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Sample records for abel inversion technique

  1. Abel inversion method for cometary atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Benoit; Opitom, Cyrielle; Hutsemekers, Damien; Jehin, Emmanuel; Munhoven, Guy; Manfroid, Jean; Bisikalo, Dmitry V.; Shematovich, Valery I.

    2016-04-01

    Remote observation of cometary atmospheres produces a measurement of the cometary emissions integrated along the line of sight joining the observing instrument and the gas of the coma. This integration is the so-called Abel transform of the local emission rate. We develop a method specifically adapted to the inversion of the Abel transform of cometary emissions, that retrieves the radial profile of the emission rate of any unabsorbed emission, under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry of the coma. The method uses weighted least squares fitting and analytical results. A Tikhonov regularization technique is applied to reduce the possible effects of noise and ill-conditioning, and standard error propagation techniques are implemented. Several theoretical tests of the inversion techniques are carried out to show its validity and robustness, and show that the method is only weakly dependent on any constant offset added to the data, which reduces the dependence of the retrieved emission rate on the background subtraction. We apply the method to observations of three different comets observed using the TRAPPIST instrument: 103P/ Hartley 2, F6/ Lemmon and A1/ Siding spring. We show that the method retrieves realistic emission rates, and that characteristic lengths and production rates can be derived from the emission rate for both CN and C2 molecules. We show that the emission rate derived from the observed flux of CN emission at 387 nm and from the C2 emission at 514.1 nm of comet Siding Spring both present an easily-identifiable shoulder that corresponds to the separation between pre- and post-outburst gas. As a general result, we show that diagnosing properties and features of the coma using the emission rate is easier than directly using the observed flux. We also determine the parameters of a Haser model fitting the inverted data and fitting the line-of-sight integrated observation, for which we provide the exact analytical expression of the line-of-sight integration

  2. Improved Abel transform inversion: First application to COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon-Angel, A.; Hernandez-Pajares, M.; Juan, J.; Sanz, J.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the first results of Ionospheric Tomographic inversion are presented, using the Improved Abel Transform on the COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 constellation of 6 LEO satellites, carrying on-board GPS receivers.[- 4mm] The Abel transform inversion is a wide used technique which in the ionospheric context makes it possible to retrieve electron densities as a function of height based of STEC (Slant Total Electron Content) data gathered from GPS receivers on board of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellites. Within this precise use, the classical approach of the Abel inversion is based on the assumption of spherical symmetry of the electron density in the vicinity of an occultation, meaning that the electron content varies in height but not horizontally. In particular, one implication of this assumption is that the VTEC (Vertical Total Electron Content) is a constant value for the occultation region. This assumption may not always be valid since horizontal ionospheric gradients (a very frequent feature in some ionosphere problematic areas such as the Equatorial region) could significantly affect the electron profiles. [- 4mm] In order to overcome this limitation/problem of the classical Abel inversion, a studied improvement of this technique can be obtained by assuming separability in the electron density (see Hernández-Pajares et al. 2000). This means that the electron density can be expressed by the multiplication of VTEC data and a shape function which assumes all the height dependency in it while the VTEC data keeps the horizontal dependency. Actually, it is more realistic to assume that this shape fuction depends only on the height and to use VTEC information to take into account the horizontal variation rather than considering spherical symmetry in the electron density function as it has been carried out in the classical approach of the Abel inversion.[-4mm] Since the above mentioned improved Abel inversion technique has already been tested and proven to be a useful

  3. Fast algorithm for computing the Abel inversion integral in broadband reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, F.D.

    1995-10-01

    The application of the Hansen--Jablokow recursive technique is proposed for the numerical computation of the Abel inversion integral which is used in ({ital O}-mode) frequency-modulated broadband reflectometry to evaluate plasma density profiles. Compared to the usual numerical methods the recursive algorithm allows substantial time savings that can be important when processing massive amounts of data aiming to control the plasma in real time. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. A new asymmetric Abel-inversion method for plasma interferometry in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1989-02-01

    In order to get precise local electron density information from chordal interferometric measurement of a tokamak plasma, a self- consistent and reliable inversion method is necessary. In this paper, a new asymmetric Abel-inversion method is introduced. This method includes flexible boundary conditions, application to a non-circular geometry, and estimation of the plasma in the scrape-off layer. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by comparison with other methods. This new inversion method is applied to a parametric study which includes dependence on the Shafranov shift and elongation of the profile. The inverted results are integrated along different views and compared with other density measurements. This new method can also be applied to plasma spectroscopy. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  5. A generalized Abel inversion method for gamma-ray imaging of thermonuclear plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.; Pavone, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Schoepf, K.; Yavorskij, V.

    2016-03-01

    A method to determine the gamma-ray emissivity profile from measurements along a few multiple collimated lines of sight in thermonuclear plasmas is presented. The algorithm is based on a generalisation of the known Abel inversion and takes into account the non circular shape of the plasma flux surfaces and the limited number of data points available. The method is applied to synthetic experimental measurements originating from parabolic and non parabolic JET gamma-ray emissivity profiles, where the aim is to compare the results of the inversion with the original, known input parameters. We find that profile parameters, such as the peak value, width and centre of the emissivity, are determined with an accuracy between 1 and 20% for parabolic and 2 to 25% for non parabolic profiles, respectively, which compare to an error at the 10% level for the input data. The results presented in this paper are primarily of relevance for the reconstruction of emissivity profiles from radiation measurements in tokamaks, but the method can also be applied to measurements along a sparse set of collimated lines of sight in general applications, provided that the surfaces at constant emissivity are known to have rotational simmetry.

  6. An ionospheric occultation inversion technique based on epoch difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Xiong, Jing; Zhu, Fuying; Yang, Jian; Qiao, Xuejun

    2013-09-01

    Of the ionospheric radio occultation (IRO) electron density profile (EDP) retrievals, the Abel based calibrated TEC inversion (CTI) is the most widely used technique. In order to eliminate the contribution from the altitude above the RO satellite, it is necessary to utilize the calibrated TEC to retrieve the EDP, which introduces the error due to the coplanar assumption. In this paper, a new technique based on the epoch difference inversion (EDI) is firstly proposed to eliminate this error. The comparisons between CTI and EDI have been done, taking advantage of the simulated and real COSMIC data. The following conclusions can be drawn: the EDI technique can successfully retrieve the EDPs without non-occultation side measurements and shows better performance than the CTI method, especially for lower orbit mission; no matter which technique is used, the inversion results at the higher altitudes are better than those at the lower altitudes, which could be explained theoretically.

  7. An efficient and flexible Abel-inversion method for noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhin, Igor I.

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient and flexible method for solving Abel integral equation of the first kind, frequently appearing in many fields of astrophysics, physics, chemistry, and applied sciences. This equation represents an ill-posed problem, thus solving it requires some kind of regularization. Our method is based on solving the equation on a so-called compact set of functions and/or using Tikhonov's regularization. A priori constraints on the unknown function, defining a compact set, are very loose and can be set using simple physical considerations. Tikhonov's regularization on itself does not require any explicit a priori constraints on the unknown function and can be used independently of such constraints or in combination with them. Various target degrees of smoothness of the unknown function may be set, as required by the problem at hand. The advantage of the method, apart from its flexibility, is that it gives uniform convergence of the approximate solution to the exact solution, as the errors of input data tend to zero. The method is illustrated on several simulated models with known solutions. An example of astrophysical application of the method is also given.

  8. Mathematics of Radiation Propagation in Planetary Atmospheres: Absorption, Refraction, Time Delay, Occultation, and Abel Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.

    Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths curved by refraction. The inverse problem, determining the altitude profile of mass density (index of refraction) or the concentration of an individual chemical species (absorption), from occultation data, also has its mathematically interesting (i.e., difficult) aspects. Now we automatically have noise and thus statistical analysis is just as important as calculus and numerical analysis. Here we will describe a new approach of least-squares fitting occultation data to an expansion over compact basis functions. This approach, which avoids numerical differentiation and singular integrals, was originally developed to analyze laboratory imaging data.Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths

  9. Techniques in Doppler gravity inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The types of Doppler gravity data available for local as opposed to planetwide geophysical modeling are reviewed. Those gravity fields that are determined dynamically in orbit determination programs yield a smoothed representation of the local gravity field that may be used for quantitative modeling. An estimate of the difference between smoothed and true fields can be considered as a noise limitation in generating local gravity models. A nonlinear inversion for the geometry, depth, and density of the Mare Serenitatis mascon using an ellipsoidal model yielded a global least squares minimum in horizontal dimensions, depth, and thickness-density contrast product. It was subsequently found, by using a linear model, that there were an infinite number of solutions corresponding to various combinations of depth and lateral inhomogeneity. Linear modeling was performed by means of generalized inverse theory.

  10. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented.

  11. An alternative Shell inversion technique - Analysis and validation based on COSMIC and ionosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Wu, Yun; Qiao, Xuejun; Zhou, Yiyan

    2012-01-01

    Multi-channel Global Positioning System (GPS) carrier phase signals, received by the six low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) program, were used to undertake active limb sounding of the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere via radio occultation. In the ionospheric radio occultation (IRO) data processing, the standard Shell inversion technique (SIT), transformed from the traditional Abel inversion technique (AIT), is widely used, and can retrieve good electron density profiles. In this paper, an alternative SIT method is proposed. The comparison between different inversion techniques will be discussed, taking advantage of the availability of COSMIC datasets. Moreover, the occultation results obtained from the SIT and alternative SIT at 500 km and 800 km, are compared with ionosonde measurements. The electron densities from the alternative SIT show excellent consistency to those from the SIT, with strong correlations over 0.996 and 0.999 at altitudes of 500 km and 800 km, respectively, and the peak electron densities (NmF2) from the alternative SIT are equivalent to the SIT, with 0.839 vs. 0.844, and 0.907 vs. 0.909 correlation coefficients when comparing to those by the ionosondes. These results show that: (1) the NmF2 and hmF2 retrieved from the SIT and alternative SIT are highly consistent, and in a good agreement with those measured by ionosondes, (2) no matter which inversion technique is used, the occultation results at the higher orbits (˜800 km) are better than those at the lower orbits (˜500 km).

  12. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, C

    2004-02-05

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060.

  13. Inversion of electromagnetic data: An overview of new techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, Doug

    1990-09-01

    This paper explores some of the newer techniques for acquiring and inverting electromagnetic data. Attention is confined primarily to the 2d magnetotelluric (MT) problem but the inverse methods are applicable to all areas of EM induction. The basis of the EMAP technique of Bostick is presented along with examples to illustrate the efficacy of that method in structural imaging and in overcoming the deleterious effects of near-surface distortions of the electric field. Reflectivity imaging methods and the application of seismic migration techniques to EM problems are also explored as imaging tools. Two new approaches to the solution of the inverse problem are presented. The AIM (Approximate Inverse Mapping) inversion of Oldenburg and Ellis uses a new way to estimate a perturbation in an iterative solution which does not involve linearization of the equations. The RRI (Rapid Relaxation Inverse) of Smith and Booker shows how approximate Fréchet derivatives and sequences of 1d inversions can be used to develop a practical inversion algorithm. The overview is structured to provide insight about the latest inversion techniques and also to touch upon most areas of the inverse problem that must be considered to carry out a practical inversion. These include model parameterization, methods of calculating first order sensitivities, and methods for setting up a linearized inversion.

  14. Planetary radar data inversion techniques improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picardi, G.; Masdea, A.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Restano, M.; Seu, R.

    2012-04-01

    The planetary radar (e.g. MARSIS) data inversion is based on the selection of groups of stationary frames, within the area under investigation, that shall be statistically analyzed after suitable correction. The selection step includes the recovery of bad/poor data and the estimation of the geometrical surface and subsurface features; these feature shall be utilized in order to obtain data that are only dependent by the material nature of the inclusion, within the layer, and of the interface. This paper is addressed to the techniques used for the frames selection, recovery and their geometric estimation content. As first step, frames have been selected in Mars areas where the surface and subsurface have a physical optics behavior (i.e. quite flat); the surface flatness has been estimated according to a simulator based on MOLA (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter) data while the subsurface has been estimated taking into account the Doppler filters content (i.e. filter 0, +1, -1). Being the surface and subsurface quite flat only small geometric contribution have been estimated and used for correction of the received echoes. To perform this task surface and subsurface models have been developed, under the Kirchhoff approximation hypothesis, to be compared with the experimental data. A figure showing the different material nature of different areas of the Mars South Pole has been drawn. The discovery of areas with an high dielectric constant led geologists to analyze those areas with other instrument to confirm the results obtained by MARSIS. This paper outlines also the way out for future works in order to analyze more complex surface and subsurface scenarios where conditions for geometric optics or fractal can be present. In this case, it will be mandatory to develop a clutter cancellation technique to avoid the presence of false subsurface echoes generated by surface and subsurface features not immediately below the nadir direction of observation. It will be also necessary

  15. Trimming and procrastination as inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, George E.

    1996-12-01

    By examining the processes of truncating and approximating the model space (trimming it), and by committing to neither the objectivist nor the subjectivist interpretation of probability (procrastinating), we construct a formal scheme for solving linear and non-linear geophysical inverse problems. The necessary prior information about the correct model xE can be either a collection of inequalities or a probability measure describing where xE was likely to be in the model space X before the data vector y0 was measured. The results of the inversion are (1) a vector z0 that estimates some numerical properties zE of xE; (2) an estimate of the error δz = z0 - zE. As y0 is finite dimensional, so is z0, and hence in principle inversion cannot describe all of xE. The error δz is studied under successively more specialized assumptions about the inverse problem, culminating in a complete analysis of the linear inverse problem with a prior quadratic bound on xE. Our formalism appears to encompass and provide error estimates for many of the inversion schemes current in geomagnetism, and would be equally applicable in geodesy and seismology if adequate prior information were available there. As an idealized example we study the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary, using satellite measurements of field elements at sites assumed to be almost uniformly distributed on a single spherical surface. Magnetospheric currents are neglected and the crustal field is idealized as a random process with rotationally invariant statistics. We find that an appropriate data compression diagonalizes the variance matrix of the crustal signal and permits an analytic trimming of the idealized problem.

  16. Acoustic source identification using a Generalized Weighted Inverse Beamforming technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presezniak, Flavio; Zavala, Paulo A. G.; Steenackers, Gunther; Janssens, Karl; Arruda, Jose R. F.; Desmet, Wim; Guillaume, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    In the last years, acoustic source identification has gained special attention, mainly due to new environmental norms, urbanization problems and more demanding acoustic comfort expectation of consumers. From the current methods, beamforming techniques are of common use, since normally demands affordable data acquisition effort, while producing clear source identification in most of the applications. In order to improve the source identification quality, this work presents a method, based on the Generalized Inverse Beamforming, that uses a weighted pseudo-inverse approach and an optimization procedure, called Weighted Generalized Inverse Beamforming. To validate this method, a simple case of two compact sources in close vicinity in coherent radiation was investigated by numerical and experimental assessment. Weighted generalized inverse results are compared to the ones obtained by the conventional beamforming, MUltiple Signal Classification, and Generalized Inverse Beamforming. At the end, the advantages of the proposed method are outlined together with the computational effort increase compared to the Generalized Inverse Beamforming.

  17. Extended mapping and characteristics techniques for inverse aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieczky, H.; Qian, Y. J.

    1991-01-01

    Some ideas for using hodograph theory, mapping techniques and methods of characteristics to formulate typical aerodynamic design boundary value problems are developed. The inverse method of characteristics is shown to be a fast tool for design of transonic flow elements as well as supersonic flows with given shock waves.

  18. A fast Stokes inversion technique based on quadratic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Deng, Yuan-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Stokes inversion calculation is a key process in resolving polarization information on radiation from the Sun and obtaining the associated vector magnetic fields. Even in the cases of simple local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and where the Milne-Eddington approximation is valid, the inversion problem may not be easy to solve. The initial values for the iterations are important in handling the case with multiple minima. In this paper, we develop a fast inversion technique without iterations. The time taken for computation is only 1/100 the time that the iterative algorithm takes. In addition, it can provide available initial values even in cases with lower spectral resolutions. This strategy is useful for a filter-type Stokes spectrograph, such as SDO/HMI and the developed two-dimensional real-time spectrograph (2DS).

  19. Inverse boundary-layer technique for airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A description is presented of a technique for the optimization of airfoil pressure distributions using an interactive inverse boundary-layer program. This program allows the user to determine quickly a near-optimum subsonic pressure distribution which meets his requirements for lift, drag, and pitching moment at the desired flow conditions. The method employs an inverse turbulent boundary-layer scheme for definition of the turbulent recovery portion of the pressure distribution. Two levels of pressure-distribution architecture are used - a simple roof top for preliminary studies and a more complex four-region architecture for a more refined design. A technique is employed to avoid the specification of pressure distributions which result in unrealistic airfoils, that is, those with negative thickness. The program allows rapid evaluation of a designed pressure distribution off-design in Reynolds number, transition location, and angle of attack, and will compute an airfoil contour for the designed pressure distribution using linear theory.

  20. Subsonic, transonic, and supersonic nozzle flow by the inverse technique.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    The inverse technique is used to obtain a mathematically and physically consistent solution of the flowfield in a nozzle from the mass generation surface through the supersonic region. The inverse method employs an assumed centerline function which is of the Cauchy type in that the values and the derivatives of the function are known. Since the Cauchy boundary conditions can give rise to numerical instabilities, the governing gasdynamic equations for rotational steady flow were transformed into a form which puts the geometry into a rectangular shape, and which spaces the network of interior points more finely in regions of the greatest gradients of the dependent variables. For arbitrarily specified centerline data, the solution of the governing flow equations may not exist, and if it does it may not depend continuously on the data.

  1. Mass Substructure in Abell 3128

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleary, J.; dell'Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  2. Review of inversion techniques using analysis of different tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaglichenko, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    Tomographic techniques are tools, which estimate the Earth's deep interior by inverting seismic data. Reliability of visualization provides adequate understanding of geodynamic processes for prediction of natural hazard and protection of environment. This presentation focuses on two interrelated factors, which affect on the reliability namely: particularities of geophysical medium and strategy for choice of inversion method. Three main techniques are under review. First, the standard LSQR algorithm is derived directly by the Lanczos algebraic application. The Double Difference tomography widely incorporates this algorithm and its expansion. Next, the CSSA technique, or method of subtraction has been introduced into seismology by Nikolaev et al. in 1985. This method got farther development in 2003 (Smaglichenko et al.) as the coordinate method of possible directions, which has been already known in the theory of numerical methods. And finally, the new Differentiated Approach (DA) tomography that has been recently developed by the author for seismology and introduced into applied mathematics as the modification of Gaussian elimination. Different test models are presented by detecting various properties of the medium and having a value for the mining sector as well for prediction of seismic activity. They are: 1) checker-board resolution test; 2) the single anomalous block surrounded by an uniform zone; 3) the large-size structure; 4) the most complicated case, when the model consist of contrast layers and the observation response is equal zero value. The geometry of experiment for all models is given in the note of Leveque et al., 1993. It was assumed that errors in experimental data are in limits of pre-assigned accuracy. The testing showed that LSQR is effective, when the small-size structure (1) is retrieved, while CSSA works faster under reconstruction of the separated anomaly (2). The large-size structure (3) can be reconstructed applying DA, which uses both

  3. Stokes Inversion Techniques for the SOLIS-VSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henney, C. J.; Keller, C. U.; Jones, H. P.; SOLIS Team

    2002-05-01

    The Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) instrument of the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) project will begin operation in 2002 and provide a 25 year record of synoptic solar observations. The 50-cm aperture VSM will provide daily full-disk photospheric vector and high sensitivity longitudinal magnetograms. In addition, the VSM will produce daily full-disk chormospheric longitudinal magnetograms, along with 1083 nm equivalent width images. Current data transmission and storage resources are such that the reduction of VSM data will be performed at the observing site on Kitt Peak. Reduced data products will be transmitted via a DS3 link from Kitt Peak to the National Solar Observatory's digital archive in Tucson. During a typical observing day, three full-disk photospheric vector magnetograms will be available over the web in two stages: first, as a ``quick-look'' product within 10 minutes of data acquisition, and then as a full Milne-Eddington (ME) inversion product within 24 hours of each observation. The quick-look parameters will include estimates of the magnetic field strength, azimuth and inclination based on Auer, Heasley, House (1977, Solar Physics 55, p. 47). The high-precision vector products will be determined with the High Altitude Observatory ME inversion technique implemented by Skumanich and Lites (1987, ApJ, 322, p.473). The flexible design of the VSM data handling system can incorporate future improvements under consideration (e.g., principal component analysis). However, since the original Stokes profiles observed will not be archived, a retrospective reduction of VSM data will not be possible. Quick-look and full ME inversion results are compared using simulated VSM Stokes profile data based on Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope magnetograms. This research was supported in part by the Office of Naval Research Grant N00014-91-J-1040.

  4. A comparison of techniques for inversion of radio-ray phase data in presence of ray bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallio, H. A.; Grossi, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Derivations are presented of the straight-line Abel transform and the seismological Herglotz-Wiechert transform (which takes ray bending into account) that are used in the reconstruction of refractivity profiles from radio-wave phase data. Profile inversion utilizing these approaches, performed in computer-simulated experiments, are compared for cases of positive, zero, and negative ray bending. For thin atmospheres and ionospheres, such as the Martian atmosphere and ionosphere, radio wave signals are shown to be inverted accurately with both methods. For dense media, such as the solar corona or the lower Venus atmosphere, the refractive recovered by the seismological Herglotz-Wiechert transform provide a significant improvement compared with the straight-line Abel transform.

  5. Inverse imaging of the breast with a material classification technique.

    PubMed

    Manry, C W; Broschat, S L

    1998-03-01

    In recent publications [Chew et al., IEEE Trans. Blomed. Eng. BME-9, 218-225 (1990); Borup et al., Ultrason. Imaging 14, 69-85 (1992)] the inverse imaging problem has been solved by means of a two-step iterative method. In this paper, a third step is introduced for ultrasound imaging of the breast. In this step, which is based on statistical pattern recognition, classification of tissue types and a priori knowledge of the anatomy of the breast are integrated into the iterative method. Use of this material classification technique results in more rapid convergence to the inverse solution--approximately 40% fewer iterations are required--as well as greater accuracy. In addition, tumors are detected early in the reconstruction process. Results for reconstructions of a simple two-dimensional model of the human breast are presented. These reconstructions are extremely accurate when system noise and variations in tissue parameters are not too great. However, for the algorithm used, degradation of the reconstructions and divergence from the correct solution occur when system noise and variations in parameters exceed threshold values. Even in this case, however, tumors are still identified within a few iterations. PMID:9514017

  6. Vicarious adjustment of MERIS reflectances using an inverse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, M. E.; Barker, K. L.; Ondrusek, M.

    2009-04-01

    The method that has been used for the vicarious adjustment of the SeaWiFS ocean colour data relies on the assumptions that the water-leaving radiance is negligible in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) in oligotrophic waters, and that the longest NIR band is perfectly calibrated. In this paper a novel approach to vicarious adjustment is proposed that does not require these assumptions: a least-squares inverse technique is used to adjust atmospheric variables and MERIS reflectances within their error bars to obtain a best fit to the buoy observations at all wavelengths. A simple example will be presented using match-up MOBY (Marine Optical Buoy) observations from MERMAID (the MERis MAtch In-situ Database).

  7. A comparison of material classification techniques for ultrasound inverse imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Broschat, Shira L; Flynn, Patrick J

    2002-01-01

    The conjugate gradient method with edge preserving regularization (CGEP) is applied to the ultrasound inverse scattering problem for the early detection of breast tumors. To accelerate image reconstruction, several different pattern classification schemes are introduced into the CGEP algorithm. These classification techniques are compared for a full-sized, two-dimensional breast model. One of these techniques uses two parameters, the sound speed and attenuation, simultaneously to perform classification based on a Bayesian classifier and is called bivariate material classification (BMC). The other two techniques, presented in earlier work, are univariate material classification (UMC) and neural network (NN) classification. BMC is an extension of UMC, the latter using attenuation alone to perform classification, and NN classification uses a neural network. Both noiseless and noisy cases are considered. For the noiseless case, numerical simulations show that the CGEP-BMC method requires 40% fewer iterations than the CGEP method, and the CGEP-NN method requires 55% fewer. The CGEP-BMC and CGEP-NN methods yield more accurate reconstructions than the CGEP method. A quantitative comparison of the CGEP-BMC, CGEP-NN, and GN-UMC methods shows that the CGEP-BMC and CGEP-NN methods are more robust to noise than the GN-UMC method, while all three are similar in computational complexity. PMID:11831821

  8. A comparison of material classification techniques for ultrasound inverse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Broschat, Shira L.; Flynn, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    The conjugate gradient method with edge preserving regularization (CGEP) is applied to the ultrasound inverse scattering problem for the early detection of breast tumors. To accelerate image reconstruction, several different pattern classification schemes are introduced into the CGEP algorithm. These classification techniques are compared for a full-sized, two-dimensional breast model. One of these techniques uses two parameters, the sound speed and attenuation, simultaneously to perform classification based on a Bayesian classifier and is called bivariate material classification (BMC). The other two techniques, presented in earlier work, are univariate material classification (UMC) and neural network (NN) classification. BMC is an extension of UMC, the latter using attenuation alone to perform classification, and NN classification uses a neural network. Both noiseless and noisy cases are considered. For the noiseless case, numerical simulations show that the CGEP-BMC method requires 40% fewer iterations than the CGEP method, and the CGEP-NN method requires 55% fewer. The CGEP-BMC and CGEP-NN methods yield more accurate reconstructions than the CGEP method. A quantitative comparison of the CGEP-BMC, CGEP-NN, and GN-UMC methods shows that the CGEP-BMC and CGEP-NN methods are more robust to noise than the GN-UMC method, while all three are similar in computational complexity.

  9. Hybrid inverse lithography techniques for advanced hierarchical memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guangming; Hooker, Kevin; Irby, Dave; Zhang, Yunqiang; Ward, Brian; Cecil, Tom; Hall, Brett; Lee, Mindy; Kim, Dave; Lucas, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Traditional segment-based model-based OPC methods have been the mainstream mask layout optimization techniques in volume production for memory and embedded memory devices for many device generations. These techniques have been continually optimized over time to meet the ever increasing difficulties of memory and memory periphery patterning. There are a range of difficult issues for patterning embedded memories successfully. These difficulties include the need for a very high level of symmetry and consistency (both within memory cells themselves and between cells) due to circuit effects such as noise margin requirements in SRAMs. Memory cells and access structures consume a large percentage of area in embedded devices so there is a very high return from shrinking the cell area as much as possible. This aggressive scaling leads to very difficult resolution, 2D CD control and process window requirements. Additionally, the range of interactions between mask synthesis corrections of neighboring areas can extend well beyond the size of the memory cell, making it difficult to fully take advantage of the inherent designed cell hierarchy in mask pattern optimization. This is especially true for non-traditional (i.e., less dependent on geometric rule) OPC/RET methods such as inverse lithography techniques (ILT) which inherently have more model-based decisions in their optimizations. New inverse methods such as model-based SRAF placement and ILT are, however, well known to have considerable benefits in finding flexible mask pattern solutions to improve process window, improve 2D CD control, and improve resolution in ultra-dense memory patterns. They also are known to reduce recipe complexity and provide native MRC compliant mask pattern solutions. Unfortunately, ILT is also known to be several times slower than traditional OPC methods due to the increased computational lithographic optimizations it performs. In this paper, we describe and present results for a methodology to

  10. Nonlinear inverse synthesis technique for optical links with lumped amplification.

    PubMed

    Le, Son Thai; Prilepsky, Jaroslaw E; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2015-04-01

    The nonlinear inverse synthesis (NIS) method, in which information is encoded directly onto the continuous part of the nonlinear signal spectrum, has been proposed recently as a promising digital signal processing technique for combating fiber nonlinearity impairments. However, because the NIS method is based on the integrability property of the lossless nonlinear Schrödinger equation, the original approach can only be applied directly to optical links with ideal distributed Raman amplification. In this paper, we propose and assess a modified scheme of the NIS method, which can be used effectively in standard optical links with lumped amplifiers, such as, erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs). The proposed scheme takes into account the average effect of the fiber loss to obtain an integrable model (lossless path-averaged model) to which the NIS technique is applicable. We found that the error between lossless path-averaged and lossy models increases linearly with transmission distance and input power (measured in dB). We numerically demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed NIS scheme in a burst mode with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission scheme with advanced modulation formats (e.g., QPSK, 16QAM, and 64QAM), showing a performance improvement up to 3.5 dB; these results are comparable to those achievable with multi-step per span digital back-propagation. PMID:25968670

  11. Vicarious Adjustment of MERIS Reflectances Using an Inverse Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, M. E.; Barker, K. L.; Zibordi, G..

    2010-12-01

    The method used for the vicarious adjustment of the SeaWiFS & MERIS ocean colour data relies on the assumptions that the water-leaving radiance is negligible in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) in oligotrophic waters, and the NIR band is perfectly calibrated. Here, a novel approach to vicarious adjustment is proposed that does not need these assumptions: a least-squares inverse technique is used to adjust the most uncertain parameters in the atmosphere model: the aerosol scattering (ρa) and the error in the ozone optical depth (dτoz) within their error bars to obtain a best fit between the satellite and buoy water reflectance. Examples are presented using match-ups of satellite and in situ observations from MERMAID (the MERis Match- up In-situ Database) for the MOBY, Gustav Dalen, BOUSSOLE and AAOT platforms. The new method predicts the lowest dτ for MOBY, the lowest ρ for the Gustav Dalen site, and the largest a values of both at AAOT. The method is simple to code, potentially more flexible than the present gain method, can weight observations for reliability and predicts poorly-known atmospheric properties. However, it requires accurate physics, a good initial guess, enough data for convergence and cannot correct biases. The method could be tested by running it in parallel with the existing method.

  12. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  13. Implementation of MASW and waveform inversion techniques for new seismic hazard estimation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    el-aziz abd el-aal, abd; Kamal, heba

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution, an integrated multi-channel analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) technique is applied to explore the geotechnical parameters of subsurface layers at the Zafarana Wind Farm site. The study area includes many active fault systems along the Gulf of Suez that cause many moderate and large earthquakes. Overall, the seismic activity of the area has recently become better understood following the use of waveform inversion method and software to develop accurate focal mechanism solutions for recent recorded earthquakes around the studied area. These earthquakes resulted in major stress-drops in the Eastern Desert and the Gulf of Suez area. These findings have helped to reshape the understanding of the seismotectonic environment of the Gulf of Suez area, which is a perplexing tectonic domain. Based on the collected new information and data, this study uses new an extended stochastic technique to re-examine the seismic hazard for the Gulf of Suez region, particularly the wind turbine towers sites at Zafarana Wind Farm and its vicinity. The essential characteristics of the extended stochastic technique are to obtain and simulate ground motion in order to minimize future earthquake consequences. The first step of this technique is defining the seismic sources which mostly affect the study area. Then, the maximum expected magnitude is defined for each of these seismic sources. It is followed by estimating the ground motion using an empirical attenuation relationship. Finally, the site amplification is implemented in calculating the peak ground acceleration (PGA) at each site of interest. Key words: MASW, waveform inversion, extended stochastic technique, Zafarana Wind Farm

  14. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaksa)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Lazerson, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-08-08

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at LHD. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICSmore » can provide pro file measurements of the local emissivity, temperature and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modifi ed Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.« less

  15. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaksa)

    SciTech Connect

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Lazerson, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-08-08

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at LHD. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICS can provide pro file measurements of the local emissivity, temperature and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modifi ed Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.

  16. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Lazerson, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-11-15

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at the Large Helical Device. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICS can provide profile measurements of the local emissivity, temperature, and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modified Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example, geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.

  17. Nonlinear inversion for arbitrarily-oriented anisotropic models II: Inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present output models from inversion of a synthetic surface wave dataset. We implement new 3-D finite-frequency kernels, based on the Born approximation, to invert for upper mantle structure beneath western North America. The kernels are formulated based on a hexagonal symmetry with an arbitrary orientation. Numerical tests were performed to achieve a robust inversion scheme. Four synthetic input models were created, to include: isotropic, constant strength anisotropic, variable strength anisotropic, and both anisotropic and isotropic together. The reference model was a simplified version of PREM (dubbed PREM LIGHT) in which the crust and 220 km discontinuity have been removed. Output models from inversions of calculated synthetic data are compared against these input models to test for accurate reproduction of input model features, and the resolution of those features. The object of this phase of the study was to determine appropriate nonlinear inversion schemes that adequately recover the input models. The synthetic dataset consists of collected seismic waveforms of 126 earthquake mechanisms, of magnitude 6-7 from Dec 2006 to Feb 2009, from the IRIS database. Events were selected to correlate with USArray deployments, and to have as complete an azimuthal coverage as possible. The events occurred within a circular region of radius 150o centered about 44o lat, -110o lon (an arbitrary location within USArray coverage). Synthetic data were calculated utilizing a spectral element code (SEM) coupled to a normal mode solution. The mesh consists of a 3-D heterogeneous outer shell, representing the upper mantle above 450 km depth, coupled to a spherically symmetric inner sphere. From the synthetic dataset, multi-taper fundamental mode surface wave phase delay measurements are taken. The orthogonal 2.5π -prolate spheroidal wave function eigentapers (Slepian tapers) reduce noise biasing, and can provide error estimates in phase delay measurements. This study is a

  18. Asynchronous global optimization techniques for medium and large inversion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Pereyra, V.; Koshy, M.; Meza, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    We discuss global optimization procedures adequate for seismic inversion problems. We explain how to save function evaluations (which may involve large scale ray tracing or other expensive operations) by creating a data base of information on what parts of parameter space have already been inspected. It is also shown how a correct parallel implementation using PVM speeds up the process almost linearly with respect to the number of processors, provided that the function evaluations are expensive enough to offset the communication overhead.

  19. X-ray morphologies of Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. L. W.; Kowalski, M. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented for X-ray measurements made with the Einstein Observatory's IPC for a sample of 49 Abell clusters, which were used to determine quantitative measures of two morphological parameters of these clusters, the orientation and ellipticity. Consideration is given to the techniques used for estimating and removing background noise in the images and for determining the variation of these parameters with the flux level of a cluster. It was found that most clusters are clearly flattened; for 20 of these clusters, the orientation was unambiguously determined. A catalog of cluster properties is presented.

  20. Spectral line inversion for sounding of stratospheric minor constituents by infrared heterodyne technique from balloon altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Shapiro, G. L.; Allario, F.; Alvarez, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A combination of two different techniques for the inversion of infrared laser heterodyne measurements of tenuous gases in the stratosphere by solar occulation is presented which incorporates the advantages of each technique. An experimental approach and inversion technique are developed which optimize the retrieval of concentration profiles by incorporating the onion peel collection scheme into the spectral inversion technique. A description of an infrared heterodyne spectrometer and the mode of observations for solar occulation measurement is presented, and the results of inversions of some synthetic ClO spectral lines corresponding to solar occulation limb-scans of the stratosphere are examined. A comparison between the new techniques and one of the current techniques indicates that considerable improvement in the accuracy of the retrieved profiles can be achieved. It is found that noise affects the accuracy of both techniques but not in a straightforward manner since there is interaction between the noise level, noise propagation through inversion, and the number of scans leading to an optimum retrieval.

  1. Inverse-dispersion technique for assessing lagoon gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring gas emissions from treatment lagoons and storage ponds poses challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques because of non-ideal wind conditions, such as those induced by trees and crops surrounding the lagoons, and lagoons with dimensions too small to establish equilib...

  2. Prostate clinical study of a full inversion unconstrained ultrasound elastography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Reza; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Samani, Abbas

    2014-03-01

    Prostate cancer detection at early stages is crucial for desirable treatment outcome. Among available imaging modalities, ultrasound (US) elastography is being developed as an effective clinical tool for prostate cancer diagnosis. Current clinical US elastography systems utilise strain imaging where tissue strain images are generated to approximate the tissue elastic modulus distribution. While strain images can be generated in real-time fashion, they lack the accuracy necessary for having desirable sensitivity and specificity. To improve strain imaging, full inversion based elastography techniques were proposed. Among these techniques, a constrained elastography technique was developed which showed promising results as long as the tumor and prostate geometry can be obtained accurately from the imaging modality used in conjunction with the elastography system. This requirement is not easy to fulfill, especially with US imaging. To address this issue, we present an unconstrained full inversion prostate elastography method in conjunction with US imaging where knowledge of tissue geometry is not necessary. One of the reasons that full inversion elastography techniques have not been routinely used in the clinic is lack of clinical validation studies. To our knowledge, no quasistatic full inversion based prostate US elastography technique has been applied in vivo before. In this work, the proposed method was applied to clinical prostate data and reconstructed elasticity images were compared to corresponding annotated histopathology images which is the first quasi-static full inversion based prostate US elastography technique applied successfully in vivo. Results demonstrated a good potential for clinical utility of the proposed method.

  3. Development and evaluation of an inverse solution technique for studying helicopter maneuverability and agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalley, Matthew S.

    1991-01-01

    An inverse solution technique for determining the maximum maneuvering performance of a helicopter using smooth, pilotlike control inputs is presented. Also described is a pilot simulation experiment performed to investigate the accuracy of the solution resulting from this technique. The maneuverability and agility capability of the helicopter math model was varied by varying the pitch and roll damping, the maximum pitch and roll rate, and the maximum load-factor capability. Three maneuvers were investigated: a 180-deg turn, a longitudinal pop-up, and a lateral jink. The inverse solution technique yielded accurate predictions of pilot-in-the-loop maneuvering performance for two of the three maneuvers.

  4. Image deconvolution of extended objects - A comparison of the inverse Fourier and the Lucy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, C. C.; Anthony, D.

    1993-04-01

    Two methods of deconvolution, the inverse Fourier method and the Lucy iterative technique, are compared with respect to their applicability to restoration of Hubble Space Telescope images of Saturn. The two techniques are found to provide nearly identical results in the case of cloud morphologies and comparable results for fluxes from Saturn's bright disk.

  5. Determining ammonia emissions from a cattle feedlot with an inverse dispersion technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An inverse-dispersion technique is used to calculate ammonia (NH3) gas emissions from a cattle feedlot. The technique relies on a simple backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) dispersion model to relate atmospheric NH3 concentration to the emission rate Qbls. Because the wind and the source configurat...

  6. Abel reconstruction of piecewise constant radial density profiles from x-ray radiographs.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, M; Notea, A; Pal, D

    1989-08-01

    We present a method for reconstructing the radial density profile of a cylindrically symmetric object from a single x-ray projection, when the profile consists of a number of different constant sections. A forward Abel transform based algorithm is employed whereby the profile is recovered recursively, onion peelinglike, starting from the outside diameter of the object and moving in. Distortions originating in the Gibbs phenomenon, unavoidable in most available Abel inversion methods, are completely eliminated. The method is simple enough to be carried out on a handheld calculator or a spreadsheet program on a personal computer, and no elaborate computer fits or application programming are required. The method is demonstrated by inverting a simulated three-section noisy set of data and is shown to yield results of a quality equal to that of a recent powerful Abel inversion method, based on full nonlinear least-squares computer fits. PMID:20555668

  7. A Geophysical Inversion Model Enhancement Technique Based on the Blind Deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, B.; Hu, X.; Li, H.

    2011-12-01

    A model-enhancement technique is proposed to enhance the geophysical inversion model edges and details without introducing any additional information. Firstly, the theoretic correctness of the proposed geophysical inversion model-enhancement technique is discussed. An inversion MRM (model resolution matrix) convolution approximating PSF (Point Spread Function) method is designed to demonstrate the correctness of the deconvolution model enhancement method. Then, a total-variation regularization blind deconvolution geophysical inversion model-enhancement algorithm is proposed. In previous research, Oldenburg et al. demonstrate the connection between the PSF and the geophysical inverse solution. Alumbaugh et al. propose that more information could be provided by the PSF if we return to the idea of it behaving as an averaging or low pass filter. We consider the PSF as a low pass filter to enhance the inversion model basis on the theory of the PSF convolution approximation. Both the 1D linear and the 2D magnetotelluric inversion examples are used to analyze the validity of the theory and the algorithm. To prove the proposed PSF convolution approximation theory, the 1D linear inversion problem is considered. It shows the ratio of convolution approximation error is only 0.15%. The 2D synthetic model enhancement experiment is presented. After the deconvolution enhancement, the edges of the conductive prism and the resistive host become sharper, and the enhancement result is closer to the actual model than the original inversion model according the numerical statistic analysis. Moreover, the artifacts in the inversion model are suppressed. The overall precision of model increases 75%. All of the experiments show that the structure details and the numerical precision of inversion model are significantly improved, especially in the anomalous region. The correlation coefficient between the enhanced inversion model and the actual model are shown in Fig. 1. The figure

  8. Inversion technique for IR heterodyne sounding of stratospheric constituents from space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Shapiro, G. L.; Alvarez, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques which have been employed for inversion of IR heterodyne measurements for remote sounding of stratospheric trace constituents usually rely on either geometric effects based on limb-scan observations (i.e., onion peel techniques) or spectral effects by using weighting functions corresponding to different frequencies of an IR spectral line. An experimental approach and inversion technique are discussed which optimize the retrieval of concentration profiles by combining the geometric and the spectral effects in an IR heterodyne receiver. The results of inversions of some synthetic CIO spectral lines corresponding to solar occultation limb scans of the stratosphere are presented, indicating considerable improvement in the accuracy of the retrieved profiles. The effects of noise on the accuracy of retrievals are discussed for realistic situations.

  9. Grid-based Moment Tensor Inversion Technique Apply for Earthquakes Offshore of Northeast Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.; Lee, S.; Ma, K.

    2010-12-01

    We use a grid-based moment tensor inversion technique and broadband continuous recordings to real-time monitoring the earthquakes offshore northeast Taiwan. The moment tensor inversion technique and a grid search scheme are applied to obtain the information of source parameters, including the hypocenter, moment magnitude, and focal mechanism. In Taiwan, the routine moment tensor solutions are reported by CWB(Central Weather Bureau) and BATS(Broadband Array in Taiwan for Seismology) which both require some lag time for the information on event time and location before doing CMT(Centroid Moment Tensor) analysis. By using the Grid-based moment tensor inversion technique, the event location and focal mechanism could be obtained simultaneously within about two minutes after the occurrence of the earthquake. This inversion procedure is based on a 1-D Green’s functions database calculated by frequency-wavenumber(fk) method. The northeast offshore of Taiwan has been taken into account as our first test area which covers the region of 121.5E to 123E, 23.5N to 25N, and the depth to 136 km. A 3D grid system is set in this study area with average grid size of 10 x 10 x 10 km3. We compare our results with the past earthquakes from 2008 to 2010 which had analyzed by BATS CMT. We also compare the event time detected by GridMT with the CWB earthquake reports. The results indicate that the grid-based moment tensor inversion system is efficient and realizable to be applied real-time on monitoring the local seismic activity. Our long-term goal is to use the GridMT technique with fully 3-D Green’s functions for the whole Taiwan in the future.

  10. The dynamics of Abell 2634

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkney, J.; Rhee, George F.; Burns, Jack O.; Batuski, D.; Hill, J. M.; Hintzen, P.; Oegerle, W.

    1993-01-01

    We have amassed a large sample of velocity data for the cluster of galaxies Abell 2634 which contains the wide-angle tail (WAT) radio source 3C 465. Robust indicators of location and scale and their confidence intervals are used to determine if the cD galaxy, containing the WAT, has a significant peculiar motion. We find a cD peculiar radial velocity of 219 plus or minus 98 km s(exp -1). Further dynamical analyses, including substructure and normality tests, suggest that A 2634 is an unrelaxed cluster whose radio source structure may be bent by the turbulent gas of a recent cluster-subcluster merger.

  11. Optical Tomography of a Sunspot. I. Comparison between Two Inversion Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westendorp Plaza, C.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Lites, B. W.; Skumanich, A.

    1998-02-01

    A quantitative comparison between the Milne-Eddington (ME) inversion technique implemented by Skumanich & Lites and the SIR (Stokes Inversion based on Response Functions) proposed by Ruiz Cobo & del Toro Iniesta is presented. Numerical experiments are carried out to explore the capabilities and limitations of both diagnostic techniques. Such experiments consist of inversions of Stokes profiles previously synthesized in ``realistic'' solar atmospheric models. The results show that the ME inversion provides accurate, line-of-sight (LOS) averaged values for the input stratification of the vector magnetic field. Its greater speed compared to SIR makes it useful for quick analysis of large quantities of data (such as those currently provided by modern spectropolarimeters) if one is only interested in LOS-averaged quantities. However, the higher order description of the atmosphere used by SIR (which acknowledges variation of the thermal, dynamic, and magnetic parameters through the photosphere) allows retrieval of the stratification of all these parameters to good accuracy. This is so even in the presence of discontinuities such as those foreseen in magnetic canopies of sunspots. The trade-offs between thermodynamic and magnetic parameters observed in some ME inversions are reduced considerably in the case of SIR inversions because of the more realistic treatment of the thermodynamics in this analysis. Notably, both allow one to extract quantitative inferences of fairly weak magnetic fields (below 500 G), even when they are applied to Zeeman-sensitive lines in the visible spectrum; i.e., well below the commonly accepted limit of 500 G. The thermodynamic parameters resulting from the ME inversion are understood theoretically in terms of the generalized response functions introduced by Ruiz Cobo & del Toro Iniesta and through the concept of height of formation for inferred values proposed by Sánchez Almeida, Ruiz Cobo, & del Toro Iniesta. The present comparison and

  12. Nanogels based on alginic aldehyde and gelatin by inverse miniemulsion technique: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; Anil Kumar, P R; Raj, Deepa K; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2015-03-30

    Nanogels were developed from alginic aldehyde and gelatin by an inverse miniemulsion technique. Stable inverse miniemulsions were prepared by sonication of noncontinuous aqueous phase (mixture of alginic aldehyde and gelatin) in a continuous organic phase (Span 20 dissolved in cyclohexane). Cross-linking occurred between alginic aldehyde (AA) and gelatin (gel) in the presence of borax by Schiff's base reaction during the formation of inverse miniemulsion. The effects of surfactant (Span 20) concentration, volume of the aqueous phase and AA/gel weight ratio on the size of the alginic aldehyde-gelatin (AA-gel) nanoparticles were studied. Nanogels were characterized by DLS, FT-IR spectroscopy, TGA, SEM and TEM. DLS, TEM and SEM studies demonstrated nanosize and spherical morphology of the nanogels. Hemocompatibility and in vitro cytocompatibility analyses of the nanogels proved their nontoxicity. The results indicated the potential of the present nanogel system as a candidate for drug- and gene-delivery applications. PMID:25563951

  13. Forward-Inverse Adaptive Techniques for Reservoir Characterization and Simulation: Theory and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, S D; Ezzedine, S; Gelinas, R; Chawathe, A

    2001-06-11

    A novel approach called Forward-Inverse Adaptive Techniques (FIAT) for reservoir characterization is developed and applied to three representative exploration cases. Inverse modeling refers to the determination of the entire reservoir permeability under steady state single-phase flow regime, given only field permeability, pressure and production well measurements. FIAT solves the forward and inverse partial differential equations (PDEs) simultaneously by adding a regularization term and filtering pressure gradients. An implicit adaptive-grid, Galerkin, numerical scheme is used to numerically solve the set of PDEs subject to pressure and permeability boundary conditions. Three examples are presented. Results from all three cases demonstrate attainable and reasonably accurate solutions and, more importantly, provide insights into the consequences of data undersampling.

  14. A Constrainted Design Approach for NLF Airfoils by Coupling Inverse Design and Optimal Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L.; Gao, Y. W.; Qiao, Z. D.

    2011-09-01

    In present paper, a design method for natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow on both surfaces by coupling inverse design method and optimal technique is developed. The N-factor method is used to design the target pressure distributions before pressure recovery region with desired transition locations while maintaining aerodynamics constraints. The pressure in recovery region is designed according to Stratford separation criteria to prevent the laminar separation. In order to improve the off-design performance in inverse design, a multi-point inverse design is performed. An optimal technique based on response surface methodology (RSM) is used to calculate the target airfoil shapes according to the designed target pressure distributions. The set of design points is selected to satisfy the D-optimality and the reduced quadratic polynomial RS models without the 2nd-order cross items are constructed to reduce the computational cost. The design cases indicated that by the coupling-method developed in present paper, the inverse design method can be used in multi-point design to improve the off-design performance and the airfoils designed have the desired transition locations and maintain the aerodynamics constraints while the thickness constraint is difficult to meet in this design procedure.

  15. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques in the examination of engine oils.

    PubMed

    Fall, Jacek; Voelkel, Adam

    2002-09-01

    The emerging market of engine oils consists of a number of products from different viscosity and quality classes. Determination of the base oil used in manufacturing of the final product (engine oil) as well as estimation of mutual miscibility of oils and their solubility could be crucial problems. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques are presented as an interesting and fruitful extension of normalised standard analytical methods used in the oil industry. PMID:12385390

  16. Application of the Baade-Wesselink inversion technique to SW Dra, X Ari and U SGR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Norman R.

    1989-03-01

    The Baade-Wesselink inversion technique was applied to three pulsators: the RR(ab) stars SW Dra and X Ari, and the classical Cepheid, U Sgr. A surface brightness parameterization using the V-K color was found to be superior for RR Lyrae stars, while B-V is superior for classical Cepheids. A consistent radius was obtained for SW Dra but not for X Ari.

  17. Stellar acoustic radii, mean densities, and ages from seismic inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldgen, G.; Reese, D. R.; Dupret, M. A.; Samadi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Determining stellar characteristics such as the radius, mass or age is crucial when studying stellar evolution or exoplanetary systems, or when characterising stellar populations in the Galaxy. Asteroseismology is the golden path to accurately obtain these characteristics. In this context, a key question is how to make these methods less model-dependent. Aims: Building on the previous work of Daniel Reese, we wish to extend the Substractive Optimally Localized Averages (SOLA) inversion technique to new stellar global characteristics beyond the mean density. The goal is to provide a general framework in which to estimate these characteristics as accurately as possible in low-mass main-sequence stars. Methods: First, we describe our framework and discuss the reliability of the inversion technique and possible sources of error. We then apply this methodology to the acoustic radius, an age indicator based on the sound speed derivative and the mean density, and compare it to estimates based on the average large and small frequency separations. These inversions are carried out for several test cases including various metallicities, different mixing-lengths, non-adiabatic effects, and turbulent pressure. Results: We observe that the SOLA method yields accurate results in all test cases whereas results based on the large and small frequency separations are less accurate and more sensitive to surface effects and structural differences in the models. If we include the surface corrections of Kjeldsen et al. (2008, ApJ, 683, L175), we obtain results of comparable accuracy for the mean density. Overall, the mean density and acoustic radius inversions are more robust than the inversions for the age indicator. Moreover, the current approach is limited to relatively young stars with radiative cores. Increasing the number of observed frequencies improves the reliability and accuracy of the method. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. A comparative study among different regularization techniques for solving ill-posed magnetic inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazeem, Maha; Gobashy, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic inverse problem is, intrinsically, non-unique and its numerical solution is unstable. This means that any small perturbation in the data (noise) causes large variation in the solution. This ill-posedness is not only due to complex geological situations, but it may arise because of ill-conditioned kernel matrix. Procedures adopted to stabilize the inversion of ill-posed problem are called regularization, so the selection of regularization parameter is very important to invert the earth model causing the measured magnetic field. Two strategies are commonly used, techniques based on Tikhonov formula and techniques using the trust region sub-problem TRS and the controlling factor will be the radius of such region. In this study, the two categories are compared to examine the stability of solutions with noise. A MATLAB-based inversion code is implemented and tested on some synthetic total magnetic fields with different noise levels added to simulate real fields. The capability of such techniques have been further tested by applying it to real data.

  19. Remote sensing of row crop structure and component temperatures using directional radiometric temperatures and inversion techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    A physically based sensor response model of a row crop was used as the mathematical framework from which several inversion strategies were tested for extracting row structure information and component temperatures using a series of sensor view angles. The technique was evaluated on ground-based radiometric thermal infrared data of a cotton row crop that covered 48 percent of the ground in the vertical projection. The results showed that the accuracies of the predicted row heights and widths, vegetation temperatures, and soil temperatures of the cotton row crop were on the order of 5 cm, 1 deg, and 2 deg C, respectively. The inversion techniques can be applied to directional sensor data from aircraft platforms and even space platforms if the effects of atmospheric absorption and emission can be corrected. In theory, such inversion techniques can be applied to a wide variety of vegetation types and thus can have significant implications for remote sensing research and applications in disciplines that deal with incomplete vegetation canopies.

  20. Inverse problem solution techniques as applied to indirect in situ estimation of fish target strength.

    PubMed

    Stepnowski, A; Moszyński, M

    2000-05-01

    In situ indirect methods of fish target strength (TS) estimation are analyzed in terms of the inverse techniques recently applied to the problem in question. The solution of this problem requires finding the unknown probability density function (pdf) of fish target strength from acoustic echoes, which can be estimated by solving the integral equation, relating pdf's of echo variable, target strength, and beam pattern of the echosounder transducer. In the first part of the paper the review of existing indirect in situ TS-estimation methods is presented. The second part introduces the novel TS-estimation methods, viz.: Expectation, Maximization, and Smoothing (EMS), Windowed Singular Value Decomposition (WSVD), Regularization and Wavelet Decomposition, which are compared using simulations as well as actual data from acoustic surveys. The survey data, acquired by the dual-beam digital echosounder, were thoroughly analyzed by numerical algorithms and the target strength and acoustical backscattering length pdf's estimates were calculated from fish echoes received in the narrow beam channel of the echosounder. Simultaneously, the estimates obtained directly from the dual-beam system were used as a reference for comparison of the estimates calculated by the newly introduced inverse techniques. The TS estimates analyzed in the paper are superior to those obtained from deconvolution or other conventional techniques, as the newly introduced methods partly avoid the problem of ill-conditioned equations and matrix inversion. PMID:10830379

  1. A gEUD-based inverse planning technique for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Giantsoudi, D.; Baltas, D.; Karabis, A.; Mavroidis, P.; Zamboglou, N.; Tselis, N.; Shi, C.; Papanikolaou, N.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of a new inverse planning technique based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose for image-guided high dose rate (HDR) prostate cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional dose-volume based optimization. Methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO (Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization) is compared with alternative plans, which were produced through inverse planning using the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). All the common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk were considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the different dose distributions was investigated by comparing dose volume histogram and gEUD evaluators. Results: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of gEUD-based inverse planning in HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate. A statistically significant decrease in D{sub 10} or/and final gEUD values for the organs at risk (urethra, bladder, and rectum) was found while improving dose homogeneity or dose conformity of the target volume. Conclusions: Following the promising results of gEUD-based optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment optimization, as reported in the literature, the implementation of a similar model in HDR brachytherapy treatment plan optimization is suggested by this study. The potential of improved sparing of organs at risk was shown for various gEUD-based optimization parameter protocols, which indicates the ability of this method to adapt to the user's preferences.

  2. Geoacoustic inversion techniques (GAIT) Version 1.0 global search (GS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Peter; Muncill, Gregory

    2003-04-01

    Geoacoustic Inversion Techniques (GAIT) Version 1.0 is a PEO (C4I and Space) PMW 155 funded product that accepts measured acoustic data and produces an optimized estimate of the bottom environment that produced the observed acoustic data. The Global Search (GS) segment of GAIT pairs the Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) algorithm with a variety of Navy standard propagation loss models (PE, ASTRAL and Nautilus) and an active sonar performance prediction model (ASPM). The goal of the GS segment of GAIT is to provide a best estimate of the geoacoustic properties of the ocean bottom that, when paired with a selected model, result in the observed acoustic data. An overview of the GS segment of GAIT 1.0 will be presented with details on the ASA algorithm, component models, cost functions and geoacoustic parametrizations. Inversion results will be shown for synthetic test cases from the Inversion Technique Workshop (ITW) held in May 2001 and from both narrowband and broadband measured data test cases. [Work supported by PEO (C4I and Space) PMW 155 and uses the products of a Phase I and II SBIR from the ONR (Code 321US).

  3. The updated statistical inversion technique to the evaluation of Umkehr observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frolov, Alexander D.; Obrazcov, Sergey P.

    1994-01-01

    In the present study the standard retrieval Umkehr method to estimate the vertical distribution of ozone was updated using a statistical approach to the mathematical inversion scheme. The vertical ozone profile covariance matrix was used as a priori information for the inverse problem. A new method of the ozonesonde data organization according to air mass types helped to improve the covariance matrix quality. A retrieval method was developed using eigenvector technique. An optimal vertical ozone profile resolution was determined from the mathematical inversion scheme analysis based on the same technique. The sun radiation transfer was accounted for multiple scattering and atmospheric sphericity in this calculation. The retrievals using actual Umkehr Dobson spectrophotometer observations were also performed to provide the comparison of the standard and updated methods with concurrent ozone sound data at Boulder U.S. The comparison has revealed that the present method has some advantages in both resolution and accuracy, as compared to the standard one, especially for the atmospheric layers below ozone maximum.

  4. Use of reduced basis technique in the inverse dynamics of large space cranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, S. K.; Utku, S.; Wada, B. K.

    1990-01-01

    The inverse dynamics of adaptive structures used as space cranes can prove computationally expensive in the case of large structures, due to the large number of degrees of freedom involved. Consequently, reduced basis techniques (reduction techniques) are frequently used to reduce the problem size to a time manageable level (for possible use in real time control). A reduced basis technique is proposed which is different from, but related to, the path-derivatives reduction technique. A linearly independent set of deflection n-tuples is used, chosen at the beginning of the time range in which it is wished to reduce the equations, in whose subspace it is assumed that the deflection vectors of the unreduced problem will lie (approximately).

  5. Site effects by generalized inversion technique using strong motion recordings of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yefei; Wen, Ruizhi; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kashima, Toshihide

    2013-06-01

    The generalized inversion of S-wave amplitude spectra from the free-field strong motion recordings of the China National Strong Motion Observation Network System (NSMONS) are used to evaluate the site effects in the Wenchuan area. In this regard, a total of 602 recordings from 96 aftershocks of the Wenchuan earthquake with magnitudes of M3.7- M6.5 were selected as a dataset. These recordings were obtained from 28 stations at a hypocenter distance ranging from 30 km to 150 km. The inversion results have been verified as reliable by comparing the site response at station 62WUD using the Generalized Inversion Technique (GIT) and the Standard Spectral Ratio method (SSR). For all 28 stations, the site predominant frequency F p and the average site amplification in different frequency bands of 1.0-5.0 Hz, 5.0-10.0 Hz and 1.0-10.0 Hz have been calculated based on the inversion results. Compared with the results from the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method, it shows that the HVSR method can reasonably estimate the site predominant frequency but underestimates the site amplification. The linear fitting between the average site amplification for each frequency band and the V s20 (the average uppermost-20 m shear wave velocity) shows good correlation. A distance measurement called the asperity distance D Aspt is proposed to reasonably characterize the source-to-site distance for large earthquakes. Finally, the inversed site response is used to identify the soil nonlinearity in the main shock and aftershocks of Wenchuan earthquake. In ten of the 28 stations analyzed in the main shock, the soil behaved nonlinearly, where the ground motion level is apparently beyond a threshold of PGA > 300 cm/s2 or PGV > 20 cm/s, and only one station coded 51SFB has evidence of soil nonlinear behavior in the aftershocks.

