARS may allow dGEMRIC measurements. The position and size of the IR artifact is variable, and must be assessed for each implant/imaging set-up.

  5. A redshift survey of the strong-lensing cluster ABELL 383

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kurtz, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    Abell 383 is a famous rich cluster (z = 0.1887) imaged extensively as a basis for intensive strong- and weak-lensing studies. Nonetheless, there are few spectroscopic observations. We enable dynamical analyses by measuring 2360 new redshifts for galaxies with r {sub Petro} ≤ 20.5 and within 50' of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG; R.A.{sub 2000} = 42.°014125, decl.{sub 2000} = –03.°529228). We apply the caustic technique to identify 275 cluster members within 7 h {sup –1} Mpc of the hierarchical cluster center. The BCG lies within –11 ± 110 km s{sup –1} and 21 ± 56 h {sup –1} kpcmore » of the hierarchical cluster center; the velocity dispersion profile of the BCG appears to be an extension of the velocity dispersion profile based on cluster members. The distribution of cluster members on the sky corresponds impressively with the weak-lensing contours of Okabe et al. especially when the impact of foreground and background structure is included. The values of R {sub 200} = 1.22 ± 0.01 h {sup –1} Mpc and M {sub 200} = (5.07 ± 0.09) × 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} obtained by application of the caustic technique agree well with recent completely independent lensing measures. The caustic estimate extends direct measurement of the cluster mass profile to a radius of ∼5 h {sup –1} Mpc.« less

  6. Bootstrap inversion technique for atmospheric trace gas source detection and quantification using long open-path laser measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, Caroline B.; Ghosh, Subhomoy; Coburn, Sean; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Wright, Robert; Coddington, Ian; Rieker, Gregory B.; Prasad, Kuldeep

    2018-03-01

    Advances in natural gas extraction technology have led to increased activity in the production and transport sectors in the United States and, as a consequence, an increased need for reliable monitoring of methane leaks to the atmosphere. We present a statistical methodology in combination with an observing system for the detection and attribution of fugitive emissions of methane from distributed potential source location landscapes such as natural gas production sites. We measure long (> 500 m), integrated open-path concentrations of atmospheric methane using a dual frequency comb spectrometer and combine measurements with an atmospheric transport model to infer leak locations and strengths using a novel statistical method, the non-zero minimum bootstrap (NZMB). The new statistical method allows us to determine whether the empirical distribution of possible source strengths for a given location excludes zero. Using this information, we identify leaking source locations (i.e., natural gas wells) through rejection of the null hypothesis that the source is not leaking. The method is tested with a series of synthetic data inversions with varying measurement density and varying levels of model-data mismatch. It is also tested with field observations of (1) a non-leaking source location and (2) a source location where a controlled emission of 3.1 × 10-5 kg s-1 of methane gas is released over a period of several hours. This series of synthetic data tests and outdoor field observations using a controlled methane release demonstrates the viability of the approach for the detection and sizing of very small leaks of methane across large distances (4+ km2 in synthetic tests). The field tests demonstrate the ability to attribute small atmospheric enhancements of 17 ppb to the emitting source location against a background of combined atmospheric (e.g., background methane variability) and measurement uncertainty of 5 ppb (1σ), when measurements are averaged over 2 min. The

  7. Crazy heart: kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, R.; Richtler, T.; West, M. J.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Lloyd-Davies, E.; Schuberth, Y.

    2011-04-01

    We study the structure and internal kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545 - a low surface brightness structure lying in the center of the cluster. We have obtained deep long-slit spectroscopy of the star pile using VLT/FORS2 and Gemini/GMOS, which is analyzed in conjunction with deep multiband CFHT/MEGACAM imaging. As presented in a previous study the star pile has a flat luminosity profile and its color is consistent with the outer parts of elliptical galaxies. Its velocity map is irregular, with parts being seemingly associated with an embedded nucleus, and others which have significant velocity offsets to the cluster systemic velocity with no clear kinematical connection to any of the surrounding galaxies. This would make the star pile a dynamically defined stellar intra-cluster component. The complicated pattern in velocity and velocity dispersions casts doubts on the adequacy of using the whole star pile as a dynamical test for the innermost dark matter profile of the cluster. This status is fulfilled only by the nucleus and its nearest surroundings which lie at the center of the cluster velocity distribution. Based on observations taken at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, under programme ID 080.B-0529. Also based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and SECYT (Argentina); and on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National

  8. Metallicity Gradients in the Intracluster Gas of Abell 496

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato A.; White, Raymond E., III

    2000-07-01

    Analysis of spatially resolved ASCA spectra of the intracluster gas in Abell 496 confirms there are mild metal abundance enhancements near the center, as previously found in a joint analysis of spectra from Ginga Large Area Counter and Einstein solid state spectrometer. Simultaneous analysis of spectra from all ASCA instruments (SIS+GIS) shows that the iron abundance is 0.36+/-0.03 solar 3'-12' from the center of the cluster and rises ~50% to 0.53+/-0.04 solar within the central 2'. The F-test shows that this abundance gradient is significant at the more than 99.99% level. Nickel and sulfur abundances are also centrally enhanced. We use a variety of elemental abundance ratios to assess the relative contribution of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and Type II supernovae (SNe II) to the metal enrichment of the intracluster gas. We find spatial gradients in several abundance ratios, indicating that the fraction of iron from SNe Ia increases toward the cluster center, with SNe Ia accounting for ~50% of the iron mass 3'-12' from the center and ~70% within 2'. The increased proportion of SN Ia ejecta at the center is such that the central iron abundance enhancement can be attributed wholly to SNe Ia; we find no significant gradient in SN II ejecta. These spatial gradients in the proportion of SN Ia/II ejecta imply that the dominant metal enrichment mechanism near the center is different than in the outer parts of the cluster. We show that the central abundance enhancement is unlikely to be due to ram pressure stripping of gas from cluster galaxies or to secularly accumulated stellar mass loss within the central cD. We suggest that the additional SN Ia ejecta near the center is the vestige of a secondary SN Ia-driven wind from the cD (following a more energetic protogalactic SN II-driven wind phase), which was partially smothered in the cD due to its location at the cluster center.

  9. Abyssal BEnthic Laboratory (ABEL): a novel approach for long-term investigation at abyssal depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, M.; Gasparoni, F.; Capobianco, M.

    1995-03-01

    This study assesses the feasibility of a configuration for a benthic underwater system, called ABEL (Abyssal BEnthic Laboratory), capable of operating both under controlled and autonomous modes for periods of several months to over one year at abyssal depths up to 6000 m. A network of stations, capable of different configurations, has been identified as satisfying the widest range of scientific expectations, and at the same time to address the technological challenge to increase the feasibility of scientific investigations, even when the need is not yet well specified. The overall system consists of a central Benthic Investigation Laboratory, devoted to the execution of the most complex scientific activities, with fixed Satellite Stations acting as nodes of a measuring network and a Mobile Station extending ABEL capabilities with the possibility to carry out surveys over the investigation area and interventions on the fixed stations. ABEL architecture also includes a dedicated deployment and recovery module, as well as sea-surface and land-based facilities. Such an installation constitutes the sea-floor equivalent of a meteorological or geophysical laboratory. Attention has been paid to selecting investigation tools supporting the ABEL system to carry out its mission with high operativity and minimal risk and environmental impact. This demands technologies to enable presence and operation at abyssal depths for the required period of time. Presence can be guaranteed by proper choice of power supply and communication systems. Operations require visual and manipulative capabilities, as well as deployment and retrieval capabilities. Advanced control system architectures must be considered, along with knowledge based approaches, to comply with the requirements for autonomous control. The results of this investigation demonstrate the feasibility of the ABEL concept and the pre-dimensioning of its main components.

  10. Multi-quadrant biopsy technique improves diagnostic ability in large heterogeneous renal masses. Abel EJ, Heckman JE, Hinshaw L, Best S, Lubner M, Jarrard DF, Downs TM, Nakada SY, Lee FT Jr, Huang W, Ziemlewicz T.J Urol. 2015 Oct;194(4):886-91. [Epub 2015 Mar 30]. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2015.03.106.

    PubMed

    Jay, Raman; Heckman, J E; Hinshaw, L; Best, S; Lubner, M; Jarrard, D F; Downs, T M; Nakada, S Y; Lee, F T; Huang, W; Ziemlewicz, T

    2017-03-01

    Percutaneous biopsy obtained from a single location is prone to sampling error in large heterogeneous renal masses, leading to nondiagnostic results or failure to detect poor prognostic features. We evaluated the accuracy of percutaneous biopsy for large renal masses using a modified multi-quadrant technique vs. a standard biopsy technique. Clinical and pathological data for all patients with cT2 or greater renal masses who underwent percutaneous biopsy from 2009 to 2014 were reviewed. The multi-quadrant technique was defined as multiple core biopsies from at least 4 separate solid enhancing areas in the tumor. The incidence of nondiagnostic findings, sarcomatoid features and procedural complications was recorded, and concordance between biopsy specimens and nephrectomy pathology was compared. A total of 122 biopsies were performed for 117 tumors in 116 patients (46 using the standard biopsy technique and 76 using the multi-quadrant technique). Median tumor size was 10cm (IQR: 8-12). Biopsy was nondiagnostic in 5 of 46 (10.9%) standard and 0 of 76 (0%) multi-quadrant biopsies (P = 0.007). Renal cell carcinoma was identified in 96 of 115 (82.0%) tumors and nonrenal cell carcinoma tumors were identified in 21 (18.0%). One complication occurred using the standard biopsy technique and no complications were reported using the multi-quadrant technique. Sarcomatoid features were present in 23 of 96 (23.9%) large renal cell carcinomas studied. Sensitivity for identifying sarcomatoid features was higher using the multi-quadrant technique compared to the standard biopsy technique at 13 of 15 (86.7%) vs. 2 of 8 (25.0%) (P = 0.0062). The multi-quadrant percutaneous biopsy technique increases the ability to identify aggressive pathological features in large renal tumors and decreases nondiagnostic biopsy rates. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Parametric strong gravitational lensing analysis of Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halkola, A.; Seitz, S.; Pannella, M.

    2006-11-01

    We have derived the mass distribution of galaxy cluster Abell 1689 within 0.3h-170Mpc of the cluster centre using its strong lensing (SL) effect on 32 background galaxies, which are mapped in altogether 107 multiple images. The multiple images are based on some from the literature with modifications to both include new and exclude some of the original image systems. The cluster profile is explored further out to ~2.5h-170Mpc with weak lensing (WL) shear measurements from the literature. The masses of ~200 cluster galaxies are measured with the Fundamental Plane (FP) in order to model accurately the small-scale mass structure in the cluster. The cluster galaxies are modelled as elliptical truncated isothermal spheres. The scalings of the truncation radii with the velocity dispersions of galaxies are assumed to match those of: (i) field galaxies; and (ii) theoretical expectations for galaxies in dense environments. The dark matter (DM) component of the cluster is described by either non-singular isothermal ellipsoids (NSIE) or elliptical versions of the universal DM profile (elliptical Navarro, Frenk & White, ENFW). To account for substructure in the DM we allow for two DM haloes. The fitting of a non-singular isothermal sphere (NSIS) to the smooth DM component results in a velocity dispersion of 1450+39-31kms-1 and a core radius of 77+10-8h-170kpc, while a Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) profile has an r200 of 2.86 +/- 0.16h-170Mpc (M200 = 3.2 × 1015Msolarh70) and a concentration of 4.7+0.6-0.5. The total mass profile is well described by either a NSIS profile with σ = 1514+18-17kms-1 and a core radius of rc = 71 +/- 5h-170kpc, or an NFW profile with C = 6.0 +/- 0.5 and r200 = 2.82 +/- 0.11h-170Mpc (M200 = 3.0 × 1015Msolarh70). The errors are assumed to be due to the error in assigning masses to the individual galaxies in the galaxy component. Their small size is due to the very strong constraints imposed by multiple images and the ability of the smooth DM component

  12. Application of a XMM-Newton EPIC Monte Carlo to Analysis And Interpretation of Data for Abell 1689, RXJ0658-55 And the Centaurus Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Karl E.; /Stockholm U. /SLAC; Peterson, J.R.

    2007-04-17

    We propose a new Monte Carlo method to study extended X-ray sources with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard XMM Newton. The Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI) technique, described in a companion paper, is applied here to the EPIC data for the clusters of galaxies Abell 1689, Centaurus and RXJ 0658-55 (the ''bullet cluster''). We aim to show the advantages of this method of simultaneous spectral-spatial modeling over traditional X-ray spectral analysis. In Abell 1689 we confirm our earlier findings about structure in temperature distribution and produce a high resolution temperature map. We also confirm our findings about velocity structuremore » within the gas. In the bullet cluster, RXJ 0658-55, we produce the highest resolution temperature map ever to be published of this cluster allowing us to trace what looks like the motion of the bullet in the cluster. We even detect a south to north temperature gradient within the bullet itself. In the Centaurus cluster we detect, by dividing up the luminosity of the cluster in bands of gas temperatures, a striking feature to the north-east of the cluster core. We hypothesize that this feature is caused by a subcluster left over from a substantial merger that slightly displaced the core. We conclude that our method is very powerful in determining the spatial distributions of plasma temperatures and very useful for systematic studies in cluster structure.« less

  13. UV Observations of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1795 with the Optical Monitor on XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittaz, J. P. D.; Kaastra, J. S.; Tamura, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, F.; Peterson, J. R.; Ikebe, Y.; Lumb, D. H.; Paerels, F.; Stewart, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of broad band UV observations of the central regions of Abell 1795 observed with the optical monitor on XMM-Newton. As have been found with other UV observations of the central regions of clusters of galaxies, we find evidence for star formation. However, we also find evidence for absorption in the cD galaxy on a more extended scale than has been seen with optical imaging. We also report the first UV observation of part of the filamentary structure seen in H-alpha, X-rays and very deep U band imaging. The part of the filament we see is very blue with UV colours consistent with a very early (O/B) stellar population. This is the first direct evidence of a dominant population of early type stars at the centre of Abell 1795 and implies very recent star formation. The relationship of this emission to emission at other wavebands is discussed.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Halpha measurements in Abell 2465 (Wegner+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, G. A.; Chu, D. S.; Hwang, H. S.

    2015-07-01

    The wavelength of the Hα line at the redshift of Abell 2465 is near 817nm in a clear spectral region between the many telluric emission lines. A custom narrow-band filter for observing Hα was obtained from the Andover Corp. It has a peak transmission at 817.7nm (m817) and a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 8.77nm. The wide filter was a Gunn i (ig) filter with nearly the same central wavelength of 820nm and a FWHM of 185nm, and was manufactured by Custom Scientific. Hα observations of Abell 2465 were obtained 2012 September 19-23 using the 2.4m Hiltner telescope at the MDM Observatory on Kitt Peak. The 'Nellie' CCD was used. (1 data file).

  15. Topology in two dimensions. II - The Abell and ACO cluster catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plionis, Manolis; Valdarnini, Riccardo; Coles, Peter

    1992-09-01

    We apply a method for quantifying the topology of projected galaxy clustering to the Abell and ACO catalogues of rich clusters. We use numerical simulations to quantify the statistical bias involved in using high peaks to define the large-scale structure, and we use the results obtained to correct our observational determinations for this known selection effect and also for possible errors introduced by boundary effects. We find that the Abell cluster sample is consistent with clusters being identified with high peaks of a Gaussian random field, but that the ACO shows a slight meatball shift away from the Gaussian behavior over and above that expected purely from the high-peak selection. The most conservative explanation of this effect is that it is caused by some artefact of the procedure used to select the clusters in the two samples.

  16. The nature of the driving mechanism in the pulsating hybrid PG 1159 star Abell 43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, P.-O.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2005-10-01

    We extend our previous pulsational stability analyses of PG 1159 stars by modeling the hybrid PG 1159 type star Abell 43. We show that the standard κ-mechanism due to the ionization of C and O in the envelope of this H-rich PG 1159 star is perfectly able to drive g-mode pulsations. Thus, contrary to a recent suggestion, there is no need to invoke any new or exotic mechanism to explain the pulsational instabilities observed in this particular star. Our expected instability band for l=1 modes extends in period from ~2604 s to ~5529 s, which is consistent with the available photometric observations of Abell 43. We also suggest that efforts to detect luminosity variations in its sibling NGC 7094 be pursued.

  17. Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic (ABEL) Trapping of Single High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockenhauer, Samuel; Furstenberg, Alexandre; Wang, Quan; Devree, Brian; Jie Yao, Xiao; Bokoch, Michael; Kobilka, Brian; Sunahara, Roger; Moerner, W. E.

    2010-03-01

    The ABEL trap is a novel device for trapping single biomolecules in solution for extended observation. The trap estimates the position of a fluorescently-labeled object as small as ˜10 nm in solution and then applies a feedback electrokinetic drift every 20 us to trap the object by canceling its Brownian motion. We use the ABEL trap to study HDL particles at the single-copy level. HDL particles, essential in regulation of ``good'' cholesterol in humans, comprise a small (˜10 nm) lipid bilayer disc bounded by a belt of apolipoproteins. By engineering HDL particles with single fluorescent donor/acceptor probes and varying lipid compositions, we are working to study lipid diffusion on small length scales. We also use HDL particles as hosts for single transmembrane receptors, which should enable study of receptor conformational dynamics on long timescales.

  18. Abell 1763: A Giant Gas Sloshing Spiral But No Cool Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Edmund

    2017-09-01

    We propose a 76 ksec observation of the z=0.23 galaxy cluster Abell 1763. Previous Chandra data reveals the system as host to a large 950 kpc gas sloshing spiral. Atypical of spiral-hosting clusters, an intact cool core is not detected. Its absence suggests the interaction has led to significant disruption since the onset of core sloshing. The primary cluster is accompanied by two X-ray emitting subsystems. Given the orientation of the spiral, both systems are strong candidates for being the perturber responsible for its formation. Abell 1763 provides us with the rare opportunity to examine an infall event (primary + perturber) resulting in sloshing to the point of core disintegration. Detailed analysis will be performed on the disrupted core, the spiral, and the perturber candidates.

  19. RELICS Discovery of a Probable Lens-magnified SN behind Galaxy Cluster Abell 1763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, S.; Coe, D.; Bradley, L.; Strolger, L.; Brammer, G.; Avila, R.; Ryan, R.; Ogaz, S.; Riess, A.; Sharon, K.; Johnson, T.; Paterno-Mahler, R.; Molino, A.; Graham, M.; Kelly, P.; Filippenko, A.; Frye, B.; Foley, R.; Schmidt, K.; Umetsu, K.; Czakon, N.; Weiner, B.; Stark, D.; Mainali, R.; Zitrin, A.; Sendra, I.; Graur, O.; Grillo, C.; Hjorth, J.; Selsing, J.; Christensen, L.; Rosati, P.; Nonino, M.; Balestra, I.; Vulcani, B.; McCully, C.; Dawson, W.; Bouwens, R.; Lam, D.; Trenti, M.; Nunez, D. Carrasco; Matheson, T.; Merten, J.; Jha, S.; Jones, C.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Salmon, B.; Bradac, M.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.; Wang, X.; Oesch, P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of a likely supernova (SN) in the background field of the galaxy cluster Abell 1763 (a.k.a. RXC J1335.3+4059, ZwCl 1333.7+4117). The SN candidate was detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations collected on June 17, 2016 as part of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS, HST program ID: 14096, PI: D.Coe).

  20. Statistical analysis of catalogs of extragalactic objects. II - The Abell catalog of rich clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, M. G.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a power-spectrum analysis are presented for the distribution of clusters in the Abell catalog. Clear and direct evidence is found for superclusters with small angular scale, in agreement with the recent study of Bogart and Wagoner (1973). It is also found that the degree and angular scale of the apparent superclustering varies with distance in the manner expected if the clustering is intrinsic to the spatial distribution rather than a consequence of patchy local obscuration.

  1. UV spectroscopy including ISM line absorption: of the exciting star of Abell 35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, M.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Kruk, J. W.

    Reliable spectral analysis that is based on high-resolution UV observations requires an adequate, simultaneous modeling of the interstellar line absorption and reddening. In the case of the central star of the planetary nebula Abell 35, BD-22 3467, we demonstrate our current standard spectral-analysis method that is based on the Tübingen NLTE Model-Atmosphere Package (TMAP). We present an on- going spectral analysis of FUSE and HST/STIS observations of BD-22 3467.

  2. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  3. Deep Chandra Observations of Abell 586: A Remarkably Relaxed Non-Cool-Core Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richstein, Hannah; Su, Yuanyuan

    2018-01-01

    The dichotomy between cool-core and non-cool-core clusters has been a lasting perplexity in extragalactic astronomy. Nascent cores in non-cool-core clusters may have been disrupted by major mergers, yet the dichotomy cannot be reproduced in cosmology simulations. We present deep Chandra observations of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 586, which resides at z=0.17, thus allowing its gas properties to be measured out to its virial radius. Abell 586 appears remarkably relaxed with a nearly spherical X-ray surface brightness distribution and without any offset between its X-ray and optical centroids. We measure that its temperature profile does not decrease towards the cluster center and its central entropy stays above 100 keV cm2. A non-cool-core emerges in Abell 586 in the absence of any disruptions on the large scale. Our study demonstrates that non-cool-core clusters can be formed without major mergers. The origins of some non-cool-core clusters may be related to conduction, AGN feedback, or preheating.The SAO REU program is funded by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant AST-1659473, and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  4. PredictABEL: an R package for the assessment of risk prediction models.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Aulchenko, Yurii S; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Janssens, A Cecile J W

    2011-04-01

    The rapid identification of genetic markers for multifactorial diseases from genome-wide association studies is fuelling interest in investigating the predictive ability and health care utility of genetic risk models. Various measures are available for the assessment of risk prediction models, each addressing a different aspect of performance and utility. We developed PredictABEL, a package in R that covers descriptive tables, measures and figures that are used in the analysis of risk prediction studies such as measures of model fit, predictive ability and clinical utility, and risk distributions, calibration plot and the receiver operating characteristic plot. Tables and figures are saved as separate files in a user-specified format, which include publication-quality EPS and TIFF formats. All figures are available in a ready-made layout, but they can be customized to the preferences of the user. The package has been developed for the analysis of genetic risk prediction studies, but can also be used for studies that only include non-genetic risk factors. PredictABEL is freely available at the websites of GenABEL ( http://www.genabel.org ) and CRAN ( http://cran.r-project.org/).

  5. Abell 48 - a rare WN-type central star of a planetary nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, H.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Hamann, W.-R.; Buckley, D.; Crause, L.; Crawford, S. M.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Hettlage, C.; Hooper, E.; Husser, T.-O.; Kotze, P.; Loaring, N.; Nordsieck, K. H.; O'Donoghue, D.; Pickering, T.; Potter, S.; Romero-Colmenero, E.; Vaisanen, P.; Williams, T.; Wolf, M.

    2013-04-01

    A considerable fraction of the central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) are hydrogen-deficient. Almost all of these H-deficient central stars (CSs) display spectra with strong carbon and helium lines. Most of them exhibit emission-line spectra resembling those of massive WC stars. Therefore these stars are classed as CSPNe of spectral type [WC]. Recently, quantitative spectral analysis of two emission-line CSs, PB 8 and IC 4663, revealed that these stars do not belong to the [WC] class. Instead PB 8 has been classified as [WN/WC] type and IC 4663 as [WN] type. In this work we report the spectroscopic identification of another rare [WN] star, the CS of Abell 48. We performed a spectral analysis of Abell 48 with the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) models for expanding atmospheres. We find that the expanding atmosphere of Abell 48 is mainly composed of helium (85 per cent by mass), hydrogen (10 per cent) and nitrogen (5 per cent). The residual hydrogen and the enhanced nitrogen abundance make this object different from the other [WN] star IC 4663. We discuss the possible origin of this atmospheric composition.

  6. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software

    PubMed Central

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the ’omics’ context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  7. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software.

    PubMed

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the 'omics' context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL.

  8. Evidence for an extensive intracluster medium from radio observations of distant Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisch, R. J.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Observations have been made of 18 distance class 5 and 6 Abell clusters of galaxies using the VLA in its 'C' configuration at a frequency of 1460 MHz. Half of the clusters in the sample are confirmed or probable sources of X-ray emission. All the detected radio sources with flux densities above 10 mJy are reported, and information is provided concerning the angular extent of the sources, as well as the most likely optical identification. The existence of an extensive intracluster medium is inferred by identifying extended/distorted radio sources with galaxies whose apparent magnitudes are consistent with their being cluster members and that are at projected distances of 3-4 Abell radii (6-8 Mpc) from the nearest cluster center. By requiring that the radio sources are confined by the ambient medium, the ambient density is calculated and the total cluster mass is estimated. As a sample calculation, a wide-angle-tail radio source some 5 Mpc from the center of Abell 348 is used to estimate these quantities.

  9. Diffuse light and building history of the galaxy cluster Abell 2667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covone, G.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Kneib, J.-P.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Slezak, E.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.We searched for diffuse intracluster light in the galaxy cluster Abell 2667 (z=0.233) from HST images in three broad band-filters. Methods: .We applied an iterative multi-scale wavelet analysis and reconstruction technique to these images, which allows to subtract stars and galaxies from the original images. Results: .We detect a zone of diffuse emission southwest of the cluster center (DS1) and a second faint object (ComDif) within DS1. Another diffuse source (DS2) may be detected at lower confidence level northeast of the center. These sources of diffuse light contribute to 10-15% of the total visible light in the cluster. Whether they are independent entities or part of the very elliptical external envelope of the central galaxy remains unclear. Deep VLT VIMOS integral field spectroscopy reveals a faint continuum at the positions of DS1 and ComDif but do not allow a redshift to be computed, so we conclude if these sources are part of the central galaxy or not. A hierarchical substructure detection method reveals the presence of several galaxy pairs and groups defining a similar direction to the one drawn by the DS1 - central galaxy - DS2 axis. The analysis of archive XMM-Newton and Chandra observations shows X-ray emission elongated in the same direction. The X-ray temperature map shows the presence of a cool core, a broad cool zone stretching from north to south, and hotter regions towards the northeast, southwest, and northwest. This might suggest shock fronts along these directions produced by infalling material, even if uncertainties remain quite large on the temperature determination far from the center. Conclusions: .These various data are consistent with a picture in which diffuse sources are concentrations of tidal debris and harassed matter expelled from infalling galaxies by tidal stripping and undergoing an accretion process onto the central cluster galaxy; as such, they are expected to be found along the main infall directions. Note, however

  10. X-ray emission from a complete sample of Abell clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briel, Ulrich G.; Henry, J. Patrick

    1993-11-01

    The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) is used to investigate the X-ray properties of a complete sample of Abell clusters with measured redshifts and accurate positions. The sample comprises the 145 clusters within a 561 square degree region at high galactic latitude. The mean redshift is 0.17. This sample is especially well suited to be studied within the RASS since the mean exposure time is higher than average and the mean galactic column density is very low. These together produce a flux limit of about 4.2 x 10-13 erg/sq cm/s in the 0.5 to 2.5 keV energy band. Sixty-six (46%) individual clusters are detected at a significance level higher than 99.7% of which 7 could be chance coincidences of background or foreground sources. At redshifts greater than 0.3 six clusters out of seven (86%) are detected at the same significance level. The detected objects show a clear X-ray luminosity -- galaxy count relation with a dispersion consistent with other external estimates of the error in the counts. By analyzing the excess of positive fluctuations of the X-ray flux at the cluster positions, compared with the fluctuations of randomly drawn background fields, it is possible to extend these results below the nominal flux limit. We find 80% of richness R greater than or = 0 and 86% of R greater than or = 1 clusters are X-ray emitters with fluxes above 1 x 10-13 erg/sq cm/s. Nearly 90% of the clusters meeting the requirements to be in Abell's statistical sample emit above the same level. We therefore conclude that almost all Abell clusters are real clusters and the Abell catalog is not strongly contaminated by projection effects. We use the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator to calculate the cumulative X-ray luminosity function. We show that the shape of the luminosity functions are similiar for different richness classes, but the characteristic luminosities of richness 2 clusters are about twice those of richness 1 clusters which are in turn about twice those of richness 0

  11. Tomographic inversion of satellite photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Hays, P. B.; Abreu, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    An inversion algorithm capable of reconstructing the volume emission rate of thermospheric airglow features from satellite photometry has been developed. The accuracy and resolution of this technique are investigated using simulated data, and the inversions of several sets of observations taken by the Visible Airglow Experiment are presented.

  12. Electromagnetic inverse scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bojarski, N. N.

    1972-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic inverse scattering identity, based on the physical optics approximation, is developed for the monostatic scattered far field cross section of perfect conductors. Uniqueness of this inverse identity is proven. This identity requires complete scattering information for all frequencies and aspect angles. A nonsingular integral equation is developed for the arbitrary case of incomplete frequence and/or aspect angle scattering information. A general closed-form solution to this integral equation is developed, which yields the shape of the scatterer from such incomplete information. A specific practical radar solution is presented. The resolution of this solution is developed, yielding short-pulse target resolution radar system parameter equations. The special cases of two- and one-dimensional inverse scattering and the special case of a priori knowledge of scatterer symmetry are treated in some detail. The merits of this solution over the conventional radar imaging technique are discussed.

  13. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  14. Color Dispersion as an Indicator of Stellar Population Complexity: Insights from the Pixel Color–Magnitude Diagrams of 32 Bright Galaxies in Abell 1139 and Abell 2589

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Hyeop; Pak, Mina; Lee, Hye-Ran; Oh, Sree

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the properties of bright galaxies of various morphological types in Abell 1139 and Abell 2589, using pixel color–magnitude diagram (pCMD) analysis. The sample contains 32 galaxies brighter than M r = ‑21.3 mag with spectroscopic redshifts, which are deeply imaged in the g and r bands using the MegaCam mounted on the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope. After masking contaminants with two-step procedures, we examine how the detailed properties in the pCMDs depend on galaxy morphology and infrared color. The mean g ‑ r color as a function of surface brightness (μ r ) in the pCMD of a galaxy shows good performance in distinguishing between early- and late-type galaxies, but it is not perfect because of the similarity between elliptical galaxies and bulge-dominated spiral galaxies. On the other hand, the g ‑ r color dispersion as a function of μ r works better. We find that the best set of parameters for galaxy classification is a combination of the minimum color dispersion at μ r ≤ 21.2 mag arcsec‑2 and the maximum color dispersion at 20.0 ≤ μ r ≤ 21.0 mag arcsec‑2 the latter reflects the complexity of stellar populations at the disk component in a typical spiral galaxy. Finally, the color dispersion measurements of an elliptical galaxy appear to be correlated with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared color ([4.6]–[12]). This indicates that the complexity of stellar populations in an elliptical galaxy is related to its recent star formation activities. From this observational evidence, we infer that gas-rich minor mergers or gas interactions may have usually occurred during the recent growth of massive elliptical galaxies.

  15. Pixel Color–Magnitude Diagram Analysis of the Brightest Cluster Galaxies in Dynamically Young and Old Clusters Abell 1139 and Abell 2589

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Hyeop; Oh, Sree; Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Kyeong, Jaemann; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2017-07-01

    As a case study to understand the coevolution of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) and their host clusters, we investigate the BCGs in dynamically young and old clusters Abell 1139 (A1139) and Abell 2589 (A2589). We analyze the pixel color–magnitude diagrams (pCMDs) using deep g- and r-band images, obtained from the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope observations. After masking foreground/background objects and smoothing pixels in consideration of the observational seeing size, detailed pCMD features are compared between the two BCGs. (1) Although the overall shapes of the pCMDs are similar to those of typical early-type galaxies, the A2589-BCG tends to have redder mean pixel color and smaller pixel color deviation at given surface brightness than the A1139-BCG. (2) The mean pixel color distribution as a function of pixel surface brightness (pCMD backbone) indicates that the A2589-BCG formed a larger central body (∼2.0 kpc in radius) via major dry mergers at an early epoch than the A1139-BCG (a central body ∼1.3 kpc in radius), whereas they have grown commonly in subsequent minor mergers. (3) The spatial distributions of the pCMD outliers reveal that the A1139-BCG experienced considerable tidal events more recently than the A2589-BCG, whereas the A2589-BCG has an asymmetric compact core, possibly resulting from a major dry merger at an early epoch. (4) The A2589-BCG shows a very large faint-to-bright pixel number ratio, compared to early-type non-BCGs, whereas the ratio for the A1139-BCG is not distinctively large. These results are consistent with the idea that the BCG in the dynamically older cluster (A2589) formed earlier and is better relaxed.

  16. Mystery solved: discovery of extended radio emission in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Gendron-Marsolais, M.-L.; Fecteau-Beaucage, D.; van Weeren, R. J.; Russell, H. R.; Edge, A.; Olamaie, M.; Rumsey, C.; King, L.; Fabian, A. C.; McNamara, B.; Hogan, M.; Mezcua, M.; Taylor, G.

    2018-04-01

    Abell 2146 (z = 0.232) is a massive galaxy cluster currently undergoing a spectacular merger in the plane of the sky with a bullet-like morphology. It was the first system in which both the bow and upstream shock fronts were detected at X-ray wavelengths (Mach ˜2), yet deep Giant MetreWave Telescope 325 MHz observations failed to detect extended radio emission associated with the cluster as is typically seen in such systems. We present new, multiconfiguration 1-2 GHz Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of Abell 2146 totalling 16 h of observations. These data reveal for the first time the presence of an extended (≈850 kpc), faint radio structure associated with Abell 2146. The structure appears to harbour multiple components, one associated with the upstream shock that we classify as a radio relic and one associated with the subcluster core that is consisted as being a radio halo bounded by the bow shock. The newly detected structures have some of the lowest radio powers detected thus far in any cluster (P1.4 GHz, halo = 2.4 ± 0.2 × 1023 W Hz-1 and P1.4 GHz, relic = 2.2 ± 0.2 × 1023 W Hz-1). The flux measurement of the halo, as well as its morphology, also suggests that the halo was recently created (≈0.3 Gyr after core passage), consistent with the dynamical state of the cluster. These observations demonstrate the capacity of the upgraded VLA to detect extremely faint and extended radio structures. Based on these observations, we predict that many more radio relics and radio haloes in merging clusters should be detected by future radio facilities such as the Square Kilometre Array.

  17. Shocks and Bubbles in a Deep Chandra Observation of the Cooling Flow Cluster Abell 2052

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    the bubble rims related to radio source outbursts have been found in a few clusters including M87/ Virgo (Forman et al. 2005), Hydra A (Nulsen et al...Printed in the U.S.A. SHOCKS AND BUBBLES IN A DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF THE COOLING FLOW CLUSTER ABELL 2052 E. L. Blanton1, S. W. Randall2, E. M...Douglass1, C. L. Sarazin3, T. E. Clarke4,5, and B. R. McNamara2,6,7 1 Institute for Astrophysical Research , Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue

  18. Abell 2069 - An X-ray cluster of galaxies with multiple subcondensations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Stocke, J.; Steiner, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray and optical observations of the cluster Abell 2069 are presented. The cluster is at a mean redshift of 0.116. The cluster shows multiple condensations in both the X-ray emission and in the galaxy surface density and, thus, does not appear to be relaxed. There is a close correspondence between the gas and galaxy distributions which indicates that the galaxies in this system do map the mass distribution, contrary to what might be expected if low-mass neutrinos dominate the cluster mass.

  19. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  20. Revisiting Abell 2744: a powerful synergy of GLASS spectroscopy and HFF photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Wang

    We present new emission line identifications and improve the lensing reconstruction of the mass distribution of galaxy cluster Abell 2744 using the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) spectroscopy and the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging. We performed blind and targeted searches for faint line emitters on all objects, including the arc sample, within the field of view (FoV) of GLASS prime pointings. We report 55 high quality spectroscopic redshifts, 5 of which are for arc images. We also present an extensive analysis based on the HFF photometry, measuring the colors and photometric redshifts of all objects within the FoV, and comparing the spectroscopic and photometric redshift estimates. In order to improve the lens model of Abell 2744, we develop a rigorous algorithm to screen arc images, based on their colors and morphology, and selecting the most reliable ones to use. As a result, 25 systems (corresponding to 72 images) pass the screening process and are used to reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive mesh. The resulting total mass distribution is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the Spitzer Frontier Fields data in order to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster.

  1. Dark matter dynamics in Abell 3827: new data consistent with standard cold dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Harvey, David; Liesenborgs, Jori; Richard, Johan; Stach, Stuart; Swinbank, Mark; Taylor, Peter; Williams, Liliya; Clowe, Douglas; Courbin, Frédéric; Edge, Alastair; Israel, Holger; Jauzac, Mathilde; Joseph, Rémy; Jullo, Eric; Kitching, Thomas D.; Leonard, Adrienne; Merten, Julian; Nagai, Daisuke; Nightingale, James; Robertson, Andrew; Romualdez, Luis Javier; Saha, Prasenjit; Smit, Renske; Tam, Sut-Ieng; Tittley, Eric

    2018-06-01

    We present integral field spectroscopy of galaxy cluster Abell 3827, using Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA) and Very Large Telescope/Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer. It reveals an unusual configuration of strong gravitational lensing in the cluster core, with at least seven lensed images of a single background spiral galaxy. Lens modelling based on Hubble Space Telescope imaging had suggested that the dark matter associated with one of the cluster's central galaxies may be offset. The new spectroscopic data enable better subtraction of foreground light, and better identification of multiple background images. The inferred distribution of dark matter is consistent with being centred on the galaxies, as expected by Λ cold dark matter. Each galaxy's dark matter also appears to be symmetric. Whilst, we do not find an offset between mass and light (suggestive of self-interacting dark matter) as previously reported, the numerical simulations that have been performed to calibrate Abell 3827 indicate that offsets and asymmetry are still worth looking for in collisions with particular geometries. Meanwhile, ALMA proves exceptionally useful for strong lens image identifications.

  2. Chandra Observation of the WAT Radio Source/ICM Interaction in Abell 623

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Gagandeep; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, Scott W.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Douglass, Edmund

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are important objects for studying the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM), galaxy formation and evolution, and cosmological parameters. Clusters containing wide-angle tail (WAT) radio sources are particularly valuable for studies of the interaction between these sources and the surrounding ICM. These sources are thought to form when the ram pressure from the ICM caused by the relative motion between the host radio galaxy and the cluster bends the radio lobes into a distinct wide-angle morphology. We present our results from the analysis of a Chandra observation of the nearby WAT hosting galaxy cluster Abell 623. A clear decrement in X-ray emission is coincident with the southern radio lobe, consistent with being a cavity carved out by the radio source. We present profiles of surface brightness, temperature, density, and pressure and find evidence for a possible shock. Based on the X-ray pressure in the vicinity of the radio lobes and assumptions about the content of the lobes, we estimate the relative ICM velocity required to bend the lobes into the observed angle. We also present spectral model fits to the overall diffuse cluster emission and see no strong signature for a cool core. The sum of the evidence indicates that Abell 623 may be undergoing a large scale cluster-cluster merger.

  3. Testing joint inversion techniques of gravity data and cosmic ray muon flux at a well-characterized site for use in the detection of subsurface density structures beneath volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosburn, K.; Roy, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Guardincerri, E.

    2017-12-01

    Obtaining accurate static and time-dependent shallow subsurface density structure beneath volcanic, hydrogeologic, and tectonic targets can help illuminate active processes of fluid flow and magma transport. A limitation of using surface gravity measurements for such imaging is that these observations are vastly underdetermined and non-unique. In order to hone in on a more accurate solution, other data sets are needed to provide constraints, typically seismic or borehole observations. The spatial resolution of these techniques, however, is relatively poor, and a novel solution to this problem in recent years has been to use attenuation of the cosmic ray muon flux, which provides an independent constraint on density. In this study we present a joint inversion of gravity and cosmic ray muon flux observations to infer the density structure of a target rock volume at a well-characterized site near Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA. We investigate the shallow structure of a mesa formed by the Quaternary ash-flow tuffs on the Pajarito Plateau, flanking the Jemez volcano in New Mexico. Gravity measurements were made using a Lacoste and Romberg D meter on the surface of the mesa and inside a tunnel beneath the mesa. Muon flux measurements were also made at the mesa surface and at various points within the same tunnel using a muon detector having an acceptance region of 45 degrees from the vertical and a track resolution of several milliradians. We expect the combination of muon and gravity data to provide us with enhanced resolution as well as the ability to sense deeper structures in our region of interest. We use Bayesian joint inversion techniques on the gravity-muon dataset to test these ideas, building upon previous work using gravity inversion alone to resolve density structure in our study area. Both the regional geology and geometry of our study area is well-known and we assess the inferred density structure from our gravity-muon joint inversion within this known

  4. Resolution of the apparent discrepancy between the number of massive subhaloes in Abell 2744 and ΛCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tian-Xiang; Wang, Jie; Frenk, Carlos S.; Gao, Liang; Li, Ran; Wang, Qiao; Cao, Xiaoyue; Li, Ming

    2018-07-01

    Schwinn et al. have recently compared the abundance and distribution of massive substructures identified in a gravitational lensing analysis of Abell 2744 by Jauzac et al. and N-body simulation, and found no cluster in Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) simulation that is similar to Abell 2744. Schwinn et al. identified the measured projected aperture masses with the actual masses associated with subhaloes in the Millenium XXL N-body simulation. We have used the high-resolution Phoenix cluster simulations to show that such an identification is incorrect: the aperture mass is dominated by mass in the body of the cluster that happens to be projected along the line of sight to the subhalo. This enhancement varies from factors of a few to factors of more than 100, particularly for subhaloes projected near the centre of the cluster. We calculate aperture masses for subhaloes in our simulation and compare them to the measurements for Abell 2744. We find that the data for Abell 2744 are in excellent agreement with the matched predictions from ΛCDM. We provide further predictions for aperture mass functions of subhaloes in idealized surveys with varying mass detection thresholds.

  5. Revisiting the monster: the mass profile of the galaxy cluster Abell 3827 using dynamical and strong lensing constrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo Carrasco Damele, Eleazar; Verdugo, Tomas

    2018-01-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 3827 is one of the most massive clusters know at z ≦ 0.1 (Richness class 2, BM typeI, X-ray LX = 2.4 x 1044 erg s-1). The Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) in Abell 3827 is perhaps the most extreme example of ongoing galaxy cannibalism. The multi-component BCG hosts the stellar remnants nuclei of at least four bright elliptical galaxies embedded in a common assymetric halo extended up to 15 kpc. The most notorious characteristic of the BCG is the existence of a unique strong gravitational lens system located within the inner 15 kpc region. A mass estimation of the galaxy based on strong lensing model was presented in Carrasco et al (2010, ApJL, 715, 160). Moreover, the exceptional strong lensing lens system in Abell 3827 and the location of the four bright galaxies has been used to measure for the first time small physical separations between dark and ordinary matter (Williams et al. 2011, MNRAS, 415, 448, Massey et al. 2015, MNRAS, 449, 3393). In this contribution, we present a detailed strong lensing and dynamical analysis of the cluster Abell 3827 based on spectroscopic redshift of the lensed features and from ~70 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies inside 0.5 x 0.5 Mpc from the cluster center.

  6. A Comparison of Resistivity Imaging Techniques Using 1D, 2D and 3D MT Inversions in the Middle Rio Grande Rift, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folsom, M.; Pepin, J.; Person, M. A.; Kelley, S.; Peacock, J.