  6. Inversion Technique for Estimating Emissions of Volcanic Ash from Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelley, Rachel; Cooke, Michael; Manning, Alistair; Thomson, David; Witham, Claire; Hort, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    When using dispersion models such as NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment) to predict the dispersion of volcanic ash, a source term defining the mass release rate of ash is required. Inversion modelling using observations of the ash plume provides a method of estimating the source term for use in NAME. Our inversion technique makes use of satellite retrievals, calculated using data from the SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) instrument on-board the MSG (Meteosat Second Generation) satellite, as the ash observations. InTEM (Inversion Technique for Emission Modelling) is the UK Met Office's inversion modelling system. Recently the capability to estimate time and height varying source terms has been implemented and applied to volcanic ash. InTEM uses a probabilistic approach to fit NAME model concentrations to satellite retrievals. This is achieved by applying Bayes Theorem to give a cost function for the source term. Source term profiles with lower costs generate model concentrations that better fit the satellite retrievals. InTEM uses the global optimisation technique, simulated annealing, to find the minimum of the cost function. The use of a probabilistic approach allows the uncertainty in the satellite retrievals to be incorporated into the inversion technique. InTEM makes use of satellite retrievals of both ash column loadings and of cloud free regions. We present a system that allows InTEM to be used during an eruption. The system is automated and can produce source term updates up to four times a day. To allow automation hourly satellite retrievals of ash are routinely produced using conservative detection limits. The conservative detection limits provide good detection of the ash plume while limiting the number of false alarms. Regions which are flagged as ash contaminated or free from cloud (both meteorological and ash) are used in the InTEM system. This approach is shown to improve the concentrations in the

  7. A direct inverse technique for low speed high lift airfoil flowfield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    A direct inverse method is presented for computing the flow about low speed airfoils under high lift massive separation conditions. On the lower surface the flowfield is determined using an iterative inviscid relaxation technique coupled to a laminar turbulent momentum integral boundary layer scheme direct boundary conditions. On the upper surface, the flowfield is also computed directly with viscous interaction up to the separation point, with the separation point and separated pressure level determined as part of the solution. Downstream of separation, inverse boundary conditions are utilized; and the flowfield and displacement surface are calculated. Typical results and comparisons with experimental data for GA(W)-2 and NACA 4412 airfoils are presented, including pressure distributions, lift, and drag coefficients versus angle of attack.

  8. Impulse radar imaging for dispersive concrete using inverse adaptive filtering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, J.; Hernandez, J.M.; Brase, J.

    1993-05-01

    This publication addresses applications of a delayed inverse model adaptive filter for modeled data obtained from short-pulse radar reflectometry. To determine the integrity of concrete, a digital adaptive filter was used, which allows compensation of dispersion and clutter generated by the concrete. A standard set of weights produced by an adaptive filter are used on modeled data to obtain the inverse-impulse response of the concrete. The data for this report include: Multiple target, nondispersive data; single-target, variable-size dispersive data; single-target, variable-depth dispersive data; and single-target, variable transmitted-pulse-width dispersive data. Results of this simulation indicate that data generated by the weights of the adaptive filter, coupled with a two-dimensional, synthetic-aperture focusing technique, successfully generate two-dimensional images of targets within the concrete from modeled data.

  9. Encapsulated metal nanocluster materials prepared by a novel inverse micelle/sol-gel technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, S.A.; Martino, A.; Kawola, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    A wide variety of manometer sized metal and semiconductor particles (Au, Ag, Pd, Pt, Rh, Fe, Ni, CdS, MoS{sub 2} and FeS{sub 2}) can be prepared using an inverse micelle technique. Such materials are of great interest for their potential use in catalytic, photochemical, electrochemical and optical applications but their practicality is often hindered by the agglomeration of the particles. Agglomeration may be prevented by using a porous support matrix where the nanoclusters are sterically trapped within the pores. The sol-gel process results in the formation of such a porous support material. We have thus combined the technique of forming metal nanoclusters in inverse micelle solutions with the technique of forming sol-gel materials. Using our novel method, we have succeeded in preparing manometer sized metal colloids encapsulated in both xerogel and aerogel materials. Characterization of these materials has been carried out by TEM, SEM, UV/Vis, NMR and nitrogen sorption porosimetry.

  10. Algorithm for polarimetry data inversion, consistent with other measuring techniques in tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Yu. A.; Chrzanowski, J.; Mazon, D.

    2011-06-01

    New procedure for plasma polarimetry data inversion is suggested, which fits two parameter knowledge-based plasma model to the measured parameters (azimuthal and ellipticity angles) of the polarization ellipse. The knowledge-based model is supposed to use the magnetic field and electron density profiles, obtained from magnetic measurements and LIDAR data on the Thomson scattering. In distinction to traditional polarimetry, polarization evolution along the ray is determined on the basis of angular variables technique (AVT). The paper contains a few examples of numerical solutions of these equations, which are applicable in conditions, when Faraday and Cotton-Mouton effects are simultaneously strong.

  11. Iterative matrix inversion technique for simultaneous strain and temperature sensing in an extended temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopf, Barbara; Koch, Alexander W.; Roths, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    The linear matrix approach is the common method for multi-parameter FBG-based strain and temperature sensing. As it does not include non-linear temperature responses and hence lacks accuracy, the application of an iterative matrix inversion technique can be used to remedy this deficiency. Employing this method in a set-up using a multi-parameter sensor system that consists of two FBGs in fibers, which differ in cladding diameters, significantly reduced temperature uncertainties of +/- 1°C could be achieved within a temperature range between -20°C and 150°C.

  12. VLP Source Inversion and Evaluation of Error Analysis Techniques at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, K. A.; Waite, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    In January of 2012, our team occupied 10 sites around Fuego volcano with broadband seismometers, two of which were collocated with infrasound microphone arrays and tilt-meters (see Figure 1 for full deployment details). Our radial coverage around Fuego during the 2012 campaign satisfies conditions outlined by Dawson et al. [2011] for good network coverage. Very-long-period (VLP) events that accompany small-scale explosions were classified by waveform and eruption style. We located these VLP event families which have been persistent at Fuego since at least 2008 through inversion in the same manner employed by Lyons and Waite [2011] with improved radial coverage in our network. We compare results for source inversions performed with independent tilt data against inversions incorporating tilt data extracted from the broadband. The current best-practice method for choosing an optimum solution for inversion results is based on each solution's residual error, the relevance of free parameters used in the model, and the physical significance of the source mechanism. Error analysis was performed through a boot strapping in order to explore the source location uncertainty and significance of components of the moment tensor. The significance of the number of free parameters has mostly been evaluated by calculating Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), but little has been done to evaluate the sensitivity of AIC or other criteria (i.e. Bayesian Information Criterion) to the number of model parameters. We compare solutions as chosen by these alternate methods with more standard techniques for our real data set as well through the use of synthetic data and make recommendations as to best practices. Figure 1: a) Map of 2012 station network: stations highlighted in red were collocated with infrasound arrays. b) Location of Fuego within Guatemala and view of the complex from the west with different eruptive centers labeled. c) Operational times for each of the stations and cameras.

  13. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    SciTech Connect

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion (d{sup 2}X)/(dt{sup 2}) +(dU)/(dX) =0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27–29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A=(1/√(π))∫{sub 0}{sup E}dU/√(E−U) is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = T{sub A}(E) + T{sub N}(E) where τ is a constant period, T{sub A}(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and T{sub N}(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function X{sub A}(U) is determined from T{sub A}(E) via the Abel-transform relation X{sub A}(U) ∝ A[T{sub A}(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential U{sub N}(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing

  14. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion {d^2X}/{dt^2} + {dU}/{dX} = 0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27-29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A = (1/sqrt{π })int 0E {dU}/sqrt{E-U} is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = TA(E) + TN(E) where τ is a constant period, TA(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and TN(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function XA(U) is determined from TA(E) via the Abel-transform relation XA(U) ∝ A[TA(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential UN(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing the isochronicity problem, there has been no attempt of N-type regions that are

  15. Three-Dimensional Inverse Transport Solver Based on Compressive Sensing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuxiong; Wu, Hongchun; Cao, Liangzhi; Zheng, Youqi

    2013-09-01

    According to the direct exposure measurements from flash radiographic image, a compressive sensing-based method for three-dimensional inverse transport problem is presented. The linear absorption coefficients and interface locations of objects are reconstructed directly at the same time. It is always very expensive to obtain enough measurements. With limited measurements, compressive sensing sparse reconstruction technique orthogonal matching pursuit is applied to obtain the sparse coefficients by solving an optimization problem. A three-dimensional inverse transport solver is developed based on a compressive sensing-based technique. There are three features in this solver: (1) AutoCAD is employed as a geometry preprocessor due to its powerful capacity in graphic. (2) The forward projection matrix rather than Gauss matrix is constructed by the visualization tool generator. (3) Fourier transform and Daubechies wavelet transform are adopted to convert an underdetermined system to a well-posed system in the algorithm. Simulations are performed and numerical results in pseudo-sine absorption problem, two-cube problem and two-cylinder problem when using compressive sensing-based solver agree well with the reference value.

  16. Eversion-Inversion Labral Repair and Reconstruction Technique for Optimal Suction Seal

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Brett; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Chadayamurri, Vivek; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Labral tears are a significant cause of hip pain and are currently the most common indication for hip arthroscopy. Compared with labral debridement, labral repair has significantly better outcomes in terms of both daily activities and athletic pursuits in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement. The classic techniques described in the literature for labral repair all use loop or pass-through intrasubstance labral sutures to achieve a functional hip seal. This hip seal is important for hip stability and optimal joint biomechanics, as well as in the prevention of long-term osteoarthritis. We describe a novel eversion-inversion intrasubstance suturing technique for labral repair and reconstruction that can assist in restoration of the native labrum position by re-creating an optimal seal around the femoral head. PMID:26870648

  17. Dwarf busting in Abell 868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon

    1999-07-01

    We request 24 orbits to obtain a deep mosaic {6 * 4-orbit pointings} of the central region of A868, a rich Abell cluster which we have imaged comprehensively from the ground. The objective is to identify and characterise the morphological nature of the dwarf galaxy population{s} responsible for the steep upturn seen in this cluster's luminosity function. While similar upturns have been reported in many clusters, the specifics of the dwarf population remain unknown as these objects cannot be resolved from the ground. What type of dwarf galaxies are they ? Is there more than one population contributing ? How are they clustered ? By obtaining deep high-resolution HST WFPC2 imaging over a central field roughly 7.5' * 3.75' we will be able to measure morphologies, light- profiles and the clustering properties of the dwarf population{s} down to M_I = -16 mags {H_o=75kms^-1Mpc^-1}. Although we shall primarily concentrate on the dwarf galaxies, we will also recover the cluster's morphological luminosity distributions for elliptical, spirals and irregulars over a broad absolute magnitude range {-24 < M_I < -16 mags} as well as the more quantitative bivariate brightness distribution {- 24 < M_I < -16 mags, 17.0 < mu_e^I < 25 mags per sq arcsec}. Comparing these results to those recently derived for the general field will provide an insight into the environmental influences on morphology and surface brightness.

  18. Constraints on the structure of 16 Cygni A and 16 Cygni B using inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldgen, G.; Reese, D. R.; Dupret, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Constraining additional mixing processes and chemical composition is a central problem in stellar physics as their impact on determining stellar age leads to biases in our studies of stellar evolution, galactic history and exoplanetary systems. In two previous papers, we have shown how seismic inversion techniques could be used to offer strong constraints on such processes by pointing out weaknesses in current theoretical models. The theoretical approach having been tested, we now wish to apply our technique to observations. In that sense, the solar analogues 16CygA and 16CygB, being amongst the best targets in the Kepler field, are probably currently the most well suited stars to test the diagnostic potential of seismic inversions. Aims: We wish to use seismic indicators obtained through inversion techniques to constrain additional mixing processes in the components of the binary system 16Cyg. The combination of various seismic indicators will help to point out the weaknesses of stellar models and thus obtain more constrained and accurate fundamendal parameters for these stars. Methods: First, we used the latest seismic, spectroscopic and interferometric observational constraints in the literature for this system to independently determine suitable reference models for both stars. We then carried out seismic inversions of the acoustic radius, the mean density and a core conditions indicator. These additional constraints will be used to improve the reference models for both stars. Results: The combination of seismic, interferometric and spectroscopic constraints allows us to obtain accurate reference models for both stars. However, we note that it is possible to achieve similar accuracy for a range of model parameters. Namely, changing the diffusion coefficient or the chemical composition within the observational values could lead to a 5% uncertainty in mass, a 3% uncertainty in radius and up to an 8% uncertainty in age. We used acoustic radius and mean

  19. Disentangling Structures in the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 133

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamical analysis of the structure of the cluster of galaxies Abell 133 will be presented using multi-wavelength data combined from multiple space and earth based observations. New and familiar statistical clustering techniques are used in combination in an attempt to gain a fully consistent picture of this interesting nearby cluster of galaxies. The type of analysis presented should be typical of cluster studies in the future, especially those to come from the surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2DF.

  20. Reducing Non-Uniqueness in Satellite Gravity Inversion using 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.

    2013-12-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has been usually reduced by using a priori information from various sources, e.g. seismic tomography models. The reduction in non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation for 3D subsurface structures (objects) in seismic tomography models. However, these processes introduce additional uncertainty through the conversion relations due to the dependency on the other physical parameters such as temperature and pressure, or through the bias in the interpretation due to user choices and experience. In this research, a new methodology is introduced to extract the 3D subsurface structures from 3D geophysical data using a state-of-art 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis (OOA) technique. 3D OOA is tested using a set of synthetic models that simulate the real situation in the study area of this research. Then, 3D OOA is used to extract 3D subsurface objects from a real 3D seismic tomography model. The extracted 3D objects are used to reconstruct a forward model and its response is compared with the measured satellite gravity. Finally, the result of the forward modelling, based on the extracted 3D objects, is used to constrain the inversion process of satellite gravity data. Through this work, a new object-based approach is introduced to interpret and extract the 3D subsurface objects from 3D geophysical data. This can be used to constrain modelling and inversion of potential field data using the extracted 3D subsurface structures from other methods. In summary, a new approach is introduced to constrain inversion of satellite gravity measurements and enhance interpretation capabilities.

  1. Rapid Inversion of Angular Deflection Data for Certain Axisymmetric Refractive Index Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R.; Greenberg, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Certain functions useful for representing axisymmetric refractive-index distributions are shown to have exact solutions for Abel transformation of the resulting angular deflection data. An advantage of this procedure over direct numerical Abel inversion is that least-squares curve fitting is a smoothing process that reduces the noise sensitivity of the computation

  2. Simultaneous determination of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity by an inverse technique

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, K.A.; Boohaker, C.G.

    1996-12-31

    Determination of thermal properties by inverse methods often involves limited thermal excitation of a relatively small sample. If these thermal properties are to be found as functions of temperature, then this procedure must be replicated at several artificially elevated temperatures. For some types of materials (for example, those bearing moisture) this approach is impractical. In this paper, a procedure is developed for determining thermal properties (conductivity k and volumetric heat capacity C {equivalent_to} {rho}c{sub p}) as functions of temperature from a single experiment. This procedure is targeted for determination of k(T) and C(T) for sand molds used in castings. An inverse method based on a Gauss linearization is used to estimate these functions. The experiment used to determine these properties consists of heating a one-dimensional specimen of the material from one end. The variation of thermal properties with temperature is assumed to be a piecewise linear function, with values of properties to be determined at prescribed temperatures. A numerical experiment is used to demonstrate the technique.

  3. Inversion kinematics at deep-seated gravity slope deformations revealed by trenching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquaré Mariotto, Federico; Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    We compare data from three deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (DSGSDs) where palaeoseismological techniques were applied in artificial trenches. At all trenches, located in metamorphic rocks of the Italian Alps, there is evidence of extensional deformation given by normal movements along slip planes dipping downhill or uphill, and/or fissures, as expected in gravitational failure. However, we document and illustrate - with the aid of trenching - evidence of reverse movements. The reverse slips occurred mostly along the same planes along which normal slip occurred, and they produced drag folds in unconsolidated Holocene sediments as well as the superimposition of substrate rocks on Holocene sediments. The studied trenches indicate that reverse slip might occur not only at the toe portions of DSGSDs but also in their central-upper portions. When the age relationships between the two deformation kinematics can be determined, they clearly indicate that reverse slips postdate normal ones. Our data suggest that, during the development of long-lived DSGSDs, inversion kinematics may occur in different sectors of the unstable rock mass. The inversion is interpreted as due either to locking of the frontal blocks of a DSGSD or to the relative decrease in the rate of downward movement in the frontal blocks with respect to the rear blocks.

  4. A three-field monoisocentric inverse breast treatment planning technique without half-beam blocking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tiezhi; Dilworth, Joshua T; Marina, Ovidiu; Chen, Peter; Benedetti, Lisa; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a three-field monoisocentric inverse treatment planning method without half-beam blocks for breast cancer radiation treatments. Three-field monoisocentric breast treatment planning with half-beam blocks limits the tangential field length to 20 cm. A dual-isocenter approach accommodates patients with larger breasts, but prolongs treatment time and may introduce dose uncertainty at the matching plane due to daily setup variations. We developed a novel monoisocentric, three-field treatment planning method without half-beam blocking. The new beam-matching method utilizes the full field size with a single isocenter. Furthermore, an open/IMRT hybrid inverse optimization method was employed to improve dose uniformity and coverage. Geometric beam matching was achieved by rotating the couch, collimator, and gantry together. Formulae for three-field geometric matching were derived and implemented in Pinnacle scripts. This monoisocentric technique can be used for patients with larger breast size. The new method has no constraints on the length of tangential fields. Compared with the dual-isocenter method, it can significantly reduce patient setup time anduncertainties. PMID:26699305

  5. SEMI-DEFINITE PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES FOR STRUCTURED QUADRATIC INVERSE EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS

    PubMed Central

    LIN, MATTHEW M.; DONG, BO; CHU, MOODY T.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade or so, semi-definite programming (SDP) has emerged as a powerful tool capable of handling a remarkably wide range of problems. This article describes an innovative application of SDP techniques to quadratic inverse eigenvalue problems (QIEPs). The notion of QIEPs is of fundamental importance because its ultimate goal of constructing or updating a vibration system from some observed or desirable dynamical behaviors while respecting some inherent feasibility constraints well suits many engineering applications. Thus far, however, QIEPs have remained challenging both theoretically and computationally due to the great variations of structural constraints that must be addressed. Of notable interest and significance are the uniformity and the simplicity in the SDP formulation that solves effectively many otherwise very difficult QIEPs. PMID:25392603

  6. Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of a bLS inverse-dispersion technique for measuring gas emissions from livestock operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) inverse-dispersion technique has been used to measure fugitive gas emissions from livestock operations. The accuracy of the bLS technique, as indicated by the percentages of gas recovery in various tracer-release experiments, has generally been within ± 10% o...

  7. A Jacobi-Legendre polynomial-based method for the stable solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammari, Amara; Karoui, Abderrazek

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we build a stable scheme for the solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type. This scheme is obtained by further developing the orthogonal polynomial-based techniques for solving the Abel integral equation of Ammari and Karoui (2010 Inverse Problems 26 105005). More precisely, this method is based on the simultaneous use of the two families of orthogonal polynomials of the Legendre and Jacobi types. In particular, we provide an explicit formula for the computation of the Legendre expansion coefficients of the solution. This explicit formula is based on some known formulae for the exact computation of the integrals of the product of some Jacobi polynomials with the derivatives of the Legendre polynomials. Besides the explicit and the exact computation of the expansion coefficients of the solution, our proposed method has the advantage of ensuring the stability of the solution under a fairly weak condition on the functional space to which the data function belongs. Finally, we provide the reader with some numerical examples that illustrate the results of this work.

  8. LensPerfect Analysis of Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan A.

    2007-12-01

    I present the first massmap to perfectly reproduce the position of every gravitationally-lensed multiply-imaged galaxy detected to date in ACS images of Abell 1689. This massmap was obtained using a powerful new technique made possible by a recent advance in the field of Mathematics. It is the highest resolution assumption-free Dark Matter massmap to date, with the resolution being limited only by the number of multiple images detected. We detect 8 new multiple image systems and identify multiple knots in individual galaxies to constrain a grand total of 168 knots within 135 multiple images of 42 galaxies. No assumptions are made about mass tracing light, and yet the brightest visible structures in A1689 are reproduced in our massmap, a few with intriguing positional offsets. Our massmap probes radii smaller than that resolvable in current Dark Matter simulations of galaxy clusters. And at these radii, we observe slight deviations from the NFW and Sersic profiles which describe simulated Dark Matter halos so well. While we have demonstrated that our method is able to recover a known input massmap (to limited resolution), further tests are necessary to determine the uncertainties of our mass profile and positions of massive subclumps. I compile the latest weak lensing data from ACS, Subaru, and CFHT, and attempt to fit a single profile, either NFW or Sersic, to both the observed weak and strong lensing. I confirm the finding of most previous authors, that no single profile fits extremely well to both simultaneously. Slight deviations are revealed, with the best fits slightly over-predicting the mass profile at both large and small radius. Our easy-to-use software, called LensPerfect, will be made available soon. This research was supported by the European Commission Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant 017288-BPZ and the PNAYA grant AYA2005-09413-C02.

  9. Abel's Theorem Simplifies Reduction of Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We give an alternative to the standard method of reduction or order, in which one uses one solution of a homogeneous, linear, second order differential equation to find a second, linearly independent solution. Our method, based on Abel's Theorem, is shorter, less complex and extends to higher order equations.

  10. Measurement of electron energy distribution from X-rays diagnostics - foil techniques used with the hard X-ray camera on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Goeler, S. von; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Davis, W.; Ignat, D.

    1995-12-31

    A half-screen foil technique is used with the Hard X-ray Camera on the PBX-M tokamak to determine the energy distribution of the suprathermal electrons generated during lower hybrid current drive. The ratio of perpendicular to parallel temperature of the suprathermal electrons is deduced from the anisotropy of the bremsstrahlung emission utilizing Abel inversion techniques. Results from lower hybrid current drive discharges are discussed.

  11. Revisiting the time domain induced polarization technique, from linearization to inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Oldenburg, D.

    2015-12-01

    The induced polarization (IP) technique has been successful in mineral exploration, particularly for finding disseminated sulphide or porphyry deposits, but also in helping solve geotechnical and environmental problems. Electrical induced polarization (EIP) surveys use grounded electrodes and take measurements of the electric field while the current is both "on" and "off". Currently, 2D and 3D inversions of EIP data are generally carried out by first finding a background conductivity from the asymptotic "on-time" measurements. The DC resistivity problem is then linearized about that conductivity to obtain a linear relationship between the off-time data and the "pseudo-chargeability". The distribution of pseudo-chargeability in the earth is then interpreted within the context of the initial geoscience problem pursued. Despite its success, the current EIP implementation does have challenges. A fundamental assumption, that there is no electromagnetic induction (EM) effect, breaks down when the background is conductive. This is especially problematic in regions having conductive overburden. EM induction complicates, and sometimes overwhelms, the IP signal. To ameliorate this effect, we estimate the inductive signal, subtract it from the "off-time" data and invert the resultant IP data using the linearized formulation. We carefully examine the conditions under which this works. We also investigate the potential alterations to the linearized sensitivity function that are needed to allow a linearized inversion to be carried out. Inversions of EIP data recover a "chargeability" but this is not a uniquely defined quantity. There are multiple definitions of this property because there are a diverse number of ways in which an IP datum is defined. In time domain IP surveys, the data might be mV/V or a time-integrated voltage with units of ms. In reality however, data from an EIP survey have many time channels and each one can be inverted separately to produce a chargeability

  12. Development of a neuro-fuzzy technique for automated parameter optimization of inverse treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Stieler, Florian; Yan, Hui; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2009-01-01

    Background Parameter optimization in the process of inverse treatment planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is mainly conducted by human planners in order to create a plan with the desired dose distribution. To automate this tedious process, an artificial intelligence (AI) guided system was developed and examined. Methods The AI system can automatically accomplish the optimization process based on prior knowledge operated by several fuzzy inference systems (FIS). Prior knowledge, which was collected from human planners during their routine trial-and-error process of inverse planning, has first to be "translated" to a set of "if-then rules" for driving the FISs. To minimize subjective error which could be costly during this knowledge acquisition process, it is necessary to find a quantitative method to automatically accomplish this task. A well-developed machine learning technique, based on an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), was introduced in this study. Based on this approach, prior knowledge of a fuzzy inference system can be quickly collected from observation data (clinically used constraints). The learning capability and the accuracy of such a system were analyzed by generating multiple FIS from data collected from an AI system with known settings and rules. Results Multiple analyses showed good agreements of FIS and ANFIS according to rules (error of the output values of ANFIS based on the training data from FIS of 7.77 ± 0.02%) and membership functions (3.9%), thus suggesting that the "behavior" of an FIS can be propagated to another, based on this process. The initial experimental results on a clinical case showed that ANFIS is an effective way to build FIS from practical data, and analysis of ANFIS and FIS with clinical cases showed good planning results provided by ANFIS. OAR volumes encompassed by characteristic percentages of isodoses were reduced by a mean of between 0 and 28%. Conclusion The study demonstrated a

  13. Inverse solution technique of steady-state responses for local nonlinear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing; Guan, Xin; Zheng, Gangtie

    2016-03-01

    An inverse solution technique with the ability of obtaining complete steady-state primary harmonic responses of local nonlinear structures in the frequency domain is proposed in the present paper. In this method, the nonlinear dynamic equations of motion is first condensed from many to only one algebraic amplitude-frequency equation of relative motion. Then this equation is transformed into a polynomial form, and with its frequency as the unknown variable, the polynomial equation is solved by tracing all the solutions of frequency with the increase of amplitude. With this solution technique, some complicated dynamic behaviors such as sharp tuning, anomalous jumps, breaks in responses and detached resonance curves could be obtained. The proposed method is demonstrated and validated through a finite element beam under force excitations and a lumped parameter model with a local nonlinear element under base excitations. The phenomenon of detached resonance curves in the frequency response and its coupling effects with multiple linear modes in the latter example are observed.

  14. Odour emissions from a waste treatment plant using an inverse dispersion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauberger, Günther; Piringer, Martin; Knauder, Werner; Petz, Erwin

    2011-03-01

    The determination of the in situ emission rate of pollution sources can often not be done directly. In the absence of emission measurements, the emission rate of the source can be assessed by an inverse dispersion technique using ambient concentration measurements and meteorological parameters as input. The dispersion model used is the Austrian regulatory Gaussian model. The method is applied to a thermal waste recycling plant. Seven chemical species (butyl acetate, benzene, ethyl acetate, toluene, m/p-xylene, o-xylene and α-pinene), are identified as odorants and measured over a period of 1½ years in the prevailing wind direction leeward of the plant. The overall odour emission rate is calculated by adding the odour emission rate of all single species, using the individual odour threshold concentration. The estimated odour emission rates range between 206 and 8950 OU s -1, caused by the wide variety of the odour thresholds of the seven species. The higher value is in the upper range of odour emission rates of modern thermal treatment plants for waste.

  15. Non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery as a novel partial gastrectomy technique.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takashi; Niimi, Keiko; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Goto, Osamu; Aikou, Susumu; Hatao, Fumihiko; Wada, Ikuo; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    In gastric full-thickness resection employing both endoscopy and laparoscopy, intraabdominal contamination or even possibly tumor seeding is unavoidable as a result of iatrogenic perforation and the resultant spread of gastric juice. To minimize contamination and resected tissue volume, we developed a new technique without perforation termed non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS), and present here the preliminary results. In a clinical observation cohort study, NEWS was attempted in six patients with gastric SMT to investigate the procedure, mortality, and morbidity. NEWS consists of several steps: marking around a tumor on the mucosal as well as the serosal surface, submucosal injection of sodium hyaluronate with indigo carmine dye, circumferential seromuscular dissection with suture closure under laparoscopy, and circumferential mucosubmucosal incision under gastric endoscopy. The resected specimen is then retrieved perorally. Perforation occurred as a result of misidentification and technical inadequacy in the first three patients. After modification of the devices, the entire procedure was successfully achieved in the latter three. There were no complications in any of our six cases. NEWS allows en bloc full-thickness resection, theoretically avoiding contamination and tumor dissemination into the peritoneal cavity. PMID:23974429

  16. Understanding Methane Emission from Natural Gas Activities Using Inverse Modeling Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdioskouei, M.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas (NG) has been promoted as a bridge fuel that can smooth the transition from fossil fuels to zero carbon energy sources by having lower carbon dioxide emission and lower global warming impacts in comparison to other fossil fuels. However, the uncertainty around the estimations of methane emissions from NG systems can lead to underestimation of climate and environmental impacts of using NG as a replacement for coal. Accurate estimates of methane emissions from NG operations is crucial for evaluation of environmental impacts of NG extraction and at larger scale, adoption of NG as transitional fuel. However there is a great inconsistency within the current estimates. Forward simulation of methane from oil and gas operation sites for the US is carried out based on NEI-2011 using the WRF-Chem model. Simulated values are compared against measurements of observations from different platforms such as airborne (FRAPPÉ field campaign) and ground-based measurements (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory). A novel inverse modeling technique is used in this work to improve the model fit to the observation values and to constrain methane emission from oil and gas extraction sites.

  17. An inverse technique for developing models for fluid flow in fracture systems using simulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Mauldon, A.D.; Karasaki, K.; Martel, S.J.; Long, J.C.S.; Landsfield, M.; Mensch, A. ); Vomvoris, S. )

    1993-11-01

    One of the characteristics of flow and transport in fractured rock is that the flow may be largely confined to a poorly connected network of fractures. In order to represent this condition, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been developing a new type of fracture hydrology model called an equivalent discontinuum model. In this model we represent the discontinuous nature of the problem through flow on a partially filled lattice. This is done through a statistical inverse technique called [open quotes]simulated annealing.[close quotes] The fracture network model is [open quotes]annealed[close quotes] by continually modifying a base model, or [open quotes]template,[close quotes] so that with each modification, the model behaves more and more like the observed system. This template is constructed using geological and geophysical data to identify the regions that possibly conduct fluid an the probable orientations of channels that conduct fluid. In order to see how the simulated annealing algorithm works, we have developed a synthetic case. In this case, the geometry of the fracture network is completely known, so that the results of annealing to steady state data can be evaluated absolutely. We also analyze field data from the Migration Experiment at the Grimsel Rock Laboratory in Switzerland. 28 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. A new co-operative inversion strategy via fuzzy clustering technique applied to seismic and magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong Kieu, Duy; Kepic, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical inversion produces very useful images of earth parameters; however, inversion results usually suffer from inherent non-uniqueness: many subsurface models with different structures and parameters can explain the measurements. To reduce the ambiguity, extra information about the earth's structure and physical properties is needed. This prior information can be extracted from geological principles, prior petrophysical information from well logs, and complementary information from other geophysical methods. Any technique used to constrain inversion should be able to integrate the prior information and to guide updating inversion process in terms of the geological model. In this research, we have adopted fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering technique for this purpose. FCM is a clustering method that allows us to divide the model of physical parameters into a few clusters of representative values that also may relate to geological units based on the similarity of the geophysical properties. This exploits the fact that in many geological environments the earth is comprised of a few distinctive rock units with different physical properties. Therefore FCM can provide a platform to constrain geophysical inversion, and should tend to produce models that are geologically meaningful. FCM was incorporated in both separate and co-operative inversion processing of seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) data with petrophysical constraints. Using petrophysical information through FCM assists the inversion to build a reliable earth model. In this algorithm, FCM plays a role of guider; it uses the prior information to drive the model update process, and also forming an earth model filled with rocks units rather than smooth transitions when the boundary is in doubt. Where petrophysical information from well logs or core measurement is not locally available the cluster petrophysics may be solved for in inversion as well if some knowledge of how many distinctive geological exist. A

  19. The clusters Abell 222 and Abell 223: a multi-wavelength view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Laganá, T. F.; Adami, C.; Bertin, E.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The Abell 222 and 223 clusters are located at an average redshift z ~ 0.21 and are separated by 0.26 deg. Signatures of mergers have been previously found in these clusters, both in X-rays and at optical wavelengths, thus motivating our study. In X-rays, they are relatively bright, and Abell 223 shows a double structure. A filament has also been detected between the clusters both at optical and X-ray wavelengths. Aims: We analyse the optical properties of these two clusters based on deep imaging in two bands, derive their galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs) and correlate these properties with X-ray characteristics derived from XMM-Newton data. Methods: The optical part of our study is based on archive images obtained with the CFHT Megaprime/Megacam camera, covering a total region of about 1 deg2, or 12.3 × 12.3 Mpc2 at a redshift of 0.21. The X-ray analysis is based on archive XMM-Newton images. Results: The GLFs of Abell 222 in the g' and r' bands are well fit by a Schechter function; the GLF is steeper in r' than in g'. For Abell 223, the GLFs in both bands require a second component at bright magnitudes, added to a Schechter function; they are similar in both bands. The Serna & Gerbal method allows to separate well the two clusters. No obvious filamentary structures are detected at very large scales around the clusters, but a third cluster at the same redshift, Abell 209, is located at a projected distance of 19.2 Mpc. X-ray temperature and metallicity maps reveal that the temperature and metallicity of the X-ray gas are quite homogeneous in Abell 222, while they are very perturbed in Abell 223. Conclusions: The Abell 222/Abell 223 system is complex. The two clusters that form this structure present very different dynamical states. Abell 222 is a smaller, less massive and almost isothermal cluster. On the other hand, Abell 223 is more massive and has most probably been crossed by a subcluster on its way to the northeast. As a consequence, the

  20. FINAL REPORT. A HYBRID HYDROLOGIC-GEOPHYSICAL INVERSE TECHNIQUE FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING OF LEACHATES IN THE VADOSE ZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research conducted under this project has led to the development of a new, integrated Hybrid
    Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at
    contaminated sites. The HHGIT combines information from geophysical measurements, sta...

  1. A HYBRID HYDROLOGIC-GEOPHYSICAL INVERSE TECHNIQUE FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING OF LEACHATES IN THE VADOSE ZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is the objective of this proposed study to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This fundamentally new approach to site characterization and monitoring wi...

  2. Application of direct inverse analogy method (DIVA) and viscous design optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greff, E.; Forbrich, D.; Schwarten, H.

    1991-01-01

    A direct-inverse approach to the transonic design problem was presented in its initial state at the First International Conference on Inverse Design Concepts and Optimization in Engineering Sciences (ICIDES-1). Further applications of the direct inverse analogy (DIVA) method to the design of airfoils and incremental wing improvements and experimental verification are reported. First results of a new viscous design code also from the residual correction type with semi-inverse boundary layer coupling are compared with DIVA which may enhance the accuracy of trailing edge design for highly loaded airfoils. Finally, the capabilities of an optimization routine coupled with the two viscous full potential solvers are investigated in comparison to the inverse method.

  3. Recursive Ant Colony Global Optimization: a new technique for the inversion of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D. K.; Gupta, J. P.; Arora, Y.; Singh, U. K.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new method called Recursive Ant Colony Global Optimization (RACO) technique, a modified form of general ACO, which can be used to find the best solutions to inversion problems in geophysics. RACO simulates the social behaviour of ants to find the best path between the nest and the food source. A new term depth has been introduced, which controls the extent of recursion. A selective number of cities get qualified for the successive depth. The results of one depth are used to construct the models for the next depth and the range of values for each of the parameters is reduced without any change to the number of models. The three additional steps performed after each depth, are the pheromone tracking, pheromone updating and city selection. One of the advantages of RACO over ACO is that if a problem has multiple solutions, then pheromone accumulation will take place at more than one city thereby leading to formation of multiple nested ACO loops within the ACO loop of the previous depth. Also, while the convergence of ACO is almost linear, RACO shows exponential convergence and hence is faster than the ACO. RACO proves better over some other global optimization techniques, as it does not require any initial values to be assigned to the parameters function. The method has been tested on some mathematical functions, synthetic self-potential (SP) and synthetic gravity data. The obtained results reveal the efficiency and practicability of the method. The method is found to be efficient enough to solve the problems of SP and gravity anomalies due to a horizontal cylinder, a sphere, an inclined sheet and multiple idealized bodies buried inside the earth. These anomalies with and without noise were inverted using the RACO algorithm. The obtained results were compared with those obtained from the conventional methods and it was found that RACO results are more accurate. Finally this optimization technique was applied to real field data collected over the Surda

  4. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasadia, S.; Sun, M.; Sarazin, C.; Morandi, A.; Markevitch, M.; Wik, D.; Feretti, L.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    Deep (103 ks) Chandra observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of M = 3.0 ± 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell 665 the second cluster, after the Bullet cluster, where a strong merger shock of M ≈ 3 has been detected. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 ± 0.7) × 103 km s-1. The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the re-acceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  5. The X-ray cluster Abell 744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gioia, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray and optical observations of the cluster of galaxies Abell 744 are presented. The X-ray flux (assuming H(0) = 100 km/s per Mpc) is about 9 x 10 to the 42nd erg/s. The X-ray source is extended, but shows no other structure. Photographic photometry (in Kron-Cousins R), calibrated by deep CCD frames, is presented for all galaxies brighter than 19th magnitude within 0.75 Mpc of the cluster center. The luminosity function is normal, and the isopleths show little evidence of substructure near the cluster center. The cluster has a dominant central galaxy, which is classified as a normal brightest-cluster elliptical on the basis of its luminosity profile. New redshifts were obtained for 26 galaxies in the vicinity of the cluster center; 20 appear to be cluster members. The spatial distribution of redshifts is peculiar; the dispersion within the 150 kpc core radius is much greater than outside. Abell 744 is similar to the nearby cluster Abell 1060.

  6. ROSAT HRI images of Abell 85 and Abell 496: Evidence for inhomogeneities in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Guimond, Stephen J.; Luginbuhl, Christian; Joy, Marshall

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT HRI images of two clusters of galaxies with cooling flows, Abell 496 and Abell 85. In these clusters, x-ray emission on small scales above the general cluster emission is significant at the 3 sigma level. There is no evidence for optical counterparts. The enhancements may be associated with lumps of gas at a lower temperature and higher density than the ambient medium, or hotter, denser gas perhaps compressed by magnetic fields. These observations can be used to test models of how thermal instabilities form and evolve in cooling flows.

  7. An improved inversion for FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC ionosphere electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.

    2015-10-01

    An improved method to retrieve electron density profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) data is presented and applied to Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) observations. The improved inversion uses a monthly grid of COSMIC F region peak densities (NmF2), which are obtained via the standard Abel inversion, to aid the Abel inversion by providing information on the horizontal gradients in the ionosphere. This lessens the impact of ionospheric gradients on the retrieval of GPS RO electron density profiles, reducing the dominant error source in the standard Abel inversion. Results are presented that demonstrate the NmF2 aided retrieval significantly improves the quality of the COSMIC electron density profiles. Improvements are most notable at E region altitudes, where the improved inversion reduces the artificial plasma cave that is generated by the Abel inversion spherical symmetry assumption at low latitudes during the daytime. Occurrence of unphysical negative electron densities at E region altitudes is also reduced. Furthermore, the NmF2 aided inversion has a positive impact at F region altitudes, where it results in a more distinct equatorial ionization anomaly. COSMIC electron density profiles inverted using our new approach are currently available through the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research COSMIC Data Analysis and Archive Center. Owing to the significant improvement in the results, COSMIC data users are encouraged to use electron density profiles based on the improved inversion rather than those inverted by the standard Abel inversion.

  8. The cluster of galaxies Abell 2670

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shambrook, Anouk Aimee

    2001-10-01

    The rich cluster of galaxies Abell 2670 provides a laboratory in which to observe how galaxy properties change as a function of environment. Though initially considered a relaxed cluster, Abell 2670 exhibits substructure in optical, x-ray, and radio 21 cm H I line data. The cluster hosts a plethora of elliptical galaxies as well as spiral galaxies including galaxies rich in cold gas (some with more than 1010 Msolar in H I), and K+A galaxies. A group of galaxies rich in cold gas may be entering the cluster environment for the first time, making Abell 2670 a valuable case study. This thesis presents a catalog of UBV RI colors for objects located in an area 1° x 1° centered on Abell 2670, based on observations using the CTIO 0.9-m Schmidt telescope. Follow up observations using the Keck II 10-m and the CTIO 4-m telescopes will enable the classification of galaxy morphology. Using evolutionary synthesis models by Poggianti and Barbaro, a photometric redshift analysis yields a best- fit redshift and spectral energy distribution for each galaxy. The results are checked with galaxies observed by Sharples, Ellis, and Gray, which are known cluster members. Radial density profiles of cluster and field galaxies are modeled by King and uniform distributions respectively. A set of simulated galaxies, drawn from a combination of the two models, is compared to the data; for each redshift classification (based on the photometric redshift analysis), Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests characterize the probable fraction of cluster galaxies relative to the total. For the galaxies classified by the photometric redshift analysis as E, Sa, and Sc, an overdensity value is calculated, quantifying the density-morphology relation for this sample. A detailed study of this low redshift (z = 0.076) cluster may inform future studies of high redshift clusters. The optical UBV RI catalog is an important part of a multiwavelength set of data on Abell 2670 which in the future will probably lend itself well

  9. Comparison of four stable numerical methods for Abel's integral equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murio, Diego A.; Mejia, Carlos E.

    1991-01-01

    The 3-D image reconstruction from cone-beam projections in computerized tomography leads naturally, in the case of radial symmetry, to the study of Abel-type integral equations. If the experimental information is obtained from measured data, on a discrete set of points, special methods are needed in order to restore continuity with respect to the data. A new combined Regularized-Adjoint-Conjugate Gradient algorithm, together with two different implementations of the Mollification Method (one based on a data filtering technique and the other on the mollification of the kernal function) and a regularization by truncation method (initially proposed for 2-D ray sample schemes and more recently extended to 3-D cone-beam image reconstruction) are extensively tested and compared for accuracy and numerical stability as functions of the level of noise in the data.

  10. Verification of the helioseismology travel-time measurement technique and the inversion procedure for sound speed using artificial data

    SciTech Connect

    Parchevsky, K. V.; Zhao, J.; Hartlep, T.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-04-10

    We performed three-dimensional numerical simulations of the solar surface acoustic wave field for the quiet Sun and for three models with different localized sound-speed perturbations in the interior with deep, shallow, and two-layer structures. We used the simulated data generated by two solar acoustics codes that employ the same standard solar model as a background model, but utilize different integration techniques and different models of stochastic wave excitation. Acoustic travel times were measured using a time-distance helioseismology technique, and compared with predictions from ray theory frequently used for helioseismic travel-time inversions. It is found that the measured travel-time shifts agree well with the helioseismic theory for sound-speed perturbations, and for the measurement procedure with and without phase-speed filtering of the oscillation signals. This testing verifies the whole measuring-filtering-inversion procedure for static sound-speed anomalies with small amplitude inside the Sun outside regions of strong magnetic field. It is shown that the phase-speed filtering, frequently used to extract specific wave packets and improve the signal-to-noise ratio, does not introduce significant systematic errors. Results of the sound-speed inversion procedure show good agreement with the perturbation models in all cases. Due to its smoothing nature, the inversion procedure may overestimate sound-speed variations in regions with sharp gradients of the sound-speed profile.

  11. Tauberian theorems for Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Enes; ćoşkun, Hüsamettin

    2015-09-01

    We give some conditions under which Abel summable sequences of fuzzy numbers are convergent. As corollaries we obtain the results given in [E. Yavuz, Ö. Talo, Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers, Soft computing 2014, doi: 10.1007/s00500-014-1563-7].

  12. Joint inversion of geophysical data using petrophysical clustering and facies deformation wth the level set technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2015-12-01

    Geological expertise and petrophysical relationships can be brought together to provide prior information while inverting multiple geophysical datasets. The merging of such information can result in more realistic solution in the distribution of the model parameters, reducing ipse facto the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. We consider two level of heterogeneities: facies, described by facies boundaries and heteroegenities inside each facies determined by a correlogram. In this presentation, we pose the geophysical inverse problem in terms of Gaussian random fields with mean functions controlled by petrophysical relationships and covariance functions controlled by a prior geological cross-section, including the definition of spatial boundaries for the geological facies. The petrophysical relationship problem is formulated as a regression problem upon each facies. The inversion of the geophysical data is performed in a Bayesian framework. We demonstrate the usefulness of this strategy using a first synthetic case for which we perform a joint inversion of gravity and galvanometric resistivity data with the stations located at the ground surface. The joint inversion is used to recover the density and resistivity distributions of the subsurface. In a second step, we consider the possibility that the facies boundaries are deformable and their shapes are inverted as well. We use the level set approach to perform such deformation preserving prior topological properties of the facies throughout the inversion. With the help of prior facies petrophysical relationships and topological characteristic of each facies, we make posterior inference about multiple geophysical tomograms based on their corresponding geophysical data misfits. The method is applied to a second synthetic case showing that we can recover the heterogeneities inside the facies, the mean values for the petrophysical properties, and, to some extent, the facies boundaries using the 2D joint inversion of

  13. Inversion of seismological data using a controlled random search global optimization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, K.; Mohan, C.; Khattri, K. N.

    1991-11-01

    Inversion problems in seismology deal with the estimation of the location and the time of occurrence of an earthquake from observations of the arrival time of the body waves. These problems can be regarded as non-linear optimization problems in which the objective function to be minimized is the discrepancy between the recorded arrival times and the calculated arrival times at a prescribed set of observation stations, as a function of the hypocentral parameters and the wave speed structure of the Earth. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a controlled random search algorithm of global optimization (Shanker and Mohan, 1987; Mohan and Shanker, 1988) in solving such types of inversion problems. The performance of the algorithm has been tested on earthquake arrival time data of earthquakes recorded in the vicinity of local networks in the Garhwal Kumaon region of the Himalayas.

  14. The investigation of advanced remote sensing, radiative transfer and inversion techniques for the measurement of atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, Adarsh; Wang, Pi-Huan

    1985-01-01

    The research program is documented for developing space and ground-based remote sensing techniques performed during the period from December 15, 1977 to March 15, 1985. The program involved the application of sophisticated radiative transfer codes and inversion methods to various advanced remote sensing concepts for determining atmospheric constituents, particularly aerosols. It covers detailed discussions of the solar aureole technique for monitoring columnar aerosol size distribution, and the multispectral limb scattered radiance and limb attenuated radiance (solar occultation) techniques, as well as the upwelling scattered solar radiance method for determining the aerosol and gaseous characteristics. In addition, analytical models of aerosol size distribution and simulation studies of the limb solar aureole radiance technique and the variability of ozone at high altitudes during satellite sunrise/sunset events are also described in detail.

  15. Spectroscopic Studies of Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Michael Joseph

    The objectives of this work are to use spectroscopic techniques to accurately categorize galaxies as either HII region star forming galaxies or as Active Galactic Nuclei powered via a black hole, and to use radial velocities and projected positions of galaxies in clusters to obtain the total cluster mass and its distribution. The masses and distributions compare well to X-ray mass measurements. The commonly used Dressler, A., Thompson, I. & Shectman, S. 1985, ApJ, 288, 481 technique for discriminating between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies uses the measurement of the equivalent width of the emission lines (OII) 3727 A, H/beta, and (OIII) 5007 A. High quality spectra from 42 galaxies were taken and it is shown that their method is not capable of distinguishing between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. The emission line flux from H/beta, (OIII) 5007 A, (OI) 6300 A, Hα, (NII) 6583 A, and (SII) 6716+6731 A in combination with the method of Veilleux, S. & Osterbrock, D. E. 1987, ApJS, 63, 295 must be used to accurately distinguish between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. Galaxy radial velocities from spectroscopic data and their projected 2-D positions in clusters are used to obtain robust estimates of the total mass and mass distribution in two clusters. The total mass is calculated using the Virial theorem after removing substructure. The mass distribution is estimated via several robust statistical tests for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structure. It is shown that the derived mass estimates agree well with those found independently from hot X-ray gas emission in clusters.

  16. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial edema using a short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique: Diagnostic accuracy of visual and semi-quantitative assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique has been used to visualize myocardial edema, and thus to differentiate acute from chronic myocardial lesions. However, some cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) groups have reported variable image quality, and hence the diagnostic value of STIR in routine clinical practice has been put into question. The aim of our study was to analyze image quality and diagnostic performance of STIR using a set of pulse sequence parameters dedicated to edema detection, and to discuss possible factors that influence image quality. We hypothesized that STIR imaging is an accurate and robust way of detecting myocardial edema in non-selected patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods Forty-six consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction underwent CMR (day 4.5, +/- 1.6) including STIR for the assessment of myocardial edema and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for quantification of myocardial necrosis. Thirty of these patients underwent a follow-up CMR at approximately six months (195 +/- 39 days). Both STIR and LGE images were evaluated separately on a segmental basis for image quality as well as for presence and extent of myocardial hyper-intensity, with both visual and semi-quantitative (threshold-based) analysis. LGE was used as a reference standard for localization and extent of myocardial necrosis (acute) or scar (chronic). Results Image quality of STIR images was rated as diagnostic in 99.5% of cases. At the acute stage, the sensitivity and specificity of STIR to detect infarcted segments on visual assessment was 95% and 78% respectively, and on semi-quantitative assessment was 99% and 83%, respectively. STIR differentiated acutely from chronically infarcted segments with a sensitivity of 95% by both methods and with a specificity of 99% by visual assessment and 97% by semi-quantitative assessment. The extent of hyper-intense areas on acute STIR images was 85% larger than

  17. Mapping the intracluster medium of Abell 3627

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, Julie; Koribalski, Baerbel; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Wong, O. Ivy; Serra, Paolo; Schnitzeler, Dominic; Dehghan, Siamak

    2013-10-01

    Galaxy clusters are among the largest structures in the Universe. They provide a high density environment where galaxies undergo high-speed collisions, ram pressure stripping, and tidal interactions. The resulting debris can sometimes be detected in the form of neutral or ionised intergalactic filaments. Abell 3627 lies at a distance of ~66kpc right in the heart of the Great Attractor and is one of the most massive clusters known. We propose to map an area of 1 sq. deg. around Abell 3627 at 1 - 3 GHz to study the polarised emission in and between cluster members and search for HI absorption of neutral intracluster gas. We will be able to: (1) test cluster magnetic field turbulence on very small scales; (2) examine rotation measure (RM) spectra to understand the effect of radio sources in cluster environments; (3) detect the intracluster medium (ICM) magnetic field; (4) determine the magnetic field strength of the cluster and place upper limits on the age; and (5) constrain the HI column density in the ICM. All of these goals together will provide information to understand how the large-scale structure of the Universe evolves.

  18. Are Abell Clusters Correlated with Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Laros, J.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A recent study has presented marginal statistical evidence that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources are correlated with Abell clusters, based on analyses of bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog. Using precise localization information from the Third Interplanetary Network, we have reanalyzed this possible correlation. We find that most of the Abell clusters that are in the relatively large 3B error circles are not in the much smaller IPN/BATSE error regions. We believe that this argues strongly against an Abell cluster-GRB correlation.

  19. Non-contrast MRA using an inflow-enhanced, inversion recovery SSFP technique in pediatric abdominal imaging.

    PubMed

    Serai, Suraj; Towbin, Alexander J; Podberesky, Daniel J

    2012-03-01

    Abdominal contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) is routinely performed in children. CE-MRA is challenging in children because of patient motion, difficulty in obtaining intravenous access, and the inability of young patients to perform a breath-hold during imaging. The combination of pediatric-specific difficulties in imaging and the safety concerns regarding the risk of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with impaired renal function has renewed interest in the use of non-contrast (NC) MRA techniques. At our institution, we have optimized 3-D NC-MRA techniques for abdominal imaging. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of an inflow-enhanced, inversion recovery balanced steady-state free precession-based (b-SSFP) NC-MRA technique. PMID:22072071

  20. Retrieval of data from ground-based microwave sensing of the middle atmosphere: Comparison of two inversion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jarchow, C.; Hartogh, P.

    1995-12-31

    Since the discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica the interest in measuring atmospheric trace gas distributions has greatly increased. First of all scientists are interested in monitoring the long term behavior of the ozone layer over the Antarctic and also over the Arctic region, but in addition one is also interested in measuring and monitoring not so well known trace gases which are assumed to play a central role in ozone depletion. In microwave remote sensing of atmospheric trace gases a retrieval technique has been widely adopted during the last years. The authors found some difficulties in applying this method to the analysis of long term ground-based observations due to the large variability of the tropospheric transmission. The corresponding changes of the data quality and the weight of the apriori profile in the inversion algorithm can lead to an artificial correlation between the retrieved profiles and the transmission. In addition an assessment of the inversion only from the error bars of the profile is impossible since they don`t respond linearly to the errors of the spectra. It is shown that an inversion algorithm according to Backus-Gilbert`s philosophy will avoid these difficulties.

  1. Comparing inversion techniques for constraining CO2 fluxes in the Brazilian Amazon Basin with aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, V. Y.; Gerbig, C.; Longo, M.; Koch, F.; Nehrkorn, T.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Ceballos, J. C.; Longo, K.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia (BARCA) aircraft program spanned the dry to wet and wet to dry transition seasons in November 2008 & May 2009 respectively. It resulted in ~150 vertical profiles covering the Brazilian Amazon Basin (BAB). With the data we attempt to estimate a carbon budget for the BAB, to determine if regional aircraft experiments can provide strong constraints for a budget, and to compare inversion frameworks when optimizing flux estimates. We use a LPDM to integrate satellite-, aircraft-, & surface-data with mesoscale meteorological fields to link bottom-up and top-down models to provide constraints and error bounds for regional fluxes. The Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model driven by meteorological fields from BRAMS, ECMWF, and WRF are coupled to a biosphere model, the Vegetation Photosynthesis Respiration Model (VPRM), to determine regional CO2 fluxes for the BAB. The VPRM is a prognostic biosphere model driven by MODIS 8-day EVI and LSWI indices along with shortwave radiation and temperature from tower measurements and mesoscale meteorological data. VPRM parameters are tuned using eddy flux tower data from the Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere experiment. VPRM computes hourly CO2 fluxes by calculating Gross Ecosystem Exchange (GEE) and Respiration (R) for 8 different vegetation types. The VPRM fluxes are scaled up to the BAB by using time-averaged drivers (shortwave radiation & temperature) from high-temporal resolution runs of BRAMS, ECMWF, and WRF and vegetation maps from SYNMAP and IGBP2007. Shortwave radiation from each mesoscale model is validated using surface data and output from GL 1.2, a global radiation model based on GOES 8 visible imagery. The vegetation maps are updated to 2008 and 2009 using landuse scenarios modeled by Sim Amazonia 2 and Sim Brazil. A priori fluxes modeled by STILT-VPRM are optimized using data from BARCA, eddy covariance sites, and flask measurements. The

  2. Thermal characterization of ZnO-DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) colloidal dispersions using the inverse photopyroelectric technique.

    PubMed

    Marín, E; Calderón, A; Díaz, D

    2009-05-01

    Nanofluids, i.e., colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in a base liquid (solvent), have received considerable attention in the last years due to their potential applications. One attractive feature of these systems is that their thermal conductivity can exceed the corresponding values of the base fluid and of the fluid with large particles of the same chemical composition. However, there is a lack of agreement between published results and the suggested mechanisms which explain the thermal conductivity enhancement. Here we show the possibilities of the inverse photopyroelectric method for the determination of the effective thermal effusivity of the system constituted by small ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in dimethyl sulfoxide, as a function of the nanoparticles volumetric fraction. Using a phenomenological model we estimated the thermal conductivity of these colloidal samples without observing any significant enhancement of this parameter above effective medium predictions. PMID:19430157

  3. Quantification of Substructure in Nearby Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriessler, J. R.; Beers, T. C.; Odewahn, S. C.

    1995-05-01

    Theory, as well as numerical simulations, suggests that Omega_o may be observationally constrained by the amount of substructure observed in present-day clusters of galaxies. We have therefore begun a study of the 116 Abell clusters with richness class greater than or equal to 1 and distance class less than or equal to 4, the so-called ``volume-limited'' sample of Hoessel, Gunn, & Thuan 1980 (ApJ 241, 486) to determine the prevalence of substructure in the clusters' projected galaxy positions. We use positions of galaxies identified by the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner to obtain contour plots of the available clusters using an adaptive kernel routine. Significance of substructure is evaluated using the 2-D Lee test as well as a likelihood-ratio test on fits made with mixtures of two-dimensional gaussians. We also present nonparametric density profile estimates obtained with the program MAPEL (Merritt and Tremblay 1994, AJ 108, 514).

  4. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21(sub -0.47 sup +0.43) on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36(sub -0.17 sup +0.46).

  5. Comparison of data inversion techniques for remotely sensed wide-angle observations of Earth emitted radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The shape factor, parameter estimation, and deconvolution data analysis techniques were applied to the same set of Earth emitted radiation measurements to determine the effects of different techniques on the estimated radiation field. All three techniques are defined and their assumptions, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed. Their results are compared globally, zonally, regionally, and on a spatial spectrum basis. The standard deviations of the regional differences in the derived radiant exitance varied from 7.4 W-m/2 to 13.5 W-m/2.

  6. A low-computational-cost inverse heat transfer technique for convective heat transfer measurements in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, F.; Greco, C. S.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; Cardone, G.

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of the convective wall heat flux in hypersonic flows may be particularly challenging in the presence of high-temperature gradients and when using high-thermal-conductivity materials. In this case, the solution of multidimensional problems is necessary, but it considerably increases the computational cost. In this paper, a low-computational-cost inverse data reduction technique is presented. It uses a recursive least-squares approach in combination with the trust-region-reflective algorithm as optimization procedure. The computational cost is reduced by performing the discrete Fourier transform on the discrete convective heat flux function and by identifying the most relevant coefficients as objects of the optimization algorithm. In the paper, the technique is validated by means of both synthetic data, built in order to reproduce physical conditions, and experimental data, carried out in the Hypersonic Test Facility Delft at Mach 7.5 on two wind tunnel models having different thermal properties.

  7. The magnitude-redshift relation for 561 Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.; Henry, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble diagram for the 561 Abell clusters with measured redshifts has been examined using Abell's (1958) corrected photo-red magnitudes for the tenth-ranked cluster member (m10). After correction for the Scott effect and K dimming, the data are in good agreement with a linear magnitude-redshift relation with a slope of 0.2 out to z = 0.1. New redshift data are also presented for 20 Abell clusters. Abell's m10 is suitable for redshift estimation for clusters with m10 of no more than 16.5. At fainter m10, the number of foreground galaxies expected within an Abell radius is large enough to make identification of the tenth-ranked galaxy difficult. Interlopers bias the estimated redshift toward low values at high redshift. Leir and van den Bergh's (1977) redshift estimates suffer from this same bias but to a smaller degree because of the use of multiple cluster parameters. Constraints on deviations of cluster velocities from the mean cosmological flow require greater photometric accuracy than is provided by Abell's m10 magnitudes.