    2016-12-01

    Twelve magnetotelluric (MT) soundings were collected along a 40 km profile crossing the Rio Grande rift and a portion of the Socorro Magma Body (SMB). A comparison of 1D, 2D and 3D inverse models highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the respective methods. 2D inversion results are distorted by the 3D nature of the data at longer periods, producing conductive artifacts at depths greater than 3 km. We demonstrate through a 3D forward modelling exercise how it is possible to recreate this effect by placing large resistive and conductive features off of an otherwise perfectly 2D resistivity model. Investigators that image deep conductors using 2D inversion codes should consider the influence of off-axis 3D features. Interpretation of the models currently show no indication of the SMB, but outlines the geometry of syn-rift and pre-rift sediments at the "Socorro Constriction", the southern terminus of the Albuquerque Basin. A strong, northward trending conductor 2-3 km deep and less than 2 ohm-m is coincident with the rift, creating a reversal of induction arrow direction at this point. This is interpreted as deep basin brines, perhaps influenced by evaporates hosted in the Permian Abo and Yeso formations. It has been noted that Rio Grande salinity increases in a stepwise manner, coincident with the terminal ends of sedimentary basins. Our geophysical models suggest a possible connection between rift-bounding faults and deep sedimentary brines, which likely impact the water quality of the Rio Grande. Future work includes adding additional MT stations to better constrain off-axis features and their relationship to the Rio Grande.

  7. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach.

  8. Mass dependent galaxy transformation mechanisms in the complex environment of SuperGroup Abell 1882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Aparajita

    We present our data and results from panchromatic photometry and optical spectrometry of the nearest (extremely rich) filamentary large scale structure, SuperGroup Abell 1882. It is a precursor of a cluster and is an inevitable part of the narrative in the study of galaxy transformations. There has been strong empirical evidence over the past three decades that galaxy environment affects galaxy properties. Blue disky galaxies transform into red bulge-like galaxies as they traverse into the deeper recesses of a cluster. However, we have little insight into the story of galaxy evolution in the early stages of cluster formation. Besides, in relaxed clusters that have been studied extensively, several evolutionary mechanisms take effect on similar spatial and temporal scales, making it almost impossible to disentangle different local and global mechanisms. A SuperGroup on the other hand, has a shallower dark-matter potential. Here, the accreting galaxies are subjected to evolutionary mechanisms over larger time and spatial scales. This separates processes that are otherwise superimposed in rich cluster-filament interfaces. As has been found from cluster studies, galaxy color and morphology tie very strongly with local galaxy density even in a complex and nascent structure like Abell 1882. Our major results indicate that there is a strong dependence of galaxy transformations on the galaxy masses themselves. Mass- dependent evolutionary mechanisms affect galaxies at different spatial scales. The galaxy color also varies with radial projected distance from the assumed center of the structure for a constant local galaxy density, indicating the underlying large scale structure as a second order evolutionary driver. We have looked for clues to the types of mechanisms that might cause the transformations at various mass regimes. We have found the thoroughly quenched low mass galaxies confined to the groups, whereas there are evidences of intermediate-mass quenched galaxies

  9. A Statistical Study of Multiply Imaged Systems in the Lensing Cluster Abell 68

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jullo, Eric; Covone, Giovanni; Limousin, Marceau; Ellis, Richard; Stark, Daniel; Bundy, Kevin; Czoske, Oliver; Ebeling, Harald; Soucail, Geneviève

    2007-06-01

    We have carried out an extensive spectroscopic survey with the Keck and VLT telescopes, targeting lensed galaxies in the background of the massive cluster Abell 68. Spectroscopic measurements are obtained for 26 lensed images, including a distant galaxy at z=5.4. Redshifts have been determined for 5 out of 7 multiple-image systems. Through a careful modeling of the mass distribution in the strongly lensed regime, we derive a mass estimate of 5.3×1014 Msolar within 500 kpc. Our mass model is then used to constrain the redshift distribution of the remaining multiply imaged and singly imaged sources. This enables us to examine the physical properties for a subsample of 7 Lyα emitters at 1.7<~z<~5.5, whose unlensed luminosities of ~=1041 ergs s-1 are fainter than similar objects found in blank fields. Of particular interest is an extended Lyα emission region surrounding a highly magnified source at z=2.6, detected in VIMOS integral field spectroscopy data. The physical scale of the most distant lensed source at z=5.4 is very small (<300 pc), similar to the lensed z~5.6 emitter reported by Ellis et al. in Abell 2218. New photometric data available for Abell 2218 allow for a direct comparison between these two unique objects. Our survey illustrates the practicality of using lensing clusters to probe the faint end of the z~2-5 Lyα luminosity function in a manner that is complementary to blank-field narrowband surveys. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Also based on observations collected at the Very Large Telescope (Antu/UT1 and Melipal/UT3), European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programs 070.A-0643 and 073.A-0774), the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

  10. Tectonic Inversion Along the Algerian and Ligurian Margins: On the Insight Provided By Latest Seismic Processing Techniques Applied to Recent and Vintage 2D Offshore Multichannel Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenini, L.; Beslier, M. O.; Sage, F.; Badji, R.; Galibert, P. Y.; Lepretre, A.; Dessa, J. X.; Aidi, C.; Watremez, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies on the Algerian and the North-Ligurian margins in the Western Mediterranean have evidenced inversion-related superficial structures, such as folds and asymmetric sedimentary perched basins whose geometry hints at deep compressive structures dipping towards the continent. Deep seismic imaging of these margins is difficult due to steep slope and superficial multiples, and, in the Mediterranean context, to the highly diffractive Messinian evaporitic series in the basin. During the Algerian-French SPIRAL survey (2009, R/V Atalante), 2D marine multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data were collected along the Algerian Margin using a 4.5 km, 360 channel digital streamer and a 3040 cu. in. air-gun array. An advanced processing workflow has been laid out using Geocluster CGG software, which includes noise attenuation, 2D SRME multiple attenuation, surface consistent deconvolution, Kirchhoff pre-stack time migration. This processing produces satisfactory seismic images of the whole sedimentary cover, and of southward dipping reflectors in the acoustic basement along the central part of the margin offshore Great Kabylia, that are interpreted as inversion-related blind thrusts as part of flat-ramp systems. We applied this successful processing workflow to old 2D marine MCS data acquired on the North-Ligurian Margin (Malis survey, 1995, R/V Le Nadir), using a 2.5 km, 96 channel streamer and a 1140 cu. in. air-gun array. Particular attention was paid to multiple attenuation in adapting our workflow. The resulting reprocessed seismic images, interpreted with a coincident velocity model obtained by wide-angle data tomography, provide (1) enhanced imaging of the sedimentary cover down to the top of the acoustic basement, including the base of the Messinian evaporites and the sub-salt Miocene series, which appear to be tectonized as far as in the mid-basin, and (2) new evidence of deep crustal structures in the margin which the initial processing had failed to

  11. Television documentary, history and memory. An analysis of Sergio Zavoli's The Gardens of Abel.

    PubMed

    Foot, John

    2014-10-20

    This article examines a celebrated documentary made for Italian state TV in 1968 and transmitted in 1969 to an audience of millions. The programme - The Gardens of Abel - looked at changes introduced by the radical psychiatrist Franco Basaglia in an asylum in the north-east of Italy (Gorizia). The article examines the content of this programme for the first time, questions some of the claims that have been made for it, and outlines the sources used by the director, Sergio Zavoli. The article argues that the film was as much an expression of Zavoli's vision and ideas as it was linked to those of Franco Basaglia himself. Finally, the article highlights the way that this programme has become part of historical discourse and popular memory.

  12. Inhibition of α-glucosidase by polysaccharides from the fruit hull of Camellia oleifera Abel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Li, Xiang-Zhou

    2015-01-22

    We isolated and purified polysaccharides from the Camellia oleifera Abel. fruit hull and studied its hypoglycemic potential. Our results revealed six polysaccharides (CFPA-1-5 & CFPB) from the aqueous extract from the defatted C. oleifera fruit hull. Purified polysaccharides (purity >90%) were investigated for the inhibition of α-glucosidase activity in vitro. Two polysaccharides, CFPB and CFPA-3 were present in high concentration in the fruit hull and showed a dose-dependent inhibition of α-glucosidase activity, with IC50 concentrations of 11.80 and 10.95 μg/mL, respectively. This result suggests that polysaccharides (CFP) extracted from the fruit hull of C. oleifera may have potential as functional foods with featuring a hypoglycemic effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. X-ray constraints on the shape of the dark matter in five Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buote, David A.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray observations obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to constrain the shape of the dark matter in the inner regions of Abell clusters A401, A426, A1656, A2029, and A2199, each of which exhibits highly flattened optical isopleths. The dark matter is modeled as an ellipsoid with a mass density of about r exp -2. The possible shapes of the dark matter is constrained by comparing these model isophotes to the image isophotes. The X-ray isophotes, and therefore the gravitational potentials, have ellipticities of about 0.1-0.2. The dark matter within the central 1 Mpc is found to be substantially rounder for all the clusters. It is concluded that the shape of the galaxy distributions in these clusters traces neither the gravitational potential nor the gravitating matter.

  14. Television documentary, history and memory. An analysis of Sergio Zavoli's The Gardens of Abel

    PubMed Central

    Foot, John

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a celebrated documentary made for Italian state TV in 1968 and transmitted in 1969 to an audience of millions. The programme – The Gardens of Abel – looked at changes introduced by the radical psychiatrist Franco Basaglia in an asylum in the north-east of Italy (Gorizia). The article examines the content of this programme for the first time, questions some of the claims that have been made for it, and outlines the sources used by the director, Sergio Zavoli. The article argues that the film was as much an expression of Zavoli's vision and ideas as it was linked to those of Franco Basaglia himself. Finally, the article highlights the way that this programme has become part of historical discourse and popular memory. PMID:25937804

  15. Revisiting Abell 2744: a powerful synergy of the GLASS spectroscopy and the HFF photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Borello Schmidt, Kasper; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-08-01

    We present new emission line identifications and improve the strong lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744 using the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) observations and the full depth of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging. We performed a blind and targeted search for emission lines in objects within the full field of view (FoV) of the GLASS prime pointings, including all the previously known multiple arc images. We report over 50 high quality spectroscopic redshifts, 4 of which are for the arc images. We also present an extensive analysis based on the HFF photometry, measuring the colors and photometric redshifts of all objects within the FoV, and comparing the spectroscopic and photometric results of the same ensemble of sources. In order to improve the lens model of Abell 2744, we develop a rigorous alogorithm to screen arc images, based on their colors and morphology, and selecting the most reliable ones to use. As a result, 21 systems (corresponding to 59 images) pass the screening process and are used to reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive mesh. The resulting total mass distribution is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data in a fashion very similar to the reduction of the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP) clusters, in order to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made publicly available in the standard HFF format.

  16. On the merging cluster Abell 578 and its central radio galaxy 4C+67.13

    DOE PAGES

    Hagino, K.; Stawarz, Ł.; Siemiginowska, A.; ...

    2015-05-26

    Here we analyze radio, optical, and X-ray data for the peculiar cluster Abell 578. This cluster is not fully relaxed and consists of two merging sub-systems. The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), CGPG 0719.8+6704, is a pair of interacting ellipticals with projected separation ~10 kpc, the brighter of which hosts the radio source 4C+67.13. The Fanaroff–Riley type-II radio morphology of 4C+67.13 is unusual for central radio galaxies in local Abell clusters. Our new optical spectroscopy revealed that both nuclei of the CGPG 0719.8+6704 pair are active, albeit at low accretion rates corresponding to the Eddington ratiomore » $$\\sim {{10}^{-4}}$$ (for the estimated black hole masses of $$\\sim 3\\times {{10}^{8}}\\;{{M}_{\\odot }}$$ and $$\\sim {{10}^{9}}\\;{{M}_{\\odot }}$$). The gathered X-ray (Chandra) data allowed us to confirm and to quantify robustly the previously noted elongation of the gaseous atmosphere in the dominant sub-cluster, as well as a large spatial offset (~60 kpc projected) between the position of the BCG and the cluster center inferred from the modeling of the X-ray surface brightness distribution. Detailed analysis of the brightness profiles and temperature revealed also that the cluster gas in the vicinity of 4C+67.13 is compressed (by a factor of about ~1.4) and heated (from $$\\simeq 2.0$$ keV up to 2.7 keV), consistent with the presence of a weak shock (Mach number ~1.3) driven by the expanding jet cocoon. As a result, this would then require the jet kinetic power of the order of $$\\sim {{10}^{45}}$$ erg s –1, implying either a very high efficiency of the jet production for the current accretion rate, or a highly modulated jet/accretion activity in the system.« less

  17. Astrometry With the Hubble Space Telescope: Trigonometric Parallaxes of Planetary Nebula Nuclei NGC 6853, NGC 7293, ABELL 31, and DeHt 5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. ASTROMETRY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE: TRIGONOMETRIC PARALLAXES OF PLANETARY NEBULA NUCLEI NGC 6853, NGC 7293, ABELL 31...present absolute parallaxes and relative proper motions for the central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 6853 (The Dumbbell), NGC 7293 (The Helix...Abell 31, and DeHt 5. This paper details our reduction and analysis using DeHt 5 as an example. We obtain these planetary nebula nuclei (PNNi

  18. Effects of sensor location and the atmospheric stability on the accuracy of an inverse-dispersion technique for lagoon gas emission measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Measuring gas emission rates from wastewater lagoons and storage ponds using currently available micrometeorological techniques can be an arduous task because typical lagoon environments contain a variety of obstructions (e.g., berm, trees, buildings) to wind flow. These non-homogeneous terrain cond...

  19. Adapting machine learning techniques to censored time-to-event health record data: A general-purpose approach using inverse probability of censoring weighting.

    PubMed

    Vock, David M; Wolfson, Julian; Bandyopadhyay, Sunayan; Adomavicius, Gediminas; Johnson, Paul E; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Models for predicting the probability of experiencing various health outcomes or adverse events over a certain time frame (e.g., having a heart attack in the next 5years) based on individual patient characteristics are important tools for managing patient care. Electronic health data (EHD) are appealing sources of training data because they provide access to large amounts of rich individual-level data from present-day patient populations. However, because EHD are derived by extracting information from administrative and clinical databases, some fraction of subjects will not be under observation for the entire time frame over which one wants to make predictions; this loss to follow-up is often due to disenrollment from the health system. For subjects without complete follow-up, whether or not they experienced the adverse event is unknown, and in statistical terms the event time is said to be right-censored. Most machine learning approaches to the problem have been relatively ad hoc; for example, common approaches for handling observations in which the event status is unknown include (1) discarding those observations, (2) treating them as non-events, (3) splitting those observations into two observations: one where the event occurs and one where the event does not. In this paper, we present a general-purpose approach to account for right-censored outcomes using inverse probability of censoring weighting (IPCW). We illustrate how IPCW can easily be incorporated into a number of existing machine learning algorithms used to mine big health care data including Bayesian networks, k-nearest neighbors, decision trees, and generalized additive models. We then show that our approach leads to better calibrated predictions than the three ad hoc approaches when applied to predicting the 5-year risk of experiencing a cardiovascular adverse event, using EHD from a large U.S. Midwestern healthcare system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Motion-insensitive carotid intraplaque hemorrhage imaging using 3D inversion recovery preparation stack of stars (IR-prep SOS) technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Eun; Roberts, John A; Eisenmenger, Laura B; Aldred, Booth W; Jamil, Osama; Bolster, Bradley D; Bi, Xiaoming; Parker, Dennis L; Treiman, Gerald S; McNally, J Scott

    2017-02-01

    Carotid artery imaging is important in the clinical management of patients at risk for stroke. Carotid intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH) presents an important diagnostic challenge. 3D magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) has been shown to accurately image carotid IPH; however, this sequence can be limited due to motion- and flow-related artifact. The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate an improved 3D carotid MPRAGE sequence for IPH detection. We hypothesized that a radial-based k-space trajectory sequence such as "Stack of Stars" (SOS) incorporated with inversion recovery preparation would offer reduced motion sensitivity and more robust flow suppression by oversampling of central k-space. A total of 31 patients with carotid disease (62 carotid arteries) were imaged at 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with 3D IR-prep Cartesian and SOS sequences. Image quality was determined between SOS and Cartesian MPRAGE in 62 carotid arteries using t-tests and multivariable linear regression. Kappa analysis was used to determine interrater reliability. In all, 25 among 62 carotid plaques had carotid IPH by consensus from the reviewers on SOS compared to 24 on Cartesian sequence. Image quality was significantly higher with SOS compared to Cartesian (mean 3.74 vs. 3.11, P < 0.001). SOS acquisition yielded sharper image features with less motion (19.4% vs. 45.2%, P < 0.002) and flow artifact (27.4% vs. 41.9%, P < 0.089). There was also excellent interrater reliability with SOS (kappa = 0.89), higher than that of Cartesian (kappa = 0.84). By minimizing flow and motion artifacts and retaining high interrater reliability, the SOS MPRAGE has important advantages over Cartesian MPRAGE in carotid IPH detection. 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:410-417. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. EDITORIAL: Inverse Problems in Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert M.; Lesnic, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Presented here are 11 noteworthy papers selected from the Fifth International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice held in Cambridge, UK during 11-15 July 2005. The papers have been peer-reviewed to the usual high standards of this journal and the contributions of reviewers are much appreciated. The conference featured a good balance of the fundamental mathematical concepts of inverse problems with a diverse range of important and interesting applications, which are represented here by the selected papers. Aspects of finite-element modelling and the performance of inverse algorithms are investigated by Autrique et al and Leduc et al. Statistical aspects are considered by Emery et al and Watzenig et al with regard to Bayesian parameter estimation and inversion using particle filters. Electrostatic applications are demonstrated by van Berkel and Lionheart and also Nakatani et al. Contributions to the applications of electrical techniques and specifically electrical tomographies are provided by Wakatsuki and Kagawa, Kim et al and Kortschak et al. Aspects of inversion in optical tomography are investigated by Wright et al and Douiri et al. The authors are representative of the worldwide interest in inverse problems relating to engineering applications and their efforts in producing these excellent papers will be appreciated by many readers of this journal.

  2. Environmental Effects on Galaxy Evolution. II. Quantifying the Tidal Features in NIR Images of the Cluster Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatapathy, Y.; Bravo-Alfaro, H.; Mayya, Y. D.; Lobo, C.; Durret, F.; Gamez, V.; Valerdi, M.; Granados-Contreras, A. P.; Navarro-Poupard, F.

    2017-12-01

    This work is part of a series of papers devoted to investigating the evolution of cluster galaxies during their infall. In the present article, we image in NIR a selected sample of galaxies throughout the massive cluster Abell 85 (z = 0.055). We obtain (JHK‧) photometry for 68 objects, reaching ˜1 mag arcsec-2 deeper than 2MASS. We use these images to unveil asymmetries in the outskirts of a sample of bright galaxies and develop a new asymmetry index, {α }{An}, which allows us to quantify the degree of disruption by the relative area occupied by the tidal features on the plane of the sky. We measure the asymmetries for a subsample of 41 large-area objects, finding clear asymmetries in 10 galaxies; most of these are in groups and pairs projected at different clustercentric distances, and some of them are located beyond R 500. Combining information on the H I gas content of blue galaxies and the distribution of substructures across Abell 85 with the present NIR asymmetry analysis, we obtain a very powerful tool to confirm that tidal mechanisms are indeed present and are currently affecting a fraction of galaxies in Abell 85. However, when comparing our deep NIR images with UV blue images of two very disrupted (jellyfish) galaxies in this cluster, we discard the presence of tidal interactions down to our detection limit. Our results suggest that ram-pressure stripping is at the origin of such spectacular disruptions. We conclude that across a complex cluster like Abell 85, environmental mechanisms, both gravitational and hydrodynamical, are playing an active role in driving galaxy evolution.

  3. Use of open-path FTIR and inverse dispersion technique to quantify gaseous nitrogen loss from an intensive vegetable production site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei; Suter, Helen; Lam, Shu Kee; Sun, Jianlei; Chen, Deli

    2014-09-01

    An open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopic technique in combination with a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) dispersion model (WindTrax) can be used to simultaneously measure gaseous emissions of N2O, NH3, CH4 and CO2. We assessed the capability of this technique for measuring NH3 and N2O emissions following the application of calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2), Nitrophoska (NPK) and chicken manure on a celery farm at Boneo, Victoria, during April and May 2013. We found that the OP-FTIR/WindTrax method was able to measure the diurnal variation in NH3 flux from the field site following application of chicken manure with measured emissions ranging from approximately 0.1-9.8 kg NH3-N ha-1 day-1. The OP-FTIR/WindTrax method also detected a diurnal variation in N2O flux of 1.5-6.2 kg N2O-N ha-1 day-1 and N2O flux increased in response to application of the Ca(NO3)2. We concluded that the OP-FTIR/WindTrax technique can quantify gaseous N loss from vegetable production systems.

  4. Oleiferoside W from the roots of Camellia oleifera C. Abel, inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang-Ping; Kang, Nai-Xin; Zhang, Mi-Ya; Gao, Hong-Wei; Li, Xiao-Ran; Liu, Yan-Li; Xu, Qiong-Ming; Yang, Shi-Lin

    2017-07-06

    Camellia oleifera C. Abel has been widely cultivated in China, and a group of bioactive constituents such as triterpeniod saponin have been isolated from C. oleifera C. Abel. In the current study, a new triterpeniod saponin was isolated from the EtOH extract of the roots of C. oleifera C. Abel, named as oleiferoside W, and the cytotoxic properties of oleiferoside W were evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. At the same time the inducing apoptosis, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ), the up-regulation of related pro-apoptotic proteins, such as cleaved-PARP, cleaved-caspase-3, and the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2/Bax were measured on oleiferoside W. Furthermore, the function, inducing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis, of oleiferoside W could be reversed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC). In conclusion, our findings showed that oleiferoside W induced apoptosis involving mitochondrial pathway and increasing intracellular ROS production in the A549 cells, suggesting that oleiferoside W may have the possibility to be a useful anticancer agent for therapy in lung cancer.

  5. Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic (ABEL) trapping of single β2-adrenergic receptors in the absence and presence of agonist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockenhauer, Samuel; Fuerstenberg, Alexandre; Yao, Xiao Jie; Kobilka, Brian K.; Moerner, W. E.

    2012-02-01

    The ABEL trap allows trapping of single biomolecules in solution for extended observation without immobilization. The essential idea combines fluorescence-based position estimation with fast electrokinetic feedback in a microfluidic geometry to counter the Brownian motion of a single nanoscale object, hence maintaining its position in the field of view for hundreds of milliseconds to seconds. Such prolonged observation of single proteins allows access to slow dynamics, as probed by any available photophysical observables. We have used the ABEL trap to study conformational dynamics of the β2-adrenergic receptor, a key G-protein coupled receptor and drug target, in the absence and presence of agonist. A single environment-sensitive dye reports on the receptor microenvironment, providing a real-time readout of conformational change for each trapped receptor. The focus of this paper will be a quantitative comparison of the ligandfree and agonist-bound receptor data from our ABEL trap experiments. We observe a small but clearly detectable shift in conformational equilibria and a lengthening of fluctuation timescales upon binding of agonist. In order to quantify the shift in state distributions and timescales, we apply nonparametric statistical tests to place error bounds on the resulting single-molecule distributions.

  6. Analysis of the optical emission of the young precataclysmic variables HS 1857+5144 and ABELL 65

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimansky, V. V.; Pozdnyakova, S. A.; Borisov, N. V.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Vlasyuk, V. V.; Spiridonova, O. I.; Galeev, A. I.; Mel'Nikov, S. S.

    2009-10-01

    We analyze the physical state and the properties of the close binary systems HS 1857+5144 and Abell 65. We took the spectra of both systems over a wide range of orbital phases with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SAO RAS) and obtained their multicolor light curves with the RTT150 and Zeiss-1000 telescopes of the SAO RAS. We demonstrate that both Abell 65 and HS 1857+5144 are young precataclysmic variables (PV) with orbital periods of P orb = 1. d 003729 and P orb = 0. d 26633331, respectively. The observed brightness and spectral variations during the orbital period are due to the radiation of the cold component, which absorbs the short-wave radiation of the hot component and reemits it in the visual part of the spectrum. A joint analysis of the brightness and radial velocity curves allowed us to find the possible and optimum sets of their fundamental parameters. We found the luminosity excesses of the secondary components of HS 1857+5144 and Abell 65 with respect to the corresponding Main Sequence stars to be typical for such objects. The excess luminosities of the secondary components of all young PVs are indicative of their faster relaxation rate towards the quiescent state compared to the rates estimated in earlier studies.

  7. A Census of Star Formation and Active Galactic Nuclei Populations in Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Logan H.; Atlee, David Wesley

    2016-01-01

    A recent survey of low-z galaxy clusters observed a disjunction between X-ray and mid-infrared selected populations of active galactic nuclei (X-ray and IR AGNs) (Atlee+ 2011, ApJ 729, 22.). Here we present an analysis of near-infrared spectroscopic data of star-forming galaxies in cluster Abell 1689 in order to confirm the identity of some of their IR AGN and to provide a check on their reported star formation rates. Our sample consists of 24 objects in Abell 1689. H and K band spectroscopic observations of target objects and standard stars were obtained by David Atlee between 2010 May 17 and 2011 June 6 using the Large Binocular Telescope's LUCI instrument. After undergoing initial reductions, standard stars were corrected for telluric absorption using TelFit (Gullikson+ 2014, AJ, 158, 53). Raw detector counts were converted to physical units using the wavelength-dependent response of the grating and the star's reported H and K band magnitudes to produce conversion factors that fully correct for instrumental effects. Target spectra were flux-calibrated using the airmass-corrected transmission profiles produced by TelFit and the associated H band conversion factor (or the average of the two factors, for nights with two standard stars). Star formation rates were calculated using the SFR-L(Ha) relation reported in Kennicutt (1998), with the measured luminosity of the Pa-a emission line at the luminosity distance of the cluster used as a proxy for L(Ha) (Kennicutt 1998, ARA&A 36, 189; Hummer & Stoney 1987, MNRAS 346, 1055). The line ratios H2 2.121 mm/Brg and [FeII]/Pab were used to classify targets as starburst galaxies, AGNs, or LINERs (Rodriguez-Ardila+ 2005, MNRAS, 364, 1041). Jones was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  8. On the Merging Cluster Abell 578 and Its Central Radio Galaxy 4C+67.13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, K.; Stawarz, Ł.; Siemiginowska, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Szostek, A.; Madejski, G.; Harris, D. E.; Simionescu, A.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-06-01

    Here we analyze radio, optical, and X-ray data for the peculiar cluster Abell 578. This cluster is not fully relaxed and consists of two merging sub-systems. The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), CGPG 0719.8+6704, is a pair of interacting ellipticals with projected separation ˜10 kpc, the brighter of which hosts the radio source 4C+67.13. The Fanaroff-Riley type-II radio morphology of 4C+67.13 is unusual for central radio galaxies in local Abell clusters. Our new optical spectroscopy revealed that both nuclei of the CGPG 0719.8+6704 pair are active, albeit at low accretion rates corresponding to the Eddington ratio ˜ {{10}-4} (for the estimated black hole masses of ˜ 3× {{10}8} {{M}⊙ } and ˜ {{10}9} {{M}⊙ }). The gathered X-ray (Chandra) data allowed us to confirm and to quantify robustly the previously noted elongation of the gaseous atmosphere in the dominant sub-cluster, as well as a large spatial offset (˜60 kpc projected) between the position of the BCG and the cluster center inferred from the modeling of the X-ray surface brightness distribution. Detailed analysis of the brightness profiles and temperature revealed also that the cluster gas in the vicinity of 4C+67.13 is compressed (by a factor of about ˜1.4) and heated (from ≃ 2.0 keV up to 2.7 keV), consistent with the presence of a weak shock (Mach number ˜1.3) driven by the expanding jet cocoon. This would then require the jet kinetic power of the order of ˜ {{10}45} erg s-1, implying either a very high efficiency of the jet production for the current accretion rate, or a highly modulated jet/accretion activity in the system. Based on service observations made with the WHT operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  9. Strain Transient Detection Techniques: A Comparison of Source Parameter Inversions of Signals Isolated through Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Non-Linear PCA, and Rotated PCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, B.; Funning, G. J.

    2009-12-01

    We compare several techniques for the analysis of geodetic time series with the ultimate aim to characterize the physical processes which are represented therein. We compare three methods for the analysis of these data: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Non-Linear PCA (NLPCA), and Rotated PCA (RPCA). We evaluate each method by its ability to isolate signals which may be any combination of low amplitude (near noise level), temporally transient, unaccompanied by seismic emissions, and small scale with respect to the spatial domain. PCA is a powerful tool for extracting structure from large datasets which is traditionally realized through either the solution of an eigenvalue problem or through iterative methods. PCA is an transformation of the coordinate system of our data such that the new "principal" data axes retain maximal variance and minimal reconstruction error (Pearson, 1901; Hotelling, 1933). RPCA is achieved by an orthogonal transformation of the principal axes determined in PCA. In the analysis of meteorological data sets, RPCA has been seen to overcome domain shape dependencies, correct for sampling errors, and to determine principal axes which more closely represent physical processes (e.g., Richman, 1986). NLPCA generalizes PCA such that principal axes are replaced by principal curves (e.g., Hsieh 2004). We achieve NLPCA through an auto-associative feed-forward neural network (Scholz, 2005). We show the geophysical relevance of these techniques by application of each to a synthetic data set. Results are compared by inverting principal axes to determine deformation source parameters. Temporal variability in source parameters, estimated by each method, are also compared.

  10. Chemical Enrichment History Of Abell 3112 Galaxy Cluster Out To The Virial Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezer, C.; Bulbul, E.; Ercan, E.; Smith, R.; Bautz, M.; Loewenstein, M.; McDonald, M.; Miller, E.

    2017-10-01

    The deep potential well of the galaxy clusters confines all metals produced via supernova explosions within the intra-cluster medium (ICM). The radial distributions of these metals along the ICM are direct records of the metal enrichment history. In this work, we investigate the chemical enrichment history of Abell 3112 galaxy cluster from cluster's core to out to radius R_{200} (˜ 1470 kpc) by analyzing a deep 1.2 Ms Suzaku observations with overlapping 72 ks Chandra observations. The fraction of supernova explosions enriching the ICM is obtained by fitting the X-ray spectra with a robust snapec model implemented in XSPEC. The ratio of supernova type Ia explosions to the core collapse supernova explosions is found in the range 0.12 - 0.16 and uniformly distributed out to R_{200}. The uniform spatial distribution of supernova enrichment indicates an early metal enrichment between the epoch of z ˜ 2 - 3. We also observe that W7, CDD, and WDD SN Ia models equally better explain the highest signal-to-noise region compared to 2D delayed detonation model CDDT. We further report the first time temperature (3.37 ± 0.77 keV) and metallicity (0.22 ± 0.08 Z_{⊙}) measurements of this archetypal cluster at its virial radius.

  11. Discovery of Ram-pressure Stripped Gas around an Elliptical Galaxy in Abell 2670

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Kim, Minjin; Smith, Rory

    Studies of cluster galaxies are increasingly finding galaxies with spectacular one-sided tails of gas and young stars, suggestive of intense ram-pressure stripping. These so-called “jellyfish” galaxies typically have late-type morphology. In this paper, we present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) observations of an elliptical galaxy in Abell 2670 with long tails of material visible in the optical spectra, as well as blobs with tadpole-like morphology. The spectra in the central part of the galaxy reveal a stellar component as well as ionized gas. The stellar component does not have significant rotation, while the ionized gas defines a clear star-forming gasmore » disk. We argue, based on deep optical images of the galaxy, that the gas was most likely acquired during a past wet merger. It is possible that the star-forming blobs are also remnants of the merger. In addition, the direction and kinematics of the one-sided ionized tails, combined with the tadpole morphology of the star-forming blobs, strongly suggests that the system is undergoing ram pressure from the intracluster medium. In summary, this paper presents the discovery of a post-merger elliptical galaxy undergoing ram-pressure stripping.« less

  12. Discovery of Ram-pressure Stripped Gas around an Elliptical Galaxy in Abell 2670

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Smith, Rory; Jaffé, Yara; Kim, Minjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Nantais, Julie; Candlish, Graeme; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2017-05-01

    Studies of cluster galaxies are increasingly finding galaxies with spectacular one-sided tails of gas and young stars, suggestive of intense ram-pressure stripping. These so-called “jellyfish” galaxies typically have late-type morphology. In this paper, we present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) observations of an elliptical galaxy in Abell 2670 with long tails of material visible in the optical spectra, as well as blobs with tadpole-like morphology. The spectra in the central part of the galaxy reveal a stellar component as well as ionized gas. The stellar component does not have significant rotation, while the ionized gas defines a clear star-forming gas disk. We argue, based on deep optical images of the galaxy, that the gas was most likely acquired during a past wet merger. It is possible that the star-forming blobs are also remnants of the merger. In addition, the direction and kinematics of the one-sided ionized tails, combined with the tadpole morphology of the star-forming blobs, strongly suggests that the system is undergoing ram pressure from the intracluster medium. In summary, this paper presents the discovery of a post-merger elliptical galaxy undergoing ram-pressure stripping.

  13. Diffuse radio emission in the complex merging galaxy cluster Abell2069

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabent, A.; Hoeft, M.; Pizzo, R. F.; Bonafede, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Klein, U.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters with signs of a recent merger in many cases show extended diffuse radio features. This emission originates from relativistic electrons that suffer synchrotron losses due to the intracluster magnetic field. The mechanisms of particle acceleration and the properties of the magnetic field are still poorly understood. Aims: We search for diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters. Here, we study the complex galaxy cluster Abell 2069, for which X-ray observations indicate a recent merger. Methods: We investigate the cluster's radio continuum emission by deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations at 346 MHz and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations at 322 MHz. Results: We find an extended diffuse radio feature roughly coinciding with the main component of the cluster. We classify this emission as a radio halo and estimate its lower limit flux density at 25 ± 9 mJy. Moreover, we find a second extended diffuse source located at the cluster's companion and estimate its flux density at 15 ± 2 mJy. We speculate that this is a small halo or a mini-halo. If true, this cluster is the first example of a double-halo in a single galaxy cluster.

  14. Mapping the Dark Matter Distribution of the Merging Galaxy Cluster Abell 115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mincheol; Jee, Myungkook James; Forman, William; Golovich, Nathan; van Weeren, Reinout

    2018-01-01

    The colliding galaxy cluster Abell 115 shows a number of clear merging features including radio relics, double X-ray peaks, and offsets between the cluster member galaxies and the X-ray distributions. In order to constrain the merging scenario of this complex system, it is critical to know where the dark matter is. We present a high-fidelity weak-lensing analysis of the system using a state-of-the-art method that robustly models the detailed PSF variations. Our mass reconstruction reveals two distinct mass peaks. Through a careful bootstrapping analysis, we demonstrate that the positions of these two mass peaks are highly consistent with those of the cluster galaxies, although the comparison with the X-ray emission shows that the mass peaks lead the X-ray peaks. We obtain the first weak-lensing mass of each subcluster by simultaneously fitting two NFW profiles, as well as the total mass of the system. Interestingly, the total mass is a few factors lower than the published dynamical mass based on velocity dispersion. This large mass discrepancy may be attributed to a significant disruption of the cluster galaxy orbits due to the violent merger. Our preliminary analysis indicates that the two subclusters might have experienced a first off-axis collision a few Gyrs ago and might be now returning for a second collision.

  15. Discovery of large-scale diffuse radio emission in low-mass galaxy cluster Abell 1931

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggen, M.; Rafferty, D.; Bonafede, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Shimwell, T.; Intema, H.; Röttgering, H.; Brunetti, G.; Di Gennaro, G.; Savini, F.; Wilber, A.; O'Sullivan, S.; Ensslin, T. A.; De Gasperin, F.; Hoeft, M.

    2018-07-01

    Extended, steep-spectrum radio synchrotron sources are pre-dominantly found in massive galaxy clusters as opposed to groups. LOFAR Two-Metre Sky Survey images have revealed a diffuse, ultra-steep-spectrum radio source in the low-mass cluster Abell 1931. The source has a fairly irregular morphology with the largest linear size of about 550 kpc. The source is only seen in LOFAR observations at 143 MHz and Giant Metre Radio Telescope observations at 325 MHz. The spectral index of the total source between 143 and 325 MHz is α _{143}^{325} = -2.86 ± 0.36. The source remains invisible in Very Large Array (1-2 GHz) observations as expected given the spectral index. Chandra X-ray observations of the cluster revealed a bolometric luminosity of LX = (1.65 ± 0.39) × 1043 erg s-1 and a temperature of 2.92_{-0.87}^{+1.89} keV which implies a mass of around ˜1014 M⊙. We conclude that the source is a remnant radio galaxy that has shut off around 200 Myr ago. The brightest cluster galaxy, a radio-loud elliptical galaxy, could be the source for this extinct source. Unlike remnant sources studied in the literature, our source has a steep spectrum at low radio frequencies. Studying such remnant radio galaxies at low radio frequencies is important for understanding the scarcity of such sources and their role in feedback processes.

  16. Discovery of large-scale diffuse radio emission in low-mass galaxy cluster Abell 1931

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggen, M.; Rafferty, D.; Bonafede, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Shimwell, T.; Intema, H.; Röttgering, H.; Brunetti, G.; Di Gennaro, G.; Savini, F.; Wilber, A.; O'Sullivan, S.; Ensslin, T. A.; De Gasperin, F.; Hoeft, M.

    2018-04-01

    Extended, steep-spectrum radio synchrotron sources are pre-dominantly found in massive galaxy clusters as opposed to groups. LOFAR Two-Metre Sky Survey images have revealed a diffuse, ultra-steep spectrum radio source in the low-mass cluster Abell 1931. The source has a fairly irregular morphology with a largest linear size of about 550 kpc. The source is only seen in LOFAR observations at 143 MHz and GMRT observations at 325 MHz. The spectral index of the total source between 143 MHz and 325 MHz is α _{143}^{325} = -2.86 ± 0.36. The source remains invisible in Very Large Array (1-2 GHz) observations as expected given the spectral index. Chandra X-ray observations of the cluster revealed a bolometric luminosity of LX = (1.65 ± 0.39) × 1043 erg s-1 and a temperature of 2.92_{-0.87}^{+1.89} keV which implies a mass of around ˜1014M⊙. We conclude that the source is a remnant radio galaxy that has shut off around 200 Myr ago. The brightest cluster galaxy, a radio-loud elliptical galaxy, could be the source for this extinct source. Unlike remnant sources studied in the literature, our source has a steep spectrum at low radio frequencies. Studying such remnant radio galaxies at low radio frequencies is important for understanding the scarcity of such sources and their role in feedback processes.

  17. On the X-ray spectrum of the volume emissivity arising from Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stottlemyer, A. R.; Boldt, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    HEAO 1 A-2 X-ray spectra (2-15 keV) for an optically selected sample of Abell clusters of galaxies with z less than 0.1 have been analyzed to determine the energy dependence of the cosmological X-ray volume emissivity arising from such clusters. This spectrum is well fitted by an isothermal-bremsstrahlung model with kT = 7.4 + or - 1.5 KeV. This result is a test of the isothermal-volume-emissivity spectrum to be inferred from the conjecture that all contributing clusters may be characterized by kT = 7 keV, as assumed by McKee et al. (1980) in estimating the underlying luminosity function for the same sample. Although satisfied at the statistical level indicated, the analysis of a low-luminosity subsample suggests that this assumption of identical isothermal spectra would lead to a systematic error for a more statistically precise determination of the luminosity function's form.

  18. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 1795 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamura, T.; Kaastra, J. S.; Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F.; Mittaz, J. P. D.; Trudolyubov, S. P.; Stewart, G.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Lumb, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    The initial results from XMM-Newton observations of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 1795 are presented. The spatially-resolved X-ray spectra taken by the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) show a temperature drop at a radius of - 200 kpc from the cluster center, indicating that the ICM is cooling. Both the EPIC and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) spectra extracted from the cluster center can be described by an isothermal model with a temperature of approx. 4 keV. The volume emission measure of any cool component (less than 1 keV) is less than a few % of the hot component at the cluster center. A strong O VIII Lyman alpha line was detected with the RGS from the cluster core. The O abundance of the ICM is 0.2-0.5 times the solar value. The O to Fe ratio at the cluster center is 0.5 - 1.5 times the solar ratio.

  19. Diffuse X-ray emission from Abell clusters 401 and 399 - A gravitationally bound system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Kinzer, R.; Cruddace, R. G.; Wood, K.; Evans, W.; Byram, E. T.; Chubb, T. A.; Friedman, H.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray emission from the Abell 401-399 region has been studied using data obtained by the A-1 proportional counter aboard HEAO 1 in two different ways. The first involved routine scanning of the region during the all-sky survey, and the second was an observation in which the instrument was pointed at A401 during a lunar occultation. The emission is shown to be unusually extended and to be centered on a point lying between A401 and A399. The best fit of a uniform disk model to the data yielded a radius of 25.5 + or -4.4 arcmin for the lunar occultation and 42 + or - 17 arcmin for the scans. A possible explanation of the results is that A401 and A399 are both diffuse cluster X-ray sources. Alternatively, the emission may come from a large gas cloud of at least 10 to the 15th solar masses enveloping both clusters.

  20. XMM-Newton Observations of the Southeastern Radio Relic in Abell 3667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Emma; Vink, Jacco; Zandanel, Fabio; Akamatsu, Hiroki

    2018-06-01

    Radio relics, elongated, non-thermal, structures located at the edges of galaxy clusters, are the result of synchrotron radiation from cosmic-ray electrons accelerated by merger-driven shocks at the cluster outskirts. However, X-ray observations of such shocks in some clusters suggest that they are too weak to efficiently accelerate electrons via diffusive shock acceleration to energies required to produce the observed radio power. We examine this issue in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3667 (A3667), which hosts a pair of radio relics. While the Northwest relic in A3667 has been well studied in the radio and X-ray by multiple instruments, the Southeast relic region has only been observed so far by Suzaku, which detected a temperature jump across the relic, suggesting the presence of a weak shock. We present observations of the Southeastern region of A3667 with XMM-Newton centered on the radio relic. We confirm the existence of an X-ray shock with Mach number of about 1.8 from a clear detection of temperature jump and a tentative detection of a density jump, consistent with previous measurements by Suzaku. We discuss the implications of this measurement for diffusive shock acceleration as the main mechanism for explaining the origin of radio relics. We then speculate on the plausibility of alternative scenarios, including re-acceleration and variations in the Mach number along shock fronts.

  1. Anatomy of a Merger: A Deep Chandra Observation of Abell 115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, William R.