  8. A comparison of direct and iterative finite element inversion techniques in dynamic elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarvar, M.; Rohling, R.; Salcudean, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    As part of tissue elasticity imaging or elastography, an inverse problem needs to be solved to find the elasticity distribution from the measured displacements. The finite element method (FEM) is a common method for solving the inverse problem in dynamic elastography. This problem has been solved with both direct and iterative FEM schemes. Each of these methods has its own advantages and disadvantages which are examined in this paper. Choosing the data resolution and the excitation frequency are critical for achieving the best estimation of the tissue elasticity in FEM methods. In this paper we investigate the performance of both direct and iterative FEMs for different ranges of excitation frequency. A new form of iterative method is suggested here which requires a lower mesh density compared to the original form. Also two forms of the direct method are compared in this paper: one using the exact fit for derivatives calculation and the other using the least squares fit. We also perform a study on the spatial resolution of these methods using simulations. The comparison is also validated using a phantom experiment. The results suggest that the direct method with least squares fit is more robust to noise compared to other methods but has slightly lower resolution results. For example, for the homogenous region with 20 dB noise added to the data, the RMS error for the direct method with least squares fit is approximately half of the iterative method. It was observed that the ratio of voxel size to the wavelength should be within a specific range for the results to be reliable. For example for the direct method with least squares fit, for the case of 20 dB noise level, this ratio should be between 0.1 to 0.2. On balance, considering the much higher computational cost of the iterative method, the dependency of the iterative method on the initial guess, and the greater robustness of the direct method to noise, we suggest using the direct method with least squares fit for

  9. Infrared observations of gravitational lensing in Abell 2219 with CIRSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Meghan E.; Ellis, Richard S.; Refregier, Alexandre; Bézecourt, Jocelyn; McMahon, Richard G.; Beckett, Martin G.; Mackay, Craig D.; Hoenig, Michael D.

    2000-10-01

    We present the first detection of a gravitational depletion signal at near-infrared wavelengths, based on deep panoramic images of the cluster Abell 2219 (z=0.22) taken with the Cambridge Infrared Survey Instrument (CIRSI) at the prime focus of the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. Infrared studies of gravitational depletion offer a number of advantages over similar techniques applied at optical wavelengths, and can provide reliable total masses for intermediate-redshift clusters. Using the maximum-likelihood technique developed by Schneider, King & Erben, we detect the gravitational depletion at the 3σ confidence level. By modelling the mass distribution as a singular isothermal sphere and ignoring the uncertainty in the unlensed number counts, we find an Einstein radius of θE ~= 13.7+3.9-4.2 arcsec (66per cent confidence limit). This corresponds to a projected velocity dispersion of σv~800kms-1, in agreement with constraints from strongly lensed features. For a Navarro, Frenk & White mass model, the radial dependence observed indicates a best-fitting halo scalelength of 125h-1kpc. We investigate the uncertainties arising from the observed fluctuations in the unlensed number counts, and show that clustering is the dominant source of error. We extend the maximum-likelihood method to include the effect of incompleteness, and discuss the prospects of further systematic studies of lensing in the near-infrared band.

  10. Identifying Isotropic Events Using an Improved Regional Moment Tensor Inversion Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

    2007-07-06

    Using a regional time-domain waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor we calculate the deviatoric and isotropic source components for several explosions at the Nevada Test Site as well as earthquakes, and collapses in the surrounding region of the western US. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Error in the moment tensor solutions and source parameters is also calculated. We investigate the sensitivity of the moment tensor solutions to Green's functions calculated with imperfect Earth models, inaccurate event locations, and data with a low signal-to-noise ratio. We also test the performance of the method under a range of recording conditions from excellent azimuthal coverage to cases of sparse station availability, as might be expected for smaller events. Finally, we assess the depth and frequency dependence upon event size. This analysis will be used to determine the range where well-constrained solutions can be obtained.

  11. Separating the BL Lac and cluster X-ray emissions in Abell 689 with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, P. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Lancaster, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a Chandra observation of the galaxy cluster Abell 689 (z = 0.279). Abell 689 is one of the most luminous clusters detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS), but was flagged as possibly including significant point source contamination. The small point spread function of the Chandra telescope allows us to confirm this and separate the point source from the extended cluster X-ray emission. For the cluster, we determine a bolometric luminosity of Lbol= (3.3 ± 0.3) × 1044 erg s-1 and a temperature of kT = 5.1+2.2- 1.3 keV when including a physically motivated background model. We compare our measured luminosity for A689 to that quoted in the RASS, and find L0.1-2.4 keV= 2.8 × 1044 erg s-1, a value ˜10 times lower than the ROSAT measurement. Our analysis of the point source shows evidence for significant pile-up, with a pile-up fraction of ≃60 per cent. Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images lead us to the conclusion that the point source within Abell 689 is a BL Lac object. Using radio and optical observations from the Very Large Array and HST archives, we determine αro= 0.50, αox= 0.77 and αrx= 0.58 for the BL Lac, which would classify it as being of 'high-energy peak BL Lac' type. Spectra extracted of A689 show a hard X-ray excess at energies above 6 keV that we interpret as inverse-Compton emission from aged electrons that may have been transported into the cluster from the BL Lac.

  12. A comparison of solute-transport solution techniques based on inverse modelling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Five common numerical techniques (finite difference, predictor-corrector, total-variation-diminishing, method-of-characteristics, and modified-method-of-characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using randomly distributed homogeneous blocks of five sand types. This experimental model provides an outstanding opportunity to compare the solution techniques because of the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution of known structure, and the availability of detailed measurements with which to compare simulated concentrations. The present work uses this opportunity to investigate how three common types of results-simulated breakthrough curves, sensitivity analysis, and calibrated parameter values-change in this heterogeneous situation, given the different methods of simulating solute transport. The results show that simulated peak concentrations, even at very fine grid spacings, varied because of different amounts of numerical dispersion. Sensitivity analysis results were robust in that they were independent of the solution technique. They revealed extreme correlation between hydraulic conductivity and porosity, and that the breakthrough curve data did not provide enough information about the dispersivities to estimate individual values for the five sands. However, estimated hydraulic conductivity values are significantly influenced by both the large possible variations in model dispersion and the amount of numerical dispersion present in the solution technique.Five common numerical techniques (finite difference, predictor-corrector, total-variation-diminishing, method-of-characteristics, and modified-method-of-characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using randomly

  13. Measuring gas emissions from animal waste lagoons with an inverse-dispersion technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring gas emissions from treatment lagoons and storage ponds poses challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques due to non-ideal conditions such as trees and crops surrounding the lagoons, and short fetch to establish equilibrated microclimate conditions within the water bo...

  14. Subtask 2.2 - Creating A Numerical Technique for Microseismic Data Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasia Dobroskok; Yevhen Holubnyak; James Sorensen

    2009-05-01

    Geomechanical and geophysical monitoring are the techniques which can complement each other and provide enhancement in the solutions of many problems of geotechnical engineering. One of the most promising geophysical techniques is passive seismic monitoring. The essence of the technique is recording the acoustic signals produced in the subsurface, either naturally or in response to human activity. The acoustic signals are produced by mechanical displacements on the contacts of structural elements (e.g., faults, boundaries of rock blocks, natural and induced fractures). The process can be modeled by modern numerical techniques developed in geomechanics. The report discusses a study that was aimed at the unification of the passive seismic monitoring and numerical modeling for the monitoring of the hydraulic fracture propagation. The approach adopted in the study consisted of numerical modeling of the seismicity accompanying hydraulic fracture propagation and defining seismic attributes and patterns characterizing the process and fracture parameters. Numerical experiments indicated that the spatial distribution of seismic events is correlated to geometrical parameters of hydrofracture. Namely, the highest density of the events is observed along fracture contour, and projection of the events to the fracture plane makes this effect most pronounced. The numerical experiments also showed that dividing the totality of the events into groups corresponding to the steps of fracture propagation allows for reconstructing the geometry of the resulting fracture more accurately than has been done in the majority of commercial applications.

  15. The merging cluster Abell 1758: an optical and dynamical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro-Oliveira, Rogerio; Serra Cypriano, Eduardo; Machado, Rubens; Lima Neto, Gastao B.

    2015-08-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 1758-North (z=0.28) is a binary system composed by the sub-structures NW and NE. This is supposed to be a post-merging cluster due to observed detachment between the NE BCG and the respective X-ray emitting hot gas clump in a scenario very close to the famous Bullet Cluster. On the other hand, the projected position of the NW BCG coincides with the local hot gas peak. This system was been targeted previously by several studies, using multiple wavelengths and techniques, but there is still no clear picture of the scenario that could have caused this unusual configuration. To help solving this complex puzzle we added some pieces: firstly, we have used deep B, RC and z' Subaru images to perform both weak lensing shear and magnification analysis of A1758 (including here the South component that is not in interaction with A1758-North) modeling each sub-clump as an NFW profile in order to constrain masses and its center positions through MCMC methods; the second piece is the dynamical analysis using radial velocities available in the literature (143) plus new Gemini-GMOS/N measurements (68 new redshifts).From weak lensing we found that independent shear and magnification mass determinations are in excellent agreement between them and combining both we could reduce mass error bar by ~30% compared to shear alone. By combining this two weak-lensing probes we found that the position of both Northern BCGs are consistent with the masses centers within 2σ and and the NE hot gas peak to be offseted of the respective mass peak (M200=5.5 X 1014 M⊙) with very high significance. The most massive structure is NW (M200=7.95 X 1014 M⊙ ) where we observed no detachment between gas, DM and BCG.We have calculated a low line-of-sight velocity difference (<300 km/s) between A1758 NW and NE. We have combined it with the projected velocity of 1600 km/s which was estimated by previous X-ray analysis (David & Kempner 2004) and we have obtained a small angle between

  16. Analysis for nonlinear inversion technique developed to estimate depth-distribution of absorption by spatially resolved backscattering measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kazuhiro; Namita, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi

    2015-03-01

    We have proposed a new nonlinear inversion technique to estimate the spatial distribution of the absorption coefficient (μa) in the depth direction of a turbid medium by spatially resolved backscattering measurement. With this technique, we can obtain cross-sectional image of μa as deep as the backscattered light traveled even when the transmitted light through the medium cannot be detected. In this technique, the depth distribution of absorption coefficient is determined by iterative calculation using the spatial path-length distribution (SPD) of traveled photons as a function of source-detector distance. In this calculation, the variance of path-length of many photons in each layer is also required. The SPD and the variance of path-length are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using a known reduced scattering coefficient (μs'). Therefore, we need to know the μs' of the turbid medium beforehand. We have shown in computer simulation that this technique works well when the μs' is the typical values of mammalian body tissue, or 1.0 /mm. In this study, the accuracy of the μa estimation was analyzed and its dependence on the μs' was clarified quantitatively in various situations expected in practice. 10% deviations in μs' resulted in about 30% error in μa estimation, in average. This suggested that the measurement or the appropriate estimation of μs' is required to utilize the proposed technique effectively. Through this analysis, the effectiveness and the limitation of the newly proposed technique were clarified, and the problems to be solved were identified.

  17. Mesoporous CeO2 nanoparticles synthesized by an inverse miniemulsion technique and their catalytic properties in methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabih, Nermeen; Schiller, Renate; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Kockrick, Emanuel; Frind, Robert; Kaskel, Stefan; Weiss, Clemens K.; Landfester, Katharina

    2011-04-01

    Cerium(IV) oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using an inverse miniemulsion technique with cerium nitrate hexahydrate as precursor. The resulting nanocrystallites are as small as 5 nm with a specific surface area of 158 m2 g - 1 after calcination at 400 °C. With the addition of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide)) triblock copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO) as template in the miniemulsion droplets, the specific surface area can be increased up to 255 m2 g - 1. The miniemulsions were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and the obtained oxides were examined by x-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen sorption (BET and BJH), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The catalytic activity of the resulting ceria was investigated for the temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) of methane.

  18. A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

    1999-06-15

    The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

  19. Study of 12C excited states decaying into three α particles using the thick target inverse kinematic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Gauthier, J.; Wuenschel, S.; de Souza, R. T.; Hudan, S.; Fang, D.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Zheng, H.; Giuliani, G.; Rapisarda, G.; Kim, E.-J.; Liu, X.; Natowitz, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We will show that the Thick Target Inverse Kinematics (TTIK) technique can be used to investigate the breakup of excited selfconjugate nuclei into many alpha particles. Two test runs were performed at Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University to study the reaction 20Ne+α at maximum beam energies of 10 and 12 AMeV. Due to the limited statistics, only events with alpha multiplicity up to three were analyzed. The analysis of the three α-particle emission data allowed the identification of the Hoyle state and other 12C excited states decaying into three alpha particles. The results will be shown and compared with other data available in the literature.

  20. Effects of process variables on the encapsulation of oil in ca-alginate capsules using an inverse gelation technique.

    PubMed

    Abang, Sariah; Chan, Eng-Seng; Poncelet, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of process variables on the encapsulation of oil in a calcium alginate membrane using an inverse gelation technique. A dispersion of calcium chloride solution in sunflower oil (water-in-oil emulsion) was added dropwise to the alginate solution. The migration of calcium ions to the alginate solution initiates the formation of a ca-alginate membrane around the emulsion droplets. The membrane thickness of wet capsules and the elastic modulus of dry capsules increased following first-order kinetics with an increasing curing time. An increase in the calcium chloride concentration increased the membrane thickness of wet capsules and the elastic modulus of dry capsules. An increase in the alginate concentration decreased the mean diameter of wet capsules but increased the elastic modulus of dry capsules. PMID:22292966

  1. Top-down estimate of anthropogenic emission inventories and their interannual variability in Houston using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Brioude, J.; Kim, S. W.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Frost, G. J.; Lee, S. H.; McKeen, S. A.; Trainer, Michael; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Williams, E. J.; Petron, Gabrielle; Fast, Jerome D.

    2011-10-31

    The 2000 and 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000 and 2006) field campaigns took place in eastern Texas in August-October of 2000 and 2006. Several flights of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) research aircraft were dedicated to characterizing anthropogenic emissions over Houston. Houston is known for having serious problems with non-attainment of air quality standards. We present a method that uses three models and aircraft observations to assess and improve existing emission inventories using an inverse modeling technique. We used 3-dimensional and 4-dimensional variational (3D-VAR and 4D-VAR) inverse modeling techniques based on a least-squares method to improve the spatial and temporal distribution of CO, NOy (sum of all reactive nitrogen compounds), and SO2 emissions predicted by the 4-km-resolution U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Inventory (NEI) for 2005. Differences between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed in detail. We found that in 2006 the prior daytime emissions in the urban area of Houston have to be reduced by 40% {+-} 12% for CO and 7% {+-} 13% for NOy. Over the Houston Ship Channel, where industrial emissions are predominant, the prior emissions have to be reduced by 41% {+-} 15% for CO and 51% {+-} 9% for NOy. Major ports around Houston have their NOy emissions reduced as well, probably due to uncertainties in near-shore ship emissions in the EPA NEI inventory. Using the measurements from the two field campaigns, we assessed the interannual emission variability between 2000 and 2006. Daytime CO emissions from the Houston urban area have been reduced by 8% {+-} 20%, while the NOy emissions have increased by 20% {+-} 12% from 2000 to 2006. In the Houston Ship Channel, the daytime NOy emissions have increased by 13% {+-} 17%. Our results show qualitative consistencies with known changes in Houston emissions sources.

  2. Top-down estimate of anthropogenic emission inventories and their interannual variability in Houston using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brioude, J.; Kim, S.-W.; Angevine, W. M.; Frost, G. J.; Lee, S.-H.; McKeen, S. A.; Trainer, M.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Williams, E. J.; Petron, G.; Fast, J. D.

    2011-10-01

    Texas Air Quality Study field campaigns took place in eastern Texas in August-October of 2000 and 2006. Several flights of NOAA and NCAR research aircraft were dedicated to characterizing anthropogenic emissions over Houston. We present results from an inverse modeling technique that uses three atmospheric transport models and these aircraft observations to assess and improve existing emission inventories. We used inverse modeling techniques to improve the spatial and temporal emissions' distribution of CO, NOy, and SO2 predicted by the 4 km resolution U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Inventory (NEI) for 2005. Differences between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed in detail. In September 2006, we found that the prior daytime CO emissions in the Houston urban area have to be reduced by 41% ± 8%. Over the Houston Ship Channel, where industrial emissions are predominant, the prior emissions have to be decreased by 43% ± 5% for CO and 51% ± 5% for NOy. Prior NOy emissions from other major ports around Houston also have to be reduced, probably owing to uncertain nearshore ship emissions in the EPA NEI inventory. Using the measurements from the two field campaigns, we assessed the emissions' variability between August 2000 and September 2006. Daytime CO emissions from the Houston urban area have decreased by 8% ± 3%, while the NOy emissions have increased by 20% ± 6%. In the Houston Ship Channel, daytime NOy emissions have increased by 13% ± 7%. Our results show qualitative consistencies with known changes in Houston emissions' sources.

  3. Inverse measurement of stiffness by the normalization technique for J-integral fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric

    2012-06-07

    The single specimen normalization technique for J-integral fracture toughness has been successfully employed by several researchers to study the strongly non-linear fracture response of ductile semicrystalline polymers. As part of the normalization technique the load and the plastic component of displacement are normalized. The normalized data is then fit with a normalization function that approximates a power law for small displacements that are dominated by blunting and smoothly transitions to a linear relationship for large displacements that are dominated by stable crack extension. Particularly for very ductile polymers the compliance term used to determine the plastic displacement can dominate the solution and small errors in determining the elastic modulus can lead to large errors in the normalization or even make it ill-posed. This can be further complicated for polymers where the elastic modulus is strong strain rate dependent and simply using a 'quasistatic' modulus from a dogbone measurement may not equate to the dominant strain rate in the compact tension specimen. The current work proposes directly measuring the compliance of the compact tension specimen in the solution of J-integral fracture toughness and then solving for the elastic modulus. By comparison with a range of strain rate data the dominant strain rate can then be determined.

  4. Optimization of the Inverse Algorithm for Estimating the Optical Properties of Biological Materials Using Spatially-resolved Diffuse Reflectance Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of the optical properties from intact biological materials based on diffusion approximation theory is a complicated inverse problem, and it requires proper implementation of inverse algorithm, instrumentation, and experiment. This work was aimed at optimizing the procedure of estimatin...

  5. General Matrix Inversion Technique for the Calibration of Electric Field Sensor Arrays on Aircraft Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, D. M.; Koshak, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    A matrix calibration procedure has been developed that uniquely relates the electric fields measured at the aircraft with the external vector electric field and net aircraft charge. The calibration method can be generalized to any reasonable combination of electric field measurements and aircraft. A calibration matrix is determined for each aircraft that represents the individual instrument responses to the external electric field. The aircraft geometry and configuration of field mills (FMs) uniquely define the matrix. The matrix can then be inverted to determine the external electric field and net aircraft charge from the FM outputs. A distinct advantage of the method is that if one or more FMs need to be eliminated or deemphasized [e.g., due to a malfunction), it is a simple matter to reinvert the matrix without the malfunctioning FMs. To demonstrate the calibration technique, data are presented from several aircraft programs (ER-2, DC-8, Altus, and Citation).

  6. The Filtered Abel Transform and Its Application in Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    Many non-intrusive combustion diagnosis methods generate line-of-sight projections of a flame field. To reconstruct the spatial field of the measured properties, these projections need to be deconvoluted. When the spatial field is axisymmetric, commonly used deconvolution method include the Abel transforms, the onion peeling method and the two-dimensional Fourier transform method and its derivatives such as the filtered back projection methods. This paper proposes a new approach for performing the Abel transform method is developed, which possesses the exactness of the Abel transform and the flexibility of incorporating various filters in the reconstruction process. The Abel transform is an exact method and the simplest among these commonly used methods. It is evinced in this paper that all the exact reconstruction methods for axisymmetric distributions must be equivalent to the Abel transform because of its uniqueness and exactness. Detailed proof is presented to show that the two dimensional Fourier methods when applied to axisymmetric cases is identical to the Abel transform. Discrepancies among various reconstruction method stem from the different approximations made to perform numerical calculations. An equation relating the spectrum of a set of projection date to that of the corresponding spatial distribution is obtained, which shows that the spectrum of the projection is equal to the Abel transform of the spectrum of the corresponding spatial distribution. From the equation, if either the projection or the distribution is bandwidth limited, the other is also bandwidth limited, and both have the same bandwidth. If the two are not bandwidth limited, the Abel transform has a bias against low wave number components in most practical cases. This explains why the Abel transform and all exact deconvolution methods are sensitive to high wave number noises. The filtered Abel transform is based on the fact that the Abel transform of filtered projection data is equal

  7. Chandra View of Galaxy Cluster Abell 2554

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kıyami Erdim, Muhammed; Hudaverdi, Murat

    2016-07-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 2554 at z = 0.11, which is a member of Aquarius Super cluster using the Chandra archival data. The X-ray peak coincides with a bright elliptical cD galaxy. Slightly elongated X-ray plasma has an average temperature and metal abundance values of ˜6 keV and 0.28 solar, respectively. We observe small-scale temperature variations in the ICM. There is a significantly hot wall-like structure with 9 keV at the SE and also radio-lope locates at the tip of this hot region. A2554 is also part of a trio-cluster. Its close neighbors A2550 (at SW) and A2556 (at SE) have only 2 Mpc and 1.5 Mpc separations with A2554. Considering the temperature fluctuations and the dynamical environment of super cluster, we examine the possible ongoing merger scenarios within A2554.

  8. Abell 1033: birth of a radio phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperin, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Dawson, W. A.; Brüggen, M.; Bonafede, A.; Simionescu, A.

    2015-04-01

    Extended steep-spectrum radio emission in a galaxy cluster is usually associated with a recent merger. However, given the complex scenario of galaxy cluster mergers, many of the discovered sources hardly fit into the strict boundaries of a precise taxonomy. This is especially true for radio phoenixes that do not have very well defined observational criteria. Radio phoenixes are aged radio galaxy lobes whose emission is reactivated by compression or other mechanisms. Here, we present the detection of a radio phoenix close to the moment of its formation. The source is located in Abell 1033, a peculiar galaxy cluster which underwent a recent merger. To support our claim, we present unpublished Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Chandra observations together with archival data from the Very Large Array and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We discover the presence of two subclusters displaced along the N-S direction. The two subclusters probably underwent a recent merger which is the cause of a moderately perturbed X-ray brightness distribution. A steep-spectrum extended radio source very close to an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is proposed to be a newly born radio phoenix: the AGN lobes have been displaced/compressed by shocks formed during the merger event. This scenario explains the source location, morphology, spectral index, and brightness. Finally, we show evidence of a density discontinuity close to the radio phoenix and discuss the consequences of its presence.

  9. On sky characterization of the BAORadio wide band digital backend. Search for HI emission in Abell85, Abell1205 and Abell2440 galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Campagne, J. E.; Colom, P.; Ferrari, C.; Magneville, Ch.; Martin, J. M.; Moniez, M.; Torrentó, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    We have observed regions of three galaxy clusters at z˜[0.06÷0.09] (Abell85, Abell1205, Abell2440) with the Nançay radiotelescope (NRT) to search for 21 cm emission and to fully characterize the FPGA based BAORadio digital backend. We have tested the new BAORadio data acquisition system by observing sources in parallel with the NRT standard correlator (ACRT) back-end over several months. BAORadio enables wide band instantaneous observation of the [1250,1500] MHz frequency range, as well as the use of powerful RFI mitigation methods thanks to its fine time sampling. A number of questions related to instrument stability, data processing and calibration are discussed. We have obtained the radiometer curves over the integration time range [0.01,10 000] seconds and we show that sensitivities of few mJy over most of the wide frequency band can be reached with the NRT. It is clearly shown that in blind line search, which is the context of H I intensity mapping for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, the new acquisition system and processing pipeline outperforms the standard one. We report a positive detection of 21 cm emission at 3 σ-level from galaxies in the outer region of Abell85 at ≃1352 MHz (14400 km/s) corresponding to a line strength of ≃0.8 Jy km/s. We also observe an excess power around ≃1318 MHz (21600 km/s), although at lower statistical significance, compatible with emission from Abell1205 galaxies. Detected radio line emissions have been cross matched with optical catalogs and we have derived hydrogen mass estimates.

  10. Aircraft automatic-flight-control system with inversion of the model in the feed-forward path using a Newton-Raphson technique for the inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. A.; Meyer, G.; Nordstrom, M.

    1986-01-01

    A new automatic flight control system concept suitable for aircraft with highly nonlinear aerodynamic and propulsion characteristics and which must operate over a wide flight envelope was investigated. This exact model follower inverts a complete nonlinear model of the aircraft as part of the feed-forward path. The inversion is accomplished by a Newton-Raphson trim of the model at each digital computer cycle time of 0.05 seconds. The combination of the inverse model and the actual aircraft in the feed-forward path alloys the translational and rotational regulators in the feedback path to be easily designed by linear methods. An explanation of the model inversion procedure is presented. An extensive set of simulation data for essentially the full flight envelope for a vertical attitude takeoff and landing aircraft (VATOL) is presented. These data demonstrate the successful, smooth, and precise control that can be achieved with this concept. The trajectory includes conventional flight from 200 to 900 ft/sec with path accelerations and decelerations, altitude changes of over 6000 ft and 2g and 3g turns. Vertical attitude maneuvering as a tail sitter along all axes is demonstrated. A transition trajectory from 200 ft/sec in conventional flight to stationary hover in the vertical attitude includes satisfactory operation through lift-cure slope reversal as attitude goes from horizontal to vertical at constant altitude. A vertical attitude takeoff from stationary hover to conventional flight is also demonstrated.

  11. Fabrication of phosphotungstic acid functionalized mesoporous silica composite membrane by alternative tape-casting incorporating phase inversion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Li; Zhang, Lan; He, Hong Quan; Rasheed, Raj Kamal S./O. Abdul; Zhang, Cai Zhi; Ding, Ovi Lian; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Meso-porous silica (MCM-41) membranes functionalized by phosphotungstic acid (HPW) for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) are successfully developed by a cost-effective tape-casting incorporating phase inversion and vacuum assisted wet impregnation techniques. The microstructure of the membrane is characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The effect of MCM-41 content on the tensile strength, ultimate elongation, and weight gain ratio and swelling ratio in water/methanol of the membranes are investigated in detail. The thermal stability of MCM-41 membrane with/without HPW is analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) techniques. In particular, the effects of HPW loading and MCM-41 content on the proton conductivity of HPW/MCM-41 membranes are studied comprehensively. The results on the swelling ratio and tensile tension show that the developed membranes can be applied as an electrolyte membrane for HT-PEMFCs. The developed MCM-41 membrane, in which polyethersulfone (PESf) is used as the supporting backbone, is able to operate up to 200 °C. The single cell assembled from HPW/MCM-41 membrane with 70 wt.% HPW loading gives a peak output power of ∼230 mW cm-2 and ∼125 mW cm-2 in H2/air at 90 °C and in methanol/air at 150 °C without any humidification, respectively.

  12. A 1400-MHz survey of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. N.; White, R. A.; Hilldrup, K. C.; Hanisch, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies with the NRAO 91-m telescope at 1400 MHz are reported. The measured beam shape was deconvolved from the measured source Gaussian fits in order to estimate the source size and position angle. All detected sources within 0.5 corrected Abell cluster radii are listed, including the cluster number, richness class, distance class, magnitude of the tenth brightest galaxy, redshift estimate, corrected cluster radius in arcmin, right ascension and error, declination and error, total flux density and error, and angular structure for each source.

  13. Radio Galaxies in Abell Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, M. J.

    1994-05-01

    We have defined a complete sample of radio galaxies chosen from Abell's northern catalog consisting of all clusters with measured redshifts < 0.09. This sample consists of nearly 300 clusters. A multiwavelength survey including optical CCD R-Band imaging, optical spectroscopy, and VLA 20 cm radio maps has been compiled. I have used this database to study the optical/radio properties of radio galaxies in the cluster environment. In particular, optical properties have been compared to a radio-quiet selected sample to look for optical signatures which may distinguish radio galaxies from normal radio-quiet ellipticals. The correlations between radio morphology and galaxy type, the optical dependence of the FR I/II break, and the univariate and bivariate luminosity functions have been examined for this sample. This study is aimed at understanding radio galaxies as a population and examining their status in the AGN heirarchy. The results of this work will be applied to models of radio source evolution. The results from the optical data analysis suggest that radio galaxies, as a class, cannot be distinguished from non-radio selected elliptical galaxies. The magnitude/size relationship, the surface-brightness profiles, the fundamental plane, and the intrinsic shape of the radio galaxies are consistent between our radio galaxy and control sample. The radio galaxies also trace the elliptical galaxy optical luminosity function in clusters very well; with many more L(*) galaxies than brightest cluster members. Combined with the results of the spectroscopy, the data are consistent with the idea that all elliptical galaxies may at some point in their lifetimes become radio sources. In conclusion, I present a new observational picture for radio galaxies and discuss the important properties which may determine the evolution of individual sources.

  14. The Merger Dynamics of Abell 2061

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Avery; Sarazin, Craig L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Hogge, Taylor; Wik, Daniel R.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnsworth, Damon; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brown, Shea

    2016-04-01

    Abell 2061, a galaxy cluster at a redshift of z=.0784 in the Corona Borealis Supercluster, displays features in both the X-ray and radio indicative of merger activity. Observations by the GBT and the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) have indicated the presence of an extended, central radio halo/relic coincident with the cluster's main X-ray emission and a bright radio relic to the SW of the center of the cluster. Previous observations by ROSAT, Beppo-SAX, and Chandra show an elongated structure (referred to as the ‘Plume’), emitting in the soft X-ray and stretching to the NE of the cluster’s center. The Beppo-SAX and Chandra observations also suggest the presence of a hard X-ray shock slightly NE of the cluster’s center. Here we present the details of an August 2013 XMM-Newton observation of A2061 which has greater field of view and longer exposure (48.6 ks) than the previous Chandra observation. We present images displaying the cluster’s soft and hard X-ray emission and also a temperature map of the cluster. This temperature map highlights the presence of a previously unseen cool region of the cluster which we hypothesize to be the cool core of one of the subclusters involved in this merger. We also discuss the structural similarity of this cluster with a simulated high mass-ratio offset cluster merger taken from the Simulation Library of Astrophysical cluster Mergers (SLAM). This simulation would suggest that the Plume is gas from the cool core of a subcluster which is now falling back into the center of the cluster after initial core passage.

  15. TH-C-12A-06: Feasibility of a MLC-Based Inversely Optimized Multi-Field Grid Therapy Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J; Zhao, B; Huang, Y; Kim, J; Qin, Y; Wen, N; Ryu, S; Chetty, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Grid therapy (GT), which generates highly spatially modulated dose distributions, can deliver single- or hypo-fractionated radiotherapy for large tumors without causing significant toxicities. GT may be applied in combination with immunotherapy, in light of recent preclinical data of synergetic interaction between radiotherapy and immunotherapy. However, conventional GT uses only one field, which does not have the advantage of multi-fields in 3D conformal-RT or IMRT. We have proposed a novel MLC-based, inverse-planned multi-field 3D GT technique. This study aims to test its deliverability and dosimetric accuracy. Methods: A lattice of small spheres was created as the boost volume within a large target. A simultaneous boost IMRT plan with 8-Gy to the target and 20-Gy to the boost volume was generated in the Eclipse treatment planning system (AAA v10) with a HD120 MLC. Nine beams were used, and the gantry and couch angles were selected so that the spheres were perfectly aligned in every beams eye view. The plan was mapped to a phantom with dose scaled. EBT3 films were calibrated and used to measure the delivered dose. Results: The IMRT plan generated a highly spatially modulated dose distribution in the target. D95%, D50%, D5% for the spheres and the targets in Gy were 18.5, 20.0, 21.4 and 7.9, 9.8, 16.1, respectively. D50% for a 1cm ring 1cm outside the target was 2.9-Gy. Film dosimetry showed good agreement between calculated and delivered dose, with an overall gamma passing rate of 99.6% (3%/1mm). The point dose differences for different spheres varied from 1–6%. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the deliverability and dose calculation accuracy of the MLC-based inversely optimized multi-field GT technique, which achieved a brachytherapy-like dose distribution. Single-fraction high dose can be delivered to the spheres in a large target with minimal dose to the surrounding normal tissue.

  16. Mass Profile of Abell 2204 An X-Ray Analysis of Abell 2204 using XMM-Newton Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Travis

    2003-09-05

    The vast majority of the matter in the universe is of an unknown type. This matter is called dark matter by astronomers. The dark matter manifests itself only through gravitational interaction and is otherwise undetectable. The distribution of this matter in can be better understood by studying the mass profile of galaxy clusters. The X-ray emissions of the galaxy cluster Abell 2204 were analyzed using archived data from the XMM-Newton space telescope. We analyze a 40ks observation of Abell 2204 and present a radial temperature and radial mass profile based on hydrostatic equilibrium calculations.

  17. Exploring clustering in alpha-conjugate nuclei using the thick target inverse kinematic technique for multiple alpha emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Gauthier, J.; Wuenschel, S.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Zheng, H.; Giuliani, G.; Rapisarda, G.; Kim, E.-J.; Liu, X.; Natowitz, J. B.; Desouza, R. T.; Hudan, S.; Fang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Searching for alpha cluster states analogous to the 12C Hoyle state in heavier alpha-conjugate nuclei can provide tests of the existence of alpha condensates in nuclear matter. Such states are predicted for 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, etc. at excitation energies slightly above the decay threshold. The Thick Target Inverse Kinematics (TTIK) technique can be successfully used to study the breakup of excited self-conjugate nuclei into many alpha particles. The reaction 20Ne + α at 11 and 13 AMeV was studied at Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. Here the TTIK method was used to study both single α-particle emission and multiple α-particle decays. Due to the limited statistics, only events with alpha multiplicity up to three were analyzed. The analysis of the three α-particle emission data allowed the identification of the Hoyle state and other 12C excited states decaying into three alpha particles. The results will be shown and compared with other data available in the literature. Another experiment is planned in August 2015 to study the system 28Si + α at 15 AMeV. Preliminary results will be shown. Supported by the U.S. DOE and the Robert A. Welch Foundation, Grant No. A0330.

  18. Inverse estimation of the spheroidal particle size distribution using Ant Colony Optimization algorithms in multispectral extinction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Wang, Yuqing; Ruan, Liming

    2014-10-01

    Four improved Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithms, i.e. the probability density function based ACO (PDF-ACO) algorithm, the Region ACO (RACO) algorithm, Stochastic ACO (SACO) algorithm and Homogeneous ACO (HACO) algorithm, are employed to estimate the particle size distribution (PSD) of the spheroidal particles. The direct problems are solved by the extended Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA) and the Lambert-Beer law. Three commonly used monomodal distribution functions i.e. the Rosin-Rammer (R-R) distribution function, the normal (N-N) distribution function, and the logarithmic normal (L-N) distribution function are estimated under dependent model. The influence of random measurement errors on the inverse results is also investigated. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm is more accurate than the other three ACO algorithms and can be used as an effective technique to investigate the PSD of the spheroidal particles. Furthermore, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution functions to retrieve the PSD of spheroidal particles using PDF-ACO algorithm. The investigation shows a reasonable agreement between the original distribution function and the general distribution function when only considering the variety of the length of the rotational semi-axis.

  19. Near-infrared optical properties of ex vivo human uterus determined by the Monte Carlo inversion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, P. M.; Laufer, J. G.; Gordon, A. D.; Connell, R. J.; Bown, S. G.

    1999-10-01

    The optical properties, absorption (µa) and reduced scattering coefficient (µs´), of ex vivo human myometrium and leiomyoma (fibroid) have been determined by the Monte Carlo inversion technique over the wavelength range 600 - 1000 nm. This region is currently of interest for new, minimal-access, surgical laser procedures such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) for abnormalities of the uterus, and interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) for the thermal ablation of fibroids. In the region 630 - 675 nm (corresponding to PDT), the optical coefficients of myometrium are µa = 0.041±0.012 mm-1 and µs´ = 1.37±0.19 mm-1. For the wavelength range 800-1000 nm (associated with infrared lasers for ILP), the optical coefficients of fibroid were found to be µa = 0.020±0.003 mm-1 and µs´ = 0.56±0.03 mm-1. Overall, the optical properties of fibroid were found to be lower than myometrium, and this was attributed to the differences in both anatomy and vascularity. The results show that PDT for ablation of the uterine endometrium is most unlikely to affect any tissues beyond the myometrium, and that the region around 800 nm is the most effective for ablation of fibroids using ILP as the penetration depth of light is greatest at this wavelength.

  20. Microscopy and Chemical Inversing Techniques to Determine the Photonic Crystal Structure of Iridescent Beetle Scales in the Cerambycidae Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Lauren; Gardner, John; Standing, Michael; Jorgensen, Matthew; Bartl, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are periodic structures that manipulate electromagnetic waves by defining allowed and forbidden frequency bands known as photonic band gaps. Despite production of PC structures operating at infrared wavelengths, visible counterparts are difficult to fabricate because periodicities must satisfy the diffraction criteria. As part of an ongoing search for naturally occurring PCs [1], a three-dimensional array of nanoscopic spheres in the iridescent scales of the Cerambycidae insects A. elegans and G. celestis has been found. Such arrays are similar to opal gemstones and self-assembled colloidal spheres which can be chemically inverted to create a lattice-like PC. Through a chemical replication process [2], scanning electron microscopy analysis, sequential focused ion beam slicing and three-dimensional modeling, we analyzed the structural arrangement of the nanoscopic spheres. The study of naturally occurring structures and their inversing techniques into PCs allows for diversity in optical PC fabrication. [1] J.W. Galusha et al., Phys. Rev. E 77 (2008) 050904. [2] J.W. Galusha et al., J. Mater. Chem. 20 (2010) 1277.

  1. Quantification of methane emissions from full-scale open windrow composting of biowaste using an inverse dispersion technique.

    PubMed

    Hrad, Marlies; Binner, Erwin; Piringer, Martin; Huber-Humer, Marion

    2014-12-01

    An inverse dispersion technique in conjunction with Open-Path Tunable-Diode-Laser-Spectroscopy (OP-TDLS) and meteorological measurements was applied to characterise methane (CH4) emissions from an Austrian open-windrow composting plant treating source-separated biowaste. Within the measurement campaigns from July to September 2012 different operating conditions (e.g. before, during and after turning and/or sieving events) were considered to reflect the plant-specific process efficiency. In addition, the tracer technique using acetylene (C2H2) was applied during the measurement campaigns as a comparison to the dispersion model. Plant-specific methane emissions varied between 1.7 and 14.3 gCH4/m(3)d (1.3-10.7 kg CH4/h) under real-life management assuming a rotting volume of 18,000 m(3). In addition, emission measurements indicated that the turning frequency of the open windrows appears to be a crucial factor controlling CH4 emissions when composting biowaste. The lowest CH4 emission was measured at a passive state of the windrows without any turning event ("standstill" and "sieving of matured compost"). Not surprisingly, higher CH4 emissions occurred during turning events, which can be mainly attributed to the instant release of trapped CH4. Besides the operation mode, the meteorological conditions (e.g. wind speed, atmospheric stability) may be further factors that likely affect the release of CH4 emissions at an open windrow system. However, the maximum daily CH4 emissions of 1m(3) rotting material of the composting plant are only 0.7-6.5% of the potential daily methane emissions released from 1m(3) of mechanically-biologically treated (MBT) waste being landfilled according to the required limit values given in the Austrian landfill ordinance. PMID:25242603

  2. The application of tomographic reconstruction techniques to ill-conditioned inverse problems in atmospheric science and biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Vern Philip, II

    A methodology is presented for creating tomographic reconstructions from various projection data, and the relevance of the results to applications in atmospheric science and biomedical imaging is analyzed. The fundamental differences between transform and iterative methods are described and the properties of the imaging configurations are addressed. The presented results are particularly suited for highly ill-conditioned inverse problems in which the imaging data are restricted as a result of poor angular coverage, limited detector arrays, or insufficient access to an imaging region. The class of reconstruction algorithms commonly used in sparse tomography, the algebraic reconstruction techniques, is presented, analyzed, and compared. These algorithms are iterative in nature and their accuracy depends significantly on the initialization of the algorithm, the so-called initial guess. A considerable amount of research was conducted into novel initialization techniques as a means of improving the accuracy. The main body of this paper is comprised of three smaller papers, which describe the application of the presented methods to atmospheric and medical imaging modalities. The first paper details the measurement of mesospheric airglow emissions at two camera sites operated by Utah State University. Reconstructions of vertical airglow emission profiles are presented, including three-dimensional models of the layer formed using a novel fanning technique. The second paper describes the application of the method to the imaging of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) by NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite. The contrasting elements of straight-line and diffusive tomography are also discussed in the context of ill-conditioned imaging problems. A number of developing modalities in medical tomography use near infrared light, which interacts strongly with biological tissue and results in significant optical scattering. In order to perform tomography on the

  3. AGES Observations of Abell1367 and its Outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Minchin, R. F.; Auld, R. R.; Davies, J. I.; Catinella, B.; Momjian, E.; Rosenberg, J. L.; O'Neil, K.

    2007-05-01

    The Arecibo Galactic Environment Survey (AGES) will map over the next years ˜200 square degrees using the ALFA feed array at the 305-m Arecibo Telescope. AGES is specifically designed to investigate various galactic environments from local voids to interacting groups and cluster of galaxies. AGES will map 20 square degrees in the Coma-Abell1367 supercluster covering all the Abell cluster 1367 and its outskirts (˜2 virial radii). In Spring 2006 we nearly completed the observations of 5 square degrees in the range (11:34Abell1367 (˜92 Mpc). An HI selected sample has been extracted from the datacube obtaining a complete catalogue of fluxes, recessional velocities, positions and velocity widths. We will present a preliminary analysis of the properties of the HI sources and report the discovery of HI diffuse features within interacting groups at the periphery of Abell1367.

  4. Retrieval Performance and Indexing Differences in ABELL and MLAIB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Vince

    2012-01-01

    Searches for 117 British authors are compared in the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (ABELL) and the Modern Language Association International Bibliography (MLAIB). Authors are organized by period and genre within the early modern era. The number of records for each author was subdivided by format, language of publication,…

  5. The Morphological Decomposition of Abell 868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, S. P.; Odewahn, S. C.; Echevarria, L.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Phillipps, S.; Couch, W. J.

    2003-12-01

    We report on the morphological luminosity functions (LFs) and radial profiles derived for the galaxy population within the rich cluster Abell 868 (z=0.153) based purely on Hubble Space Telescope imaging in F606W. We recover Schechter functions (-24.0

  6. Integrating sampling techniques and inverse virtual screening: toward the discovery of artificial peptide-based receptors for ligands.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Germán M; Salomón, Luis A; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A; de la Vega, José M García; Mascini, Marcello

    2016-05-01

    A novel heuristic using an iterative select-and-purge strategy is proposed. It combines statistical techniques for sampling and classification by rigid molecular docking through an inverse virtual screening scheme. This approach aims to the de novo discovery of short peptides that may act as docking receptors for small target molecules when there are no data available about known association complexes between them. The algorithm performs an unbiased stochastic exploration of the sample space, acting as a binary classifier when analyzing the entire peptides population. It uses a novel and effective criterion for weighting the likelihood of a given peptide to form an association complex with a particular ligand molecule based on amino acid sequences. The exploratory analysis relies on chemical information of peptides composition, sequence patterns, and association free energies (docking scores) in order to converge to those peptides forming the association complexes with higher affinities. Statistical estimations support these results providing an association probability by improving predictions accuracy even in cases where only a fraction of all possible combinations are sampled. False positives/false negatives ratio was also improved with this method. A simple rigid-body docking approach together with the proper information about amino acid sequences was used. The methodology was applied in a retrospective docking study to all 8000 possible tripeptide combinations using the 20 natural amino acids, screened against a training set of 77 different ligands with diverse functional groups. Afterward, all tripeptides were screened against a test set of 82 ligands, also containing different functional groups. Results show that our integrated methodology is capable of finding a representative group of the top-scoring tripeptides. The associated probability of identifying the best receptor or a group of the top-ranked receptors is more than double and about 10 times higher

  7. Nondestructive imaging of small size voids at Akrotiri archaeological site, Thera Island, Greece, by seismic inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Filippos I.; Clark, Roger A.; Louis, Ioannis F.; Makropoulos, Costas C.

    2005-07-01

    High-resolution travel time tomography was used to explore the volcanic basement rock at the Akrotiri archaeological site, Thera (Santorini) Island. The survey was carried out in the context of a large scale project, in which the protective roof cover of old monuments is being replaced by a new environmentally friendly structure, which will be supported by 95 pillars drilled into the volcanic basement rock. Man-made or natural cavities (empty or half-filled with stones), ceramics, and other materials of archaeological interest were unveiled during the excavation of foundation shafts. The objective of this geophysical investigation was the detection of such voids in the vicinity of the excavated shafts, so that the overhead structure can be better supported and protected in the case of an earthquake event. The cross-hole seismic tomography technique was adopted for this purpose. A number of synthetic examples and a calibration experiment at a shaft with a known natural cavity clearly indicated that the tomographic inversion is capable of providing high-resolution 2-D velocity models. High S/N ratios ensured field seismic records of high quality. A set of stability tests was run to check the consistency of the method. Travel time residuals verified the validity of the final velocity depth sections, while model complexity trends showed a consistency between models after a certain number of iterations. The reconstructed velocity fields were quite consistent with the expected velocity structures based on the geologic descriptions of formations encountered during the drilling of the shafts. Impressive low-velocity structures attributed to natural or man-made cavities were reported to the constructing group of engineers, and a remedial action plan was being undertaken to support and improve the ground behavior.

  8. Comparing source inversion techniques for GPS-based local tsunami forecasting: A case study for the April 2014 M8.1 Iquique, Chile, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejie; Babeyko, Andrey; Hoechner, Andreas; Ge, Maorong

    2016-04-01

    Real-time GPS is nowadays considered as a valuable component of next generation near-field tsunami early warning systems able to provide fast and reliable source parameters. Looking for optimal methodologies and assessing corresponding uncertainties becomes an important task. We take the opportunity and consider the 2014 Pisagua event as a case study to explore tsunami forecast uncertainty related to the GPS-based source inversion. We intentionally neglect all other sources of uncertainty (observation set, signal processing, wave simulation, etc.) and exclusively assess the effect of inversion technique. In particular, we compare three end-member methods: (1) point-source fastCMT (centroid moment tensor), (2) distributed slip along predefined plate interface, and (3) unconstrained inversion into a single uniform slip finite fault. The three methods provide significantly different far-field tsunami forecast but show surprisingly similar tsunami predictions in the near field.

  9. Comparison of three IMRT inverse planning techniques that allow for partial esophagus sparing in patients receiving thoracic radiation therapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Michalski, D; Houser, C; Bednarz, G; Curran, W; Galvin, James

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare 3 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) inverse treatment planning techniques as applied to locally-advanced lung cancer. This study evaluates whether sufficient radiotherapy (RT) dose is given for durable control of tumors while sparing a portion of the esophagus, and whether large number of segments and monitor units are required. We selected 5 cases of locally-advanced lung cancer with large central tumor, abutting the esophagus. To ensure that no more than half of the esophagus circumference at any level received the specified dose limit, it was divided into disk-like sections and dose limits were imposed on each. Two sets of dose objectives were specified for tumor and other critical structures for standard dose RT and for dose escalation RT. Plans were generated using an aperture-based inverse planning (ABIP) technique with the Cimmino algorithm for optimization. Beamlet-based inverse treatment planning was carried out with a commercial simulated annealing package (CORVUS) and with an in-house system that used the Cimmino projection algorithm (CIMM). For 3 of the 5 cases, results met all of the constraints from the 3 techniques for the 2 sets of dose objectives. The CORVUS system without delivery efficiency consideration required the most segments and monitor units. The CIMM system reduced the number while the ABIP techniques showed a further reduction, although for one of the cases, a solution was not readily obtained using the ABIP technique for dose escalation objectives. PMID:15324918

  10. Study of the technique of stellar occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Graves, M. E.; Roble, R. G.; Shah, A. N.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of a study of the stellar occultation technique for measuring the composition of the atmosphere. The intensity of starlight was monitored during the occultation using the Wisconsin stellar ultraviolet photometers aboard the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-A2). A schematic diagram of an occultation is shown where the change in intensity at a given wavelength is illustrated. The vertical projection of the attenuation region is typically 60 km deep for molecular oxygen and 30 km deep for ozone. Intensity profiles obtained during various occultations were analyzed by first determining the tangential columm density of the absorbing gases, and then Abel inverting the column densities to obtain the number density profile. Errors are associated with each step in the inversion scheme and have been considered as an integral part of this study.

  11. Comparing source inversion techniques for GPS-based tsunami early warning: a case study 2014 Pisagua M8.1 earthquake, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeyko, Andrey; Chen, Kejie

    2016-04-01

    Real-time GPS is nowadays considered as a valuable component of next-generation near-field tsunami early warning systems. A fast and reliable source inversion technique, whose function is to convert co-seismic displacements into seismic source parameters for subsequent tsunami modeling and forecasting, plays a central role in the entire warning chain. To date, there have been suggested various inversion approaches and, not surprisingly, different methods yield different inversion results even for the same input information. Differences in source parameters are then propagated to the coast by means of wave simulation and thus contribute to the total forecast uncertainty. The northern Chile April 2014 Mw8.1 Pisagua earthquake and aftermath tsunami were extensively recorded by a large number of land- and ocean-based sensors including real-time GPS. We take the opportunity and consider the 2014 Pisagua event as a case study to explore possible sources and magnitudes of forecast uncertainty related to the GPS-based source inversion. In particular, we test uncertainties related to different inversion approaches: fastCMT (centroid moment tensor); unconstrained inversion into a single Okada fault; distributed slip along curved plate interface. The three different source models provide very different far-field tsunami forecasts but show surprisingly similar predictions in the near-field. The predictions are also consistent with coastal tide gauge observations. In addition, we demonstrate how incorporation of real-time GPS-observations reduces forecast uncertainty imminent to the classical, epicentre/magnitude tsunami early warning scheme.

  12. X-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Abell 1835

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Kaastra, J. S.; Arnaud, M.; Reiprich T. H.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Jernigan, J. G.; Sakelliou, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopy results of the observation of Abell 1835 using the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton observatory. Abell 1835 is a luminous (10(exp 46)ergs/s), medium redshift (z = 0.2523), X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. The observations support the interpretation that large amounts of cool gas are present in a multi-phase medium surrounded by a hot (kT(sub e) = 8.2 keV) outer envelope. We detect O VIII Ly(alpha) and two Fe XXIV complexes in the RGS spectrum. The emission measure of the cool gas below kT(sub e) = 2.7 keV is much lower than expected from standard cooling-flow models, suggesting either a more complicated cooling process than simple isobaric radiative cooling or differential cold absorption of the cooler gas.

  13. Preliminary Analysis of Low-Thrust Gravity Assist Trajectories by An Inverse Method and a Global Optimization Technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pascale, P.; Vasile, M.; Casotto, S.

    The design of interplanetary trajectories requires the solution of an optimization problem, which has been traditionally solved by resorting to various local optimization techniques. All such approaches, apart from the specific method employed (direct or indirect), require an initial guess, which deeply influences the convergence to the optimal solution. The recent developments in low-thrust propulsion have widened the perspectives of exploration of the Solar System, while they have at the same time increased the difficulty related to the trajectory design process. Continuous thrust transfers, typically characterized by multiple spiraling arcs, have a broad number of design parameters and thanks to the flexibility offered by such engines, they typically turn out to be characterized by a multi-modal domain, with a consequent larger number of optimal solutions. Thus the definition of the first guesses is even more challenging, particularly for a broad search over the design parameters, and it requires an extensive investigation of the domain in order to locate the largest number of optimal candidate solutions and possibly the global optimal one. In this paper a tool for the preliminary definition of interplanetary transfers with coast-thrust arcs and multiple swing-bys is presented. Such goal is achieved combining a novel methodology for the description of low-thrust arcs, with a global optimization algorithm based on a hybridization of an evolutionary step and a deterministic step. Low thrust arcs are described in a 3D model in order to account the beneficial effects of low-thrust propulsion for a change of inclination, resorting to a new methodology based on an inverse method. The two-point boundary values problem (TPBVP) associated with a thrust arc is solved by imposing a proper parameterized evolution of the orbital parameters, by which, the acceleration required to follow the given trajectory with respect to the constraints set is obtained simply through

  14. Towards 3D multi-scale teleseismic and gravity data inversion using hybrid DSM/SPECFEM technique : application to the Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Monteiller, Vadim; Chevrot, Sébastien; Wang, Yi; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Dufréchou, Grégory

    2015-04-01

    We describe here a method of inversion applied to seismic data sets constrained by gravity data at the regional scale. This will allow us to obtain robust models of P and S wave velocities but also of density, providing key constraints on the composition and thermal state of the lithosphere. Our approach relies on teleseimic waves, which illuminate the medium from below. We have developped a hybrid method in which a wave propagation method at the global scale (DSM/Direct solution method) is coupled with a spectral element method at the regional scale (Monteiller et al. 2013). With the spectral element method, we are able to model the 3D wave propagation effects in a computational domain of 400km long x 400km wide and 200 km deep, for an incident teleseismic wavefront introduced at the boundaries of this domain with periods as short as 2 s. The DSM global method allows to compute this incident field for a spherical Earth model. We use a multi-scale joint inversion of both gravity and seismic waveform data, accounting for the long wavelengths of the gravity field taken from a global model. In terms of inversion technique, we have validated an adjoint method for the inversion of seismic waveforms. An optimized BFGS inversion technique is used to minimize the difference between observed and computed full waveforms. The gradient of the misfit function gives the direction over which the model must be perturbed to minimize this difference. At each step of the inversion procedure we choose an optimal step length that accelerates the minimization. This is the crucial ingredient that allows us to build an efficient iterative full waveform inversion. We have extended this method by incorporating gravity data provided by the BGI/Bureau Gravimétrique International into the inversion. If the waveforms allow us to constrain the seismic velocities, they are less sensitive to the structure in density, which gives independent and crucial information to constrain the nature of rocks

  15. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    PubMed

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  16. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics

    PubMed Central

    Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the “core team”, facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  17. RADIO AND DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISTURBED COOL CORE CLUSTER ABELL 133

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, S. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Owers, M. S.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2010-10-10

    We present results based on new Chandra and multi-frequency radio observations of the disturbed cool core cluster Abell 133. The diffuse gas has a complex bird-like morphology, with a plume of emission extending from two symmetric wing-like features. The plume is capped with a filamentary radio structure that has been previously classified as a radio relic. X-ray spectral fits in the region of the relic indicate the presence of either high-temperature gas or non-thermal emission, although the measured photon index is flatter than would be expected if the non-thermal emission is from inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background by the radio-emitting particles. We find evidence for a weak elliptical X-ray surface brightness edge surrounding the core, which we show is consistent with a sloshing cold front. The plume is consistent with having formed due to uplift by a buoyantly rising radio bubble, now seen as the radio relic, and has properties consistent with buoyantly lifted plumes seen in other systems (e.g., M87). Alternatively, the plume may be a gas sloshing spiral viewed edge-on. Results from spectral analysis of the wing-like features are inconsistent with the previous suggestion that the wings formed due to the passage of a weak shock through the cool core. We instead conclude that the wings are due to X-ray cavities formed by displacement of X-ray gas by the radio relic. The central cD galaxy contains two small-scale cold gas clumps that are slightly offset from their optical and UV counterparts, suggestive of a galaxy-galaxy merger event. On larger scales, there is evidence for cluster substructure in both optical observations and the X-ray temperature map. We suggest that the Abell 133 cluster has recently undergone a merger event with an interloping subgroup, initialing gas sloshing in the core. The torus of sloshed gas is seen close to edge-on, leading to the somewhat ragged appearance of the elliptical surface brightness edge. We show

  18. Stellar populations of BCGs, close companions and intracluster light in Abell 85, Abell 2457 and IIZw108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. O. V.; Alpert, H. S.; Trierweiler, I. L.; Abraham, T.; Beizer, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first results from an integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey of a ˜75 kpc region around three brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), combining over 100 IFU fibres to study the intracluster light (ICL). We fit population synthesis models to estimate age and metallicity. For Abell 85 and Abell 2457, the ICL is best-fit with a fraction of old, metal-rich stars like in the BCG, but requires 30-50 per cent young and metal-poor stars, a component not found in the BCGs. This is consistent with the ICL having been formed by a combination of interactions with less massive, younger, more metal-poor cluster members in addition to stars that form the BCG. We find that the three galaxies are in different stages of evolution and may be the result of different formation mechanisms. The BCG in Abell 85 is near a relatively young, metal-poor galaxy, but the dynamical friction time-scale is long and the two are unlikely to be undergoing a merger. The outer regions of Abell 2457 show a higher relative fraction of metal-poor stars, and we find one companion, with a higher fraction of young, metal-poor stars than the BCG, which is likely to merge within a gigayear. Several luminous red galaxies are found at the centre of the cluster IIZw108, with short merger time-scales, suggesting that the system is about to embark on a series of major mergers to build up a dominant BCG. The young, metal-poor component found in the ICL is not found in the merging galaxies.

  19. Stellar Populations of BCGs, Close Companions and Intracluster Light in Abell 85, Abell 2457 and IIZw108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. O. V.; Alpert, H. S.; Trierweiler, I. L.; Abraham, T.; Beizer, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first results from an integral field (IFU) spectroscopic survey of a ˜75 kpc region around three Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs), combining over 100 IFU fibres to study the intracluster light (ICL). We fit population synthesis models to estimate age and metallicity. For Abell 85 and Abell 2457, the ICL is best-fit with a fraction of old, metal-rich stars like in the BCG, but requires 30-50% young and metal-poor stars, a component not found in the BCGs. This is consistent with the ICL having been formed by a combination of interactions with less massive, younger, more metal-poor cluster members in addition to stars that form the BCG. We find that the three galaxies are in different stages of evolution and may be the result of different formation mechanisms. The BCG in Abell 85 is near a relatively young, metal-poor galaxy, but the dynamical friction timescale is long and the two are unlikely to be undergoing a merger. The outer regions of Abell 2457 show a higher relative fraction of metal-poor stars, and we find one companion, with a higher fraction of young, metal-poor stars than the BCG, which is likely to merge within a gigayear. Several luminous red galaxies are found at the centre of the cluster IIZw108, with short merger timescales, suggesting the system is about to embark on a series of major mergers to build up a dominant BCG. The young, metal-poor component found in the ICL is not found in the merging galaxies.