    2017-08-01

    A deep Chandra observation of Abell 115 provides a unique probe of the anatomy of cluster mergers. The X-ray image shows two prominent subclusters, A115N (north) and A115S (south) with a projected separation of almost 1 Mpc. The X-ray subclusters each have ram-pressure stripped tails that unambiguously indicate the directions of motion. The central BCG of A115N hosts the radio source 3C28 which shows a pair of jets, almost perpendicular to the direction of the sucluster's motion. The jets terminate in lobes each of which has a "tail" pointing IN the direction of motion of the subcluster. The Chandra analysis provides details of the merger including the velocities of the subclusters both through analysis of the cold front and a weak shock. The motion of A115N through the cluster generates counter-rotating vortices in the subcluster gas that form the two radio tails. Hydrodynamic modeling yields circulation velocities within the A115N sub cluster. Thus, the radio emitting plasma acts as a dye tracing the motions of the X-ray emitting plasma. A115S shows two "cores", one coincident with the BCG and a second appears as a ram pressure stripped tail.

  2. Canibalismo Extremo y Lente Gravitacional Intensa en el Cúmulo de Galaxias Abell 3827

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, R. J.; West, M.; Bergmann, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; Gomez, P.; Lee, H.; Miller, B.; Turner, J.

    Abell 3827 is one of the most massive known clusters and at its center we observe an extreme example of galactic canibalism: a super giant elliptical galaxy in its formation process, devoring five massive galaxies at the same time. Using high spatial resolution Gemini+GMOS imagery and multi-object spectroscopy, we derived the redshift (z=0.099) and the radial velocity dispersion of the 55 brightest galaxies in the cluster central region (1134 +- 125 km/s). The estimated virial mass is ~ 1E14 M(sun) inside a radius of 300 kpc of the cluster center. We have also found features corresponding to a strong gravitational lense, four anular features arranged in an Einstein Ring from a galaxy (z=0.2) at double redshift than the cluster, and a fifth arclet feature corresponding to the lensed light of a farther galaxy (z=0.4). The possible Einstein Ring is of small angular size and the gravitational lense morphology would confirm that the cluster is indeed very massive and dense. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH.

  3. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING BY THE SUPER-MASSIVE cD GALAXY IN ABELL 3827

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, E. R.; Gomez, P. L.; Lee, H.

    2010-06-01

    We have discovered strong gravitational lensing features in the core of the nearby cluster Abell 3827 by analyzing Gemini South GMOS images. The most prominent strong lensing feature is a highly magnified, ring-shaped configuration of four images around the central cD galaxy. GMOS spectroscopic analysis puts this source at z {approx} 0.2. Located {approx}20'' away from the central galaxy is a secondary tangential arc feature which has been identified as a background galaxy with z {approx} 0.4. We have modeled the gravitational potential of the cluster core, taking into account the mass from the cluster, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG),more » and other galaxies. We derive a total mass of (2.7 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 13} M {sub sun} within 37 h {sup -1} kpc. This mass is an order of magnitude larger than that derived from X-ray observations. The total mass derived from lensing data suggests that the BCG in this cluster is perhaps the most massive galaxy in the nearby universe.« less

  4. Abell 1142 and the Missing Central Galaxy – A Cluster in Transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alexander; Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David; Forman, William; van Weeren, Reinout; Jones, Christine; Gastaldello, Fabio; Kraft, Ralph; Randall, Scott

    2018-01-01

    Two types of galaxy clusters exist: cool core (CC) clusters which exhibit centrally-peaked metallicity and X-ray emission and non-cool core (NCC) clusters, possessing comparably homogeneous metallicity and X-ray emission distributions. However, the origin of this dichotomy is still unknown. The current prevailing theories state that either there is a primordial entropy limit, above which a CC is unable to form, or that clusters can change type through major mergers and radiative cooling. Abell 1142 is a galaxy cluster that can provide a unique probe of the root of this cluster-type division. It is formed of two merging sub-clusters, each with its own brightest cluster galaxies (BCG). Its enriched X-ray centroid (possible CC remnant) lies between these two BCGs. We present the thermal and chemical distributions of this system using deep (180ks) XMM-Newton observations to shed light on the role of mergers in the evolution of galaxy clusters.

  5. Deep Chandra observations of the stripped galaxy group falling into Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.; Gaspari, M.; Owers, M. S.; Roediger, E.; Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Paltani, S.; Ettori, S.; Venturi, T.; Rossetti, M.; Rudnick, L.

    2017-09-01

    In the local Universe, the growth of massive galaxy clusters mainly operates through the continuous accretion of group-scale systems. The infalling group in Abell 2142 is the poster child of such an accreting group, and as such, it is an ideal target to study the astrophysical processes induced by structure formation. We present the results of a deep (200 ks) observation of this structure with Chandra that highlights the complexity of this system in exquisite detail. In the core of the group, the spatial resolution of Chandra reveals a leading edge and complex AGN-induced activity. The morphology of the stripped gas tail appears straight in the innermost 250 kpc, suggesting that magnetic draping efficiently shields the gas from its surroundings. However, beyond 300 kpc from the core, the tail flares and the morphology becomes strongly irregular, which could be explained by a breaking of the drape, for example, caused by turbulent motions. The power spectrum of surface-brightness fluctuations is relatively flat (P2D ∝ k-2.3), which indicates that thermal conduction is strongly inhibited even beyond the region where magnetic draping is effective. The amplitude of density fluctuations in the tail is consistent with a mild level of turbulence with a Mach number M3D 0.1 - 0.25. Overall, our results show that the processes leading to the thermalization and mixing of the infalling gas are slow and relatively inefficient.

  6. Wavelet transform analysis of the small-scale X-ray structure of the cluster Abell 1367

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebeney, S. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a new technique based on a wavelet transform analysis to quantify the small-scale (less than a few arcminutes) X-ray structure of clusters of galaxies. We apply this technique to the ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) and Einstein high-resolution imager (HRI) images of the central region of the cluster Abell 1367 to detect sources embedded within the diffuse intracluster medium. In addition to detecting sources and determining their fluxes and positions, we show that the wavelet analysis allows a characterization of the sources extents. In particular, the wavelet scale at which a given source achieves a maximum signal-to-noise ratio in the wavelet images provides an estimate of the angular extent of the source. To account for the widely varying point response of the ROSAT PSPC as a function of off-axis angle requires a quantitative measurement of the source size and a comparison to a calibration derived from the analysis of a Deep Survey image. Therefore, we assume that each source could be described as an isotropic two-dimensional Gaussian and used the wavelet amplitudes, at different scales, to determine the equivalent Gaussian Full Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) (and its uncertainty) appropriate for each source. In our analysis of the ROSAT PSPC image, we detect 31 X-ray sources above the diffuse cluster emission (within a radius of 24 min), 16 of which are apparently associated with cluster galaxies and two with serendipitous, background quasars. We find that the angular extents of 11 sources exceed the nominal width of the PSPC point-spread function. Four of these extended sources were previously detected by Bechtold et al. (1983) as 1 sec scale features using the Einstein HRI. The same wavelet analysis technique was applied to the Einstein HRI image. We detect 28 sources in the HRI image, of which nine are extended. Eight of the extended sources correspond to sources previously detected by Bechtold et al. Overall, using both the

  7. Structure and Formation of cD Galaxies: NGC 6166 in ABELL 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Ralf; Kormendy, John; Cornell, Mark E.; Fisher, David B.

    2015-07-01

     Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy is used to measure the velocity dispersion profile of the nearest prototypical cD galaxy, NGC 6166 in the cluster Abell 2199. We also present composite surface photometry from many telescopes. We confirm the defining feature of a cD galaxy; i.e., (we suggest), a halo of stars that fills the cluster center and that is controlled dynamically by cluster gravity, not by the central galaxy. Our HET spectroscopy shows that the velocity dispersion of NGC 6166 rises from σ ≃ 300 km s-1 in the inner r˜ 10\\prime\\prime to σ =865+/- 58 km s-1 at r ˜ 100″ in the cD halo. This extends published observations of an outward σ increase and shows for the first time that σ rises all the way to the cluster velocity dispersion of 819 ± 32 km s-1. We also observe that the main body of NGC 6166 moves at +206 ± 39 km s-1 with respect to the cluster mean velocity, but the velocity of the inner cD halo is ˜70 km s-1 closer to the cluster velocity. These results support our picture that cD halos consist of stars that were stripped from individual cluster galaxies by fast tidal encounters.  However, our photometry does not confirm the widespread view that cD halos are identifiable as an extra, low-surface-brightness component that is photometrically distinct from the inner, steep-Sérsic-function main body of an otherwise-normal giant elliptical galaxy. Instead, all of the brightness profile of NGC 6166 outside its core is described to ±0.037 V mag arcsec-2 by a single Sérsic function with index n≃ 8.3. The cD halo is not recognizable from photometry alone. This blurs the distinction between cluster-dominated cD halos and the similarly-large-Sérsic-index halos of giant, core-boxy-nonrotating ellipticals. These halos are believed to be accreted onto compact, high-redshift progenitors (“red nuggets”) by large numbers of minor mergers. They belong dynamically to their central galaxies. Still, cDs and core-boxy-nonrotating Es

  8. Time-reversal and Bayesian inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debski, Wojciech

    2017-04-01

    Probabilistic inversion technique is superior to the classical optimization-based approach in all but one aspects. It requires quite exhaustive computations which prohibit its use in huge size inverse problems like global seismic tomography or waveform inversion to name a few. The advantages of the approach are, however, so appealing that there is an ongoing continuous afford to make the large inverse task as mentioned above manageable with the probabilistic inverse approach. One of the perspective possibility to achieve this goal relays on exploring the internal symmetry of the seismological modeling problems in hand - a time reversal and reciprocity invariance. This two basic properties of the elastic wave equation when incorporating into the probabilistic inversion schemata open a new horizons for Bayesian inversion. In this presentation we discuss the time reversal symmetry property, its mathematical aspects and propose how to combine it with the probabilistic inverse theory into a compact, fast inversion algorithm. We illustrate the proposed idea with the newly developed location algorithm TRMLOC and discuss its efficiency when applied to mining induced seismic data.

  9. Twin radio relics in the nearby low-mass galaxy cluster Abell 168

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarakanath, K. S.; Parekh, V.; Kale, R.; George, L. T.

    2018-06-01

    We report the discovery of twin radio relics in the outskirts of the low-mass merging galaxy cluster Abell 168 (redshift=0.045). One of the relics is elongated with a linear extent ˜800 kpc and projected width of ˜80 kpc and is located ˜900 kpc towards the north of the cluster centre, oriented roughly perpendicular to the major axis of the X-ray emission. The second relic is ring-shaped with a size ˜220 kpc and is located near the inner edge of the elongated relic at a distance of ˜600 kpc from the cluster centre. These radio sources were imaged at 323 and 608 MHz with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope and at 1520 MHz with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). The elongated relic was detected at all frequencies, with a radio power of 1.38 ± 0.14 × 1023 W Hz-1 at 1.4 GHz and a power law in the frequency range 70-1500 MHz (S ∝ να, α = -1.1 ± 0.04). This radio power is in good agreement with that expected from the known empirical relation between the radio powers of relics and host cluster masses. This is the lowest mass (M500 = 1.24 × 1014 M⊙) cluster in which relics due to merger shocks are detected. The ring-shaped relic has a steeper spectral index (α) of -1.74 ± 0.29 in the frequency range 100-600 MHz. We propose this relic to be an old plasma, revived due to adiabatic compression by the outgoing shock that produced the elongated relic.

  10. Radio observations of the double-relic galaxy cluster Abell 1240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, D. N.; Shimwell, T. W.; van Weeren, R. J.; Intema, H. T.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Akamatsu, H.; Bonafede, A.; Brunetti, G.; Dawson, W. A.; Golovich, N.; Best, P. N.; Botteon, A.; Brüggen, M.; Cassano, R.; de Gasperin, F.; Hoeft, M.; Stroe, A.; White, G. J.

    2018-05-01

    We present LOFAR 120 - 168 MHz images of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 1240 that hosts double radio relics. In combination with the GMRT 595 - 629 MHz and VLA 2 - 4 GHz data, we characterised the spectral and polarimetric properties of the radio emission. The spectral indices for the relics steepen from their outer edges towards the cluster centre and the electric field vectors are approximately perpendicular to the major axes of the relics. The results are consistent with the picture that these relics trace large-scale shocks propagating outwards during the merger. Assuming diffusive shock acceleration (DSA), we obtain shock Mach numbers of M=2.4 and 2.3 for the northern and southern shocks, respectively. For M≲ 3 shocks, a pre-existing population of mildly relativistic electrons is required to explain the brightness of the relics due to the high (>10 per cent) particle acceleration efficiency required. However, for M≳ 4 shocks the required efficiency is ≳ 1% and ≳ 0.5%, respectively, which is low enough for shock acceleration directly from the thermal pool. We used the fractional polarization to constrain the viewing angle to ≥53 ± 3° and ≥39 ± 5° for the northern and southern shocks, respectively. We found no evidence for diffuse emission in the cluster central region. If the halo spans the entire region between the relics (˜1.8 Mpc) our upper limit on the power is P1.4GHz = (1.4 ± 0.6) × 1023 W Hz-1 which is approximately equal to the anticipated flux from a cluster of this mass. However, if the halo is smaller than this, our constraints on the power imply that the halo is underluminous.

  11. Can standard cosmological models explain the observed Abell cluster bulk flow?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Michael A.; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Laure, Tod R.; Postman, Marc

    1995-01-01

    Lauer and Postman (LP) observed that all Abell clusters with redshifts less than 15,000 km/s appear to be participating in a bulk flow of 689 km/s with respect to the cosmic microwave background. We find this result difficult to reconcile with all popular models for large-scale structure formation that assume Gaussian initial conditions. This conclusion is based on Monte Carlo realizations of the LP data, drawn from large particle-mesh N-body simulations for six different models of the initial power spectrum (standard, tilted, and Omega(sub 0) = 0.3 cold dark matter, and two variants of the primordial baryon isocurvature model). We have taken special care to treat properly the longest-wavelength components of the power spectra. The simulations are sampled, 'observed,' and analyzed as identically as possible to the LP cluster sample. Large-scale bulk flows as measured from clusters in the simulations are in excellent agreement with those measured from the grid: the clusters do not exhibit any strong velocity bias on large scales. Bulk flows with amplitude as large as that reported by LP are not uncommon in the Monte Carlo data stes; the distribution of measured bulk flows before error bias subtraction is rougly Maxwellian, with a peak around 400 km/s. However the chi squared of the observed bulk flow, taking into account the anisotropy of the error ellipsoid, is much more difficult to match in the simulations. The models examined are ruled out at confidence levels between 94% and 98%.

  12. Galaxy evolution in the cluster Abell 85: new insights from the dwarf population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habas, Rebecca; Fadda, Dario; Marleau, Francine R.; Biviano, Andrea; Durret, Florence

    2018-04-01

    We present the first results of a new spectroscopic survey of the cluster Abell 85 targeting 1466 candidate cluster members within the central ˜1 deg2 of the cluster and having magnitudes mr < 20.5 using the VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph on the VLT and the Hydra spectrograh on WIYN. A total of 520 galaxies are confirmed as either relaxed cluster members or part of an infalling population. A significant fraction are low mass; the median stellar mass of the sample is 109.6 M⊙, and 25 per cent have stellar masses below 109 M⊙ (i.e. 133 dwarf galaxies). We also identify seven active galactic nuclei (AGN), four of which reside in dwarf host galaxies. We probe the evolution of star formation rates, based on Hα emission and continuum modelling, as a function of both mass and environment. We find that more star-forming galaxies are observed at larger clustercentric distances, while infalling galaxies show evidence for recently enhanced star-forming activity. Main-sequence galaxies, defined by their continuum star formation rates, show different evolutionary behaviour based on their mass. At the low-mass end, the galaxies have had their star formation recently quenched, while more massive galaxies show no significant change. The time-scales probed here favour fast quenching mechanisms, such as ram-pressure stripping. Galaxies within the green valley, defined similarly, do not show evidence of quenching. Instead, the low-mass galaxies maintain their levels of star-forming activity, while the more massive galaxies have experienced a recent burst.

  13. Dynamics of cD clusters of galaxies. II: Analysis of seven Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Hill, John M.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of the seven Abell clusters A193, A399, A401, A1795, A1809, A2063, and A2124, based on redshift data reported previously by us (Hill & Oegerle, (1993)). These papers present the initial results of a survey of cD cluster kinematics, with an emphasis on studying the nature of peculiar velocity cD galaxies and their parent clusters. In the current sample, we find no evidence for significant peculiar cD velocities, with respect to the global velocity distribution. However, the cD in A2063 has a significant (3 sigma) peculiar velocity with respect to galaxies in the inner 1.5 Mpc/h, which is likely due to the merger of a subcluster with A2063. We also find significant evidence for subclustering in A1795, and a marginally peculiar cD velocity with respect to galaxies within approximately 200 kpc/h of the cD. The available x-ray, optical, and galaxy redshift data strongly suggest that a subcluster has merged with A1795. We propose that the subclusters which merged with A1795 and A2063 were relatively small, with shallow potential wells, so that the cooling flows in these clusters were not disrupted. Two-body gravitational models of the A399/401 and A2063/MKW3S systems indicate that A399/401 is a bound pair with a total virial mass of approximately 4 x 10(exp 15) solar mass/h, while A2063 and MKW3S are very unlikely to be bound.

  14. Exploring the origin of a large cavity in Abell 1795 using deep Chandra observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Kosec, P.

    2014-12-01

    We examine deep stacked Chandra observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 1795 (over 700 ks) to study in depth a large (34 kpc radius) cavity in the X-ray emission. Curiously, despite the large energy required to form this cavity (4PV = 4 × 1060 erg), there is no obvious counterpart to the cavity on the opposite side of the cluster, which would be expected if it has formed due to jets from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) inflating bubbles. There is also no radio emission associated with the cavity, and no metal enhancement or filaments between it and the brightest cluster galaxy, which are normally found for bubbles inflated by AGN which have risen from the core. One possibility is that this is an old ghost cavity, and that gas sloshing has dominated the distribution of metals around the core. Projection effects, particularly the long X-ray bright filament to the south-east, may prevent us from seeing the companion bubble on the opposite side of the cluster core. We calculate that such a companion bubble would easily have been able to uplift the gas in the southern filament from the core. Interestingly, it has recently been found that inside the cavity is a highly variable X-ray point source coincident with a small dwarf galaxy. Given the remarkable spatial correlation of this point source and the X-ray cavity, we explore the possibility that an outburst from this dwarf galaxy in the past could have led to the formation of the cavity, but find this to be an unlikely scenario.

  15. Detection of a pair of prominent X-ray cavities in Abell 3847

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagshette, Nilkanth D.; Naik, Sachindra; Patil, Madhav. K.; Sonkamble, Satish S.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results obtained from a detailed analysis of a deep Chandra observation of the bright FRII radio galaxy 3C 444 in Abell 3847 cluster. A pair of huge X-ray cavities are detected along the north and south directions from the centre of 3C 444. X-ray and radio images of the cluster reveal peculiar positioning of the cavities and radio bubbles. The radio lobes and X-ray cavities are apparently not spatially coincident and exhibit offsets by ˜61 and 77 kpc from each other along the north and south directions, respectively. Radial temperature and density profiles reveal the presence of a cool core in the cluster. Imaging and spectral studies showed the removal of substantial amount of matter from the core of the cluster by the radio jets. A detailed analysis of the temperature and density profiles showed the presence of a rarely detected elliptical shock in the cluster. Detection of inflating cavities at an average distance of ˜55 kpc from the centre implies that the central engine feeds a remarkable amount of radio power (˜6.3 × 1044 erg s-1) into the intra-cluster medium over ˜108 yr, the estimated age of cavity. The cooling luminosity of the cluster was estimated to be ˜8.30 × 1043 erg s-1 , which confirms that the AGN power is sufficient to quench the cooling. Ratios of mass accretion rate to Eddington and Bondi rates were estimated to be ˜0.08 and 3.5 × 104, respectively. This indicates that the black hole in the core of the cluster accretes matter through chaotic cold accretion.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Magellan/M2FS spectroscopy of Abell 267 (Tucker+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, E.; Walker, M. G.; Mateo, M.; Olszewski, E. W.; Bailey, J. I.; Crane, J. D.; Shectman, S. A.

    2018-02-01

    We select targets for Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) observations by identifying galaxies detected in SDSS images (Data Release 12; Alam et al.2015, Cat. V/147) that are projected along the line of sight to Abell 267 and are likely to be quiescent cluster members. We observed 223 individual galaxy spectra on 2013 November 30 on the Clay Magellan Telescope using M2FS. We used the low-resolution grating on M2FS and chose a coverage range of 4600-6400Å with a resolution of R~2000. The detector used with M2FS consists of two 4096*4112 pixel CCDs. (1 data file).

  17. Generalized Uncertainty Quantification for Linear Inverse Problems in X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Michael James

    2014-04-25

    In industrial and engineering applications, X-ray radiography has attained wide use as a data collection protocol for the assessment of material properties in cases where direct observation is not possible. The direct measurement of nuclear materials, particularly when they are under explosive or implosive loading, is not feasible, and radiography can serve as a useful tool for obtaining indirect measurements. In such experiments, high energy X-rays are pulsed through a scene containing material of interest, and a detector records a radiograph by measuring the radiation that is not attenuated in the scene. One approach to the analysis of these radiographsmore » is to model the imaging system as an operator that acts upon the object being imaged to produce a radiograph. In this model, the goal is to solve an inverse problem to reconstruct the values of interest in the object, which are typically material properties such as density or areal density. The primary objective in this work is to provide quantitative solutions with uncertainty estimates for three separate applications in X-ray radiography: deconvolution, Abel inversion, and radiation spot shape reconstruction. For each problem, we introduce a new hierarchical Bayesian model for determining a posterior distribution on the unknowns and develop efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for sampling from the posterior. A Poisson likelihood, based on a noise model for photon counts at the detector, is combined with a prior tailored to each application: an edge-localizing prior for deconvolution; a smoothing prior with non-negativity constraints for spot reconstruction; and a full covariance sampling prior based on a Wishart hyperprior for Abel inversion. After developing our methods in a general setting, we demonstrate each model on both synthetically generated datasets, including those from a well known radiation transport code, and real high energy radiographs taken at two U. S. Department of Energy

  18. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery BLADE magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: an alternative to spin-echo technique for detection of brain lesions in the unsedated pediatric patient?

    PubMed

    Alibek, Sedat; Adamietz, Boris; Cavallaro, Alexander; Stemmer, Alto; Anders, Katharina; Kramer, Manuel; Bautz, Werner; Staatz, Gundula

    2008-08-01

    We compared contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain using different types of data acquisition techniques: periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER, BLADE) imaging versus standard k-space sampling (conventional spin-echo pulse sequence) in the unsedated pediatric patient with focus on artifact reduction, overall image quality, and lesion detectability. Forty-eight pediatric patients (aged 3 months to 18 years) were scanned with a clinical 1.5-T whole body MR scanner. Cross-sectional contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo sequence was compared to a T1-weighted dark-fluid fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) BLADE sequence for qualitative and quantitative criteria (image artifacts, image quality, lesion detectability) by two experienced radiologists. Imaging protocols were matched for imaging parameters. Reader agreement was assessed using the exact Bowker test. BLADE images showed significantly less pulsation and motion artifacts than the standard T1-weighted spin-echo sequence scan. BLADE images showed statistically significant lower signal-to-noise ratio but higher contrast-to-noise ratios with superior gray-white matter contrast. All lesions were demonstrated on FLAIR BLADE imaging, and one false-positive lesion was visible in spin-echo sequence images. BLADE MR imaging at 1.5 T is applicable for central nervous system imaging of the unsedated pediatric patient, reduces motion and pulsation artifacts, and minimizes the need for sedation or general anesthesia without loss of relevant diagnostic information.

  19. Illuminating a Dark Lens : A Type Ia Supernova Magnified by the Frontier Fields Galaxy Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Patel, Brandon; Scolnic, Daniel; Foley, Ryan J.; Molino, Alberto; Brammer, Gabriel; Jauzac, Mathilde; Bradač, Maruša; Broadhurst, Tom; Coe, Dan; Diego, Jose M.; Graur, Or; Hjorth, Jens; Hoag, Austin; Jha, Saurabh W.; Johnson, Traci L.; Kelly, Patrick; Lam, Daniel; McCully, Curtis; Medezinski, Elinor; Meneghetti, Massimo; Merten, Julian; Richard, Johan; Riess, Adam; Sharon, Keren; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Treu, Tommaso; Wang, Xin; Williams, Liliya L. R.; Zitrin, Adi

    2015-09-01

    SN HFF14Tom is a Type Ia SN discovered at z=1.3457+/- 0.0001 behind the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). In a cosmology-independent analysis, we find that HFF14Tom is 0.77 ± 0.15 mag brighter than unlensed Type Ia SNe at similar redshift, implying a lensing magnification of {μ }{obs}=2.03+/- 0.29. This observed magnification provides a rare opportunity for a direct empirical test of galaxy cluster lens models. Here we test 17 lens models, 13 of which were generated before the SN magnification was known, qualifying as pure “blind tests.” The models are collectively fairly accurate: 8 of the models deliver median magnifications that are consistent with the measured μ to within 1σ. However, there is a subtle systematic bias: the significant disagreements all involve models overpredicting the magnification. We evaluate possible causes for this mild bias, and find no single physical or methodological explanation to account for it. We do find that model accuracy can be improved to some extent with stringent quality cuts on multiply imaged systems, such as requiring that a large fraction have spectroscopic redshifts. In addition to testing model accuracies as we have done here, Type Ia SN magnifications could also be used as inputs for future lens models of Abell 2744 and other clusters, providing valuable constraints in regions where traditional strong- and weak-lensing information is unavailable.

  20. A photometric analysis of Abell 1689: two-dimensional multistructure decomposition, morphological classification and the Fundamental Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Bontà, E.; Davies, R. L.; Houghton, R. C. W.; D'Eugenio, F.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    2018-02-01

    We present a photometric analysis of 65 galaxies in the rich cluster Abell 1689 at z = 0.183, using the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys archive images in the rest-frame V band. We perform two-dimensional multicomponent photometric decomposition of each galaxy adopting different models of the surface-brightness distribution. We present an accurate morphological classification for each of the sample galaxies. For 50 early-type galaxies, we fit both a de Vaucouleurs law and a Sérsic law; S0s are modelled by also including a disc component described by an exponential law. Bars of SB0s are described by the profile of a Ferrers ellipsoid. For the 15 spirals, we model a Sérsic bulge, exponential disc and, when required, a Ferrers bar component. We derive the Fundamental Plane (FP) by fitting 40 early-type galaxies in the sample, using different surface-brightness distributions. We find that the tightest plane is that derived by Sérsic bulges. We find that bulges of spirals lie on the same relation. The FP is better defined by the bulges alone rather than the entire galaxies. Comparison with local samples shows both an offset and rotation in the FP of Abell 1689.

  1. Real Variable Inversion of Laplace Transforms: An Application in Plasma Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohn, C. L.; Flynn, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Laplace transform techniques and explains an alternative to them: the Widder's real inversion. To illustrate the power of this new technique, it is applied to a difficult inversion: the problem of Landau damping. (GA)

  2. A remarkably large depleted core in the Abell 2029 BCG IC 1101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Graham, Alister W.; Knapen, Johan H.

    2017-10-01

    We report the discovery of an extremely large (Rb ˜2.77 arcsec ≈ 4.2 kpc) core in the brightest cluster galaxy, IC 1101, of the rich galaxy cluster Abell 2029. Luminous core-Sérsic galaxies contain depleted cores - with sizes (Rb) typically 20-500 pc - that are thought to be formed by coalescing black hole binaries. We fit a (double nucleus) + (spheroid) + (intermediate-scale component) + (stellar halo) model to the Hubble Space Telescope surface brightness profile of IC 1101, finding the largest core size measured in any galaxy to date. This core is an order of magnitude larger than those typically measured for core-Sérsic galaxies. We find that the spheroid's V-band absolute magnitude (MV) of -23.8 mag (˜25 per cent of the total galaxy light, I.e. including the stellar halo) is faint for the large Rb, such that the observed core is 1.02 dex ≈ 3.4σs (rms scatter) larger than that estimated from the Rb-MV relation. The suspected scouring process has produced a large stellar mass deficit (Mdef) ˜4.9 × 1011 M⊙, I.e. a luminosity deficit ≈28 per cent of the spheroid's luminosity prior to the depletion. Using IC 1101's black hole mass (MBH) estimated from the MBH-σ, MBH-L and MBH-M* relations, we measure an excessive and unrealistically high number of 'dry' major mergers for IC 1101 (I.e. N ≳ 76) as traced by the large Mdef/MBH ratios of 38-101. The large core, high mass deficit and oversized Mdef/MBH ratio of IC 1101 suggest that the depleted core was scoured by overmassive SMBH binaries with a final coalesced mass MBH ˜ (4-10) × 1010 M⊙, I.e. ˜ (1.7-3.2) × σs larger than the black hole masses estimated using the spheroid's σ, L and M*. The large core might be partly due to oscillatory core passages by a gravitational radiation-recoiled black hole.

  3. The mystery of the "Kite" radio source in Abell 2626: Insights from new Chandra observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignesti, A.; Gitti, M.; Brunetti, G.; O'Sullivan, E.; Sarazin, C.; Wong, K.

    2018-03-01

    Context. We present the results of a new Chandra study of the galaxy cluster Abell 2626. The radio emission of the cluster shows a complex system of four symmetric arcs without known correlations with the thermal X-ray emission. The mirror symmetry of the radio arcs toward the center and the presence of two optical cores in the central galaxy suggested that they may be created by pairs of precessing radio jets powered by dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) inside the core dominant galaxy. However, previous observations failed to observe the second jetted AGN and the spectral trend due to radiative age along the radio arcs, thus challenging this interpretation. Aim. The new Chandra observation had several scientific objectives, including the search for the second AGN that would support the jet precession model. We focus here on the detailed study of the local properties of the thermal and non-thermal emission in the proximity of the radio arcs, in order to obtain further insights into their origin. Methods: We performed a standard data reduction of the Chandra dataset deriving the radial profiles of temperature, density, pressure and cooling time of the intra-cluster medium. We further analyzed the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of the gas temperature, discovering that the south-western junction of the radio arcs surrounds the cool core of the cluster. Results: We studied the X-ray surface brightness and spectral profiles across the junction, finding a cold front spatially coincident with the radio arcs. This may suggest a connection between the sloshing of the thermal gas and the nature of the radio filaments, raising new scenarios for their origin. A tantalizing possibility is that the radio arcs trace the projection of a complex surface connecting the sites where electrons are most efficiently reaccelerated by the turbulence that is generated by the gas sloshing. In this case, diffuse emission embedded by the arcs and with extremely steep spectrum should be

  4. Probing the non-thermal emission in Abell 2146 and the Perseus cluster with the JVLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendron-Marsolais, Marie-Lou; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; van Weeren, Reinout; Clarke, Tracy; Intema, Huib; Russell, Helen; Edge, Alastair; Fabian, Andy; Olamaie, Malak; Rumsey, Clare; King, Lindsay; McNamara, Brian; Fecteau-Beaucage, David; Hogan, Michael; Mezcua, Mar; Taylor, Gregory; Blundell, Katherine; Sanders, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    Jets created from accretion onto supermassive black holes release relativistic particles on large distances. These strongly affect the intracluster medium when located in the center of a brightest cluster galaxy. The hierarchical merging of subclusters and groups, from which cluster originate, also generates perturbations into the intracluster medium through shocks and turbulence, constituting a potential source of reacceleration for these particles. I will present deep multi-configuration low radio frequency observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of two unique clusters, probing the non-thermal emission from the old particle population of the AGN outflows.Recently awarded of 550 hours of Chandra observations, Abell 2146 is one of the rare clusters undergoing a spectacular merger in the plane of the sky. Our recent deep multi-configuration JVLA 1.4 GHz observations have revealed the presence of a structure extending to 850 kpc in size, consisting of one component associated with the upstream shock and classified as a radio relic, and one associated with the subcluster core, consistent with a radio halo bounded by the bow shock. Theses structures have some of the lowest radio powers detected thus far in any cluster. The flux measurements of the halo, its morphology and measurements of the dynamical state of the cluster suggest that the halo was recently created (~ 0.3 Gyr after core passage). This makes A2146 extremely interesting to study, allowing us to probe the complete evolutionary stages of halos.I will also present results on 230-470 MHz JVLA observations of the Perseus cluster. Our observations of this nearby relaxed cool core cluster have revealed a multitude of new structures associated with the mini-halo, extending to hundreds of kpc in size. Its irregular morphology seems to be have been influenced both by the AGN activity and by the sloshing motion of the cluster’ gas. In addition, it has a filamentary structure similar to that seen in

  5. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  6. Vitamins and Violence: Can Micronutrients Make Students Behave, Schools Safer and Test Scores Better? The Abell Report. Volume 23, No.6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joann Ellison

    2010-01-01

    The notion that vitamins, minerals, and other "supplemental" nutrients profoundly change behavior, mood, and intellect has origins as old as recorded history. Research has indeed suggested connections between nutrient deficiencies and behavior problems, but correlations are not the same as causality. This "Abell Report" is an…

  7. Zero-order bows in radially inhomogeneous spheres: direct and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    Adam, John A

    2011-10-01

    Zero-order ray paths are examined in radially inhomogeneous spheres with differentiable refractive index profiles. It is demonstrated that zero-order and sometimes twin zero-order bows can exist when the gradient of refractive index is sufficiently negative. Abel inversion is used to "recover" the refractive index profiles; it is therefore possible in principle to specify the nature and type of bows and determine the refractive index profile that induces them. This may be of interest in the field of rainbow refractometry and optical fiber studies. This ray-theoretic analysis has direct similarities with the phenomenon of "orbiting" and other phenomena in scattering theory and also in seismological, surface gravity wave, and gravitational "lensing" studies. For completeness these topics are briefly discussed in the appendixes; they may also be of pedagogic interest.

  8. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood,more » and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.« less

  9. Bayesian inversion of refraction seismic traveltime data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryberg, T.; Haberland, Ch

    2018-03-01

    We apply a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) formalism to the inversion of refraction seismic, traveltime data sets to derive 2-D velocity models below linear arrays (i.e. profiles) of sources and seismic receivers. Typical refraction data sets, especially when using the far-offset observations, are known as having experimental geometries which are very poor, highly ill-posed and far from being ideal. As a consequence, the structural resolution quickly degrades with depth. Conventional inversion techniques, based on regularization, potentially suffer from the choice of appropriate inversion parameters (i.e. number and distribution of cells, starting velocity models, damping and smoothing constraints, data noise level, etc.) and only local model space exploration. McMC techniques are used for exhaustive sampling of the model space without the need of prior knowledge (or assumptions) of inversion parameters, resulting in a large number of models fitting the observations. Statistical analysis of these models allows to derive an average (reference) solution and its standard deviation, thus providing uncertainty estimates of the inversion result. The highly non-linear character of the inversion problem, mainly caused by the experiment geometry, does not allow to derive a reference solution and error map by a simply averaging procedure. We present a modified averaging technique, which excludes parts of the prior distribution in the posterior values due to poor ray coverage, thus providing reliable estimates of inversion model properties even in those parts of the models. The model is discretized by a set of Voronoi polygons (with constant slowness cells) or a triangulated mesh (with interpolation within the triangles). Forward traveltime calculations are performed by a fast, finite-difference-based eikonal solver. The method is applied to a data set from a refraction seismic survey from Northern Namibia and compared to conventional tomography. An inversion test

  10. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. I. Multiwavelength photometry of Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Buitrago, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Lotz, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Frontier Fields survey is a pioneering observational program aimed at collecting photometric data, both from space (Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope) and from ground-based facilities (VLT Hawk-I), for six deep fields pointing at clusters of galaxies and six nearby deep parallel fields, in a wide range of passbands. The analysis of these data is a natural outcome of the Astrodeep project, an EU collaboration aimed at developing methods and tools for extragalactic photometry and creating valuable public photometric catalogues. Aims: We produce multiwavelength photometric catalogues (from B to 4.5 μm) for the first two of the Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416 (plus their parallel fields). Methods: To detect faint sources even in the central regions of the clusters, we develop a robust and repeatable procedure that uses the public codes Galapagos and Galfit to model and remove most of the light contribution from both the brightest cluster members, and the intra-cluster light. We perform the detection on the processed HST H160 image to obtain a pure H-selected sample, which is the primary catalogue that we publish. We also add a sample of sources which are undetected in the H160 image but appear on a stacked infrared image. Photometry on the other HST bands is obtained using SExtractor, again on processed images after the procedure for foreground light removal. Photometry on the Hawk-I and IRAC bands is obtained using our PSF-matching deconfusion code t-phot. A similar procedure, but without the need for the foreground light removal, is adopted for the Parallel fields. Results: The procedure of foreground light subtraction allows for the detection and the photometric measurements of ~2500 sources per field. We deliver and release complete photometric H-detected catalogues, with the addition of the complementary sample of infrared-detected sources. All objects have multiwavelength coverage including B to H HST bands, plus K

  11. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    cas dans d'autres cas de figure. Par ailleurs, il peut être vu comme une des étapes dans le processus de détermination du comportement de l'aquifère. Il est montré que les méthodes d'évaluation des paramètres actuels ne diffèrent pas si ce n'est dans les détails des calculs informatiques. Il est montré qu'il existe une large panoplie de techniques d'inversion : codes de calcul utilisables par tout-un-chacun, accommodation de la variabilité via la géostatistique, incorporation d'informations géologiques et de différents types de données (température, occurrence, concentration en isotopes, âge, etc.), détermination de l'incertitude. Vu ces développements, la calibration automatique facilite énormément la modélisation. Par ailleurs, il est souhaitable que son utilisation devienne une pratique standardisée. Se sintetiza el estado del problema inverso en aguas subterráneas. El énfasis se ubica en la caracterización de acuíferos, donde los modeladores tienen que enfrentar la incertidumbre del modelo conceptual (principalmente variabilidad temporal y espacial), dependencia de escala, muchos tipos de parámetros desconocidos (transmisividad, recarga, condiciones limitantes, etc), no linealidad, y frecuentemente baja sensibilidad de variables de estado (típicamente presiones y concentraciones) a las propiedades del acuífero. Debido a estas dificultades, no puede separarse la calibración de los procesos de modelado, como frecuentemente se hace en otros campos. En su lugar, debe de visualizarse como un paso en el proceso de enten dimiento del comportamiento del acuífero. En realidad, se muestra que los métodos reales de estimación de parámetros no difieren uno del otro en lo esencial, aunque sí pueden diferir en los detalles computacionales. Se discute que existe amplio espacio para la mejora del problema inverso en aguas subterráneas: desarrollo de códigos amigables alusuario, acomodamiento de variabilidad a través de geoestad

  12. LOFAR discovery of an ultra-steep radio halo and giant head-tail radio galaxy in Abell 1132

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilber, A.; Brüggen, M.; Bonafede, A.; Savini, F.; Shimwell, T.; van Weeren, R. J.; Rafferty, D.; Mechev, A. P.; Intema, H.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Clarke, A. O.; Mahony, E. K.; Morganti, R.; Prandoni, I.; Brunetti, G.; Röttgering, H.; Mandal, S.; de Gasperin, F.; Hoeft, M.

    2018-01-01

    Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations at 144 MHz have revealed large-scale radio sources in the unrelaxed galaxy cluster Abell 1132. The cluster hosts diffuse radio emission on scales of ∼650 kpc near the cluster centre and a head-tail (HT) radio galaxy, extending up to 1 Mpc, south of the cluster centre. The central diffuse radio emission is not seen in NRAO VLA FIRST Survey, Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, nor in C & D array VLA observations at 1.4 GHz, but is detected in our follow-up Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations at 325 MHz. Using LOFAR and GMRT data, we determine the spectral index of the central diffuse emission to be α = -1.75 ± 0.19 (S ∝ να). We classify this emission as an ultra-steep spectrum radio halo and discuss the possible implications for the physical origin of radio haloes. The HT radio galaxy shows narrow, collimated emission extending up to 1 Mpc and another 300 kpc of more diffuse, disturbed emission, giving a full projected linear size of 1.3 Mpc - classifying it as a giant radio galaxy (GRG) and making it the longest HT found to date. The head of the GRG coincides with an elliptical galaxy (SDSS J105851.01+564308.5) belonging to Abell 1132. In our LOFAR image, there appears to be a connection between the radio halo and the GRG. The turbulence that may have produced the halo may have also affected the tail of the GRG. In turn, the GRG may have provided seed electrons for the radio halo.

  13. The near-infrared Tully-Fisher relation - A preliminary study of the Coma and Abell 400 clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Bernstein, Gary; Raychaudhury, Somak; Haynes, Martha; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Herter, Terry; Vogt, Nicole

    1993-01-01

    We have started a large project to study the NIR Tully-Fisher (TF) relation using H- and I-band surface photometry of spiral galaxies. A preliminary study of 20 spirals in the Coma and Abell 400 clusters is presented. The NIR images have been used to derive accurate inclinations and total magnitudes, and rotational linewidths are measured from high-quality 21-cm Arecibo data. The scatter in the Coma TF plot is found to be 0.19 mag in the H band and 0.20 mag in the I band for a set of 13 galaxies, if we assume that they are all at the same distance. The deviation of the Coma galaxies from the best-fit Tully-Fisher relation is correlated with their redshift, indicating that some of the galaxies are not bound to the cluster. Indeed, if we treat all the galaxies in the Coma sample as undergoing free Hubble expansion, the TF scatter drops to 0.12 and 0.13 mag for the H- and I-band datasets, respectively. The Abell 400 sample is best fit by a common distance model, yielding a scatter of 0.12 mag for seven galaxies in H using a fixed TF slope. We are in the process of studying cluster and field spirals out to about 10,000 km/s in order to calibrate the NIR TF relation and will apply it to more nearby galaxies to measure the peculiar velocity field in the local universe.

  14. A Joint Method of Envelope Inversion Combined with Hybrid-domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CUI, C.; Hou, W.

    2017-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) aims to construct high-precision subsurface models by fully using the information in seismic records, including amplitude, travel time, phase and so on. However, high non-linearity and the absence of low frequency information in seismic data lead to the well-known cycle skipping problem and make inversion easily fall into local minima. In addition, those 3D inversion methods that are based on acoustic approximation ignore the elastic effects in real seismic field, and make inversion harder. As a result, the accuracy of final inversion results highly relies on the quality of initial model. In order to improve stability and quality of inversion results, multi-scale inversion that reconstructs subsurface model from low to high frequency are applied. But, the absence of very low frequencies (< 3Hz) in field data is still bottleneck in the FWI. By extracting ultra low-frequency data from field data, envelope inversion is able to recover low wavenumber model with a demodulation operator (envelope operator), though the low frequency data does not really exist in field data. To improve the efficiency and viability of the inversion, in this study, we proposed a joint method of envelope inversion combined with hybrid-domain FWI. First, we developed 3D elastic envelope inversion, and the misfit function and the corresponding gradient operator were derived. Then we performed hybrid-domain FWI with envelope inversion result as initial model which provides low wavenumber component of model. Here, forward modeling is implemented in the time domain and inversion in the frequency domain. To accelerate the inversion, we adopt CPU/GPU heterogeneous computing techniques. There were two levels of parallelism. In the first level, the inversion tasks are decomposed and assigned to each computation node by shot number. In the second level, GPU multithreaded programming is used for the computation tasks in each node, including forward modeling, envelope

  15. Neural network explanation using inversion.

    PubMed

    Saad, Emad W; Wunsch, Donald C

    2007-01-01

    An important drawback of many artificial neural networks (ANN) is their lack of explanation capability [Andrews, R., Diederich, J., & Tickle, A. B. (1996). A survey and critique of techniques for extracting rules from trained artificial neural networks. Knowledge-Based Systems, 8, 373-389]. This paper starts with a survey of algorithms which attempt to explain the ANN output. We then present HYPINV, a new explanation algorithm which relies on network inversion; i.e. calculating the ANN input which produces a desired output. HYPINV is a pedagogical algorithm, that extracts rules, in the form of hyperplanes. It is able to generate rules with arbitrarily desired fidelity, maintaining a fidelity-complexity tradeoff. To our knowledge, HYPINV is the only pedagogical rule extraction method, which extracts hyperplane rules from continuous or binary attribute neural networks. Different network inversion techniques, involving gradient descent as well as an evolutionary algorithm, are presented. An information theoretic treatment of rule extraction is presented. HYPINV is applied to example synthetic problems, to a real aerospace problem, and compared with similar algorithms using benchmark problems.

  16. Magnetotelluric inversion via reverse time migration algorithm of seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Taeyoung; Shin, Changsoo

    2007-07-01

    We propose a new algorithm for two-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion. Our algorithm is an MT inversion based on the steepest descent method, borrowed from the backpropagation technique of seismic inversion or reverse time migration, introduced in the middle 1980s by Lailly and Tarantola. The steepest descent direction can be calculated efficiently by using the symmetry of numerical Green's function derived from a mixed finite element method proposed by Nedelec for Maxwell's equation, without calculating the Jacobian matrix explicitly. We construct three different objective functions by taking the logarithm of the complex apparent resistivity as introduced in the recent waveform inversionmore » algorithm by Shin and Min. These objective functions can be naturally separated into amplitude inversion, phase inversion and simultaneous inversion. We demonstrate our algorithm by showing three inversion results for synthetic data.« less

  17. Recursive inverse factorization.

    PubMed

    Rubensson, Emanuel H; Bock, Nicolas; Holmström, Erik; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2008-03-14

    A recursive algorithm for the inverse factorization S(-1)=ZZ(*) of Hermitian positive definite matrices S is proposed. The inverse factorization is based on iterative refinement [A.M.N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. B 70, 193102 (2004)] combined with a recursive decomposition of S. As the computational kernel is matrix-matrix multiplication, the algorithm can be parallelized and the computational effort increases linearly with system size for systems with sufficiently sparse matrices. Recent advances in network theory are used to find appropriate recursive decompositions. We show that optimization of the so-called network modularity results in an improved partitioning compared to other approaches. In particular, when the recursive inverse factorization is applied to overlap matrices of irregularly structured three-dimensional molecules.

  18. Atmospheric inverse modeling via sparse reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Nils; Miller, Scot M.; Maaß, Peter; Notholt, Justus; Palm, Mathias; Warneke, Thorsten

    2017-10-01

    Many applications in atmospheric science involve ill-posed inverse problems. A crucial component of many inverse problems is the proper formulation of a priori knowledge about the unknown parameters. In most cases, this knowledge is expressed as a Gaussian prior. This formulation often performs well at capturing smoothed, large-scale processes but is often ill equipped to capture localized structures like large point sources or localized hot spots. Over the last decade, scientists from a diverse array of applied mathematics and engineering fields have developed sparse reconstruction techniques to identify localized structures. In this study, we present a new regularization approach for ill-posed inverse problems in atmospheric science. It is based on Tikhonov regularization with sparsity constraint and allows bounds on the parameters. We enforce sparsity using a dictionary representation system. We analyze its performance in an atmospheric inverse modeling scenario by estimating anthropogenic US methane (CH4) emissions from simulated atmospheric measurements. Different measures indicate that our sparse reconstruction approach is better able to capture large point sources or localized hot spots than other methods commonly used in atmospheric inversions. It captures the overall signal equally well but adds details on the grid scale. This feature can be of value for any inverse problem with point or spatially discrete sources. We show an example for source estimation of synthetic methane emissions from the Barnett shale formation.

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Inverse Problems. Activities for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    into the nature of inverse problems and the appropriate mode of thought, chapter 1 offers historical vignettes, most of which have played an essential role in the development of natural science. These vignettes cover the first successful application of `non-destructive testing' by Archimedes (page 4) via Newton's laws of motion up to literary tomography, and readers will be able to enjoy a wide overview of inverse problems. Therefore, as the author asks, the reader should not skip this chapter. This may not be hard to do, since the headings of the sections are quite intriguing (`Archimedes' Bath', `Another World', `Got the Time?', `Head Games', etc). The author embarks on the technical approach to inverse problems in chapter 2. He has elegantly designed each section with a guide specifying course level, objective, mathematical and scientifical background and appropriate technology (e.g. types of calculators required). The guides are designed such that teachers may be able to construct effective and attractive courses by themselves. The book is not intended to offer one rigidly determined course, but should be used flexibly and independently according to the situation. Moreover, every section closes with activities which can be chosen according to the students' interests and levels of ability. Some of these exercises do not have ready solutions, but require long-term study, so readers are not required to solve all of them. After chapter 5, which contains discrete inverse problems such as the algebraic reconstruction technique and the Backus - Gilbert method, there are answers and commentaries to the activities. Finally, scripts in MATLAB are attached, although they can also be downloaded from the author's web page (http://math.uc.edu/~groetsch/). This book is aimed at students but it will be very valuable to researchers wishing to retain a wide overview of inverse problems in the midst of busy research activities. A Japanese version was published in 2002.

  20. Inversion of particle-size distribution from angular light-scattering data with genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ye, M; Wang, S; Lu, Y; Hu, T; Zhu, Z; Xu, Y

    1999-04-20

    A stochastic inverse technique based on a genetic algorithm (GA) to invert particle-size distribution from angular light-scattering data is developed. This inverse technique is independent of any given a priori information of particle-size distribution. Numerical tests show that this technique can be successfully applied to inverse problems with high stability in the presence of random noise and low susceptibility to the shape of distributions. It has also been shown that the GA-based inverse technique is more efficient in use of computing time than the inverse Monte Carlo method recently developed by Ligon et al. [Appl. Opt. 35, 4297 (1996)].

  1. A compilation of redshifts and velocity dispersions for Abell clusters (Struble and Rood 1987): Documentation for the machine-readable version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The machine readable version of the compilation, as it is currently being distributed from the Astronomical Data Center, is described. The catalog contains redshifts and velocity dispersions for all Abell clusters for which these data had been published up to 1986 July. Also included are 1950 equatorial coordinates for the centers of the listed clusters, numbers of observations used to determine the redshifts, and bibliographical references citing the data sources.

  2. Inverse problems and coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, H. P.; Ferwerda, H. A.

    1981-03-01

    A summary of current inverse problems of statistical optics is presented together with a short guide to the pertinent review-type literature. The retrieval of structural information from the far-zone degree of coherence and the average intensity distribution of radiation scattered by a superposition of random and periodic scatterers is discussed.

  3. ABEL model: Evaluates corporations` claims of inability to afford penalties and compliance costs (version 3.0.16). Model-simulation

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The easy-to-use ABEL software evaluates for-profit company claims of inability to afford penalties, clean-up costs, or compliance costs. Violators raise the issue of inability to pay in most of EPA`s enforcement actions regardless of whether there is any hard evidence supporting those claims. The program enables Federal, State and local enforcement professionals to quickly determine if there was any validity to those claims. ABEL is a tool that promotes quick settlements by performing screening analyses of defendants and potentially responsible parties (PRP`s) to determine their financial capacity. After analyzing some basic financial ratios that reflect a company`s solvency, ABEL assessesmore » the firm`s ability to pay by focusing on projected cash flows. The model explicitly calculates the value of projected, internally generated cash flows from historical tax information, and compares these cash flows to the proposed environmental expenditure(s). The software is extremely easy to use. Version 3.0.16 updates the standard values for inflation and discount rate.« less

  4. A Forward Glimpse into Inverse Problems through a Geology Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a forward approach to an inverse problem related to detecting the nature of geological substrata which makes use of optimization techniques in a multivariable calculus setting. The true nature of the related inverse problem is highlighted. (Contains 2 figures.)

  5. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  6. Inverse halftoning via robust nonlinear filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mei-Yin; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    1999-10-01

    A new blind inverse halftoning algorithm based on a nonlinear filtering technique of low computational complexity and low memory requirement is proposed in this research. It is called blind since we do not require the knowledge of the halftone kernel. The proposed scheme performs nonlinear filtering in conjunction with edge enhancement to improve the quality of an inverse halftoned image. Distinct features of the proposed approach include: efficiently smoothing halftone patterns in large homogeneous areas, additional edge enhancement capability to recover the edge quality and an excellent PSNR performance with only local integer operations and a small memory buffer.

  7. Computational inverse methods of heat source in fatigue damage problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aizhou; Li, Yuan; Yan, Bo

    2018-04-01

    Fatigue dissipation energy is the research focus in field of fatigue damage at present. It is a new idea to solve the problem of calculating fatigue dissipation energy by introducing inverse method of heat source into parameter identification of fatigue dissipation energy model. This paper introduces the research advances on computational inverse method of heat source and regularization technique to solve inverse problem, as well as the existing heat source solution method in fatigue process, prospects inverse method of heat source applying in fatigue damage field, lays the foundation for further improving the effectiveness of fatigue dissipation energy rapid prediction.

  8. Nonlinear adaptive inverse control via the unified model neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Jin-Tsong; Lee, Tsu-Tian

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new nonlinear adaptive inverse control via a unified model neural network. In order to overcome nonsystematic design and long training time in nonlinear adaptive inverse control, we propose the approximate transformable technique to obtain a Chebyshev Polynomials Based Unified Model (CPBUM) neural network for the feedforward/recurrent neural networks. It turns out that the proposed method can use less training time to get an inverse model. Finally, we apply this proposed method to control magnetic bearing system. The experimental results show that the proposed nonlinear adaptive inverse control architecture provides a greater flexibility and better performance in controlling magnetic bearing systems.

  9. Synthesis of nanostructured materials in inverse miniemulsions and their applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhihai; Ziener, Ulrich

    2013-11-07

    Polymeric nanogels, inorganic nanoparticles, and organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles can be prepared via the inverse miniemulsion technique. Hydrophilic functional cargos, such as proteins, DNA, and macromolecular fluoresceins, may be conveniently encapsulated in these nanostructured materials. In this review, the progress of inverse miniemulsions since 2000 is summarized on the basis of the types of reactions carried out in inverse miniemulsions, including conventional free radical polymerization, controlled/living radical polymerization, polycondensation, polyaddition, anionic polymerization, catalytic oxidation reaction, sol-gel process, and precipitation reaction of inorganic precursors. In addition, the applications of the nanostructured materials synthesized in inverse miniemulsions are also reviewed.

  10. Electrochemically driven emulsion inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johans, Christoffer; Kontturi, Kyösti

    2007-09-01

    It is shown that emulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants can be inverted by controlling the electrical potential across the oil-water interface. The potential dependent partitioning of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was studied by cyclic voltammetry at the 1,2-dichlorobenzene|water interface. In the emulsion the potential control was achieved by using a potential-determining salt. The inversion of a 1,2-dichlorobenzene-in-water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by SDS was followed by conductometry as a function of added tetrapropylammonium chloride. A sudden drop in conductivity was observed, indicating the change of the continuous phase from water to 1,2-dichlorobenzene, i.e. a water-in-1,2-dichlorobenzene emulsion was formed. The inversion potential is well in accordance with that predicted by the hydrophilic-lipophilic deviation if the interfacial potential is appropriately accounted for.

  11. Adaptive Inverse Control for Rotorcraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.

    1985-01-01

    convergence with increased possibility of unstable identification. In the simulation studies, the LMS adaptive inverse control algorithm is shown to be capable of adapting the inverse (controller) matrix to track changes in the flight conditions. The algorithm converges quickly for moderate disturbances, while taking longer for larger disturbances. Perfect knowledge of the inverse matrix is not required for good control of the N/Rev vibration. However it is shown that measurement noise will prevent the LMS adaptive inverse control technique from controlling the vibration, unless the signal averaging method presented is incorporated into the algorithm.

  12. Anisotropy effects on 3D waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stekl, I.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the recent years 3D waveform inversion has become achievable procedure for seismic data processing. A number of datasets has been inverted and presented (Warner el al 2008, Ben Hadj at all, Sirgue et all 2010) using isotropic 3D waveform inversion. However the question arises will the results be affected by isotropic assumption. Full-wavefield inversion techniques seek to match field data, wiggle-for-wiggle, to synthetic data generated by a high-resolution model of the sub-surface. In this endeavour, correctly matching the travel times of the principal arrivals is a necessary minimal requirement. In many, perhaps most, long-offset and wide-azimuth datasets, it is necessary to introduce some form of p-wave velocity anisotropy to match the travel times successfully. If this anisotropy is not also incorporated into the wavefield inversion, then results from the inversion will necessarily be compromised. We have incorporated anisotropy into our 3D wavefield tomography codes, characterised as spatially varying transverse isotropy with a tilted axis of symmetry - TTI anisotropy. This enhancement approximately doubles both the run time and the memory requirements of the code. We show that neglect of anisotropy can lead to significant artefacts in the recovered velocity models. We will present inversion results of inverting anisotropic 3D dataset by assuming isotropic earth and compare them with anisotropic inversion result. As a test case Marmousi model extended to 3D with no velocity variation in third direction and with added spatially varying anisotropy is used. Acquisition geometry is assumed as OBC with sources and receivers everywhere at the surface. We attempted inversion using both 2D and full 3D acquisition for this dataset. Results show that if no anisotropy is taken into account although image looks plausible most features are miss positioned in depth and space, even for relatively low anisotropy, which leads to incorrect result. This may lead to

  13. Program manual for the Eppler airfoil inversion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program is described for calculating the profile of an airfoil as well as the boundary layer momentum thickness and energy form parameter. The theory underlying the airfoil inversion technique developed by Eppler is discussed.

  14. Inverse kinematic-based robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolovich, W. A.; Flueckiger, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    A fundamental problem which must be resolved in virtually all non-trivial robotic operations is the well-known inverse kinematic question. More specifically, most of the tasks which robots are called upon to perform are specified in Cartesian (x,y,z) space, such as simple tracking along one or more straight line paths or following a specified surfacer with compliant force sensors and/or visual feedback. In all cases, control is actually implemented through coordinated motion of the various links which comprise the manipulator; i.e., in link space. As a consequence, the control computer of every sophisticated anthropomorphic robot must contain provisions for solving the inverse kinematic problem which, in the case of simple, non-redundant position control, involves the determination of the first three link angles, theta sub 1, theta sub 2, and theta sub 3, which produce a desired wrist origin position P sub xw, P sub yw, and P sub zw at the end of link 3 relative to some fixed base frame. Researchers outline a new inverse kinematic solution and demonstrate its potential via some recent computer simulations. They also compare it to current inverse kinematic methods and outline some of the remaining problems which will be addressed in order to render it fully operational. Also discussed are a number of practical consequences of this technique beyond its obvious use in solving the inverse kinematic question.

  15. Synergism and foaming properties in binary mixtures of a biosurfactant derived from Camellia oleifera Abel and synthetic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Jian, Hong-lei; Liao, Xiao-xia; Zhu, Li-wei; Zhang, Wei-ming; Jiang, Jian-xin

    2011-07-15

    A biosurfactant, named tea saponin (TS), was isolated and purified from the defatted seed of Camellia oleifera Abel. The characterization of TS including molecular weight, glycosyl composition, and thermal behavior as well as the surface and foaming properties was conducted. The synergistic interactions of binary systems of CTAB-TS, SDS-TS, and Brij35-TS were investigated. The results show that TS had a weight-average molecular weight of 809.12 g mol(-1) and contained four aglycones of L-rhamnose, D-galactose, D-glucose, and D-glucuronic acid. The critical micelle concentration (cmc) of 2.242 mmol L(-1) and the minimum surface tension (γ(cmc)) of 43.5 mN m(-1) were determined for TS. Synergisms in surface tension reduction efficiency, in mixed micelle formation, and in surface tension reduction effectiveness were observed in CTAB-TS and SDS-TS systems, whereas that was not shown in Brij35-TS mixtures. The mixtures of TS with CTAB and SDS showed synergism in foaming efficiency, but this synergism did not exist in Brij35-TS system with respect to the surface properties. Nevertheless, there appears to be no significant correlation between foam stability and the surface properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Uniform Contribution of Supernova Explosions to the Chemical Enrichment of Abell 3112 out to R{sub 200}

    SciTech Connect

    Ezer, Cemile; Ercan, E. Nihal; Bulbul, Esra

    2017-02-10

    The spatial distribution of the metals residing in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters records all the information on a cluster’s nucleosynthesis and chemical enrichment history. We present measurements from a total of 1.2 Ms Suzaku XIS and 72 ks Chandra observations of the cool-core galaxy cluster Abell 3112 out to its virial radius (∼1470 kpc). We find that the ratio of the observed supernova type Ia explosions to the total supernova explosions has a uniform distribution at a level of 12%–16% out to the cluster’s virial radius. The observed fraction of type Ia supernova explosions is in agreementmore » with the corresponding fraction found in our Galaxy and the chemical enrichment of our Galaxy. The non-varying supernova enrichment suggests that the ICM in cluster outskirts was enriched by metals at an early stage before the cluster itself was formed during a period of intense star formation activity. Additionally, we find that the 2D delayed detonation model CDDT produce significantly worse fits to the X-ray spectra compared to simple 1D W7 models. This is due to the relative overestimate of Si, and the underestimate of Mg in these models with respect to the measured abundances.« less

  17. Top-down estimate of surface flux in the Los Angeles Basin using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: assessing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CO2 and their impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brioude, Jerome; Angevine, Wayne; Ahmadov, Ravan; Kim, Si Wan; Evan, Stephanie; McKeen, Stuart; Hsie, Eirh Yu; Frost, Greg; Neuman, Andy; Pollack, Ilana; Peischl, Jeff; Ryerson, Tom; Holloway, John; Brown, Steeve; Nowak, John; Roberts, Jim; Wofsy, Steeve; Santoni, Greg; Trainer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    We present top-down estimates of anthropogenic CO, NOx and CO2 surface fluxes at mesoscale using a Lagrangian model in combination with three different WRF model configurations, driven by data from aircraft flights during the CALNEX campaign in southern California in May-June 2010. The US EPA National Emission Inventory 2005 (NEI 2005) was the prior in the CO and NOx inversion calculations. The flux ratio inversion method, based on linear relationships between chemical species, was used to calculate the CO2 inventory without prior knowledge of CO2 surface fluxes. The inversion was applied to each flight to estimate the variability of single-flight-based flux estimates. In Los Angeles (LA) County, the uncertainties on CO and NOx fluxes were 10% and 15%, respectively. Compared with NEI 2005, the CO posterior emissions were lower by 43% ± 6% in LA County and by 37% ± 10% in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). NOx posterior emissions were lower by 32% ± 10% in LA County and by 27% ± 15% in the SoCAB. NOx posterior emissions were 40% lower on weekends relative to weekdays. The CO2 posterior estimates were 183 ± 18 Tg yr-1 in SoCAB. A flight during ITCT in 2002 was used to estimate emissions in the LA Basin in 2002. From 2002 to 2010, the CO and NOx posterior emissions decreased by 41% and 37%, respectively, in agreement with previous studies. Over the same time period, CO2 emissions increased by 10% ± 14% in LA County but decreased by 4% ± 10% in the SoCAB, a statistically insignificant change. Overall, the posterior estimates were in good agreement with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory, with differences of 15% or less. However, the posterior spatial distribution in the basin was significantly different from CARB for NOx emissions. WRF-Chem mesoscale chemical-transport model simulations allowed an evaluation of differences in chemistry using different inventory assumptions, including NEI 2005, CARB 2010 and the posterior inventories derived in

  18. Top-down estimate of surface flux in the Los Angeles Basin using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: assessing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CO2 and their impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; Ahmadov, R.; Kim, S.-W.; Evan, S.; McKeen, S. A.; Hsie, E.-Y.; Frost, G. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J.; Brown, S. S.; Nowak, J. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Santoni, G. W.; Oda, T.; Trainer, M.

    2013-04-01

    We present top-down estimates of anthropogenic CO, NOx and CO2 surface fluxes at mesoscale using a Lagrangian model in combination with three different WRF model configurations, driven by data from aircraft flights during the CALNEX campaign in southern California in May-June 2010. The US EPA National Emission Inventory 2005 (NEI 2005) was the prior in the CO and NOx inversion calculations. The flux ratio inversion method, based on linear relationships between chemical species, was used to calculate the CO2 inventory without prior knowledge of CO2 surface fluxes. The inversion was applied to each flight to estimate the variability of single-flight-based flux estimates. In Los Angeles (LA) County, the uncertainties on CO and NOx fluxes were 10% and 15%, respectively. Compared with NEI 2005, the CO posterior emissions were lower by 43% in LA County and by 37% in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). NOx posterior emissions were lower by 32% in LA County and by 27% in the SoCAB. NOx posterior emissions were 40% lower on weekends relative to weekdays. The CO2 posterior estimates were 183 Tg yr-1 in SoCAB. A flight during ITCT (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation) in 2002 was used to estimate emissions in the LA Basin in 2002. From 2002 to 2010, the CO and NOx posterior emissions decreased by 41% and 37%, respectively, in agreement with previous studies. Over the same time period, CO2 emissions increased by 10% in LA County but decreased by 4% in the SoCAB, a statistically insignificant change. Overall, the posterior estimates were in good agreement with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory, with differences of 15% or less. However, the posterior spatial distribution in the basin was significantly different from CARB for NOx emissions. WRF-Chem mesoscale chemical-transport model simulations allowed an evaluation of differences in chemistry using different inventory assumptions, including NEI 2005, a gridded CARB inventory and the posterior

  19. Top-down estimate of surface flux in the Los Angeles Basin using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: assessing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CO2 and their impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; Ahmadov, R.; Kim, S.-W.; Evan, S.; McKeen, S. A.; Hsie, E.-Y.; Frost, G. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J.; Brown, S. S.; Nowak, J. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Santoni, G. W.; Trainer, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present top-down estimates of anthropogenic CO, NOx and CO2 surface fluxes at mesoscale using a Lagrangian model in combination with three different WRF model configurations, driven by data from aircraft flights during the CALNEX campaign in southern California in May-June 2010. The US EPA National Emission Inventory 2005 (NEI 2005) was the prior in the CO and NOx inversion calculations. The flux ratio inversion method, based on linear relationships between chemical species, was used to calculate the CO2 inventory without prior knowledge of CO2 surface fluxes. The inversion was applied to each flight to estimate the variability of single-flight-based flux estimates. In Los Angeles (LA) County, the uncertainties on CO and NOx fluxes were 10% and 15%, respectively. Compared with NEI 2005, the CO posterior emissions were lower by 43% ± 6% in LA County and by 37% ± 10% in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). NOx posterior emissions were lower by 32% ± 10% in LA County and by 27% ± 15% in the SoCAB. NOx posterior emissions were 40% lower on weekends relative to weekdays. The CO2 posterior estimates were 183 ± 18 Tg yr-1 in SoCAB. A flight during ITCT in 2002 was used to estimate emissions in the LA Basin in 2002. From 2002 to 2010, the CO and NOx posterior emissions decreased by 41% and 37%, respectively, in agreement with previous studies. Over the same time period, CO2 emissions increased by 10% ± 14% in LA County but decreased by 4% ± 10% in the SoCAB, a statistically insignificant change. Overall, the posterior estimates were in good agreement with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory, with differences of 15% or less. However, the posterior spatial distribution in the basin was significantly different from CARB for NOx emissions. WRF-Chem mesoscale chemical-transport model simulations allowed an evaluation of differences in chemistry using different inventory assumptions, including NEI 2005, CARB 2010 and the posterior inventories derived in

  20. Inverse Faraday Effect Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Ali, S.; Davies, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    The inverse Faraday effect is usually associated with circularly polarized laser beams. However, it was recently shown that it can also occur for linearly polarized radiation [1]. The quasi-static axial magnetic field by a laser beam propagating in plasma can be calculated by considering both the spin and the orbital angular momenta of the laser pulse. A net spin is present when the radiation is circularly polarized and a net orbital angular momentum is present if there is any deviation from perfect rotational symmetry. This orbital angular momentum has recently been discussed in the plasma context [2], and can give an additional contribution to the axial magnetic field, thus enhancing or reducing the inverse Faraday effect. As a result, this effect that is usually attributed to circular polarization can also be excited by linearly polarized radiation, if the incident laser propagates in a Laguerre-Gauss mode carrying a finite amount of orbital angular momentum.[4pt] [1] S. ALi, J.R. Davies and J.T. Mendonca, Phys. Rev. Lett., 105, 035001 (2010).[0pt] [2] J. T. Mendonca, B. Thidé, and H. Then, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 185005 (2009).

  1. A complete and partial integrability technique of the Lorenz system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougoffa, Lazhar; Al-Awfi, Saud; Bougouffa, Smail

    2018-06-01

    In this paper we deal with the well-known nonlinear Lorenz system that describes the deterministic chaos phenomenon. We consider an interesting problem with time-varying phenomena in quantum optics. Then we establish from the motion equations the passage to the Lorenz system. Furthermore, we show that the reduction to the third order non linear equation can be performed. Therefore, the obtained differential equation can be analytically solved in some special cases and transformed to Abel, Dufing, Painlevé and generalized Emden-Fowler equations. So, a motivating technique that permitted a complete and partial integrability of the Lorenz system is presented.

  2. Abell 1367: a high fraction of late-type galaxies displaying H I morphological and kinematic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, T. C.; Brinks, E.; Cortese, L.; Boselli, A.; Bravo-Alfaro, H.

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effects the cluster environment has on late-type galaxies (LTGs), we studied H I perturbation signatures for all Abell 1367 LTGs with H I detections. We used new Very Large Array H I observations combined with AGES single-dish blind survey data. Our study indicates that the asymmetry between the high- and low-velocity wings of the characteristic double-horn-integrated H I spectrum as measured by the asymmetry parameter, A_{flux}, can be a useful diagnostic for ongoing and/or recent H I stripping. 26 per cent of A1367 LTGs have an A_{flux} ratio, more asymmetrical than 3 times the 1σ spread in the A_{flux} ratio distribution of an undisturbed sample of isolated galaxies (2 per cent) and samples from other denser environments (10 per cent-20 per cent). Over half of the A1367 LTGs, which are members of groups or pairs, have an A_{flux} ratio larger than twice the 1σ spread found in the isolated sample. This suggests intergroup/pair interactions could be making a significant contribution to the LTGs displaying such A_{flux} ratios. The study also demonstrates that the definition of the H I offset from the optical centre of LTGs is resolution dependent, suggesting that unresolved AGES H I offsets that are significantly larger than the pointing uncertainties (>2σ), reflect interactions which have asymmetrically displaced, significant masses of lower density H I, while having minimal impact on the location of the highest density H I in resolved maps. The distribution of A_{flux} from a comparable sample of Virgo galaxies provides a clear indication that the frequency of H I profile perturbations is lower than in A1367.

  3. Close entrainment of massive molecular gas flows by radio bubbles in the central galaxy of Abell 1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. R.; McNamara, B. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Combes, F.; Edge, A. C.; Hogan, M. T.; McDonald, M.; Salomé, P.; Tremblay, G.; Vantyghem, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    We present new ALMA observations tracing the morphology and velocity structure of the molecular gas in the central galaxy of the cluster Abell 1795. The molecular gas lies in two filaments that extend 5-7 kpc to the N and S from the nucleus and project exclusively around the outer edges of two inner radio bubbles. Radio jets launched by the central active galactic nucleus have inflated bubbles filled with relativistic plasma into the hot atmosphere surrounding the central galaxy. The N filament has a smoothly increasing velocity gradient along its length from the central galaxy's systemic velocity at the nucleus to -370 km s^{-1}, the average velocity of the surrounding galaxies, at the furthest extent. The S filament has a similarly smooth but shallower velocity gradient and appears to have partially collapsed in a burst of star formation. The close spatial association with the radio lobes, together with the ordered velocity gradients and narrow velocity dispersions, shows that the molecular filaments are gas flows entrained by the expanding radio bubbles. Assuming a Galactic XCO factor, the total molecular gas mass is 3.2 ± 0.2 × 109 M⊙. More than half lies above the N radio bubble. Lifting the molecular clouds appears to require an infeasibly efficient coupling between the molecular gas and the radio bubble. The energy required also exceeds the mechanical power of the N radio bubble by a factor of 2. Stimulated feedback, where the radio bubbles lift low-entropy X-ray gas that becomes thermally unstable and rapidly cools in situ, provides a plausible model. Multiple generations of radio bubbles are required to lift this substantial gas mass. The close morphological association then indicates that the cold gas either moulds the newly expanding bubbles or is itself pushed aside and shaped as they inflate.

  4. The Kormendy relation of galaxies in the Frontier Fields clusters: Abell S1063 and MACS J1149.5+2223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortorelli, Luca; Mercurio, Amata; Paolillo, Maurizio; Rosati, Piero; Gargiulo, Adriana; Gobat, Raphael; Balestra, Italo; Caminha, G. B.; Annunziatella, Marianna; Grillo, Claudio; Lombardi, Marco; Nonino, Mario; Rettura, Alessandro; Sartoris, Barbara; Strazzullo, Veronica

    2018-06-01

    We analyse the Kormendy relations (KRs) of the two Frontier Fields clusters, Abell S1063, at z = 0.348, and MACS J1149.5+2223, at z = 0.542, exploiting very deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry and Very Large Telescope (VLT)/Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field spectroscopy. With this novel data set, we are able to investigate how the KR parameters depend on the cluster galaxy sample selection and how this affects studies of galaxy evolution based on the KR. We define and compare four different galaxy samples according to (a) Sérsic indices: early-type (`ETG'), (b) visual inspection: `ellipticals', (c) colours: `red', (d) spectral properties: `passive'. The classification is performed for a complete sample of galaxies with mF814W ≤ 22.5 ABmag (M* ≳ 1010.0 M⊙). To derive robust galaxy structural parameters, we use two methods: (1) an iterative estimate of structural parameters using images of increasing size, in order to deal with closely separated galaxies and (2) different background estimations, to deal with the intracluster light contamination. The comparison between the KRs obtained from the different samples suggests that the sample selection could affect the estimate of the best-fitting KR parameters. The KR built with ETGs is fully consistent with the one obtained for ellipticals and passive. On the other hand, the KR slope built on the red sample is only marginally consistent with those obtained with the other samples. We also release the photometric catalogue with structural parameters for the galaxies included in the present analysis.

  5. Extracting Galaxy Cluster Gas Inhomogeneity from X-Ray Surface Brightness: A Statistical Approach and Application to Abell 3667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Hajime; Reese, Erik D.; Kitayama, Tetsu; Sasaki, Shin; Suto, Yasushi

    2008-11-01

    Our previous analysis indicates that small-scale fluctuations in the intracluster medium (ICM) from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations follow the lognormal probability density function. In order to test the lognormal nature of the ICM directly against X-ray observations of galaxy clusters, we develop a method of extracting statistical information about the three-dimensional properties of the fluctuations from the two-dimensional X-ray surface brightness. We first create a set of synthetic clusters with lognormal fluctuations around their mean profile given by spherical isothermal β-models, later considering polytropic temperature profiles as well. Performing mock observations of these synthetic clusters, we find that the resulting X-ray surface brightness fluctuations also follow the lognormal distribution fairly well. Systematic analysis of the synthetic clusters provides an empirical relation between the three-dimensional density fluctuations and the two-dimensional X-ray surface brightness. We analyze Chandra observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 3667, and find that its X-ray surface brightness fluctuations follow the lognormal distribution. While the lognormal model was originally motivated by cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, this is the first observational confirmation of the lognormal signature in a real cluster. Finally we check the synthetic cluster results against clusters from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. As a result of the complex structure exhibited by simulated clusters, the empirical relation between the two- and three-dimensional fluctuation properties calibrated with synthetic clusters when applied to simulated clusters shows large scatter. Nevertheless we are able to reproduce the true value of the fluctuation amplitude of simulated clusters within a factor of 2 from their two-dimensional X-ray surface brightness alone. Our current methodology combined with existing observational data is useful in describing and inferring the

  6. VLA Radio Observations of the HST Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744: The Discovery of New Radio Relics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, C. J. J.; van Weeren, R. J.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Brüggen, M.; Bulbul, E.; Clarke, T. E.; Kraft, R. P.; Medezinski, E.; Mroczkowski, T.; Nonino, M.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Randall, S. W.; Umetsu, K.

    2017-08-01

    Cluster mergers leave distinct signatures in the intracluster medium (ICM) in the form of shocks and diffuse cluster radio sources that provide evidence for the acceleration of relativistic particles. However, the physics of particle acceleration in the ICM is still not fully understood. Here we present new 1-4 GHz Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and archival Chandra observations of the HST Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744. In our new VLA images, we detect the previously known ˜2.1 Mpc radio halo and ˜1.5 Mpc radio relic. We carry out a radio spectral analysis from which we determine the relic’s injection spectral index to be {α }{inj}=-1.12+/- 0.19. This corresponds to a shock Mach number of { M }={2.05}-0.19+0.31 under the assumption of diffusive shock acceleration. We also find evidence for spectral steepening in the post-shock region. We do not find evidence for a significant correlation between the radio halo’s spectral index and ICM temperature. In addition, we observe three new polarized diffuse sources and determine two of these to be newly discovered giant radio relics. These two relics are located in the southeastern and northwestern outskirts of the cluster. The corresponding integrated spectral indices measure -1.81 ± 0.26 and -0.63 ± 0.21 for the SE and NW relics, respectively. From an X-ray surface brightness profile we also detect a possible density jump of R={1.39}-0.22+0.34 co-located with the newly discovered SE relic. This density jump would correspond to a shock front Mach number of { M }={1.26}-0.15+0.25.

  7. The Sizes of z ˜ 6-8 Lensed Galaxies from the Hubble Frontier Fields Abell 2744 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamata, Ryota; Ishigaki, Masafumi; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Oguri, Masamune; Ouchi, Masami

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the sizes of z ˜ 6-8 dropout galaxies using the complete data of the Abell 2744 cluster and parallel fields in the Hubble Frontier Fields program. By directly fitting light profiles of observed galaxies with lensing-distorted Sérsic profiles on the image plane with the glafic software, we accurately measure intrinsic sizes of 31 z ˜ 6-7 and 8 z˜ 8 galaxies, including those as faint as {{M}UV}≃ -16.6. We find that half-light radii re positively correlates with UV luminosity at each redshift, although the correlation is not very tight. The largest ({{r}e}\\gt 0.8 kpc) galaxies are mostly red in UV color while the smallest ({{r}e}\\lt 0.08 kpc) ones tend to be blue. We also find that galaxies with multiple cores tend to be brighter. Combined with previous results at 2.5≲ z≲ 12, our result confirms that the average {{r}e} of bright ((0.3-1)Lz=3*) galaxies scales as {{r}e}\\propto {{≤ft( 1+z \\right)}-m} with m=1.24+/- 0.1. We find that the ratio of re to virial radius is virtually constant at 3.3 ± 0.1% over a wide redshift range, where the virial radii of hosting dark matter halos are derived based on the abundance matching. This constant ratio is consistent with the disk formation model by Mo et al. with {{j}d}˜ {{m}d}, where jd and md are the fractions of the angular momentum and mass within halos confined in the disks. A comparison with various types of local galaxies indicates that our galaxies are most similar to circumnuclear star-forming regions of barred galaxies in the sense that a sizable amount of stars are forming in a very small area.

  8. Preview-Based Stable-Inversion for Output Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Qing-Ze; Devasia, Santosh

    1999-01-01

    Stable Inversion techniques can be used to achieve high-accuracy output tracking. However, for nonminimum phase systems, the inverse is non-causal - hence the inverse has to be pre-computed using a pre-specified desired-output trajectory. This requirement for pre-specification of the desired output restricts the use of inversion-based approaches to trajectory planning problems (for nonminimum phase systems). In the present article, it is shown that preview information of the desired output can be used to achieve online inversion-based output tracking of linear systems. The amount of preview-time needed is quantified in terms of the tracking error and the internal dynamics of the system (zeros of the system). The methodology is applied to the online output tracking of a flexible structure and experimental results are presented.

  9. Application of a stochastic inverse to the geophysical inverse problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. H.; Minster, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The inverse problem for gross earth data can be reduced to an undertermined linear system of integral equations of the first kind. A theory is discussed for computing particular solutions to this linear system based on the stochastic inverse theory presented by Franklin. The stochastic inverse is derived and related to the generalized inverse of Penrose and Moore. A Backus-Gilbert type tradeoff curve is constructed for the problem of estimating the solution to the linear system in the presence of noise. It is shown that the stochastic inverse represents an optimal point on this tradeoff curve. A useful form of the solution autocorrelation operator as a member of a one-parameter family of smoothing operators is derived.

  10. Face inversion increases attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Leder, Helmut; Goller, Juergen; Forster, Michael; Schlageter, Lena; Paul, Matthew A

    2017-07-01

    Assessing facial attractiveness is a ubiquitous, inherent, and hard-wired phenomenon in everyday interactions. As such, it has highly adapted to the default way that faces are typically processed: viewing faces in upright orientation. By inverting faces, we can disrupt this default mode, and study how facial attractiveness is assessed. Faces, rotated at 90 (tilting to either side) and 180°, were rated on attractiveness and distinctiveness scales. For both orientations, we found that faces were rated more attractive and less distinctive than upright faces. Importantly, these effects were more pronounced for faces rated low in upright orientation, and smaller for highly attractive faces. In other words, the less attractive a face was, the more it gained in attractiveness by inversion or rotation. Based on these findings, we argue that facial attractiveness assessments might not rely on the presence of attractive facial characteristics, but on the absence of distinctive, unattractive characteristics. These unattractive characteristics are potentially weighed against an individual, attractive prototype in assessing facial attractiveness. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatial operator factorization and inversion of the manipulator mass matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    This paper advances two linear operator factorizations of the manipulator mass matrix. Embedded in the factorizations are many of the techniques that are regarded as very efficient computational solutions to inverse and forward dynamics problems. The operator factorizations provide a high-level architectural understanding of the mass matrix and its inverse, which is not visible in the detailed algorithms. They also lead to a new approach to the development of computer programs or organize complexity in robot dynamics.

  12. Modular theory of inverse systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between multivariable zeros and inverse systems was explored. A definition of zero module is given in such a way that it is basis independent. The existence of essential right and left inverses were established. The way in which the abstract zero module captured previous definitions of multivariable zeros is explained and examples are presented.

  13. Inversion exercises inspired by mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    An elementary calculus transform, inspired by the centroid and gyration radius, is introduced as a prelude to the study of more advanced transforms. Analysis of the transform, including its inversion, makes use of several key concepts from basic calculus and exercises in the application and inversion of the transform provide practice in the use of technology in calculus.

  14. Clinical knowledge-based inverse treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2004-11-01

    Clinical IMRT treatment plans are currently made using dose-based optimization algorithms, which do not consider the nonlinear dose-volume effects for tumours and normal structures. The choice of structure specific importance factors represents an additional degree of freedom of the system and makes rigorous optimization intractable. The purpose of this work is to circumvent the two problems by developing a biologically more sensible yet clinically practical inverse planning framework. To implement this, the dose-volume status of a structure was characterized by using the effective volume in the voxel domain. A new objective function was constructed with the incorporation of the volumetric information of the system so that the figure of merit of a given IMRT plan depends not only on the dose deviation from the desired distribution but also the dose-volume status of the involved organs. The conventional importance factor of an organ was written into a product of two components: (i) a generic importance that parametrizes the relative importance of the organs in the ideal situation when the goals for all the organs are met; (ii) a dose-dependent factor that quantifies our level of clinical/dosimetric satisfaction for a given plan. The generic importance can be determined a priori, and in most circumstances, does not need adjustment, whereas the second one, which is responsible for the intractable behaviour of the trade-off seen in conventional inverse planning, was determined automatically. An inverse planning module based on the proposed formalism was implemented and applied to a prostate case and a head-neck case. A comparison with the conventional inverse planning technique indicated that, for the same target dose coverage, the critical structure sparing was substantially improved for both cases. The incorporation of clinical knowledge allows us to obtain better IMRT plans and makes it possible to auto-select the importance factors, greatly facilitating the inverse

  15. Probing the dynamical and X-ray mass proxies of the cluster of galaxies Abell S1101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Andreas; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Schwope, Axel; Verdugo, Miguel; Reiprich, Thomas H.; Klein, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Context. The galaxy cluster Abell S1101 (S1101 hereafter) deviates significantly from the X-ray luminosity versus velocity dispersion relation (L-σ) of galaxy clusters in our previous study. Given reliable X-ray luminosity measurement combining XMM-Newton and ROSAT, this could most likely be caused by the bias in the velocity dispersion due to interlopers and low member statistic in the previous sample of member galaxies, which was solely based on 20 galaxy redshifts drawn from the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the galaxy member statistics to perform precision measurements of the velocity dispersion and dynamical mass of S1101. We aim for a detailed substructure and dynamical state characterization of this cluster, and a comparison of mass estimates derived from (I) the velocity dispersion (Mvir), (II) the caustic mass computation (Mcaustic), and (III) mass proxies from X-ray observations and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Methods: We carried out new optical spectroscopic observations of the galaxies in this cluster field with VIMOS, obtaining a sample of 60 member galaxies for S1101. We revised the cluster redshift and velocity dispersion measurements based on this sample and also applied the Dressler-Shectman substructure test. Results: The completeness of cluster members within r200 was significantly improved for this cluster. Tests for dynamical substructure do not show evidence of major disturbances or merging activities in S1101. We find good agreement between the dynamical cluster mass measurements and X-ray mass estimates, which confirms the relaxed state of the cluster displayed in the 2D substructure test. The SZ mass proxy is slightly higher than the other estimates. The updated measurement of σ erased the deviation of S1101 in the L-σ relation. We also noticed a background structure in the cluster field of S1101. This structure is a galaxy group that is very close to the cluster S1101 in projection but at almost twice its redshift

  16. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. II. Photometric redshifts and rest frame properties in Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Amorín, R.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; McLure, R. J.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Mortlock, A.; Parsa, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Balestra, I.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Rosati, P.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present the first public release of photometric redshifts, galaxy rest frame properties and associated magnification values in the cluster and parallel pointings of the first two Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416. The released catalogues aim to provide a reference for future investigations of extragalactic populations in these legacy fields: from lensed high-redshift galaxies to cluster members themselves. Methods: We exploit a multiwavelength catalogue, ranging from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to ground-based K and Spitzer IRAC, which is specifically designed to enable detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. The multiband information is used to derive photometric redshifts and physical properties of sources detected either in the H-band image alone, or from a stack of four WFC3 bands. To minimize systematics, median photometric redshifts are assembled from six different approaches to photo-z estimates. Their reliability is assessed through a comparison with available spectroscopic samples. State-of-the-art lensing models are used to derive magnification values on an object-by-object basis by taking into account sources positions and redshifts. Results: We show that photometric redshifts reach a remarkable ~3-5% accuracy. After accounting for magnification, the H-band number counts are found to be in agreement at bright magnitudes with number counts from the CANDELS fields, while extending the presently available samples to galaxies that, intrinsically, are as faint as H ~ 32-33, thanks to strong gravitational lensing. The Frontier Fields allow the galaxy stellar mass distribution to be probed, depending on magnification, at 0.5-1.5 dex lower masses with respect to extragalactic wide fields, including sources at Mstar ~ 107-108 M⊙ at z > 5. Similarly, they allow the detection of objects with intrinsic star formation rates (SFRs) >1 dex lower than in the CANDELS fields reaching 0.1-1 M⊙/yr at z ~ 6-10. The

  17. The VLT/MUSE view of the central galaxy in Abell 2052. Ionized gas swept by the expanding radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmaverde, Barbara; Capetti, Alessandro; Marconi, Alessandro; Venturi, Giacomo

    2018-04-01

    We report observations of the radio galaxy 3C 317 (at z = 0.0345) located at the center of the Abell cluster A2052, obtained with the VLT/MUSE integral field spectrograph. The Chandra images of this cluster show cavities in the X-ray emitting gas, which were produced by the expansion of the radio lobes inflated by the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Our exquisite MUSE data show with unprecedented detail the complex network of line emitting filaments enshrouding the northern X-ray cavity. We do not detect any emission lines from the southern cavity, with a luminosity asymmetry between the two regions higher than 75. The emission lines produced by the warm phase of the interstellar medium (WIM) enable us to obtain unique information on the properties of the emitting gas. We find dense gas (up to 270 cm-3) that makes up part of a global quasi spherical outflow that is driven by the radio source, and obtain a direct estimate of the expansion velocity of the cavities (265 km s-1). The emission lines diagnostic rules out ionization from the AGN or from star-forming regions, suggesting instead ionization from slow shocks or from cosmic rays. The striking asymmetric line emission observed between the two cavities contrasts with the less pronounced differences between the north and south sides in the hot gas; this represents a significant new ingredient for our understanding of the process of the exchange of energy between the relativistic plasma and the external medium. We conclude that the expanding radio lobes displace the hot tenuous phase of the interstellar medium (ISM), but also impact the colder and denser ISM phases. These results show the effects of the AGN on its host and the importance of radio mode feedback. The reduced datacube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/612/A19

  18. We introduce an algorithm for the simultaneous reconstruction of faults and slip fields. We prove that the minimum of a related regularized functional converges to the unique solution of the fault inverse problem. We consider a Bayesian approach. We use a parallel multi-core platform and we discuss techniques to save on computational time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, D.