  20. Electromagnetic modelling, inversion and data-processing techniques for GPR: ongoing activities in Working Group 3 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Giannopoulos, Antonis; van der Kruk, Jan

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 3 (WG3) 'EM methods for near-field scattering problems by buried structures; data processing techniques' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. WG3 is structured in four Projects. Project 3.1 deals with 'Electromagnetic modelling for GPR applications.' Project 3.2 is concerned with 'Inversion and imaging techniques for GPR applications.' The topic of Project 3.3 is the 'Development of intrinsic models for describing near-field antenna effects, including antenna-medium coupling, for improved radar data processing using full-wave inversion.' Project 3.4 focuses on 'Advanced GPR data-processing algorithms.' Electromagnetic modeling tools that are being developed and improved include the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique and the spectral domain Cylindrical-Wave Approach (CWA). One of the well-known freeware and versatile FDTD simulators is GprMax that enables an improved realistic representation of the soil/material hosting the sought structures and of the GPR antennas. Here, input/output tools are being developed to ease the definition of scenarios and the visualisation of numerical results. The CWA expresses the field scattered by subsurface two-dimensional targets with arbitrary cross-section as a sum of cylindrical waves. In this way, the interaction is taken into account of multiple scattered fields within the medium hosting the sought targets. Recently, the method has been extended to deal with through-the-wall scenarios. One of the

  1. Application of Abel-Plana Formula for Collapse and Revival of Rabi Oscillations in Jaynes-Cummings Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Hiroo

    In this paper, we give an analytical treatment to study the behavior of the collapse and the revival of the Rabi oscillations in the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM). The JCM is an exactly soluble quantum mechanical model, which describes the interaction between a two-level atom and a single cavity mode of the electromagnetic field. If we prepare the atom in the ground state and the cavity mode in a coherent state initially, the JCM causes the collapse and the revival of the Rabi oscillations many times in a complicated pattern in its time-evolution. In this phenomenon, the atomic population inversion is described with an intractable infinite series. (When the electromagnetic field is resonant with the atom, the nth term of this infinite series is given by a trigonometric function for √ {n} t, where t is a variable of the time.) According to Klimov and Chumakov's method, using the Abel-Plana formula, we rewrite this infinite series as a sum of two integrals. We examine the physical meanings of these two integrals and find that the first one represents the initial collapse (the semi-classical limit) and the second one represents the revival (the quantum correction) in the JCM. Furthermore, we evaluate the first- and second-order perturbations for the time-evolution of the JCM with an initial thermal coherent state for the cavity mode at low temperature, and write down their correction terms as sums of integrals by making use of the Abel-Plana formula.

  2. Current and emerging MR imaging techniques for the diagnosis and management of CSF flow disorders: a review of phase-contrast and time-spatial labeling inversion pulse.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Tsuchiya, K; Bradley, W G; Law, M; Winkler, M L; Borzage, M T; Miyazaki, M; Kelly, E J; McComb, J G

    2015-04-01

    This article provides an overview of phase-contrast and time-spatial labeling inversion pulse MR imaging techniques to assess CSF movement in the CNS under normal and pathophysiologic situations. Phase-contrast can quantitatively measure stroke volume in selected regions, notably the aqueduct of Sylvius, synchronized to the heartbeat. Judicious fine-tuning of the technique is needed to achieve maximal temporal resolution, and it has limited visualization of CSF motion in many CNS regions. Phase-contrast is frequently used to evaluate those patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus and a Chiari I malformation. Correlation with successful treatment outcome has been problematic. Time-spatial labeling inversion pulse, with a high signal-to-noise ratio, assesses linear and turbulent motion of CSF anywhere in the CNS. Time-spatial labeling inversion pulse can qualitatively visualize whether CSF flows between 2 compartments and determine whether there is flow through the aqueduct of Sylvius or a new surgically created stoma. Cine images reveal CSF linear and turbulent flow patterns. PMID:25012672

  3. Interpretation of Magnetic Anomalies in Salihli (Turkey) Geothermal Area Using 3-D Inversion and Edge Detection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timur, Emre

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous geophysical methods used to investigate geothermal areas. The major purpose of this magnetic survey is to locate the boudaries of active hydrothermal system in the South of Gediz Graben in Salihli (Manisa/Turkey). The presence of the hydrothermal system had already been inferred from surface evidence of hydrothermal activity and drillings. Firstly, 3-D prismatic models were theoretically investigated and edge detection methods were utilized with an iterative inversion method to define the boundaries and the parameters of the structure. In the first step of the application, it was necessary to convert the total field anomaly into a pseudo-gravity anomaly map. Then the geometric boudaries of the structures were determined by applying a MATLAB based software with 3 different edge detection algorithms. The exact location of the structures were obtained by using these boundary coordinates as initial geometric parameters in the inversion process. In addition to these methods, reduction to pole and horizontal gradient methods were applied to the data to achieve more information about the location and shape of the possible reservoir. As a result, the edge detection methods were found to be successful, both in the field and as theoretical data sets for delineating the boundaries of the possible geothermal reservoir structure. The depth of the geothermal reservoir was determined as 2,4 km from 3-D inversion and 2,1 km from power spectrum methods.

  4. Experimental investigation of an inversion technique for the determination of broadband duct mode amplitudes by the use of near-field sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Castres, Fabrice O; Joseph, Phillip F

    2007-08-01

    This paper is an experimental investigation of an inverse technique for deducing the amplitudes of the modes radiated from a turbofan engine, including schemes for stablizing the solution. The detection of broadband modes generated by a laboratory-scaled fan inlet is performed using a near-field array of microphones arranged in a geodesic geometry. This array geometry is shown to allow a robust and accurate modal inversion. The sound power radiated from the fan inlet and the coherence function between different modal amplitudes are also presented. The knowledge of such modal content is useful in helping to characterize the source mechanisms of fan broadband noise generation, for determining the most appropriate mode distribution model for duct liner predictions, and for making sound power measurements of the radiated sound field. PMID:17672635

  5. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, B; Ruiz, C L

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution. PMID:23902066

  6. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1482156 is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  7. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-15

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20–25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  8. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si -Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; et al

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research andmore » Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.« less

  9. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si-Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wofsy, Steve C.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Kort, Eric A.; Fischer, Marc L.; Trainer, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research and Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. We estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.

  10. Assessment of cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns using the time-spatial labeling inversion pulse technique with 3T MRI: early clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kayoko; Ono, Yuko; Yoneyama, Hiroko; Nishina, Yu; Aihara, Yasuo; Okada, Yoshikazu; Sakai, Shuji

    2014-06-01

    CSF imaging using the time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (time-SLIP) technique at 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. The study population comprised 15 healthy volunteers and five patients with MR findings showing expansive dilation of the third and lateral ventricles suggesting aqueductal stenosis (AS). Signal intensity changes were evaluated in the tag-labeled CSF, untagged brain parenchyma, and untagged CSF of healthy volunteers by changing of black-blood time-inversion pulse (BBTI). CSF flow from the aqueduct to the third ventricle, the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle, and the foramen of Monro to the lateral ventricle was clearly rendered in all healthy volunteers with suitable BBTI. The travel distance of CSF flow as demonstrated by the time-SLIP technique was compared with the distance between the aqueduct and the fourth ventricle. The distance between the foramen of Monro and the lateral ventricle was used to calculate the CSF flow/distance ratio (CD ratio). The CD ratio at each level was significantly reduced in patients suspected to have AS compared to healthy volunteers. CSF flow was not identified at the aqueductal level in most of the patients. Two patients underwent time-SLIP assessments before and after endoscopic third ventriculostomies (ETVs). CSF flow at the ETV site was confirmed in each patient. With the time-SLIP technique, CSF imaging is sensitive enough to detect kinetic changes in CSF flow due to AS and ETV. PMID:24976193

  11. Characterization of the nonlinear elastic properties of soft tissues using the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique: inverse method, ex vivo and in vivo experiments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Li, Guo-Yang; Qian, Lin-Xue; Hu, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Dong; Liang, Si; Cao, Yanping

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic elastography has become a new clinical tool in recent years to characterize the elastic properties of soft tissues in vivo, which are important for the disease diagnosis, e.g., the detection of breast and thyroid cancer and liver fibrosis. This paper investigates the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) method commercialized in recent years with the purpose to determine the nonlinear elastic properties based on this promising technique. Particularly, we explore the propagation of the shear wave induced by the acoustic radiation force in a stressed hyperelastic soft tissue described via the Demiray-Fung model. Based on the elastodynamics theory, an analytical solution correlating the wave speed with the hyperelastic parameters of soft tissues is first derived. Then an inverse approach is established to determine the hyperelastic parameters of biological soft tissues based on the measured wave speeds at different stretch ratios. The property of the inverse method, e.g., the existence, uniqueness and stability of the solution, has been investigated. Numerical experiments based on finite element simulations and the experiments conducted on the phantom and pig livers have been employed to validate the new method. Experiments performed on the human breast tissue and human heel fat pads have demonstrated the capability of the proposed method for measuring the in vivo nonlinear elastic properties of soft tissues. Generalization of the inverse analysis to other material models and the implication of the results reported here for clinical diagnosis have been discussed. PMID:25476413

  12. Seismic Inversion Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason

    2009-09-16

    With the rapid advances in sophisticated solar modeling and the abundance of high-quality solar pulsation data, efficient and robust inversion techniques are crucial for seismic studies. We present some aspects of an efficient Fourier Optimally Localized Averaging (OLA) inversion method with an example applied to time-distance helioseismology.

  13. On Different Techniques for the Calculation of Bougher Gravity Anomalies for Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data in the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, A.; Hussein, M. J.; Velasco, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Density variations in the Earth result from different material properties, which reflect the tectonic processess attributed to a region. Density variations can be identified through measurable material properties, such as seismic velocities, gravity field, magnetic field, etc. Gravity anomaly inversions are particularly sensitive to density variations but suffer from significant non-uniqueness. However, using inverse models with gravity Bougher anomalies and other geophysical data, we can determine three dimensional structural and geological properties of the given area. We explore different techniques for the calculation of Bougher gravity anomalies for their use in joint inversion of multiple geophysical data sets. Various 2- and 3-Dimensional (3-D) gravity profile forward modeling programs have been developed as variations of existing algorithms; these variations have similarities, differences, and strengths and weaknesses. The purpose of this study is to determine the most effective gravity forward modeling method that can be used to combine the information provided by complementary datasets, such as gravity and seismic information, to improve the accuracy and resolution of Earth models obtained for the underlying structure of the Rio Grande Rift. In an effort to determine the most appropriate method to use in a joint inversion algorithm and a data fusion approach currently in development, we test each approach by using a model of the Rio Grande Rift obtained from seismic surface wave dispersion and receiver functions. We find that there are different uncertainties associated with each methodology that affect the accuracy achieved by including gravity profile forward modeling. Moreover, there exists a bigger margin of error associated to the 2-D methods due to the simplification of calculations that do not take into account the 3-D characteristics of the Earth's structure.

  14. Buoyant Bubbles and the Disturbed Cool Core of Abell 133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, T.; Nulsen, P.; Owers, M.; Sarazin, C.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    2010-03-01

    X-ray cavities, often filled with radio-emitting plasma, are routinely observed in the intracluster medium of clusters of galaxies. These cavities, or "bubbles", are evacuated by jets from central AGN and subsequently rise buoyantly, playing a vital role in the "AGN feedback" model now commonly evoked to explain the balance between heating and radiative cooling in cluster cores. As the bubbles rise, they can displace cool central gas, promoting mixing and the redistribution of metals. I will show a few examples of buoyant bubbles, then argue that the peculiar morphology of the Abell 133 is due to buoyant lifting of cool central gas by a radio-filled bubble.

  15. The discovery of diffuse steep spectrum sources in Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Intema, H. T.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Clarke, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Hierarchical galaxy formation models indicate that during their lifetime galaxy clusters undergo several mergers. An example of such a merging cluster is Abell 2256. Here we report on the discovery of three diffuse radio sources in the periphery of Abell 2256, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Aims: The aim of the observations was to search for diffuse ultra-steep spectrum radio sources within the galaxy cluster Abell 2256. Methods: We have carried out GMRT 325 MHz radio continuum observations of Abell 2256. V, R and I band images of the cluster were taken with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). Results: We have discovered three diffuse elongated radio sources located about 1 Mpc from the cluster center. Two are located to the west of the cluster center, and one to the southeast. The sources have a measured physical extent of 170, 140 and 240 kpc, respectively. The two western sources are also visible in deep low-resolution 115-165 MHz Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) images, although they are blended into a single source. For the combined emission of the blended source we find an extreme spectral index (α) of -2.05 ± 0.14 between 140 and 351 MHz. The extremely steep spectral index suggests these two sources are most likely the result of adiabatic compression of fossil radio plasma due to merger shocks. For the source to the southeast, we find that {α < -1.45} between 1369 and 325 MHz. We did not find any clear optical counterparts to the radio sources in the WHT images. Conclusions: The discovery of the steep spectrum sources implies the existence of a population of faint diffuse radio sources in (merging) clusters with such steep spectra that they have gone unnoticed in higher frequency (⪆1 GHz) observations. Simply considering the timescales related to the AGN activity, synchrotron losses, and the presence of shocks, we find that most massive clusters should possess similar sources. An exciting possibility

  16. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si -Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wofsy, Steve C.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Kort, Eric A.; Fischer, Marc L.; Trainer, Michael

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research and Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.

  17. A hybrid hydrologic-geophysical inverse technique for the assessment and monitoring of leachates in the vadose zone. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    'It is the objective of this proposed study to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This fundamentally new approach to site characterization and monitoring will provide detailed knowledge about hydrological properties, geological heterogeneity and the extent and movement of contamination. HHGIT combines electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to geophysically sense a 3D volume, statistical information about fabric of geological formations, and sparse data on moisture and contaminant distributions. Combining these three types of information into a single inversion process will provide much better estimates of spatially varied hydraulic properties and three-dimensional contaminant distributions than could be obtained from interpreting the data types individually. Furthermore, HHGIT will be a geostatistically based estimation technique; the estimates represent conditional mean hydraulic property fields and contaminant distributions. Thus, this method will also quantify the uncertainty of the estimates as well as the estimates themselves. The knowledge of this uncertainty is necessary to determine the likelihood of success of remediation efforts and the risk posed by hazardous materials. Controlled field experiments will be conducted to provide critical data sets for evaluation of these methodologies, for better understanding of mechanisms controlling contaminant movement in the vadose zone, and for evaluation of the HHGIT method as a long term monitoring strategy.'

  18. Synergetic technique combining elastic backscatter lidar data and sunphotometer AERONET inversion for retrieval by layer of aerosol optical and microphysical properties.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Juan; Flamant, Pierre H; Flamant, Cyrille

    2008-09-01

    We present a so-called lidar and almucantar (LidAlm) algorithm that combines information provided by standard elastic backscatter lidar (i.e., calibrated attenuated backscatter coefficient profile at one or two wavelengths) and sunphotometer AERONET inversion of almucantar like measurements (i.e., column-integrated aerosol size distribution and refractive index). The purpose of the LidAlm technique is to characterize the atmospheric column by its different aerosol layers. These layers may be distinct or partially mixed, and they may contain different aerosol species (e.g., urban, desert, or biomass burning aerosols). The LidAlm synergetic technique provides the extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles, particle size distributions, and backscatter-to-extinction ratios for each aerosol layer. We present the LidAlm procedure and sensitivity studies. The applications are illustrated with examples of actual atmospheric conditions encountered in the Paris area. PMID:18758531

  19. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Métayer, Olivier; Saurel, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOS named "Noble Abel stiffened gas," this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular "Stiffened Gas (SG)" EOS. It is a combination of the so-called "Noble-Abel" and "stiffened gas" equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.

  20. Hierarchical Velocity Structure in the Core of Abell 2597

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, Martin; Mushotzky, Richard

    2004-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton RGS and EPIC data of the putative cooling flow cluster Abell 2597. Velocities of the low-ionization emission lines in the spectrum are blue shifted with respect to the high-ionization lines by 1320 (sup +660) (sub -210) kilometers per second, which is consistent with the difference in the two peaks of the galaxy velocity distribution and may be the signature of bulk turbulence, infall, rotation or damped oscillation in the cluster. A hierarchical velocity structure such as this could be the direct result of galaxy mergers in the cluster core, or the injection of power into the cluster gas from a central engine. The uniform X-ray morphology of the cluster, the absence of fine scale temperature structure and the random distribution of the the galaxy positions, independent of velocity, suggests that our line of sight is close to the direction of motion. These results have strong implications for cooling flow models of the cluster Abell 2597. They give impetus to those models which account for the observed temperature structure of some clusters using mergers instead of cooling flows.

  1. Three-dimensional microwave imaging of realistic numerical breast phantoms via a multiple-frequency inverse scattering technique

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Jacob D.; Kosmas, Panagiotis; Hagness, Susan C.; Van Veen, Barry D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Breast density measurement has the potential to play an important role in individualized breast cancer risk assessment and prevention decisions. Routine evaluation of breast density will require the availability of a low-cost, nonionizing, three-dimensional (3-D) tomographic imaging modality that exploits a strong properties contrast between dense fibroglandular tissue and less dense adipose tissue. The purpose of this computational study is to investigate the performance of 3-D tomography using low-power microwaves to reconstruct the spatial distribution of breast tissue dielectric properties and to evaluate the modality for application to breast density characterization. Methods: State-of-the-art 3-D numerical breast phantoms that are realistic in both structural and dielectric properties are employed. The test phantoms include one sample from each of four classes of mammographic breast density. Since the properties of these phantoms are known exactly, these testbeds serve as a rigorous benchmark for the imaging results. The distorted Born iterative imaging method is applied to simulated array measurements of the numerical phantoms. The forward solver in the imaging algorithm employs the finite-difference time-domain method of solving the time-domain Maxwell’s equations, and the dielectric profiles are estimated using an integral equation form of the Helmholtz wave equation. A multiple-frequency, bound-constrained, vector field inverse scattering solution is implemented that enables practical inversion of the large-scale 3-D problem. Knowledge of the frequency-dependent characteristic of breast tissues at microwave frequencies is exploited to obtain a parametric reconstruction of the dispersive dielectric profile of the interior of the breast. Imaging is performed on a high-resolution voxel basis and the solution is bounded by a known range of dielectric properties of the constituent breast tissues. The imaging method is validated using a breast

  2. Stabilization of the total force in multi-finger pressing tasks studied with the 'inverse piano' technique.

    PubMed

    Martin, J R; Budgeon, M K; Zatsiorsky, V M; Latash, M L

    2011-06-01

    When one finger changes its force, other fingers of the hand can show unintended force changes in the same direction (enslaving) and in the opposite direction (error compensation). We tested a hypothesis that externally imposed changes in finger force predominantly lead to error compensation effects in other fingers thus stabilizing the total force. A novel device, the "inverse piano", was used to impose controlled displacements to one of the fingers over different magnitudes and at different rates. Subjects (n=10) pressed with four fingers at a constant force level and then one of the fingers was unexpectedly raised. The subjects were instructed not to interfere with possible changes in the finger forces. Raising a finger caused an increase in its force and a drop in the force of the other three fingers. Overall, total force showed a small increase. Larger force drops were seen in neighbors of the raised finger (proximity effect). The results showed that multi-finger force stabilizing synergies dominate during involuntary reactions to externally imposed finger force changes. Within the referent configuration hypothesis, the data suggest that the instruction "not to interfere" leads to adjustments of the referent coordinates of all the individual fingers. PMID:21450360

  3. Stabilization of the total force in multi-finger pressing tasks studied with the ‘inverse piano’ technique

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J.R.; Budgeon, M.K.; Zatsiorsky, V.M.; Latash, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    When one finger changes its force, other fingers of the hand can show unintended force changes in the same direction (enslaving) and in the opposite direction (error compensation). We tested a hypothesis that externally imposed changes in finger force predominantly lead to error compensation effects in other fingers thus stabilizing the total force. A novel device, the “inverse piano”, was used to impose controlled displacements to one of the fingers over different magnitudes and at different rates. Subjects (n =10) pressed with four fingers at a constant force level and then one of the fingers was unexpectedly raised. The subjects were instructed not to interfere with possible changes in the finger forces. Raising a finger caused an increase in its force and a drop in the force of the other three fingers. Overall, total force showed a small increase. Larger force drops were seen in neighbors of the raised finger (proximity effect). The results show that multi-finger force stabilizing synergies dominate during involuntary reactions to externally imposed finger force changes. Within the referent configuration hypothesis, the data suggest that the instruction “not to interfere” leads to adjustments of the referent coordinates of all the individual fingers. PMID:21450360

  4. Terahertz Wide-Angle Imaging and Analysis on Plane-wave Criteria Based on Inverse Synthetic Aperture Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing Kun; Qin, Yu Liang; Deng, Bin; Wang, Hong Qiang; Li, Jin; Li, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents two parts of work around terahertz imaging applications. The first part aims at solving the problems occurred with the increasing of the rotation angle. To compensate for the nonlinearity of terahertz radar systems, a calibration signal acquired from a bright target is always used. Generally, this compensation inserts an extra linear phase term in the intermediate frequency (IF) echo signal which is not expected in large-rotation angle imaging applications. We carried out a detailed theoretical analysis on this problem, and a minimum entropy criterion was employed to estimate and compensate for the linear-phase errors. In the second part, the effects of spherical wave on terahertz inverse synthetic aperture imaging are analyzed. Analytic criteria of plane-wave approximation were derived in the cases of different rotation angles. Experimental results of corner reflectors and an aircraft model based on a 330-GHz linear frequency-modulated continuous wave (LFMCW) radar system validated the necessity and effectiveness of the proposed compensation. By comparing the experimental images obtained under plane-wave assumption and spherical-wave correction, it also showed to be highly consistent with the analytic criteria we derived.

  5. Assessing the impact of cloud slicing techniques on estimates of surface CO2 exchange using atmospheric inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, A. E.; Kawa, S. R.; Crowell, S.; Browell, E. V.; Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typically more than half of the earth's surface is cloudy at any one point in time. Passive CO2 satellite instruments such as GOSAT and OCO-2 have historically filtered out these scenes, as being too difficult to interpret. However, with the advent of active sensing technologies coupled with ranging capabilities, many of these limitations are being lifted. While, the remote sensing community continues to grapple with the radiative-transfer aspects of the cloud-top CO2 retrieval problem, the carbon cycling community has begun to consider what parts of the carbon cycle might be constrained with this new stream of data. Using cloud data derived from CALIPSO, a simulated carbon cycle, and state of the art atmospheric inversion models, we will investigate the impact of "above cloud" partial-column retrievals of CO2 upon estimates of surface CO2 flux. In particular, we will investigate (1) the general constraint imposed upon surface CO2 fluxes, by retrievals over spatially and time coherent cloud structures around the globe as well as (2) the partitioning of gross primary production and respiration CO2 flux terms by differencing full-column and above-cloud partial column CO2 over scenes with optically thick low clouds.

  6. Order preserving contact transformations and dynamical symmetries of scalar and coupled Riccati and Abel chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin Pradeep, R.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Mohanasubha, R.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-07-01

    We identify contact transformations which linearize the given equations in the Riccati and Abel chains of nonlinear scalar and coupled ordinary differential equations to the same order. The identified contact transformations are not of Cole-Hopf type and are new to the literature. The linearization of Abel chain of equations is also demonstrated explicitly for the first time. The contact transformations can be utilized to derive dynamical symmetries of the associated nonlinear ODEs. The wider applicability of identifying this type of contact transformations and the method of deriving dynamical symmetries by using them is illustrated through two dimensional generalizations of the Riccati and Abel chains as well.

  7. A comparison of solute-transport solution techniques and their effect on sensitivity analysis and inverse modeling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Five common numerical techniques for solving the advection-dispersion equation (finite difference, predictor corrector, total variation diminishing, method of characteristics, and modified method of characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using discrete, randomly distributed, homogeneous blocks of five sand types. This experimental model provides an opportunity to compare the solution techniques: the heterogeneous hydraulic-conductivity distribution of known structure can be accurately represented by a numerical model, and detailed measurements can be compared with simulated concentrations and total flow through the tank. The present work uses this opportunity to investigate how three common types of results - simulated breakthrough curves, sensitivity analysis, and calibrated parameter values - change in this heterogeneous situation given the different methods of simulating solute transport. The breakthrough curves show that simulated peak concentrations, even at very fine grid spacings, varied between the techniques because of different amounts of numerical dispersion. Sensitivity-analysis results revealed: (1) a high correlation between hydraulic conductivity and porosity given the concentration and flow observations used, so that both could not be estimated; and (2) that the breakthrough curve data did not provide enough information to estimate individual values of dispersivity for the five sands. This study demonstrates that the choice of assigned dispersivity and the amount of numerical dispersion present in the solution technique influence estimated hydraulic conductivity values to a surprising degree.

  8. A novel pulse technique for thermal diffusivity determination of high-temperature levitated materials - Inverse analysis and experimental set-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, F.; Khodadadi, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    In order to determine the thermal diffusivity of materials at high temperatures, a two-step extended flash technique, which is applicable to levitated spherical samples, is proposed. The containerless flash method is modeled as an axisymmetric transient conduction heat transfer problem within the sphere subjected to a radiative boundary condition on its surface. The problem of nonlinearity which arises from the radiative heat transfer boundary condition is solved by replacing it with the measured time-dependent surface temperature data, thus giving rise to an 'Inverse Analysis'. Upon obtaining the analytic solution for the temperature field, the determination of the thermal diffusivity turns into a minimization problem, whereby the difference between the actual surface boundary condition and the analytic solution is minimized. In performing the proposed experiments, there is a need to undertake a cool-down experiment which should be governed by the lumped parameter analysis.

  9. Brig. Gen. Richard F. Abel and Col. Natan J. Lindsay answering questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Brigadier General Richard F. Abel, right, director of public affairs for the Air Force, and Colonel Nathan J. Lindsay of the USAF's space division, answer questions concerning STS-4 during a press conference at JSC on May 20, 1982.

  10. SHOCKING TAILS IN THE MAJOR MERGER ABELL 2744

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare 'jellyfish' galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging 'Bullet-like' subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  11. Large Scale Diffuse X-ray Emission from Abell 3571

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the Luman alpha forest suggest that there are many more baryons at high redshift than we can find in the Universe nearby. The largest known concentration of baryons in the nearby Universe is the Shapley supercluster. We scanned the Shapley supercluster to search for large scale diffuse emission with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and found some evidence for such emission. Large scale diffuse emission may be associated to the supercluster, or the clusters of galaxies within the supercluster. In this paper we present results of scans near Abell 3571. We found that the sum of a cooling flow and an isothermal beta model adequately describes the X-ray emission from the cluster. Our results suggest that diffuse emission from A3571 extends out to about two virial radii. We briefly discuss the importance of the determination of the cut off radius of the beta model.

  12. The cD galaxy in Abell cluster 1775

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. J. E.; Bhattacharya, B.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, a number of workers have studied the multiple nuclei cD galaxy in the rich Abell cluster 1775, trying to discover its nature. In all the cases though, very little has been published concerning its morphology. The majority of arguments about the nature of this object have been based on the relative radial velocities of the 2 components with each other and with the other galaxies in the cluster, or its radio morphology. Very little work has been done on the optical morphology. To rectify that lack of data, the authors have obtained charge coupled device (CCD) images of the cD. The authors find from the CCD data that the cD is unlikely to be a bound object and that there is strong evidence for a collision.

  13. Shocking Tails in the Major Merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare "jellyfish" galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging "Bullet-like" subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  14. Diffuse Radio Emission in the Galaxy Cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a low frequency (<1.4GHz) study of the diffuse radio halo and relic emission in the galaxy cluster Abell 0754. Images at 150 MHz made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) revealed 4 diffuse features; 3 of which are new. Images at 330 and 1363 MHz were created using archival data from the GMRT and the VLA respectively. These yield synchrotron spectral indices, α (S ∝ν-α), steeper than 2 for the new features. Adiabatic compression of fossil radio galaxy cocoon by shocks can lead to the formation of radio relics (Ensslin & Gopal-Krishna, 2001). In the framework of this model we find that the relic in A754 can be explained as a lurking cocoon of a radio galaxy; no shock compression is required to produce this emission. The implications of this result to the merger scenario in A754 are discussed.

  15. A shock front at the radio relic of Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.; Jauzac, M.; Vazza, F.; Owers, M. S.; Kneib, J.-P.; Tchernin, C.; Intema, H.; Knowles, K.

    2016-09-01

    Radio relics are Mpc-scale diffuse radio sources at the peripheries of galaxy clusters which are thought to trace outgoing merger shocks. We present XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.306), which reveal the presence of a shock front 1.5 Mpc east of the cluster core. The surface-brightness jump coincides with the position of a known radio relic. Although the surface-brightness jump indicates a weak shock with a Mach number M=1.7_{-0.3}^{+0.5}, the plasma in the post-shock region has been heated to a very high temperature (˜13 keV) by the passage of the shock wave. The low-acceleration efficiency expected from such a weak shock suggests that mildly relativistic electrons have been re-accelerated by the passage of the shock front.

  16. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts. PMID:17082451

  17. Single florescent nanodiamond in a three dimensional ABEL trap

    PubMed Central

    Kayci, Metin; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional single particle trapping and manipulation is an outstanding challenge in various fields ranging from basic physics to life sciences. By monitoring the response of a trapped particle to a designed environment one can extract its characteristics. In addition, quantum dynamics of a spatially scanned well-known particle can provide environmental information. Precise tracking and positioning of such a particle in aqueous environment is crucial task for achieving nano-scale resolution. Here we experimentally demonstrate three dimensional ABEL trap operating at high frequency by employing a hybrid approach in particle tracking. The particle location in the transverse plane is detected via a scanning laser beam while the axial position is determined by defocused imaging. The scanning of the trapped particle is accomplished through a nano positioning stage integrated to the trap platform. PMID:26559890

  18. The central star of the planetary nebula Abell 78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaler, J. B.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The ultraviolet spectrum of the nucleus of Abell 78, one of the two planetaries known to contain zones of nearly pure helium, is studied. The line spectrum and wind velocities are examined, the determination of interstellar extinction for assessing circumstellar dust is improved, and the temperature, luminosity, and core mass are derived. The results for A78 are compared with results for A30, and it is concluded that the dust distributions around the two central stars are quite different. The temperature of the A78 core is not as high as previously believed, and almost certainly lies between 67,000 K and 130,000 K. The most likely temperature range is 77,000-84,000 K. The core mass lies between 0.56 and 0.70 solar mass, with the most likely values between 0.56 and 0.58 solar mass.

  19. A comparison of geostatistically based inverse techniques for use in performance assessment analysis at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Results from Test Case No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, D.A.; Gallegos, D.P.

    1993-10-01

    The groundwater flow pathway in the Culebra Dolomite aquifer at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been identified as a potentially important pathway for radionuclide migration to the accessible environment. Consequently, uncertainties in the models used to describe flow and transport in the Culebra need to be addressed. A ``Geostatistics Test Problem`` is being developed to evaluate a number of inverse techniques that may be used for flow calculations in the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The Test Problem is actually a series of test cases, each being developed as a highly complex synthetic data set; the intent is for the ensemble of these data sets to span the range of possible conceptual models of groundwater flow at the WIPP site. The Test Problem analysis approach is to use a comparison of the probabilistic groundwater travel time (GWTT) estimates produced by each technique as the basis for the evaluation. Participants are given observations of head and transmissivity (possibly including measurement error) or other information such as drawdowns from pumping wells, and are asked to develop stochastic models of groundwater flow for the synthetic system. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of groundwater flow (computed via particle tracking) are constructed using the head and transmissivity data generated through the application of each technique; one semi-analytical method generates the CDFs of groundwater flow directly. This paper describes the results from Test Case No. 1.

  20. Properties of the Blue Galaxy Population in Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rix, H.-W.; Caldwell, N.

    2000-12-01

    Do star-forming spirals accreted recently by massive clusters evolve in a few Gyrs. into smooth disk galaxies with little or no current star formation? Hierarchical models of large-scale structure and the observed effect of the cluster environment on galaxy morphologies and star formation rates have given rise to many theories predicting such cluster galaxy evolution. Depending on the star formation truncation mechanism timescale, the more recent cluster arrivals should still have relatively young stellar populations and thus bluer colors (esp. in U-V) than the older, red early-types (E/S0) that define the cluster color-magnitude relation. Yet to date no significant population of bluer S0's has been found in local clusters, though we note previous studies have concentrated on the inner regions (R<0.5Mpc) of nearby clusters, which are expected to be dominated by older members. Therefore, we have obtained wide-field (R>0.6/h Mpc) UVI imaging for 10 local (z<0.06) Abell clusters, with 100's of spectroscopically confirmed members, to search the cluster outskirts for bluer S0's which may be recently accreted spirals. From our detailed photometry, we have measured structural parameters for a sample of over 300 U-band selected, spectroscopically confirmed members, by fitting each galaxy surface brightness profile with a PSF-convolved, de Vaucouleur's bulge plus exponential disk model. We have found a population of blue, disk-dominated galaxies, that are predominately in the outskirts (>0.75/h Mpc projected radius) of our first analyzed cluster, Abell 754 at z=0.053. We present the photometric and structural properties of this blue population.

  1. The distribution of dark and luminous matter in the unique galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lindsay J.; Clowe, Douglas I.; Coleman, Joseph E.; Russell, Helen R.; Santana, Rebecca; White, Jacob A.; Canning, Rebecca E. A.; Deering, Nicole J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Lee, Brandyn E.; Li, Baojiu; McNamara, Brian R.

    2016-06-01

    Abell 2146 (z = 0.232) consists of two galaxy clusters undergoing a major merger. The system was discovered in previous work, where two large shock fronts were detected using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, consistent with a merger close to the plane of the sky, caught soon after first core passage. A weak gravitational lensing analysis of the total gravitating mass in the system, using the distorted shapes of distant galaxies seen with Advanced Camera for Surveys - Wide Field Channel on Hubble Space Telescope, is presented. The highest peak in the reconstruction of the projected mass is centred on the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 2146-A. The mass associated with Abell 2146-B is more extended. Bootstrapped noise mass reconstructions show the mass peak in Abell 2146-A to be consistently centred on the BCG. Previous work showed that BCG-A appears to lag behind an X-ray cool core; although the peak of the mass reconstruction is centred on the BCG, it is also consistent with the X-ray peak given the resolution of the weak lensing mass map. The best-fitting mass model with two components centred on the BCGs yields M200 = 1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.4} × 1015 and 3^{+1}_{-2} × 1014 M⊙ for Abell 2146-A and Abell 2146-B, respectively, assuming a mass concentration parameter of c = 3.5 for each cluster. From the weak lensing analysis, Abell 2146-A is the primary halo component, and the origin of the apparent discrepancy with the X-ray analysis where Abell 2146-B is the primary halo is being assessed using simulations of the merger.

  2. A redshift survey of the strong-lensing cluster ABELL 383

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kurtz, Michael J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Coe, Dan; Rines, Kenneth J. E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu

    2014-03-01

    Abell 383 is a famous rich cluster (z = 0.1887) imaged extensively as a basis for intensive strong- and weak-lensing studies. Nonetheless, there are few spectroscopic observations. We enable dynamical analyses by measuring 2360 new redshifts for galaxies with r {sub Petro} ≤ 20.5 and within 50' of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG; R.A.{sub 2000} = 42.°014125, decl.{sub 2000} = –03.°529228). We apply the caustic technique to identify 275 cluster members within 7 h {sup –1} Mpc of the hierarchical cluster center. The BCG lies within –11 ± 110 km s{sup –1} and 21 ± 56 h {sup –1} kpc of the hierarchical cluster center; the velocity dispersion profile of the BCG appears to be an extension of the velocity dispersion profile based on cluster members. The distribution of cluster members on the sky corresponds impressively with the weak-lensing contours of Okabe et al. especially when the impact of foreground and background structure is included. The values of R {sub 200} = 1.22 ± 0.01 h {sup –1} Mpc and M {sub 200} = (5.07 ± 0.09) × 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} obtained by application of the caustic technique agree well with recent completely independent lensing measures. The caustic estimate extends direct measurement of the cluster mass profile to a radius of ∼5 h {sup –1} Mpc.

  3. A hybrid hydrologic-geophysical inverse technique for the assessment and monitoring of leachates in the vadose zone. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Glass, R.J.; Yeh, T.C.; LaBrecque, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from electric resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity of the vadose zone (from the ERT measurements) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related. As of the 21st month of a 36-month project, a three-dimensional stochastic hydrologic inverse model for heterogeneous vadose zones has been developed. This model employs pressure and moisture content measurements under both transient and steady flow conditions to estimate unsaturated hydraulic parameters. In this model, an innovative approach to sequentially condition the estimate using temporal measurements has been incorporated. This allows us to use vast amounts of pressure and moisture content information measured at different times while keeping the computational effort manageable. Using this model the authors have found that the relative importance of the pressure and moisture content measurements in defining the different vadose zone parameters depends on whether the soil is wet or dry. They have also learned that pressure and moisture content measurements collected during steady state flow provide the best characterization of heterogeneity compared to other types of hydrologic data. These findings provide important guidance to the design of sampling scheme of the field experiment described below.'

  4. The Use of Genetic Algorithms as an Inverse Technique to Guide the Design and Implementation of Research at a Test Site in Shelby County, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, R. W.

    2002-12-01

    The Shelby Farms test site in Shelby County, Tennessee is being developed to better understand recharge hydraulics to the Memphis aquifer in areas where leakage through an overlying aquitard occurs. The site is unique in that it demonstrates many opportunities for interdisciplinary research regarding environmental tracers, anthropogenic impacts and inverse modeling. The objective of the research funding the development of the test site is to better understand the groundwater hydrology and hydraulics between a shallow alluvial aquifer and the Memphis aquifer given an area of leakage, defined as an aquitard window. The site is situated in an area on the boundary of a highly developed urban area and is currently being used by an agricultural research agency and a local recreational park authority. Also, an abandoned landfill is situated to the immediate south of the window location. Previous research by the USGS determined the location of the aquitard window subsequent to the landfill closure. Inverse modeling using a genetic algorithm approach has identified the likely extents of the area of the window given an interaquifer accretion rate. These results, coupled with additional fieldwork, have been used to guide the direction of the field studies and the overall design of the research project. This additional work has encompassed the drilling of additional monitoring wells in nested groups by rotasonic drilling methods. The core collected during the drilling will provide additional constraints to the physics of the problem that may provide additional help in redefining the conceptual model. The problem is non-unique with respect to the leakage area and accretion rate and further research is being performed to provide some idea of the advective flow paths using a combination of tritium and 3He analyses and geochemistry. The outcomes of the research will result in a set of benchmark data and physical infrastructure that can be used to evaluate other environmental

  5. Spatial analysis of time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometric images by ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighted interpolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Milillo, Tammy M; Gardella, Joseph A

    2008-07-01

    Ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighted (IDW) are two interpolation methods for spatial analysis of data and are commonly used to analyze macroscopic spatial data in the fields of remote sensing, geography, and geology. In this study, these two interpolation techniques were compared and used to analyze microscopic chemical images created from time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry images from a patterned polymer sample of fluorocarbon (C(x)F(y)) and poly(aminopropyl siloxane) (APS, a.k.a. siloxane). Data was eliminated from the original high-resolution data set by successive random removal, and the image file was interpolated and reconstructed with a random subset of points using both methods. The statistical validity of the reconstructed image was determined by both standard geographic information system (GIS) validation statistics and evaluating the resolution across an image boundary using ASTM depth and image resolution methodology. The results show that both ordinary kriging and IDW techniques can be used to accurately reconstruct an image using substantially fewer sample points than the original data set. Ordinary kriging performed better than the IDW technique, resulting in fewer errors in predicted intensities and greater retention of original image features. The size of the data set required for the most accurate reconstruction of the original image is directly related to the autocorrelation present within the data set. When 10% of the original siloxane data set was used for an ordinary kriging interpolation, the resulting image still retained the characteristic gridlike pattern. The C(x)F(y) data set exhibited stronger spatial correlation, resulting in reconstruction of the image with only 1% of the original data set. The removal of data points does result in a loss of image resolution; however, the resolution loss is not directly related to the percentage of sample points removed. PMID:18537271

  6. Searching for Young S0 Galaxies in Abell 2052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rix, H.-W.; Caldwell, N.

    1999-12-01

    Numerous studies have established strong observational evidence for evolution in cluster member color and morphology. Such evolution is predicted by hierarchical structure formation scenarios where galaxy clusters evolve via accretion of mass from the field. It has been hypothesized that recently accreted large surface brightness spirals will rapidly evolve via some star formation (SF) truncation mechanism into smooth disk galaxies with little or no current SF, but relatively young stellar populations. These younger S0's (hereafter bluer S0's = BS0's) would have bluer colors than the older early-types (E/S0) that define the mean cluster color-magnitude relation (CMR). The existence of such galaxies provides explanations for the disappearance of the blue, star-forming disk galaxies that were common in clusters at z 0.5 (the Butcher-Oemler effect), and the increased fraction of S0's in present-day clusters. To date a significant population of BS0's in nearby clusters has not been found. Therefore, we have obtained wide field (R > 0.6 Mpc), high precision UVI photometry for a sample of 14 local (z < 0.06) Abell clusters, most with over <100 spectroscopically confirmed members. We present photometric results for our first completely reduced cluster, Abell 2052. We have selected candidate BS0's as those early-type members that deviate blueward from the CMR by more than the intrinsic CMR scatter. We used 2-D bulge/disk (B/D) decomposition as an indicator of morphology to refine our sample. This spring, we will obtain spectroscopy of this sample to confirm the relative youth of the stellar populations. In addition, we will use the B/D decompositions of these candidate BS0's to address the following questions: (1) do BS0's make up a significant fraction of the early-type members that deviated from the cluster mean CMR; (2) do BS0's avoid the inner cluster; (3) are BS0's bluer in their disks or bulges; (4) do BS0's exhibit a range of B/D ratios similar to that found in

  7. Digital imaging technique for optical emission spectroscopy of a hydrogen arcjet plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Ruyten, Wim M.

    1995-07-01

    A digital imaging technique has been developed for optical emission spectroscopy measurements of a 1.6-kW hydrogen arcjet plume. Emissions from the Balmer alpha and beta transitions of excited atomic hydrogen were measured with a computer-controlled red-green-blue color CCD detector with and without line-centered bandpass interference filters. A method for extending the effective dynamic range of the detector was developed, whereby images obtained with a wide range of exposure times are combined to form a single composite nonsaturated map of the plume emission structure. The line-of-sight measurements were deconvoluted to obtain the true radial intensity distribution with an inverse Abel transformation. Analysis of the inverted measurements indicates that the upper levels of the Balmer alpha and beta transitions are not thermalized with the electrons in the plasma. The local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption fails for this plasma, and the electron temperature is not equivalent to the apparent excitation

  8. Saturation of superstorms and finite compressibility of the magnetosphere: Results of the magnetogram inversion technique and global PPMLR-MHD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, V. V.; Mishin, V. M.; Karavaev, Yu.; Han, J. P.; Wang, C.

    2016-07-01

    We report on novel features of the saturation process of the polar cap magnetic flux and Poynting flux into the magnetosphere from the solar wind during three superstorms. In addition to the well-known effect of the interplanetary electric (Esw) and southward magnetic (interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz) fields, we found that the saturation depends also on the solar wind ram pressure Pd. By means of the magnetogram inversion technique and a global MHD numerical model Piecewise Parabolic Method with a Lagrangian Remap, we explore the dependence of the magnetopause standoff distance on ram pressure and the southward IMF. Unlike earlier studies, in the considered superstorms both Pd and Bz achieve extreme values. As a result, we show that the compression rate of the dayside magnetosphere decreases with increasing Pd and the southward Bz, approaching very small values for extreme Pd ≥ 15 nPa and Bz ≤ -40 nT. This dependence suggests that finite compressibility of the magnetosphere controls saturation of superstorms.

  9. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Cooray, Asantha R.; Holzappel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect toward the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas distribution to be strongly aspherical, as do the X-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction in two ways. We first compare the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deprojecting the three-dimensional gas density distribution and deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods and find that they agree within the errors of the measurement. We discuss the possible system- atic errors in the gas mass fraction measurement and the constraints it places on the matter density parameter, Omega(sub M).

  10. A shock at the radio relic position in Abell 115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botteon, A.; Gastaldello, F.; Brunetti, G.; Dallacasa, D.

    2016-07-01

    We analysed a deep Chandra observation (334 ks) of the galaxy cluster Abell 115 and detected a shock cospatial with the radio relic. The X-ray surface brightness profile across the shock region presents a discontinuity, corresponding to a density compression factor {C}=2.0± 0.1, leading to a Mach number {M}=1.7± 0.1 ({M}=1.4-2 including systematics). Temperatures measured in the upstream and downstream regions are consistent with what expected for such a shock: T_u=4.3^{+1.0}_{-0.6}{keV} and T_d=7.9^{+1.4}_{-1.1}{keV}, respectively, implying a Mach number {M}=1.8^{+0.5}_{-0.4}. So far, only few other shocks discovered in galaxy clusters are consistently detected from both density and temperature jumps. The spatial coincidence between this discontinuity and the radio relic edge strongly supports the view that shocks play a crucial role in powering these synchrotron sources. We suggest that the relic is originated by shock re-acceleration of relativistic electrons rather than acceleration from the thermal pool. The position and curvature of the shock and the associated relic are consistent with an off-axis merger with unequal mass ratio where the shock is expected to bend around the core of the less massive cluster.

  11. ABELL 1201: A MINOR MERGER AT SECOND CORE PASSAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Chengjiun; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Owers, Matt; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-06-20

    We present an analysis of the structures and dynamics of the merging cluster Abell 1201, which has two sloshing cold fronts around a cooling core, and an offset gas core approximately 500 kpc northwest of the center. New Chandra and XMM-Newton data reveal a region of enhanced brightness east of the offset core, with breaks in surface brightness along its boundary to the north and east. This is interpreted as a tail of gas stripped from the offset core. Gas in the offset core and the tail is distinguished from other gas at the same distance from the cluster center chiefly by having higher density, hence lower entropy. In addition, the offset core shows marginally lower temperature and metallicity than the surrounding area. The metallicity in the cool core is high and there is an abrupt drop in metallicity across the southern cold front. We interpret the observed properties of the system, including the placement of the cold fronts, the offset core, and its tail in terms of a simple merger scenario. The offset core is the remnant of a merging subcluster, which first passed pericenter southeast of the center of the primary cluster and is now close to its second pericenter passage, moving at {approx_equal} 1000 km s{sup -1}. Sloshing excited by the merger gave rise to the two cold fronts and the disposition of the cold fronts reveals that we view the merger from close to the plane of the orbit of the offset core.

  12. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Spectrum of Abell 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaRoque, S. J.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Reese, E. D.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Joy, M.; Grego, L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present an interferometric measurement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) at 1 cm for the galaxy cluster Abell 2163. We combine this data point with previous measurements at 1.1, 1.4, and 2.1 mm from the SuZIE experiment to construct the most complete SZE spectrum to date. The intensity in four wavelength bands is fit to determine the Compton y-parameter (y(sub 0)) and the peculiar velocity (v(sub p)) for this cluster. Our results are y(sub 0) = 3.56((sup +0.41+0.27)(sub -0.41-0.19)) X 10(exp -4) and v(sub p) = 410((sup +1030+460) (sub -850-440)) km s(exp -1) where we list statistical and systematic uncertainties, respectively, at 68% confidence. These results include corrections for contamination by Galactic dust emission. We find less contamination by dust emission than previously reported. The dust emission is distributed over much larger angular scales than the cluster signal and contributes little to the measured signal when the details of the SZE observing strategy are taken into account.

  13. Dynamical analysis of galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.; Canning, R. E. A.; King, L. J.; Lee, B. E.; Russell, H. R.; Baum, S. A.; Clowe, D. I.; Coleman, J. E.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; McNamara, B. R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Sanders, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the merging galaxy cluster system Abell 2146 using spectroscopy obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini North telescope. As revealed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the system is undergoing a major merger and has a gas structure indicative of a recent first core passage. The system presents two large shock fronts, making it unique amongst these rare systems. The hot gas structure indicates that the merger axis must be close to the plane of the sky and that the two merging clusters are relatively close in mass, from the observation of two shock fronts. Using 63 spectroscopically determined cluster members, we apply various statistical tests to establish the presence of two distinct massive structures. With the caveat that the system has recently undergone a major merger, the virial mass estimate is M_vir= 8.5^{+4.3}_{-4.7} × 10^{14} M_{⊙} for the whole system, consistent with the mass determination in a previous study using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal. The newly calculated redshift for the system is z = 0.2323. A two-body dynamical model gives an angle of 13°-19° between the merger axis and the plane of the sky, and a time-scale after first core passage of ≈0.24-0.28 Gyr.

  14. An optical analysis of the merging cluster Abell 3888

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakouri, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Dehghan, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present new AAOmega spectroscopy of 254 galaxies within a 30 arcmin radius around Abell 3888. We combine these data with the existing redshifts measured in a one degree radius around the cluster and performed a substructure analysis. We confirm 71 member galaxies within the core of A3888 and determine a new average redshift and velocity dispersion for the cluster of 0.1535 ± 0.0009 and 1181 ± 197 km s-1, respectively. The cluster is elongated along an East-West axis and we find the core is bimodal along this axis with two subgroups of 26 and 41 members detected. Our results suggest that A3888 is a merging system putting to rest the previous conjecture about the morphological status of the cluster derived from X-ray observations. In addition to the results on A3888 we also present six newly detected galaxy overdensities in the field, three of which we classify as new galaxy clusters.

  15. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootaninia, Zahra

    2015-05-01

    This thesis presents a study of the radio luminosity function and the evolution of galaxies in the Abell 2256 cluster (z=0.058, richness class 2). Using the NED database and VLA deep data with an rms sensitivity of 18 mu Jy.beam--1, we identified 257 optical galaxies as members of A2256, of which 83 are radio galaxies. Since A2256 is undergoing a cluster-cluster merger, it is a good candidate to study the radio activity of galaxies in the cluster. We calculated the Univariate and Bivariate radio luminosity functions for A2256, and compared the results to studies on other clusters. We also used the SDSS parameter fracDev to roughly classify galaxies as spirals and ellipticals, and investigated the distribution and structure of galaxies in the cluster. We found that most of the radio galaxies in A2256 are faint, and are distributed towards the outskirts of the cluster. On the other hand, almost all very bright radio galaxies are ellipticals which are located at the center of the cluster. We also found there is an excess in the number of radio spiral galaxies in A2256 compared to the number of radio ellipticals, counting down to a radio luminosity of log(luminosity)=20.135 W/Hz..

  16. Measuring Galaxy Properties in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2007-10-01

    We develop a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties, as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and we have already obtained spectroscopic redshifts for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. We fit a world coordinate system to the images using the software ``WCStools.'' We use ``SExtractor'' to extract sources from the images. We create software for merging catalogs in such a way as to avoid double counting, to reject cosmic rays, and to combine redundant measurements. The measured properties include magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We investigate the efficacy of our separation of galaxies and stars and find that it begins breaking down around R=19.0. We attempt to separate cluster members from foreground and background galaxies using the color-magnitude relation. In future work, we will investigate substructure (clumping) within clusters and its correlation with galaxy properties (especially color, size and morphology).

  17. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2009-04-01

    We have developed a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and redshifts exist for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. We fitted a world coordinate system to the images using the software ``WCStools,'' then used ``Source Extractor'' to extract sources from the images. We have created software for merging catalogs in such a way as to avoid double counting, to reject cosmic rays, and to combine redundant measurements. The software also corrects magnitude differences by comparing the mean difference and adding this to each individual catalog before merging it to a master catalog. The measured properties included in this study were magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We investigate the efficacy of our separation of galaxies and stars and find that it begins breaking down around R=19.0. We divide our master catalog into several subsamples for substructure analysis. For one subsample, we attempt to separate cluster members from foreground and background galaxies using the color-magnitude relation. We compare the results of substructure diagnostics for the subsamples. In future work, we will examine correlation of substructure with galaxy properties (especially color, size and morphology).

  18. Shedding light on the matter of Abell 781

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, D.; Dawson, William; Benson, Bryant

    2014-02-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 781 West has been viewed as a challenge to weak gravitational lensing mass calibration, as Cook & dell'Antonio found that the weak lensing signal-to-noise ratio in three independent sets of observations was consistently lower than expected from mass models based on X-ray and dynamical measurements. We correct some errors in statistical inference in Cook & dell'Antonio and show that their own results agree well with the dynamical mass and exhibit at most 2.2-2.9σ low compared to the X-ray mass, similar to the tension between the dynamical and X-ray masses. Replacing their simple magnitude cut with weights based on source photometric redshifts eliminates the tension between lensing and X-ray masses; in this case the weak lensing mass estimate is actually higher than, but still in agreement with, the dynamical estimate. A comparison of lensing analyses with and without photometric redshifts shows that a 1-2σ chance alignment of low-redshift sources lowers the signal-to-noise ratio observed by all previous studies which used magnitude cuts rather than photometric redshifts. The fluctuation is unexceptional, but appeared to be highly significant in Cook & dell'Antonio due to the errors in statistical interpretation.

  19. Chandra Observations of Point Sources in Abell 2255

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David S.; Miller, Neal A.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    In our search for "hidden" AGN we present results from a Chandra observation of the nearby cluster Abell 2255. Eight cluster galaxies are associated with point-like X-ray emission, and we classify these galaxies based on their X-ray, radio, and optical properties. At least three are associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN) with no optical signatures of nuclear activity, with a further two being potential AGN. Of the potential AGN, one corresponds to a galaxy with a post-starburst optical spectrum. The remaining three X-ray detected cluster galaxies consist of two starbursts and an elliptical with luminous hot gas. Of the eight cluster galaxies five are associated with luminous (massive) galaxies and the remaining three lie in much lower luminosity systems. We note that the use of X-ray to optical flux ratios for classification of X-ray sources is often misleading, and strengthen the claim that the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting an AGN based on optical data is significantly lower than the fraction based on X-ray and radio data.

  20. Anatomy-Based Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing Optimization in High-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Significant Dosimetric Advantage Over Other Optimization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Dayee Raben, Adam; Sarkar, Abhirup; Grimm, Jimm; Simpson, Larry

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To perform an independent validation of an anatomy-based inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) algorithm in obtaining superior target coverage and reducing the dose to the organs at risk. Method and Materials: In a recent prostate high-dose-rate brachytherapy protocol study by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (0321), our institution treated 20 patients between June 1, 2005 and November 30, 2006. These patients had received a high-dose-rate boost dose of 19 Gy to the prostate, in addition to an external beam radiotherapy dose of 45 Gy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Three-dimensional dosimetry was obtained for the following optimization schemes in the Plato Brachytherapy Planning System, version 14.3.2, using the same dose constraints for all the patients treated during this period: anatomy-based IPSA optimization, geometric optimization, and dose point optimization. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volume and organs at risk for each optimization method, from which the volume receiving at least 75% of the dose (V{sub 75%}) for the rectum and bladder, volume receiving at least 125% of the dose (V{sub 125%}) for the urethra, and total volume receiving the reference dose (V{sub 100%}) and volume receiving 150% of the dose (V{sub 150%}) for the planning target volume were determined. The dose homogeneity index and conformal index for the planning target volume for each optimization technique were compared. Results: Despite suboptimal needle position in some implants, the IPSA algorithm was able to comply with the tight Radiation Therapy Oncology Group dose constraints for 90% of the patients in this study. In contrast, the compliance was only 30% for dose point optimization and only 5% for geometric optimization. Conclusions: Anatomy-based IPSA optimization proved to be the superior technique and also the fastest for reducing the dose to the organs at risk without compromising the target coverage.

  1. Fast Computation of the Inverse CMH Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A fast computational method based on differential equation approach for inverse DOK model has been extended for the inverse CMH model. Also, a cobweb technique for calculating the inverse CMH model is also presented. The two techniques are differed from the point of view of flexibility and computation time.

  2. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  3. New approach for the inverse boundary value problem of Laplace's equation on a rectangle: technique renovation for the Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Feng, X. S.; Xiang, J.; Zuo, P.

    2014-12-01

    In Li et al. [2013, New approach for solving the inverse boundary value problem of Laplace's equation on a circle: Technique renovation of the Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction, J. Geophys. Res. Space., 118, 2876-2881], a couple of Hilbert transform relations were applied to the study of the ill-posedness for the essential GS reconstructions. In this further study, a detailed derivation for these reciprocal relations are presented in case of the plane circular region, and then the reciprocal relations are extended to apply to the plane rectangular region after a conformal mapping procedure. While for the case of plane rectangular region, it is confronted by a traditional problem of the so-called corner singularities, which divided the extended reciprocal relations into four integrals with end-point singularities. With the help of the extended Euler-Maclaurin expansion, new quadrature schemes are developed for these singular integrals. Benchmark testing with the analytic solutions on a rectangle boundary has also show the efficiency and robustness of these extensions. The new solution approach is also developed with the introduced reciprocal relations, and an iterated Tikhonov regularization scheme is applied to deal with the ill-posed linear operators appearing in the discretization of the new approach. The special case on the rectangular boundary is benchmarked with the analytic solutions. Numerical experiments highlight the efficiency and robustness of the proposed method. A robust solution approach is expected to be developed based on these new results for the GS equation on any 2D region with partial-known boundary conditions.

  4. U(1)-invariant membranes: The geometric formulation, Abel, and pendulum differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltukhin, A. A.; Trzetrzelewski, M.

    2010-06-15

    The geometric approach to study the dynamics of U(1)-invariant membranes is developed. The approach reveals an important role of the Abel nonlinear differential equation of the first type with variable coefficients depending on time and one of the membrane extendedness parameters. The general solution of the Abel equation is constructed. Exact solutions of the whole system of membrane equations in the D=5 Minkowski space-time are found and classified. It is shown that if the radial component of the membrane world vector is only time dependent, then the dynamics is described by the pendulum equation.

  5. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Holzapfel, William L.; Cooray, Asantha K.

    1999-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect towards the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas is strongly aspherical, on agreement with the morphology revealed by x-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction by comparing the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods. The Hubble constant derived for this cluster, when the known systematic uncertainties are included, has a very wide range of values and therefore does not provide additional constraints on the validity of the assumptions. We examine carefully the possible systematic errors in the gas fraction measurement. The gas fraction is a lower limit to the cluster's baryon fraction and so we compare the gas mass fraction, calibrated by numerical simulations to approximately the virial radius, to measurements of the global mass fraction of baryonic matter, OMEGA(sub B)/OMEGA(sub matter). Our lower limit to the cluster baryon fraction is f(sub B) = (0.043 +/- 0.014)/h (sub 100). From this, we derive an upper limit to the universal matter density, OMEGA(sub matter) <= 0.72/h(sub 100), and a likely value of OMEGA(sub matter) <= (0.44(sup 0.15, sub -0.12)/h(sub 100).

  6. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2008-10-01

    We continue development of a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties, as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and we have already obtained spectroscopic redshifts for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. For each CCD frame we fit a WCS (world coordinate system), remove bright cosmic rays, and extract sources using ``SExtractor.'' We create software for merging source catalogs in such a way as to reject residual cosmic rays and other invalid sources, and to combine redundant measurements without double counting. The measured properties include magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We compare our data to those of the HST (Hubble Space Telescope) and SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) archives to examine the accuracy of our star/galaxy separation and our color measurements. For our substructure investigation, we draw several subsamples of galaxies based on stellarity index, color (the color-magnitude relation), magnitude and velocity. The smallest subsample of spectroscopically confirmed members produces significant substructure signals from 1D (velocity) and 3D (x,y,velocity) diagnostics - a small, offset group may be the culprit. The 2D (x,y) diagnostics applied to the larger samples produce some significant statistics, the cause does not seem to be a large-scale merger, but perhaps several small groups. This is consistent with previous X-ray data showing X-ray emitting gas clumped around small groupings of galaxies.