    2017-12-01

    We introduce an algorithm for the simultaneous reconstruction of faults and slip fields on those faults. We define a regularized functional to be minimized for the reconstruction. We prove that the minimum of that functional converges to the unique solution of the related fault inverse problem. Due to inherent uncertainties in measurements, rather than seeking a deterministic solution to the fault inverse problem, we consider a Bayesian approach. The advantage of such an approach is that we obtain a way of quantifying uncertainties as part of our final answer. On the downside, this Bayesian approach leads to a very large computation. To contend with the size of this computation we developed an algorithm for the numerical solution to the stochastic minimization problem which can be easily implemented on a parallel multi-core platform and we discuss techniques to save on computational time. After showing how this algorithm performs on simulated data and assessing the effect of noise, we apply it to measured data. The data was recorded during a slow slip event in Guerrero, Mexico.

  19. Convergence of Chahine's nonlinear relaxation inversion method used for limb viewing remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1985-01-01

    The application of Chahine's (1970) inversion technique to remote sensing problems utilizing the limb viewing geometry is discussed. The problem considered here involves occultation-type measurements and limb radiance-type measurements from either spacecraft or balloon platforms. The kernel matrix of the inversion problem is either an upper or lower triangular matrix. It is demonstrated that the Chahine inversion technique always converges, provided the diagonal elements of the kernel matrix are nonzero.

  20. BD-22deg3467, a DAO-type Star Exciting the Nebula Abell 35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, M.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Koppen, J.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral analyses of hot, compact stars with non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) model-atmosphere techniques allow the precise determination of photospheric parameters such as the effective temperature (T(sub eff)), the surface gravity (log g), and the chemical composition. The derived photospheric metal abundances are crucial constraints for stellar evolutionary theory. Aims. Previous spectral analyses of the exciting star of the nebula A35, BD-22deg3467, were based on He+C+N+O+Si+Fe models only. For our analysis, we use state-of-the-art fully metal-line blanketed NLTE model atmospheres that consider opacities of 23 elements from hydrogen to nickel. We aim to identify all observed lines in the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of BD-22deg3467 and to determine the abundances of the respective species precisely. Methods. For the analysis of high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) far-ultraviolet (FUSE) and UV (HST/STIS) observations, we combined stellar-atmosphere models and interstellar line-absorption models to fully reproduce the entire observed UV spectrum. Results. The best agreement with the UV observation of BD-22deg3467 is achieved at T(sub eff) = 80 +/- 10 kK and log g = 7.2 +/- 0.3. While T(sub eff) of previous analyses is verified, log g is significantly lower. We re-analyzed lines of silicon and iron (1/100 and about solar abundances, respectively) and for the first time in this star identified argon, chromium, manganese, cobalt, and nickel and determined abundances of 12, 70, 35, 150, and 5 times solar, respectively. Our results partially agree with predictions of diffusion models for DA-type white dwarfs. A combination of photospheric and interstellar line-absorption models reproduces more than 90% of the observed absorption features. The stellar mass is M approx. 0.48 Solar Mass. Conclusions. BD.22.3467 may not have been massive enough to ascend the asymptotic giant branch and may have evolved directly from the extended horizontal branch

  1. Characterizing the Retrieval of Cloud Optical Thickness and Droplet Effective Radius to Overlying Aerosols Using a General Inverse Theory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.

    2013-12-01

    The upwelling shortwave irradiance measured by the airborne Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) flying above a cloud and aerosol layer is influenced by the properties of the cloud and aerosol particles below, just as would the radiance measured from satellite. Unlike satellite measurements, those from aircraft provide the unique capability to fly a lower-level leg above the cloud, yet below the aerosol layer, to characterize the extinction of the aerosol layer and account for its impact on the measured cloud albedo. Previous work [Coddington et al., 2010] capitalized on this opportunity to test the effects of aerosol particles (or more appropriately, the effects of neglecting aerosols in forward modeling calculations) on cloud retrievals using data obtained during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment/Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation of anthropogenic pollution (INTEX-A/ITCT) study. This work showed aerosols can cause a systematic bias in the cloud retrieval and that such a bias would need to be distinguished from a true aerosol indirect effect (i.e. the brightening of a cloud due to aerosol effects on cloud microphysics) as theorized by Haywood et al., [2004]. The effects of aerosols on clouds are typically neglected in forward modeling calculations because their pervasiveness, variable microphysical properties, loading, and lifetimes makes forward modeling calculations under all possible combinations completely impractical. Using a general inverse theory technique, which propagates separate contributions from measurement and forward modeling errors into probability distributions of retrieved cloud optical thickness and droplet effective radius, we have demonstrated how the aerosol presence can be introduced as a spectral systematic error in the distributions of the forward modeling solutions. The resultant uncertainty and bias in cloud properties induced by the aerosols is identified by the shape and peak of the posteriori

  2. Coupled Hydrogeophysical Inversion and Hydrogeological Data Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Schwede, R. L.; Li, W.

    2012-12-01

    Tomographic geophysical monitoring methods give the opportunity to observe hydrogeological tests at higher spatial resolution than is possible with classical hydraulic monitoring tools. This has been demonstrated in a substantial number of studies in which electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been used to monitor salt-tracer experiments. It is now accepted that inversion of such data sets requires a fully coupled framework, explicitly accounting for the hydraulic processes (groundwater flow and solute transport), the relationship between solute and geophysical properties (petrophysical relationship such as Archie's law), and the governing equations of the geophysical surveying techniques (e.g., the Poisson equation) as consistent coupled system. These data sets can be amended with data from other - more direct - hydrogeological tests to infer the distribution of hydraulic aquifer parameters. In the inversion framework, meaningful condensation of data does not only contribute to inversion efficiency but also increases the stability of the inversion. In particular, transient concentration data themselves only weakly depend on hydraulic conductivity, and model improvement using gradient-based methods is only possible when a substantial agreement between measurements and model output already exists. The latter also holds when concentrations are monitored by ERT. Tracer arrival times, by contrast, show high sensitivity and a more monotonic dependence on hydraulic conductivity than concentrations themselves. Thus, even without using temporal-moment generating equations, inverting travel times rather than concentrations or related geoelectrical signals themselves is advantageous. We have applied this approach to concentrations measured directly or via ERT, and to heat-tracer data. We present a consistent inversion framework including temporal moments of concentrations, geoelectrical signals obtained during salt-tracer tests, drawdown data from hydraulic tomography

  3. A Generalization of the Spherical Inversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we introduce a generalization of the spherical inversion. In particular, we define an inversion with respect to an ellipsoid, and prove several properties of this new transformation. The inversion in an ellipsoid is the generalization of the elliptic inversion to the three-dimensional space. We also study the inverse images…

  4. Approximated Stable Inversion for Nonlinear Systems with Nonhyperbolic Internal Dynamics. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, Santosh

    1999-01-01

    A technique to achieve output tracking for nonminimum phase nonlinear systems with non- hyperbolic internal dynamics is presented. The present paper integrates stable inversion techniques (that achieve exact-tracking) with approximation techniques (that modify the internal dynamics) to circumvent the nonhyperbolicity of the internal dynamics - this nonhyperbolicity is an obstruction to applying presently available stable inversion techniques. The theory is developed for nonlinear systems and the method is applied to a two-cart with inverted-pendulum example.

  5. Inverse Opal Scaffolds and Their Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Zhu, Chunlei; Xia, Younan

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional porous scaffolds play a pivotal role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine by functioning as biomimetic substrates to manipulate cellular behaviors. While many techniques have been developed to fabricate porous scaffolds, most of them rely on stochastic processes that typically result in scaffolds with pores uncontrolled in terms of size, structure, and interconnectivity, greatly limiting their use in tissue regeneration. Inverse opal scaffolds, in contrast, possess uniform pores inheriting from the template comprised of a closely packed lattice of monodispersed microspheres. The key parameters of such scaffolds, including architecture, pore structure, porosity, and interconnectivity, can all be made uniform across the same sample and among different samples. In conjunction with a tight control over pore sizes, inverse opal scaffolds have found widespread use in biomedical applications. In this review, we provide a detailed discussion on this new class of advanced materials. After a brief introduction to their history and fabrication, we highlight the unique advantages of inverse opal scaffolds over their non-uniform counterparts. We then showcase their broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, followed by a summary and perspective on future directions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Towards a Full Waveform Ambient Noise Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, K.; Ermert, L. A.; Boehm, C.; Fichtner, A.

    2015-12-01

    Noise tomography usually works under the assumption that the inter-station ambient noise correlation is equal to a scaled version of the Green's function between the two receivers. This assumption, however, is only met under specific conditions, for instance, wavefield diffusivity and equipartitioning, zero attenuation, etc., that are typically not satisfied in the Earth. This inconsistency inhibits the exploitation of the full waveform information contained in noise correlations regarding Earth structure and noise generation. To overcome this limitation we attempt to develop a method that consistently accounts for noise distribution, 3D heterogeneous Earth structure and the full seismic wave propagation physics in order to improve the current resolution of tomographic images of the Earth. As an initial step towards a full waveform ambient noise inversion we develop a preliminary inversion scheme based on a 2D finite-difference code simulating correlation functions and on adjoint techniques. With respect to our final goal, a simultaneous inversion for noise distribution and Earth structure, we address the following two aspects: (1) the capabilities of different misfit functionals to image wave speed anomalies and source distribution and (2) possible source-structure trade-offs, especially to what extent unresolvable structure could be mapped into the inverted noise source distribution and vice versa.

  7. Inverse problems biomechanical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-03-01

    It is now well recognized that a host of imaging modalities (a list that includes Ultrasound, MRI, Optical Coherence Tomography, and optical microscopy) can be used to "watch" tissue as it deforms in response to an internal or external excitation. The result is a detailed map of the deformation field in the interior of the tissue. This deformation field can be used in conjunction with a material mechanical response to determine the spatial distribution of material properties of the tissue by solving an inverse problem. Images of material properties thus obtained can be used to quantify the health of the tissue. Recently, they have been used to detect, diagnose and monitor cancerous lesions, detect vulnerable plaque in arteries, diagnose liver cirrhosis, and possibly detect the onset of Alzheimer's disease. In this talk I will describe the mathematical and computational aspects of solving this class of inverse problems, and their applications in biology and medicine. In particular, I will discuss the well-posedness of these problems and quantify the amount of displacement data necessary to obtain a unique property distribution. I will describe an efficient algorithm for solving the resulting inverse problem. I will also describe some recent developments based on Bayesian inference in estimating the variance in the estimates of material properties. I will conclude with the applications of these techniques in diagnosing breast cancer and in characterizing the mechanical properties of cells with sub-cellular resolution.

  8. On the Duality of Forward and Inverse Light Transport.

    PubMed

    Chandraker, Manmohan; Bai, Jiamin; Ng, Tian-Tsong; Ramamoorthi, Ravi

    2011-10-01

    Inverse light transport seeks to undo global illumination effects, such as interreflections, that pervade images of most scenes. This paper presents the theoretical and computational foundations for inverse light transport as a dual of forward rendering. Mathematically, this duality is established through the existence of underlying Neumann series expansions. Physically, it can be shown that each term of our inverse series cancels an interreflection bounce, just as the forward series adds them. While the convergence properties of the forward series are well known, we show that the oscillatory convergence of the inverse series leads to more interesting conditions on material reflectance. Conceptually, the inverse problem requires the inversion of a large light transport matrix, which is impractical for realistic resolutions using standard techniques. A natural consequence of our theoretical framework is a suite of fast computational algorithms for light transport inversion--analogous to finite element radiosity, Monte Carlo and wavelet-based methods in forward rendering--that rely at most on matrix-vector multiplications. We demonstrate two practical applications, namely, separation of individual bounces of the light transport and fast projector radiometric compensation, to display images free of global illumination artifacts in real-world environments.

  9. Temperature Inversions Have Cold Bottoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.; Brown, Gail M.

    1982-01-01

    Uses discussion and illustrations of several demonstrations on air temperature differences and atmospheric stability to explain the phenomena of temperature inversions. Relates this to the smog in Los Angeles and discusses the implications. (DC)

  10. Testing earthquake source inversion methodologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, M.; Mai, P.M.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Source Inversion Validation Workshop; Palm Springs, California, 11-12 September 2010; Nowadays earthquake source inversions are routinely performed after large earthquakes and represent a key connection between recorded seismic and geodetic data and the complex rupture process at depth. The resulting earthquake source models quantify the spatiotemporal evolution of ruptures. They are also used to provide a rapid assessment of the severity of an earthquake and to estimate losses. However, because of uncertainties in the data, assumed fault geometry and velocity structure, and chosen rupture parameterization, it is not clear which features of these source models are robust. Improved understanding of the uncertainty and reliability of earthquake source inversions will allow the scientific community to use the robust features of kinematic inversions to more thoroughly investigate the complexity of the rupture process and to better constrain other earthquakerelated computations, such as ground motion simulations and static stress change calculations.

  11. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikelymore » to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.« less

  12. Inverse problems in quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwowski, Jacek

    Inverse problems constitute a branch of applied mathematics with well-developed methodology and formalism. A broad family of tasks met in theoretical physics, in civil and mechanical engineering, as well as in various branches of medical and biological sciences has been formulated as specific implementations of the general theory of inverse problems. In this article, it is pointed out that a number of approaches met in quantum chemistry can (and should) be classified as inverse problems. Consequently, the methodology used in these approaches may be enriched by applying ideas and theorems developed within the general field of inverse problems. Several examples, including the RKR method for the construction of potential energy curves, determining parameter values in semiempirical methods, and finding external potentials for which the pertinent Schrödinger equation is exactly solvable, are discussed in detail.

  13. Ocular manifestations of gravity inversion.

    PubMed

    Friberg, T R; Weinreb, R N

    To determine the ocular manifestations of inverting the human body into a head-down vertical position, we evaluated normal volunteers with applanation tonometry, fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and ophthalmodynamometry. Compared with data obtained in the sitting position, the intraocular pressure more than doubled on inversion (35.6 +/- 4 v 14.1 +/- 2.8 mm Hg, n = 16), increasing to levels well within the glaucomatous range. Pressures in the central retinal artery underwent similar increases, while the caliber of the retinal arterioles decreased substantially. External ocular findings associated with gravity inversion included orbital congestion, conjunctival hyperemia, petechiae of the eyelids, excessive tearing (epiphora), and subconjunctival hemorrhage. We suggest that patients with retinal vascular abnormalities, macular degeneration, ocular hypertension, glaucoma, and similar disorders refrain from inversion altogether. Whether normal individuals will suffer irreversible damage from inversion is uncertain, but it seems prudent to recommend that prolonged periods of inverted posturing be avoided.

  14. Solving inversion problems with neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamgar-Parsi, Behzad; Gualtieri, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A class of inverse problems in remote sensing can be characterized by Q = F(x), where F is a nonlinear and noninvertible (or hard to invert) operator, and the objective is to infer the unknowns, x, from the observed quantities, Q. Since the number of observations is usually greater than the number of unknowns, these problems are formulated as optimization problems, which can be solved by a variety of techniques. The feasibility of neural networks for solving such problems is presently investigated. As an example, the problem of finding the atmospheric ozone profile from measured ultraviolet radiances is studied.

  15. Inversion Therapy: Can It Relieve Back Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    Inversion therapy: Can it relieve back pain? Does inversion therapy relieve back pain? Is it safe? Answers from Edward R. Laskowski, M.D. Inversion therapy doesn't provide lasting relief from back ...

  16. Nonlinear Waves and Inverse Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    transform provides a linearization.’ Well known systems include the Kadomtsev - Petviashvili , Davey-Stewartson and Self-Dual Yang-Mills equations . The d...which employs inverse scattering theory in order to linearize the given nonlinear equation . I.S.T. has led to new developments in both fields: inverse...scattering and nonlinear wave equations . Listed below are some of the problems studied and a short description of results. - Multidimensional

  17. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-01-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to Tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed.

  18. Recursive partitioned inversion of large (1500 x 1500) symmetric matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B. H.; Brownd, J. E.; Gomez, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A recursive algorithm was designed to invert large, dense, symmetric, positive definite matrices using small amounts of computer core, i.e., a small fraction of the core needed to store the complete matrix. The described algorithm is a generalized Gaussian elimination technique. Other algorithms are also discussed for the Cholesky decomposition and step inversion techniques. The purpose of the inversion algorithm is to solve large linear systems of normal equations generated by working geodetic problems. The algorithm was incorporated into a computer program called SOLVE. In the past the SOLVE program has been used in obtaining solutions published as the Goddard earth models.

  19. Optimal Inversion Parameters for Full Waveform Inversion using OBS Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Chung, W.; Shin, S.; Kim, D.; Lee, D.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, full Waveform Inversion (FWI) has been the most researched technique in seismic data processing. It uses the residuals between observed and modeled data as an objective function; thereafter, the final subsurface velocity model is generated through a series of iterations meant to minimize the residuals.Research on FWI has expanded from acoustic media to elastic media. In acoustic media, the subsurface property is defined by P-velocity; however, in elastic media, properties are defined by multiple parameters, such as P-velocity, S-velocity, and density. Further, the elastic media can also be defined by Lamé constants, density or impedance PI, SI; consequently, research is being carried out to ascertain the optimal parameters.From results of advanced exploration equipment and Ocean Bottom Seismic (OBS) survey, it is now possible to obtain multi-component seismic data. However, to perform FWI on these data and generate an accurate subsurface model, it is important to determine optimal inversion parameters among (Vp, Vs, ρ), (λ, μ, ρ), and (PI, SI) in elastic media. In this study, staggered grid finite difference method was applied to simulate OBS survey. As in inversion, l2-norm was set as objective function. Further, the accurate computation of gradient direction was performed using the back-propagation technique and its scaling was done using the Pseudo-hessian matrix.In acoustic media, only Vp is used as the inversion parameter. In contrast, various sets of parameters, such as (Vp, Vs, ρ) and (λ, μ, ρ) can be used to define inversion in elastic media. Therefore, it is important to ascertain the parameter that gives the most accurate result for inversion with OBS data set.In this study, we generated Vp and Vs subsurface models by using (λ, μ, ρ) and (Vp, Vs, ρ) as inversion parameters in every iteration, and compared the final two FWI results.This research was supported by the Basic Research Project(17-3312) of the Korea Institute of

  20. Inverse and Predictive Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Syracuse, Ellen Marie

    The LANL Seismo-Acoustic team has a strong capability in developing data-driven models that accurately predict a variety of observations. These models range from the simple – one-dimensional models that are constrained by a single dataset and can be used for quick and efficient predictions – to the complex – multidimensional models that are constrained by several types of data and result in more accurate predictions. Team members typically build models of geophysical characteristics of Earth and source distributions at scales of 1 to 1000s of km, the techniques used are applicable for other types of physical characteristics at an evenmore » greater range of scales. The following cases provide a snapshot of some of the modeling work done by the Seismo- Acoustic team at LANL.« less

  1. The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey. VI. Spatial distribution and kinematics of early- and late-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Theije, P. A. M.; Katgert, P.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the data obtained in the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (ENACS) has shown that the space distribution and kinematics of galaxies with detectable emission lines in their spectra differ significantly from those of galaxies without emission lines. This result, and details of the kinematics, were considered as support for the idea that at least the spirals with emission lines are on orbits that are not isotropic. This might indicate that this subset of late-type galaxies either has `first approach'-orbits towards the dense core of their respective clusters, or has orbits that `avoid' the core. The galaxies with emission lines are essentially all late-type galaxies. On the other hand, the emission-line galaxies represent only about a third of the late-type galaxies, the majority of which do not show detectable emission lines. The galaxies without emission lines are therefore a mix of early- and late-type galaxies. In this paper we attempt to separate early- and late-type galaxies, and we study possible differences in distribution and kinematics of the two galaxy classes. For only about 10% of the galaxies in the ENACS, the morphology is known from imaging. Here, we describe our classification on the basis of the ENACS spectrum. The significant information in each spectrum is compressed into 15 Principal Components, which are used as input for an Artificial Neural Network. The latter is `trained' with 150 of the 270 galaxies for which a morphological type is available from Dressler, and subsequently used to classify each galaxy. This yields a classification for two-thirds of the ENACS galaxies. The Artificial Neural Network has two output classes: early-type (E+S0) and late-type (S+I) galaxies. We do not distinguish E and S0 galaxies, because these cannot be separated very robustly on the basis of the spectrum. The success rate of the classification is estimated from the sample of 120 galaxies with Dressler morphologies which were not used to train the ANN

  2. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion.

  3. The Effect of Flow Velocity on Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Shin, S.; Chung, W.; Ha, J.; Lim, Y.; Kim, S.

    2017-12-01

    The waveform inversion is a velocity modeling technique that reconstructs accurate subsurface physical properties. Therefore, using the model in its final, updated version, we generated data identical to modeled data. Flow velocity, like several other factors, affects observed data in seismic exploration. Despite this, there is insufficient research on its relationship with waveform inversion. In this study, the generated synthetic data considering flow velocity was factored in waveform inversion and the influence of flow velocity in waveform inversion was analyzed. Measuring the flow velocity generally requires additional equipment. However, for situations where only seismic data was available, flow velocity was calculated by fixed-point iteration method using direct wave in observed data. Further, a new waveform inversion was proposed, which can be applied to the calculated flow velocity. We used a wave equation, which can work with the flow velocities used in the study by Käser and Dumbser. Further, we enhanced the efficiency of computation by applying the back-propagation method. To verify the proposed algorithm, six different data sets were generated using the Marmousi2 model; each of these data sets used different flow velocities in the range 0-50, i.e., 0, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50. Thereafter, the inversion results from these data sets along with the results without the use of flow velocity were compared and analyzed. In this study, we analyzed the results of waveform inversion after flow velocity has been factored in. It was demonstrated that the waveform inversion is not affected significantly when the flow velocity is of smaller value. However, when the flow velocity has a large value, factoring it in the waveform inversion produces superior results. This research was supported by the Basic Research Project(17-3312, 17-3313) of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources(KIGAM) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning of Korea.

  4. Inverse boundary-layer theory and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Inverse boundary layer computational procedures, which permit nonsingular solutions at separation and reattachment, are presented. In the first technique, which is for incompressible flow, the displacement thickness is prescribed; in the second technique, for compressible flow, a perturbation mass flow is the prescribed condition. The pressure is deduced implicitly along with the solution in each of these techniques. Laminar and turbulent computations, which are typical of separated flow, are presented and comparisons are made with experimental data. In both inverse procedures, finite difference techniques are used along with Newton iteration. The resulting procedure is no more complicated than conventional boundary layer computations. These separated boundary layer techniques appear to be well suited for complete viscous-inviscid interaction computations.

  5. Gemini Frontier Fields: Wide-field Adaptive Optics Ks-band Imaging of the Galaxy Clusters MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; Pessev, P.; Garrel, V.; Winge, C.; Neichel, B.; Vidal, F.

    2015-04-01

    We have observed two of the six Frontier Fields galaxy clusters, MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744, using the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) and the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI). With 0.″ 08-0.″ 10 FWHM our data are nearly diffraction-limited over a 100\\prime\\prime × 100\\prime\\prime wide area. GeMS/GSAOI complements the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) redwards of 1.6 μm with twice the angular resolution. We reach a 5σ depth of {{K}s}˜ 25.6 mag (AB) for compact sources. In this paper, we describe the observations, data processing, and initial public data release. We provide fully calibrated, co-added images matching the native GSAOI pixel scale as well as the larger plate scales of the HST release, adding to the legacy value of the Frontier Fields. Our work demonstrates that even for fields at high galactic latitude where natural guide stars are rare, current multi-conjugated adaptive optics technology at 8 m telescopes has opened a new window on the distant universe. Observations of a third Frontier Field, Abell 370, are planned. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal Observatories, Chile.

  6. Aerosol properties from spectral extinction and backscatter estimated by an inverse Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Ligon, D A; Gillespie, J B; Pellegrino, P

    2000-08-20

    The feasibility of using a generalized stochastic inversion methodology to estimate aerosol size distributions accurately by use of spectral extinction, backscatter data, or both is examined. The stochastic method used, inverse Monte Carlo (IMC), is verified with both simulated and experimental data from aerosols composed of spherical dielectrics with a known refractive index. Various levels of noise are superimposed on the data such that the effect of noise on the stability and results of inversion can be determined. Computational results show that the application of the IMC technique to inversion of spectral extinction or backscatter data or both can produce good estimates of aerosol size distributions. Specifically, for inversions for which both spectral extinction and backscatter data are used, the IMC technique was extremely accurate in determining particle size distributions well outside the wavelength range. Also, the IMC inversion results proved to be stable and accurate even when the data had significant noise, with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.

  7. Towards Full-Waveform Ambient Noise Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, Korbinian; Ermert, Laura; Afanasiev, Michael; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Noise tomography usually works under the assumption that the inter-station ambient noise correlation is equal to a scaled version of the Green function between the two receivers. This assumption, however, is only met under specific conditions, e.g. wavefield diffusivity and equipartitioning, or the isotropic distribution of both mono- and dipolar uncorrelated noise sources. These assumptions are typically not satisfied in the Earth. This inconsistency inhibits the exploitation of the full waveform information contained in noise correlations in order to constrain Earth structure and noise generation. To overcome this limitation, we attempt to develop a method that consistently accounts for the distribution of noise sources, 3D heterogeneous Earth structure and the full seismic wave propagation physics. This is intended to improve the resolution of tomographic images, to refine noise source distribution, and thereby to contribute to a better understanding of both Earth structure and noise generation. First, we develop an inversion strategy based on a 2D finite-difference code using adjoint techniques. To enable a joint inversion for noise sources and Earth structure, we investigate the following aspects: i) the capability of different misfit functionals to image wave speed anomalies and source distribution and ii) possible source-structure trade-offs, especially to what extent unresolvable structure can be mapped into the inverted noise source distribution and vice versa. In anticipation of real-data applications, we present an extension of the open-source waveform modelling and inversion package Salvus (http://salvus.io). It allows us to compute correlation functions in 3D media with heterogeneous noise sources at the surface and the corresponding sensitivity kernels for the distribution of noise sources and Earth structure. By studying the effect of noise sources on correlation functions in 3D, we validate the aforementioned inversion strategy and prepare the

  8. Inverse source problems in elastodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Hu, Guanghui; Kian, Yavar; Yin, Tao

    2018-04-01

    We are concerned with time-dependent inverse source problems in elastodynamics. The source term is supposed to be the product of a spatial function and a temporal function with compact support. We present frequency-domain and time-domain approaches to show uniqueness in determining the spatial function from wave fields on a large sphere over a finite time interval. The stability estimate of the temporal function from the data of one receiver and the uniqueness result using partial boundary data are proved. Our arguments rely heavily on the use of the Fourier transform, which motivates inversion schemes that can be easily implemented. A Landweber iterative algorithm for recovering the spatial function and a non-iterative inversion scheme based on the uniqueness proof for recovering the temporal function are proposed. Numerical examples are demonstrated in both two and three dimensions.

  9. Some Phenomena on Negative Inversion Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Tae-Soo

    2013-01-01

    We examine the characteristics of NDI (negative degree inversion) and its relation with other inversion phenomena such as SVI (subject-verb inversion) and SAI (subject-auxiliary inversion). The negative element in the NDI construction may be" not," a negative adverbial, or a negative verb. In this respect, NDI has similar licensing…

  10. Darwin's "strange inversion of reasoning".

    PubMed

    Dennett, Daniel

    2009-06-16

    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection unifies the world of physics with the world of meaning and purpose by proposing a deeply counterintuitive "inversion of reasoning" (according to a 19th century critic): "to make a perfect and beautiful machine, it is not requisite to know how to make it" [MacKenzie RB (1868) (Nisbet & Co., London)]. Turing proposed a similar inversion: to be a perfect and beautiful computing machine, it is not requisite to know what arithmetic is. Together, these ideas help to explain how we human intelligences came to be able to discern the reasons for all of the adaptations of life, including our own.

  11. Damage identification using inverse methods.

    PubMed

    Friswell, Michael I

    2007-02-15

    This paper gives an overview of the use of inverse methods in damage detection and location, using measured vibration data. Inverse problems require the use of a model and the identification of uncertain parameters of this model. Damage is often local in nature and although the effect of the loss of stiffness may require only a small number of parameters, the lack of knowledge of the location means that a large number of candidate parameters must be included. This paper discusses a number of problems that exist with this approach to health monitoring, including modelling error, environmental effects, damage localization and regularization.

  12. The Inverse of Banded Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    indexed entries all zeros. In this paper, generalizing a method of Mallik (1999) [5], we give the LU factorization and the inverse of the matrix Br,n (if it...r ≤ i ≤ r, 1 ≤ j ≤ r, with the remaining un-indexed entries all zeros. In this paper generalizing a method of Mallik (1999) [5...matrices and applications to piecewise cubic approximation, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 8 (4) (1982) 285–288. [5] R.K. Mallik , The inverse of a lower

  13. Fast Component Pursuit for Large-Scale Inverse Covariance Estimation.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Tong

    2016-08-01

    The maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) for the Gaussian graphical model, which is also known as the inverse covariance estimation problem, has gained increasing interest recently. Most existing works assume that inverse covariance estimators contain sparse structure and then construct models with the ℓ 1 regularization. In this paper, different from existing works, we study the inverse covariance estimation problem from another perspective by efficiently modeling the low-rank structure in the inverse covariance, which is assumed to be a combination of a low-rank part and a diagonal matrix. One motivation for this assumption is that the low-rank structure is common in many applications including the climate and financial analysis, and another one is that such assumption can reduce the computational complexity when computing its inverse. Specifically, we propose an efficient COmponent Pursuit (COP) method to obtain the low-rank part, where each component can be sparse. For optimization, the COP method greedily learns a rank-one component in each iteration by maximizing the log-likelihood. Moreover, the COP algorithm enjoys several appealing properties including the existence of an efficient solution in each iteration and the theoretical guarantee on the convergence of this greedy approach. Experiments on large-scale synthetic and real-world datasets including thousands of millions variables show that the COP method is faster than the state-of-the-art techniques for the inverse covariance estimation problem when achieving comparable log-likelihood on test data.

  14. Inversion of Zeeman polarization for solar magnetic field diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derouich, M.

    2017-05-01

    The topic of magnetic field diagnostics with the Zeeman effect is currently vividly discussed. There are some testable inversion codes available to the spectropolarimetry community and their application allowed for a better understanding of the magnetism of the solar atmosphere. In this context, we propose an inversion technique associated with a new numerical code. The inversion procedure is promising and particularly successful for interpreting the Stokes profiles in quick and sufficiently precise way. In our inversion, we fit a part of each Stokes profile around a target wavelength, and then determine the magnetic field as a function of the wavelength which is equivalent to get the magnetic field as a function of the height of line formation. To test the performance of the new numerical code, we employed "hare and hound" approach by comparing an exact solution (called input) with the solution obtained by the code (called output). The precision of the code is also checked by comparing our results to the ones obtained with the HAO MERLIN code. The inversion code has been applied to synthetic Stokes profiles of the Na D1 line available in the literature. We investigated the limitations in recovering the input field in case of noisy data. As an application, we applied our inversion code to the polarization profiles of the Fe Iλ 6302.5 Å observed at IRSOL in Locarno.

  15. Targeted next generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-06

    1 Targeted next-generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes Christopher P...development and evaluation of a panel of 44 single-stranded molecular inversion probes (MIPs) coupled to next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the...padlock and molecular inversion probes as upfront enrichment steps for use with NGS showed the specificity and multiplexability of these techniques

  16. Normal-inverse bimodule operation Hadamard transform ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Huang, Chaoqun; Liu, Sheng; Xia, Lei; Shen, Chengyin; Chu, Yannan

    2018-10-31

    In order to suppress or eliminate the spurious peaks and improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of Hadamard transform ion mobility spectrometry (HT-IMS), a normal-inverse bimodule operation Hadamard transform - ion mobility spectrometry (NIBOHT-IMS) technique was developed. In this novel technique, a normal and inverse pseudo random binary sequence (PRBS) was produced in sequential order by an ion gate controller and utilized to control the ion gate of IMS, and then the normal HT-IMS mobility spectrum and the inverse HT-IMS mobility spectrum were obtained. A NIBOHT-IMS mobility spectrum was gained by subtracting the inverse HT-IMS mobility spectrum from normal HT-IMS mobility spectrum. Experimental results demonstrate that the NIBOHT-IMS technique can significantly suppress or eliminate the spurious peaks, and enhance the SNR by measuring the reactant ions. Furthermore, the gas CHCl 3 and CH 2 Br 2 were measured for evaluating the capability of detecting real sample. The results show that the NIBOHT-IMS technique is able to eliminate the spurious peaks and improve the SNR notably not only for the detection of larger ion signals but also for the detection of small ion signals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Inverse-Square Law with Data Loggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The inverse-square law for the intensity of light received at a distance from a light source has been verified using various experimental techniques. Typical measurements involve a manual variation of the distance between a light source and a light sensor, usually by sliding the sensor or source along a bench, measuring the source-sensor distance…

  18. DEVELOPING SEASONAL AMMONIA EMISSION ESTIMATES WITH AN INVERSE MODELING TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant uncertainty exists in magnitude and variability of ammonia (NH3) emissions, which are needed for air quality modeling of aerosols and deposition of nitrogen compounds. Approximately 85% of NH3 emissions are estimated to come from agricultural non-point sources. We sus...

  19. Inversion group (IG) fitting: A new T1 mapping method for modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) that allows arbitrary inversion groupings and rest periods (including no rest period).

    PubMed

    Sussman, Marshall S; Yang, Issac Y; Fok, Kai-Ho; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2016-06-01

    The Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI) technique is used for T1 mapping in the heart. However, a drawback of this technique is that it requires lengthy rest periods in between inversion groupings to allow for complete magnetization recovery. In this work, a new MOLLI fitting algorithm (inversion group [IG] fitting) is presented that allows for arbitrary combinations of inversion groupings and rest periods (including no rest period). Conventional MOLLI algorithms use a three parameter fitting model. In IG fitting, the number of parameters is two plus the number of inversion groupings. This increased number of parameters permits any inversion grouping/rest period combination. Validation was performed through simulation, phantom, and in vivo experiments. IG fitting provided T1 values with less than 1% discrepancy across a range of inversion grouping/rest period combinations. By comparison, conventional three parameter fits exhibited up to 30% discrepancy for some combinations. The one drawback with IG fitting was a loss of precision-approximately 30% worse than the three parameter fits. IG fitting permits arbitrary inversion grouping/rest period combinations (including no rest period). The cost of the algorithm is a loss of precision relative to conventional three parameter fits. Magn Reson Med 75:2332-2340, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Action Understanding as Inverse Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Chris L.; Saxe, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2009-01-01

    Humans are adept at inferring the mental states underlying other agents' actions, such as goals, beliefs, desires, emotions and other thoughts. We propose a computational framework based on Bayesian inverse planning for modeling human action understanding. The framework represents an intuitive theory of intentional agents' behavior based on the…

  1. Workflows for Full Waveform Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Christian; Krischer, Lion; Afanasiev, Michael; van Driel, Martin; May, Dave A.; Rietmann, Max; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Despite many theoretical advances and the increasing availability of high-performance computing clusters, full seismic waveform inversions still face considerable challenges regarding data and workflow management. While the community has access to solvers which can harness modern heterogeneous computing architectures, the computational bottleneck has fallen to these often manpower-bounded issues that need to be overcome to facilitate further progress. Modern inversions involve huge amounts of data and require a tight integration between numerical PDE solvers, data acquisition and processing systems, nonlinear optimization libraries, and job orchestration frameworks. To this end we created a set of libraries and applications revolving around Salvus (http://salvus.io), a novel software package designed to solve large-scale full waveform inverse problems. This presentation focuses on solving passive source seismic full waveform inversions from local to global scales with Salvus. We discuss (i) design choices for the aforementioned components required for full waveform modeling and inversion, (ii) their implementation in the Salvus framework, and (iii) how it is all tied together by a usable workflow system. We combine state-of-the-art algorithms ranging from high-order finite-element solutions of the wave equation to quasi-Newton optimization algorithms using trust-region methods that can handle inexact derivatives. All is steered by an automated interactive graph-based workflow framework capable of orchestrating all necessary pieces. This naturally facilitates the creation of new Earth models and hopefully sparks new scientific insights. Additionally, and even more importantly, it enhances reproducibility and reliability of the final results.

  2. GalWeight: A New and Effective Weighting Technique for Determining Galaxy Cluster and Group Membership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohamed H.; Wilson, Gillian; Klypin, Anatoly

    2018-07-01

    We introduce GalWeight, a new technique for assigning galaxy cluster membership. This technique is specifically designed to simultaneously maximize the number of bona fide cluster members while minimizing the number of contaminating interlopers. The GalWeight technique can be applied to both massive galaxy clusters and poor galaxy groups. Moreover, it is effective in identifying members in both the virial and infall regions with high efficiency. We apply the GalWeight technique to MDPL2 and Bolshoi N-body simulations, and find that it is >98% accurate in correctly assigning cluster membership. We show that GalWeight compares very favorably against four well-known existing cluster membership techniques (shifting gapper, den Hartog, caustic, SIM). We also apply the GalWeight technique to a sample of 12 Abell clusters (including the Coma cluster) using observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We conclude by discussing GalWeight’s potential for other astrophysical applications.

  3. Nonlinear Stimulated Raman Exact Passage by Resonance-Locked Inverse Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorier, V.; Gevorgyan, M.; Ishkhanyan, A.; Leroy, C.; Jauslin, H. R.; Guérin, S.

    2017-12-01

    We derive an exact and robust stimulated Raman process for nonlinear quantum systems driven by pulsed external fields. The external fields are designed with closed-form expressions from the inverse engineering of a given efficient and stable dynamics. This technique allows one to induce a controlled population inversion which surpasses the usual nonlinear stimulated Raman adiabatic passage efficiency.

  4. Gravity inversion of a fault by Particle swarm optimization (PSO).

    PubMed

    Toushmalani, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization is a heuristic global optimization method and also an optimization algorithm, which is based on swarm intelligence. It comes from the research on the bird and fish flock movement behavior. In this paper we introduce and use this method in gravity inverse problem. We discuss the solution for the inverse problem of determining the shape of a fault whose gravity anomaly is known. Application of the proposed algorithm to this problem has proven its capability to deal with difficult optimization problems. The technique proved to work efficiently when tested to a number of models.

  5. Inverse sampling regression for pooled data.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-López, Osval A; Montesinos-López, Abelardo; Eskridge, Kent; Crossa, José

    2017-06-01

    Because pools are tested instead of individuals in group testing, this technique is helpful for estimating prevalence in a population or for classifying a large number of individuals into two groups at a low cost. For this reason, group testing is a well-known means of saving costs and producing precise estimates. In this paper, we developed a mixed-effect group testing regression that is useful when the data-collecting process is performed using inverse sampling. This model allows including covariate information at the individual level to incorporate heterogeneity among individuals and identify which covariates are associated with positive individuals. We present an approach to fit this model using maximum likelihood and we performed a simulation study to evaluate the quality of the estimates. Based on the simulation study, we found that the proposed regression method for inverse sampling with group testing produces parameter estimates with low bias when the pre-specified number of positive pools (r) to stop the sampling process is at least 10 and the number of clusters in the sample is also at least 10. We performed an application with real data and we provide an NLMIXED code that researchers can use to implement this method.

  6. Quantum Effects in Inverse Opal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleiweiss, Michael; Datta, Timir; Lungu, Anca; Yin, Ming; Iqbal, Zafar; Palm, Eric; Brandt, Bruce

    2002-03-01

    Properties of bismuth inverse opals and carbon opal replicas were studied. The bismuth nanostructures were fabricated by pressure infiltration into porous artificial opal, while the carbon opal replicas were created via CVD. These structures form a regular three-dimensional network in which the bismuth and carbon regions percolate in all directions between the close packed spheres of SiO_2. The sizes of the conducting regions are of the order of tens of nanometers. Static susceptibility of the bismuth inverse opal showed clear deHaas-vanAlphen oscillations. Transport measurements, including Hall, were done using standard ac four and six probe techniques in fields up to 17 T* and temperatures between 4.2 and 200 K. Observations of Shubnikov-deHaas oscillations in magnetoresistance, one-dimensional weak localization, quantum Hall and other effects will be discussed. *Performed at the National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) FSU, Tallahassee, FL. This work was partially supported by grants from DARPA-nanothermoelectrics, NASA-EPSCOR and the USC nanocenter.

  7. An evolutive real-time source inversion based on a linear inverse formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Reyes, H. S.; Tago, J.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Metivier, L.; Contreras Zazueta, M. A.; Virieux, J.

    2016-12-01

    Finite source inversion is a steppingstone to unveil earthquake rupture. It is used on ground motion predictions and its results shed light on seismic cycle for better tectonic understanding. It is not yet used for quasi-real-time analysis. Nowadays, significant progress has been made on approaches regarding earthquake imaging, thanks to new data acquisition and methodological advances. However, most of these techniques are posterior procedures once seismograms are available. Incorporating source parameters estimation into early warning systems would require to update the source build-up while recording data. In order to go toward this dynamic estimation, we developed a kinematic source inversion formulated in the time-domain, for which seismograms are linearly related to the slip distribution on the fault through convolutions with Green's functions previously estimated and stored (Perton et al., 2016). These convolutions are performed in the time-domain as we progressively increase the time window of records at each station specifically. Selected unknowns are the spatio-temporal slip-rate distribution to keep the linearity of the forward problem with respect to unknowns, as promoted by Fan and Shearer (2014). Through the spatial extension of the expected rupture zone, we progressively build-up the slip-rate when adding new data by assuming rupture causality. This formulation is based on the adjoint-state method for efficiency (Plessix, 2006). The inverse problem is non-unique and, in most cases, underdetermined. While standard regularization terms are used for stabilizing the inversion, we avoid strategies based on parameter reduction leading to an unwanted non-linear relationship between parameters and seismograms for our progressive build-up. Rise time, rupture velocity and other quantities can be extracted later on as attributs from the slip-rate inversion we perform. Satisfactory results are obtained on a synthetic example (FIgure 1) proposed by the Source

  8. Efficient 3D inversions using the Richards equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockett, Rowan; Heagy, Lindsey J.; Haber, Eldad

    2018-07-01

    Fluid flow in the vadose zone is governed by the Richards equation; it is parameterized by hydraulic conductivity, which is a nonlinear function of pressure head. Investigations in the vadose zone typically require characterizing distributed hydraulic properties. Water content or pressure head data may include direct measurements made from boreholes. Increasingly, proxy measurements from hydrogeophysics are being used to supply more spatially and temporally dense data sets. Inferring hydraulic parameters from such datasets requires the ability to efficiently solve and optimize the nonlinear time domain Richards equation. This is particularly important as the number of parameters to be estimated in a vadose zone inversion continues to grow. In this paper, we describe an efficient technique to invert for distributed hydraulic properties in 1D, 2D, and 3D. Our technique does not store the Jacobian matrix, but rather computes its product with a vector. Existing literature for the Richards equation inversion explicitly calculates the sensitivity matrix using finite difference or automatic differentiation, however, for large scale problems these methods are constrained by computation and/or memory. Using an implicit sensitivity algorithm enables large scale inversion problems for any distributed hydraulic parameters in the Richards equation to become tractable on modest computational resources. We provide an open source implementation of our technique based on the SimPEG framework, and show it in practice for a 3D inversion of saturated hydraulic conductivity using water content data through time.

  9. Role of various DNA repair pathways in chromosomal inversion formation in CHO mutants.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Ian M; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the formation of chromosomal inversions, we investigated the role of various DNA repair pathways, including the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HR), and Fanconi Anemia (FA) repair pathways for the formation of radiation induced chromosomal inversions. CHO10B2 wild type, CHO DNA repair-deficient, and CHO DNA repair-deficient corrected mutant cells were synchronized into G1 phase and exposed to gamma-rays. First post-irradiation metaphase cells were analyzed for chromosomal inversions by a differential chromatid staining technique involving a single cycle pre-irradiation ethynyl-uridine treatment and statistic calculations. It was observed that inhibition of the NHEJ pathway resulted in an overall decrease in the number of radiation-induced inversions, roughly a 50% decrease when compared to the CHO wild type. Interestingly, inhibition of the FA pathway resulted in an increase in both the number of spontaneous inversions and the number of radiation-induced inversions observed after exposure to 2 Gy of ionizing radiation. It was observed that FA-deficient cells contained roughly 330% (1.24 inversions per cell) more spontaneous inversions and 20% (0.4 inversions per cell) more radiation-induced inversions than the wild-type CHO cell lines. The HR mutants, defective in Rad51 foci, showed similar number of spontaneous and radiation-induced inversion as the wild-type cells. Gene complementation resulted in both spontaneous and radiation-induced inversions resembling the CHO wild-type cells. We have concluded that the NHEJ repair pathway contributes to the formation of radiation-induced inversions. Additionally, through an unknown molecular mechanism it appears that the FA signal pathway prevents the formation of both spontaneous and radiation induced inversions.

  10. Astrometry With the Hubble Space Telescope: Trigonometric Parallaxes of Planetary Nebula Nuclei NGC 6853, NGC 7293, ABELL 31, and DeHt 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, G. F.; McArthur, Barbara E.; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Harrison, Thomas E.; Harris, Hugh C.; Nelan, Edmund; Bond, Howard E; Patterson, Richard J.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2009-01-01

    We present absolute parallaxes and relative proper motions for the central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 6853 (The Dumbbell), NGC 7293 (The Helix), Abell 31, and DeHt 5. This paper details our reduction and analysis using DeHt 5 as an example. We obtain these planetary nebula nuclei (PNNi) parallaxes with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors FGS 1r and FGS 3, white-light interferometers on the Hubble Space Telescope. Proper motions, spectral classifications and VJHKT2M and DDO51 photometry of the stars comprising the astrometric reference frames provide spectrophotometric estimates of reference star absolute parallaxes. Introducing these into our model as observations with error, we determine absolute parallaxes for each PNN. Weighted averaging with previous independent parallax measurements yields an average parallax precision, sigma (sub pi)/ pi = 5%. Derived distances are: d(sub NGC6853) = 405(exp +28 sub -25) pc, d(sub NGC7293) = 216(exp +14 sub -12) pc, d(sub Abell31) = 621(exp +91 sub -70) pc, and d(sub DeHt5) = 345(exp +19 sub -17) pc. These PNNi distances are all smaller than previously derived from spectroscopic analyses of the central stars. To obtain absolute magnitudes from these distances requires estimates of interstellar extinction. We average extinction measurements culled from the literature, from reddening based on PNNi intrinsic colors derived from model SEDs, and an assumption that each PNN experiences the same rate of extinction as a function of distance as do the reference stars nearest (in angular separation) to each central star. We also apply Lutz-Kelker bias corrections. The absolute magnitudes and effective temperatures permit estimates of PNNi radii through both the Stefan-Boltzmann relation and Eddington fluxes. Comparing absolute magnitudes with post-AGB models provides mass estimates. Masses cluster around 0.57 solar Mass, close to the peak of the white dwarf mass distribution. Adding a few more PNNi with well

  11. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived from Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From an analysis of X-ray spectroscopy and imaging data, we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster. The X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect observations are combined to determine the angular diameter distance to the cluster of D(sub A) = 1294(sup +294 +438, sub -283 -458) Mpc (Statistical followed by systematic uncertainty), implying a Hubble constant of H(sub 0) = 52.2(sup +11.4 +18.5, sub -11.9 -17.7) km/s.Mpc for Omega(sub M) = 0.3 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0.7. We find a best-fit H(sub 0) of 46 km/s.Mpc for the Omega(sub M) = 1 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0 cosmology, and 48 km/s.Mpc for Omega(sub M) = 0.3 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0.0. The X-ray data are also used to derive a total cluster mass of M(sup HSE, sub tot)(r(sub 500)) = 5.18(sup +0.62, sub -0.48) x 10(exp 14)/h solar mass; the optical velocity dispersion yields an independent and consistent estimate of M(sup virial, sub tot)(r(sub 500)) = 6.35(sup +1.51, sub -1.19) X 10(exp 14) /h solar mass. Both of the total mass estimates are evaluated at a fiducial radius, r(sub 500) = 830 /h kpc, where the overdensity is 500 times the critical density. The total cluster mass is then combined with gas mass measurements to determine a cluster gas mass fraction of F(sub g) = 0.056(sup +0.010, sub -0.013) /h(sup 3/2) in combination with recent baryon density constraints, the measured gas mass fraction yields an upper limit on the mass density parameter of Omega(sub M) h(sup 1/2) <= 0.34(sup +/0.06, sub 0.05.

  12. Titania inverse opals for infrared optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanata, M.; Cherchi, M.; Zappettini, A.; Pietralunga, S. M.; Martinelli, M.

    2001-06-01

    Photonic crystals have gathered great importance in recent years. In particular macroporous materials (inverse opals) show interesting properties as photonic crystals. Ordered macroporous titanium dioxide (TiO 2) is made using polystyrene spheres as a template. Titania is chosen for its high refractive index (>2.5). Following an already known technique [E.G. Judith, J. Wijnhoven, W.L. Vos, Science 281 (1998) 802; B.T. Holland, C.F. Blanford, A. Stein, Science 281 (1998) 538; B.T. Holland, C.F. Blanford, T. Do, A. Stein, Chem. Mater. 11 (1999) 795] large-scale order in macroporous TiO 2 is obtained both using the 778 and the 3190 nm beads as documented by optical microscope and SEM images. These structures would lead to applications in the mid-infrared range.

  13. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics.

  14. Inversion for the driving forces of plate tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    Inverse modeling techniques have been applied to the problem of determining the roles of various forces that may drive and resist plate tectonic motions. Separate linear inverse problems have been solved to find the best fitting pole of rotation for finite element grid point velocities and to find the best combination of force models to fit the observed relative plate velocities for the earth's twelve major plates using the generalized inverse operator. Variance-covariance data on plate motion have also been included. Results emphasize the relative importance of ridge push forces in the driving mechanism. Convergent margin forces are smaller by at least a factor of two, and perhaps by as much as a factor of twenty. Slab pull, apparently, is poorly transmitted to the surface plate as a driving force. Drag forces at the base of the plate are smaller than ridge push forces, although the sign of the force remains in question.

  15. RNA inverse folding using Monte Carlo tree search.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiufeng; Yoshizoe, Kazuki; Taneda, Akito; Tsuda, Koji

    2017-11-06

    Artificially synthesized RNA molecules provide important ways for creating a variety of novel functional molecules. State-of-the-art RNA inverse folding algorithms can design simple and short RNA sequences of specific GC content, that fold into the target RNA structure. However, their performance is not satisfactory in complicated cases. We present a new inverse folding algorithm called MCTS-RNA, which uses Monte Carlo tree search (MCTS), a technique that has shown exceptional performance in Computer Go recently, to represent and discover the essential part of the sequence space. To obtain high accuracy, initial sequences generated by MCTS are further improved by a series of local updates. Our algorithm has an ability to control the GC content precisely and can deal with pseudoknot structures. Using common benchmark datasets for evaluation, MCTS-RNA showed a lot of promise as a standard method of RNA inverse folding. MCTS-RNA is available at https://github.com/tsudalab/MCTS-RNA .

  16. Indium oxide inverse opal films synthesized by structure replication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Berghoff, Daniel; Nikitin, Andreas; Reichelt, Matthias; Wu, Xia; Meier, Torsten; Wagner, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    We present the synthesis of indium oxide (In2O3) inverse opal films with photonic stop bands in the visible range by a structure replication method. Artificial opal films made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres are utilized as template. The opal films are deposited via sedimentation facilitated by ultrasonication, and then impregnated by indium nitrate solution, which is thermally converted to In2O3 after drying. The quality of the resulting inverse opal film depends on many parameters; in this study the water content of the indium nitrate/PMMA composite after drying is investigated. Comparison of the reflectance spectra recorded by vis-spectroscopy with simulated data shows a good agreement between the peak position and calculated stop band positions for the inverse opals. This synthesis is less complex and highly efficient compared to most other techniques and is suitable for use in many applications.

  17. Joint inversion of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.-H.; Xia, J.-H.; Liu, J.-P.; Liu, Q.-S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the characteristics of the phase velocity of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waves in a six-layer earth model. The results show that fundamental mode is more sensitive to the shear velocities of shallow layers (< 7 m) and concentrated in a very narrow band (around 18 Hz) while higher modes are more sensitive to the parameters of relatively deeper layers and distributed over a wider frequency band. These properties provide a foundation of using a multi-mode joint inversion to define S-wave velocity. Inversion results of both synthetic data and a real-world example demonstrate that joint inversion with the damped least squares method and the SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) technique to invert Rayleigh waves of fundamental and higher modes can effectively reduce the ambiguity and improve the accuracy of inverted S-wave velocities.

  18. Simplified, inverse, ejector design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechant, Lawrence J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple lumped parameter based inverse design tool has been developed which provides flow path geometry and entrainment estimates subject to operational, acoustic, and design constraints. These constraints are manifested through specification of primary mass flow rate or ejector thrust, fully-mixed exit velocity, and static pressure matching. Fundamentally, integral forms of the conservation equations coupled with the specified design constraints are combined to yield an easily invertible linear system in terms of the flow path cross-sectional areas. Entrainment is computed by back substitution. Initial comparison with experimental and analogous one-dimensional methods show good agreement. Thus, this simple inverse design code provides an analytically based, preliminary design tool with direct application to High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) design studies.

  19. Inverse statistics and information content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, H.; Bolgorian, Meysam; Jafari, G. R.

    2010-12-01

    Inverse statistics analysis studies the distribution of investment horizons to achieve a predefined level of return. This distribution provides a maximum investment horizon which determines the most likely horizon for gaining a specific return. There exists a significant difference between inverse statistics of financial market data and a fractional Brownian motion (fBm) as an uncorrelated time-series, which is a suitable criteria to measure information content in financial data. In this paper we perform this analysis for the DJIA and S&P500 as two developed markets and Tehran price index (TEPIX) as an emerging market. We also compare these probability distributions with fBm probability, to detect when the behavior of the stocks are the same as fBm.

  20. Nonlinear Waves and Inverse Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-29

    equations include the Kadomtsev - Petviashvili (K-P), Davey-Stewartson (D-S), 2+1 Toda, and Self-Dual Yang-Mills (SDYM) equations . We have uncovered a... Petviashvili Equation and Associated Constraints, M.J. Ablowitz and Javier Villaroel, Studies in Appl. Math. 85, (1991), 195-213. 12. On the Hamiltonian...nonlinear wave equations of physical significance, multidimensional inverse scattering, numer- ically induced instabilities and chaos, and forced

  1. Nonlinear Waves and Inverse Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-18

    to be published Proceedings: conference Chaos in Australia (February 1990). 5. On the Kadomtsev Petviashvili Equation and Associated Constraints by...Scattering Transfoni (IST). IST is a method which alows one to’solve nonlinear wave equations by solving certain related direct and inverse scattering...problems. We use these results to find solutions to nonlinear wave equations much like one uses Fourier analysis for linear problems. Moreover the

  2. Source encoding in multi-parameter full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matharu, Gian; Sacchi, Mauricio D.

    2018-04-01

    Source encoding techniques alleviate the computational burden of sequential-source full waveform inversion (FWI) by considering multiple sources simultaneously rather than independently. The reduced data volume requires fewer forward/adjoint simulations per non-linear iteration. Applications of source-encoded full waveform inversion (SEFWI) have thus far focused on monoparameter acoustic inversion. We extend SEFWI to the multi-parameter case with applications presented for elastic isotropic inversion. Estimating multiple parameters can be challenging as perturbations in different parameters can prompt similar responses in the data. We investigate the relationship between source encoding and parameter trade-off by examining the multi-parameter source-encoded Hessian. Probing of the Hessian demonstrates the convergence of the expected source-encoded Hessian, to that of conventional FWI. The convergence implies that the parameter trade-off in SEFWI is comparable to that observed in FWI. A series of synthetic inversions are conducted to establish the feasibility of source-encoded multi-parameter FWI. We demonstrate that SEFWI requires fewer overall simulations than FWI to achieve a target model error for a range of first-order optimization methods. An inversion for spatially inconsistent P - (α) and S-wave (β) velocity models, corroborates the expectation of comparable parameter trade-off in SEFWI and FWI. The final example demonstrates a shortcoming of SEFWI when confronted with time-windowing in data-driven inversion schemes. The limitation is a consequence of the implicit fixed-spread acquisition assumption in SEFWI. Alternative objective functions, namely the normalized cross-correlation and L1 waveform misfit, do not enable SEFWI to overcome this limitation.

  3. Parameterizations for ensemble Kalman inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chada, Neil K.; Iglesias, Marco A.; Roininen, Lassi; Stuart, Andrew M.

    2018-05-01

    The use of ensemble methods to solve inverse problems is attractive because it is a derivative-free methodology which is also well-adapted to parallelization. In its basic iterative form the method produces an ensemble of solutions which lie in the linear span of the initial ensemble. Choice of the parameterization of the unknown field is thus a key component of the success of the method. We demonstrate how both geometric ideas and hierarchical ideas can be used to design effective parameterizations for a number of applied inverse problems arising in electrical impedance tomography, groundwater flow and source inversion. In particular we show how geometric ideas, including the level set method, can be used to reconstruct piecewise continuous fields, and we show how hierarchical methods can be used to learn key parameters in continuous fields, such as length-scales, resulting in improved reconstructions. Geometric and hierarchical ideas are combined in the level set method to find piecewise constant reconstructions with interfaces of unknown topology.

  4. Viscoacoustic anisotropic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yingming; Li, Zhenchun; Huang, Jianping; Li, Jinli

    2017-01-01

    A viscoacoustic vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) quasi-differential wave equation, which takes account for both the viscosity and anisotropy of media, is proposed for wavefield simulation in this study. The finite difference method is used to solve the equations, for which the attenuation terms are solved in the wavenumber domain, and all remaining terms in the time-space domain. To stabilize the adjoint wavefield, robust regularization operators are applied to the wave equation to eliminate the high-frequency component of the numerical noise produced during the backward propagation of the viscoacoustic wavefield. Based on these strategies, we derive the corresponding gradient formula and implement a viscoacoustic VTI full waveform inversion (FWI). Numerical tests verify that our proposed viscoacoustic VTI FWI can produce accurate and stable inversion results for viscoacoustic VTI data sets. In addition, we test our method's sensitivity to velocity, Q, and anisotropic parameters. Our results show that the sensitivity to velocity is much higher than that to Q and anisotropic parameters. As such, our proposed method can produce acceptable inversion results as long as the Q and anisotropic parameters are within predefined thresholds.

  5. Non-recursive augmented Lagrangian algorithms for the forward and inverse dynamics of constrained flexible multibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayo, Eduardo; Ledesma, Ragnar

    1993-01-01

    A technique is presented for solving the inverse dynamics of flexible planar multibody systems. This technique yields the non-causal joint efforts (inverse dynamics) as well as the internal states (inverse kinematics) that produce a prescribed nominal trajectory of the end effector. A non-recursive global Lagrangian approach is used in formulating the equations for motion as well as in solving the inverse dynamics equations. Contrary to the recursive method previously presented, the proposed method solves the inverse problem in a systematic and direct manner for both open-chain as well as closed-chain configurations. Numerical simulation shows that the proposed procedure provides an excellent tracking of the desired end effector trajectory.

  6. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-01-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination. PMID:10471710

  7. Probabilistic Geoacoustic Inversion in Complex Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Probabilistic Geoacoustic Inversion in Complex Environments Jan Dettmer School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria BC...long-range inversion methods can fail to provide sufficient resolution. For proper quantitative examination of variability, parameter uncertainty must...project aims to advance probabilistic geoacoustic inversion methods for complex ocean environments for a range of geoacoustic data types. The work is

  8. UVIT view of ram-pressure stripping in action: Star formation in the stripped gas of the GASP jellyfish galaxy JO201 in Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, K.; Poggianti, B. M.; Gullieuszik, M.; Fasano, G.; Bellhouse, C.; Postma, J.; Moretti, A.; Jaffé, Y.; Vulcani, B.; Bettoni, D.; Fritz, J.; Côté, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Hutchings, J. B.; Mohan, R.; Sreekumar, P.; Stalin, C. S.; Subramaniam, A.; Tandon, S. N.

    2018-06-01

    Jellyfish are cluster galaxies that experience strong ram-pressure effects that strip their gas. Their Hα images reveal ionized gas tails up to 100 kpc, which could be hosting ongoing star formation. Here we report the ultraviolet (UV) imaging observation of the jellyfish galaxy JO201 obtained at a spatial resolution ˜ 1.3 kpc. The intense burst of star formation happening in the tentacles is the focus of the present study. JO201 is the "UV-brightest cluster galaxy" in Abell 85 (z ˜ 0.056) with knots and streams of star formation in the ultraviolet. We identify star forming knots both in the stripped gas and in the galaxy disk and compare the UV features with the ones traced by Hα emission. Overall, the two emissions remarkably correlate, both in the main body and along the tentacles. Similarly, also the star formation rates of individual knots derived from the extinction-corrected FUV emission agree with those derived from the Hα emission and range from ˜ 0.01 -to- 2.07 M⊙ yr-1. The integrated star formation rate from FUV flux is ˜ 15 M⊙ yr-1. The unprecedented deep UV imaging study of the jellyfish galaxy JO201 shows clear signs of extraplanar star-formation activity due to a recent/ongoing gas stripping event.

  9. LOFAR discovery of a double radio halo system in Abell 1758 and radio/X-ray study of the cluster pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botteon, A.; Shimwell, T. W.; Bonafede, A.; Dallacasa, D.; Brunetti, G.; Mandal, S.; van Weeren, R. J.; Brüggen, M.; Cassano, R.; de Gasperin, F.; Hoang, D. N.; Hoeft, M.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Savini, F.; White, G. J.; Wilber, A.; Venturi, T.

    2018-05-01

    Radio halos and radio relics are diffuse synchrotron sources that extend over Mpc-scales and are found in a number of merger galaxy clusters. They are believed to form as a consequence of the energy that is dissipated by turbulence and shocks in the intra-cluster medium (ICM). However, the precise physical processes that generate these steep synchrotron spectrum sources are still poorly constrained. We present a new LOFAR observation of the double galaxy cluster Abell 1758. This system is composed of A1758N, a massive cluster hosting a known giant radio halo, and A1758S, which is a less massive cluster whose diffuse radio emission is confirmed here for the first time. Our observations have revealed a radio halo and a candidate radio relic in A1758S, and a suggestion of emission along the bridge connecting the two systems which deserves confirmation. We combined the LOFAR data with archival VLA and GMRT observations to constrain the spectral properties of the diffuse emission. We also analyzed a deep archival Chandra observation and used this to provide evidence that A1758N and A1758S are in a pre-merger phase. The ICM temperature across the bridge that connects the two systems shows a jump which might indicate the presence of a transversal shock generated in the initial stage of the merger.

  10. Probing the Curious Case of a Galaxy Cluster Merger in Abell 115 with High-fidelity Chandra X-Ray Temperature and Radio Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallman, Eric J.; Alden, Brian; Rapetti, David; Datta, Abhirup; Burns, Jack O.

    2018-05-01

    We present results from an X-ray and radio study of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 115. We use the full set of five Chandra observations taken of A115 to date (360 ks total integration) to construct high-fidelity temperature and surface brightness maps. We also examine radio data from the Very Large Array at 1.5 GHz and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 0.6 GHz. We propose that the high X-ray spectral temperature between the subclusters results from the interaction of the bow shocks driven into the intracluster medium by the motion of the subclusters relative to one another. We have identified morphologically similar scenarios in Enzo numerical N-body/hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters in a cosmological context. In addition, the giant radio relic feature in A115, with an arc-like structure and a relatively flat spectral index, is likely consistent with other shock-associated giant radio relics seen in other massive galaxy clusters. We suggest a dynamical scenario that is consistent with the structure of the X-ray gas, the hot region between the clusters, and the radio relic feature.

  11. A direct-inverse method for transonic and separated flows about airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    A direct-inverse technique and computer program called TAMSEP that can be sued for the analysis of the flow about airfoils at subsonic and low transonic freestream velocities is presented. The method is based upon a direct-inverse nonconservative full potential inviscid method, a Thwaites laminar boundary layer technique, and the Barnwell turbulent momentum integral scheme; and it is formulated using Cartesian coordinates. Since the method utilizes inverse boundary conditions in regions of separated flow, it is suitable for predicing the flowfield about airfoils having trailing edge separated flow under high lift conditions. Comparisons with experimental data indicate that the method should be a useful tool for applied aerodynamic analyses.

  12. A direct-inverse method for transonic and separated flows about airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1990-01-01

    A direct-inverse technique and computer program called TAMSEP that can be used for the analysis of the flow about airfoils at subsonic and low transonic freestream velocities is presented. The method is based upon a direct-inverse nonconservative full potential inviscid method, a Thwaites laminar boundary layer technique, and the Barnwell turbulent momentum integral scheme; and it is formulated using Cartesian coordinates. Since the method utilizes inverse boundary conditions in regions of separated flow, it is suitable for predicting the flow field about airfoils having trailing edge separated flow under high lift conditions. Comparisons with experimental data indicate that the method should be a useful tool for applied aerodynamic analyses.

  13. Large-scale inverse model analyses employing fast randomized data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Youzuo; Le, Ellen B.; O'Malley, Daniel; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Bui-Thanh, Tan

    2017-08-01

    When the number of observations is large, it is computationally challenging to apply classical inverse modeling techniques. We have developed a new computationally efficient technique for solving inverse problems with a large number of observations (e.g., on the order of 107 or greater). Our method, which we call the randomized geostatistical approach (RGA), is built upon the principal component geostatistical approach (PCGA). We employ a data reduction technique combined with the PCGA to improve the computational efficiency and reduce the memory usage. Specifically, we employ a randomized numerical linear algebra technique based on a so-called "sketching" matrix to effectively reduce the dimension of the observations without losing the information content needed for the inverse analysis. In this way, the computational and memory costs for RGA scale with the information content rather than the size of the calibration data. Our algorithm is coded in Julia and implemented in the MADS open-source high-performance computational framework (http://mads.lanl.gov). We apply our new inverse modeling method to invert for a synthetic transmissivity field. Compared to a standard geostatistical approach (GA), our method is more efficient when the number of observations is large. Most importantly, our method is capable of solving larger inverse problems than the standard GA and PCGA approaches. Therefore, our new model inversion method is a powerful tool for solving large-scale inverse problems. The method can be applied in any field and is not limited to hydrogeological applications such as the characterization of aquifer heterogeneity.

  14. Inversion climatology at San Jose, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T.; Bornstein, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Month-to-month variations in the early morning surface-based and near-noon elevated inversions at San Jose, Calif., were determined from slow rise radiosondes launched during a four-year period. A high frequency of shallow, radiative, surface-based inversions were found in winter during the early morning hours, while during the same period in summer, a low frequency of deeper based inversions arose from a combination of radiative and subsidence processes. The frequency of elevated inversions in the hours near noon was lowest during fall and spring, while inversion bases were highest and thicknesses least during these periods.

  15. Unlocking the spatial inversion of large scanning magnetic microscopy datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myre, J. M.; Lascu, I.; Andrade Lima, E.; Feinberg, J. M.; Saar, M. O.; Weiss, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    Modern scanning magnetic microscopy provides the ability to perform high-resolution, ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometry, with spatial resolutions better than 10^-4 m and magnetic moments as weak as 10^-16 Am^2. These microscopy capabilities have enhanced numerous magnetic studies, including investigations of the paleointensity of the Earth's magnetic field, shock magnetization and demagnetization of impacts, magnetostratigraphy, the magnetic record in speleothems, and the records of ancient core dynamos of planetary bodies. A common component among many studies utilizing scanning magnetic microscopy is solving an inverse problem to determine the non-negative magnitude of the magnetic moments that produce the measured component of the magnetic field. The two most frequently used methods to solve this inverse problem are classic fast Fourier techniques in the frequency domain and non-negative least squares (NNLS) methods in the spatial domain. Although Fourier techniques are extremely fast, they typically violate non-negativity and it is difficult to implement constraints associated with the space domain. NNLS methods do not violate non-negativity, but have typically been computation time prohibitive for samples of practical size or resolution. Existing NNLS methods use multiple techniques to attain tractable computation. To reduce computation time in the past, typically sample size or scan resolution would have to be reduced. Similarly, multiple inversions of smaller sample subdivisions can be performed, although this frequently results in undesirable artifacts at subdivision boundaries. Dipole interactions can also be filtered to only compute interactions above a threshold which enables the use of sparse methods through artificial sparsity. To improve upon existing spatial domain techniques, we present the application of the TNT algorithm, named TNT as it is a "dynamite" non-negative least squares algorithm which enhances the performance and accuracy of

  16. Joint inversion of regional and teleseismic earthquake waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Mark R.; Doser, Diane I.

    1988-03-01

    A least squares joint inversion technique for regional and teleseismic waveforms is presented. The mean square error between seismograms and synthetics is minimized using true amplitudes. Matching true amplitudes in modeling requires meaningful estimates of modeling uncertainties and of seismogram signal-to-noise ratios. This also permits calculating linearized uncertainties on the solution based on accuracy and resolution. We use a priori estimates of earthquake parameters to stabilize unresolved parameters, and for comparison with a posteriori uncertainties. We verify the technique on synthetic data, and on the 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho (M = 7.3), earthquake. We demonstrate the inversion on the August 1954 Rainbow Mountain, Nevada (M = 6.8), earthquake and find parameters consistent with previous studies.

  17. Inverse transport calculations in optical imaging with subspace optimization algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Tian, E-mail: tding@math.utexas.edu; Ren, Kui, E-mail: ren@math.utexas.edu

    2014-09-15

    Inverse boundary value problems for the radiative transport equation play an important role in optics-based medical imaging techniques such as diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and fluorescence optical tomography (FOT). Despite the rapid progress in the mathematical theory and numerical computation of these inverse problems in recent years, developing robust and efficient reconstruction algorithms remains a challenging task and an active research topic. We propose here a robust reconstruction method that is based on subspace minimization techniques. The method splits the unknown transport solution (or a functional of it) into low-frequency and high-frequency components, and uses singular value decomposition to analyticallymore » recover part of low-frequency information. Minimization is then applied to recover part of the high-frequency components of the unknowns. We present some numerical simulations with synthetic data to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.« less

  18. Towards full waveform ambient noise inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, Korbinian; Ermert, Laura; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    In this work we investigate fundamentals of a method—referred to as full waveform ambient noise inversion—that improves the resolution of tomographic images by extracting waveform information from interstation correlation functions that cannot be used without knowing the distribution of noise sources. The fundamental idea is to drop the principle of Green function retrieval and to establish correlation functions as self-consistent observables in seismology. This involves the following steps: (1) We introduce an operator-based formulation of the forward problem of computing correlation functions. It is valid for arbitrary distributions of noise sources in both space and frequency, and for any type of medium, including 3-D elastic, heterogeneous and attenuating media. In addition, the formulation allows us to keep the derivations independent of time and frequency domain and it facilitates the application of adjoint techniques, which we use to derive efficient expressions to compute first and also second derivatives. The latter are essential for a resolution analysis that accounts for intra- and interparameter trade-offs. (2) In a forward modelling study we investigate the effect of noise sources and structure on different observables. Traveltimes are hardly affected by heterogeneous noise source distributions. On the other hand, the amplitude asymmetry of correlations is at least to first order insensitive to unmodelled Earth structure. Energy and waveform differences are sensitive to both structure and the distribution of noise sources. (3) We design and implement an appropriate inversion scheme, where the extraction of waveform information is successively increased. We demonstrate that full waveform ambient noise inversion has the potential to go beyond ambient noise tomography based on Green function retrieval and to refine noise source location, which is essential for a better understanding of noise generation. Inherent trade-offs between source and structure

  19. The inverse gravimetric problem in gravity modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanso, F.; Tscherning, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main purposes of geodesy is to determine the gravity field of the Earth in the space outside its physical surface. This purpose can be pursued without any particular knowledge of the internal density even if the exact shape of the physical surface of the Earth is not known, though this seems to entangle the two domains, as it was in the old Stoke's theory before the appearance of Molodensky's approach. Nevertheless, even when large, dense and homogeneous data sets are available, it was always recognized that subtracting from the gravity field the effect of the outer layer of the masses (topographic effect) yields a much smoother field. This is obviously more important when a sparse data set is bad so that any smoothing of the gravity field helps in interpolating between the data without raising the modeling error, this approach is generally followed because it has become very cheap in terms of computing time since the appearance of spectral techniques. The mathematical description of the Inverse Gravimetric Problem (IGP) is dominated mainly by two principles, which in loose terms can be formulated as follows: the knowledge of the external gravity field determines mainly the lateral variations of the density; and the deeper the density anomaly giving rise to a gravity anomaly, the more improperly posed is the problem of recovering the former from the latter. The statistical relation between rho and n (and its inverse) is also investigated in its general form, proving that degree cross-covariances have to be introduced to describe the behavior of rho. The problem of the simultaneous estimate of a spherical anomalous potential and of the external, topographic masses is addressed criticizing the choice of the mixed collection approach.

  20. Inverse design of multicomponent assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeros, William D.; Lindquist, Beth A.; Jadrich, Ryan B.; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2018-03-01

    Inverse design can be a useful strategy for discovering interactions that drive particles to spontaneously self-assemble into a desired structure. Here, we extend an inverse design methodology—relative entropy optimization—to determine isotropic interactions that promote assembly of targeted multicomponent phases, and we apply this extension to design interactions for a variety of binary crystals ranging from compact triangular and square architectures to highly open structures with dodecagonal and octadecagonal motifs. We compare the resulting optimized (self- and cross) interactions for the binary assemblies to those obtained from optimization of analogous single-component systems. This comparison reveals that self-interactions act as a "primer" to position particles at approximately correct coordination shell distances, while cross interactions act as the "binder" that refines and locks the system into the desired configuration. For simpler binary targets, it is possible to successfully design self-assembling systems while restricting one of these interaction types to be a hard-core-like potential. However, optimization of both self- and cross interaction types appears necessary to design for assembly of more complex or open structures.

  1. The Earthquake Source Inversion Validation (SIV) - Project: Summary, Status, Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Finite-fault earthquake source inversions infer the (time-dependent) displacement on the rupture surface from geophysical data. The resulting earthquake source models document the complexity of the rupture process. However, this kinematic source inversion is ill-posed and returns non-unique solutions, as seen for instance in multiple source models for the same earthquake, obtained by different research teams, that often exhibit remarkable dissimilarities. To address the uncertainties in earthquake-source inversions and to understand strengths and weaknesses of various methods, the Source Inversion Validation (SIV) project developed a set of forward-modeling exercises and inversion benchmarks. Several research teams then use these validation exercises to test their codes and methods, but also to develop and benchmark new approaches. In this presentation I will summarize the SIV strategy, the existing benchmark exercises and corresponding results. Using various waveform-misfit criteria and newly developed statistical comparison tools to quantify source-model (dis)similarities, the SIV platforms is able to rank solutions and identify particularly promising source inversion approaches. Existing SIV exercises (with related data and descriptions) and all computational tools remain available via the open online collaboration platform; additional exercises and benchmark tests will be uploaded once they are fully developed. I encourage source modelers to use the SIV benchmarks for developing and testing new methods. The SIV efforts have already led to several promising new techniques for tackling the earthquake-source imaging problem. I expect that future SIV benchmarks will provide further innovations and insights into earthquake source kinematics that will ultimately help to better understand the dynamics of the rupture process.

  2. Real-time inverse planning for Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q Jackie; Chankong, Vira; Jitprapaikulsarn, Suradet; Wessels, Barry W; Einstein, Douglas B; Mathayomchan, Boonyanit; Kinsella, Timothy J

    2003-11-01

    The challenges of real-time Gamma Knife inverse planning are the large number of variables involved and the unknown search space a priori. With limited collimator sizes, shots have to be heavily overlapped to form a smooth prescription isodose line that conforms to the irregular target shape. Such overlaps greatly influence the total number of shots per plan, making pre-determination of the total number of shots impractical. However, this total number of shots usually defines the search space, a pre-requisite for most of the optimization methods. Since each shot only covers part of the target, a collection of shots in different locations and various collimator sizes selected makes up the global dose distribution that conforms to the target. Hence, planning or placing these shots is a combinatorial optimization process that is computationally expensive by nature. We have previously developed a theory of shot placement and optimization based on skeletonization. The real-time inverse planning process, reported in this paper, is an expansion and the clinical implementation of this theory. The complete planning process consists of two steps. The first step is to determine an optimal number of shots including locations and sizes and to assign initial collimator size to each of the shots. The second step is to fine-tune the weights using a linear-programming technique. The objective function is to minimize the total dose to the target boundary (i.e., maximize the dose conformity). Results of an ellipsoid test target and ten clinical cases are presented. The clinical cases are also compared with physician's manual plans. The target coverage is more than 99% for manual plans and 97% for all the inverse plans. The RTOG PITV conformity indices for the manual plans are between 1.16 and 3.46, compared to 1.36 to 2.4 for the inverse plans. All the inverse plans are generated in less than 2 min, making real-time inverse planning a reality.

  3. Influence of Gridded Standoff Measurement Resolution on Numerical Bathymetric Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesser, T.; Farthing, M. W.; Brodie, K.

    2016-02-01

    The bathymetry from the surfzone to the shoreline incurs frequent, active movement due to wave energy interacting with the seafloor. Methodologies to measure bathymetry range from point-source in-situ instruments, vessel-mounted single-beam or multi-beam sonar surveys, airborne bathymetric lidar, as well as inversion techniques from standoff measurements of wave processes from video or radar imagery. Each type of measurement has unique sources of error and spatial and temporal resolution and availability. Numerical bathymetry estimation frameworks can use these disparate data types in combination with model-based inversion techniques to produce a "best-estimate of bathymetry" at a given time. Understanding how the sources of error and varying spatial or temporal resolution of each data type affect the end result is critical for determining best practices and in turn increase the accuracy of bathymetry estimation techniques. In this work, we consider an initial step in the development of a complete framework for estimating bathymetry in the nearshore by focusing on gridded standoff measurements and in-situ point observations in model-based inversion at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility in Duck, NC. The standoff measurement methods return wave parameters computed using linear wave theory from the direct measurements. These gridded datasets can range in temporal and spatial resolution that do not match the desired model parameters and therefore could lead to a reduction in the accuracy of these methods. Specifically, we investigate the affect of numerical resolution on the accuracy of an Ensemble Kalman Filter bathymetric inversion technique in relation to the spatial and temporal resolution of the gridded standoff measurements. The accuracies of the bathymetric estimates are compared with both high-resolution Real Time Kinematic (RTK) single-beam surveys as well as alternative direct in-situ measurements using sonic altimeters.

  4. 3D Acoustic Full Waveform Inversion for Engineering Purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y.; Shin, S.; Kim, D.; Kim, S.; Chung, W.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic waveform inversion is the most researched data processing technique. In recent years, with an increase in marine development projects, seismic surveys are commonly conducted for engineering purposes; however, researches for application of waveform inversion are insufficient. The waveform inversion updates the subsurface physical property by minimizing the difference between modeled and observed data. Furthermore, it can be used to generate an accurate subsurface image; however, this technique consumes substantial computational resources. Its most compute-intensive step is the calculation of the gradient and hessian values. This aspect gains higher significance in 3D as compared to 2D. This paper introduces a new method for calculating gradient and hessian values, in an effort to reduce computational overburden. In the conventional waveform inversion, the calculation area covers all sources and receivers. In seismic surveys for engineering purposes, the number of receivers is limited. Therefore, it is inefficient to construct the hessian and gradient for the entire region (Figure 1). In order to tackle this problem, we calculate the gradient and the hessian for a single shot within the range of the relevant source and receiver. This is followed by summing up of these positions for the entire shot (Figure 2). In this paper, we demonstrate that reducing the area of calculation of the hessian and gradient for one shot reduces the overall amount of computation and therefore, the computation time. Furthermore, it is proved that the waveform inversion can be suitably applied for engineering purposes. In future research, we propose to ascertain an effective calculation range. This research was supported by the Basic Research Project(17-3314) of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources(KIGAM) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning of Korea.

  5. Learning Inverse Rig Mappings by Nonlinear Regression.

    PubMed

    Holden, Daniel; Saito, Jun; Komura, Taku

    2017-03-01

    We present a framework to design inverse rig-functions-functions that map low level representations of a character's pose such as joint positions or surface geometry to the representation used by animators called the animation rig. Animators design scenes using an animation rig, a framework widely adopted in animation production which allows animators to design character poses and geometry via intuitive parameters and interfaces. Yet most state-of-the-art computer animation techniques control characters through raw, low level representations such as joint angles, joint positions, or vertex coordinates. This difference often stops the adoption of state-of-the-art techniques in animation production. Our framework solves this issue by learning a mapping between the low level representations of the pose and the animation rig. We use nonlinear regression techniques, learning from example animation sequences designed by the animators. When new motions are provided in the skeleton space, the learned mapping is used to estimate the rig controls that reproduce such a motion. We introduce two nonlinear functions for producing such a mapping: Gaussian process regression and feedforward neural networks. The appropriate solution depends on the nature of the rig and the amount of data available for training. We show our framework applied to various examples including articulated biped characters, quadruped characters, facial animation rigs, and deformable characters. With our system, animators have the freedom to apply any motion synthesis algorithm to arbitrary rigging and animation pipelines for immediate editing. This greatly improves the productivity of 3D animation, while retaining the flexibility and creativity of artistic input.

  6. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  7. Shear Wave Splitting Inversion in a Complex Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Shear wave splitting (SWS) inversion presents a method whereby the upper crust can be interrogated for fracture density. It is caused when a shear wave traverses an area of anisotropy, splits in two, with each wave experiencing a different velocity resulting in an observable separation in arrival times. A SWS observation consists of the first arrival polarization direction and the time delay. Given the large amount of data common in SWS studies, manual inspection for polarization and time delay is considered prohibitively time intensive. All automated techniques used can produce high amounts of observations falsely interpreted as SWS. Thus introducing error into the interpretation. The technique often used for removing these false observations is to manually inspect all SWS observations defined as high quality by the automated routine, and remove false identifications. We investigate the nature of events falsely identified compared to those correctly identified. Once this identification is complete we conduct a inversion for crack density from SWS time delay. The current body of work on linear SWS inversion utilizes an equation that defines the time delay between arriving shear waves with respect to fracture density. This equation makes the assumption that no fluid flow occurs as a result of the passing shear wave, a situation called squirt flow. We show that the assumption is not applicable in all geological situations. When it is not true, its use in an inversion produces a result which is negatively affected by the assumptions. This is shown to be the case at the test case of 6894 SWS observations gathered in a small area at Puna geothermal field, Hawaii. To rectify this situation, a series of new time delay formulae, applicable to linear inversion, are derived from velocity equations presented in literature. The new formula use a 'fluid influence parameter' which indicates the degree to which squirt flow is influencing the SWS. It is found that accounting for

  8. Action understanding as inverse planning.

    PubMed

    Baker, Chris L; Saxe, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Joshua B

    2009-12-01

    Humans are adept at inferring the mental states underlying other agents' actions, such as goals, beliefs, desires, emotions and other thoughts. We propose a computational framework based on Bayesian inverse planning for modeling human action understanding. The framework represents an intuitive theory of intentional agents' behavior based on the principle of rationality: the expectation that agents will plan approximately rationally to achieve their goals, given their beliefs about the world. The mental states that caused an agent's behavior are inferred by inverting this model of rational planning using Bayesian inference, integrating the likelihood of the observed actions with the prior over mental states. This approach formalizes in precise probabilistic terms the essence of previous qualitative approaches to action understanding based on an "intentional stance" [Dennett, D. C. (1987). The intentional stance. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press] or a "teleological stance" [Gergely, G., Nádasdy, Z., Csibra, G., & Biró, S. (1995). Taking the intentional stance at 12 months of age. Cognition, 56, 165-193]. In three psychophysical experiments using animated stimuli of agents moving in simple mazes, we assess how well different inverse planning models based on different goal priors can predict human goal inferences. The results provide quantitative evidence for an approximately rational inference mechanism in human goal inference within our simplified stimulus paradigm, and for the flexible nature of goal representations that human observers can adopt. We discuss the implications of our experimental results for human action understanding in real-world contexts, and suggest how our framework might be extended to capture other kinds of mental state inferences, such as inferences about beliefs, or inferring whether an entity is an intentional agent.