  7. Measurement of temperature and electrons density distribution of atmospheric arc plasma by moiré deflectometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi Meidanshahi, Fatemeh; Madanipour, Khosro; Shokri, Babak

    2013-04-01

    In the present paper, the refractive index, electron density and temperature distribution of atmospheric arc plasmas are measured by moiré deflectometry. The deflection angle of rays passing through the plasma is obtained by moiré fringe analysis. Then by using inverse Abel transform integral for this axisymmetric plasma, the refractive index distribution is obtained in different points of plasma and environment. Considering the relation between plasma temperature and refractive index, the spatial temperature distribution of the arc plasma is evaluated. Also, in contrast to conventional models to obtain electron number density, in which the refractive index of plasmas is approximately assumed equal to the electron refractive index, a model is used for accurate and absolute measurement of the electron density profile. This technique is especially suitable for measuring axially symmetric plasma parameters.

  8. Electromagnetic inverse scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bojarski, N. N.

    1972-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic inverse scattering identity, based on the physical optics approximation, is developed for the monostatic scattered far field cross section of perfect conductors. Uniqueness of this inverse identity is proven. This identity requires complete scattering information for all frequencies and aspect angles. A nonsingular integral equation is developed for the arbitrary case of incomplete frequence and/or aspect angle scattering information. A general closed-form solution to this integral equation is developed, which yields the shape of the scatterer from such incomplete information. A specific practical radar solution is presented. The resolution of this solution is developed, yielding short-pulse target resolution radar system parameter equations. The special cases of two- and one-dimensional inverse scattering and the special case of a priori knowledge of scatterer symmetry are treated in some detail. The merits of this solution over the conventional radar imaging technique are discussed.

  9. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  10. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  11. Applying the Time-Domain Moment Tensor Inversion technique to Regional Earthquake Data in the Puerto Rico-Virgin Island Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Torres, F. A.; Lopez, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The quick determination of an earthquake's moment tensor, whose description relate to centroid depth, faulting geometry and size, is crucial for tsunami warning systems. Whether an event possesses the critical parameters to produce a devastating tsunami, tsunami warning centers must knowThis research project seeks to test, well-formulated time-domain moment tensor inversion code in order to obtain in quasi real-time faulting parameters of significant regional earthquakes in the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands region. The inversion code has been developed by researchers at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, whose main attractive is to decrease the time it takes to have an estimate calculation of a moment tensor for any major earthquake using regional data, approximately less than 7 minutes of an earthquake's origin time. Four seismic events in the region have been used as testbed to the inversion code configured for this area. In order to compare our results, previously computed and published moment tensor inversions from the Global CMT and USGS for the same events were used to assess the deviations from results obtained in this study. Our results indicate the inversion method is capable of reproducing the regional and teleseismic solutions, and thus can be incorporated into daily earthquake location operations at the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN) for quick estimation of faulting mechanisms and tsunami warning purposes.

  12. THE DISTRIBUTION OF DARK MATTER OVER THREE DECADES IN RADIUS IN THE LENSING CLUSTER ABELL 611

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S.; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Sand, David J.; Richard, Johan; Capak, Peter; Miyazaki, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the baryonic and dark matter distribution in the lensing cluster Abell 611 (z = 0.288), with the goal of determining the dark matter profile over an unprecedented range of cluster-centric distance. By combining three complementary probes of the mass distribution, weak lensing from multi-color Subaru imaging, strong lensing constraints based on the identification of multiply imaged sources in Hubble Space Telescope images, and resolved stellar velocity dispersion measures for the brightest cluster galaxy secured using the Keck telescope, we extend the methodology for separating the dark and baryonic mass components introduced by Sand et al. Our resulting dark matter profile samples the cluster from approx3 kpc to 3.25 Mpc, thereby providing an excellent basis for comparisons with recent numerical models. We demonstrate that only by combining our three observational techniques can degeneracies in constraining the form of the dark matter profile be broken on scales crucial for detailed comparisons with numerical simulations. Our analysis reveals that a simple Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile is an unacceptable fit to our data. We confirm earlier claims based on less extensive analyses of other clusters that the inner profile of the dark matter profile deviates significantly from the NFW form and find a inner logarithmic slope beta flatter than 0.3 (68%; where rho{sub DM} propor to r{sup -b}eta at small radii). In order to reconcile our data with cluster formation in a LAMBDACDM cosmology, we speculate that it may be necessary to revise our understanding of the nature of baryon-dark matter interactions in cluster cores. Comprehensive weak and strong lensing data, when coupled with kinematic information on the brightest cluster galaxy, can readily be applied to a larger sample of clusters to test the universality of these results.

  13. Reconstructing the projected gravitational potential of Abell 1689 from X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernin, Céline; Majer, Charles L.; Meyer, Sven; Sarli, Eleonora; Eckert, Dominique; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters can be used as cosmological probes, but to this end, they need to be thoroughly understood. Combining all cluster observables in a consistent way will help us to understand their global properties and their internal structure. Aims: We provide proof of the concept that the projected gravitational potential of galaxy clusters can directly be reconstructed from X-ray observations. We also show that this joint analysis can be used to locally test the validity of the equilibrium assumptions in galaxy clusters. Methods: We used a newly developed reconstruction method, based on Richardson-Lucy deprojection, that allows reconstructing projected gravitational potentials of galaxy clusters directly from X-ray observations. We applied this algorithm to the well-studied cluster Abell 1689 and compared the gravitational potential reconstructed from X-ray observables to the potential obtained from gravitational lensing measurements. We also compared the X-ray deprojected profiles obtained by the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm with the findings from the more conventional onion-peeling technique. Results: Assuming spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium, the potentials recovered from gravitational lensing and from X-ray emission agree very well beyond 500 kpc. Owing to the fact that the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm allows deprojecting each line of sight independently, this result may indicate that non-gravitational effects and/or asphericity are strong in the central regions of the clusters. Conclusions: We demonstrate the robustness of the potential reconstruction method based on the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm and show that gravitational lensing and X-ray emission lead to consistent gravitational potentials. Our results illustrate the power of combining galaxy-cluster observables in a single, non-parametric, joint reconstruction of consistent cluster potentials that can be used to locally constrain the physical state

  14. Red population of Abell 1314 : A rest-frame narrowband photometric evolutionary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, Yuvraj Harsha

    2014-06-01

    Red sequence galaxies form with an intense burst of star formation in the early universe to evolve passively into massive, metal rich, old galaxies at z ˜ 0. But Abell 1314 (z=0.034) is found to host almost all red sequence galaxy members - identified using the mz index, classified using the Principle Component Analysis technique and SDSS colour correlations - some of which show properties of low-mass, star forming, and metal rich galaxies. The variably spread Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) near the core forms a vital part in influencing the evolution of these members. To study their evolution, I correlated different parameters of the rest-frame narrowband photometry and the derived luminosity-weighted mean Single Stellar Population model ages and metallicities. The study finds the member galaxies evolve differently in three different sections of the cluster: 1. the region of ≤ 200 kpc hosts passively evolving old, massive systems which accumulate mass by dry, minor mergers, 2. the zone between 200-500 kpc shows stripped systems (or in the process of being gas stripped) by ram pressure with moderate star formation history, 3. the outer regions (≥ 500 kpc) show low-mass red objects with blue, star forming Butcher-Oemler galaxy like colours. This sort of environmental condition is known to harbour hybrid systems, like, the pseudo bulges, blue sequence E/S0 and Butcher-Oemler like satellite cluster galaxies. Overall, the cluster is found to be poor, quiescent with galaxies to have formed by the monolithic structure formation in the early universe and are now evolving with mergers and gas stripping processes by ram pressure.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Deep spectroscopy of Abell 85 (Agulli+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sanchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Palmero, L. D.; Yu, H.

    2016-07-01

    File a85_memb.dat contains 5 columns with the sky coordinates (RA;DE), the r and g band magnitudes and the recessional velocities for each 460 confirmed members of Abell 85 cluster. Details on the data set can be found in the paper. (1 data file).

  16. Abell 58 - a Planetary Nebula with an ONe-rich knot: a signature of binary interaction? .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, H. H. B.; De Marco, O.; Liu, X.-W.

    We have investigated the possibility that binary evolution is involved in the formation of the planetary nebula Abell 58. In particular, we assume a neon nova is responsible for the observed high oxygen and neon abundances of the central hydrogen-deficient knot of the H-deficient planetary nebula Abell 58 and the ejecta from the explosion are mixed with the planetary nebula. We have investigated different scenarios involving mergers and wind accretion and found that the most promising formation scenario involves a primary SAGB star that ends its evolution as an ONe white dwarf with an AGB companion at a moderately close separation. Mass is deposited on the white dwarf through wind accretion. So neon novae could occur just after the secondary AGB companion undergoes its final flash. However, the initial separation has to be fine-tuned. To estimate the frequency of such systems we evolve a population of binary systems and find that that Abell 58-like objects should indeed be rare and the fraction of Abell-58 planetary nebula is on the order of 10-4, or lower, among all planetary nebulae.

  17. Dark matter distribution in the merging cluster Abell 2163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucail, G.

    2012-04-01

    Context. The cluster Abell 2163 is a merging system of several subclusters with complex dynamics. It presents exceptional X-rays properties (high temperature and luminosity), suggesting that it is a very massive cluster. Recent 2D analysis of the gas distribution has revealed a complex and multiphase structure. Aims: This paper presents a wide-field weak lensing study of the dark matter distribution in the cluster in order to provide an alternative vision of the merging status of the cluster. The 2D mass distribution was built and compared to the galaxies and gas distributions. Methods: A Bayesian method, implemented in the Im2shape software, was used to fit the shape parameters of the faint background galaxies and to correct for PSF smearing. A careful color selection on the background galaxies was applied to retrieve the weak lensing signal. Shear signal was measured out to more than 2 Mpc (≃12' from the center). The radial shear profile was fit with different parametric mass profiles. The 2D mass map was built from the shear distribution and used to identify the different mass components. Results: The 2D mass map agrees with the galaxy distribution, while the total mass inferred from weak lensing shows a strong discrepancy to the X-ray deduced mass. Regardless of the method used, the virial mass M200 falls in the range 8 to 14 × 1014 h70-1 M⊙, a value that is two times less than the mass deduced from X-rays. The central mass clump appears bimodal in the dark matter distribution, with a mass ratio ~3:1 between the two components. The infalling clump A2163-B is detected in weak lensing as an independent entity. All these results are interpreted in the context of a multiple merger seen less than 1 Gyr after the main crossover. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of

  18. MUSE observations of the lensing cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, D.; Pelló, R.; Richard, J.; Lewis, J.; Patrício, V.; Cantalupo, S.; Herenz, E. C.; Soto, K.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Bacon, R.; Vernet, J. D. R.; Wisotzki, L.; Clément, B.; Cuby, J. G.; Lagattuta, D. J.; Soucail, G.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-05-01

    Context. This paper presents the results obtained with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) for the core of the lensing cluster Abell 1689, as part of MUSE's commissioning at the ESO Very Large Telescope. Aims: Integral-field observations with MUSE provide a unique view of the central 1 × 1 arcmin2 region at intermediate spectral resolution in the visible domain, allowing us to conduct a complete census of both cluster galaxies and lensed background sources. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of all sources found in the MUSE data cube. Two hundred and eighty-two objects were systematically extracted from the cube based on a guided-and-manual approach. We also tested three different tools for the automated detection and extraction of line emitters. Cluster galaxies and lensed sources were identified based on their spectral features. We investigated the multiple-image configuration for all known sources in the field. Results: Previous to our survey, 28 different lensed galaxies displaying 46 multiple images were known in the MUSE field of view, most of them were detected through photometric redshifts and lensing considerations. Of these, we spectroscopically confirm 12 images based on their emission lines, corresponding to 7 different lensed galaxies between z = 0.95 and 5.0. In addition, 14 new galaxies have been spectroscopically identified in this area thanks to MUSE data, with redshifts ranging between 0.8 and 6.2. All background sources detected within the MUSE field of view correspond to multiple-imaged systems lensed by A1689. Seventeen sources in total are found at z ≥ 3 based on their Lyman-α emission, with Lyman-α luminosities ranging between 40.5 ≲ log (Lyα) ≲ 42.5 after correction for magnification. This sample is particularly sensitive to the slope of the luminosity function toward the faintest end. The density of sources obtained in this survey is consistent with a steep value of α ≤ -1.5, although this result still

  19. A weak-lensing analysis of the Abell 383 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Radovich, M.; Grado, A.; Puddu, E.; Romano, A.; Limatola, L.; Fu, L.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We use deep CFHT and SUBARU uBVRIz archival images of the Abell 383 cluster (z = 0.187) to estimate its mass by weak-lensing. Methods: To this end, we first use simulated images to check the accuracy provided by our Kaiser-Squires-Broadhurst (KSB) pipeline. These simulations include shear testing programme (STEP) 1 and 2 simulations, as well as more realistic simulations of the distortion of galaxy shapes by a cluster with a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. From these simulations we estimate the effect of noise on shear measurement and derive the correction terms. The R-band image is used to derive the mass by fitting the observed tangential shear profile with an NFW mass profile. Photometric redshifts are computed from the uBVRIz catalogs. Different methods for the foreground/background galaxy selection are implemented, namely selection by magnitude, color, and photometric redshifts, and the results are compared. In particular, we developed a semi-automatic algorithm to select the foreground galaxies in the color-color diagram, based on the observed colors. Results: Using color selection or photometric redshifts improves the correction of dilution from foreground galaxies: this leads to higher signals in the inner parts of the cluster. We obtain a cluster mass Mvir = 7.5+2.7_{-1.9 × 1014} M⊙: this value is 20% higher than previous estimates and is more consistent the mass expected from X-ray data. The R-band luminosity function of the cluster is computed and gives a total luminosity Ltot = (2.14 ± 0.5) × 1012 L⊙ and a mass-to-luminosity ratio M/L 300 M⊙/L⊙. Based on: data collected with the Subaru Telescope (University of Tokyo) and obtained from the SMOKA, which is operated by the Astronomy Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada

  20. Crazy heart: kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, R.; Richtler, T.; West, M. J.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Lloyd-Davies, E.; Schuberth, Y.

    2011-04-01

    We study the structure and internal kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545 - a low surface brightness structure lying in the center of the cluster. We have obtained deep long-slit spectroscopy of the star pile using VLT/FORS2 and Gemini/GMOS, which is analyzed in conjunction with deep multiband CFHT/MEGACAM imaging. As presented in a previous study the star pile has a flat luminosity profile and its color is consistent with the outer parts of elliptical galaxies. Its velocity map is irregular, with parts being seemingly associated with an embedded nucleus, and others which have significant velocity offsets to the cluster systemic velocity with no clear kinematical connection to any of the surrounding galaxies. This would make the star pile a dynamically defined stellar intra-cluster component. The complicated pattern in velocity and velocity dispersions casts doubts on the adequacy of using the whole star pile as a dynamical test for the innermost dark matter profile of the cluster. This status is fulfilled only by the nucleus and its nearest surroundings which lie at the center of the cluster velocity distribution. Based on observations taken at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, under programme ID 080.B-0529. Also based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and SECYT (Argentina); and on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National

  1. Wavelet Sparse Approximate Inverse Preconditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tang, W.-P.; Wan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using sparse approximate inverses as preconditioners for Krylov subspace iterative methods. Recent studies of Grote and Huckle and Chow and Saad also show that sparse approximate inverse preconditioner can be effective for a variety of matrices, e.g. Harwell-Boeing collections. Nonetheless a drawback is that it requires rapid decay of the inverse entries so that sparse approximate inverse is possible. However, for the class of matrices that, come from elliptic PDE problems, this assumption may not necessarily hold. Our main idea is to look for a basis, other than the standard one, such that a sparse representation of the inverse is feasible. A crucial observation is that the kind of matrices we are interested in typically have a piecewise smooth inverse. We exploit this fact, by applying wavelet techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse in the wavelet basis. We shall justify theoretically and numerically that our approach is effective for matrices with smooth inverse. We emphasize that in this paper we have only presented the idea of wavelet approximate inverses and demonstrated its potential but have not yet developed a highly refined and efficient algorithm.

  2. Application of a XMM-Newton EPIC Monte Carlo to Analysis And Interpretation of Data for Abell 1689, RXJ0658-55 And the Centaurus Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Karl E.; Peterson, J.R.; Madejski, G.M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-17

    We propose a new Monte Carlo method to study extended X-ray sources with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard XMM Newton. The Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI) technique, described in a companion paper, is applied here to the EPIC data for the clusters of galaxies Abell 1689, Centaurus and RXJ 0658-55 (the ''bullet cluster''). We aim to show the advantages of this method of simultaneous spectral-spatial modeling over traditional X-ray spectral analysis. In Abell 1689 we confirm our earlier findings about structure in temperature distribution and produce a high resolution temperature map. We also confirm our findings about velocity structure within the gas. In the bullet cluster, RXJ 0658-55, we produce the highest resolution temperature map ever to be published of this cluster allowing us to trace what looks like the motion of the bullet in the cluster. We even detect a south to north temperature gradient within the bullet itself. In the Centaurus cluster we detect, by dividing up the luminosity of the cluster in bands of gas temperatures, a striking feature to the north-east of the cluster core. We hypothesize that this feature is caused by a subcluster left over from a substantial merger that slightly displaced the core. We conclude that our method is very powerful in determining the spatial distributions of plasma temperatures and very useful for systematic studies in cluster structure.

  3. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  4. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach. PMID:18025701

  5. Inverse Floatation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Anish; Chatterjee, Souvick; Ganguly, Ranjan; Sen, Swarnendu; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    We have observed that capillarity forces may cause floatation in a few non-intuitive configurations. These may be divided into 2 categories: i) floatation of heavier liquid droplets on lighter immiscible ones and ii) fully submerged floatation of lighter liquid droplets in a heavier immiscible medium. We call these counter-intuitive because of the inverse floatation configuration. For case (i) we have identified and studied in detail the several factors affecting the shape and maximum volume of the floating drop. We used water and vegetable oil combinations as test fluids and established the relation between Bond Number and maximum volume contained in a floating drop (in the order of μL). For case (ii), we injected vegetable oil drop-wise into a pool of water. The fully submerged configuration of the drop is not stable and a slight perturbation to the system causes the droplet to burst and float in partially submerged condition. Temporal variation of a characteristic length of the droplet is analyzed using MATLAB image processing. The constraint of small Bond Number establishes the assumption of lubrication regime in the thin gap. A brief theoretical formulation also shows the temporal variation of the gap thickness. Jadavpur University, Jagadis Bose Centre of Excellence, Virginia Tech.

  6. The nature of the driving mechanism in the pulsating hybrid PG 1159 star Abell 43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, P.-O.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2005-10-01

    We extend our previous pulsational stability analyses of PG 1159 stars by modeling the hybrid PG 1159 type star Abell 43. We show that the standard κ-mechanism due to the ionization of C and O in the envelope of this H-rich PG 1159 star is perfectly able to drive g-mode pulsations. Thus, contrary to a recent suggestion, there is no need to invoke any new or exotic mechanism to explain the pulsational instabilities observed in this particular star. Our expected instability band for l=1 modes extends in period from ~2604 s to ~5529 s, which is consistent with the available photometric observations of Abell 43. We also suggest that efforts to detect luminosity variations in its sibling NGC 7094 be pursued.

  7. UV Observations of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1795 with the Optical Monitor on XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittaz, J. P. D.; Kaastra, J. S.; Tamura, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, F.; Peterson, J. R.; Ikebe, Y.; Lumb, D. H.; Paerels, F.; Stewart, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of broad band UV observations of the central regions of Abell 1795 observed with the optical monitor on XMM-Newton. As have been found with other UV observations of the central regions of clusters of galaxies, we find evidence for star formation. However, we also find evidence for absorption in the cD galaxy on a more extended scale than has been seen with optical imaging. We also report the first UV observation of part of the filamentary structure seen in H-alpha, X-rays and very deep U band imaging. The part of the filament we see is very blue with UV colours consistent with a very early (O/B) stellar population. This is the first direct evidence of a dominant population of early type stars at the centre of Abell 1795 and implies very recent star formation. The relationship of this emission to emission at other wavebands is discussed.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Halpha measurements in Abell 2465 (Wegner+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, G. A.; Chu, D. S.; Hwang, H. S.

    2015-07-01

    The wavelength of the Hα line at the redshift of Abell 2465 is near 817nm in a clear spectral region between the many telluric emission lines. A custom narrow-band filter for observing Hα was obtained from the Andover Corp. It has a peak transmission at 817.7nm (m817) and a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 8.77nm. The wide filter was a Gunn i (ig) filter with nearly the same central wavelength of 820nm and a FWHM of 185nm, and was manufactured by Custom Scientific. Hα observations of Abell 2465 were obtained 2012 September 19-23 using the 2.4m Hiltner telescope at the MDM Observatory on Kitt Peak. The 'Nellie' CCD was used. (1 data file).

  9. A survey by HEAO 1 of clusters of galaxies. III - The complete Abell catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. W.; Cruddace, R. G.; Wood, K. S.; Ulmer, M. P.; Kowalski, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    A catalog of 128 X-ray emitting clusters, including the Virgo Cluster, is presented. Ninety-one of these are new identifications. The catalog was obtained by searching the HEAO 1 survey observations for coincidences of X-ray sources with Abell clusters. The distribution of these sources in the sky has been examined in search of associations with other Abell clusters, with a null result. The X-ray luminosity has been correlated with cluster richness, but no association with Bautz-Morgan class has been found. The cluster luminosity function has been evaluated, and using this function the contribution of clusters to the diffuse X-ray background radiation has been estimated. It amounts to less than 15% at 2 keV and 3% at 6 keV.

  10. A combined optical/X-ray study of the Galaxy cluster Abell 2256

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabricant, Daniel G.; Kent, Stephen M.; Kurtz, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of Abell 2256 is investigated by combining X-ray observations of the intracluster gas with optical observations of the galaxy distribution and kinematics. Magnitudes and positions are presented for 172 galaxies and new redshifts for 75. Abell 2256 is similar to the Coma Cluster in its X-ray luminosity, mass, and galaxy density. Both the X-ray surface brightness and the galaxy surface density distributions exhibit an elliptical morphology. The radial galaxy distribution is steeper than the density profile of the X-ray-emitting gas, yet the galaxy velocity dispersion is higher than the equivalent value for the gas. Under the simplest assumptions that the galaxy velocity distribution is isotropic and the gas is isothermal, the galaxies and gas cannot be in hydrostatic equilibrium in a common gravitational potential. Models consistent with available data have mass-to-light ratios which increase with radius and galaxy orbits that are anisotropic with a radial bias.

  11. An X-ray temperature map of Abell 754: A major merger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. Patrick; Briel, Ulrich G.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first two-dimensional X-ray temperature map of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 754. We also present an X-ray surface brightness map with improved spatial resolution and sensitivity compared with previous maps. Both the temperature map and the surface brightness map show that A754 is in the throes of a violent merger; it is probably far from hydrostatic equilibrium.

  12. Statistical analysis of catalogs of extragalactic objects. II - The Abell catalog of rich clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, M. G.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a power-spectrum analysis are presented for the distribution of clusters in the Abell catalog. Clear and direct evidence is found for superclusters with small angular scale, in agreement with the recent study of Bogart and Wagoner (1973). It is also found that the degree and angular scale of the apparent superclustering varies with distance in the manner expected if the clustering is intrinsic to the spatial distribution rather than a consequence of patchy local obscuration.

  13. RELICS Discovery of a Probable Lens-magnified SN behind Galaxy Cluster Abell 1763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, S.; Coe, D.; Bradley, L.; Strolger, L.; Brammer, G.; Avila, R.; Ryan, R.; Ogaz, S.; Riess, A.; Sharon, K.; Johnson, T.; Paterno-Mahler, R.; Molino, A.; Graham, M.; Kelly, P.; Filippenko, A.; Frye, B.; Foley, R.; Schmidt, K.; Umetsu, K.; Czakon, N.; Weiner, B.; Stark, D.; Mainali, R.; Zitrin, A.; Sendra, I.; Graur, O.; Grillo, C.; Hjorth, J.; Selsing, J.; Christensen, L.; Rosati, P.; Nonino, M.; Balestra, I.; Vulcani, B.; McCully, C.; Dawson, W.; Bouwens, R.; Lam, D.; Trenti, M.; Nunez, D. Carrasco; Matheson, T.; Merten, J.; Jha, S.; Jones, C.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Salmon, B.; Bradac, M.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.; Wang, X.; Oesch, P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of a likely supernova (SN) in the background field of the galaxy cluster Abell 1763 (a.k.a. RXC J1335.3+4059, ZwCl 1333.7+4117). The SN candidate was detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations collected on June 17, 2016 as part of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS, HST program ID: 14096, PI: D.Coe).

  14. The Extraordinary Amount of Substructure in the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauzac, M.; Eckert, D.; Schwinn, J.; Harvey, D.; Baugh, C. M.; Robertson, A.; Bose, S.; Massey, R.; Owers, M.; Ebeling, H.; Shan, H. Y.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Richard, J.; Atek, H.; Clément, B.; Egami, E.; Israel, H.; Knowles, K.; Limousin, M.; Natarajan, P.; Rexroth, M.; Taylor, P.; Tchernin, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a joint optical/X-ray analysis of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z=0.308). Our strong- and weak-lensing analysis within the central region of the cluster, i.e., at R < 1 Mpc from the brightest cluster galaxy, reveals eight substructures, including the main core. All of these dark-matter halos are detected with a significance of at least 5σ and feature masses ranging from 0.5 to 1.4× 1014M⊙ within R < 150 kpc. Merten et al. (2011) and Medezinski et al. (2016) substructures are also detected by us. We measure a slightly higher mass for the main core component than reported previously and attribute the discrepancy to the inclusion of our tightly constrained strong-lensing mass model built on Hubble Frontier Fields data. X-ray data obtained by XMM-Newton reveal four remnant cores, one of them a new detection, and three shocks. Unlike Merten et al. (2011), we find all cores to have both dark and luminous counterparts. A comparison with clusters of similar mass in the MXXL simulations yields no objects with as many massive substructures as observed in Abell 2744, confirming that Abell 2744 is an extreme system. We stress that these properties still do not constitute a challenge to ΛCDM, as caveats apply to both the simulation and the observations: for instance, the projected mass measurements from gravitational lensing and the limited resolution of the sub-haloes finders. We discuss implications of Abell 2744 for the plausibility of different dark-matter candidates and, finally, measure a new upper limit on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter of σDM < 1.28 cm2g-1(68% CL), in good agreement with previous results from Harvey et al. (2015).

  15. Assessing the Bayesian inversion technique of C-band synthetic aperture radar data for the retrieval of wind fields in marine coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Maria; Rana, Fabio Michele; De Carolis, Giacomo; Pasquariello, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors have demonstrated their ability to provide accurate wind speed and direction measurements in the ocean. Although SAR capability to image the sea surface at a suitable spatial resolution, SAR wind field retrieval in marine coastal areas still remains an open issue. The aim of this work is to assess the potential and limits of the Bayesian approach to the C-band NRCS SAR inversion problem for the retrieval of wind fields in marine coastal areas. A dataset of 139 SAR images gathered by the European ERS-2 and ENVISAT satellites during 2007 was analyzed to estimate the sea surface wind vectors over three selected coastal sites in the Mediterranean Sea, offshore Puglia region (Italy). The sites were instrumented to monitor marine and environmental parameters, including wind intensity and direction for further comparison with SAR wind estimations. Results discussed in this study show that the statistical approach in the retrieval of SAR wind speed can be applied in coastal areas with performances comparable with those obtained off-shore. In contrast, the SAR inversion procedure was not able to retrieve wind direction with the same accuracy.

  16. Novel technique for full-thickness resection of gastric malignancy: feasibility of nonexposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (news) in porcine models.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takashi; Goto, Osamu; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Hatao, Fumihiko; Wada, Ikuo; Niimi, Keiko; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Fujishiro, Mitsuihiro; Koike, Kazuhiko; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2013-12-01

    Full-thickness resection for gastric malignancy carries a risk of peritoneal dissemination due to opening of the gastric lumen. We evaluated the feasibility and safety a novel method of full-thickness resection without transmural communication, called nonexposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery in ex vivo and in vivo porcine models. Six explanted porcine stomachs and 6 live pigs were used for this study. After marking and submucosal injection around 3 cm simulated lesions, the seromuscular layer was laparoscopically cut and sutured with the lesion inverted to the inside. Consecutively, a mucosubmucosal incision was made endoscopically. Three pigs used for the survival study were monitored for 7 days. All 12 lesions were successfully resected en bloc without perforation. The 3 pigs survived for 1 week without adverse events, and necropsy revealed neither leakage nor abscess formation related to the operation. We demonstrated nonexposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery to be technically feasible and safe in both ex vivo and in vivo porcine studies. PMID:24300935

  17. Diffuse light and building history of the galaxy cluster Abell 2667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covone, G.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Kneib, J.-P.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Slezak, E.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.We searched for diffuse intracluster light in the galaxy cluster Abell 2667 (z=0.233) from HST images in three broad band-filters. Methods: .We applied an iterative multi-scale wavelet analysis and reconstruction technique to these images, which allows to subtract stars and galaxies from the original images. Results: .We detect a zone of diffuse emission southwest of the cluster center (DS1) and a second faint object (ComDif) within DS1. Another diffuse source (DS2) may be detected at lower confidence level northeast of the center. These sources of diffuse light contribute to 10-15% of the total visible light in the cluster. Whether they are independent entities or part of the very elliptical external envelope of the central galaxy remains unclear. Deep VLT VIMOS integral field spectroscopy reveals a faint continuum at the positions of DS1 and ComDif but do not allow a redshift to be computed, so we conclude if these sources are part of the central galaxy or not. A hierarchical substructure detection method reveals the presence of several galaxy pairs and groups defining a similar direction to the one drawn by the DS1 - central galaxy - DS2 axis. The analysis of archive XMM-Newton and Chandra observations shows X-ray emission elongated in the same direction. The X-ray temperature map shows the presence of a cool core, a broad cool zone stretching from north to south, and hotter regions towards the northeast, southwest, and northwest. This might suggest shock fronts along these directions produced by infalling material, even if uncertainties remain quite large on the temperature determination far from the center. Conclusions: .These various data are consistent with a picture in which diffuse sources are concentrations of tidal debris and harassed matter expelled from infalling galaxies by tidal stripping and undergoing an accretion process onto the central cluster galaxy; as such, they are expected to be found along the main infall directions. Note, however

  18. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software

    PubMed Central

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the ’omics’ context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  19. The Two-Point Spatial Correlation Function for the MX Northern Abell Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.; Slinglend, K. A.; Batuski, D. J.; Hill, J.

    1997-12-01

    The results from the COBE satellite show the existence of structure in the cosmic microwave background radiation on scales ~ 10% or more of the horizon scale of the Universe. Rich clusters of galaxies from the Abell/ACO catalogs show evidence of structure on scales of 100h(-1) Mpc and hold the promise of confirming structure on the scale of the COBE results. However, previous analyses for large-scale structure based on the clusters in these catalogs suffer from small sample sizes, imcomplete samples, and large uncertainties in the measured data. Our efforts with the MX Cluster Redshift Survey have resulted in galaxy redshifts for 95 rich Abell clusters returning 88 positive cluster identifications. Five cluster fields did not supply enough data for cluster positions and two clusters were found to be simply projections of galaxies strung out along the line of sight. By obtaining an average of 9 member galaxy redshifts per cluster, we have greatly reduced uncertainty in cluster locations. The Abell catalog is now 98% complete out to m10 <= 16.8. This complete sample has provided us with the necessary data to calculate the two-point spatial correlation function, xi (r), characterized by the slope of its power-law fit gamma and a scale length r_o. Preliminary results give gamma = -2.26+/-0.14 and r_o = 21.9+/- 1.5 h(-1) Mpc. These results are then compared with other spatial analyses based on different samples.

  20. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software.

    PubMed

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the 'omics' context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  1. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s‑1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX–TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  2. Deciphering the bipolar planetary nebula Abell 14 with 3D ionization and morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akras, S.; Clyne, N.; Boumis, P.; Monteiro, H.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Redman, M. P.; Williams, S.

    2016-04-01

    Abell 14 is a poorly studied object despite being considered a born-again planetary nebula. We performed a detailed study of its 3D morphology and ionization structure using the SHAPE and MOCASSIN codes. We found that Abell 14 is a highly evolved, bipolar nebula with a kinematical age of ˜19 400 yr for a distance of 4 kpc. The high He abundance, and N/O ratio indicate a progenitor of 5 M⊙ that has experienced the third dredge-up and hot bottom burning phases. The stellar parameters of the central source reveal a star at a highly evolved stage near to the white dwarf cooling track, being inconsistent with the born-again scenario. The nebula shows unexpectedly strong [N I] λ5200 and [O I] λ6300 emission lines indicating possible shock interactions. Abell 14 appears to be a member of a small group of highly evolved, extreme type-I planetary nebulae (PNe). The members of this group lie at the lower-left corner of the PNe regime on the [N II]/Hα versus [S II]/Hα diagnostic diagram, where shock-excited regions/objects are also placed. The low luminosity of their central stars, in conjunction with the large physical size of the nebulae, result in a very low photoionization rate, which can make any contribution of shock interaction easily perceptible, even for small velocities.

  3. ASCA Temperature Maps of Three Clusters of Galaxies: Abell 1060, AWM 7, and the Centaurus Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusho, Tae; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ohashi, Takaya; Shibata, Ryo; Kagei, Tomohiro; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Ezawa, Hajime; Ikebe, Yasushi

    2001-06-01

    We present two-dimensional temperature maps of three bright clusters of galaxies (Abell 1060, AWM 7, and the Centaurus cluster), based on multi-pointing observations with the ASCA GIS. The temperatures were derived from hardness ratios by taking into account the XRT response. For the Centaurus cluster, we subtracted the central cool component using the previous ASCA and ROSAT results, and the metallicity gradients observed in AWM 7 and the Centaurus cluster were included in deriving the temperatures. The intracluster medium in Abell 1060 and AWM 7 is almost isothermal from the center to the outer regions with temperatures of 3.3 and 3.9 keV, respectively. The Centaurus cluster exhibits remarkable hot regions within about 30' from the cluster center, showing a temperature increase of ×0.8 keV from the surrounding level of 3.5keV, and the outer cool regions with lower temperatures by -1.3 keV. These results imply that a strong merger has occurred in the Centaurus in the recent 2-3Gyr, and that the central cool component has survived it. In contrast, the gas in Abell 1060 was well-mixed in an early period, which probably has prevented the development of a central cool component. In AWM 7, mixing of the gas should have occurred in a period earlier than the epoch of metal enrichment.

  4. X-ray cavities and temperature jumps in the environment of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkamble, S. S.; Vagshette, N. D.; Pawar, P. K.; Patil, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present results based on the systematic analysis of high resolution 95 ks Chandra observations of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390 at the redshift of z = 0.228 that hosts an energetic radio AGN. This analysis has enabled us to investigate five X-ray deficient cavities in the atmosphere of Abell 2390 within central 30''. Presence of these cavities have been confirmed through a variety of image processing techniques like, the surface brightness profiles, unsharp masked image, as well as 2D elliptical model subtracted residual map. Temperature profile as well as 2D temperature map revealed structures in the distribution of ICM, in the sense that ICM in the NW direction is cooler than that on the SE direction. Temperature jump in all directions is evident near 25'' (90.5 kpc) corresponding to the average Mach number 1.44± 0.05, while another jump from 7.47 keV to 9.10 keV at 68'' (246 kpc) in the north-west direction, corresponding to Mach number 1.22± 0.06 and these jumps are associated with the cold fronts. Tricolour map as well as hardness ratio map detects cool gas clumps in the central 30 kpc region of temperature 4.45_{-0.10}^{+0.16} keV. The entropy profile derived from the X-ray analysis is found to fall systematically inward in a power-law fashion and exhibits a floor near 12.20± 2.54 keV cm2 in the central region. This flattening of the entropy profile in the core region confirms the intermittent heating at the centre by AGN. The diffuse radio emission map at 1.4 GHz using VLA L-band data exhibits highly asymmetric morphology with an edge in the north-west direction coinciding with the X-ray edge seen in the unsharp mask image. The mechanical power injected by the AGN in the form of X-ray cavities is found to be 5.94× 10^{45} erg s^{-1} and is roughly an order of magnitude higher than the energy lost by the ICM in the form of X-ray emission, confirming that AGN feedback is capable enough to quench the cooling flow in this cluster.

  5. Probing single biomolecules in solution using the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Goldsmith, Randall H; Jiang, Yan; Bockenhauer, Samuel D; Moerner, W E

    2012-11-20

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements allow researchers to study asynchronous dynamics and expose molecule-to-molecule structural and behavioral diversity, which contributes to the understanding of biological macromolecules. To provide measurements that are most consistent with the native environment of biomolecules, researchers would like to conduct these measurements in the solution phase if possible. However, diffusion typically limits the observation time to approximately 1 ms in many solution-phase single-molecule assays. Although surface immobilization is widely used to address this problem, this process can perturb the system being studied and contribute to the observed heterogeneity. Combining the technical capabilities of high-sensitivity single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, real-time feedback control and electrokinetic flow in a microfluidic chamber, we have developed a device called the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap to significantly prolong the observation time of single biomolecules in solution. We have applied the ABEL trap method to explore the photodynamics and enzymatic properties of a variety of biomolecules in aqueous solution and present four examples: the photosynthetic antenna allophycocyanin, the chaperonin enzyme TRiC, a G protein-coupled receptor protein, and the blue nitrite reductase redox enzyme. These examples illustrate the breadth and depth of information which we can extract in studies of single biomolecules with the ABEL trap. When confined in the ABEL trap, the photosynthetic antenna protein allophycocyanin exhibits rich dynamics both in its emission brightness and its excited state lifetime. As each molecule discontinuously converts from one emission/lifetime level to another in a primarily correlated way, it undergoes a series of state changes. We studied the ATP binding stoichiometry of the multi-subunit chaperonin enzyme TRiC in the ABEL trap by counting the number of hydrolyzed Cy3-ATP using stepwise

  6. Inversion of Three Layers Multi-Scale SPM Model Based on Neural Network Technique for the Retrieval of Soil Multi-Scale Roughness and Moisture Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosni, I.; JaafriGhamki, M.; Bennaceur Farah, L.; Naceur, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a multi-layered multi-scale backscattering model for a lossy medium and a neural network inversion procedure has been presented. We have used a bi-dimensional multi-scale (2D MLS) roughness description where the surface is considered as a superposition of a finite number of one-dimensional Gaussian processes each one having a spatial scale using the wavelet transform and the Mallat algorithm to describe natural surface roughness. An adapted three layers 2D MLS small perturbations (SPM) model has been used to describe radar backscattering response of semiarid sub-surfaces. The total reflection coefficients of the natural soil are computed using the multilayer model, and volumetric scattering is approximated by the internal reflections between layers. The original multi-scale SPM model includes only the surface scattering of the natural bare soil, while the multilayer soil modified 2D MLS SPM model includes both the surface scattering and the volumetric scattering within the soil. This multi-layered model has been used to calculate the total surface reflection coefficients of a natural soil surface for both horizontal and vertical co-polarizations. A parametric analysis presents the dependence of the backscattering coefficient on multi scale roughness and soil. The overall objective of this work is to retrieve soil surfaces parameters namely roughness and soil moisture related to the dielectric constant by inverting the radar backscattered signal from natural soil surfaces. To perform the inversion of the modified three layers 2D MLS SPM model, we used a multilayer neural network (NN) architecture trained by a back-propagation learning rule.

  7. Uterine Inversion; A case report.

    PubMed

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, Ma

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  8. Uterine Inversion; A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, MA

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  9. Inversion of X-band nautical radar data for sea-state monitoring: a new technique to estimate the surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafino, F.; Lugni, C.; Raffa, F.; Soldovieri, F.

    2009-04-01

    The inversion of X-band marine images sequences allows obtaining the sea state parameter estimation and the reconstruction of the wave height evolution [1-4]. This result is possible tanks to the fact that the backscattering from the sea is "visible", under some conditions, on the marine radar images. These radar signatures, that typically are suppressed because represent a noise (clutter) for the navigation, are the "useful signal" to be processed in order to achieve information about the sea state: peak wave length, period and direction, current speed and direction and the evolution of surface elevation. The backscattering phenomena is due to the Bragg resonance with ocean waves of wavelengths similar to those of the transmitted electromagnetic waves. In particular, the longer waves modulate the backscattering phenomenon and thus they become visible in the "radar" images. As a consequence, the radar image is not a direct representation of the sea state and thus a processing procedure is needed in order to reconstruct the sea state. After a Fourier Transform of the data, a spectral filter is used to erase all the undesired phenomenon via a dispersion relation. The use of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) allows the passage from the radar spectrum to sea spectrum; finally, the resulting spectrum is Fourier transformed to return to the space-time domain. A key step of the whole procedure is the generation of the spectral filter. To built the filter the surface currents have to be estimated, if they are not correctly determined the results of the overall inversion are quite poor. This drawback is further increased when the values of the surface current become high or the data are acquired by a moving vessel, since the problem of the determination of the current is quite complicated and particular attention needs the filtering procedure. This work presents an innovative procedure able to estimate the free-surface current values with high accuracy compared to the

  10. Revising the retrieval technique of a long-term stratospheric HNO3 data set: from a constrained matrix inversion to the optimal estimation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, I.; Muscari, G.; de Zafra, R. L.

    2011-07-01

    The Ground-Based Millimeter-wave Spectrometer (GBMS) was designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in the early 1990s and since then has carried out many measurement campaigns of stratospheric O3, HNO3, CO and N2O at polar and mid-latitudes. Its HNO3 data set shed light on HNO3 annual cycles over the Antarctic continent and contributed to the validation of both generations of the satellite-based JPL Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). Following the increasing need for long-term data sets of stratospheric constituents, we resolved to establish a long-term GMBS observation site at the Arctic station of Thule (76.5° N, 68.8° W), Greenland, beginning in January 2009, in order to track the long- and short-term interactions between the changing climate and the seasonal processes tied to the ozone depletion phenomenon. Furthermore, we updated the retrieval algorithm adapting the Optimal Estimation (OE) method to GBMS spectral data in order to conform to the standard of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) microwave group, and to provide our retrievals with a set of averaging kernels that allow more straightforward comparisons with other data sets. The new OE algorithm was applied to GBMS HNO3 data sets from 1993 South Pole observations to date, in order to produce HNO3 version 2 (v2) profiles. A sample of results obtained at Antarctic latitudes in fall and winter and at mid-latitudes is shown here. In most conditions, v2 inversions show a sensitivity (i.e., sum of column elements of the averaging kernel matrix) of 100 ± 20 % from 20 to 45 km altitude, with somewhat worse (better) sensitivity in the Antarctic winter lower (upper) stratosphere. The 1σ uncertainty on HNO3 v2 mixing ratio vertical profiles depends on altitude and is estimated at ~15 % or 0.3 ppbv, whichever is larger. Comparisons of v2 with former (v1) GBMS HNO3 vertical profiles, obtained employing the constrained matrix inversion method, show that

  11. A generalized inversion method: Simultaneous source localization and environmental inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Knobles, David P.

    2002-05-01

    The problem of localizing and tracking a source in the shallow ocean is often complicated by uncertainty in the environmental parameters. Likewise, the estimates of environmental parameters in the shallow ocean obtained by inversion methods can be degraded by incorrect information about the source location. To overcome both these common obstacles-environmental mismatch in matched field processing and incorrect source location in geoacoustic inversions-a generalized inversion scheme is developed that includes both source and environmental parameters as unknowns in the inversion. The new technique called systematic decoupling using rotated coordinates (SDRC) expands the original idea of rotated coordinates [M. D. Collins and L. Fishman, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 1637-1644 (1995)] by using multiple sets of coherent broadband rotated coordinates, each corresponding to a different set of bounds, to systematically decouple the unknowns in a series of simulated annealing inversions. The results of applying the SDRC inversion method to data from the Area Characterization Test II experiment performed on the New Jersey continental shelf are presented. [Work supported by ONR.

  12. NICOLE: NLTE Stokes Synthesis/Inversion Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socas-Navarro, H.

    2015-08-01

    NICOLE, written in Fortran 90, seeks the model atmosphere that provides the best fit to the Stokes profiles (in a least-squares sense) of an arbitrary number of simultaneously-observes spectral lines from solar/stellar atmospheres. The inversion core used for the development of NICOLE is the LORIEN engine (the Lovely Reusable Inversion ENgine), which combines the SVD technique with the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization method to solve the inverse problem.

  13. Adapting machine learning techniques to censored time-to-event health record data: A general-purpose approach using inverse probability of censoring weighting.

    PubMed

    Vock, David M; Wolfson, Julian; Bandyopadhyay, Sunayan; Adomavicius, Gediminas; Johnson, Paul E; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Models for predicting the probability of experiencing various health outcomes or adverse events over a certain time frame (e.g., having a heart attack in the next 5years) based on individual patient characteristics are important tools for managing patient care. Electronic health data (EHD) are appealing sources of training data because they provide access to large amounts of rich individual-level data from present-day patient populations. However, because EHD are derived by extracting information from administrative and clinical databases, some fraction of subjects will not be under observation for the entire time frame over which one wants to make predictions; this loss to follow-up is often due to disenrollment from the health system. For subjects without complete follow-up, whether or not they experienced the adverse event is unknown, and in statistical terms the event time is said to be right-censored. Most machine learning approaches to the problem have been relatively ad hoc; for example, common approaches for handling observations in which the event status is unknown include (1) discarding those observations, (2) treating them as non-events, (3) splitting those observations into two observations: one where the event occurs and one where the event does not. In this paper, we present a general-purpose approach to account for right-censored outcomes using inverse probability of censoring weighting (IPCW). We illustrate how IPCW can easily be incorporated into a number of existing machine learning algorithms used to mine big health care data including Bayesian networks, k-nearest neighbors, decision trees, and generalized additive models. We then show that our approach leads to better calibrated predictions than the three ad hoc approaches when applied to predicting the 5-year risk of experiencing a cardiovascular adverse event, using EHD from a large U.S. Midwestern healthcare system. PMID:26992568

  14. Effects of sensor location and the atmospheric stability on the accuracy of an inverse-dispersion technique for lagoon gas emission measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring gas emission rates from wastewater lagoons and storage ponds using currently available micrometeorological techniques can be an arduous task because typical lagoon environments contain a variety of obstructions (e.g., berm, trees, buildings) to wind flow. These non-homogeneous terrain cond...

  15. The merging cluster Abell 1758 revisited: multi-wavelength observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Laganá, T. F.; Haider, M.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Cluster properties can be more distinctly studied in pairs of clusters, where we expect the effects of interactions to be strong. Aims: We here discuss the properties of the double cluster Abell 1758 at a redshift z ~ 0.279. These clusters show strong evidence for merging. Methods: We analyse the optical properties of the North and South cluster of Abell 1758 based on deep imaging obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) archive Megaprime/Megacam camera in the g' and r' bands, covering a total region of about 1.05 × 1.16 deg2, or 16.1 × 17.6 Mpc2. Our X-ray analysis is based on archive XMM-Newton images. Numerical simulations were performed using an N-body algorithm to treat the dark-matter component, a semi-analytical galaxy-formation model for the evolution of the galaxies and a grid-based hydrodynamic code with a parts per million (PPM) scheme for the dynamics of the intra-cluster medium. We computed galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs) and 2D temperature and metallicity maps of the X-ray gas, which we then compared to the results of our numerical simulations. Results: The GLFs of Abell 1758 North are well fit by Schechter functions in the g' and r' bands, but with a small excess of bright galaxies, particularly in the r' band; their faint-end slopes are similar in both bands. In contrast, the GLFs of Abell 1758 South are not well fit by Schechter functions: excesses of bright galaxies are seen in both bands; the faint-end of the GLF is not very well defined in g'. The GLF computed from our numerical simulations assuming a halo mass-luminosity relation agrees with those derived from the observations. From the X-ray analysis, the most striking features are structures in the metal distribution. We found two elongated regions of high metallicity in Abell 1758 North with two peaks towards the centre. In contrast, Abell 1758 South shows a deficit of metals in its central regions. Comparing observational results to those derived from numerical

  16. The SAMI Pilot Survey: stellar kinematics of galaxies in Abell 85, 168 and 2399

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, L. M. R.; Scott, N.; Owers, M. S.; Croom, S. M.; Bekki, K.; Houghton, R. C. W.; van de Sande, J.; D'Eugenio, F.; Cecil, G. N.; Colless, M. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cortese, L.; Davies, R. L.; Jones, D. H.; Pracy, M.; Allen, J. T.; Bryant, J. J.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Richards, S.; Sharp, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present the SAMI Pilot Survey, consisting of integral field spectroscopy of 106 galaxies across three galaxy clusters, Abell 85, Abell 168 and Abell 2399. The galaxies were selected by absolute magnitude to have Mr < -20.25 mag. The survey, using the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI), comprises observations of galaxies of all morphological types with 75 per cent of the sample being early-type galaxies (ETGs) and 25 per cent being late-type galaxies (LTGs). Stellar velocity and velocity dispersion maps are derived for all 106 galaxies in the sample. The λR parameter, a proxy for the specific stellar angular momentum, is calculated for each galaxy in the sample. We find a trend between λR and galaxy concentration such that LTGs are less concentrated higher angular momentum systems, with the fast-rotating ETGs (FRs) more concentrated and lower in angular momentum. This suggests that some dynamical processes are involved in transforming LTGs to FRs, though a significant overlap between the λR distributions of these classes of galaxies implies that this is just one piece of a more complicated picture. We measure the kinematic misalignment angle, Ψ, for the ETGs in the sample, to probe the intrinsic shapes of the galaxies. We find the majority of FRs (83 per cent) to be aligned, consistent with them being oblate spheroids (i.e. discs). The slow rotating ETGs (SRs), on the other hand, are significantly more likely to show kinematic misalignment (only 38 per cent are aligned). This confirms previous results that SRs are likely to be mildly triaxial systems.

  17. Two long H I tails in the outskirts of Abell 1367

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, T. C.; Cortese, L.; Brinks, E.; Bravo-Alfaro, H.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R.

    2012-01-01

    We present VLA D-array H I observations of the RSCG 42 and FGC 1287 galaxy groups, in the outskirts of the Abell 1367 cluster. These groups are projected ˜1.8 and 2.7 Mpc west from the cluster centre. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey provided evidence for H I extending over as much as 200 kpc in both groups. Our new, higher resolution observations reveal that the complex H I features detected by Arecibo are in reality two extraordinary long H I tails extending for ˜160 and 250 kpc, respectively, i.e. among the longest H I structures ever observed in groups of galaxies. Although in the case of RSCG 42 the morphology and dynamics of the H I tail, as well as the optical properties of the group members, support a low-velocity tidal interaction scenario, less clear is the origin of the unique features associated with FGC 1287. This galaxy displays an exceptionally long 'dog leg' H I tail, and the large distance from the X-ray-emitting region of Abell 1367 makes a ram-pressure stripping scenario highly unlikely. At the same time, a low-velocity tidal interaction seems unable to explain the extraordinary length of the tail and the lack of any sign of disturbance in the optical properties of FGC 1287. An intriguing possibility could be that this galaxy might have recently experienced a high-speed interaction with another member of the Coma-Abell 1367 Great Wall. We searched for the interloper responsible for this feature and, although we find a possible candidate, we show that without additional observations it is impossible to settle this issue. While the mechanism responsible for this extraordinary H I tail remains to be determined, our discovery highlights how little we know about environmental effects in galaxy groups.

  18. Use of open-path FTIR and inverse dispersion technique to quantify gaseous nitrogen loss from an intensive vegetable production site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei; Suter, Helen; Lam, Shu Kee; Sun, Jianlei; Chen, Deli

    2014-09-01

    An open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopic technique in combination with a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) dispersion model (WindTrax) can be used to simultaneously measure gaseous emissions of N2O, NH3, CH4 and CO2. We assessed the capability of this technique for measuring NH3 and N2O emissions following the application of calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2), Nitrophoska (NPK) and chicken manure on a celery farm at Boneo, Victoria, during April and May 2013. We found that the OP-FTIR/WindTrax method was able to measure the diurnal variation in NH3 flux from the field site following application of chicken manure with measured emissions ranging from approximately 0.1-9.8 kg NH3-N ha-1 day-1. The OP-FTIR/WindTrax method also detected a diurnal variation in N2O flux of 1.5-6.2 kg N2O-N ha-1 day-1 and N2O flux increased in response to application of the Ca(NO3)2. We concluded that the OP-FTIR/WindTrax technique can quantify gaseous N loss from vegetable production systems.

  19. Temperature and elemental abundances in the Abell cluster A 576 derived from X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenflug, R.; Vigroux, L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of Einstein solid state spectrometer observations of the central region of Abell 576 combined with HEAO 1 spectra of the total cluster are given. Line emission was detected due to Fe, Si, and S from a hot plasma in the central region. The temperature of the total cluster spectrum may be in conflict with the central temperature. This difference can be explained either if cooling takes place in the center, or if part of the measured emission is due to individual galaxies. If the X-ray emission comes from the intergalactic gas only, there is some difficulty in producing all the silicon observed in the galaxies of A 576.

  20. Morphological study of three Abell's planetary nebulae - A33, A36, and A79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, C. T.; Nguyen-Trong, T.

    1983-01-01

    The Abell list discovered in the Palomar Sky Survey includes the three objects A33, A36 and A79, which have been classified as old planetary nebulae. The monochromatic images of these three objects in H-alpha, H-beta, and the forbidden lines N II 6584 A and S II 6717 A, are presented and discussed. The forbidden line N II/H-alpha intensity ratio is found to be useful because of its implications in the evolutionary behavior of planetary nebulae.

  1. The hydrogen-deficient knot of the `born-again' planetary nebula Abell 58 (V605 Aql)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, R.; Barlow, M. J.; Liu, X.-W.; Storey, P. J.; Ercolano, B.; De Marco, O.

    2008-02-01

    We have analysed deep optical spectra of the `born-again' planetary nebula Abell 58 and its hydrogen-deficient knot, surrounding V605 Aql, which underwent a nova-like eruption in 1919. Our analysis shows that the extinction towards the central knot is much higher than previously thought, with c(Hβ) = 2.0. The outer nebula is less reddened, with c(Hβ) = 1.04. We find that the outer nebula has a Ne/O ratio higher than the average PN value. The electron temperature we derive for the central knot varies widely depending on the diagnostic used. The [OIII] nebular-to-auroral transition ratio gives a temperature of 20800K, while the ratio of the [NII] nebular and auroral lines gives Te = 15200K. The helium line ratios λ5876/λ4471 and λ6678/λ4471 imply temperatures of 350 and 550K, respectively. Weakly temperature-sensitive OII recombination line ratios imply similarly low electron temperatures. Abundances derived from recombination lines are vastly higher than those found from collisionally excited lines, with the abundance discrepancy factor (ADF) for O2+ reaching 89 - the second highest known value after that found for the hydrogen-deficient knots in Abell 30. The observed temperature diagnostics and abundances support the idea that, like Abell 30, the knot of Abell 58 contains some very cold ionized material. Although the central star is carbon-rich (C/O > 1), the knot is found to be oxygen-rich, a situation not predicted by the single-star `born-again' theory of its formation. We compare the known properties of Abell 58 to those of Abell 30, Sakurai's Object and several novae and nova remnants. We argue that the abundances in the ejecta observed in A30 and A58 have more in common with neon novae than with Sakurai's Object, which is believed to have undergone a final helium flash. In particular, the C/O ratio of less than unity and the presence of substantial quantities of neon in the ejecta of both Abell 30 and Abell 58 are not predicted by very late thermal

  2. Multiphase inverse modeling: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.

    1998-03-01

    Inverse modeling is a technique to derive model-related parameters from a variety of observations made on hydrogeologic systems, from small-scale laboratory experiments to field tests to long-term geothermal reservoir responses. If properly chosen, these observations contain information about the system behavior that is relevant to the performance of a geothermal field. Estimating model-related parameters and reducing their uncertainty is an important step in model development, because errors in the parameters constitute a major source of prediction errors. This paper contains an overview of inverse modeling applications using the ITOUGH2 code, demonstrating the possibilities and limitations of a formalized approach to the parameter estimation problem.

  3. Local poloidal and toroidal plasma rotation velocities and ion temperature in a tokamak plasma obtained with a matrix inversion method considering asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condrea, I.; Haddad, E.; Gregory, B. C.; Abel, G.

    2000-09-01

    An inversion technique is presented for the local poloidal and toroidal rotation velocities and for the ion temperature from line integrated measurements performed on Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) [R. Decoste and TdeV Team, Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Seville, 1994 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995) IAEA-CN-60/A4-11]. The velocity is obtained using two matrix inversions; the first for the emissivity and the second with the velocity weighted emissivity. The temperature is obtained with three matrix inversions: emissivity, temperature weighted emissivity and rotation velocity squared. The effect of the rotation velocity represents up to 16% in the ion temperature for TdeV plasmas. The local values obtained using the lengths matrix with the magnetic flux lines from the equilibrium code are compared with those obtained by a standard Abel inversion with circular flux lines. Differences up to 20% are observed between the emissivities deduced with circular and real flux lines, whereas the rotation velocity and the ion temperature are very similar. The technique was applied for the poloidal and toroidal geometry to determine the poloidal and toroidal velocities and the emission asymmetries. Top poloidal and toroidal emissivities present strong asymmetries due to the divertor plates and the X point whereas bottom poloidal and toroidal emissivities show an inner-outer symmetry, making the inversion more reliable in this region. A first approach to model the strong asymmetry was made assuming that the emissivity has both a radial and a poloidal dependence. The best result was obtained using a radial dependence and a peaked function of the poloidal angle for the poloidal asymmetric part of the emissivity. Both emissivity and velocity asymmetries are present in the upper part of the plasma implying that the X point behaves as a source. Examples of emissivities, rotation velocities and

  4. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  5. Uniform upper bounds for the cyclicity of the zero solution of the Abel differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenkov, Dmitry; Binyamini, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Given two polynomials P, q we consider the following question: "how large can the index of the first non-zero moment m˜k = ∫ab Pk q be, assuming the sequence is not identically zero?" The answer K to this question is known as the moment Bautin index, and we provide the first general upper bound: K ⩽ 2 + deg ⁡ q + 3(deg ⁡ P - 1) 2. The proof is based on qualitative analysis of linear ODEs, applied to Cauchy-type integrals of certain algebraic functions. The moment Bautin index plays an important role in the study of bifurcations of periodic solution in the polynomial Abel equation y‧ = py2 + εqy3 for p, q polynomials and ε ≪ 1. In particular, our result implies that for p satisfying a well-known generic condition, the number of periodic solutions near the zero solution does not exceed 5 + deg ⁡ q + 3deg2 ⁡ p. This is the first such bound depending solely on the degrees of the Abel equation.

  6. Mechanisms for Galaxy Transformation in the Complex Environment of SuperGroup Abell 1882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Aparajita; Keel, W. C.; Morrison, G. E.; Windhorst, R. A.; Smith, B.