  9. 2D Inversion of Transient Electromagnetic Method (TEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, Cassiano Antonio; Luís Porsani, Jorge; Acácio Monteiro dos Santos, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    A new methodology was developed for 2D inversion of Transient Electromagnetic Method (TEM). The methodology consists in the elaboration of a set of routines in Matlab code for modeling and inversion of TEM data and the determination of the most efficient field array for the problem. In this research, the 2D TEM modeling uses the finite differences discretization. To solve the inversion problem, were applied an algorithm based on Marquardt technique, also known as Ridge Regression. The algorithm is stable and efficient and it is widely used in geoelectrical inversion problems. The main advantage of 1D survey is the rapid data acquisition in a large area, but in regions with two-dimensional structures or that need more details, is essential to use two-dimensional interpretation methodologies. For an efficient field acquisition we used in an innovative form the fixed-loop array, with a square transmitter loop (200m x 200m) and 25m spacing between the sounding points. The TEM surveys were conducted only inside the transmitter loop, in order to not deal with negative apparent resistivity values. Although it is possible to model the negative values, it makes the inversion convergence more difficult. Therefore the methodology described above has been developed in order to achieve maximum optimization of data acquisition. Since it is necessary only one transmitter loop disposition in the surface for each series of soundings inside the loop. The algorithms were tested with synthetic data and the results were essential to the interpretation of the results with real data and will be useful in future situations. With the inversion of the real data acquired over the Paraná Sedimentary Basin (PSB) was successful realized a 2D TEM inversion. The results indicate a robust geoelectrical characterization for the sedimentary and crystalline aquifers in the PSB. Therefore, using a new and relevant approach for 2D TEM inversion, this research effectively contributed to map the most

  10. ANNIT - An Efficient Inversion Algorithm based on Prediction Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Růžek, B.; Kolář, P.

    2009-04-01

    Solution of inverse problems represents meaningful job in geophysics. The amount of data is continuously increasing, methods of modeling are being improved and the computer facilities are also advancing great technical progress. Therefore the development of new and efficient algorithms and computer codes for both forward and inverse modeling is still up to date. ANNIT is contributing to this stream since it is a tool for efficient solution of a set of non-linear equations. Typical geophysical problems are based on parametric approach. The system is characterized by a vector of parameters p, the response of the system is characterized by a vector of data d. The forward problem is usually represented by unique mapping F(p)=d. The inverse problem is much more complex and the inverse mapping p=G(d) is available in an analytical or closed form only exceptionally and generally it may not exist at all. Technically, both forward and inverse mapping F and G are sets of non-linear equations. ANNIT solves such situation as follows: (i) joint subspaces {pD, pM} of original data and model spaces D, M, resp. are searched for, within which the forward mapping F is sufficiently smooth that the inverse mapping G does exist, (ii) numerical approximation of G in subspaces {pD, pM} is found, (iii) candidate solution is predicted by using this numerical approximation. ANNIT is working in an iterative way in cycles. The subspaces {pD, pM} are searched for by generating suitable populations of individuals (models) covering data and model spaces. The approximation of the inverse mapping is made by using three methods: (a) linear regression, (b) Radial Basis Function Network technique, (c) linear prediction (also known as "Kriging"). The ANNIT algorithm has built in also an archive of already evaluated models. Archive models are re-used in a suitable way and thus the number of forward evaluations is minimized. ANNIT is now implemented both in MATLAB and SCILAB. Numerical tests show good

  11. The Grism Lens-amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). IV. Mass Reconstruction of the Lensing Cluster Abell 2744 from Frontier Field Imaging and GLASS Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.-H.; Treu, T.; Bradač, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Brammer, G. B.; Vulcani, B.; Jones, T. A.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Trenti, M.

    2015-09-01

    We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain five high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and two tentative ones. We confirm one strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all three multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometric redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.

  12. Deep spectroscopy of nearby galaxy clusters - IV. The quench of the star formation in galaxies in the infall region of Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguerri, J. A. L.; Agulli, I.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    2018-06-01

    Our aim is to understand the role of the environment in the quenching of star formation of galaxies located in the infall cluster region of Abell 85 (A85). This is achieved by studying the post-starburst galaxy population as tracer of recent quenching. By measuring the equivalent width (EW) of the [O II] and Hδ spectral lines, we classify the galaxies into three groups: passive (PAS), emission line (EL), and post-starburst (PSB) galaxies. The PSB galaxy population represents ˜ 4.5 per cent of the full sample. Dwarf galaxies (Mr > -18.0) account for ˜ 70 - 80 per cent of PSBs, which indicates that most of the galaxies undergoing recent quenching are low-mass objects. Independently of the environment, PSB galaxies are disc-like objects with g - r colour between the blue ELs and the red PAS ones. The PSB and EL galaxies in low-density environments show similar luminosities and local galaxy densities. The dynamics and local galaxy density of the PSB population in high-density environments are shared with PAS galaxies. However, PSB galaxies inside A85 are at shorter clustercentric radius than PAS and EL ones. The value of the EW(Hδ) is larger for those PSBs closer to the cluster centre. We propose two different physical mechanisms producing PSB galaxies depending on the environment. In low-density environments, gas-rich minor mergers or accretions could produce the PSB galaxies. For high-density environments like A85, PSBs would be produced by the removal of the gas reservoirs of EL galaxies by ram-pressure stripping when they pass near the cluster centre.

  13. THE GRISM LENS-AMPLIFIED SURVEY FROM SPACE (GLASS). IV. MASS RECONSTRUCTION OF THE LENSING CLUSTER ABELL 2744 FROM FRONTIER FIELD IMAGING AND GLASS SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Schmidt, K. B.; Jones, T. A.

    2015-09-20

    We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain five high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and two tentative ones. We confirm one strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all three multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometricmore » redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.« less

  14. Accommodating Chromosome Inversions in Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gary K.; Slaten, Erin; Ophoff, Roel A.; Lange, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    This work develops a population-genetics model for polymorphic chromosome inversions. The model precisely describes how an inversion changes the nature of and approach to linkage equilibrium. The work also describes algorithms and software for allele-frequency estimation and linkage analysis in the presence of an inversion. The linkage algorithms implemented in the software package Mendel estimate recombination parameters and calculate the posterior probability that each pedigree member carries the inversion. Application of Mendel to eight Centre d'Étude du Polymorphisme Humain pedigrees in a region containing a common inversion on 8p23 illustrates its potential for providing more-precise estimates of the location of an unmapped marker or trait gene. Our expanded cytogenetic analysis of these families further identifies inversion carriers and increases the evidence of linkage. PMID:16826515

  15. Inverse-collimated proton radiography for imaging thin materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Matthew S.; Allison, Jason; Andrews, Malcolm; Ferm, Eric; Goett, John J.; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lopez, Julian; Mariam, Fesseha; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Martinez, Michael; Medina, Jason; Medina, Patrick; Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Chris L.; Murray, Matthew M.; Nedrow, Paul; Neukirch, Levi P.; Prestridge, Katherine; Rigg, Paolo; Saunders, Alexander; Schurman, Tamsen; Tainter, Amy; Trouw, Frans; Tupa, Dale; Tybo, Josh; Vogan-McNeil, Wendy; Wilde, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Relativistic, magnetically focused proton radiography was invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the 800 MeV LANSCE beam and is inherently well-suited to imaging dense objects, at areal densities >20 g cm-2. However, if the unscattered portion of the transmitted beam is removed at the Fourier plane through inverse-collimation, this system becomes highly sensitive to very thin media, of areal densities <100 mg cm-2. Here, this inverse-collimation scheme is described in detail and demonstrated by imaging Xe gas with a shockwave generated by an aluminum plate compressing the gas at Mach 8.8. With a 5-mrad inverse collimator, an areal density change of just 49 mg cm-2 across the shock front is discernible with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 3. Geant4 modeling of idealized and realistic proton transports can guide the design of inverse-collimators optimized for specific experimental conditions and show that this technique performs better for thin targets with reduced incident proton beam emittance. This work increases the range of areal densities to which the system is sensitive to span from ˜25 mg cm-2 to 100 g cm-2, exceeding three orders of magnitude. This enables the simultaneous imaging of a dense system as well as thin jets and ejecta material that are otherwise difficult to characterize with high-energy proton radiography.

  16. Inverse-collimated proton radiography for imaging thin materials.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Matthew S; Allison, Jason; Andrews, Malcolm; Ferm, Eric; Goett, John J; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lopez, Julian; Mariam, Fesseha; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Martinez, Michael; Medina, Jason; Medina, Patrick; Merrill, Frank E; Morris, Chris L; Murray, Matthew M; Nedrow, Paul; Neukirch, Levi P; Prestridge, Katherine; Rigg, Paolo; Saunders, Alexander; Schurman, Tamsen; Tainter, Amy; Trouw, Frans; Tupa, Dale; Tybo, Josh; Vogan-McNeil, Wendy; Wilde, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Relativistic, magnetically focused proton radiography was invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the 800 MeV LANSCE beam and is inherently well-suited to imaging dense objects, at areal densities >20 g cm -2 . However, if the unscattered portion of the transmitted beam is removed at the Fourier plane through inverse-collimation, this system becomes highly sensitive to very thin media, of areal densities <100 mg cm -2 . Here, this inverse-collimation scheme is described in detail and demonstrated by imaging Xe gas with a shockwave generated by an aluminum plate compressing the gas at Mach 8.8. With a 5-mrad inverse collimator, an areal density change of just 49 mg cm -2 across the shock front is discernible with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 3. Geant4 modeling of idealized and realistic proton transports can guide the design of inverse-collimators optimized for specific experimental conditions and show that this technique performs better for thin targets with reduced incident proton beam emittance. This work increases the range of areal densities to which the system is sensitive to span from ∼25 mg cm -2 to 100 g cm -2 , exceeding three orders of magnitude. This enables the simultaneous imaging of a dense system as well as thin jets and ejecta material that are otherwise difficult to characterize with high-energy proton radiography.

  17. Inferior olive mirrors joint dynamics to implement an inverse controller.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Icaza, Rodrigo; Boahen, Kwabena

    2012-10-01

    To produce smooth and coordinated motion, our nervous systems need to generate precisely timed muscle activation patterns that, due to axonal conduction delay, must be generated in a predictive and feedforward manner. Kawato proposed that the cerebellum accomplishes this by acting as an inverse controller that modulates descending motor commands to predictively drive the spinal cord such that the musculoskeletal dynamics are canceled out. This and other cerebellar theories do not, however, account for the rich biophysical properties expressed by the olivocerebellar complex's various cell types, making these theories difficult to verify experimentally. Here we propose that a multizonal microcomplex's (MZMC) inferior olivary neurons use their subthreshold oscillations to mirror a musculoskeletal joint's underdamped dynamics, thereby achieving inverse control. We used control theory to map a joint's inverse model onto an MZMC's biophysics, and we used biophysical modeling to confirm that inferior olivary neurons can express the dynamics required to mirror biomechanical joints. We then combined both techniques to predict how experimentally injecting current into the inferior olive would affect overall motor output performance. We found that this experimental manipulation unmasked a joint's natural dynamics, as observed by motor output ringing at the joint's natural frequency, with amplitude proportional to the amount of current. These results support the proposal that the cerebellum-in particular an MZMC-is an inverse controller; the results also provide a biophysical implementation for this controller and allow one to make an experimentally testable prediction.

  18. Inverse estimation of parameters for an estuarine eutrophication model

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.; Kuo, A.Y.

    1996-11-01

    An inverse model of an estuarine eutrophication model with eight state variables is developed. It provides a framework to estimate parameter values of the eutrophication model by assimilation of concentration data of these state variables. The inverse model using the variational technique in conjunction with a vertical two-dimensional eutrophication model is general enough to be applicable to aid model calibration. The formulation is illustrated by conducting a series of numerical experiments for the tidal Rappahannock River, a western shore tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. The numerical experiments of short-period model simulations with different hypothetical data sets and long-period model simulationsmore » with limited hypothetical data sets demonstrated that the inverse model can be satisfactorily used to estimate parameter values of the eutrophication model. The experiments also showed that the inverse model is useful to address some important questions, such as uniqueness of the parameter estimation and data requirements for model calibration. Because of the complexity of the eutrophication system, degrading of speed of convergence may occur. Two major factors which cause degradation of speed of convergence are cross effects among parameters and the multiple scales involved in the parameter system.« less

  19. Inversion methods for interpretation of asteroid lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko; Lamberg, L.; Lumme, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed methods of inversion that can be used in the determination of the three-dimensional shape or the albedo distribution of the surface of a body from disk-integrated photometry, assuming the shape to be strictly convex. In addition to the theory of inversion methods, we have studied the practical aspects of the inversion problem and applied our methods to lightcurve data of 39 Laetitia and 16 Psyche.

  20. MAP Estimators for Piecewise Continuous Inversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-08

    MAP estimators for piecewise continuous inversion M M Dunlop1 and A M Stuart Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK E...Published 8 August 2016 Abstract We study the inverse problem of estimating a field ua from data comprising a finite set of nonlinear functionals of ua...then natural to study maximum a posterior (MAP) estimators. Recently (Dashti et al 2013 Inverse Problems 29 095017) it has been shown that MAP

  1. Interferometric inversion for passive imaging and navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0096 Interferometric inversion for passive imaging and navigation Laurent Demanet MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Final...COVERED (From - To) Feb 2015-Jan 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Interferometric inversion for passive imaging and navigation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Grant title: Interferometric inversion for passive imaging and navigation • Grant number: FA9550-15-1-0078 • Period: Feburary 2015 - January 2017

  2. Multi-scale signed envelope inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guo-Xin; Wu, Ru-Shan; Wang, Yu-Qing; Chen, Sheng-Chang

    2018-06-01

    Envelope inversion based on modulation signal mode was proposed to reconstruct large-scale structures of underground media. In order to solve the shortcomings of conventional envelope inversion, multi-scale envelope inversion was proposed using new envelope Fréchet derivative and multi-scale inversion strategy to invert strong contrast models. In multi-scale envelope inversion, amplitude demodulation was used to extract the low frequency information from envelope data. However, only to use amplitude demodulation method will cause the loss of wavefield polarity information, thus increasing the possibility of inversion to obtain multiple solutions. In this paper we proposed a new demodulation method which can contain both the amplitude and polarity information of the envelope data. Then we introduced this demodulation method into multi-scale envelope inversion, and proposed a new misfit functional: multi-scale signed envelope inversion. In the numerical tests, we applied the new inversion method to the salt layer model and SEG/EAGE 2-D Salt model using low-cut source (frequency components below 4 Hz were truncated). The results of numerical test demonstrated the effectiveness of this method.

  3. Bayesian approach to inverse statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Habeck, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Inverse statistical mechanics aims to determine particle interactions from ensemble properties. This article looks at this inverse problem from a Bayesian perspective and discusses several statistical estimators to solve it. In addition, a sequential Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed that draws the interaction parameters from their posterior probability distribution. The posterior probability involves an intractable partition function that is estimated along with the interactions. The method is illustrated for inverse problems of varying complexity, including the estimation of a temperature, the inverse Ising problem, maximum entropy fitting, and the reconstruction of molecular interaction potentials.

  4. Bayesian approach to inverse statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeck, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Inverse statistical mechanics aims to determine particle interactions from ensemble properties. This article looks at this inverse problem from a Bayesian perspective and discusses several statistical estimators to solve it. In addition, a sequential Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed that draws the interaction parameters from their posterior probability distribution. The posterior probability involves an intractable partition function that is estimated along with the interactions. The method is illustrated for inverse problems of varying complexity, including the estimation of a temperature, the inverse Ising problem, maximum entropy fitting, and the reconstruction of molecular interaction potentials.

  5. Human inversions and their functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Villatoro, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphic inversions are a type of structural variants that are difficult to analyze owing to their balanced nature and the location of breakpoints within complex repeated regions. So far, only a handful of inversions have been studied in detail in humans and current knowledge about their possible functional effects is still limited. However, inversions have been related to phenotypic changes and adaptation in multiple species. In this review, we summarize the evidences of the functional impact of inversions in the human genome. First, given that inversions have been shown to inhibit recombination in heterokaryotes, chromosomes displaying different orientation are expected to evolve independently and this may lead to distinct gene-expression patterns. Second, inversions have a role as disease-causing mutations both by directly affecting gene structure or regulation in different ways, and by predisposing to other secondary arrangements in the offspring of inversion carriers. Finally, several inversions show signals of being selected during human evolution. These findings illustrate the potential of inversions to have phenotypic consequences also in humans and emphasize the importance of their inclusion in genome-wide association studies. PMID:25998059

  6. PREFACE: First International Congress of the International Association of Inverse Problems (IPIA): Applied Inverse Problems 2007: Theoretical and Computational Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    2008-07-01

    This volume represents the proceedings of the fourth Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) international conference and the first congress of the Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) which was held in Vancouver, Canada, June 25 29, 2007. The organizing committee was formed by Uri Ascher, University of British Columbia, Richard Froese, University of British Columbia, Gary Margrave, University of Calgary, and Gunther Uhlmann, University of Washington, chair. The conference was part of the activities of the Pacific Institute of Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) Collaborative Research Group on inverse problems (http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific/collaborative-research-groups/past-crgs). This event was also supported by grants from NSF and MITACS. Inverse Problems (IP) are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. The enormous increase in computing power and the development of powerful algorithms have made it possible to apply the techniques of IP to real-world problems of growing complexity. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences. The series of Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) Conferences aims to provide a primary international forum for academic and industrial researchers working on all aspects of inverse problems, such as mathematical modelling, functional analytic methods, computational approaches, numerical algorithms etc. The steering committee of the AIP conferences consists of Heinz Engl (Johannes Kepler Universität, Austria), Joyce McLaughlin (RPI, USA), William Rundell (Texas A&M, USA), Erkki Somersalo (Helsinki University of Technology

  7. CCD correlation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewes, C. R.; Bosshart, P. W.; Eversole, W. L.; Dewit, M.; Buss, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    Two CCD techniques were discussed for performing an N-point sampled data correlation between an input signal and an electronically programmable reference function. The design and experimental performance of an implementation of the direct time correlator utilizing two analog CCDs and MOS multipliers on a single IC were evaluated. The performance of a CCD implementation of the chirp z transform was described, and the design of a new CCD integrated circuit for performing correlation by multiplication in the frequency domain was presented. This chip provides a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) or inverse DFT, multipliers, and complete support circuitry for the CCD CZT. The two correlation techniques are compared.

  8. A Computationally Efficient Parallel Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm for Large-Scale Big-Data Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; O'Malley, D.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modeling seeks model parameters given a set of observed state variables. However, for many practical problems due to the facts that the observed data sets are often large and model parameters are often numerous, conventional methods for solving the inverse modeling can be computationally expensive. We have developed a new, computationally-efficient Levenberg-Marquardt method for solving large-scale inverse modeling. Levenberg-Marquardt methods require the solution of a dense linear system of equations which can be prohibitively expensive to compute for large-scale inverse problems. Our novel method projects the original large-scale linear problem down to a Krylov subspace, such that the dimensionality of the measurements can be significantly reduced. Furthermore, instead of solving the linear system for every Levenberg-Marquardt damping parameter, we store the Krylov subspace computed when solving the first damping parameter and recycle it for all the following damping parameters. The efficiency of our new inverse modeling algorithm is significantly improved by using these computational techniques. We apply this new inverse modeling method to invert for a random transitivity field. Our algorithm is fast enough to solve for the distributed model parameters (transitivity) at each computational node in the model domain. The inversion is also aided by the use regularization techniques. The algorithm is coded in Julia and implemented in the MADS computational framework (http://mads.lanl.gov). Julia is an advanced high-level scientific programing language that allows for efficient memory management and utilization of high-performance computational resources. By comparing with a Levenberg-Marquardt method using standard linear inversion techniques, our Levenberg-Marquardt method yields speed-up ratio of 15 in a multi-core computational environment and a speed-up ratio of 45 in a single-core computational environment. Therefore, our new inverse modeling method is a

  9. Laterally constrained inversion for CSAMT data interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruo; Yin, Changchun; Wang, Miaoyue; Di, Qingyun

    2015-10-01

    Laterally constrained inversion (LCI) has been successfully applied to the inversion of dc resistivity, TEM and airborne EM data. However, it hasn't been yet applied to the interpretation of controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data. In this paper, we apply the LCI method for CSAMT data inversion by preconditioning the Jacobian matrix. We apply a weighting matrix to Jacobian to balance the sensitivity of model parameters, so that the resolution with respect to different model parameters becomes more uniform. Numerical experiments confirm that this can improve the convergence of the inversion. We first invert a synthetic dataset with and without noise to investigate the effect of LCI applications to CSAMT data, for the noise free data, the results show that the LCI method can recover the true model better compared to the traditional single-station inversion; and for the noisy data, the true model is recovered even with a noise level of 8%, indicating that LCI inversions are to some extent noise insensitive. Then, we re-invert two CSAMT datasets collected respectively in a watershed and a coal mine area in Northern China and compare our results with those from previous inversions. The comparison with the previous inversion in a coal mine shows that LCI method delivers smoother layer interfaces that well correlate to seismic data, while comparison with a global searching algorithm of simulated annealing (SA) in a watershed shows that though both methods deliver very similar good results, however, LCI algorithm presented in this paper runs much faster. The inversion results for the coal mine CSAMT survey show that a conductive water-bearing zone that was not revealed by the previous inversions has been identified by the LCI. This further demonstrates that the method presented in this paper works for CSAMT data inversion.

  10. Selected inversion as key to a stable Langevin evolution across the QCD phase boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Jacques; Schenk, Olaf

    2018-03-01

    We present new results of full QCD at nonzero chemical potential. In PRD 92, 094516 (2015) the complex Langevin method was shown to break down when the inverse coupling decreases and enters the transition region from the deconfined to the confined phase. We found that the stochastic technique used to estimate the drift term can be very unstable for indefinite matrices. This may be avoided by using the full inverse of the Dirac operator, which is, however, too costly for four-dimensional lattices. The major breakthrough in this work was achieved by realizing that the inverse elements necessary for the drift term can be computed efficiently using the selected inversion technique provided by the parallel sparse direct solver package PARDISO. In our new study we show that no breakdown of the complex Langevin method is encountered and that simulations can be performed across the phase boundary.

  11. Full-Physics Inverse Learning Machine for Satellite Remote Sensing Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyola, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    The satellite remote sensing retrievals are usually ill-posed inverse problems that are typically solved by finding a state vector that minimizes the residual between simulated data and real measurements. The classical inversion methods are very time-consuming as they require iterative calls to complex radiative-transfer forward models to simulate radiances and Jacobians, and subsequent inversion of relatively large matrices. In this work we present a novel and extremely fast algorithm for solving inverse problems called full-physics inverse learning machine (FP-ILM). The FP-ILM algorithm consists of a training phase in which machine learning techniques are used to derive an inversion operator based on synthetic data generated using a radiative transfer model (which expresses the "full-physics" component) and the smart sampling technique, and an operational phase in which the inversion operator is applied to real measurements. FP-ILM has been successfully applied to the retrieval of the SO2 plume height during volcanic eruptions and to the retrieval of ozone profile shapes from UV/VIS satellite sensors. Furthermore, FP-ILM will be used for the near-real-time processing of the upcoming generation of European Sentinel sensors with their unprecedented spectral and spatial resolution and associated large increases in the amount of data.

  12. Solution of some types of differential equations: operational calculus and inverse differential operators.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, K

    2014-01-01

    We present a general method of operational nature to analyze and obtain solutions for a variety of equations of mathematical physics and related mathematical problems. We construct inverse differential operators and produce operational identities, involving inverse derivatives and families of generalised orthogonal polynomials, such as Hermite and Laguerre polynomial families. We develop the methodology of inverse and exponential operators, employing them for the study of partial differential equations. Advantages of the operational technique, combined with the use of integral transforms, generating functions with exponentials and their integrals, for solving a wide class of partial derivative equations, related to heat, wave, and transport problems, are demonstrated.

  13. The Extratropical Tropopause Inversion Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Alison; Haynes, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The extratropical tropopause inversion layer (TIL) is studied by analyzing numerical simulations with a dry idealized global circulation model. The model temperature field is relaxed towards different restoration profiles. We demonstrate that in simulations with the Held and Suarez restoration profile, a TIL is present in the steady state, whereas for a different restoration profile no TIL arises. Neither restoration profile includes a TIL-like structure and if an enhancement in the static stability occurs, it is a result of the model dynamics. We consider the mechanisms by which the TIL forms following previous work in attributing the formation to the structure of the residual circulation, but by further examining the relation of the residual circulation to the structure of the Eliassen-Palm flux convergence using the downward control principle. The presence of two separate regions of convergence of the Eliassen-Palm flux, one in the troposphere and the other in the stratosphere, is found to be necessary to the formation of the TIL. We also discuss the relations to other theories that emphasize the role of vertical gradients in radiatively active species.

  14. Machine Learning and Inverse Problem in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahnas, M. H.; Yuen, D. A.; Pysklywec, R.

    2017-12-01

    During the past few decades numerical modeling and traditional HPC have been widely deployed in many diverse fields for problem solutions. However, in recent years the rapid emergence of machine learning (ML), a subfield of the artificial intelligence (AI), in many fields of sciences, engineering, and finance seems to mark a turning point in the replacement of traditional modeling procedures with artificial intelligence-based techniques. The study of the circulation in the interior of Earth relies on the study of high pressure mineral physics, geochemistry, and petrology where the number of the mantle parameters is large and the thermoelastic parameters are highly pressure- and temperature-dependent. More complexity arises from the fact that many of these parameters that are incorporated in the numerical models as input parameters are not yet well established. In such complex systems the application of machine learning algorithms can play a valuable role. Our focus in this study is the application of supervised machine learning (SML) algorithms in predicting mantle properties with the emphasis on SML techniques in solving the inverse problem. As a sample problem we focus on the spin transition in ferropericlase and perovskite that may cause slab and plume stagnation at mid-mantle depths. The degree of the stagnation depends on the degree of negative density anomaly at the spin transition zone. The training and testing samples for the machine learning models are produced by the numerical convection models with known magnitudes of density anomaly (as the class labels of the samples). The volume fractions of the stagnated slabs and plumes which can be considered as measures for the degree of stagnation are assigned as sample features. The machine learning models can determine the magnitude of the spin transition-induced density anomalies that can cause flow stagnation at mid-mantle depths. Employing support vector machine (SVM) algorithms we show that SML techniques

  15. An inverse dynamics approach to trajectory optimization for an aerospace plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1992-01-01

    An inverse dynamics approach for trajectory optimization is proposed. This technique can be useful in many difficult trajectory optimization and control problems. The application of the approach is exemplified by ascent trajectory optimization for an aerospace plane. Both minimum-fuel and minimax types of performance indices are considered. When rocket augmentation is available for ascent, it is shown that accurate orbital insertion can be achieved through the inverse control of the rocket in the presence of disturbances.

  16. Obtaining valid geologic models from 3-D resistivity inversion of magnetotelluric data at Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2015-01-01

    The 3-D inversion was generally able to reproduce the gross resistivity structure of the “known” model, but the simulated conductive volcanic composite unit horizons were often too shallow when compared to the “known” model. Additionally, the chosen computation parameters such as station spacing appear to have resulted in computational artifacts that are difficult to interpret but could potentially be removed with further refinements of the 3-D resistivity inversion modeling technique.

  17. Inversion in Mathematical Thinking and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Inversion is a fundamental relational building block both within mathematics as the study of structures and within people's physical and social experience, linked to many other key elements such as equilibrium, invariance, reversal, compensation, symmetry, and balance. Within purely formal arithmetic, the inverse relationships between addition and…

  18. Recursive inversion of externally defined linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, Ralph E., Jr.; Baram, Yoram

    1988-01-01

    The approximate inversion of an internally unknown linear system, given by its impulse response sequence, by an inverse system having a finite impulse response, is considered. The recursive least squares procedure is shown to have an exact initialization, based on the triangular Toeplitz structure of the matrix involved. The proposed approach also suggests solutions to the problems of system identification and compensation.

  19. Inversion and approximation of Laplace transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    A method of inverting Laplace transforms by using a set of orthonormal functions is reported. As a byproduct of the inversion, approximation of complicated Laplace transforms by a transform with a series of simple poles along the left half plane real axis is shown. The inversion and approximation process is simple enough to be put on a programmable hand calculator.

  20. Non-cavitating propeller noise modeling and inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongho; Lee, Keunhwa; Seong, Woojae

    2014-12-01

    Marine propeller is the dominant exciter of the hull surface above it causing high level of noise and vibration in the ship structure. Recent successful developments have led to non-cavitating propeller designs and thus present focus is the non-cavitating characteristics of propeller such as hydrodynamic noise and its induced hull excitation. In this paper, analytic source model of propeller non-cavitating noise, described by longitudinal quadrupoles and dipoles, is suggested based on the propeller hydrodynamics. To find the source unknown parameters, the multi-parameter inversion technique is adopted using the pressure data obtained from the model scale experiment and pressure field replicas calculated by boundary element method. The inversion results show that the proposed source model is appropriate in modeling non-cavitating propeller noise. The result of this study can be utilized in the prediction of propeller non-cavitating noise and hull excitation at various stages in design and analysis.

  1. Improving rotorcraft survivability to RPG attack using inverse methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D.; Thomson, D. G.

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation of optimal threat evasion strategies for improving the survivability of rotorcraft under attack by rocket propelled grenades (RPGs). The basis of this approach is the application of inverse simulation techniques pioneered for simulation of aggressive helicopter manoeuvres to the RPG engagement problem. In this research, improvements in survivability are achieved by computing effective evasive manoeuvres. The first step in this process uses the missile approach warning system camera (MAWS) on the aircraft to provide angular information of the threat. Estimates of the RPG trajectory and impact point are then estimated. For the current flight state an appropriate evasion response is selected then realised via inverse simulation of the platform dynamics. Results are presented for several representative engagements showing the efficacy of the approach.

  2. Radiative-conductive inverse problem for lumped parameter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alifanov, O. M.; Nenarokomov, A. V.; Gonzalez, V. M.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a iterative regularization method in the research of radiative and thermal properties of materials with applications in the design of Thermal Control Systems (TCS) of spacecrafts. In this paper the radiative and thermal properties (emissivity and thermal conductance) of a multilayered thermal-insulating blanket (MLI), which is a screen-vacuum thermal insulation as a part of the (TCS) for perspective spacecrafts, are estimated. Properties of the materials under study are determined in the result of temperature and heat flux measurement data processing based on the solution of the Inverse Heat Transfer Problem (IHTP) technique. Given are physical and mathematical models of heat transfer processes in a specimen of the multilayered thermal-insulating blanket located in the experimental facility. A mathematical formulation of the inverse heat conduction problem is presented too. The practical testing were performed for specimen of the real MLI.

  3. Study of multilayer thermal insulation by inverse problems method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alifanov, O. M.; Nenarokomov, A. V.; Gonzalez, V. M.

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new method in the research of radiative and thermal properties of materials with further applications in the design of thermal control systems (TCS) of spacecrafts. In this paper the radiative and thermal properties (emissivity and thermal conductance) of a multilayered thermal-insulating blanket (MLI), which is a screen-vacuum thermal insulation as a part of the TCS for perspective spacecrafts, are estimated. Properties of the materials under study are determined in the result of temperature and heat flux measurement data processing based on the solution of the inverse heat transfer problem (IHTP) technique. Given are physical and mathematical models of heat transfer processes in a specimen of the multilayered thermal-insulating blanket located in the experimental facility. A mathematical formulation of the inverse heat conduction problem is presented as well. The practical approves were made for specimen of the real MLI.

  4. Inverse problems in the modeling of vibrations of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Powers, R. K.; Rosen, I. G.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation and solution of inverse problems for the estimation of parameters which describe damping and other dynamic properties in distributed models for the vibration of flexible structures is considered. Motivated by a slewing beam experiment, the identification of a nonlinear velocity dependent term which models air drag damping in the Euler-Bernoulli equation is investigated. Galerkin techniques are used to generate finite dimensional approximations. Convergence estimates and numerical results are given. The modeling of, and related inverse problems for the dynamics of a high pressure hose line feeding a gas thruster actuator at the tip of a cantilevered beam are then considered. Approximation and convergence are discussed and numerical results involving experimental data are presented.

  5. Decomposing Large Inverse Problems with an Augmented Lagrangian Approach: Application to Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Travel Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, D. T.; Rodi, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Constructing 3D Earth models through the joint inversion of large geophysical data sets presents numerous theoretical and practical challenges, especially when diverse types of data and model parameters are involved. Among the challenges are the computational complexity associated with large data and model vectors and the need to unify differing model parameterizations, forward modeling methods and regularization schemes within a common inversion framework. The challenges can be addressed in part by decomposing the inverse problem into smaller, simpler inverse problems that can be solved separately, providing one knows how to merge the separate inversion results into an optimal solution of the full problem. We have formulated an approach to the decomposition of large inverse problems based on the augmented Lagrangian technique from optimization theory. As commonly done, we define a solution to the full inverse problem as the Earth model minimizing an objective function motivated, for example, by a Bayesian inference formulation. Our decomposition approach recasts the minimization problem equivalently as the minimization of component objective functions, corresponding to specified data subsets, subject to the constraints that the minimizing models be equal. A standard optimization algorithm solves the resulting constrained minimization problems by alternating between the separate solution of the component problems and the updating of Lagrange multipliers that serve to steer the individual solution models toward a common model solving the full problem. We are applying our inversion method to the reconstruction of the·crust and upper-mantle seismic velocity structure across Eurasia.· Data for the inversion comprise a large set of P and S body-wave travel times·and fundamental and first-higher mode Rayleigh-wave group velocities.

  6. A preprocessing strategy for helioseismic inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Thompson, M. J.

    1993-05-01

    Helioseismic inversion in general involves considerable computational expense, due to the large number of modes that is typically considered. This is true in particular of the widely used optimally localized averages (OLA) inversion methods, which require the inversion of one or more matrices whose order is the number of modes in the set. However, the number of practically independent pieces of information that a large helioseismic mode set contains is very much less than the number of modes, suggesting that the set might first be reduced before the expensive inversion is performed. We demonstrate with a model problem that by first performing a singular value decomposition the original problem may be transformed into a much smaller one, reducing considerably the cost of the OLA inversion and with no significant loss of information.

  7. Stochastic Gabor reflectivity and acoustic impedance inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri Naghadeh, Diako; Morley, Christopher Keith; Ferguson, Angus John

    2018-02-01

    To delineate subsurface lithology to estimate petrophysical properties of a reservoir, it is possible to use acoustic impedance (AI) which is the result of seismic inversion. To change amplitude to AI, removal of wavelet effects from the seismic signal in order to get a reflection series, and subsequently transforming those reflections to AI, is vital. To carry out seismic inversion correctly it is important to not assume that the seismic signal is stationary. However, all stationary deconvolution methods are designed following that assumption. To increase temporal resolution and interpretation ability, amplitude compensation and phase correction are inevitable. Those are pitfalls of stationary reflectivity inversion. Although stationary reflectivity inversion methods are trying to estimate reflectivity series, because of incorrect assumptions their estimations will not be correct, but may be useful. Trying to convert those reflection series to AI, also merging with the low frequency initial model, can help us. The aim of this study was to apply non-stationary deconvolution to eliminate time variant wavelet effects from the signal and to convert the estimated reflection series to the absolute AI by getting bias from well logs. To carry out this aim, stochastic Gabor inversion in the time domain was used. The Gabor transform derived the signal’s time-frequency analysis and estimated wavelet properties from different windows. Dealing with different time windows gave an ability to create a time-variant kernel matrix, which was used to remove matrix effects from seismic data. The result was a reflection series that does not follow the stationary assumption. The subsequent step was to convert those reflections to AI using well information. Synthetic and real data sets were used to show the ability of the introduced method. The results highlight that the time cost to get seismic inversion is negligible related to general Gabor inversion in the frequency domain. Also

  8. Inverse analysis of turbidites by machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, H.; Nakao, K.

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to propose a method to estimate paleo-hydraulic conditions of turbidity currents from ancient turbidites by using machine-learning technique. In this method, numerical simulation was repeated under various initial conditions, which produces a data set of characteristic features of turbidites. Then, this data set of turbidites is used for supervised training of a deep-learning neural network (NN). Quantities of characteristic features of turbidites in the training data set are given to input nodes of NN, and output nodes are expected to provide the estimates of initial condition of the turbidity current. The optimization of weight coefficients of NN is then conducted to reduce root-mean-square of the difference between the true conditions and the output values of NN. The empirical relationship with numerical results and the initial conditions is explored in this method, and the discovered relationship is used for inversion of turbidity currents. This machine learning can potentially produce NN that estimates paleo-hydraulic conditions from data of ancient turbidites. We produced a preliminary implementation of this methodology. A forward model based on 1D shallow-water equations with a correction of density-stratification effect was employed. This model calculates a behavior of a surge-like turbidity current transporting mixed-size sediment, and outputs spatial distribution of volume per unit area of each grain-size class on the uniform slope. Grain-size distribution was discretized 3 classes. Numerical simulation was repeated 1000 times, and thus 1000 beds of turbidites were used as the training data for NN that has 21000 input nodes and 5 output nodes with two hidden-layers. After the machine learning finished, independent simulations were conducted 200 times in order to evaluate the performance of NN. As a result of this test, the initial conditions of validation data were successfully reconstructed by NN. The estimated values show very small

  9. Linearized inversion of multiple scattering seismic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldawood, Ali; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Zuberi, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Internal multiples deteriorate the quality of the migrated image obtained conventionally by imaging single scattering energy. So, imaging seismic data with the single-scattering assumption does not locate multiple bounces events in their actual subsurface positions. However, imaging internal multiples properly has the potential to enhance the migrated image because they illuminate zones in the subsurface that are poorly illuminated by single scattering energy such as nearly vertical faults. Standard migration of these multiples provides subsurface reflectivity distributions with low spatial resolution and migration artifacts due to the limited recording aperture, coarse sources and receivers sampling, and the band-limited nature of the source wavelet. The resultant image obtained by the adjoint operator is a smoothed depiction of the true subsurface reflectivity model and is heavily masked by migration artifacts and the source wavelet fingerprint that needs to be properly deconvolved. Hence, we proposed a linearized least-square inversion scheme to mitigate the effect of the migration artifacts, enhance the spatial resolution, and provide more accurate amplitude information when imaging internal multiples. The proposed algorithm uses the least-square image based on single-scattering assumption as a constraint to invert for the part of the image that is illuminated by internal scattering energy. Then, we posed the problem of imaging double-scattering energy as a least-square minimization problem that requires solving the normal equation of the following form: GTGv = GTd, (1) where G is a linearized forward modeling operator that predicts double-scattered seismic data. Also, GT is a linearized adjoint operator that image double-scattered seismic data. Gradient-based optimization algorithms solve this linear system. Hence, we used a quasi-Newton optimization technique to find the least-square minimizer. In this approach, an estimate of the Hessian matrix that contains

  10. Transdimensional, hierarchical, Bayesian inversion of ambient seismic noise: Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, E.; Rawlinson, N.; Cornwell, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    We present models of crustal velocity structure in southeastern Australia using a novel, transdimensional and hierarchical, Bayesian inversion approach. The inversion is applied to long-time ambient noise cross-correlations. The study area of SE Australia is thought to represent the eastern margin of Gondwana. Conflicting tectonic models have been proposed to explain the formation of eastern Gondwana and the enigmatic geological relationships in Bass Strait, which separates Tasmania and the mainland. A geologically complex area of crustal accretion, Bass Strait may contain part of an exotic continental block entrained in colliding crusts. Ambient noise data recorded by an array of 24 seismometers is used to produce a high resolution, 3D shear wave velocity model of Bass Strait. Phase velocity maps in the period range 2-30 s are produced and subsequently inverted for 3D shear wave velocity structure. The transdimensional, hierarchical Bayesian, inversion technique is used. This technique proves far superior to linearised inversion. The inversion model is dynamically parameterised during the process, implicitly controlled by the data, and noise is treated as an inversion unknown. The resulting shear wave velocity model shows three sedimentary basins in Bass Strait constrained by slow shear velocities (2.4-2.9 km/s) at 2-10 km depth. These failed rift basins from the breakup of Australia-Antartica appear to be overlying thinned crust, where typical mantle velocities of 3.8-4.0 km/s occur at depths greater than 20 km. High shear wave velocities ( 3.7-3.8 km/s) in our new model also match well with regions of high magnetic and gravity anomalies. Furthermore, we use both Rayleigh and Love wave phase data to to construct Vsv and Vsh maps. These are used to estimate crustal radial anisotropy in the Bass Strait. We interpret that structures delineated by our velocity models support the presence and extent of the exotic Precambrian micro-continent (the Selwyn Block) that was

  11. Inversion of solar extinction data from the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (ASTP/SAM) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    The inversion methods are reported that have been used to determine the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient due to the stratospheric aerosols from data measured during the ASTP/SAM solar occultation experiment. Inversion methods include the onion skin peel technique and methods of solving the Fredholm equation for the problem subject to smoothing constraints. The latter of these approaches involves a double inversion scheme. Comparisons are made between the inverted results from the SAM experiment and near simultaneous measurements made by lidar and balloon born dustsonde. The results are used to demonstrate the assumptions required to perform the inversions for aerosols.

  12. Neurotensin inversely modulates maternal aggression

    PubMed Central

    Gammie, Stephen C.; D’Anna, Kimberly L.; Gerstein, Hilary; Stevenson, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a versatile neuropeptide involved in analgesia, hypothermia, and schizophrenia. Although NT is released from and acts upon brain regions involved in social behaviors, it has not been linked to a social behavior. We previously selected mice for high maternal aggression (maternal defense), an important social behavior that protects offspring, and found significantly lower NT expression in the CNS of highly protective females. Our current study directly tested NT’s role in maternal defense. Intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of NT significantly impaired defense in terms of time aggressive and number of attacks at all doses tested (0.05, 0.1, 1.0, and 3.0 μg). Other maternal behaviors, including pup retrieval, were unaltered following NT injections (0.05 μg) relative to vehicle, suggesting specificity of NT action on defense. Further, icv injections of the NT receptor 1 (NT1) antagonist, SR 48692 (30 μg), significantly elevated maternal aggression in terms of time aggressive and attack number. To understand where NT may regulate aggression, we examined Fos following injection of either 0.1 μg NT or vehicle. 13 of 26 brain regions examined exhibited significant Fos increases with NT, including regions expressing NT1 and previously implicated in maternal aggression, such as lateral septum, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, and central amygdala. Together, our results indicate that NT inversely regulates maternal aggression and provide the first direct evidence that lowering of NT signaling can be a mechanism for maternal aggression. To our knowledge, this is the first study to directly link NT to a social behavior. PMID:19118604

  13. Identification of polymorphic inversions from genotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymorphic inversions are a source of genetic variability with a direct impact on recombination frequencies. Given the difficulty of their experimental study, computational methods have been developed to infer their existence in a large number of individuals using genome-wide data of nucleotide variation. Methods based on haplotype tagging of known inversions attempt to classify individuals as having a normal or inverted allele. Other methods that measure differences between linkage disequilibrium attempt to identify regions with inversions but unable to classify subjects accurately, an essential requirement for association studies. Results We present a novel method to both identify polymorphic inversions from genome-wide genotype data and classify individuals as containing a normal or inverted allele. Our method, a generalization of a published method for haplotype data [1], utilizes linkage between groups of SNPs to partition a set of individuals into normal and inverted subpopulations. We employ a sliding window scan to identify regions likely to have an inversion, and accumulation of evidence from neighboring SNPs is used to accurately determine the inversion status of each subject. Further, our approach detects inversions directly from genotype data, thus increasing its usability to current genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Conclusions We demonstrate the accuracy of our method to detect inversions and classify individuals on principled-simulated genotypes, produced by the evolution of an inversion event within a coalescent model [2]. We applied our method to real genotype data from HapMap Phase III to characterize the inversion status of two known inversions within the regions 17q21 and 8p23 across 1184 individuals. Finally, we scan the full genomes of the European Origin (CEU) and Yoruba (YRI) HapMap samples. We find population-based evidence for 9 out of 15 well-established autosomic inversions, and for 52 regions previously predicted by

  14. MUSE sneaks a peek at extreme ram-pressure events. III. Tomography of UGC 6697, a massive galaxy falling into Abell 1367

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, G.; Gavazzi, G.; Fossati, M.; Fumagalli, M.; Boselli, A.; Yagi, M.; Yoshida, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present the MUSE observations of UGC 6697, a giant (M∗ ≈ 1010M⊙) spiral galaxy infalling in the nearby cluster Abell 1367. During its high-velocity transit through the intracluster medium (ICM), the hydrodynamical interactions with the ICM produce a ≈ 100 kpc tail of ionized gas that we map with a mosaic of five MUSE pointings up to 60 kpc from the galaxy. CGCG 97087N, a small companion that lies at few arcminutes in projection from UGC 6697, is also showing signs of the hydrodynamic action of the ICM of the cluster. Along the whole extent of the tail, we detect diffuse Hα emission, and to a lesser extent, Hβ, [OIII]λ5007, and [OI]λ6300. By comparing the kinematics and distribution of gas and stars (as traced by the CaII triplet) for both galaxies, we separate the ionized gas, as traced by the Hα line, into a component that is still bound to the galaxy and a component that is stripped. We find that the bound component shows a low-velocity dispersion and line ratios consistent with photoionization by hot stars. The stripped gas is more turbulent, with velocity dispersions up to ≳100 km s-1, and is excited by shocks, as traced by high values of [OI]/Hα and [NII]/Hα ratio. In the tail of UGC 6697, we identify numerous bright compact knots with line ratios typical of HII regions. These are distributed along the only streams of stripped gas that retain low-velocity dispersions (≲35 km s-1). Despite being in the stripped gas, their physical properties are not different from normal HII regions in galactic disks. We find evidence of a past fast encounter between the two galaxies in the form of a double tail emerging from CGCG 97087N that connects with UGC 6697. This encounter might have increased the efficiency of the stripping process, leaving the stellar distribution and kinematics unaltered. The composite data cube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  15. The XMM Cluster Outskirts Project (X-COP): Thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium out to R200 in Abell 2319

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardini, V.; Ettori, S.; Eckert, D.; Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Pointecouteau, E.; Hurier, G.; Bourdin, H.

    2018-06-01

    Aims: We present the joint analysis of the X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signals in Abell 2319, the galaxy cluster with the highest signal-to-noise ratio in SZ Planck maps and that has been surveyed within our XMM-Newton Cluster Outskirts Project (X-COP), a very large program which aims to grasp the physical condition in 12 local (z < 0.1) and massive (M200 > 3 × 1014 M⊙) galaxy clusters out to R200 and beyond. Methods: We recover the profiles of the thermodynamic properties by the geometrical deprojection of the X-ray surface brightness, of the SZ Comptonization parameter, and accurate and robust spectroscopic measurements of the gas temperature out to 3.2 Mpc (1.6 R200), 4 Mpc (2 R200), and 1.6 Mpc (0.8 R200), respectively. We resolve the clumpiness of the gas density to be below 20% over the entire observed volume. We also demonstrate that most of this clumpiness originates from the ongoing merger and can be associated with large-scale inhomogeneities (the "residual" clumpiness). We estimate the total mass through the hydrostatic equilibrium equation. This analysis is done both in azimuthally averaged radial bins and in eight independent angular sectors, enabling us to study in detail the azimuthal variance of the recovered properties. Results: Given the exquisite quality of the X-ray and SZ datasets, their radial extension, and their complementarity, we constrain at R200 the total hydrostatic mass, modelled with a Navarro-Frenk-White profile at very high precision (M200 = 10.7 ± 0.5stat. ± 0.9syst. × 1014 M⊙). We identify the ongoing merger and how it is affecting differently the gas properties in the resolved azimuthal sectors. We have several indications that the merger has injected a high level of non-thermal pressure in this system: the clumping free density profile is above the average profile obtained by stacking Rosat/PSPC observations; the gas mass fraction recovered using our hydrostatic mass profile exceeds the expected cosmic gas fraction

  16. Application of Carbonate Reservoir using waveform inversion and reverse-time migration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Kim, H.; Min, D.; Keehm, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Recent exploration targets of oil and gas resources are deeper and more complicated subsurface structures, and carbonate reservoirs have become one of the attractive and challenging targets in seismic exploration. To increase the rate of success in oil and gas exploration, it is required to delineate detailed subsurface structures. Accordingly, migration method is more important factor in seismic data processing for the delineation. Seismic migration method has a long history, and there have been developed lots of migration techniques. Among them, reverse-time migration is promising, because it can provide reliable images for the complicated model even in the case of significant velocity contrasts in the model. The reliability of seismic migration images is dependent on the subsurface velocity models, which can be extracted in several ways. These days, geophysicists try to obtain velocity models through seismic full waveform inversion. Since Lailly (1983) and Tarantola (1984) proposed that the adjoint state of wave equations can be used in waveform inversion, the back-propagation techniques used in reverse-time migration have been used in waveform inversion, which accelerated the development of waveform inversion. In this study, we applied acoustic waveform inversion and reverse-time migration methods to carbonate reservoir models with various reservoir thicknesses to examine the feasibility of the methods in delineating carbonate reservoir models. We first extracted subsurface material properties from acoustic waveform inversion, and then applied reverse-time migration using the inverted velocities as a background model. The waveform inversion in this study used back-propagation technique, and conjugate gradient method was used in optimization. The inversion was performed using the frequency-selection strategy. Finally waveform inversion results showed that carbonate reservoir models are clearly inverted by waveform inversion and migration images based on the

  17. Recovering Long-wavelength Velocity Models using Spectrogram Inversion with Single- and Multi-frequency Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, J.; Chung, W.; Shin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many waveform inversion algorithms have been proposed in order to construct subsurface velocity structures from seismic data sets. These algorithms have suffered from computational burden, local minima problems, and the lack of low-frequency components. Computational efficiency can be improved by the application of back-propagation techniques and advances in computing hardware. In addition, waveform inversion algorithms, for obtaining long-wavelength velocity models, could avoid both the local minima problem and the effect of the lack of low-frequency components in seismic data. In this study, we proposed spectrogram inversion as a technique for recovering long-wavelength velocity models. In spectrogram inversion, decomposed frequency components from spectrograms of traces, in the observed and calculated data, are utilized to generate traces with reproduced low-frequency components. Moreover, since each decomposed component can reveal the different characteristics of a subsurface structure, several frequency components were utilized to analyze the velocity features in the subsurface. We performed the spectrogram inversion using a modified SEG/SEGE salt A-A' line. Numerical results demonstrate that spectrogram inversion could also recover the long-wavelength velocity features. However, inversion results varied according to the frequency components utilized. Based on the results of inversion using a decomposed single-frequency component, we noticed that robust inversion results are obtained when a dominant frequency component of the spectrogram was utilized. In addition, detailed information on recovered long-wavelength velocity models was obtained using a multi-frequency component combined with single-frequency components. Numerical examples indicate that various detailed analyses of long-wavelength velocity models can be carried out utilizing several frequency components.

  18. Convex blind image deconvolution with inverse filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiao-Guang; Li, Fang; Zeng, Tieyong

    2018-03-01

    Blind image deconvolution is the process of estimating both the original image and the blur kernel from the degraded image with only partial or no information about degradation and the imaging system. It is a bilinear ill-posed inverse problem corresponding to the direct problem of convolution. Regularization methods are used to handle the ill-posedness of blind deconvolution and get meaningful solutions. In this paper, we investigate a convex regularized inverse filtering method for blind deconvolution of images. We assume that the support region of the blur object is known, as has been done in a few existing works. By studying the inverse filters of signal and image restoration problems, we observe the oscillation structure of the inverse filters. Inspired by the oscillation structure of the inverse filters, we propose to use the star norm to regularize the inverse filter. Meanwhile, we use the total variation to regularize the resulting image obtained by convolving the inverse filter with the degraded image. The proposed minimization model is shown to be convex. We employ the first-order primal-dual method for the solution of the proposed minimization model. Numerical examples for blind image restoration are given to show that the proposed method outperforms some existing methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity (SSIM), visual quality and time consumption.

  19. Using emulsion inversion in industrial processes.

    PubMed

    Salager, Jean-Louis; Forgiarini, Ana; Márquez, Laura; Peña, Alejandro; Pizzino, Aldo; Rodriguez, María P; Rondón-González, Marianna

    2004-05-20

    Emulsion inversion is a complex phenomenon, often perceived as an instability that is essentially uncontrollable, although many industrial processes make use of it. A research effort that started 2 decades ago has provided the two-dimensional and three-dimensional description, the categorization and the theoretical interpretation of the different kinds of emulsion inversion. A clear-cut phenomenological approach is currently available for understanding its characteristics, the factors that influence it and control it, the importance of fine-tuning the emulsification protocol, and the crucial occurrence of organized structures such as liquid crystals or multiple emulsions. The current know-how is used to analyze some industrial processes involving emulsion inversion, e.g. the attainment of a fine nutrient or cosmetic emulsion by temperature or formulation-induced transitional inversion, the preparation of a silicone oil emulsion by catastrophic phase inversion, the manufacture of a viscous polymer latex by combined inversion and the spontaneous but enigmatic inversion of emulsions used in metal working operations such as lathing or lamination.

  20. A pericentric inversion of chromosome X disrupting F8 and resulting in haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Zhou, Jingyi; Ding, Qiulan; Chen, Changming; Wu, Xi; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongli; Jiang, Xiaofeng

    2017-08-01

    The frequency of X chromosome pericentric inversion is much less than that of autosome chromosome. We hereby characterise a pericentric inversion of X chromosome associated with severe factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency in a sporadic haemophilia A (HA) pedigree. PCR primer walking and genome walking strategies were adopted to identify the exact breakpoints of the inversion. Copy number variations (CNVs) of the F8 and the whole chromosomes were detected by AccuCopy and Affymetrix CytoScan High Definition (HD) assays, respectively. A karyotype analysis was performed by cytogenetic G banding technique. We identified a previously undescribed type of pericentric inversion of the X chromosome [inv(X)(p11.21q28)] in the proband with FVIII:C <1%. One breakpoint was located in the intron 7 of the F 8, which disrupted the transcription of the F8, and the other located in the upstream of the PFKFB1 of the X chromosome. The inversion segment was approximately 64.4% of the total chromosomal length. The karyotype analysis of the X chromosome confirmed the pericentric inversion of the X chromosome in the proband and his mother. A haplotype analysis traced the inversion to his maternal grandfather, who was not a somatic mosaic of the inversion. This finding indicated that the causative mutation may originate from his germ cells or a rare possibility of germ-cell mosaicism. The characterisation of pericentric inversion involving F8 extended the molecular mechanisms causing HA. The pericentric inversion rearrangement involves F8 by non-homologous end joining is responsible for pathogensis of severe HA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Eruption mass estimation using infrasound waveform inversion and ash and gas measurements: Evaluation at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan [Comparison of eruption masses at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan calculated by infrasound waveform inversion and ground-based sampling

    DOE PAGES

    Fee, David; Izbekov, Pavel; Kim, Keehoon; ...

    2017-10-09

    Eruption mass and mass flow rate are critical parameters for determining the aerial extent and hazard of volcanic emissions. Infrasound waveform inversion is a promising technique to quantify volcanic emissions. Although topography may substantially alter the infrasound waveform as it propagates, advances in wave propagation modeling and station coverage permit robust inversion of infrasound data from volcanic explosions. The inversion can estimate eruption mass flow rate and total eruption mass if the flow density is known. However, infrasound-based eruption flow rates and mass estimates have yet to be validated against independent measurements, and numerical modeling has only recently been appliedmore » to the inversion technique. Furthermore we present a robust full-waveform acoustic inversion method, and use it to calculate eruption flow rates and masses from 49 explosions from Sakurajima Volcano, Japan.« less

  2. Eruption mass estimation using infrasound waveform inversion and ash and gas measurements: Evaluation at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan [Comparison of eruption masses at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan calculated by infrasound waveform inversion and ground-based sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Fee, David; Izbekov, Pavel; Kim, Keehoon

    Eruption mass and mass flow rate are critical parameters for determining the aerial extent and hazard of volcanic emissions. Infrasound waveform inversion is a promising technique to quantify volcanic emissions. Although topography may substantially alter the infrasound waveform as it propagates, advances in wave propagation modeling and station coverage permit robust inversion of infrasound data from volcanic explosions. The inversion can estimate eruption mass flow rate and total eruption mass if the flow density is known. However, infrasound-based eruption flow rates and mass estimates have yet to be validated against independent measurements, and numerical modeling has only recently been appliedmore » to the inversion technique. Furthermore we present a robust full-waveform acoustic inversion method, and use it to calculate eruption flow rates and masses from 49 explosions from Sakurajima Volcano, Japan.« less

  3. Efficient sampling of parsimonious inversion histories with application to genome rearrangement in Yersinia.

    PubMed

    Miklós, István; Darling, Aaron E

    2009-06-22

    Inversions are among the most common mutations acting on the order and orientation of genes in a genome, and polynomial-time algorithms exist to obtain a minimal length series of inversions that transform one genome arrangement to another. However, the minimum length series of inversions (the optimal sorting path) is often not unique as many such optimal sorting paths exist. If we assume that all optimal sorting paths are equally likely, then statistical inference on genome arrangement history must account for all such sorting paths and not just a single estimate. No deterministic polynomial algorithm is known to count the number of optimal sorting paths nor sample from the uniform distribution of optimal sorting paths. Here, we propose a stochastic method that uniformly samples the set of all optimal sorting paths. Our method uses a novel formulation of parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo. In practice, our method can quickly estimate the total number of optimal sorting paths. We introduce a variant of our approach in which short inversions are modeled to be more likely, and we show how the method can be used to estimate the distribution of inversion lengths and breakpoint usage in pathogenic Yersinia pestis. The proposed method has been implemented in a program called "MC4Inversion." We draw comparison of MC4Inversion to the sampler implemented in BADGER and a previously described importance sampling (IS) technique. We find that on high-divergence data sets, MC4Inversion finds more optimal sorting paths per second than BADGER and the IS technique and simultaneously avoids bias inherent in the IS technique.

  4. Efficient Sampling of Parsimonious Inversion Histories with Application to Genome Rearrangement in Yersinia

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Aaron E.

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are among the most common mutations acting on the order and orientation of genes in a genome, and polynomial-time algorithms exist to obtain a minimal length series of inversions that transform one genome arrangement to another. However, the minimum length series of inversions (the optimal sorting path) is often not unique as many such optimal sorting paths exist. If we assume that all optimal sorting paths are equally likely, then statistical inference on genome arrangement history must account for all such sorting paths and not just a single estimate. No deterministic polynomial algorithm is known to count the number of optimal sorting paths nor sample from the uniform distribution of optimal sorting paths. Here, we propose a stochastic method that uniformly samples the set of all optimal sorting paths. Our method uses a novel formulation of parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo. In practice, our method can quickly estimate the total number of optimal sorting paths. We introduce a variant of our approach in which short inversions are modeled to be more likely, and we show how the method can be used to estimate the distribution of inversion lengths and breakpoint usage in pathogenic Yersinia pestis. The proposed method has been implemented in a program called “MC4Inversion.” We draw comparison of MC4Inversion to the sampler implemented in BADGER and a previously described importance sampling (IS) technique. We find that on high-divergence data sets, MC4Inversion finds more optimal sorting paths per second than BADGER and the IS technique and simultaneously avoids bias inherent in the IS technique. PMID:20333186

  5. On the inversion-indel distance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The inversion distance, that is the distance between two unichromosomal genomes with the same content allowing only inversions of DNA segments, can be computed thanks to a pioneering approach of Hannenhalli and Pevzner in 1995. In 2000, El-Mabrouk extended the inversion model to allow the comparison of unichromosomal genomes with unequal contents, thus insertions and deletions of DNA segments besides inversions. However, an exact algorithm was presented only for the case in which we have insertions alone and no deletion (or vice versa), while a heuristic was provided for the symmetric case, that allows both insertions and deletions and is called the inversion-indel distance. In 2005, Yancopoulos, Attie and Friedberg started a new branch of research by introducing the generic double cut and join (DCJ) operation, that can represent several genome rearrangements (including inversions). Among others, the DCJ model gave rise to two important results. First, it has been shown that the inversion distance can be computed in a simpler way with the help of the DCJ operation. Second, the DCJ operation originated the DCJ-indel distance, that allows the comparison of genomes with unequal contents, considering DCJ, insertions and deletions, and can be computed in linear time. Results In the present work we put these two results together to solve an open problem, showing that, when the graph that represents the relation between the two compared genomes has no bad components, the inversion-indel distance is equal to the DCJ-indel distance. We also give a lower and an upper bound for the inversion-indel distance in the presence of bad components. PMID:24564182

  6. NLSE: Parameter-Based Inversion Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Aldrin, John C.; Knopp, Jeremy S.

    Chapter 11 introduced us to the notion of an inverse problem and gave us some examples of the value of this idea to the solution of realistic industrial problems. The basic inversion algorithm described in Chap. 11 was based upon the Gauss-Newton theory of nonlinear least-squares estimation and is called NLSE in this book. In this chapter we will develop the mathematical background of this theory more fully, because this algorithm will be the foundation of inverse methods and their applications during the remainder of this book. We hope, thereby, to introduce the reader to the application of sophisticated mathematical concepts to engineering practice without introducing excessive mathematical sophistication.

  7. An inverse problem in thermal imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt; Caudill, Lester F., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines uniqueness and stability results for an inverse problem in thermal imaging. The goal is to identify an unknown boundary of an object by applying a heat flux and measuring the induced temperature on the boundary of the sample. The problem is studied both in the case in which one has data at every point on the boundary of the region and the case in which only finitely many measurements are available. An inversion procedure is developed and used to study the stability of the inverse problem for various experimental configurations.

  8. Frequency-domain elastic full waveform inversion using encoded simultaneous sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, W.; Son, W.; Pyun, S.; Min, D.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, numerous studies have endeavored to develop robust full waveform inversion and migration algorithms. These processes require enormous computational costs, because of the number of sources in the survey. To avoid this problem, the phase encoding technique for prestack migration was proposed by Romero (2000) and Krebs et al. (2009) proposed the encoded simultaneous-source inversion technique in the time domain. On the other hand, Ben-Hadj-Ali et al. (2011) demonstrated the robustness of the frequency-domain full waveform inversion with simultaneous sources for noisy data changing the source assembling. Although several studies on simultaneous-source inversion tried to estimate P- wave velocity based on the acoustic wave equation, seismic migration and waveform inversion based on the elastic wave equations are required to obtain more reliable subsurface information. In this study, we propose a 2-D frequency-domain elastic full waveform inversion technique using phase encoding methods. In our algorithm, the random phase encoding method is employed to calculate the gradients of the elastic parameters, source signature estimation and the diagonal entries of approximate Hessian matrix. The crosstalk for the estimated source signature and the diagonal entries of approximate Hessian matrix are suppressed with iteration as for the gradients. Our 2-D frequency-domain elastic waveform inversion algorithm is composed using the back-propagation technique and the conjugate-gradient method. Source signature is estimated using the full Newton method. We compare the simultaneous-source inversion with the conventional waveform inversion for synthetic data sets of the Marmousi-2 model. The inverted results obtained by simultaneous sources are comparable to those obtained by individual sources, and source signature is successfully estimated in simultaneous source technique. Comparing the inverted results using the pseudo Hessian matrix with previous inversion results

  9. Sensitivity analyses of acoustic impedance inversion with full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Gang; da Silva, Nuno V.; Wu, Di

    2018-04-01

    Acoustic impedance estimation has a significant importance to seismic exploration. In this paper, we use full-waveform inversion to recover the impedance from seismic data, and analyze the sensitivity of the acoustic impedance with respect to the source-receiver offset of seismic data and to the initial velocity model. We parameterize the acoustic wave equation with velocity and impedance, and demonstrate three key aspects of acoustic impedance inversion. First, short-offset data are most suitable for acoustic impedance inversion. Second, acoustic impedance inversion is more compatible with the data generated by density contrasts than velocity contrasts. Finally, acoustic impedance inversion requires the starting velocity model to be very accurate for achieving a high-quality inversion. Based upon these observations, we propose a workflow for acoustic impedance inversion as: (1) building a background velocity model with travel-time tomography or reflection waveform inversion; (2) recovering the intermediate wavelength components of the velocity model with full-waveform inversion constrained by Gardner’s relation; (3) inverting the high-resolution acoustic impedance model with short-offset data through full-waveform inversion. We verify this workflow by the synthetic tests based on the Marmousi model.

  10. The Inverse Bagging Algorithm: Anomaly Detection by Inverse Bootstrap Aggregating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vischia, Pietro; Dorigo, Tommaso

    2017-03-01

    For data sets populated by a very well modeled process and by another process of unknown probability density function (PDF), a desired feature when manipulating the fraction of the unknown process (either for enhancing it or suppressing it) consists in avoiding to modify the kinematic distributions of the well modeled one. A bootstrap technique is used to identify sub-samples rich in the well modeled process, and classify each event according to the frequency of it being part of such sub-samples. Comparisons with general MVA algorithms will be shown, as well as a study of the asymptotic properties of the method, making use of a public domain data set that models a typical search for new physics as performed at hadronic colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  11. Cooperative inversion of magnetotelluric and seismic data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, M.; Santos, F.

    2012-04-01

    Cooperative inversion of magnetotelluric and seismic data sets Milenko Markovic,Fernando Monteiro Santos IDL, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa 1749-016 Lisboa Inversion of single geophysical data has well-known limitations due to the non-linearity of the fields and non-uniqueness of the model. There is growing need, both in academy and industry to use two or more different data sets and thus obtain subsurface property distribution. In our case ,we are dealing with magnetotelluric and seismic data sets. In our approach,we are developing algorithm based on fuzzy-c means clustering technique, for pattern recognition of geophysical data. Separate inversion is performed on every step, information exchanged for model integration. Interrelationships between parameters from different models is not required in analytical form. We are investigating how different number of clusters, affects zonation and spatial distribution of parameters. In our study optimization in fuzzy c-means clustering (for magnetotelluric and seismic data) is compared for two cases, firstly alternating optimization and then hybrid method (alternating optimization+ Quasi-Newton method). Acknowledgment: This work is supported by FCT Portugal

  12. Inverse Tomo-Lithography for Making Microscopic 3D Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Victor; Wiberg, Dean

    2003-01-01

    According to a proposal, basic x-ray lithography would be extended to incorporate a technique, called inverse tomography, that would enable the fabrication of microscopic three-dimensional (3D) objects. The proposed inverse tomo-lithographic process would make it possible to produce complex shaped, submillimeter-sized parts that would be difficult or impossible to make in any other way. Examples of such shapes or parts include tapered helices, paraboloids with axes of different lengths, and even Archimedean screws that could serve as rotors in microturbines. The proposed inverse tomo-lithographic process would be based partly on a prior microfabrication process known by the German acronym LIGA (lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung, which means lithography, electroforming, molding). In LIGA, one generates a precise, high-aspect ratio pattern by exposing a thick, x-ray-sensitive resist material to an x-ray beam through a mask that contains the pattern. One can electrodeposit metal into the developed resist pattern to form a precise metal part, then dissolve the resist to free the metal. Aspect ratios of 100:1 and patterns into resist thicknesses of several millimeters are possible.

  13. Inverse-collimated proton radiography for imaging thin materials

    DOE PAGES

    Freeman, Matthew S.; Allison, Jason; Andrews, Malcolm; ...

    2017-01-01

    Relativistic, magnetically-focused proton radiography was invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the 800 MeV LANSCE beam, and is inherently well-suited to imaging dense objects, at areal densities >20 g cm -2. However, if the unscattered portion of the transmitted beam is removed at the Fourier plane through inverse-collimation, this system becomes highly sensitive to very thin media, of areal densities <100 mg cm -2. Here, this inversecollimation scheme is described in detail and demonstrated by imaging Xe gas with a shockwave generated by an aluminum plate compressing the gas at Mach 8.8. With a 5-mrad inverse collimator, an arealmore » density change of just 49 mg cm-2 across the shock front is discernible with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 3. Geant4 modeling of idealized and realistic proton transports can guide the design of inverse-collimators optimized for specific experimental conditions and show that this technique performs better for thin targets with reduced incident proton beam emittance. This work increases the range of areal densities to which the system is sensitive to span from ~25 mg cm -2 to 100 g cm -2, exceeding three orders of magnitude. This enables the simultaneous imaging of a dense system, as well as thin jets and ejecta material that are otherwise difficult to characterize with high-energy proton radiography.« less

  14. The 2-D magnetotelluric inverse problem solved with optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beusekom, Ashley E.; Parker, Robert L.; Bank, Randolph E.; Gill, Philip E.; Constable, Steven

    2011-02-01

    The practical 2-D magnetotelluric inverse problem seeks to determine the shallow-Earth conductivity structure using finite and uncertain data collected on the ground surface. We present an approach based on using PLTMG (Piecewise Linear Triangular MultiGrid), a special-purpose code for optimization with second-order partial differential equation (PDE) constraints. At each frequency, the electromagnetic field and conductivity are treated as unknowns in an optimization problem in which the data misfit is minimized subject to constraints that include Maxwell's equations and the boundary conditions. Within this framework it is straightforward to accommodate upper and lower bounds or other conditions on the conductivity. In addition, as the underlying inverse problem is ill-posed, constraints may be used to apply various kinds of regularization. We discuss some of the advantages and difficulties associated with using PDE-constrained optimization as the basis for solving large-scale nonlinear geophysical inverse problems. Combined transverse electric and transverse magnetic complex admittances from the COPROD2 data are inverted. First, we invert penalizing size and roughness giving solutions that are similar to those found previously. In a second example, conventional regularization is replaced by a technique that imposes upper and lower bounds on the model. In both examples the data misfit is better than that obtained previously, without any increase in model complexity.

  15. Steven J. Ostro: Pioneer in Asteroid Lightcurve Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Alan W.

    2009-09-01

    In 1906, Henry Norris Russell wrote a landmark paper (Astrophys. J. 24, 1-18, 1906) that set the field of lightcurve inversion back by more than three quarters of a century, until Steve Ostro and Robert Connolly published a paper on "convex profile inversion” (Icarus 57, 443-463, 1984). Russell's stifling contribution was innocent enough, and entirely correct: he showed that with "two cans of paint", one can decorate any arbitrarily shaped body in an infinite number of ways to yield any particular lightcurve, even, for example, a cigar shape that is brightest viewed end-on. This sufficed to discourage serious mathematical attack on the problem until Ostro & Connolly's landmark paper of 1984. They showed that if you have only "one can of paint", that is, in the absence of albedo variegation, the problem is tractable and one can make remarkable progress in lightcurve inversion to obtain shapes, or at least the "convex profile” of the real shape. As we now know, nature appears to have only one can of paint (per asteroid), that is, asteroids seem to paint themselves grey so that the uniform reflectivity assumption is quite excellent. Both radar and optical lightcurve inversion techniques are now quite mature, thanks to Steve's pioneering insights.

  16. Efficient Stochastic Inversion Using Adjoint Models and Kernel-PCA

    SciTech Connect

    Thimmisetty, Charanraj A.; Zhao, Wenju; Chen, Xiao

    2017-10-18

    Performing stochastic inversion on a computationally expensive forward simulation model with a high-dimensional uncertain parameter space (e.g. a spatial random field) is computationally prohibitive even when gradient information can be computed efficiently. Moreover, the ‘nonlinear’ mapping from parameters to observables generally gives rise to non-Gaussian posteriors even with Gaussian priors, thus hampering the use of efficient inversion algorithms designed for models with Gaussian assumptions. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian stochastic inversion methodology, which is characterized by a tight coupling between the gradient-based Langevin Markov Chain Monte Carlo (LMCMC) method and a kernel principal component analysis (KPCA). Thismore » approach addresses the ‘curse-of-dimensionality’ via KPCA to identify a low-dimensional feature space within the high-dimensional and nonlinearly correlated parameter space. In addition, non-Gaussian posterior distributions are estimated via an efficient LMCMC method on the projected low-dimensional feature space. We will demonstrate this computational framework by integrating and adapting our recent data-driven statistics-on-manifolds constructions and reduction-through-projection techniques to a linear elasticity model.« less

  17. [Study of inversion and classification of particle size distribution under dependent model algorithm].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Gang; Tang, Hong; Yuan, Gui-Bin

    2008-05-01

    For the total light scattering particle sizing technique, an inversion and classification method was proposed with the dependent model algorithm. The measured particle system was inversed simultaneously by different particle distribution functions whose mathematic model was known in advance, and then classified according to the inversion errors. The simulation experiments illustrated that it is feasible to use the inversion errors to determine the particle size distribution. The particle size distribution function was obtained accurately at only three wavelengths in the visible light range with the genetic algorithm, and the inversion results were steady and reliable, which decreased the number of multi wavelengths to the greatest extent and increased the selectivity of light source. The single peak distribution inversion error was less than 5% and the bimodal distribution inversion error was less than 10% when 5% stochastic noise was put in the transmission extinction measurement values at two wavelengths. The running time of this method was less than 2 s. The method has advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and suitability for on-line particle size measurement.

  18. Including geological information in the inverse problem of palaeothermal reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, S.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2003-04-01

    A reliable reconstruction of sediment thermal history is of central importance to the assessment of hydrocarbon potential and the understanding of basin evolution. However, only rarely do sedimentation history and borehole data in the form of present day temperatures and vitrinite reflectance constrain the past thermal evolution to a useful level of accuracy (Gallagher and Sambridge,1992; Nielsen,1998; Trautner and Nielsen,2003). This is reflected in the inverse solutions to the problem of determining heat flow history from borehole data: The recent heat flow is constrained by data while older values are governed by the chosen a prior heat flow. In this paper we reduce this problem by including geological information in the inverse problem. Through a careful analysis of geological and geophysical data the timing of the tectonic processes, which may influence heat flow, can be inferred. The heat flow history is then parameterised to allow for the temporal variations characteristic of the different tectonic events. The inversion scheme applies a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach (Nielsen and Gallagher, 1999; Ferrero and Gallagher,2002), which efficiently explores the model space and futhermore samples the posterior probability distribution of the model. The technique is demonstrated on wells in the northern North Sea with emphasis on the stretching event in Late Jurassic. The wells are characterised by maximum sediment temperature at the present day, which is the worst case for resolution of the past thermal history because vitrinite reflectance is determined mainly by the maximum temperature. Including geological information significantly improves the thermal resolution. Ferrero, C. and Gallagher,K.,2002. Stochastic thermal history modelling.1. Constraining heat flow histories and their uncertainty. Marine and Petroleum Geology, 19, 633-648. Gallagher,K. and Sambridge, M., 1992. The resolution of past heat flow in sedimentary basins from non-linear inversion

  19. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  20. Tomographic inversion of satellite photometry. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Hays, P. B.; Abreu, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method for combining nadir observations of emission features in the upper atmosphere with the result of a tomographic inversion of limb brightness measurements is presented. Simulated and actual results are provided, and error sensitivity is investigated.

  1. Eco-Evolutionary Genomics of Chromosomal Inversions.

    PubMed

    Wellenreuther, Maren; Bernatchez, Louis

    2018-05-03

    Chromosomal inversions have long fascinated evolutionary biologists due to their suppression of recombination, which can protect co-adapted alleles. Emerging research documents that inversions are commonly linked to spectacular phenotypes and have a pervasive role in eco-evolutionary processes, from mating systems, social organisation, environmental adaptation, and reproductive isolation to speciation. Studies also reveal that inversions are taxonomically widespread, with many being old and large, and that balancing selection is commonly facilitating their maintenance. This challenges the traditional view that the role of balancing selection in maintaining variation is relatively minor. The ubiquitous importance of inversions in ecological and evolutionary processes suggests that structural variation should be better acknowledged and integrated in studies pertaining to the molecular basis of adaptation and speciation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Zinc oxide inverse opal enzymatic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Xueqiu; Pikul, James H.; King, William P.; Pak, James J.

    2013-06-01

    We report ZnO inverse opal- and nanowire (NW)-based enzymatic glucose biosensors with extended linear detection ranges. The ZnO inverse opal sensors have 0.01-18 mM linear detection range, which is 2.5 times greater than that of ZnO NW sensors and 1.5 times greater than that of other reported ZnO sensors. This larger range is because of reduced glucose diffusivity through the inverse opal geometry. The ZnO inverse opal sensors have an average sensitivity of 22.5 μA/(mM cm2), which diminished by 10% after 35 days, are more stable than ZnO NW sensors whose sensitivity decreased by 10% after 7 days.

  3. From inverse problems to learning: a Statistical Mechanics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassi, Carlo; Gerace, Federica; Saglietti, Luca; Zecchina, Riccardo

    2018-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to the statistical mechanics approaches for the study of inverse problems in data science. We then provide concrete new results on inferring couplings from sampled configurations in systems characterized by an extensive number of stable attractors in the low temperature regime. We also show how these result are connected to the problem of learning with realistic weak signals in computational neuroscience. Our techniques and algorithms rely on advanced mean-field methods developed in the context of disordered systems.

  4. Learning inverse kinematics: reduced sampling through decomposition into virtual robots.

    PubMed

    de Angulo, Vicente Ruiz; Torras, Carme

    2008-12-01

    We propose a technique to speedup the learning of the inverse kinematics of a robot manipulator by decomposing it into two or more virtual robot arms. Unlike previous decomposition approaches, this one does not place any requirement on the robot architecture, and thus, it is completely general. Parametrized self-organizing maps are particularly adequate for this type of learning, and permit comparing results directly obtained and through the decomposition. Experimentation shows that time reductions of up to two orders of magnitude are easily attained.

  5. Invariant-Based Inverse Engineering of Crane Control Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Resines, S.; Guéry-Odelin, D.; Tobalina, A.; Lizuain, I.; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.

    2017-11-01

    By applying invariant-based inverse engineering in the small-oscillation regime, we design the time dependence of the control parameters of an overhead crane (trolley displacement and rope length) to transport a load between two positions at different heights with minimal final-energy excitation for a microcanonical ensemble of initial conditions. The analogy between ion transport in multisegmented traps or neutral-atom transport in moving optical lattices and load manipulation by cranes opens a route for a useful transfer of techniques among very different fields.

  6. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion in practice—the electrical conductivity structure of the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Kristina; Ritter, Oliver

    2013-10-01

    3-D inversion techniques have become a widely used tool in magnetotelluric (MT) data interpretation. However, with real data sets, many of the controlling factors for the outcome of 3-D inversion are little explored, such as alignment of the coordinate system, handling and influence of data errors and model regularization. Here we present 3-D inversion results of 169 MT sites from the central San Andreas Fault in California. Previous extensive 2-D inversion and 3-D forward modelling of the data set revealed significant along-strike variation of the electrical conductivity structure. 3-D inversion can recover these features but only if the inversion parameters are tuned in accordance with the particularities of the data set. Based on synthetic 3-D data we explore the model space and test the impacts of a wide range of inversion settings. The tests showed that the recovery of a pronounced regional 2-D structure in inversion of the complete impedance tensor depends on the coordinate system. As interdependencies between data components are not considered in standard 3-D MT inversion codes, 2-D subsurface structures can vanish if data are not aligned with the regional strike direction. A priori models and data weighting, that is, how strongly individual components of the impedance tensor and/or vertical magnetic field transfer functions dominate the solution, are crucial controls for the outcome of 3-D inversion. If deviations from a prior model are heavily penalized, regularization is prone to result in erroneous and misleading 3-D inversion models, particularly in the presence of strong conductivity contrasts. A `good' overall rms misfit is often meaningless or misleading as a huge range of 3-D inversion results exist, all with similarly `acceptable' misfits but producing significantly differing images of the conductivity structures. Reliable and meaningful 3-D inversion models can only be recovered if data misfit is assessed systematically in the frequency

  7. Joint inversion of multiple geophysical and petrophysical data using generalized fuzzy clustering algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiajia; Li, Yaoguo

    2017-02-01

    Joint inversion that simultaneously inverts multiple geophysical data sets to recover a common Earth model is increasingly being applied to exploration problems. Petrophysical data can serve as an effective constraint to link different physical property models in such inversions. There are two challenges, among others, associated with the petrophysical approach to joint inversion. One is related to the multimodality of petrophysical data because there often exist more than one relationship between different physical properties in a region of study. The other challenge arises from the fact that petrophysical relationships have different characteristics and can exhibit point, linear, quadratic, or exponential forms in a crossplot. The fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering technique is effective in tackling the first challenge and has been applied successfully. We focus on the second challenge in this paper and develop a joint inversion method based on variations of the FCM clustering technique. To account for the specific shapes of petrophysical relationships, we introduce several different fuzzy clustering algorithms that are capable of handling different shapes of petrophysical relationships. We present two synthetic and one field data examples and demonstrate that, by choosing appropriate distance measures for the clustering component in the joint inversion algorithm, the proposed joint inversion method provides an effective means of handling common petrophysical situations we encounter in practice. The jointly inverted models have both enhanced structural similarity and increased petrophysical correlation, and better represent the subsurface in the spatial domain and the parameter domain of physical properties.

  8. A fluorophosphate-based inverse Keggin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fielden, John; Quasdorf, Kyle; Cronin, Leroy

    An unusual PFO(3)(2-)-templated "inverse Keggin" polyanion, [Mo(12)O(46)(PF)(4)](4-), has been isolated from the degradation reaction of an {Mo(132)}-type Keplerate to [PMo(12)O(40)](3-) by [Cu(MeCN)(4)](PF(6)) in acetonitrile. (31)P-NMR studies suggest a structure-directing role for [Cu(MeCN)(4)](+) in the formation of the highly unusual all-inorganic inverse Keggin structure.

  9. A fluorophosphate-based inverse Keggin structure.

    PubMed

    Fielden, John; Quasdorf, Kyle; Cronin, Leroy; Kögerler, Paul

    2012-09-07

    An unusual PFO(3)(2-)-templated "inverse Keggin" polyanion, [Mo(12)O(46)(PF)(4)](4-), has been isolated from the degradation reaction of an {Mo(132)}-type Keplerate to [PMo(12)O(40)](3-) by [Cu(MeCN)(4)](PF(6)) in acetonitrile. (31)P-NMR studies suggest a structure-directing role for [Cu(MeCN)(4)](+) in the formation of the highly unusual all-inorganic inverse Keggin structure.

  10. Contribution of 3D inversion of Electrical Resistivity Tomography data applied to volcanic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for geological structures imaging. Such structures can present complex characteristics that conventional 2D inversion processes cannot perfectly integrate. Here we present a new 3D inversion algorithm named EResI, firstly developed for levee investigation, and presently applied to the study of a complex lava dome (the Puy de Dôme volcano, France). EResI algorithm is based on a conventional regularized Gauss-Newton inversion scheme and a 3D non-structured discretization of the model (double grid method based on tetrahedrons). This discretization allows to accurately model the topography of investigated structure (without a mesh deformation procedure) and also permits a precise location of the electrodes. Moreover, we demonstrate that a complete 3D unstructured discretization limits the number of inversion cells and is better adapted to the resolution capacity of tomography than a structured discretization. This study shows that a 3D inversion with a non-structured parametrization has some advantages compared to classical 2D inversions. The first advantage comes from the fact that a 2D inversion leads to artefacts due to 3D effects (3D topography, 3D internal resistivity). The second advantage comes from the fact that the capacity to experimentally align electrodes along an axis (for 2D surveys) depends on the constrains on the field (topography...). In this case, a 2D assumption induced by 2.5D inversion software prevents its capacity to model electrodes outside this axis leading to artefacts in the inversion result. The last limitation comes from the use of mesh deformation techniques used to accurately model the topography in 2D softwares. This technique used for structured discretization (Res2dinv) is prohibed for strong topography (>60 %) and leads to a small computational errors. A wide geophysical survey was carried out

  11. Inverse Bremsstrahlung in Shocked Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    2000-01-01

    There has recently been interest in the role of inverse bremsstrahlung, the emission of photons by fast suprathermal ions in collisions with ambient electrons possessing relatively low velocities, in tenuous plasmas in various astrophysical contexts. This follows a long hiatus in the application of suprathermal ion bremsstrahlung to astrophysical models since the early 1970s. The potential importance of inverse bremsstrahlung relative to normal bremsstrahlung, i.e. where ions are at rest, hinges upon the underlying velocity distributions of the interacting species. In this paper, we identify the conditions under which the inverse bremsstrahlung emissivity is significant relative to that for normal bremsstrahlung in shocked astrophysical plasmas. We determine that, since both observational and theoretical evidence favors electron temperatures almost comparable to, and certainly not very deficient relative to proton temperatures in shocked plasmas, these environments generally render inverse bremsstrahlung at best a minor contributor to the overall emission. Hence inverse bremsstrahlung can be safely neglected in most models invoking shock acceleration in discrete sources such as supernova remnants. However, on scales approximately > 100 pc distant from these sources, Coulomb collisional losses can deplete the cosmic ray electrons, rendering inverse bremsstrahlung, and perhaps bremsstrahlung from knock-on electrons, possibly detectable.

  12. Inversion layer solar cell fabrication and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Silicon solar cells with induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. This charged layer was supplied through three mechanisms: (1) supplying a positive potential to a transparent electrode separated from the silicon surface by a dielectric, (2) contaminating the oxide layer with positive ions, and (3) forming donor surface states that leave a positive charge on the surface. A movable semi-infinite shadow delineated the extent of sensitivity of the cell due to the inversion region. Measurements of the inversion layer cell response to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. Theory of the conductance of the inversion layer vs. strength of the inversion layer was compared with experiment and found to match. Theoretical determinations of junction depth and inversion layer