    2013-01-01

    We present our results from a multi-wavelength study of galaxy transformations in the outskirts of SuperGroup Abell 1882, a highly filamentary and clumpy structure caught in the early stages of coalescing into a Coma-like cluster. Our data have been drawn from MMT, GMOS, WIYN, SDSS, SARA, CFHT, GALEX, Spitzer and Chandra. Clusters grow by accretion through filaments, and these accreted galaxies undergo transformations due to environmental effects. Radial locations of these transformations in cluster outskirts can be mapped to a time sequence. In relaxed clusters, several evolutionary mechanisms take effect on similar spatial and temporal scales, thus making it almost impossible to disentangle different local and global mechanisms. A SuperGroup, on the other hand, has shallower Dark Matter potential. Here, the accreting galaxies are subjected to evolutionary mechanisms over larger time and spatial scales. This separates processes that are otherwise superimposed in rich cluster-filament interfaces. We have studied transformations in Specific Star Formation Rate, birth rate parameter, color and morphological properties of 342 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies of Abell 1882, as they make their journey through the feeding filaments into the high density core of the structure, as a function of their local galaxy density and structure-centric distance. Our results show that significant transformations in galaxies begin to occur much before the galaxies reach the X-ray gas environments of the dense groups. This indicates that ram pressure stripping is unlikely driver of early galaxy transformations in proto-clusters.

  7. The double galaxy cluster Abell 2465 - II. Star formation in the cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Gary A.; Chu, Devin S.; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the star formation rate and its location in the major merger cluster Abell 2465 at z = 0.245. Optical properties of the cluster are described in Paper I. Measurements of the Hα and infrared dust emission of galaxies in the cluster were made with an interference filter centred on the redshifted line at a wavelength of 817 nm and utilized data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer satellite 12 μm band. Imaging in the Johnson U and B bands was obtained, and along with Sloan Digital Sky Survey u and r was used to study the blue fraction, which appears enhanced, as a further signature of star formation in the cluster. Star formation rates were calculated using standard calibrations. The total star formation rate normalized by the cluster mass, ΣSFR/Mcl compared to compilations for other clusters indicate that the components of Abell 2465 lie above the mean z and Mcl relations, suggestive that interacting galaxy clusters have enhanced star formation. The projected radial distribution of the star-forming galaxies does not follow an NFW profile and is relatively flat indicating that fewer star-forming galaxies are in the cluster centre. The morphologies of the Hα sources within R200 for the cluster as a whole indicate that many are disturbed or merging, suggesting that a combination of merging or harassment is working.

  8. The Utility and Psychometric Properties of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasingame, Gerry D.; Abel, Gene G.; Jordan, Alan; Wiegel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and utility of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "individuals with intellectual disabilities" (ABID) for assessment of sexual interest and problematic sexual behaviors. The study examined the preliminary psychometric properties and evaluated the clinical utility of the ABID based on a sample of 495…

  9. 3D constrained inversion of geophysical and geological information applying Spatial Mutually Constrained Inversion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Ploug, C.; Mendoza, J. A.; Martínez, K.

    2009-05-01

    The need for increaseding accuracy and reduced ambiguities in the inversion results has resulted in focus on the development of more advanced inversion methods of geophysical data. Over the past few years more advanced inversion techniques have been developed to improve the results. Real 3D-inversion is time consuming and therefore often not the best solution in a cost-efficient perspective. This has motivated the development of 3D constrained inversions, where 1D-models are constrained in 3D, also known as a Spatial Constrained Inversion (SCI). Moreover, inversion of several different data types in one inversion has been developed, known as Mutually Constrained Inversion (MCI). In this paper a presentation of a Spatial Mutually Constrained Inversion method (SMCI) is given. This method allows 1D-inversion applied to different geophysical datasets and geological information constrained in 3D. Application of two or more types of geophysical methods in the inversion has proved to reduce the equivalence problem and to increase the resolution in the inversion results. The use of geological information from borehole data or digital geological models can be integrated in the inversion. In the SMCI, a 1D inversion code is used to model soundings that are constrained in three dimensions according to their relative position in space. This solution enhances the accuracy of the inversion and produces distinct layers thicknesses and resistivities. It is very efficient in the mapping of a layered geology but still also capable of mapping layer discontinuities that are, in many cases, related to fracturing and faulting or due to valley fills. Geological information may be included in the inversion directly or used only to form a starting model for the individual soundings in the inversion. In order to show the effectiveness of the method, examples are presented from both synthetic data and real data. The examples include DC-soundings as well as land-based and airborne TEM

  10. Spatio-kinematic modelling of Abell 65, a double-shelled planetary nebula with a binary central star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckvale, L.; Prouse, B.; Jones, D.; Lloyd, M.; Pollacco, D.; López, J. A.; O'Brien, T. J.; Sabin, L.; Vaytet, N. M. H.

    2013-09-01

    We present the first detailed spatio-kinematical analysis and modelling of the planetary nebula Abell 65, which is known to host a post-common envelope, binary, central star system. As such, this object is of great interest in studying the link between nebular morphology and central star binarity. [O III]5007 Å and Hα+[N II]6584 Å longslit spectra and imagery of Abell 65 were obtained with the Manchester Échelle Spectrometer on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Martír Observatory (MES-SPM). Further [O III]5007 Å longslit spectra were obtained with the Ultraviolet and Visual Échelle Spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT-UVES). These data were used to develop a spatio-kinematical model for the [O III]5007 Å emission from Abell 65. A `best-fitting' model was found by comparing synthetic spectra and images rendered from the model to the data. The model comprises an outer shell and an inner shell, with kinematical ages of 15000 ± 5000 yr kpc-1 and 8000 ± 3000 yr kpc-1, respectively. Both shells have peanut-shaped bipolar structures with symmetry axes at inclinations of (55 ± 10)° (to the line of sight) for the outer shell and (68 ± 10)° for the inner shell. The near alignment between the nebular shells and the binary orbital inclination [of (68 ± 2)°] is strongly indicative that the binary is responsible for shaping the nebula. Abell 65 is one of a growing number of planetary nebulae (seven to date, including Abell 65 itself) for which observations and modelling support the shaping influence of a central binary.

  11. A Statistical Study of Multiply Imaged Systems in the Lensing Cluster Abell 68

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jullo, Eric; Covone, Giovanni; Limousin, Marceau; Ellis, Richard; Stark, Daniel; Bundy, Kevin; Czoske, Oliver; Ebeling, Harald; Soucail, Geneviève

    2007-06-01

    We have carried out an extensive spectroscopic survey with the Keck and VLT telescopes, targeting lensed galaxies in the background of the massive cluster Abell 68. Spectroscopic measurements are obtained for 26 lensed images, including a distant galaxy at z=5.4. Redshifts have been determined for 5 out of 7 multiple-image systems. Through a careful modeling of the mass distribution in the strongly lensed regime, we derive a mass estimate of 5.3×1014 Msolar within 500 kpc. Our mass model is then used to constrain the redshift distribution of the remaining multiply imaged and singly imaged sources. This enables us to examine the physical properties for a subsample of 7 Lyα emitters at 1.7<~z<~5.5, whose unlensed luminosities of ~=1041 ergs s-1 are fainter than similar objects found in blank fields. Of particular interest is an extended Lyα emission region surrounding a highly magnified source at z=2.6, detected in VIMOS integral field spectroscopy data. The physical scale of the most distant lensed source at z=5.4 is very small (<300 pc), similar to the lensed z~5.6 emitter reported by Ellis et al. in Abell 2218. New photometric data available for Abell 2218 allow for a direct comparison between these two unique objects. Our survey illustrates the practicality of using lensing clusters to probe the faint end of the z~2-5 Lyα luminosity function in a manner that is complementary to blank-field narrowband surveys. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Also based on observations collected at the Very Large Telescope (Antu/UT1 and Melipal/UT3), European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programs 070.A-0643 and 073.A-0774), the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

  12. Mass dependent galaxy transformation mechanisms in the complex environment of SuperGroup Abell 1882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Aparajita

    We present our data and results from panchromatic photometry and optical spectrometry of the nearest (extremely rich) filamentary large scale structure, SuperGroup Abell 1882. It is a precursor of a cluster and is an inevitable part of the narrative in the study of galaxy transformations. There has been strong empirical evidence over the past three decades that galaxy environment affects galaxy properties. Blue disky galaxies transform into red bulge-like galaxies as they traverse into the deeper recesses of a cluster. However, we have little insight into the story of galaxy evolution in the early stages of cluster formation. Besides, in relaxed clusters that have been studied extensively, several evolutionary mechanisms take effect on similar spatial and temporal scales, making it almost impossible to disentangle different local and global mechanisms. A SuperGroup on the other hand, has a shallower dark-matter potential. Here, the accreting galaxies are subjected to evolutionary mechanisms over larger time and spatial scales. This separates processes that are otherwise superimposed in rich cluster-filament interfaces. As has been found from cluster studies, galaxy color and morphology tie very strongly with local galaxy density even in a complex and nascent structure like Abell 1882. Our major results indicate that there is a strong dependence of galaxy transformations on the galaxy masses themselves. Mass- dependent evolutionary mechanisms affect galaxies at different spatial scales. The galaxy color also varies with radial projected distance from the assumed center of the structure for a constant local galaxy density, indicating the underlying large scale structure as a second order evolutionary driver. We have looked for clues to the types of mechanisms that might cause the transformations at various mass regimes. We have found the thoroughly quenched low mass galaxies confined to the groups, whereas there are evidences of intermediate-mass quenched galaxies

  13. A "voice inversion effect?".

    PubMed

    Bédard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-07-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an "auditory face" rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a "voice inversion effect," by analogy to the classical "face inversion effect," which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted of a gender identification task on two syllables pronounced by 90 speakers (boys, girls, men, and women). Experiment 2 consisted of a speaker discrimination task on pairs of syllables (8 men and 8 women). Experiment 3 consisted of an instrument discrimination task on pairs of melodies (8 string and 8 wind instruments). In all three experiments, stimuli were presented in 4 conditions: (1) no inversion; (2) temporal inversion (e.g., backwards speech); (3) frequency inversion centered around 4000 Hz; and (4) around 2500 Hz. Results indicated a significant decrease in performance caused by sound inversion, with a much stronger effect for frequency than for temporal inversion. Interestingly, although frequency inversion markedly affected timbre for both voices and instruments, subjects' performance was still above chance. However, performance at instrument discrimination was much higher than for voices, preventing comparison of inversion effects for voices vs. non-vocal stimuli. Additional experiments will be necessary to conclude on the existence of a possible "voice inversion effect." PMID:15177788

  14. Dirac neutrino mass from a neutrino dark matter model for the galaxy cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus Maria

    2016-03-01

    The dark matter in the galaxy cluster Abell 1689 is modelled as an isothermal sphere of neutrinos. New data on the 2d mass density allow an accurate description of its core and halo. The model has no “missing baryon problem” and beyond 2.1 Mpc the baryons have the cosmic mass abundance. Combination of cluster data with the cosmic dark matter fraction - here supposed to stem from the neutrinos - leads to a solution of the dark matter riddle by left and right handed neutrinos with mass (1.861 ± 0.016)h 70 -2eV/c 2. The thus far observed absence of neutrinoless double beta decay points to (quasi-) Dirac neutrinos: uncharged electrons with different flavour and mass eigenbasis, as for quarks. Though the cosmic microwave background spectrum is matched up to some 10% accuracy only, the case is not ruled out because the plasma phase of the early Universe may be turbulent.

  15. The photometric properties of brightest cluster galaxies. I - Absolute magnitudes in 116 nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, J. G.; Gunn, J. E.; Thuan, T. X.

    1980-01-01

    Two-color aperture photometry of the brightest galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters is presented. The results are used to anchor the bright end of the Hubble diagram; essentially the entire formal error for this method is then due to the sample of distant clusters used. New determinations of the systematic trend of galaxy absolute magnitude with the cluster properties of richness and Bautz-Morgan type are derived. When these new results are combined with the Gunn and Oke (1975) data on high-redshift clusters, a formal value (without accounting for any evolution) of q sub 0 = -0.55 + or - 0.45 (1 standard deviations) is found.

  16. An Approximation to the Periodic Solution of a Differential Equation of Abel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    2011-10-01

    The Abel equation, in canonical form, is y^' = sint- y^3 (*) and corresponds to the singular (ɛ --> 0) limit of the nonlinear, forced oscillator ɛy^'' + y^' + y^3 = sint, ɛ-> 0. (**) Equation (*) has the property that it has a unique periodic solution defined on (-∞,∞). Further, as t increases, all solutions are attracted into the strip |y| < 1 and any two different solutions y1(t) and y2(t) satisfy the condition Lim [y1(t) - y2(t)] = 0, (***) t --> ∞ and for t negatively decreasing, each solution, except for the periodic solution, becomes unbounded.ootnotetextU. Elias, American Mathematical Monthly, vol.115, (Feb. 2008), pps. 147-149. Our purpose is to calculate an approximation to the unique periodic solution of Eq. (*) using the method of harmonic balance. We also determine an estimation for the blow-up time of the non-periodic solutions.

  17. New bibenzyl glycosides from leaves of Camellia oleifera Abel. with cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuelong; Tang, Ling; Feng, Baomin; Shi, Liying; Wang, Huiguo; Wang, Yongqi

    2011-04-01

    Studies on the chemical constituents of leaves of Camellia oleifera Abel. led to the isolation of 3 new bibenzyl glycosides. Their structures have been elucidated as 1-(3',5'-dihydroxy)phenyl-2-(4″-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)phenylethane (1), 1-(3',5'-dimethoxy)phenyl-2-(4″-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)phenylethane (2) and 1-(3',5'-dimethoxy)phenyl-2-[4″-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(6→1)-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl]phenylethane (3) through spectral studies including HR-ESI-MS, ((1))H NMR, ((13))C NMR and 2D NMR experiments. All the above 3 bibenzyl glycosides showed cytotoxic activities to Hela and hep2 cell lines. PMID:21219989

  18. X-ray constraints on the shape of the dark matter in five Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buote, David A.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray observations obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to constrain the shape of the dark matter in the inner regions of Abell clusters A401, A426, A1656, A2029, and A2199, each of which exhibits highly flattened optical isopleths. The dark matter is modeled as an ellipsoid with a mass density of about r exp -2. The possible shapes of the dark matter is constrained by comparing these model isophotes to the image isophotes. The X-ray isophotes, and therefore the gravitational potentials, have ellipticities of about 0.1-0.2. The dark matter within the central 1 Mpc is found to be substantially rounder for all the clusters. It is concluded that the shape of the galaxy distributions in these clusters traces neither the gravitational potential nor the gravitating matter.

  19. Temperature and elemental abundances in the Abell cluster A576 derived from X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenflug, R.; Vigroux, L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the Einstein Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) observations of the central region of Abell 576 combined with HEAO 1 spectra of the total cluster are reported. Line emission due to Fe, Si, and S from a hot plasma in the central region of the object are detected. Abundances roughly one-half of the solar value are derived for these elements. The total cluster spectrum is well fitted by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with a temperature of 4 +3.5 or -1.4 x 10 to the 7th K. This temperature is in conflict with the SSS temperature determination for the center of the cluster. This difference can be explained if cooling takes place in the central part of the cluster, or if the X-ray emission in the center is dominated by the emission of a single galaxy.

  20. A Chandra Study of the Large-Scale Shock Front in Abell 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Steven

    2011-09-01

    Abell 2219 (z=0.225) is the third galaxy cluster in which a clear, large-scale shock front, viewed approximately edge-on and generated by ongoing merging activity, has been discovered. It is highly X-ray luminous and 2.5 times brighter in X-rays than either 1E0657-56 or A520. We propose a 150ks ACIS-I observation to obtain the first precise measurements of the pre- and post-shock gas temperature, enabling improved estimates of the Mach number and shock velocity. The observed gradient of the temperature jump across the shock will constrain the process of post-shock electron-ion equilibration. We will probe the origin of very hot (kT>20 keV) gas observed in the cluster center. High quality radio, optical-dynamical, and ground- and space-based gravitational lensing data are in hand.

  1. Beneficial Effects of Camellia Oil (Camellia oleifera Abel.) on Hepatoprotective and Gastroprotective Activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that increased dietary intake of natural antioxidants is beneficial for health because of their bioactivities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammation actions. Camellia oil made from tea seed (Camellia oleifera Abel.) is commonly used as an edible oil and a traditional medicine in Taiwan and China. Until now, the camellia oil has been widely considered as a dietary oil for heath. In this review, we summarize the protective effects of camellia oil with antioxidant activity against oxidative stress leading to hepatic damage and gastrointestinal ulcers. The information in this review leads to the conclusion that camellia oil is not only an edible oil but also a vegetable oil with a potential function for human health. PMID:26598814

  2. Sloshing, Shocks, and Bubbles in the Cool Core Cluster Abell 2052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, S. W.; Clarke, T. E.; Sarazin, C. L.; McNamara, B. R.; Douglass, E. M.; McDonald, M.

    2011-05-01

    We present results from a very deep (650 ksec) Chandra X-ray observation of Abell 2052, as well as archival VLA radio observations. The data reveal exquisite detail in the inner parts of the cluster, including bubbles evacuated by the AGN's radio lobes, compressed bubble rims, filaments, and loops. Two concentric shocks are seen, and a temperature rise is measured for the innermost one. On larger scales, an excess surface brightness spiral feature is detected. The spiral has cooler temperatures and higher abundances than its surroundings, and is likely the result of sloshing gas initiated by a previous cluster-cluster or sub-cluster merger. Initial evidence for previously unseen bubbles at larger radii related to earlier outbursts from the AGN is presented. Support for this work was provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, through Chandra Award Number GO9-0147X.

  3. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and evidence for radial orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Owen, Frazer N.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1986-01-01

    Published observational data on the tail orientations (TOs) of 60 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters of galaxies are analyzed statistically using a maximum-likelihood approach. The results are presented in a table, and it is found that the observed TO distributions in the whole sample and in subsamples of morphologically regular NATs and NATs with pericentric distances d greater than 500 kpc are consistent with isotropic orbits, whereas the TOs for NATs with d less than 500 kpc are consistent with highly radial orbits. If radial orbits were observed near the centers of other types of cluster galaxies as well, it could be inferred that violent relaxation during cluster formation was incomplete, and that clusters form by spherical collapse and secondary infall, as proposed by Gunn (1977).

  4. The Mass of Abell 1060 and AWM 7 from Spatially Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenstein, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1996-11-01

    Using X-ray temperature and surface brightness profiles of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) derived from ASCA (Astro-D) and ROSAT observations, we place constraints on the dark matter (DM) and baryon fraction distributions in the poor clusters Abell 1060 (A1060) and AWM 7. Although their total mass distributions are similar, AWM 7 has twice the baryon fraction of A1060 in the best-fit models. The functional form of the DM distribution is ill determined; however, mass models where the baryon fractions in A1060 and AWM 7 significantly overlap are excluded. Such variations in baryon fraction are not predicted by standard models and imply that some mechanism in addition to gravity plays a major role in organizing matter on cluster scales.

  5. Television documentary, history and memory. An analysis of Sergio Zavoli's The Gardens of Abel

    PubMed Central

    Foot, John

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a celebrated documentary made for Italian state TV in 1968 and transmitted in 1969 to an audience of millions. The programme – The Gardens of Abel – looked at changes introduced by the radical psychiatrist Franco Basaglia in an asylum in the north-east of Italy (Gorizia). The article examines the content of this programme for the first time, questions some of the claims that have been made for it, and outlines the sources used by the director, Sergio Zavoli. The article argues that the film was as much an expression of Zavoli's vision and ideas as it was linked to those of Franco Basaglia himself. Finally, the article highlights the way that this programme has become part of historical discourse and popular memory. PMID:25937804

  6. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  7. The galaxy population of Abell 1367: the stellar mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhcine, M.; Kriwattanawong, W.; James, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    Using wide baseline broad-band photometry, we analyse the stellar population properties of a sample of 72 galaxies, spanning a wide range of stellar masses and morphological types, in the nearby spiral-rich and dynamically young galaxy cluster Abell 1367. The sample galaxies are distributed from the cluster centre out to approximately half the cluster Abell radius. The optical/near-infrared colours are compared with simple stellar population synthesis models from which the luminosity-weighted stellar population ages and metallicities are determined. The locus of the colours of elliptical galaxies traces a sequence of varying metallicity at a narrow range of luminosity-weighted stellar ages. Lenticular galaxies in the red sequence, however, exhibit a substantial spread of luminosity-weighted stellar metallicities and ages. For red-sequence lenticular galaxies and blue cloud galaxies, low-mass galaxies tend to be on average dominated by stellar populations of younger luminosity-weighted ages. Sample galaxies exhibit a strong correlation between integrated stellar mass and luminosity-weighted stellar metallicity. Galaxies with signs of morphological disturbance and ongoing star formation activity, tend to be underabundant with respect to passive galaxies in the red sequence of comparable stellar masses. We argue that this could be due to tidally driven gas flows towards the star-forming regions, carrying less enriched gas and diluting the pre-existing gas to produce younger stellar populations with lower metallicities than would be obtained prior to the interaction. Finally, we find no statistically significant evidence for changes in the luminosity-weighted ages and metallicities for either red-sequence or blue-cloud galaxies, at fixed stellar mass, with location within the cluster. We dedicate this work to the memory of our friend and colleague C. Moss who died suddenly recently.

  8. Revisiting Abell 2744: a powerful synergy of the GLASS spectroscopy and the HFF photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Borello Schmidt, Kasper; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-08-01

    We present new emission line identifications and improve the strong lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744 using the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) observations and the full depth of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging. We performed a blind and targeted search for emission lines in objects within the full field of view (FoV) of the GLASS prime pointings, including all the previously known multiple arc images. We report over 50 high quality spectroscopic redshifts, 4 of which are for the arc images. We also present an extensive analysis based on the HFF photometry, measuring the colors and photometric redshifts of all objects within the FoV, and comparing the spectroscopic and photometric results of the same ensemble of sources. In order to improve the lens model of Abell 2744, we develop a rigorous alogorithm to screen arc images, based on their colors and morphology, and selecting the most reliable ones to use. As a result, 21 systems (corresponding to 59 images) pass the screening process and are used to reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive mesh. The resulting total mass distribution is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data in a fashion very similar to the reduction of the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP) clusters, in order to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made publicly available in the standard HFF format.

  9. Deep spectroscopy of nearby galaxy clusters - I. Spectroscopic luminosity function of Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Dominguez Palmero, L.; Yu, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new deep spectroscopic catalogue for Abell 85, within 3.0 × 2.6 Mpc2 and down to Mr ˜ Mr^{ast } +6. Using the Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope and the AutoFiber 2 at the William Herschel Telescope, we obtained almost 1430 new redshifts for galaxies with mr ≤ 21 mag and <μe,r> ≤ 24 mag arcsec-2. These redshifts, together with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and NASA/IPAC Extragaalctic Database spectroscopic information, result in 460 confirmed cluster members. This data set allows the study of the luminosity function (LF) of the cluster galaxies covering three orders of magnitudes in luminosities. The total and radial LFs are best modelled by a double Schechter function. The normalized LFs show that their bright (Mr ≤ -21.5) and faint (Mr ≥ -18.0) ends are independent of clustercentric distance and similar to the field LFs unlike the intermediate luminosity range (-21.5 ≤ Mr ≤ -18.0). Similar results are found for the LFs of the dominant types of galaxies: red, passive, virialized and early-infall members. On the contrary, the LFs of blue, star forming, non-virialized and recent-infall galaxies are well described by a single Schechter function. These populations contribute to a small fraction of the galaxy density in the innermost cluster region. However, in the outskirts of the cluster, they have similar densities to red, passive, virialized and early-infall members at the LF faint end. These results confirm a clear dependence of the colour and star formation of Abell 85 members in the cluster centric distance.

  10. Suzaku observation of a high-entropy cluster Abell 548W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Kato, Yuichi; Gu, Liyi; Kawaharada, Madoka; Takizawa, Motokazu; Fujita, Yutaka; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    Abell 548W, one of the galaxy clusters located in the Abell 548 region, has about an order of magnitude lower X-ray luminosity compared to ordinal clusters in view of the well-known intracluster medium (ICM) temperature vs. X-ray luminosity (kT-LX) relation. The cluster hosts a pair of diffuse radio sources to the northwest and north, both about 10' apart from the cluster center. They are candidate radio relics, frequently associated with merging clusters. A Suzaku deep observation with exposure of 84.4 ks was performed to search for signatures of merging in this cluster. The XIS detectors successfully detected the ICM emission out to 16' from the cluster center. The temperature is ˜ 3.6 keV around its center, and ˜ 2 keV at the outermost regions. The hot region (˜ 6 keV) beside the relic candidates shifted to the cluster center reported by XMM-Newton was not seen in the Suzaku data, although its temperature of 3.6 keV itself is higher than the average temperature of 2.5 keV around the radio sources. In addition, the signature of a cool (kT ˜ 0.9 keV) component was found around the northwest source. A marginal temperature jump at its outer edge was also found, consistent with the canonical idea of the shock acceleration origin of the radio relics. The cluster has among the highest central entropy of ˜ 400 keV cm2 and is one of the so-called low surface brightness clusters. Taking into account the fact that its shape itself is relatively circular and smooth and also that its temperature structure is nearly flat, possible scenarios for merging are discussed.

  11. Discovery of an overlapping cluster in the Abell 1674 field with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tawa, Noriaki; Koyama, Katsuji

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a Suzaku observation of Abell 1674, an optically very rich (richness class 3) cluster cataloged as z = 0.1066. We discover the He-like Fe K-shell line from the central region for the first time, and find that the X-ray spectrum yields a high redshift of 0.215^{+0.007}_{-0.006}. On the other hand, the spectrum of the south-western region is fitted with a redshift of 0.11 ± 0.02 by the He-like Fe L-shell lines, consistent with the optically determined value. The gas temperature, metal abundance, and core radius of the X-ray emission in the central region are 3.8 ± 0.2 keV, 0.20 ± 0.05 Z⊙, and 450 ± 40 kpc, respectively, while those in the south-western region are 2.0 ± 0.2 keV, 0.41^{+0.17}_{-0.13} Z⊙, and 220^{+90}_{-70} kpc, respectively. These parameters are typical for clusters. We thus conclude that Abell 1674 consists of two independent clusters, A 1674-C at z ˜ 0.22 and A 1674-SW at z ˜ 0.11, overlapping along the line of sight. The X-ray luminosity of A 1674-C within r = 2 Mpc is (15.9 ± 0.6) × 1043 erg s-1 in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band, while that for A 1674-SW is (1.25 ± 0.07) × 1043 erg s-1. Both are consistent with those expected from the L-T relation of clusters within a factor of 2. This is another supporting factor for our conclusion.

  12. A plethora of diffuse steep spectrum radio sources in Abell 2034 revealed by LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimwell, T. W.; Luckin, J.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Intema, H. T.; Owers, M. S.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Stroe, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; Cassano, R.; de Gasperin, F.; Heald, G. H.; Hoang, D. N.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Sridhar, S. S.; Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Bonafede, A.; Chyży, K. T.; Enßlin, T. A.; Ferrari, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; McKean, J. P.; Morabito, L. K.; Orrù, E.; Pizzo, R.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; White, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations, we have discovered a diverse assembly of steep spectrum emission that is apparently associated with the intracluster medium (ICM) of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2034. Such a rich variety of complex emission associated with the ICM has been observed in few other clusters. This not only indicates that Abell 2034 is a more interesting and complex system than previously thought but it also demonstrates the importance of sensitive and high-resolution, low-frequency observations. These observations can reveal emission from relativistic particles which have been accelerated to sufficient energy to produce observable emission or have had their high energy maintained by mechanisms in the ICM. The most prominent feature in our maps is a bright bulb of emission connected to two steep spectrum filamentary structures, the longest of which extends perpendicular to the merger axis for 0.5 Mpc across the south of the cluster. The origin of these objects is unclear, with no shock detected in the X-ray images and no obvious connection with cluster galaxies or AGNs. We also find that the X-ray bright region of the cluster coincides with a giant radio halo with an irregular morphology and a very steep spectrum. In addition, the cluster hosts up to three possible radio relics, which are misaligned with the cluster X-ray emission. Finally, we have identified multiple regions of emission with a very steep spectral index that seem to be associated with either tailed radio galaxies or a shock.

  13. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-04-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  14. Galaxy Luminosity Function of the Dynamically Young Abell 119 Cluster: Probing the Cluster Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngdae; Rey, Soo-Chang; Hilker, Michael; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the galaxy luminosity function (LF) of the Abell 119 cluster down to {M}r∼ -14 mag based on deep images in the u, g, and r bands taken by using MOSAIC II CCD mounted on the Blanco 4 m telescope at the CTIO. The cluster membership was accurately determined based on the radial velocity information and on the color–magnitude relation for bright galaxies and the scaling relation for faint galaxies. The overall LF exhibits a bimodal behavior with a distinct dip at r∼ 18.5 mag ({M}r∼ -17.8 mag), which is more appropriately described by a two-component function. The shape of the LF strongly depends on the clustercentric distance and on the local galaxy density. The LF of galaxies in the outer, low-density region exhibits a steeper slope and more prominent dip compared with that of counterparts in the inner, high-density region. We found evidence for a substructure in the projected galaxy distribution in which several overdense regions in the Abell 119 cluster appear to be closely associated with the surrounding, possible filamentary structure. The combined LF of the overdense regions exhibits a two-component function with a distinct dip, while the LF of the central region is well described by a single Schechter function. We suggest that, in the context of the hierarchical cluster formation scenario, the observed overdense regions are the relics of galaxy groups, retaining their two-component LFs with a dip, which acquired their shapes through a galaxy merging process in group environments, before they fall into a cluster.

  15. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived From Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From analysis of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging data we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the SZE toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster.

  16. Fast wavelet based sparse approximate inverse preconditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, W.L.

    1996-12-31

    Incomplete LU factorization is a robust preconditioner for both general and PDE problems but unfortunately not easy to parallelize. Recent study of Huckle and Grote and Chow and Saad showed that sparse approximate inverse could be a potential alternative while readily parallelizable. However, for special class of matrix A that comes from elliptic PDE problems, their preconditioners are not optimal in the sense that independent of mesh size. A reason may be that no good sparse approximate inverse exists for the dense inverse matrix. Our observation is that for this kind of matrices, its inverse entries typically have piecewise smooth changes. We can take advantage of this fact and use wavelet compression techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse preconditioner. We shall show numerically that our approach is effective for this kind of matrices.

  17. Real Variable Inversion of Laplace Transforms: An Application in Plasma Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohn, C. L.; Flynn, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Laplace transform techniques and explains an alternative to them: the Widder's real inversion. To illustrate the power of this new technique, it is applied to a difficult inversion: the problem of Landau damping. (GA)

  18. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  19. Digital imaging technique for optical emission spectroscopy of a hydrogen arcjet plume.

    PubMed

    Litchford, R J; Ruyten, W M

    1995-07-20

    A digital imaging technique has been developed for optical emission spectroscopy measurements of a 1.6-kW hydrogen arcjet plume. Emissions from the Balmer α and β transitions of excited atomic hydrogen were measured with a computer-controlled red-green-blue color CCD detector with and without line-centered bandpass interference filters. A method for extending the effective dynamic range of the detector was developed, whereby images obtained with a wide range of exposure times are combined to form a single composite nonsaturated map of the plume emission structure. The line-of-sight measurements were deconvoluted to obtain the true radial intensity distribution with an inverse Abel transformation. Analysis of the inverted measurements indicates that the upper levels of the Balmer α and β transitions are not thermalized with the electrons in the plasma. The local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption fails for this plasma, and the electron temperature is not equivalent to the apparent excitation temperature obtained when a Boltzmann energy distribution is assumed for the atomic hydrogen excited states. PMID:21052286

  20. Inverse structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Bruce R.; Water, Willem van de

    2005-03-01

    While the ordinary structure function in turbulence is concerned with the statistical moments of the velocity increment {delta}u measured over a distance r, the inverse structure function is related to the distance r where the turbulent velocity exits the interval {delta}u. We study inverse structure functions of wind-tunnel turbulence which covers a range of Reynolds numbers Re{sub {lambda}}=400-1100. We test a recently proposed relation between the scaling exponents of the ordinary structure functions and those of the inverse structure functions [S. Roux and M. H. Jensen, Phys. Rev. E 69, 16309 (2004)]. The relatively large range of Reynolds numbers in our experiment also enables us to address the scaling with Reynolds number that is expected to highlight the intermediate dissipative range. While we firmly establish the (relative) scaling of inverse structure functions, our experimental results fail both predictions. Therefore, the question of the significance of inverse structure functions remains open.

  1. Generalized Uncertainty Quantification for Linear Inverse Problems in X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Michael James

    2014-04-25

    In industrial and engineering applications, X-ray radiography has attained wide use as a data collection protocol for the assessment of material properties in cases where direct observation is not possible. The direct measurement of nuclear materials, particularly when they are under explosive or implosive loading, is not feasible, and radiography can serve as a useful tool for obtaining indirect measurements. In such experiments, high energy X-rays are pulsed through a scene containing material of interest, and a detector records a radiograph by measuring the radiation that is not attenuated in the scene. One approach to the analysis of these radiographs is to model the imaging system as an operator that acts upon the object being imaged to produce a radiograph. In this model, the goal is to solve an inverse problem to reconstruct the values of interest in the object, which are typically material properties such as density or areal density. The primary objective in this work is to provide quantitative solutions with uncertainty estimates for three separate applications in X-ray radiography: deconvolution, Abel inversion, and radiation spot shape reconstruction. For each problem, we introduce a new hierarchical Bayesian model for determining a posterior distribution on the unknowns and develop efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for sampling from the posterior. A Poisson likelihood, based on a noise model for photon counts at the detector, is combined with a prior tailored to each application: an edge-localizing prior for deconvolution; a smoothing prior with non-negativity constraints for spot reconstruction; and a full covariance sampling prior based on a Wishart hyperprior for Abel inversion. After developing our methods in a general setting, we demonstrate each model on both synthetically generated datasets, including those from a well known radiation transport code, and real high energy radiographs taken at two U. S. Department of Energy

  2. Stochastic inversion by ray continuation

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, A.; Viallix

    1989-05-01

    The conventional tomographic inversion consists in minimizing residuals between measured and modelled traveltimes. The process tends to be unstable and some additional constraints are required to stabilize it. The stochastic formulation generalizes the technique and sets it on firmer theoretical bases. The Stochastic Inversion by Ray Continuation (SIRC) is a probabilistic approach, which takes a priori geological information into account and uses probability distributions to characterize data correlations and errors. It makes it possible to tie uncertainties to the results. The estimated parameters are interval velocities and B-spline coefficients used to represent smoothed interfaces. Ray tracing is done by a continuation technique between source and receives. The ray coordinates are computed from one path to the next by solving a linear system derived from Fermat's principle. The main advantages are fast computations, accurate traveltimes and derivatives. The seismic traces are gathered in CMPs. For a particular CMP, several reflecting elements are characterized by their time gradient measured on the stacked section, and related to a mean emergence direction. The program capabilities are tested on a synthetic example as well as on a field example. The strategy consists in inverting the parameters for one layer, then for the next one down. An inversion step is divided in two parts. First the parameters for the layer concerned are inverted, while the parameters for the upper layers remain fixed. Then all the parameters are reinverted. The velocity-depth section computed by the program together with the corresponding errors can be used directly for the interpretation, as an initial model for depth migration or for the complete inversion program under development.

  3. Magnetotelluric inversion via reverse time migration algorithm of seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Taeyoung . E-mail: tyha@math.snu.ac.kr; Shin, Changsoo . E-mail: css@model.snu.ac.kr

    2007-07-01

    We propose a new algorithm for two-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion. Our algorithm is an MT inversion based on the steepest descent method, borrowed from the backpropagation technique of seismic inversion or reverse time migration, introduced in the middle 1980s by Lailly and Tarantola. The steepest descent direction can be calculated efficiently by using the symmetry of numerical Green's function derived from a mixed finite element method proposed by Nedelec for Maxwell's equation, without calculating the Jacobian matrix explicitly. We construct three different objective functions by taking the logarithm of the complex apparent resistivity as introduced in the recent waveform inversion algorithm by Shin and Min. These objective functions can be naturally separated into amplitude inversion, phase inversion and simultaneous inversion. We demonstrate our algorithm by showing three inversion results for synthetic data.

  4. Spatial Analyses of a Complete Sample of Rich Abell/ACO Clusters to z=0.14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    1999-12-01

    Galaxy clusters act as excellent mass tracers in our local Universe. They are bright, contain hundreds of galaxies, and are easy to observe. The most recognized galaxy cluster catalogs are those of Abell (1958) and Abell, Corwin and Olowin (1989-ACO). I will present the results of a new survey of Abell/ACO cluster redshifts that extends our knowledge of the large-scale mass distribution to a redshift of z = 0.14. The volume of the Universe traced by this survey is four times larger than any of its predecessors. The large number of clusters within the survey boundaries ( 560) as well as the large volume traced, allow for statistical analyses on scales never before probed. I will present the cluster power spectrum to scales approaching 1000h-1Mpc. I will also demonstrate the high-level of completeness for this survey, which allows one to study the effects of large-scale structure on internal cluster properties. I will then summarize some recent collaborative efforts which show that (1) Wide-Angle Tail radio jets are ``blown'' in the direction of the local large-scale axis; (2) High dM/dt cooling flow clusters reside in crowded environments; (3) Clusters with close near-neighbors are also close to the fundamental plane created from Lo, Lx and Ro. CM was funded in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Maine Science and Technology Foundation.

  5. Numerical Laplace Transform Inversion Employing the Gaver-Stehfest Algorithm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacquot, Raymond G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Presents a technique for the numerical inversion of Laplace Transforms and several examples employing this technique. Limitations of the method in terms of available computer word length and the effects of these limitations on approximate inverse functions are also discussed. (JN)

  6. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  7. A new strategy for helioseismic inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eff-Darwich, A.; Perez Hernandez, F.

    1997-10-01

    Helioseismic inversion techniques have been revealed as powerful tools for inferring the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun. One of the most popular techniques is Regularized Least Squares. When it is used, it is necessary to define an inversion mesh and a penalty function, without an a priori knowledge of the behaviour of the solution. In addition, this penalty function is weighted by a trade-off parameter that must be fixed in order to obtain the solution. We present here a new technique, developed in order to find the optimal mesh and smoothing function by means of a deep analysis of the basis functions of the inversion problem. We have found that the method is suitable in particular for obtaining the sound speed and density profiles simultaneously, without any reference to the equation of state.

  8. A Census of Star Formation and Active Galactic Nuclei Populations in Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Logan H.; Atlee, David Wesley

    2016-01-01

    A recent survey of low-z galaxy clusters observed a disjunction between X-ray and mid-infrared selected populations of active galactic nuclei (X-ray and IR AGNs) (Atlee+ 2011, ApJ 729, 22.). Here we present an analysis of near-infrared spectroscopic data of star-forming galaxies in cluster Abell 1689 in order to confirm the identity of some of their IR AGN and to provide a check on their reported star formation rates. Our sample consists of 24 objects in Abell 1689. H and K band spectroscopic observations of target objects and standard stars were obtained by David Atlee between 2010 May 17 and 2011 June 6 using the Large Binocular Telescope's LUCI instrument. After undergoing initial reductions, standard stars were corrected for telluric absorption using TelFit (Gullikson+ 2014, AJ, 158, 53). Raw detector counts were converted to physical units using the wavelength-dependent response of the grating and the star's reported H and K band magnitudes to produce conversion factors that fully correct for instrumental effects. Target spectra were flux-calibrated using the airmass-corrected transmission profiles produced by TelFit and the associated H band conversion factor (or the average of the two factors, for nights with two standard stars). Star formation rates were calculated using the SFR-L(Ha) relation reported in Kennicutt (1998), with the measured luminosity of the Pa-a emission line at the luminosity distance of the cluster used as a proxy for L(Ha) (Kennicutt 1998, ARA&A 36, 189; Hummer & Stoney 1987, MNRAS 346, 1055). The line ratios H2 2.121 mm/Brg and [FeII]/Pab were used to classify targets as starburst galaxies, AGNs, or LINERs (Rodriguez-Ardila+ 2005, MNRAS, 364, 1041). Jones was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  9. On the Merging Cluster Abell 578 and Its Central Radio Galaxy 4C+67.13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, K.; Stawarz, Ł.; Siemiginowska, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Szostek, A.; Madejski, G.; Harris, D. E.; Simionescu, A.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-06-01

    Here we analyze radio, optical, and X-ray data for the peculiar cluster Abell 578. This cluster is not fully relaxed and consists of two merging sub-systems. The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), CGPG 0719.8+6704, is a pair of interacting ellipticals with projected separation ˜10 kpc, the brighter of which hosts the radio source 4C+67.13. The Fanaroff-Riley type-II radio morphology of 4C+67.13 is unusual for central radio galaxies in local Abell clusters. Our new optical spectroscopy revealed that both nuclei of the CGPG 0719.8+6704 pair are active, albeit at low accretion rates corresponding to the Eddington ratio ˜ {{10}-4} (for the estimated black hole masses of ˜ 3× {{10}8} {{M}⊙ } and ˜ {{10}9} {{M}⊙ }). The gathered X-ray (Chandra) data allowed us to confirm and to quantify robustly the previously noted elongation of the gaseous atmosphere in the dominant sub-cluster, as well as a large spatial offset (˜60 kpc projected) between the position of the BCG and the cluster center inferred from the modeling of the X-ray surface brightness distribution. Detailed analysis of the brightness profiles and temperature revealed also that the cluster gas in the vicinity of 4C+67.13 is compressed (by a factor of about ˜1.4) and heated (from ≃ 2.0 keV up to 2.7 keV), consistent with the presence of a weak shock (Mach number ˜1.3) driven by the expanding jet cocoon. This would then require the jet kinetic power of the order of ˜ {{10}45} erg s-1, implying either a very high efficiency of the jet production for the current accretion rate, or a highly modulated jet/accretion activity in the system. Based on service observations made with the WHT operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  10. SPECTRAL INDEX STUDIES OF THE DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN ABELL 2256: IMPLICATIONS FOR MERGER ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S. E-mail: dwaraka@rri.res.i

    2010-08-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the merging rich cluster of galaxies, Abell 2256 (A2256). We have observed A2256 at 150 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and successfully detected the diffuse radio halo and the relic emission over a {approx}1.2 Mpc{sup 2} extent. Using this 150 MHz image and the images made using archival observations from the Very Large Array (VLA; 1369 MHz) and the Westerbrok Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT; 330 MHz), we have produced spectral index images of the diffuse radio emission in A2256. These spectral index images show a distribution of flat spectral index (S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup {alpha}}, {alpha} in the range -0.7 to -0.9) plasma in the region NW of the cluster center. Regions showing steep spectral indices ({alpha} in the range -1.0 to -2.3) are toward the SE of the cluster center. These spectral indices indicate synchrotron lifetimes for the relativistic plasmas in the range 0.08-0.4 Gyr. We interpret this spectral behavior as resulting from a merger event along the direction SE to NW within the last 0.5 Gyr or so. A shock may be responsible for the NW relic in A2256 and the megaparsec scale radio halo toward the SE is likely to be generated by the turbulence injected by mergers. Furthermore, the diffuse radio emission shows spectral steepening toward lower frequencies. This low-frequency spectral steepening is consistent with a combination of spectra from two populations of relativistic electrons created at two epochs (two mergers) within the last {approx}0.5 Gyr. Earlier interpretations of the X-ray and the optical data also suggested that there were two mergers in Abell 2256 in the last 0.5 Gyr, consistent with the current findings. Also highlighted in this study is the futility of correlating the average temperatures of thermal gas and the average spectral indices of diffuse radio emission in the respective clusters.

  11. Electromagnetic inverse applications for functional brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.C.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project addresses an important mathematical and computational problem in functional brain imaging, namely the electromagnetic {open_quotes}inverse problem.{close_quotes} Electromagnetic brain imaging techniques, magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG), are based on measurements of electrical potentials and magnetic fields at hundreds of locations outside the human head. The inverse problem is the estimation of the locations, magnitudes, and time-sources of electrical currents in the brain from surface measurements. This project extends recent progress on the inverse problem by combining the use of anatomical constraints derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with Bayesian and other novel algorithmic approaches. The results suggest that we can achieve significant improvements in the accuracy and robustness of inverse solutions by these two approaches.

  12. Statistical versus nonstatistical temperature inversion methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Fleming, H. E.

    1972-01-01

    Vertical temperature profiles are derived from radiation measurements by inverting the integral equation of radiative transfer. Because of the nonuniqueness of the solution, the particular temperature profile obtained depends on the numerical inversion technique used and the type of auxiliary information incorporated in the solution. The choice of an inversion algorithm depends on many factors; including the speed and size of computer, the availability of representative statistics, and the accuracy of initial data. Results are presented for a numerical study comparing two contrasting inversion methods: the statistical-matrix inversion method and the nonstatistical-iterative method. These were found to be the most applicable to the problem of determining atmospheric temperature profiles. Tradeoffs between the two methods are discussed.

  13. Generalized emissivity inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Ming, DengMing; Wen, Tao; Dai, XianXi; Dai, JiXin; Evenson, William E

    2002-04-01

    Inverse problems have recently drawn considerable attention from the physics community due to of potential widespread applications [K. Chadan and P. C. Sabatier, Inverse Problems in Quantum Scattering Theory, 2nd ed. (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1989)]. An inverse emissivity problem that determines the emissivity g(nu) from measurements of only the total radiated power J(T) has recently been studied [Tao Wen, DengMing Ming, Xianxi Dai, Jixin Dai, and William E. Evenson, Phys. Rev. E 63, 045601(R) (2001)]. In this paper, a new type of generalized emissivity and transmissivity inverse (GETI) problem is proposed. The present problem differs from our previous work on inverse problems by allowing the unknown (emissivity) function g(nu) to be temperature dependent as well as frequency dependent. Based on published experimental information, we have developed an exact solution formula for this GETI problem. A universal function set suggested for numerical calculation is shown to be robust, making this inversion method practical and convenient for realistic calculations. PMID:12005916

  14. Direct and indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, Jean; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Operto, Stéphane; Ribodetti, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    A bridge is highlighted between the direct inversion and the indirect inversion. They are based on fundamental different approaches: one is looking after a projection from the data space to the model space while the other one is reducing a misfit between observed data and synthetic data obtained from a given model. However, it is possible to obtain similar structures for model perturbation, and we shall focus on P-wave velocity reconstruction. This bridge is built up through the Born approximation linearizing the forward problem with respect to model perturbation and through asymptotic approximations of the Green functions of the wave propagation equation. We first describe the direct inversion and its ingredients and then we focus on a specific misfit function design leading to a indirect inversion. Finally, we shall compare this indirect inversion with more standard least-squares inversion as the FWI, enabling the focus on small weak velocity perturbations on one side and the speed-up of the velocity perturbation reconstruction on the other side. This bridge has been proposed by the group led by Raul Madariaga in the early nineties, emphasizing his leading role in efficient imaging workflows for seismic velocity reconstruction, a drastic requirement at that time.

  15. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    cas dans d'autres cas de figure. Par ailleurs, il peut être vu comme une des étapes dans le processus de détermination du comportement de l'aquifère. Il est montré que les méthodes d'évaluation des paramètres actuels ne diffèrent pas si ce n'est dans les détails des calculs informatiques. Il est montré qu'il existe une large panoplie de techniques d'inversion : codes de calcul utilisables par tout-un-chacun, accommodation de la variabilité via la géostatistique, incorporation d'informations géologiques et de différents types de données (température, occurrence, concentration en isotopes, âge, etc.), détermination de l'incertitude. Vu ces développements, la calibration automatique facilite énormément la modélisation. Par ailleurs, il est souhaitable que son utilisation devienne une pratique standardisée. Se sintetiza el estado del problema inverso en aguas subterráneas. El énfasis se ubica en la caracterización de acuíferos, donde los modeladores tienen que enfrentar la incertidumbre del modelo conceptual (principalmente variabilidad temporal y espacial), dependencia de escala, muchos tipos de parámetros desconocidos (transmisividad, recarga, condiciones limitantes, etc), no linealidad, y frecuentemente baja sensibilidad de variables de estado (típicamente presiones y concentraciones) a las propiedades del acuífero. Debido a estas dificultades, no puede separarse la calibración de los procesos de modelado, como frecuentemente se hace en otros campos. En su lugar, debe de visualizarse como un paso en el proceso de enten dimiento del comportamiento del acuífero. En realidad, se muestra que los métodos reales de estimación de parámetros no difieren uno del otro en lo esencial, aunque sí pueden diferir en los detalles computacionales. Se discute que existe amplio espacio para la mejora del problema inverso en aguas subterráneas: desarrollo de códigos amigables alusuario, acomodamiento de variabilidad a través de geoestad

  16. X-ray Emission from the Born-Again Planetary Nebula Abell 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    The planetary nebula (PN) Abell 30 underwent a very late thermal pulse that resulted in the ejection of knots of hydrogen-poor material. ROSAT detected soft X-ray emission from these knots. We present deep Chandra and XMM-Newton observations that show this X-ray emission to consist of two components: a point-source at the central star and diffuse emission associated with the hydrogen-poor knots and the cloverleaf structure inside the nebular shell. The spatial distribution and spectral properties of the diffuse X-ray emission suggest that it is generated by the shock-heated plasma produced by the interaction of the present stellar wind with the hydrogen-poor ejecta of the born-again event. Charge-exchange reactions between the ions of the stellar winds and the born-again ejecta may also contribute to this emission. The origin of the X-ray emission from the central star of A 30 is puzzling: shocks in the present fast stellar wind and photospheric emission can be ruled out, while the development of a new, compact hot bubble confining the fast stellar wind seems implausible.

  17. Peculiar velocities of cD galaxies - MX spectroscopy of Abell 1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Hintzen, Paul; Oegerle, W. R.; Romanishin, W.; Lesser, M. P.; Eisenhamer, J. D.; Batuski, D. J.

    1988-09-01

    Spectroscopic observations of galaxies in the Abell 1795 field have been obtained using the MX multiple-object spectrograph on the Steward Observatory 2.3 m telescope. Redshifts are presented for 46 galaxies, including 41 cluster members. It is found that the A1795 cD galaxy is not at rest in the cluster gravitational potential well; it has a peculiar radial velocity, cz, of 365 km/s, and the hypothesis that the mean cluster velocity is as large as the cD's velocity can be rejected at the 99.5 percent confidence level. This conclusion is supported by spectroscopic data for the 'cooling flow' gas found in the central region of the cluster; this gas, except for the portion coincident with the cD nucleus, lies at the velocity derived for the cluster mean. It is suggested that current models of the formation of cD galaxies are unlikely to account for the large peculiar velocities of the cD galaxies in A1795 and A2670 unless substantial subclustering is still present. However, the available data show no evidence for velocity subclustering in either A1795 or A2670.

  18. On the X-ray spectrum of the volume emissivity arising from Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stottlemyer, A. R.; Boldt, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    HEAO 1 A-2 X-ray spectra (2-15 keV) for an optically selected sample of Abell clusters of galaxies with z less than 0.1 have been analyzed to determine the energy dependence of the cosmological X-ray volume emissivity arising from such clusters. This spectrum is well fitted by an isothermal-bremsstrahlung model with kT = 7.4 + or - 1.5 KeV. This result is a test of the isothermal-volume-emissivity spectrum to be inferred from the conjecture that all contributing clusters may be characterized by kT = 7 keV, as assumed by McKee et al. (1980) in estimating the underlying luminosity function for the same sample. Although satisfied at the statistical level indicated, the analysis of a low-luminosity subsample suggests that this assumption of identical isothermal spectra would lead to a systematic error for a more statistically precise determination of the luminosity function's form.

  19. Population Analysis of Seyfert Galaxies in the Coma Abell-1367 Supercluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Megan; Wilcots, E. M.; Hess, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    In the hopes of finding a possible source of intergalactic heating, we are studying the population of active galaxies residing in and out of groups along the Coma-Abell 1367 supercluster to look at the occurrence of Seyfert galaxies. We report on the distribution of Seyfert galaxies as a function of environment across the supercluster and probe the characteristics of the population of groups that currently host at least one Seyfert. Of the 66 groups sampled, there are 11 groups containing one Seyfert and 6 groups containing multiple Seyferts, which leaves 49 groups without any activity. We have yet to determine whether the occurrence of Seyferts is dependent on environmental factors. So far, we have not identified a correlation between environment and AGN activity; activity occurs pretty evenly both within and outside of galaxy groups. However, there does seem to be some correlation between the size of the group and the the percentage of Seyfert activity; one group with over 250 members has a much smaller amount of Seyferts by percentage (9 Seyferts) than other groups with 10 or less members. We explore the effect of Seyfert activity on the intergalactic medium in galaxy groups.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abell 496 gri photometry (Moretti+, 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Molinari, E.; Chincarini, G.; de Grandi, S.

    2000-04-01

    We initiated a large project aimed to estimate the Luminosity Function of galaxies in clusters and to evaluate its relation to cluster morphology. With this paper we deem necessary to outline the general procedures of the data reduction and details of the data analysis. The cluster sample includes the brightest southern ROSAT all-sky survey clusters with z<0.1 . These have been observed in three colours g, r, i, and mapped up to a few core radii using a mosaic of CCD frames. E/S0 galaxies in the cluster core are singled out both by morphology (for the brightest galaxies), and by colour. The details of the data reduction procedure are illustrated via the analysis of the cluster Abell 496, which has been used as a pilot cluster for the whole program. The related photometric catalogue consists of 2355 objects. The limiting magnitudes (the reference Surface Brightness is given in parenthesis) in the various colours are respectively g(25.5)=24.14, r(25.5)=24.46, i(25.0)=23.75. These correspond to the limiting absolute magnitudes -12.28, -11.96 and -12.67 (H0=50km/s/Mpc). (1 data file).

  1. A Cosmic Train Wreck: JVLA Radio Observations of the HST Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Connor; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Kraft, Ralph P.; Dawson, William; Brüggen, Marcus; Roediger, Elke; Bulbul, Esra; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The galaxy cluster mergers observed in the HST Frontier Fields represent some of the most energetic events in the Universe. Major cluster mergers leave distinct signatures in the ICM in the form of shocks, turbulence, and diffuse cluster radio sources. These diffuse radio sources, so-called radio relics and halos, provide evidence for the acceleration of relativistic particles and the presence of large scale magnetic fields in the ICM. Observations of these halos and relics allow us to (i) study the physics of particle acceleration and its relation with shocks and turbulence in the ICM and (ii) constrain the dynamical evolution of the merger eventsWe present Jansky Very Large Array 1-4 GHz observations of the Frontier cluster Abell 2744. We confirm the presence of the known giant radio halo and radio relic via our deep radio images. Owing to the much greater sensitivity of the JVLA compared to previous observations, we are able to detect a previously unobserved long Mpc-size filament of synchrotron emission to the south west of the cluster core. We also present a radio spectral index image of the diffuse cluster emission to test the origin of the radio relic and halo, related to the underlying particle acceleration mechanism. Finally, we carry out a search for radio emission from the 'jellyfish' galaxies in A2744 to estimate their star formation rate. These highly disturbed galaxies are likely influenced by the cluster merger event, although the precise origin of these galaxies is still being debated.

  2. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING BY THE SUPER-MASSIVE cD GALAXY IN ABELL 3827

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, E. R.; Gomez, P. L.; Lee, H.; Diaz, R.; Bergmann, M.; Turner, J. E. H.; Miller, B. W.; West, M. J.; Verdugo, T.

    2010-06-01

    We have discovered strong gravitational lensing features in the core of the nearby cluster Abell 3827 by analyzing Gemini South GMOS images. The most prominent strong lensing feature is a highly magnified, ring-shaped configuration of four images around the central cD galaxy. GMOS spectroscopic analysis puts this source at z {approx} 0.2. Located {approx}20'' away from the central galaxy is a secondary tangential arc feature which has been identified as a background galaxy with z {approx} 0.4. We have modeled the gravitational potential of the cluster core, taking into account the mass from the cluster, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and other galaxies. We derive a total mass of (2.7 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 13} M {sub sun} within 37 h {sup -1} kpc. This mass is an order of magnitude larger than that derived from X-ray observations. The total mass derived from lensing data suggests that the BCG in this cluster is perhaps the most massive galaxy in the nearby universe.

  3. Systematic Uncertainties in Characterizing Cluster Outskirts: The Case of Abell 133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, Jennie; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Nulsen, Paul; Farrah, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    The outskirts of galaxy clusters have low surface brightness compared to the X-ray background, making accurate background subtraction particularly important for analyzing cluster spectra out to and beyond the virial radius. We analyze the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) of Abell 133 and assess the extent to which uncertainties on background subtraction affect measured quantities. We implement two methods of analyzing the ICM spectra: one in which the blank-sky background is subtracted, and another in which the sky background is modeled. We find that the two methods are consistent within the 90% confidence ranges. We were able to measure the thermodynamic properties of the cluster up to R500. Even at R500, the systematic uncertainties associated with the sky background in the direction of A133 are small, despite the ICM signal constituting only ~25% of the total signal. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution. GAO acknowledges support by NASA through a Hubble Fellowship grant HST-HF2-51345.001-A awarded by the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  4. MMTF-Halpha AND HST-FUV IMAGING OF THE FILAMENTARY COMPLEX IN ABELL 1795

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2009-10-01

    We have obtained deep, high spatial resolution images of the central region of Abell 1795 at Halpha and [N II] lambda6583 with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter (MMTF), and in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys solar blind channel on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The superb image quality of the MMTF data has made it possible to resolve the known SE filament into a pair of thin, intertwined filaments extending for {approx}50 kpc, with a width <1 kpc. The presence of these thin, tangled strands is suggestive of a cooling wake where runaway cooling is taking place, perhaps aided by an enhanced magnetic field in this region. The HST data further resolve these strands into chains of FUV-bright stellar clusters, indicating that these filaments are indeed sites of ongoing star formation, but at a rate {approx}2 orders of magnitude smaller than the mass-deposition rates predicted from the X-ray data. The elevated [N II]/Halpha ratio and large spatial variations of the FUV/Halpha flux ratio across the filaments indicate that O-star photoionization is not solely responsible for the ionization. The data favor collisional heating by cosmic rays either produced in situ by magnetohydrodynamical processes or conducted from the surrounding intracluster medium.

  5. Diffuse radio emission in the complex merging galaxy cluster Abell2069

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabent, A.; Hoeft, M.; Pizzo, R. F.; Bonafede, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Klein, U.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters with signs of a recent merger in many cases show extended diffuse radio features. This emission originates from relativistic electrons that suffer synchrotron losses due to the intracluster magnetic field. The mechanisms of particle acceleration and the properties of the magnetic field are still poorly understood. Aims: We search for diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters. Here, we study the complex galaxy cluster Abell 2069, for which X-ray observations indicate a recent merger. Methods: We investigate the cluster's radio continuum emission by deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations at 346 MHz and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations at 322 MHz. Results: We find an extended diffuse radio feature roughly coinciding with the main component of the cluster. We classify this emission as a radio halo and estimate its lower limit flux density at 25 ± 9 mJy. Moreover, we find a second extended diffuse source located at the cluster's companion and estimate its flux density at 15 ± 2 mJy. We speculate that this is a small halo or a mini-halo. If true, this cluster is the first example of a double-halo in a single galaxy cluster.

  6. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 1795 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamura, T.; Kaastra, J. S.; Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F.; Mittaz, J. P. D.; Trudolyubov, S. P.; Stewart, G.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Lumb, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    The initial results from XMM-Newton observations of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 1795 are presented. The spatially-resolved X-ray spectra taken by the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) show a temperature drop at a radius of - 200 kpc from the cluster center, indicating that the ICM is cooling. Both the EPIC and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) spectra extracted from the cluster center can be described by an isothermal model with a temperature of approx. 4 keV. The volume emission measure of any cool component (less than 1 keV) is less than a few % of the hot component at the cluster center. A strong O VIII Lyman alpha line was detected with the RGS from the cluster core. The O abundance of the ICM is 0.2-0.5 times the solar value. The O to Fe ratio at the cluster center is 0.5 - 1.5 times the solar ratio.

  7. Two new triterpenoid glycosides from the stems of Camellia oleifera Abel.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing-Wei; Fu, Hui-Zheng; Luo, Yue-Hua; Zhou, Guo-Ping; Wan, Kai-Hua; Zhong, Rui-Jian

    2016-07-01

    Two new oleanane-type triterpenoid glycosides, 3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)-[β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-22α-angeloyloxyolean-12-ene-15α,16α,28-triol(1) and 3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)-[β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21β-acetyl-22α-angeloyloxyolean-12-ene-16α,28-diol (2) were isolated from the stems of Camellia oleifera Abel. Their structures were elucidated by means of spectroscopic methods and chemical evidence. The cytotoxic activities of compounds 1-2 were evaluated against five human tumour cell lines (HCT-8, BGC-823, A5049, and A2780). Compounds 1-2 showed cytotoxic activity against five human cancer cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 3.15 to 7.32 μM. PMID:26610161

  8. Zero-order bows in radially inhomogeneous spheres: direct and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    Adam, John A

    2011-10-01

    Zero-order ray paths are examined in radially inhomogeneous spheres with differentiable refractive index profiles. It is demonstrated that zero-order and sometimes twin zero-order bows can exist when the gradient of refractive index is sufficiently negative. Abel inversion is used to "recover" the refractive index profiles; it is therefore possible in principle to specify the nature and type of bows and determine the refractive index profile that induces them. This may be of interest in the field of rainbow refractometry and optical fiber studies. This ray-theoretic analysis has direct similarities with the phenomenon of "orbiting" and other phenomena in scattering theory and also in seismological, surface gravity wave, and gravitational "lensing" studies. For completeness these topics are briefly discussed in the appendixes; they may also be of pedagogic interest. PMID:22016245

  9. Wavelet transform analysis of the small-scale X-ray structure of the cluster Abell 1367

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebeney, S. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a new technique based on a wavelet transform analysis to quantify the small-scale (less than a few arcminutes) X-ray structure of clusters of galaxies. We apply this technique to the ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) and Einstein high-resolution imager (HRI) images of the central region of the cluster Abell 1367 to detect sources embedded within the diffuse intracluster medium. In addition to detecting sources and determining their fluxes and positions, we show that the wavelet analysis allows a characterization of the sources extents. In particular, the wavelet scale at which a given source achieves a maximum signal-to-noise ratio in the wavelet images provides an estimate of the angular extent of the source. To account for the widely varying point response of the ROSAT PSPC as a function of off-axis angle requires a quantitative measurement of the source size and a comparison to a calibration derived from the analysis of a Deep Survey image. Therefore, we assume that each source could be described as an isotropic two-dimensional Gaussian and used the wavelet amplitudes, at different scales, to determine the equivalent Gaussian Full Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) (and its uncertainty) appropriate for each source. In our analysis of the ROSAT PSPC image, we detect 31 X-ray sources above the diffuse cluster emission (within a radius of 24 min), 16 of which are apparently associated with cluster galaxies and two with serendipitous, background quasars. We find that the angular extents of 11 sources exceed the nominal width of the PSPC point-spread function. Four of these extended sources were previously detected by Bechtold et al. (1983) as 1 sec scale features using the Einstein HRI. The same wavelet analysis technique was applied to the Einstein HRI image. We detect 28 sources in the HRI image, of which nine are extended. Eight of the extended sources correspond to sources previously detected by Bechtold et al. Overall, using both the

  10. Analysis of Temperature Distributions in Nighttime Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telyak, Oksana; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Svetashev, Alexander; Turishev, Leonid; Barodka, Siarhei

    2015-04-01

    Adequate prediction of temperature inversion in the atmospheric boundary layer is one of prerequisites for successful forecasting of meteorological parameters and severe weather events. Examples include surface air temperature and precipitation forecasting as well as prediction of fog, frosts and smog with hazardous levels of atmospheric pollution. At the same time, reliable forecasting of temperature inversions remains an unsolved problem. For prediction of nighttime inversions over some specific territory, it is important to study characteristic features of local circulation cells formation and to properly take local factors into account to develop custom modeling techniques for operational use. The present study aims to investigate and analyze vertical temperature distributions in tropospheric inversions (isotherms) over the territory of Belarus. We study several specific cases of formation, evolution and decay of deep nighttime temperature inversions in Belarus by means of mesoscale numerical simulations with WRF model, considering basic mechanisms of isothermal and inverse temperature layers formation in the troposphere and impact of these layers on local circulation cells. Our primary goal is to assess the feasibility of advance prediction of inversions formation with WRF. Modeling results reveal that all cases under consideration have characteristic features of radiative inversions (e.g., their formation times, development phases, inversion intensities, etc). Regions of "blocking" layers formation are extensive and often spread over the entire territory of Belarus. Inversions decay starts from the lowermost (near surface) layer (altitudes of 5 to 50 m). In all cases, one can observe formation of temperature gradients that substantially differ from the basic inversion gradient, i.e. the layer splits into smaller layers, each having a different temperature stratification (isothermal, adiabatic, etc). As opposed to various empirical techniques as well as

  11. Frequency-domain direct waveform inversion based on perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sangmin; Kim, Youngseo; Shin, Changsoo

    2014-05-01

    A direct waveform inversion based on perturbation theory is proposed to delineate a subsurface velocity structure from seismic data. This technique can directly compute the difference between the actual subsurface velocity and an initial guess of the velocity, while full waveform inversion updates the velocity model in the directions of reducing the data residual. Unlike full waveform inversion using the steepest descent method, the direct waveform inversion does not require a proper step length to iteratively update the velocity model. We present an algorithm for the waveform inversion method in the frequency domain and numerical examples demonstrating how the inversion method can reconstruct subsurface velocity structures using surface seismic data. The time-domain seismograms synthesized in the inversion procedure match the corresponding shot-gather seismograms of field data.

  12. Tabu optimization for matched field inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Ghosh-Dastidar, Urmi

    2002-11-01

    Matched field processing is a powerful tool for source localization and geoacoustic inversion. Because of significant environmental and geometry uncertainties, however, matched field processing usually involves multiparameter searches. To facilitate these searches, global optimization techniques such as genetic algorithms and simulated annealing have been successfully employed. In this work, a different approach, tabu, is implemented for optimization in matched field inversion. Tabu is a technique relying on the use of memory; it searches for the global maximum of the objective function through a navigation process that avoids already revisited models, also making use of aspiration criteria and diversification for faster convergence. The tabu performance in localization and geoacoustic inversion is demonstrated through experimentation with both synthetic and real (SWellEX 96) data. The approach is shown to provide reliable estimates in an efficient manner. [Work supported by ONR.

  13. Multi-Skip Tomographic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Bloom, Joost; Lorenz, Maarten

    2011-06-01

    Inspection of corrosion at pipe support locations is difficult because of accessibility limitations. Recently a screening technique has been developed called Multi-Skip ultrasonics. The method utilizes a pitch-catch set-up. Shear waves are transmitted that reflect multiple times in the pipe wall, from which integral wall thickness information is obtained. The method turns out to be very sensitive in detecting the presence of wall loss, but it turns out to be difficult to determine the extent of the wall loss. If the extent is not known, only a conservative estimate of depth can be derived from the Multi-Skip signals, because of the accumulative nature of the change in arrival time due to wall loss. Multi-Skip tomography appears to be a promising method in addition to Multi-Skip screening as a follow-up inspection technique. It uses full wave field inversion to determine a wall thickness profile at a particular location of the pipe on the support. As with the Multi-Skip screening method, Multi-Skip tomography is applied with the transmitter and receiver on both sides of the pipe support location and waves traveling in the axial pipe direction. The wave field inversion consists of a forward modeling step that predicts the measured wave field after which an iterative comparison process with the actually measured wave field results in an estimate of the wall thickness profile under the support.

  14. Real time inverse filter focusing through iterative time reversal.

    PubMed

    Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickaël; Fink, Mathias

    2004-02-01

    In order to achieve an optimal focusing through heterogeneous media we need to build the inverse filter of the propagation operator. Time reversal is an easy and robust way to achieve such an inverse filter in nondissipative media. However, as soon as losses appear in the medium, time reversal is not equivalent to the inverse filter anymore. Consequently, it does not produce the optimal focusing and beam degradations may appear. In such cases, we showed in previous works that the optimal focusing can be recovered by using the so-called spatiotemporal inverse filter technique. This process requires the presence of a complete set of receivers inside the medium. It allows one to reach the optimal focusing even in extreme situations such as ultrasonic focusing through human skull or audible sound focusing in strongly reverberant rooms. But, this technique is time consuming and implied fastidious numerical calculations. In this paper we propose a new way to process this inverse filter focusing technique in real time and without any calculation. The new process is based on iterative time reversal process. Contrary to the classical inverse filter technique, this iteration does not require any computation and achieves the inverse filter in an experimental way using wave propagation instead of computational power. The convergence from time reversal to inverse filter during the iterative process is theoretically explained. Finally, the feasibility of this iterative technique is experimentally demonstrated for ultrasound applications. PMID:15000188

  15. Geoacoustic inversion with ships as sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Robert A.; Knobles, David P.

    2005-02-01

    Estimation of geoacoustic parameters using acoustic data from a surface ship was performed for a shallow water region in the Gulf of Mexico. The data were recorded from hydrophones in a bottom mounted, horizontal line array (HLA). The techniques developed to produce the geoacoustic inversion are described, and an efficient method for geoacoustic inversion with broadband beam cross-spectral data is demonstrated. The performance of cost functions that involve coherent or incoherent sums over frequency and one or multiple time segments is discussed. Successful inversions for the first sediment layer sound speed and thickness and some of the parameters for the deeper layers were obtained with the surface ship at nominal ranges of 20, 30, or 50 water depths. The data for these inversions were beam cross-spectra from four subapertures of the HLA spanning a little more than two water depths. The subaperture beams included ten frequencies equally spaced in the 120-200 Hz band. The values of the geoacoustic parameters from the inversions are validated by comparisons with geophysical observations and with the parameter values from previous inversions by other invesigators, and by comparing transmission loss (TL) measured in the experiment with modeled TL based on the inverted geoacoustic parameters. .

  16. Applications of high resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Owyoung, A.; Esherick, P.

    1980-01-01

    The use of high-power, narrow-band lasers has significantly improved the resolving power and sensitivity of inverse Raman spectroscopy of gases. In this paper we shall describe this technique, illustrate its capabilities by showing some Q-branch spectra of heavy spherical tops, and survey some possible future applications.

  17. Structure and Formation of cD Galaxies: NGC 6166 in ABELL 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Ralf; Kormendy, John; Cornell, Mark E.; Fisher, David B.

    2015-07-01

     Hobby–Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy is used to measure the velocity dispersion profile of the nearest prototypical cD galaxy, NGC 6166 in the cluster Abell 2199. We also present composite surface photometry from many telescopes. We confirm the defining feature of a cD galaxy; i.e., (we suggest), a halo of stars that fills the cluster center and that is controlled dynamically by cluster gravity, not by the central galaxy. Our HET spectroscopy shows that the velocity dispersion of NGC 6166 rises from σ ≃ 300 km s‑1 in the inner r∼ 10\\prime\\prime to σ =865+/- 58 km s‑1 at r ∼ 100″ in the cD halo. This extends published observations of an outward σ increase and shows for the first time that σ rises all the way to the cluster velocity dispersion of 819 ± 32 km s‑1. We also observe that the main body of NGC 6166 moves at +206 ± 39 km s‑1 with respect to the cluster mean velocity, but the velocity of the inner cD halo is ∼70 km s‑1 closer to the cluster velocity. These results support our picture that cD halos consist of stars that were stripped from individual cluster galaxies by fast tidal encounters.  However, our photometry does not confirm the widespread view that cD halos are identifiable as an extra, low-surface-brightness component that is photometrically distinct from the inner, steep-Sérsic-function main body of an otherwise-normal giant elliptical galaxy. Instead, all of the brightness profile of NGC 6166 outside its core is described to ±0.037 V mag arcsec‑2 by a single Sérsic function with index n≃ 8.3. The cD halo is not recognizable from photometry alone. This blurs the distinction between cluster-dominated cD halos and the similarly-large-Sérsic-index halos of giant, core-boxy-nonrotating ellipticals. These halos are believed to be accreted onto compact, high-redshift progenitors (“red nuggets”) by large numbers of minor mergers. They belong dynamically to their central galaxies. Still, cDs and core

  18. The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey. II. The distribution of velocity dispersions of rich galaxy clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazure, A.; Katgert, P.; den Hartog, R.; Biviano, A.; Dubath, P.; Escalera, E.; Focardi, P.; Gerbal, D.; Giuricin, G.; Jones, B.; Le Fevre, O.; Moles, M.; Perea, J.; Rhee, G.

    1996-06-01

    The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (the ENACS) has yielded 5634 redshifts for galaxies in the directions of 107 rich, Southern clusters selected from the ACO catalogue (Abell et al. 1989). By combining these data with another 1000 redshifts from the literature, of galaxies in 37 clusters, we construct a volume-limited sample of 128 R_ACO_>=1 clusters in a solid angle of 2.55sr centered on the South Galactic Pole, out to a redshift z=0.1. For a subset of 80 of these clusters we can calculate a reliable velocity dispersion, based on at least 10 (but very often between 30 and 150) redshifts. We deal with the main observational problem that hampers an unambiguous interpretation of the distribution of cluster velocity dispersions, namely the contamination by fore- and background galaxies. We also discuss in detail the completeness of the cluster samples for which we derive the distribution of cluster velocity dispersions. We find that a cluster sample which is complete in terms of the field-corrected richness count given in the ACO catalogue gives a result that is essentially identical to that based on a smaller and more conservative sample which is complete in terms of an intrinsic richness count that has been corrected for superposition effects. We find that the large apparent spread in the relation between velocity dispersion and richness count (based either on visual inspection or on machine counts) must be largely intrinsic; i.e. this spread is not primarily due to measurement uncertainties. One of the consequences of the (very) broad relation between cluster richness and velocity dispersion is that all samples of clusters that are defined complete with respect to richness count are unavoidably biased against low-σ_V_ clusters. For the richness limit of our sample this bias operates only for velocity dispersions less than =~800km/sec. We obtain a statistically reliable distribution of global velocity dispersions which, for velocity dispersions σ_V_>800km/s, is

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Inverse Problems. Activities for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    into the nature of inverse problems and the appropriate mode of thought, chapter 1 offers historical vignettes, most of which have played an essential role in the development of natural science. These vignettes cover the first successful application of `non-destructive testing' by Archimedes (page 4) via Newton's laws of motion up to literary tomography, and readers will be able to enjoy a wide overview of inverse problems. Therefore, as the author asks, the reader should not skip this chapter. This may not be hard to do, since the headings of the sections are quite intriguing (`Archimedes' Bath', `Another World', `Got the Time?', `Head Games', etc). The author embarks on the technical approach to inverse problems in chapter 2. He has elegantly designed each section with a guide specifying course level, objective, mathematical and scientifical background and appropriate technology (e.g. types of calculators required). The guides are designed such that teachers may be able to construct effective and attractive courses by themselves. The book is not intended to offer one rigidly determined course, but should be used flexibly and independently according to the situation. Moreover, every section closes with activities which can be chosen according to the students' interests and levels of ability. Some of these exercises do not have ready solutions, but require long-term study, so readers are not required to solve all of them. After chapter 5, which contains discrete inverse problems such as the algebraic reconstruction technique and the Backus - Gilbert method, there are answers and commentaries to the activities. Finally, scripts in MATLAB are attached, although they can also be downloaded from the author's web page (http://math.uc.edu/~groetsch/). This book is aimed at students but it will be very valuable to researchers wishing to retain a wide overview of inverse problems in the midst of busy research activities. A Japanese version was published in 2002.

  20. Exploring the origin of a large cavity in Abell 1795 using deep Chandra observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Kosec, P.

    2014-12-01

    We examine deep stacked Chandra observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 1795 (over 700 ks) to study in depth a large (34 kpc radius) cavity in the X-ray emission. Curiously, despite the large energy required to form this cavity (4PV = 4 × 1060 erg), there is no obvious counterpart to the cavity on the opposite side of the cluster, which would be expected if it has formed due to jets from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) inflating bubbles. There is also no radio emission associated with the cavity, and no metal enhancement or filaments between it and the brightest cluster galaxy, which are normally found for bubbles inflated by AGN which have risen from the core. One possibility is that this is an old ghost cavity, and that gas sloshing has dominated the distribution of metals around the core. Projection effects, particularly the long X-ray bright filament to the south-east, may prevent us from seeing the companion bubble on the opposite side of the cluster core. We calculate that such a companion bubble would easily have been able to uplift the gas in the southern filament from the core. Interestingly, it has recently been found that inside the cavity is a highly variable X-ray point source coincident with a small dwarf galaxy. Given the remarkable spatial correlation of this point source and the X-ray cavity, we explore the possibility that an outburst from this dwarf galaxy in the past could have led to the formation of the cavity, but find this to be an unlikely scenario.

  1. Dynamics of cD clusters of galaxies. II: Analysis of seven Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Hill, John M.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of the seven Abell clusters A193, A399, A401, A1795, A1809, A2063, and A2124, based on redshift data reported previously by us (Hill & Oegerle, (1993)). These papers present the initial results of a survey of cD cluster kinematics, with an emphasis on studying the nature of peculiar velocity cD galaxies and their parent clusters. In the current sample, we find no evidence for significant peculiar cD velocities, with respect to the global velocity distribution. However, the cD in A2063 has a significant (3 sigma) peculiar velocity with respect to galaxies in the inner 1.5 Mpc/h, which is likely due to the merger of a subcluster with A2063. We also find significant evidence for subclustering in A1795, and a marginally peculiar cD velocity with respect to galaxies within approximately 200 kpc/h of the cD. The available x-ray, optical, and galaxy redshift data strongly suggest that a subcluster has merged with A1795. We propose that the subclusters which merged with A1795 and A2063 were relatively small, with shallow potential wells, so that the cooling flows in these clusters were not disrupted. Two-body gravitational models of the A399/401 and A2063/MKW3S systems indicate that A399/401 is a bound pair with a total virial mass of approximately 4 x 10(exp 15) solar mass/h, while A2063 and MKW3S are very unlikely to be bound.

  2. The growth of the galaxy cluster Abell 85: mergers, shocks, stripping and seeding of clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinohe, Y.; Werner, N.; Simionescu, A.; Allen, S. W.; Canning, R. E. A.; Ehlert, S.; Mernier, F.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of deep Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 85, which is currently undergoing at least two mergers, and in addition shows evidence for gas sloshing which extends out to r ≈ 600 kpc. One of the two infalling subclusters, to the south of the main cluster centre, has a dense, X-ray bright cool core and a tail extending to the south-east. The northern edge of this tail is strikingly smooth and sharp (narrower than the Coulomb mean free path of the ambient gas) over a length of 200 kpc, while towards the south-west the boundary of the tail is blurred and bent, indicating a difference in the plasma transport properties between these two edges. The thermodynamic structure of the tail strongly supports an overall north-westward motion. We propose, that a sloshing-induced tangential, ambient, coherent gas flow is bending the tail eastwards. The brightest galaxy of this subcluster is at the leading edge of the dense core, and is trailed by the tail of stripped gas, suggesting that the cool core of the subcluster has been almost completely destroyed by the time it reached its current radius of r ≈ 500 kpc. The surface-brightness excess, likely associated with gas stripped from the infalling southern subcluster, extends towards the south-east out to at least r500 of the main cluster, indicating that the stripping of infalling subclusters may seed gas inhomogeneities. The second merging subcluster appears to be a diffuse non-cool-core system. Its merger is likely supersonic with a Mach number of ≈1.4.

  3. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  4. Abell 262 and RXJ0341: Two Brightest Cluster Galaxies with Line Emission Blanketing a Cool Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Heng, Renita

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, integral field (IFU) analysis of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in several cool core clusters has revealed the central regions of these massive old red galaxies to be far from dead. Bright line emission alongside extended X-ray emission links nearby galaxies, is superposed upon vast dust lanes and extends out in long thin filaments from the galaxy core. Yet, to date no unifying picture has come into focus, and the activity across systems is currently seen as a grab-bag of possibile emission line mechanisms. Our primary goal is to work toward a consistent picture for why the BCGs seem are undergoing a renewed level of activity. One problem is most of the current data remains focused on mapping the very core of the BCG, but neglects surrounding galaxies. We propose to discover the full extent of line emission in a complementary pair of BCGs. In Abell 262, an extensive dust patch screens large portions of an otherwise smooth central galaxy, whereas RXJ0341 appears to be a double-core dust free BCG. We will map the full extent of the line emission in order to deduce whether the line emission is a product of local interactions, or the large-scale cluster X-ray gas. The narrow band filter set and large FOV afforded by the the Mayall MOSAIC-1 (MOSA) imager allows us to concurrently conduct an emission line survey of both clusters, locating all line emitting members and beginning a search for the effect of the environment of the different regions (outskirts vs. cluster core) out to the virial radius. We will combine our results with publically available data from 2MASS to determine the upper limits on specific star formation in the BCG and other cluster galaxies within the cluster virial radius.

  5. Can standard cosmological models explain the observed Abell cluster bulk flow?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Michael A.; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Laure, Tod R.; Postman, Marc

    1995-01-01

    Lauer and Postman (LP) observed that all Abell clusters with redshifts less than 15,000 km/s appear to be participating in a bulk flow of 689 km/s with respect to the cosmic microwave background. We find this result difficult to reconcile with all popular models for large-scale structure formation that assume Gaussian initial conditions. This conclusion is based on Monte Carlo realizations of the LP data, drawn from large particle-mesh N-body simulations for six different models of the initial power spectrum (standard, tilted, and Omega(sub 0) = 0.3 cold dark matter, and two variants of the primordial baryon isocurvature model). We have taken special care to treat properly the longest-wavelength components of the power spectra. The simulations are sampled, 'observed,' and analyzed as identically as possible to the LP cluster sample. Large-scale bulk flows as measured from clusters in the simulations are in excellent agreement with those measured from the grid: the clusters do not exhibit any strong velocity bias on large scales. Bulk flows with amplitude as large as that reported by LP are not uncommon in the Monte Carlo data stes; the distribution of measured bulk flows before error bias subtraction is rougly Maxwellian, with a peak around 400 km/s. However the chi squared of the observed bulk flow, taking into account the anisotropy of the error ellipsoid, is much more difficult to match in the simulations. The models examined are ruled out at confidence levels between 94% and 98%.

  6. Creation of cosmic structure in the complex galaxy cluster merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, J.; Coe, D.; Dupke, R.; Massey, R.; Zitrin, A.; Cypriano, E. S.; Okabe, N.; Frye, B.; Braglia, F. G.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Rhodes, J.; Meneghetti, M.; Moustakas, L. A.; Sodré, L., Jr.; Krick, J.; Bregman, J. N.

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed strong-lensing, weak-lensing and X-ray analysis of Abell 2744 (z= 0.308), one of the most actively merging galaxy clusters known. It appears to have unleashed 'dark', 'ghost', 'bullet' and 'stripped' substructures, each ˜1014 M⊙. The phenomenology is complex and will present a challenge for numerical simulations to reproduce. With new, multiband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, we identify 34 strongly lensed images of 11 galaxies around the massive Southern 'core'. Combining this with weak-lensing data from HST, VLT and Subaru, we produce the most detailed mass map of this cluster to date. We also perform an independent analysis of archival Chandra X-ray imaging. Our analyses support a recent claim that the Southern core and Northwestern substructure are post-merger and exhibit morphology similar to the Bullet Cluster viewed from an angle. From the separation between X-ray emitting gas and lensing mass in the Southern core, we derive a new and independent constraint on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter particles σ/m < 3 ± 1 cm2 g-1. In the Northwestern substructure, the gas, dark matter and galaxy components have become separated by much larger distances. Most curiously, the 'ghost' clump (primarily gas) leads the 'dark' clump (primarily dark matter) by more than 150 kpc. We propose an enhanced 'ram-pressure slingshot' scenario which may have yielded this reversal of components with such a large separation, but needs further confirmation by follow-up observations and numerical simulations. A secondary merger involves a second 'bullet' clump in the North and an extremely 'stripped' clump to the West. The latter appears to exhibit the largest separation between dark matter and X-ray emitting baryons detected to date in our sky.

  7. Suzaku Constraints on Soft and Hard Excess Emissions from Abell 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaharada, Madoka; Makishima, Kazuo; Kitaguchi, Takao; Okuyama, Sho; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi

    2010-02-01

    The nearby (z = 0.03015) cluster of galaxies Abell 2199 was observed by Suzaku in X-rays, with five pointings for ˜20ks each. From the XIS data, the temperature and metal abundance profiles were derived out to ˜700 kpc (0.4 times the virial radius). Both of these quantities decrease gradually from the center to peripheries by a factor of ˜2, while the oxygen abundance tends to be flat. The temperature within 12' (˜430 kpc) is ˜4 keV, and the 0.5-10 keV X-ray luminosity integrated up to 30' is (2.9±0.1) × 1044 erg s-1, in agreement with previous XMM-Newton measurements. Above this thermal emission, no significant excess was found either in the XIS range below ˜1 keV, or in the HXD-PIN range above ˜15 keV. The 90%-confidence upper limit on the emission measure of an assumed 0.2 keV warm gas is (3.7-7.5) × 1062 cm-3 arcmin-2, which is 3.7-7.6 times tighter than the detection reported with XMM-Newton. The 90%-confidence upper limit on the 20-80 keV luminosity of any power-law component is 1.8 × 1043 erg s-1, assuming a photon index of 2.0. Although this upper limit does not reject the possible 2.1σ detection by the BeppoSAX PDS, it is a factor of 2.1 tighter than that of the PDS if both are considered upper limits. The non-detection of the hard excess can be reconciled with the upper limit on diffuse radio emission, without invoking very low magnetic fields (<0.073μG) which were suggested previously.

  8. Inverse temperature in Superstatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loguercio, Humberto; Davis, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    In this work, it is shown that there are (at least) three alternative definitions of the inverse temperature for a non-canonical ensemble. These definitions coincide in expectation but, in general, not in their higher moments. We explore in detail the application to the recent formalism of Superstatistics (C. Beck, 2003), and, in particular, to the configurational probability distribution in the microcanonical ensemble.

  9. Inverse Modelling of the Kawerau Geothermal Reservoir, NZ

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we describe an existing model of the Kawerau geothermal field and attempts to improve this model using inverse modeling techniques. A match of model results to natural state temperatures and pressures at three reference depths are presented. These are used to form and ''objective function'' to be minimized by inverse modeling.

  10. A Forward Glimpse into Inverse Problems through a Geology Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a forward approach to an inverse problem related to detecting the nature of geological substrata which makes use of optimization techniques in a multivariable calculus setting. The true nature of the related inverse problem is highlighted. (Contains 2 figures.)

  11. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  12. MOSES Inversions using Multiresolution SMART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Thomas; Fox, Lewis; Kankelborg, Charles; Courrier, Hans; Plovanic, Jacob

    2014-06-01

    We present improvements to the SMART inversion algorithm for the MOSES imaging spectrograph. MOSES, the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph, is a slitless extreme ultraviolet spectrograph designed to measure cotemporal narrowband spectra over a wide field of view via tomographic inversion of images taken at three orders of a concave diffraction grating. SMART, the Smooth Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, relies on a global chi squared goodness of fit criterion, which enables overfit and underfit regions to "balance out" when judging fit quality. "Good" reconstructions show poor fits at some positions and length scales. Here we take a multiresolution approach to SMART, applying corrections to the reconstruction at positions and scales where correction is warranted based on the noise. The result is improved fit residuals that more closely resemble the expected noise in the images. Within the multiresolution framework it is also easy to include a regularized deconvolution of the instrument point spread functions, which we do. Different point spread functions among MOSES spectral orders results in spurious doppler shifts in the reconstructions, most notable near bright compact emission. We estimate the point spread funtions from the data. Deconvolution is done using the Richardson-Lucy method, which is algorithmically similar to SMART. Regularization results from only correcting the reconstruction at positions and scales where correction is warranted based on the noise. We expect the point spread function deconvolution to increase signal to noise and reduce systematic error in MOSES reconstructions.

  13. Synthesis of nanostructured materials in inverse miniemulsions and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhihai; Ziener, Ulrich

    2013-10-01

    Polymeric nanogels, inorganic nanoparticles, and organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles can be prepared via the inverse miniemulsion technique. Hydrophilic functional cargos, such as proteins, DNA, and macromolecular fluoresceins, may be conveniently encapsulated in these nanostructured materials. In this review, the progress of inverse miniemulsions since 2000 is summarized on the basis of the types of reactions carried out in inverse miniemulsions, including conventional free radical polymerization, controlled/living radical polymerization, polycondensation, polyaddition, anionic polymerization, catalytic oxidation reaction, sol-gel process, and precipitation reaction of inorganic precursors. In addition, the applications of the nanostructured materials synthesized in inverse miniemulsions are also reviewed.

  14. AVO inversion based on inverse operator estimation in trust region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xing-Yao; Deng, Wei; Zong, Zhao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude variation with offset (AVO) inversion is widely utilized in exploration geophysics, especially for reservoir prediction and fluid identification. Inverse operator estimation in the trust region algorithm is applied for solving AVO inversion problems in which optimization and inversion directly are integrated. The L1 norm constraint is considered on the basis of reasonable initial model in order to improve effciency and stability during the AVO inversion process. In this study, high-order Zoeppritz approximation is utilized to establish the inversion objective function in which variation of {{v}\\text{p}}/{{v}\\text{s}} with time is taken into consideration. A model test indicates that the algorithm has a relatively higher stability and accuracy than the damp least-squares algorithm. Seismic data inversion is feasible and inversion values of three parameters ({{v}\\text{p}},{{v}\\text{s}},ρ ) maintain good consistency with logging curves.

  15. Illuminating a Dark Lens : A Type Ia Supernova Magnified by the Frontier Fields Galaxy Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Patel, Brandon; Scolnic, Daniel; Foley, Ryan J.; Molino, Alberto; Brammer, Gabriel; Jauzac, Mathilde; Bradač, Maruša; Broadhurst, Tom; Coe, Dan; Diego, Jose M.; Graur, Or; Hjorth, Jens; Hoag, Austin; Jha, Saurabh W.; Johnson, Traci L.; Kelly, Patrick; Lam, Daniel; McCully, Curtis; Medezinski, Elinor; Meneghetti, Massimo; Merten, Julian; Richard, Johan; Riess, Adam; Sharon, Keren; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Treu, Tommaso; Wang, Xin; Williams, Liliya L. R.; Zitrin, Adi

    2015-09-01

    SN HFF14Tom is a Type Ia SN discovered at z=1.3457+/- 0.0001 behind the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). In a cosmology-independent analysis, we find that HFF14Tom is 0.77 ± 0.15 mag brighter than unlensed Type Ia SNe at similar redshift, implying a lensing magnification of {μ }{obs}=2.03+/- 0.29. This observed magnification provides a rare opportunity for a direct empirical test of galaxy cluster lens models. Here we test 17 lens models, 13 of which were generated before the SN magnification was known, qualifying as pure “blind tests.” The models are collectively fairly accurate: 8 of the models deliver median magnifications that are consistent with the measured μ to within 1σ. However, there is a subtle systematic bias: the significant disagreements all involve models overpredicting the magnification. We evaluate possible causes for this mild bias, and find no single physical or methodological explanation to account for it. We do find that model accuracy can be improved to some extent with stringent quality cuts on multiply imaged systems, such as requiring that a large fraction have spectroscopic redshifts. In addition to testing model accuracies as we have done here, Type Ia SN magnifications could also be used as inputs for future lens models of Abell 2744 and other clusters, providing valuable constraints in regions where traditional strong- and weak-lensing information is unavailable.

  16. Numerical Simulations Challenged on the Prediction of Massive Subhalo Abundance in Galaxy Clusters: The Case of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, E.; Grillo, C.; De Lucia, G.; Biviano, A.; Annunziatella, M.; Borgani, S.; Lombardi, M.; Mercurio, A.; Rosati, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter we compare the abundance of the member galaxies of a rich, nearby (z = 0.09) galaxy cluster, Abell 2142, with that of halos of comparable virial mass extracted from sets of state-of-the-art numerical simulations, both collisionless at different resolutions and with the inclusion of baryonic physics in the form of cooling, star formation, and feedback by active galactic nuclei. We also use two semi-analytical models to account for the presence of orphan galaxies. The photometric and spectroscopic information, taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 database, allows us to estimate the stellar velocity dispersion of member galaxies of Abell 2142. This quantity is used as proxy for the total mass of secure cluster members and is properly compared with that of subhalos in simulations. We find that simulated halos have a statistically significant (≳ 7 sigma confidence level) smaller amount of massive (circular velocity above 200 {km} {{{s}}}-1) subhalos, even before accounting for the possible incompleteness of observations. These results corroborate the findings from a recent strong lensing study of the Hubble Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416 and suggest that the observed difference is already present at the level of dark matter (DM) subhalos and is not solved by introducing baryonic physics. A deeper understanding of this discrepancy between observations and simulations will provide valuable insights into the impact of the physical properties of DM particles and the effect of baryons on the formation and evolution of cosmological structures.

  17. Exact travelling wave solutions of non-linear reaction-convection-diffusion equations—An Abel equation based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, T.; Mak, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    We consider quasi-stationary (travelling wave type) solutions to a general nonlinear reaction-convection-diffusion equation with arbitrary, autonomous coefficients. The second order nonlinear equation describing one dimensional travelling waves can be reduced to a first kind first order Abel equation. By using two integrability conditions for the Abel equation (the Chiellini lemma and the Lemke transformation), several classes of exact travelling wave solutions of the general reaction-convection-diffusion equation are obtained, corresponding to different functional relations imposed between the diffusion, convection and reaction functions. In particular, we obtain travelling wave solutions for two non-linear second order partial differential equations, representing generalizations of the standard diffusion equation and of the classical Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, to which they reduce for some limiting values of the model parameters. The models correspond to some specific, power law type choices of the reaction and convection functions, respectively. The travelling wave solutions of these two classes of differential equation are investigated in detail by using both numerical and semi-analytical methods.

  18. Inversion for seismic anisotropy using genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, S. Univ. of Edinburgh . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); MacBeth, C. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1994-11-01

    A general inversion scheme based on a genetic algorithm is developed to invert seismic observations for anisotropic parameters. The technique is applied to the inversion of shear-wave observations from two azimuthal VSP data sets from the Conoco test site in Oklahoma. Horizontal polarizations and time-delays are inverted for hexagonal and orthorhombic symmetries. The model solutions are consistent with previous studies using trial and error matching of full waveform synthetics. The shear-wave splitting observations suggest the presence of a shear-wave line singularity and are consistent with a dipping fracture system which is known to exist at the test site. Application of the inversion scheme prior to full waveform modeling demonstrates that a considerable saving in time is possible while retaining the same degree of accuracy.

  19. Anisotropy effects on 3D waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stekl, I.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the recent years 3D waveform inversion has become achievable procedure for seismic data processing. A number of datasets has been inverted and presented (Warner el al 2008, Ben Hadj at all, Sirgue et all 2010) using isotropic 3D waveform inversion. However the question arises will the results be affected by isotropic assumption. Full-wavefield inversion techniques seek to match field data, wiggle-for-wiggle, to synthetic data generated by a high-resolution model of the sub-surface. In this endeavour, correctly matching the travel times of the principal arrivals is a necessary minimal requirement. In many, perhaps most, long-offset and wide-azimuth datasets, it is necessary to introduce some form of p-wave velocity anisotropy to match the travel times successfully. If this anisotropy is not also incorporated into the wavefield inversion, then results from the inversion will necessarily be compromised. We have incorporated anisotropy into our 3D wavefield tomography codes, characterised as spatially varying transverse isotropy with a tilted axis of symmetry - TTI anisotropy. This enhancement approximately doubles both the run time and the memory requirements of the code. We show that neglect of anisotropy can lead to significant artefacts in the recovered velocity models. We will present inversion results of inverting anisotropic 3D dataset by assuming isotropic earth and compare them with anisotropic inversion result. As a test case Marmousi model extended to 3D with no velocity variation in third direction and with added spatially varying anisotropy is used. Acquisition geometry is assumed as OBC with sources and receivers everywhere at the surface. We attempted inversion using both 2D and full 3D acquisition for this dataset. Results show that if no anisotropy is taken into account although image looks plausible most features are miss positioned in depth and space, even for relatively low anisotropy, which leads to incorrect result. This may lead to

  20. Program manual for the Eppler airfoil inversion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program is described for calculating the profile of an airfoil as well as the boundary layer momentum thickness and energy form parameter. The theory underlying the airfoil inversion technique developed by Eppler is discussed.

  1. Silk inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Mitropoulos, Alexander N.; Spitzberg, Joshua D.; Tao, Hu; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-12-01

    Periodic nanostructures provide the facility to control and manipulate the flow of light through their lattices. Three-dimensional photonic crystals enable the controlled design of structural colour, which can be varied by infiltrating the structure with different (typically liquid) fillers. Here, we report three-dimensional photonic crystals composed entirely of a purified natural protein (silk fibroin). The biocompatibility of this protein, as well as its favourable material properties and ease of biological functionalization, present opportunities for otherwise unattainable device applications such as bioresorbable integration of structural colour within living tissue or lattice functionalization by means of organic and inorganic material doping. We present a silk inverse opal that demonstrates a pseudo-photonic bandgap in the visible spectrum and show its associated structural colour beneath biological tissue. We also leverage silk's facile dopability to manufacture a gold nanoparticle silk inverse opal and demonstrate patterned heating mediated by enhancement of nanoparticle absorption at the band-edge frequency of the photonic crystal.

  2. Vitamins and Violence: Can Micronutrients Make Students Behave, Schools Safer and Test Scores Better? The Abell Report. Volume 23, No.6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joann Ellison

    2010-01-01

    The notion that vitamins, minerals, and other "supplemental" nutrients profoundly change behavior, mood, and intellect has origins as old as recorded history. Research has indeed suggested connections between nutrient deficiencies and behavior problems, but correlations are not the same as causality. This "Abell Report" is an…

  3. Inverse kinematic-based robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolovich, W. A.; Flueckiger, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    A fundamental problem which must be resolved in virtually all non-trivial robotic operations is the well-known inverse kinematic question. More specifically, most of the tasks which robots are called upon to perform are specified in Cartesian (x,y,z) space, such as simple tracking along one or more straight line paths or following a specified surfacer with compliant force sensors and/or visual feedback. In all cases, control is actually implemented through coordinated motion of the various links which comprise the manipulator; i.e., in link space. As a consequence, the control computer of every sophisticated anthropomorphic robot must contain provisions for solving the inverse kinematic problem which, in the case of simple, non-redundant position control, involves the determination of the first three link angles, theta sub 1, theta sub 2, and theta sub 3, which produce a desired wrist origin position P sub xw, P sub yw, and P sub zw at the end of link 3 relative to some fixed base frame. Researchers outline a new inverse kinematic solution and demonstrate its potential via some recent computer simulations. They also compare it to current inverse kinematic methods and outline some of the remaining problems which will be addressed in order to render it fully operational. Also discussed are a number of practical consequences of this technique beyond its obvious use in solving the inverse kinematic question.

  4. On the nonuniqueness of receiver function inversions

    SciTech Connect

    Ammon, C.J. ); Randall, G.E. ); Zandt, G. )

    1990-09-10

    To study the resolving power of teleseismic P waveforms for receiver structure, the authors model synthetic waveforms using a time domain waveform inversion scheme beginning with a range of initial models to estimate the range of acceptable velocity structures. To speed up the waveform inversions, they implement Randall's (1989) efficient algorithms for calculating differential seismograms and include a smoothness constraint on all the resulting velocity models utilizing the jumping inversion technique of Shaw and Orcutt (1985). They present the results of more than 235 waveform inversions for one-dimensional velocity structures that indicate that the primary sensitivity of a receiver function is to high wavenumber velocity changes, and a depth-velocity product, not simply velocity. The range of slownesses in a typical receiver function study does not appear to be broad enough to remove the depth-velocity ambiguity; the inclusion of a priori information is necessary. They also present inversion results for station RSCP, located in the Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee. The results are similar to those from a previous study by Owens et al. (1984) and demonstrate the uncertainties in the resulting velocity estimate more clearly.

  5. Inversion based on computational simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; Saquib, S.S.

    1998-09-01

    A standard approach to solving inversion problems that involve many parameters uses gradient-based optimization to find the parameters that best match the data. The authors discuss enabling techniques that facilitate application of this approach to large-scale computational simulations, which are the only way to investigate many complex physical phenomena. Such simulations may not seem to lend themselves to calculation of the gradient with respect to numerous parameters. However, adjoint differentiation allows one to efficiently compute the gradient of an objective function with respect to all the variables of a simulation. When combined with advanced gradient-based optimization algorithms, adjoint differentiation permits one to solve very large problems of optimization or parameter estimation. These techniques will be illustrated through the simulation of the time-dependent diffusion of infrared light through tissue, which has been used to perform optical tomography. The techniques discussed have a wide range of applicability to modeling including the optimization of models to achieve a desired design goal.

  6. Inverse avalanches on Abelian sandpiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, H.F. Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801-3080 )

    1994-11-01

    A simple and computationally efficient way of finding inverse avalanches for Abelian sandpiles, called the inverse particle addition operator, is presented. In addition, the method is shown to be optimal in the sense that it requires the minimum amount of computation among methods of the same kind. The method is also conceptually succinct because avalanche and inverse avalanche are placed in the same footing.

  7. Multiscale full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Trampert, Jeannot; Cupillard, Paul; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay; Capdeville, Yann; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We develop and apply a full waveform inversion method that incorporates seismic data on a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, thereby constraining the details of both crustal and upper-mantle structure. This is intended to further our understanding of crust-mantle interactions that shape the nature of plate tectonics, and to be a step towards improved tomographic models of strongly scale-dependent earth properties, such as attenuation and anisotropy. The inversion for detailed regional earth structure consistently embedded within a large-scale model requires locally refined numerical meshes that allow us to (1) model regional wave propagation at high frequencies, and (2) capture the inferred fine-scale heterogeneities. The smallest local grid spacing sets the upper bound of the largest possible time step used to iteratively advance the seismic wave field. This limitation leads to extreme computational costs in the presence of fine-scale structure, and it inhibits the construction of full waveform tomographic models that describe earth structure on multiple scales. To reduce computational requirements to a feasible level, we design a multigrid approach based on the decomposition of a multiscale earth model with widely varying grid spacings into a family of single-scale models where the grid spacing is approximately uniform. Each of the single-scale models contains a tractable number of grid points, which ensures computational efficiency. The multi-to-single-scale decomposition is the foundation of iterative, gradient-based optimization schemes that simultaneously and consistently invert data on all scales for one multi-scale model. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in a full waveform inversion for Eurasia, with a special focus on Anatolia where coverage is particularly dense. Continental-scale structure is constrained by complete seismic waveforms in the 30-200 s period range. In addition to the well-known structural elements of the Eurasian mantle

  8. Top-down estimate of surface flux in the Los Angeles Basin using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: assessing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CO2 and their impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; Ahmadov, R.; Kim, S.-W.; Evan, S.; McKeen, S. A.; Hsie, E.-Y.; Frost, G. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J.; Brown, S. S.; Nowak, J. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Santoni, G. W.; Oda, T.; Trainer, M.

    2013-04-01

    We present top-down estimates of anthropogenic CO, NOx and CO2 surface fluxes at mesoscale using a Lagrangian model in combination with three different WRF model configurations, driven by data from aircraft flights during the CALNEX campaign in southern California in May-June 2010. The US EPA National Emission Inventory 2005 (NEI 2005) was the prior in the CO and NOx inversion calculations. The flux ratio inversion method, based on linear relationships between chemical species, was used to calculate the CO2 inventory without prior knowledge of CO2 surface fluxes. The inversion was applied to each flight to estimate the variability of single-flight-based flux estimates. In Los Angeles (LA) County, the uncertainties on CO and NOx fluxes were 10% and 15%, respectively. Compared with NEI 2005, the CO posterior emissions were lower by 43% in LA County and by 37% in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). NOx posterior emissions were lower by 32% in LA County and by 27% in the SoCAB. NOx posterior emissions were 40% lower on weekends relative to weekdays. The CO2 posterior estimates were 183 Tg yr-1 in SoCAB. A flight during ITCT (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation) in 2002 was used to estimate emissions in the LA Basin in 2002. From 2002 to 2010, the CO and NOx posterior emissions decreased by 41% and 37%, respectively, in agreement with previous studies. Over the same time period, CO2 emissions increased by 10% in LA County but decreased by 4% in the SoCAB, a statistically insignificant change. Overall, the posterior estimates were in good agreement with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory, with differences of 15% or less. However, the posterior spatial distribution in the basin was significantly different from CARB for NOx emissions. WRF-Chem mesoscale chemical-transport model simulations allowed an evaluation of differences in chemistry using different inventory assumptions, including NEI 2005, a gridded CARB inventory and the posterior

  9. Top-down estimate of surface flux in the Los Angeles Basin using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: assessing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CO2 and their impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; Ahmadov, R.; Kim, S.-W.; Evan, S.; McKeen, S. A.; Hsie, E.-Y.; Frost, G. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J.; Brown, S. S.; Nowak, J. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Santoni, G. W.; Trainer, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present top-down estimates of anthropogenic CO, NOx and CO2 surface fluxes at mesoscale using a Lagrangian model in combination with three different WRF model configurations, driven by data from aircraft flights during the CALNEX campaign in southern California in May-June 2010. The US EPA National Emission Inventory 2005 (NEI 2005) was the prior in the CO and NOx inversion calculations. The flux ratio inversion method, based on linear relationships between chemical species, was used to calculate the CO2 inventory without prior knowledge of CO2 surface fluxes. The inversion was applied to each flight to estimate the variability of single-flight-based flux estimates. In Los Angeles (LA) County, the uncertainties on CO and NOx fluxes were 10% and 15%, respectively. Compared with NEI 2005, the CO posterior emissions were lower by 43% ± 6% in LA County and by 37% ± 10% in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). NOx posterior emissions were lower by 32% ± 10% in LA County and by 27% ± 15% in the SoCAB. NOx posterior emissions were 40% lower on weekends relative to weekdays. The CO2 posterior estimates were 183 ± 18 Tg yr-1 in SoCAB. A flight during ITCT in 2002 was used to estimate emissions in the LA Basin in 2002. From 2002 to 2010, the CO and NOx posterior emissions decreased by 41% and 37%, respectively, in agreement with previous studies. Over the same time period, CO2 emissions increased by 10% ± 14% in LA County but decreased by 4% ± 10% in the SoCAB, a statistically insignificant change. Overall, the posterior estimates were in good agreement with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory, with differences of 15% or less. However, the posterior spatial distribution in the basin was significantly different from CARB for NOx emissions. WRF-Chem mesoscale chemical-transport model simulations allowed an evaluation of differences in chemistry using different inventory assumptions, including NEI 2005, CARB 2010 and the posterior inventories derived in

  10. Top-down estimate of surface flux in the Los Angeles Basin using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: assessing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CO2 and their impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brioude, Jerome; Angevine, Wayne; Ahmadov, Ravan; Kim, Si Wan; Evan, Stephanie; McKeen, Stuart; Hsie, Eirh Yu; Frost, Greg; Neuman, Andy; Pollack, Ilana; Peischl, Jeff; Ryerson, Tom; Holloway, John; Brown, Steeve; Nowak, John; Roberts, Jim; Wofsy, Steeve; Santoni, Greg; Trainer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    We present top-down estimates of anthropogenic CO, NOx and CO2 surface fluxes at mesoscale using a Lagrangian model in combination with three different WRF model configurations, driven by data from aircraft flights during the CALNEX campaign in southern California in May-June 2010. The US EPA National Emission Inventory 2005 (NEI 2005) was the prior in the CO and NOx inversion calculations. The flux ratio inversion method, based on linear relationships between chemical species, was used to calculate the CO2 inventory without prior knowledge of CO2 surface fluxes. The inversion was applied to each flight to estimate the variability of single-flight-based flux estimates. In Los Angeles (LA) County, the uncertainties on CO and NOx fluxes were 10% and 15%, respectively. Compared with NEI 2005, the CO posterior emissions were lower by 43% ± 6% in LA County and by 37% ± 10% in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). NOx posterior emissions were lower by 32% ± 10% in LA County and by 27% ± 15% in the SoCAB. NOx posterior emissions were 40% lower on weekends relative to weekdays. The CO2 posterior estimates were 183 ± 18 Tg yr-1 in SoCAB. A flight during ITCT in 2002 was used to estimate emissions in the LA Basin in 2002. From 2002 to 2010, the CO and NOx posterior emissions decreased by 41% and 37%, respectively, in agreement with previous studies. Over the same time period, CO2 emissions increased by 10% ± 14% in LA County but decreased by 4% ± 10% in the SoCAB, a statistically insignificant change. Overall, the posterior estimates were in good agreement with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory, with differences of 15% or less. However, the posterior spatial distribution in the basin was significantly different from CARB for NOx emissions. WRF-Chem mesoscale chemical-transport model simulations allowed an evaluation of differences in chemistry using different inventory assumptions, including NEI 2005, CARB 2010 and the posterior inventories derived in

  11. Neighborhood inverse consistency preprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Freuder, E.C.; Elfe, C.D.

    1996-12-31

    Constraint satisfaction consistency preprocessing methods are used to reduce search effort. Time and especially space costs limit the amount of preprocessing that will be cost effective. A new form of consistency preprocessing, neighborhood inverse consistency, can achieve more problem pruning than the usual arc consistency preprocessing in a cost effective manner. There are two basic ideas: (1) Common forms of consistency enforcement basically operate by identifying and remembering solutions to subproblems for which a consistent value cannot be found for some additional problem variable. The space required for this memory can quickly become prohibitive. Inverse consistency basically operates by removing values for variables that are not consistent with any solution to some subproblem involving additional variables. The space requirement is at worst linear. (2) Typically consistency preprocessing achieves some level of consistency uniformly throughout the problem. A subproblem solution will be tested against each additional variable that constrains any subproblem variable. Neighborhood consistency focuses attention on the subproblem formed by the variables that are all constrained by the value in question. By targeting highly relevant subproblems we hope to {open_quotes}skim the cream{close_quotes}, obtaining a high payoff for a limited cost.

  12. OSO-7 observations of a high-latitude X-ray source associated with Abell cluster A2052

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinz, C. J.; Clark, G. W.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Schnopper, H. W.; Sprott, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    An X-ray source with a flux of 1.6 times 10 to the -10th power ergs per sec/sq cm (2-10 keV) has been observed at high galactic latitude by the MIT X-ray detectors on the OSO-7 satellite. Designated GX 8+50, its position is 15 hr 14.2 min right ascension, 6 deg 51 min declination, with a 90 percent confidence error circle of area 0.5 sq deg. The data are consistent with a power-law spectrum with an exponent 1.2 (plus or minus 0.2) or a thermal-bremsstrahlung spectrum with kT = 4 plus or minus 1 keV. A likely identification is the Abell cluster A2052, whose center coincides with the radio source 3C 317.

  13. Summability of trigonometric Fourier series at d-points and a generalization of the Abel-Poisson method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigub, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    We study the convergence of linear means of the Fourier series \\sumk=-∞+∞λk,\\varepsilon\\hat{f}_keikx of a function f\\in L1 \\lbrack -π,π \\rbrack to f(x) as \\varepsilon\\searrow0 at all points at which the derivative \\bigl(\\int_0^xf(t) dt\\bigr)' exists (i.e. at the d-points). Sufficient conditions for the convergence are stated in terms of the factors \\{λk,\\varepsilon\\} and, in the case of λk,\\varepsilon=\\varphi(\\varepsilon k), in terms of the condition that the functions \\varphi and x\\varphi'(x) belong to the Wiener algebra A( R). We also study a new problem concerning the convergence of means of the Abel-Poisson type, \\sumk=-∞^∞r\\psi(\\vert k\\vert)\\hat{f}_keikx, as r\

  14. A 2163: Merger events in the hottest Abell galaxy cluster. I. Dynamical analysis from optical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurogordato, S.; Cappi, A.; Ferrari, C.; Benoist, C.; Mars, G.; Soucail, G.; Arnaud, M.; Pratt, G. W.; Bourdin, H.; Sauvageot, J.-L.

    2008-04-01

    Context: A 2163 is among the richest and most distant Abell clusters, presenting outstanding properties in different wavelength domains. X-ray observations have revealed a distorted gas morphology and strong features have been detected in the temperature map, suggesting that merging processes are important in this cluster. However, the merging scenario is not yet well-defined. Aims: We have undertaken a complementary optical analysis, aiming to understand the dynamics of the system, to constrain the merging scenario and to test its effect on the properties of galaxies. Methods: We present a detailed optical analysis of A 2163 based on new multicolor wide-field imaging and medium-to-high resolution spectroscopy of several hundred galaxies. Results: The projected galaxy density distribution shows strong subclustering with two dominant structures: a main central component (A), and a northern component (B), visible both in optical and in X-ray, with two other substructures detected at high significance in the optical. At magnitudes fainter than R=19, the galaxy distribution shows a clear elongation approximately with the east-west axis extending over 4~h70-1 Mpc, while a nearly perpendicular bridge of galaxies along the north-south axis appears to connect (B) to (A). The (A) component shows a bimodal morphology, and the positions of its two density peaks depend on galaxy luminosity: at magnitudes fainter than R = 19, the axis joining the peaks shows a counterclockwise rotation (from NE/SW to E-W) centered on the position of the X-ray maximum. Our final spectroscopic catalog of 512 objects includes 476 new galaxy redshifts. We have identified 361 galaxies as cluster members; among them, 326 have high precision redshift measurements, which allow us to perform a detailed dynamical analysis of unprecedented accuracy. The cluster mean redshift and velocity dispersion are respectively z= 0.2005 ± 0.0003 and 1434 ± 60 km s-1. We spectroscopically confirm that the northern

  15. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. I. Multiwavelength photometry of Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Buitrago, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Lotz, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Frontier Fields survey is a pioneering observational program aimed at collecting photometric data, both from space (Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope) and from ground-based facilities (VLT Hawk-I), for six deep fields pointing at clusters of galaxies and six nearby deep parallel fields, in a wide range of passbands. The analysis of these data is a natural outcome of the Astrodeep project, an EU collaboration aimed at developing methods and tools for extragalactic photometry and creating valuable public photometric catalogues. Aims: We produce multiwavelength photometric catalogues (from B to 4.5 μm) for the first two of the Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416 (plus their parallel fields). Methods: To detect faint sources even in the central regions of the clusters, we develop a robust and repeatable procedure that uses the public codes Galapagos and Galfit to model and remove most of the light contribution from both the brightest cluster members, and the intra-cluster light. We perform the detection on the processed HST H160 image to obtain a pure H-selected sample, which is the primary catalogue that we publish. We also add a sample of sources which are undetected in the H160 image but appear on a stacked infrared image. Photometry on the other HST bands is obtained using SExtractor, again on processed images after the procedure for foreground light removal. Photometry on the Hawk-I and IRAC bands is obtained using our PSF-matching deconfusion code t-phot. A similar procedure, but without the need for the foreground light removal, is adopted for the Parallel fields. Results: The procedure of foreground light subtraction allows for the detection and the photometric measurements of ~2500 sources per field. We deliver and release complete photometric H-detected catalogues, with the addition of the complementary sample of infrared-detected sources. All objects have multiwavelength coverage including B to H HST bands, plus K

  16. The near-infrared Tully-Fisher relation - A preliminary study of the Coma and Abell 400 clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Bernstein, Gary; Raychaudhury, Somak; Haynes, Martha; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Herter, Terry; Vogt, Nicole

    1993-01-01

    We have started a large project to study the NIR Tully-Fisher (TF) relation using H- and I-band surface photometry of spiral galaxies. A preliminary study of 20 spirals in the Coma and Abell 400 clusters is presented. The NIR images have been used to derive accurate inclinations and total magnitudes, and rotational linewidths are measured from high-quality 21-cm Arecibo data. The scatter in the Coma TF plot is found to be 0.19 mag in the H band and 0.20 mag in the I band for a set of 13 galaxies, if we assume that they are all at the same distance. The deviation of the Coma galaxies from the best-fit Tully-Fisher relation is correlated with their redshift, indicating that some of the galaxies are not bound to the cluster. Indeed, if we treat all the galaxies in the Coma sample as undergoing free Hubble expansion, the TF scatter drops to 0.12 and 0.13 mag for the H- and I-band datasets, respectively. The Abell 400 sample is best fit by a common distance model, yielding a scatter of 0.12 mag for seven galaxies in H using a fixed TF slope. We are in the process of studying cluster and field spirals out to about 10,000 km/s in order to calibrate the NIR TF relation and will apply it to more nearby galaxies to measure the peculiar velocity field in the local universe.

  17. Quasi MT Inversion of Short-Offset Transient Electromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-ying; Xue, Guo-qiang; Khan, Muhammad Younis

    2016-07-01

    The short-offset transient electromagnetic method (SOTEM) has been extensively used for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration and hydrogeological investigations due to its ease of use and capability to generate diagnostic subsurface information. At present, the data processing methods of SOTEM are mainly focused on one dimensional inversion. To apply the proven inversion methods of frequency domain electromagnetic methods to SOTEM data, this paper presents a new transformation relation from time to frequency based on the similarity between SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity and magnetotelluric (MT) apparent resistivity. Results show that the transformation coefficients depend on the variation trend of SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity curves. Bostick inversion and conjugate gradient inversion techniques were applied to transformed SOTEM data and the results were validated by some simulated calculations and field measured data. This study provides a novel method to SOTEM data processing and a useful aid to join inversion with MT data.

  18. Preview-Based Stable-Inversion for Output Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Qing-Ze; Devasia, Santosh

    1999-01-01

    Stable Inversion techniques can be used to achieve high-accuracy output tracking. However, for nonminimum phase systems, the inverse is non-causal - hence the inverse has to be pre-computed using a pre-specified desired-output trajectory. This requirement for pre-specification of the desired output restricts the use of inversion-based approaches to trajectory planning problems (for nonminimum phase systems). In the present article, it is shown that preview information of the desired output can be used to achieve online inversion-based output tracking of linear systems. The amount of preview-time needed is quantified in terms of the tracking error and the internal dynamics of the system (zeros of the system). The methodology is applied to the online output tracking of a flexible structure and experimental results are presented.

  19. Quasi MT Inversion of Short-Offset Transient Electromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-ying; Xue, Guo-qiang; Khan, Muhammad Younis

    2016-03-01

    The short-offset transient electromagnetic method (SOTEM) has been extensively used for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration and hydrogeological investigations due to its ease of use and capability to generate diagnostic subsurface information. At present, the data processing methods of SOTEM are mainly focused on one dimensional inversion. To apply the proven inversion methods of frequency domain electromagnetic methods to SOTEM data, this paper presents a new transformation relation from time to frequency based on the similarity between SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity and magnetotelluric (MT) apparent resistivity. Results show that the transformation coefficients depend on the variation trend of SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity curves. Bostick inversion and conjugate gradient inversion techniques were applied to transformed SOTEM data and the results were validated by some simulated calculations and field measured data. This study provides a novel method to SOTEM data processing and a useful aid to join inversion with MT data.

  20. Inverse radiation problem in axisymmetric cylindrical scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menguc, M. P.; Manickavasagam, S.

    1993-09-01

    A semianalytical technique has been developed to solve the inverse radiation problem in absorbing and scattering cylindrical media. The radiative properties in the medium are allowed to vary radially. Isotropic, linearly anisotropic, and Rayleigh scattering phase functions are considered, and both the first- and second-order scattering of radiation are accounted for in the analysis. The angular radiosity distribution obtained from the solution of the forward problem is employed as input to the inverse analysis. A numerical inversion scheme is followed to determine the profiles of extinction coefficient and the single-scattering albedo. For an anisotropically scattering medium, the asymmetry factor is also recovered. It is shown that the method is simple and accurate, even though the inversion is limited to three- or four-layer media. This inversion procedure can easily be used in experiments to determine the effective radiative property distributions in cylindrical systems.

  1. Inverse Compton for Compton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suortti, Pekka

    2016-04-01

    A novel concept for a high resolution Compton spectrometer is introduced. 88 keV radiation from an Inverse Compton Compact Source is focused using crossed cylindrically bent Laue-type Si perfect crystals, and dispersed on the sample with a constant energy gradient. Dispersion is compensated exactly at a Ge crystal analyzer, so that the same wavelength shift is observed for all wavelengths of the incident beam. The ThomX source is used as a concrete example. Detailed dimensions and flux estimates at successive locations of the spectrometer are given, and the performance is compared with the dispersion compensating spectrometer at ID15 of the ESRF. The momentum resolution is better than 0.1 atomic units in both cases. The intensity of scattering with the compact source is an order of magnitude smaller, but still adequate for high resolution Compton profile measurements.

  2. Inverse magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arco, L; López-López, M T; Zubarev, A Y; Gdula, K; Durán, J D G

    2014-09-01

    We report a new kind of field-responsive fluid consisting of suspensions of diamagnetic (DM) and ferromagnetic (FM) microparticles in ferrofluids. We designate them as inverse magnetorheological (IMR) fluids for analogy with inverse ferrofluids (IFFs). Observations on the particle self-assembly in IMR fluids upon magnetic field application showed that DM and FM microparticles were assembled into alternating chains oriented along the field direction. We explain such assembly on the basis of the dipolar interaction energy between particles. We also present results on the rheological properties of IMR fluids and, for comparison, those of IFFs and bidispersed magnetorheological (MR) fluids. Interestingly, we found that upon magnetic field application, the rheological properties of IMR fluids were enhanced with respect to bidispersed MR fluids with the same FM particle concentration, by an amount greater than the sum of the isolated contribution of DM particles. Furthermore, the field-induced yield stress was moderately increased when up to 30% of the total FM particle content was replaced with DM particles. Beyond this point, the dependence of the yield stress on the DM content was non-monotonic, as expected for FM concentrations decreasing to zero. We explain these synergistic results by two separate phenomena: the formation of exclusion areas for FM particles due to the perturbation of the magnetic field by DM particles and the dipole-dipole interaction between DM and FM particles, which enhances the field-induced structures. Based on the second phenomenon, we present a theoretical model for the yield stress that semi-quantitatively predicts the experimental results. PMID:25022363

  3. Inverse problem for Bremsstrahlung radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, K.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1991-10-01

    For certain predominantly one-dimensional distribution functions, an analytic inversion has been found which yields the velocity distribution of superthermal electrons given their Bremsstrahlung radiation. 5 refs.

  4. Displacement Parameter Inversion for a Novel Electromagnetic Underground Displacement Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Li, Qing; Li, Xiong; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Jiang, Guoqing; Qiu, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is an effective method to explore deep into rock and soil masses for execution of subsurface displacement measurements. It is not only an important means of geological hazards prediction and forecasting, but also a forefront, hot and sophisticated subject in current geological disaster monitoring. In previous research, the authors had designed a novel electromagnetic underground horizontal displacement sensor (called the H-type sensor) by combining basic electromagnetic induction principles with modern sensing techniques and established a mutual voltage measurement theoretical model called the Equation-based Equivalent Loop Approach (EELA). Based on that work, this paper presents an underground displacement inversion approach named “EELA forward modeling-approximate inversion method”. Combining the EELA forward simulation approach with the approximate optimization inversion theory, it can deduce the underground horizontal displacement through parameter inversion of the H-type sensor. Comprehensive and comparative studies have been conducted between the experimentally measured and theoretically inversed values of horizontal displacement under counterpart conditions. The results show when the measured horizontal displacements are in the 0–100 mm range, the horizontal displacement inversion discrepancy is generally tested to be less than 3 mm under varied tilt angles and initial axial distances conditions, which indicates that our proposed parameter inversion method can predict underground horizontal displacement measurements effectively and robustly for the H-type sensor and the technique is applicable for practical geo-engineering applications. PMID:24858960

  5. Displacement parameter inversion for a novel electromagnetic underground displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Shentu, Nanying; Li, Qing; Li, Xiong; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Jiang, Guoqing; Qiu, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is an effective method to explore deep into rock and soil masses for execution of subsurface displacement measurements. It is not only an important means of geological hazards prediction and forecasting, but also a forefront, hot and sophisticated subject in current geological disaster monitoring. In previous research, the authors had designed a novel electromagnetic underground horizontal displacement sensor (called the H-type sensor) by combining basic electromagnetic induction principles with modern sensing techniques and established a mutual voltage measurement theoretical model called the Equation-based Equivalent Loop Approach (EELA). Based on that work, this paper presents an underground displacement inversion approach named "EELA forward modeling-approximate inversion method". Combining the EELA forward simulation approach with the approximate optimization inversion theory, it can deduce the underground horizontal displacement through parameter inversion of the H-type sensor. Comprehensive and comparative studies have been conducted between the experimentally measured and theoretically inversed values of horizontal displacement under counterpart conditions. The results show when the measured horizontal displacements are in the 0-100 mm range, the horizontal displacement inversion discrepancy is generally tested to be less than 3 mm under varied tilt angles and initial axial distances conditions, which indicates that our proposed parameter inversion method can predict underground horizontal displacement measurements effectively and robustly for the H-type sensor and the technique is applicable for practical geo-engineering applications. PMID:24858960

  6. Geomechanical paleostress inversion using fracture data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerten, Laurent; Maerten, Frantz; Lejri, Mostfa; Gillespie, Paul

    2016-08-01

    We describe a fast geomechanically-based paleostress inversion technique that uses observed fracture data to constrain stress through multiple simulations. The method assumes that the local stress field around individual fractures is heterogeneous and derives the far field tectonic stress, that we also call the far field boundary conditions. We show how such far field tectonic stress can be recovered through a mechanical stress inversion technique using local observations of natural fractures (i.e. mechanical type, orientation and location). We test the paleostress inversion against outcrop analogues of fractured carbonates from both Nash Point, U.K., where there are well exposed faults and joints and the Matelles, France, where there are well exposed faults, veins and stylolites. We demonstrate through these case studies how the method can be efficiently applied to natural examples and we highlight its advantages and limitations. We discuss how such method could be applied to subsurface problems and how it can provide complementary constraints to drive discrete fracture models for better fractured reservoir characterization and modelling.

  7. Uncertainty estimations for seismic source inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duputel, Z.; Rivera, L. A.; Fukahata, Y.; Kanamori, H.

    2011-12-01

    Source inversion is a very widely used practice in seismology. Magnitudes, moment tensors, slip distributions are now routinely calculated and disseminated by several agencies and research groups whenever an earthquake occurs. The estimated source models can be used as inputs for various algorithms such as ShakeMap computation, tsunami modeling, stress transfer calculation or waveform modeling for tomography studies. Despite the importance of these applications, the source inversion algorithms often do not include proper error analyses, and the results are often given without any estimates of uncertainties. In centroid moment tensor (CMT) inversion studies, we often estimate the uncertainty on the model parameters by using various resampling techniques such as bootstrap or jacknife. The strength of these computer-based methods lies in their simplicity. We can implement them considering the inversion procedure as a "black-box" without any knowledge about the model and data statistical properties. However, these methods can suffer from too simplistic assumptions (such as the independence of data samples) and provide the first order error estimates only without the possibility of improving the source model itself. We explore here an alternative approach by taking errors explicitly into account in source inversion problems. In this perspective we use the W-phase source inversion algorithm recently developed to provide fast and robust CMT estimations for moderate to large earthquakes. We assume that the initial probability densities can be modeled by Gaussian distributions. Formally, we can separate two sources of error which generally contribute to the model parameter uncertainties. On one side we consider the error induced by the more or less imperfect data. This information is carried by the covariance matrix for the data Cd. A key point which is practically always ignored is the possibility of having non-diagonal elements in Cd; such non-diagonal elements are due to

  8. Package inspection using inverse diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2008-08-01

    More efficient cost-effective hand-held methods of inspecting packages without opening them are in demand for security. Recent new work in TeraHertz sources,1 millimeter waves, presents new possibilities. Millimeter waves pass through cardboard and styrofoam, common packing materials, and also pass through most materials except those with high conductivity like metals which block light and are easily spotted. Estimating refractive index along the path of the beam through the package from observations of the beam passing out of the package provides the necessary information to inspect the package and is a nonlinear problem. So we use a generalized linear inverse technique that we first developed for finding oil by reflection in geophysics.2 The computation assumes parallel slices in the packet of homogeneous material for which the refractive index is estimated. A beam is propagated through this model in a forward computation. The output is compared with the actual observations for the package and an update computed for the refractive indices. The loop is repeated until convergence. The approach can be modified for a reflection system or to include estimation of absorption.

  9. Inverse problem in radionuclide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste must comply with the performance objectives set forth in 10 CFR 61 for low-level waste (LLW) and 10 CFR 60 for high-level waste (HLW). To determine probable compliance, the proposed disposal system can be modeled to predict its performance. One of the difficulties encountered in such a study is modeling the migration of radionuclides through a complex geologic medium for the long term. Although many radionuclide transport models exist in the literature, the accuracy of the model prediction is highly dependent on the model parameters used. The problem of using known parameters in a radionuclide transport model to predict radionuclide concentrations is a direct problem (DP); whereas the reverse of DP, i.e., the parameter identification problem of determining model parameters from known radionuclide concentrations, is called the inverse problem (IP). In this study, a procedure to solve IP is tested, using the regression technique. Several nonlinear regression programs are examined, and the best one is recommended. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Inverse magnetic/shear catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce "inverse magnetic catalysis", signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials.

  11. Spatial operator factorization and inversion of the manipulator mass matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    This paper advances two linear operator factorizations of the manipulator mass matrix. Embedded in the factorizations are many of the techniques that are regarded as very efficient computational solutions to inverse and forward dynamics problems. The operator factorizations provide a high-level architectural understanding of the mass matrix and its inverse, which is not visible in the detailed algorithms. They also lead to a new approach to the development of computer programs or organize complexity in robot dynamics.

  12. Experimental response function of a 3 in×3 in NaI(Tl) detector by inverse matrix method and effective atomic number of composite materials by gamma backscattering technique.

    PubMed

    Kiran, K U; Ravindraswami, K; Eshwarappa, K M; Somashekarappa, H M

    2016-05-01

    Response function of a widely used 3in×3in NaI(Tl) detector is constructed to correct the observed pulse height distribution. A 10×10 inverse matrix is constructed using 7 mono-energetic gamma sources ((57)Co, (203)Hg, (133)Ba, (22)Na, (137)Cs, (54)Mn and (65)Zn) which are evenly spaced in energy scale to unscramble the observed pulse height distribution. Bin widths (E)(1/2) of 0.01 (MeV)(1/2) are used to construct the matrix. Backscattered photons for an angle of 110° are obtained from a well-collimated 0.2146GBq (5.8mCi) (137)Cs gamma source for carbon, aluminium, iron, copper, granite and Portland cement. For each observed spectrum, single scattered spectrum is constructed analytically using detector parameters like FWHM, photo-peak efficiency and peak counts. Response corrected multiple scattered photons are extracted from the observed pulse height distribution by dividing the spectrum into a 10 ×1 matrix. Saturation thicknesses of carbon, aluminium, iron, copper, granite and Portland cement are found out. Variation of multiple scattered photons as a function of target thickness are simulated using MCNP code. A relationship between experimental and simulated saturation thicknesses of carbon, aluminium, iron and copper is obtained as a function of atomic number. Using this relation, effective atomic numbers of granite and Portland cement are obtained from interpolation method. Effective atomic numbers of granite and Portland cement are also obtained by theoretical equation using their elemental composition and comparing with the experimental and simulated results. PMID:26926377

  13. Practical considerations for Abel inverting of photographic data with application to the analysis of a 15-kW wall-stabilized arc-light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Temperature profiles were measured for agron atmospheric pressure by using absolute line and continuum intensity and were compared with stark width and shift measurements. A detailed analysis of the engineering aspects of setting up for Abel inverting deta photographically is presented. The merits of using photographic detection and of using continuum radiation for temperature profile analysis are discussed. The importance of empirically determining the optical depth is emphasized by discrepancies between measured (two-path) and calculated estimates.

  14. Regeneration of stochastic processes: an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, F.; Peinke, J.; Sahimi, M.; Rahimi Tabar, M. R.

    2005-10-01

    We propose a novel inverse method that utilizes a set of data to construct a simple equation that governs the stochastic process for which the data have been measured, hence enabling us to reconstruct the stochastic process. As an example, we analyze the stochasticity in the beat-to-beat fluctuations in the heart rates of healthy subjects as well as those with congestive heart failure. The inverse method provides a novel technique for distinguishing the two classes of subjects in terms of a drift and a diffusion coefficients which behave completely differently for the two classes of subjects, hence potentially providing a novel diagnostic tool for distinguishing healthy subjects from those with congestive heart failure, even at the early stages of the disease development.

  15. Uncertainty estimations for seismic source inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duputel, Zacharie; Rivera, Luis; Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Kanamori, Hiroo

    2012-08-01

    Source inversion is a widely used practice in seismology. Magnitudes, moment tensors, slip distributions are now routinely calculated and disseminated whenever an earthquake occurs. The accuracy of such models depends on many aspects like the event magnitude, the data coverage and the data quality (instrument response, isolation, timing, etc.). Here, like in any observational problem, the error estimation should be part of the solution. It is however very rare to find a source inversion algorithm which includes realistic error analyses, and the solutions are often given without any estimates of uncertainties. Our goal here is to stress the importance of such estimation and to explore different techniques aimed at achieving such analyses. In this perspective, we use the W phase source inversion algorithm recently developed to provide fast CMT estimations for large earthquakes. We focus in particular on the linear-inverse problem of estimating the moment tensor components at a given source location. We assume that the initial probability densities can be modelled by Gaussian distributions. Formally, we can separate two sources of error which generally contribute to the model parameter uncertainties. The first source of uncertainty is the error introduced by the more or less imperfect data. This is carried by the covariance matrix for the data (Cd). The second source of uncertainty, often overlooked, is associated with modelling error or mismodelling. This is represented by the covariance matrix on the theory, CT. Among the different sources of mismodelling, we focus here on the modelling error associated with the mislocation of the centroid position. Both Cd and CT describe probability densities in the data space and it is well known that it is in fact CD=Cd+CT that should be included into the error propagation process. In source inversion problems, like in many other fields of geophysics, the data covariance (CD) is often considered as diagonal or even proportional

  16. Optical properties of silicon inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hong

    Silicon inverse opals are artificial structures in which nearly monodisperse, close-packed air bubbles are embedded in a silicon matrix. If properly tailored, this structure can exhibit a photonic band gap (PBG) in the near infrared spectral region. The PBG can block light propagation in any direction, allowing the control of light flow in the material. Silicon inverse opals can be fabricated by infiltrating amorphous silicon into silica colloidal crystals and then etching away the silica. In this thesis, the structural defects of silica colloidal crystals and the optical properties of silicon inverse opals are studied. First, by using laser-scanning confocal microscopy, the concentration and distribution of stacking faults and vacancies were quantified in silica colloidal crystals. It's shown that silica colloidal crystals show strong tendency toward face-center-cubic structure with the vacancy density as small as 5 x 10-4. Second, by combining optical microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, the transmission and reflection spectra of silicon inverse opals along the [111] direction were measured. Combined with the calculation of transmission and reflection spectra by Transfer Matrix Methods, it is concluded that the strong light attenuation in silicon inverse opals is due to the enhanced absorption (>600%) in silicon materials. Third, by using optical pump-probe techniques, the photo-induced ultra-fast reflection changes in silicon inverse opals were examined. The pump-generated free carriers cause the reflection in the band gap region to change after ˜0.5 ps. For the first few ps, the main effect is a decrease in reflectivity due to nonlinear absorption. After ˜5 ps, this effect disappears and an unexpected blue spectral shift is seen in the photonic band gap. The refractive index decreases due to optically-induced strain born the thermal expansion mismatch between silicon and its native oxide. Finally, by infiltrating silicon inverse

  17. Clinical knowledge-based inverse treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2004-11-01

    Clinical IMRT treatment plans are currently made using dose-based optimization algorithms, which do not consider the nonlinear dose-volume effects for tumours and normal structures. The choice of structure specific importance factors represents an additional degree of freedom of the system and makes rigorous optimization intractable. The purpose of this work is to circumvent the two problems by developing a biologically more sensible yet clinically practical inverse planning framework. To implement this, the dose-volume status of a structure was characterized by using the effective volume in the voxel domain. A new objective function was constructed with the incorporation of the volumetric information of the system so that the figure of merit of a given IMRT plan depends not only on the dose deviation from the desired distribution but also the dose-volume status of the involved organs. The conventional importance factor of an organ was written into a product of two components: (i) a generic importance that parametrizes the relative importance of the organs in the ideal situation when the goals for all the organs are met; (ii) a dose-dependent factor that quantifies our level of clinical/dosimetric satisfaction for a given plan. The generic importance can be determined a priori, and in most circumstances, does not need adjustment, whereas the second one, which is responsible for the intractable behaviour of the trade-off seen in conventional inverse planning, was determined automatically. An inverse planning module based on the proposed formalism was implemented and applied to a prostate case and a head-neck case. A comparison with the conventional inverse planning technique indicated that, for the same target dose coverage, the critical structure sparing was substantially improved for both cases. The incorporation of clinical knowledge allows us to obtain better IMRT plans and makes it possible to auto-select the importance factors, greatly facilitating the inverse

  18. An Algorithm to Generating Inverse S-box for Rijndael Encryption Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Iqtadar; Gondal, Muhammad Asif

    2014-12-01

    The S-box transformation is very important step for advanced encryption standard algorithm. The S-box values are generated from the multiplicative inverse of finite field with an affine transform. There are many techniques in literature to generate the multiplicative inverse values. In this paper, a software method of producing the multiplicative inverse values, which is the generator of S-box values will be discussed. The proposed technique is based on the mathematical concept of log and antilog.

  19. Inverse Problems of Thermoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Luste, O. J.; Kuz, R. V.; Strutinsky, M. N.

    2011-05-01

    Classical thermoelectricity is based on the use of the Seebeck and Thomson effects that occur in the near-contact areas between n- and p-type materials. A conceptually different approach to thermoelectric power converter design that is based on the law of thermoelectric induction of currents is also known. The efficiency of this approach has already been demonstrated by its first applications. More than 10 basically new types of thermoelements were discovered with properties that cannot be achieved by thermocouple power converters. Therefore, further development of this concept is of practical interest. This paper provides a classification and theory for solving the inverse problems of thermoelectricity that form the basis for devising new thermoelement types. Computer methods for their solution for anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are elaborated. Regularities related to thermoelectric current excitation in anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are established. The possibility of obtaining eddy currents of a particular configuration through control of the temperature field and material parameters for the creation of new thermo- element types is demonstrated for three-dimensional (3D) models of anisotropic and inhomogeneous media.

  20. Acoustic source inversion to estimate volume flux from volcanic explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keehoon; Fee, David; Yokoo, Akihiko; Lees, Jonathan M.

    2015-07-01

    We present an acoustic waveform inversion technique for infrasound data to estimate volume fluxes from volcanic eruptions. Previous inversion techniques have been limited by the use of a 1-D Green's function in a free space or half space, which depends only on the source-receiver distance and neglects volcanic topography. Our method exploits full 3-D Green's functions computed by a numerical method that takes into account realistic topographic scattering. We apply this method to vulcanian eruptions at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan. Our inversion results produce excellent waveform fits to field observations and demonstrate that full 3-D Green's functions are necessary for accurate volume flux inversion. Conventional inversions without consideration of topographic propagation effects may lead to large errors in the source parameter estimate. The presented inversion technique will substantially improve the accuracy of eruption source parameter estimation (cf. mass eruption rate) during volcanic eruptions and provide critical constraints for volcanic eruption dynamics and ash dispersal forecasting for aviation safety. Application of this approach to chemical and nuclear explosions will also provide valuable source information (e.g., the amount of energy released) previously unavailable.

  1. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.B.; Marshall, T.C.; LaPointe, M.A.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM{sub 01} fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5{pi}mm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM{sub 01} mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. A WEAK-LENSING AND NEAR-INFRARED STUDY OF A3192: DISASSEMBLING A RICHNESS CLASS 3 ABELL CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton-Morris, Victoria; Smith, Graham P.; Haines, C. P.; Sanderson, A. J. R.; Edge, A. C.; Egami, E.; Marshall, P. J.; Targett, T. A. E-mail: gps@star.sr.bham.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    We present a joint gravitational lensing and near-infrared study of the galaxy cluster Abell 3192 (A3192) that has been associated both with galaxies at z = 0.168 and with the X-ray luminous cluster RXC J0358.8-2955 (RXC J0358) at z = 0.425. Weak-lensing analysis of our Hubble Space Telescope snapshot observation with the Advanced Camera for Surveys detects two mass over-densities separated by {approx}2 arcmin, one adjacent to the optical position of A3192 (4.4{sigma} significance) and the other adjacent to the X-ray position of RXC J0358 (6.2{sigma} significance). These mass peaks coincide with peaks in the K-band luminosity density of galaxies with near-infrared colors consistent with the red sequence at z = 0.168 and z 0.425, respectively. Moreover, the Bayesian evidence of parameterized mass models that include two cluster/group-scale halos centered on the respective mass peaks exceeds that of single-halo models by a factor of {>=}10. The total projected mass of each galaxy system within 250 kpc of the respective peaks is M{sub WL}(z = 0.168) {approx_equal} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} M{sub Sun} and M{sub WL}(z = 0.425) {approx_equal} 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }, both with total mass-to-light ratios of M{sub WL}/L{sub K} {approx_equal} 20 M{sub Sun }/L{sub Sun }. The original Abell cluster therefore comprises two independent galaxy systems-a foreground group at z = 0.168 and RXC J0358 at z = 0.425. Our results demonstrate the power of combining X-ray, near-infrared, and weak-lensing observations to select massive clusters, place those clusters and interloper galaxy systems along the line of sight, and measure their masses. This combination will be invaluable to robust interpretation of future high-redshift cluster surveys, including eROSITA.

  3. Data and two-dimensional scaling relations for galaxies in Abell 1689: a hint of size evolution at z˜ 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, R. C. W.; Davies, Roger L.; Dalla Bontà, E.; Masters, R.

    2012-06-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of Abell 1689 (z= 0.183) from the Gemini multi-object spectrograph (GMOS) on the Gemini North telescope and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We measure integrated photometry from the GMOS g' and r' images (for 531 galaxies) and surface photometry from the HSTF625W image (for 43 galaxies) as well as velocities and velocity dispersions from the GMOS spectra (for 71 galaxies). We construct the Kormendy, Faber-Jackson and colour-magnitude relations for early-type galaxies in Abell 1689 using these data and compare them to those of the Coma cluster. We measure the intrinsic scatter of the colour-magnitude relation in Abell 1689 to be σCMR= 0.054 ± 0.004 mag, which places degenerate constraints on the ratio of the assembly time-scale to the time available (β) and the age of the population. Making the assumption that galaxies in Abell 1689 will evolve into those of Coma over an interval of 2.26 Gyr breaks this degeneracy and limits β to be >0.6 and the age of the red sequence to be >5.5 Gyr (formed at z > 0.55). Without corrections for size evolution but accounting for magnitude cuts and selection effects, the Kormendy and Faber-Jackson relations are inconsistent and disagree at the 2σ level regarding the amount of luminosity evolution in the last 2.26 Gyr. However, after correcting for size evolution the Kormendy and Faber-Jackson relations show similar changes in luminosity (0.22 ± 0.11 mag) that are consistent with the passive evolution of the stellar populations from a single burst of star formation 10.2 ± 3.3 Gyr ago (?). Thus, the changes in the Kormendy, Faber-Jackson and colour-magnitude relations of Abell 1689 relative to Coma all agree and suggest old galaxy populations with little or no synchronization in the star formation histories. Furthermore, the weak evidence for size evolution in the cluster environment in the last 2.26 Gyr places interesting constraints on the possible

  4. Approximated Stable Inversion for Nonlinear Systems with Nonhyperbolic Internal Dynamics. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, Santosh

    1999-01-01

    A technique to achieve output tracking for nonminimum phase nonlinear systems with non- hyperbolic internal dynamics is presented. The present paper integrates stable inversion techniques (that achieve exact-tracking) with approximation techniques (that modify the internal dynamics) to circumvent the nonhyperbolicity of the internal dynamics - this nonhyperbolicity is an obstruction to applying presently available stable inversion techniques. The theory is developed for nonlinear systems and the method is applied to a two-cart with inverted-pendulum example.

  5. Inverse scattering code

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, A.; King, A.

    1997-09-01

    A methodology for the evaluation of complex electromagnetics problems is presented. The methodology reduces the computational requirements for the analysis of large scale computational electromagnetics problems by hybridizing the method of moments and physical optics techniques. The target model is based on triangular facets and the incident field source by its system response function. Data which can be obtained from the analysis are radar cross section, power spectral density, and range profiles.

  6. On the Duality of Forward and Inverse Light Transport.

    PubMed

    Chandraker, Manmohan; Bai, Jiamin; Ng, Tian-Tsong; Ramamoorthi, Ravi

    2011-10-01

    Inverse light transport seeks to undo global illumination effects, such as interreflections, that pervade images of most scenes. This paper presents the theoretical and computational foundations for inverse light transport as a dual of forward rendering. Mathematically, this duality is established through the existence of underlying Neumann series expansions. Physically, it can be shown that each term of our inverse series cancels an interreflection bounce, just as the forward series adds them. While the convergence properties of the forward series are well known, we show that the oscillatory convergence of the inverse series leads to more interesting conditions on material reflectance. Conceptually, the inverse problem requires the inversion of a large light transport matrix, which is impractical for realistic resolutions using standard techniques. A natural consequence of our theoretical framework is a suite of fast computational algorithms for light transport inversion--analogous to finite element radiosity, Monte Carlo and wavelet-based methods in forward rendering--that rely at most on matrix-vector multiplications. We demonstrate two practical applications, namely, separation of individual bounces of the light transport and fast projector radiometric compensation, to display images free of global illumination artifacts in real-world environments. PMID:21670483

  7. Generalized multi-point inverse airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, Michael S.; Maughmer, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    In a rather general sense, inverse airfoil design can be taken to mean the problem of specifying a desired set of airfoil characteristics, such as the airfoil maximum thickness ratio, pitching moment, part of the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development, etc., then from this information determine the corresponding airfoil shape. This paper presents a method which approaches the design problem from this perspective. In particular, the airfoil is divided into segments along which, together with the design conditions, either the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development may be prescribed. In addition to these local desired distributions, single parameters like the airfoil thickness can be specified. The problem of finding the airfoil shape is determined by coupling an incompressible, inviscid, inverse airfoil design method with a direct integral boundary-layer analysis method and solving the resulting nonlinear equations via a multidimensional Newton iteration technique. The approach is fast and easily allows for interactive design. It is also flexible and could be adapted to solving compressible, inverse airfoil design problems.

  8. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2008-10-10

    Aqueous extract test is a laboratory technique commonly used to measure the amount of soluble salts of a soil sample after adding a known mass of distilled water. Measured aqueous extract data have to be re-interpreted in order to infer porewater chemical composition of the sample because porewater chemistry changes significantly due to dilution and chemical reactions which take place during extraction. Here we present an inverse hydrochemical model to estimate porewater chemical composition from measured water content, aqueous extract, and mineralogical data. The model accounts for acid-base, redox, aqueous complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/ex-solution, cation exchange and surface complexation reactions, of which are assumed to take place at local equilibrium. It has been solved with INVERSE-CORE{sup 2D} and been tested with bentonite samples taken from FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test. The inverse model reproduces most of the measured aqueous data except bicarbonate and provides an effective, flexible and comprehensive method to estimate porewater chemical composition of clays. Main uncertainties are related to kinetic calcite dissolution and variations in CO2(g) pressure.

  9. Inverse problems biomechanical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-03-01

    It is now well recognized that a host of imaging modalities (a list that includes Ultrasound, MRI, Optical Coherence Tomography, and optical microscopy) can be used to "watch" tissue as it deforms in response to an internal or external excitation. The result is a detailed map of the deformation field in the interior of the tissue. This deformation field can be used in conjunction with a material mechanical response to determine the spatial distribution of material properties of the tissue by solving an inverse problem. Images of material properties thus obtained can be used to quantify the health of the tissue. Recently, they have been used to detect, diagnose and monitor cancerous lesions, detect vulnerable plaque in arteries, diagnose liver cirrhosis, and possibly detect the onset of Alzheimer's disease. In this talk I will describe the mathematical and computational aspects of solving this class of inverse problems, and their applications in biology and medicine. In particular, I will discuss the well-posedness of these problems and quantify the amount of displacement data necessary to obtain a unique property distribution. I will describe an efficient algorithm for solving the resulting inverse problem. I will also describe some recent developments based on Bayesian inference in estimating the variance in the estimates of material properties. I will conclude with the applications of these techniques in diagnosing breast cancer and in characterizing the mechanical properties of cells with sub-cellular resolution.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Elastography: Inversions in Bounded Media

    PubMed Central

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P.; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Araoz, Philip A.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, MRE inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord in which the shear wavelength approaches the geometric dimensions of the object. The aim of this study was to develop and test mathematical inversion algorithms capable of resolving shear stiffness from displacement maps of flexural waves propagating in bounded media such as beams, plates and spherical shells using geometry-specific equations of motion. MRE and finite element modeling (FEM) of beam, plate, and spherical shell phantoms of various geometries were performed. Mechanical testing of the phantoms agreed with the stiffness values obtained from FEM and MRE data and a linear correlation of r2 ≥ 0.99 was observed between the stiffness values obtained using MRE and FEM data. In conclusion, we have demonstrated new inversion methods for calculating shear stiffness that may be more appropriate for waves propagating in bounded media. PMID:19780146

  11. Gravity inversion in spherical coordinates using tesseroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2014-05-01

    Satellite observations of the gravity field have provided geophysicists with exceptionally dense and uniform coverage of data over vast areas. This enables regional or global scale high resolution geophysical investigations. Techniques like forward modeling and inversion of gravity anomalies are routinely used to investigate large geologic structures, such as large igneous provinces, suture zones, intracratonic basins, and the Moho. Accurately modeling such large structures requires taking the sphericity of the Earth into account. A reasonable approximation is to assume a spherical Earth and use spherical coordinates. In recent years, efforts have been made to advance forward modeling in spherical coordinates using tesseroids, particularly with respect to speed and accuracy. Conversely, traditional space domain inverse modeling methods have not yet been adapted to use spherical coordinates and tesseroids. In the literature there are a range of inversion methods that have been developed for Cartesian coordinates and right rectangular prisms. These include methods for estimating the relief of an interface, like the Moho or the basement of a sedimentary basin. Another category includes methods to estimate the density distribution in a medium. The latter apply many algorithms to solve the inverse problem, ranging from analytic solutions to random search methods as well as systematic search methods. We present an adaptation for tesseroids of the systematic search method of "planting anomalous densities". This method can be used to estimate the geometry of geologic structures. As prior information, it requires knowledge of the approximate densities and positions of the structures. The main advantage of this method is its computational efficiency, requiring little computer memory and processing time. We demonstrate the shortcomings and capabilities of this approach using applications to synthetic and field data. Performing the inversion of gravity and gravity gradient

  12. A vector inverse algorithm for electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, B.

    1984-06-01

    Investigated is an inverse electromagnetic scattering technique that uses the polarization characteristics of the scattered wave to form an image of the convex portions of the scattering body. The depolarization of an electromagnetic signal by scattering surface is related to the local principal curvatures through the measurable leading edge of the impulse response. A classic problem in differential geometry (Christoffel-Hurwitz) deals with the reconstruction of such a surface from a knowledge of this kind of information, and a differential equation relating these local measurements to the surface has long been established. A Fortran code employing a 'finite-element' solution to this equation has been constructed and tested on synthetic data.

  13. Solving inversion problems with neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamgar-Parsi, Behzad; Gualtieri, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A class of inverse problems in remote sensing can be characterized by Q = F(x), where F is a nonlinear and noninvertible (or hard to invert) operator, and the objective is to infer the unknowns, x, from the observed quantities, Q. Since the number of observations is usually greater than the number of unknowns, these problems are formulated as optimization problems, which can be solved by a variety of techniques. The feasibility of neural networks for solving such problems is presently investigated. As an example, the problem of finding the atmospheric ozone profile from measured ultraviolet radiances is studied.

  14. Temperature Inversions Have Cold Bottoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.; Brown, Gail M.

    1982-01-01

    Uses discussion and illustrations of several demonstrations on air temperature differences and atmospheric stability to explain the phenomena of temperature inversions. Relates this to the smog in Los Angeles and discusses the implications. (DC)

  15. Donor states in inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  16. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-21

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  17. Recursive partitioned inversion of large (1500 x 1500) symmetric matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B. H.; Brownd, J. E.; Gomez, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A recursive algorithm was designed to invert large, dense, symmetric, positive definite matrices using small amounts of computer core, i.e., a small fraction of the core needed to store the complete matrix. The described algorithm is a generalized Gaussian elimination technique. Other algorithms are also discussed for the Cholesky decomposition and step inversion techniques. The purpose of the inversion algorithm is to solve large linear systems of normal equations generated by working geodetic problems. The algorithm was incorporated into a computer program called SOLVE. In the past the SOLVE program has been used in obtaining solutions published as the Goddard earth models.

  18. Improved TV-CS Approaches for Inverse Scattering Problem

    PubMed Central

    Bevacqua, M. T.; Di Donato, L.

    2015-01-01

    Total Variation and Compressive Sensing (TV-CS) techniques represent a very attractive approach to inverse scattering problems. In fact, if the unknown is piecewise constant and so has a sparse gradient, TV-CS approaches allow us to achieve optimal reconstructions, reducing considerably the number of measurements and enforcing the sparsity on the gradient of the sought unknowns. In this paper, we introduce two different techniques based on TV-CS that exploit in a different manner the concept of gradient in order to improve the solution of the inverse scattering problems obtained by TV-CS approach. Numerical examples are addressed to show the effectiveness of the method. PMID:26495420

  19. Impacts of cost functions on inverse lithography patterning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jue-Chin; Yu, Peichen

    2010-10-25

    For advanced CMOS processes, inverse lithography promises better patterning fidelity than conventional mask correction techniques due to a more complete exploration of the solution space. However, the success of inverse lithography relies highly on customized cost functions whose design and know-how have rarely been discussed. In this paper, we investigate the impacts of various objective functions and their superposition for inverse lithography patterning using a generic gradient descent approach. We investigate the most commonly used objective functions, which are the resist and aerial images, and also present a derivation for the aerial image contrast. We then discuss the resulting pattern fidelity and final mask characteristics for simple layouts with a single isolated contact and two nested contacts. We show that a cost function composed of a dominant resist-image component and a minor aerial-image or image-contrast component can achieve a good mask correction and contour targets when using inverse lithography patterning. PMID:21164674

  20. Two New Oleanane-Type Saponins with Anti-Proliferative Activity from Camellia oleifera Abel. Seed Cake.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Fa; Peng, Yun-Ru; Bao, Guan-Hu; Hou, Ru-Yan; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Two new oleanane-type saponins, named oleiferasaponins C₄ (1) and C₅ (2), were isolated from Camellia oleifera Abel. seed cake residue. Their respective structures were identified as 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxymethylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galacto-pyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-galactopyranosy-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosid-uronic acid methyl ester (1) and 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxy-methylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (2) through 1D- and 2D-NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and GC-MS spectroscopic methods. The two compounds exhibited potent cytotoxic activities against five human tumor cell lines (BEL-7402, BGC-823, MCF-7, HL-60 and KB). PMID:26861265

  1. Near-infrared photometry and stellar populations of first-ranked galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinx X.; Puschell, Jeffery J.

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-four brightest cluster members (BCMs) in the complete sample of high Galactic latitude nearby Abell clusters of Hoessel, Gunn, and Thuan (HGT) are investigated. The stellar populations in BCMs using near-infrared and optical-near-infrared colors are studied. Brighter BCMs have redder (J-K) and (V-K) colors, suggesting a metallicity increase in brighter galaxies. The larger dispersion of their colors implies that BCMs possess more heterogeneous stellar populations than their lower luminosity counterparts, the normal elliptical galaxies. Special attention is paid to BCMs associated with cooling flows. BCMs with larger accretion rates have bluer (V-K) colors due to ultraviolet excesses and are brighter in the visual wavelength region, but not in the infrared. It is suggested that part of the X-ray emitting cooling gas is converted into high- and intermediate-mass stars emitting in the blue and visible, but not in the infrared. The properties of BCMs as standard candles in the near-infrared are examined and compared with those in the optical.

  2. Discovery of Ultra-steep Spectrum Giant Radio Galaxy with Recurrent Radio Jet Activity in Abell 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunik, Dominika; Jamrozy, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We report a discovery of a 1.3 Mpc diffuse radio source with extremely steep spectrum fading radio structures in the vicinity of the Abell 449 cluster of galaxies. Its extended diffuse lobes are bright only at low radio frequencies and their synchrotron age is about 160 Myr. The parent galaxy of the extended relic structure, which is the dominant galaxy within the cluster, is starting a new jet activity. There are three weak X-rays sources in the vicinity of the cluster as found in the ROSAT survey, however it is not known if they are connected with this cluster of galaxies. Just a few radio galaxy relics are currently known in the literature, as finding them requires sensitive and high angular resolution low-frequency radio observations. Objects of this kind, which also are starting a new jet activity, are important for understanding the life cycle and evolution of active galactic nuclei. A new 613 MHz map as well as the archival radio data pertaining to this object are presented and analyzed.

  3. The behaviour of dark matter associated with four bright cluster galaxies in the 10 kpc core of Abell 3827

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Williams, Liliya; Smit, Renske; Swinbank, Mark; Kitching, Thomas D.; Harvey, David; Jauzac, Mathilde; Israel, Holger; Clowe, Douglas; Edge, Alastair; Hilton, Matt; Jullo, Eric; Leonard, Adrienne; Liesenborgs, Jori; Merten, Julian; Mohammed, Irshad; Nagai, Daisuke; Richard, Johan; Robertson, Andrew; Saha, Prasenjit; Santana, Rebecca; Stott, John; Tittley, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Galaxy cluster Abell 3827 hosts the stellar remnants of four almost equally bright elliptical galaxies within a core of radius 10 kpc. Such corrugation of the stellar distribution is very rare, and suggests recent formation by several simultaneous mergers. We map the distribution of associated dark matter, using new Hubble Space Telescope imaging and Very Large Telescope/Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer integral field spectroscopy of a gravitationally lensed system threaded through the cluster core. We find that each of the central galaxies retains a dark matter halo, but that (at least) one of these is spatially offset from its stars. The best-constrained offset is 1.62^{+0.47}_{-0.49} kpc, where the 68 per cent confidence limit includes both statistical error and systematic biases in mass modelling. Such offsets are not seen in field galaxies, but are predicted during the long infall to a cluster, if dark matter self-interactions generate an extra drag force. With such a small physical separation, it is difficult to definitively rule out astrophysical effects operating exclusively in dense cluster core environments - but if interpreted solely as evidence for self-interacting dark matter, this offset implies a cross-section σDM/m ˜ (1.7 ± 0.7) × 10-4 cm2 g-1 × (tinfall/109 yr)-2, where tinfall is the infall duration.

  4. An Abel transform for deriving line-of-sight wind profiles from LEO-LEO infrared laser occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syndergaard, S.; Kirchengast, G.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a formula for the retrieval of the line-of-sight (l.o.s.) wind speed from future low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-to-satellite infrared laser occultation measurements. The formula involves an Abelian integral transform akin to the Abel transform widely used for deriving refractive index from bending angle in Global Navigation Satellite System radio occultation measurements. Besides the Abelian integral transform, the formula is derived from a truncated series expansion of the volume absorption coefficient as a function of frequency and includes a simple absorption-line-asymmetry correction term. A first-order formulation (referred to as the standard formula) is complemented by higher-order terms that can be used for high-accuracy computations. Under the assumptions of spherical symmetry and perfect knowledge of spectroscopy, the residual l.o.s. wind error from using the standard formula rather than the high-accuracy formula is assessed to be small compared to that anticipated from measurement errors in a real experiment. Applying the new formula just in standard form to future infrared laser transmission profiles would therefore enable the retrieval of l.o.s. stratospheric wind profiles with an accuracy limited mainly by measurement errors, residual spectroscopic errors, and deviations from spherical symmetry.

  5. 3C28 in Abell 115- A Radio Source With a Twist: Tracing Gas Vortices in a Merging Subcluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Churazov, Eugene

    2014-08-01

    Abell 115 is one of the “bimodal” clusters, first identified from Einstein Observatory X-ray images. The X-ray image is dominated by emission from two subclusters, separated by about 900 kpc, that are in the process of merging. The northern subcluster (A115-N) contains a bright central galaxy that hosts the radio source 3C28. 3C28 has a remarkable morphology. Although there is no evidence of a presently active nucleus, there are two prominent jets connected to a pair of radio lobes, each of which exhibits a radio tail. A115-N shows a classic cold front, the remarkable phenomenon first studied from Chandra cluster observations. We describe the overall structure of the cluster from detailed Chandra observations. We review the gravitational lensing observations and radio observations of the relic and discuss the overall state of the cluster merger. In addition, we exploit the Chandra data and the cold front phenomenon to study the gas motions in and around A115-N that hosts 3C28. The subcluster motion of A115-N through the cluster induces counter-rotating vortices in the subcluster gas that give rise to the unique radio morphology of 3C28 with its two radio tails pointing in the direction of motion of A115-N. Thus, the radio emitting plasma acts as a dye in a fluid tracing the vortices in the X-ray emitting gas, resembling text book pictures of fluid motions.

  6. 3C28 in Abell 115- A Radio Source With a Twist: Tracing Gas Vortices in a Merging Subcluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, William R.; Churazov, Eugene; Heinz, Sebastian; Giacintucci, Simona; Jones, Christine; Bogdan, Akos; David, Laurence P; Kraft, Ralph P.; Murgia, Matteo; Markevitch, Maxim L.; Randall, Scott W.; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2014-06-01

    Abell 115 is one of the “bimodal” clusters, first identified from Einstein Observatory X-ray images. The X-ray image is dominated by emission from two subclusters, separated by about 900 kpc, that are in the process of merging. The northern subcluster (A115-N) contains a bright central galaxy that hosts the radio source 3C28. 3C28 has a remarkable morphology. Although there is no evidence of a presently active nucleus, there are two prominent jets connected to a pair of radio lobes, each of which exhibits a radio tail. A115-N shows a classic cold front, the remarkable phenomenon first studied from Chandra cluster observations. We describe the overall structure of the cluster from detailed Chandra obserations. In addition, we exploit the Chandra data and the cold front phenomenon to study the gas motions in and around A115-N that hosts 3C28. The subcluster motion of A115-N through the cluster induces counter-rotating vortices in the subcluster gas that give rise to the unique radio morphology of 3C28 with its two radio tails pointing in the direction of motion of A115-N. Thus, the radio emitting plasma acts as a dye in a fluid tracing the vortices in the X-ray emitting gas, resembling text book pictures of fluid motions.

  7. Novel triterpenoid saponins from residual seed cake of Camellia oleifera Abel. show anti-proliferative activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jianfa; Wang, Ruilong; Bao, Guanhu; Ling, Tiejun; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Xinfu; Hou, Ruyan

    2015-07-01

    Four oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins were isolated from the seed cake of Camellia oleifera Abel.: camelliasaponin B1 and three new saponins, oleiferasaponin C1-C3 (1-3). Their structures were identified as 22-O-angeloyl-camelliagenin B 3-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-l-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (1); 22-O-angeloyl-camelliagenin A 3-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (2); and 28-O-cinnamoyl-camelliagenin B 3-O-[β-d-galactopyranosylz-(1→2)] [β-d-galactopyranosyl(1→2)-α-l-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (3) through 1D and 2D NMR, HR-ESI-MS, as well as GC-MS spectroscopic methods. The anti-proliferative activities of these four compounds were investigated on five human tumor cell lines (BEL-7402, BGC-823, MCF-7, HL-60 and KB). Compounds 1 and 2 and camelliasaponin B1 showed significant cytotoxic activities. PMID:25958771

  8. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-01-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to Tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed.

  9. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-10-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed.

  10. Characterizing the Retrieval of Cloud Optical Thickness and Droplet Effective Radius to Overlying Aerosols Using a General Inverse Theory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.

    2013-12-01

    The upwelling shortwave irradiance measured by the airborne Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) flying above a cloud and aerosol layer is influenced by the properties of the cloud and aerosol particles below, just as would the radiance measured from satellite. Unlike satellite measurements, those from aircraft provide the unique capability to fly a lower-level leg above the cloud, yet below the aerosol layer, to characterize the extinction of the aerosol layer and account for its impact on the measured cloud albedo. Previous work [Coddington et al., 2010] capitalized on this opportunity to test the effects of aerosol particles (or more appropriately, the effects of neglecting aerosols in forward modeling calculations) on cloud retrievals using data obtained during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment/Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation of anthropogenic pollution (INTEX-A/ITCT) study. This work showed aerosols can cause a systematic bias in the cloud retrieval and that such a bias would need to be distinguished from a true aerosol indirect effect (i.e. the brightening of a cloud due to aerosol effects on cloud microphysics) as theorized by Haywood et al., [2004]. The effects of aerosols on clouds are typically neglected in forward modeling calculations because their pervasiveness, variable microphysical properties, loading, and lifetimes makes forward modeling calculations under all possible combinations completely impractical. Using a general inverse theory technique, which propagates separate contributions from measurement and forward modeling errors into probability distributions of retrieved cloud optical thickness and droplet effective radius, we have demonstrated how the aerosol presence can be introduced as a spectral systematic error in the distributions of the forward modeling solutions. The resultant uncertainty and bias in cloud properties induced by the aerosols is identified by the shape and peak of the posteriori

  11. Effects of High-Top and Low-Top Shoes on Ankle Inversion

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Mark D.; Schulties, Shane S.; Saret, Jose J.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To determine the differences in the rate and amount of ankle inversion in subjects wearing high-top and low-top shoes. Design and Setting: Subjects were filmed at 60 Hz while on an inversion platform that suddenly inverted the right ankle 35°. We measured 5 trials of sudden inversion for each subject in high-top and low-top shoes. Subjects: Twenty male subjects with no history of lower leg injury within the previous 6 months. Measurements: We measured ankle inversion using video motion analysis techniques at 60 Hz. A2 x 5 factorial repeated- measures analysis of variance was used to test for significant differences in the amount of inversion, average rate of inversion, and maximum rate of inversion. Results: The high-top shoes significantly reduced the amount and rate of inversion. The high-top shoes reduced the amount of inversion by 4.5°, the maximum rate of inversion by 100.1°/s, and the average rate of inversion by 73.0°/s. Conclusions: The high-top shoes were more effective in reducing the amount and rate of inversion than the low-top shoes. Depending upon the loading conditions, high-top shoes may help prevent some ankle sprains. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:16558606

  12. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion.

    PubMed

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion. PMID:27209370

  13. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion.

  14. Global inversion for anisotropy during full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debens, H. A.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful tool for quantitative estimation of high-resolution high-fidelity models of subsurface seismic parameters, typically P-wave velocity. The solution to FWI's posed nonlinear inverse problem is obtained via an iterative series of linearized local updates to a start model, assuming this model lies within the basin of attraction to the global minimum. Thanks to many successful published applications to three-dimensional (3D) field datasets, its advance has been rapid and driven in large-part by the oil and gas industry. The consideration of seismic anisotropy during FWI is of vital importance, as it holds influence over both the kinematics and dynamics of seismic waveforms. If not appropriately taken into account then inadequacies in the anisotropy model are likely to manifest as significant error in the recovered velocity model. Conventionally, anisotropic FWI employs either an a priori anisotropy model, held fixed during FWI, or it uses a multi-parameter local inversion scheme to recover the anisotropy as part of the FWI; both of these methods can be problematic. Constructing an anisotropy model prior to FWI often involves intensive (and hence expensive) iterative procedures, such as travel-time tomography or moveout velocity analysis. On the other hand, introducing multiple parameters to FWI itself increases the complexity of what is already an underdetermined inverse problem. We propose that global rather than local FWI can be used to recover the long-wavelength acoustic anisotropy model, and that this can then be followed by more-conventional local FWI to recover the detailed model. We validate this approach using a full 3D field dataset, demonstrating that it avoids problems associated to crosstalk that can bedevil local inversion schemes, and reconciles well with in situ borehole measurements. Although our approach includes a global inversion for anisotropy, it is nonetheless affordable and practical for 3D field data.

  15. Geophysical Inversion Through Hierarchical Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, A.; Huisman, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Geophysical investigation is a powerful tool that allows non-invasive and non-destructive mapping of subsurface states and properties. However, non-uniqueness associated with the inversion process prevents the quantitative use of these methods. One major direction researchers are going is constraining the inverse problem by hydrological observations and models. An alternative to the commonly used direct inversion methods are global optimization schemes (such as genetic algorithms and Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods). However, the major limitation here is the desired high resolution of the tomographic image, which leads to a large number of parameters and an unreasonably high computational effort when using global optimization schemes. Two innovative schemes are presented here. First, a hierarchical approach is used to reduce the computational effort for the global optimization. Solution is achieved for coarse spatial resolution, and this solution is used as the starting point for finer scheme. We show that the computational effort is reduced in this way dramatically. Second, we use a direct ERT inversion as the starting point for global optimization. In this case preliminary results show that the outcome is not necessarily beneficial, probably because of spatial mismatch between the results of the direct inversion and the true resistivity field.

  16. On the Velocity Field and the 3D Structure of the Galactic Soccer Ball Abell 43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Thomas; Werner, Klaus; Ercolano, Barbara; Köppen, Joachim

    2005-11-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) and their central stars (CSs) are ideal tools to test evolutionary theory: photospheric properties of their exciting stars give stringent constraints for theoretical predictions of stellar evolution. The nebular abundances display the star's photosphere chemical composition at the time of the nebula's ejection which allows to look back into the history of stellar evolution. More importantly, they even provide a possibility to investigate on the chemical evolution of our Galaxy because most of the nuclear processed material goes back into the interstellar medium via PNe. The recent developments in observation techniques and the new three-dimensional photoionization code MOCASSIN (Ercolano et al. 2003) enable us to analyze PNe properties accurately by the construction of consistent models of PNe and CSs. In addition to PNe imaging and spectroscopy, detailed information about the velocity field within the PNe is a pre-requisite to employ de-projection techniques in modeling the physical structure of the PNe.

  17. A numerical inversion of a the Laplace transform solution to radial dispersion in a porous medium.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.; Ogata, A.

    1981-01-01

    A special form of the numerical inversion of the Laplace transform described by Stehfest (1970) is applied to the transformed solution of dispersion in a radial flow system in a porous medium. The inversion is extremely simple to use because the weighting coefficients depend only on the number of terms used in the computation and not upon the transform solution as required by most numerical inversion techniques.-from Authors

  18. New Y-function based MOSFET parameter extraction method from weak to strong inversion range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, J. B.; Rafhay, Q.; Cros, A.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2016-09-01

    A new Y-function based MOSFET parameter extraction method is proposed. This method relies on explicit expressions of inversion charge and drain current versus Yc(=Qi√Cgc)-function and Y(=Id/√gm)-function, respectively, applicable from weak to strong inversion range. It enables a robust MOSFET parameter extraction even for low gate voltage overdrive, whereas conventional extraction techniques relying on strong inversion approximation fail.

  19. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    A fundamental part of geophysics is to make inferences about the interior of the earth on the basis of data collected at or near the surface of the earth. In almost all cases these measured data are only indirectly related to the properties of the earth that are of interest, so an inverse problem must be solved in order to obtain estimates of the physical properties within the earth. In February of 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a workshop that was intended to examine the methods currently being used to solve geophysical inverse problems and to consider what new approaches should be explored in the future. The interdisciplinary area between inverse problems in geophysics and optimization methods in mathematics was specifically targeted as one where an interchange of ideas was likely to be fruitful. Thus about half of the participants were actively involved in solving geophysical inverse problems and about half were actively involved in research on general optimization methods. This report presents some of the topics that were explored at the workshop and the conclusions that were reached. In general, the objective of a geophysical inverse problem is to find an earth model, described by a set of physical parameters, that is consistent with the observational data. It is usually assumed that the forward problem, that of calculating simulated data for an earth model, is well enough understood so that reasonably accurate synthetic data can be generated for an arbitrary model. The inverse problem is then posed as an optimization problem, where the function to be optimized is variously called the objective function, misfit function, or fitness function. The objective function is typically some measure of the difference between observational data and synthetic data calculated for a trial model. However, because of incomplete and inaccurate data, the objective function often incorporates some additional form of regularization, such as a measure of smoothness

  20. Kinematics and stellar populations of low-luminosity early-type galaxies in the Abell 496 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, I. V.; Cayatte, V.; Durret, F.; Adami, C.; Balkowski, C.; Chemin, L.; Laganá, T. F.; Prugniel, P.

    2008-07-01

    Context: The morphology and stellar populations of low-luminosity early-type galaxies in clusters have until now been limited to a few relatively nearby clusters such as Virgo or Fornax. Scenarii for the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in clusters are therefore not well constrained. Aims: We investigate here the morphology and stellar populations of low-luminosity galaxies in the relaxed richness class 1 cluster Abell 496 (z = 0.0330). Methods: Deep multiband imaging obtained with the CFHT Megacam allowed us to select a sample of faint galaxies, defined here as objects with magnitudes 18 < r' < 22 mag within a 1.2 arcsec fibre (-18.8 < MB < -15.1 mag). We observed 118 galaxies spectroscopically with the ESO VLT FLAMES/Giraffe spectrograph with a resolving power R = 6300. We present structural analysis and colour maps for the 48 galaxies belonging to the cluster. We fit the spectra of 46 objects with PEGASE.HR synthetic spectra to estimate the ages, metallicities, and velocity dispersions. We estimated possible biases by similarly analysing spectra of ~1200 early-type galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6). We computed values of α/Fe abundance ratios from the measurements of Lick indices. We briefly discuss effects of the fixed aperture size on the measurements. Results: For the first time, high-precision estimates of stellar population properties have been obtained for a large sample of faint galaxies in a cluster, allowing for the extension of relations between stellar populations and internal kinematics to the low-velocity dispersion regime. We have revealed a peculiar population of elliptical galaxies in the core of the cluster, resembling massive early-type galaxies by their stellar population properties and velocity dispersions, but having luminosities of about 2 mag fainter. Conclusions: External mechanisms of gas removal (ram pressure stripping and gravitational harassment) are more likely to have occurred than

  1. The Inverse-Square Law with Data Loggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The inverse-square law for the intensity of light received at a distance from a light source has been verified using various experimental techniques. Typical measurements involve a manual variation of the distance between a light source and a light sensor, usually by sliding the sensor or source along a bench, measuring the source-sensor distance…

  2. Inversion of Chelyabinsk Meteorite Micromagnetic Maps - Implication for Inversions of Mars Magnetic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazanec, M.; Kletetschka, G.

    2014-12-01

    The largest fragment of Chelyabinsk meteorite fell into the Russian lake Chebarkul on February 15, 2013. We used magnetic scanner constructed by Youngwood Science and Engineering (YSE, see Kletetschka et al 2013) to obtain micromagnetic maps of one of the Chelyabinsk's meteorite fragment. Our instrument has a Hall effect magnetic sensor and maps vertical component of the magnetic field approximately 0.3 mm above the planar surface of meteorite sample. Advantage of this instrument is a constant background field due to static position of the sensor. We applied fast Fourier transform inversion technique developed by Lima et al (2013). This technique is tailored for scanning magnetic microscopy (SMM), but may be also modified for aeromagnetic or satellite survey. It retrieves planar unidirectional magnetization distribution from micromagnetic field map. With this technique we achieved verifiable information about the source of the magnetic anomalies in our meteorite sample. Specific areas of detected magnetization were used for compositional analyses by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This way we obtain the ground truth for the source of magnetic anomalies of our meteorite thin section. Measurement of chemical composition of magnetic grains can be directly linked to the amount of magnetization for the specific magnetic mineralogy. The inversion technique was extended for interpretation of real magnetic anomalies on Mars. Lima, E. A., B. P. Weiss, L. Baratchart,D. P.Hardin, and E. B. Saff (2013), Fast inversion ofmagnetic field maps of unidirectional planar geological magnetization, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 118, 2723-2752, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50229.Kletetschka, G., Schnabl, P., Sifnerova, K., Tasaryova, Z., Manda, S., and Pruner, P., 2013, Magnetic scanning and interpretation of paleomagnetic data from Prague Synform's volcanics: Studia Geophysica Et Geodaetica, v. 57, no. 1, p. 103-117.

  3. Direct measurement of lensing amplification in Abell S1063 using a strongly lensed high redshift HII galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlevich, Roberto; Melnick, Jorge; Terlevich, Elena; Chávez, Ricardo; Telles, Eduardo; Bresolin, Fabio; Plionis, Manolis; Basilakos, Spyros; Fernández Arenas, David; González Morán, Ana Luisa; Díaz, Ángeles I.; Aretxaga, Itziar

    2016-08-01

    ID11 is an actively star-forming, extremely compact galaxy and Lyα emitter at z = 3.117 that is gravitationally magnified by a factor of ~17 by the cluster of galaxies Hubble Frontier Fields AS1063. The observed properties of this galaxy resemble those of low luminosity HII galaxies or giant HII regions such as 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Using the tight correlation correlation between the Balmer-line luminosities and the width of the emission lines (typically L(Hβ) - σ(Hβ)), which are valid for HII galaxies and giant HII regions to estimate their total luminosity, we are able to measure the lensing amplification of ID11. We obtain an amplification of 23 ± 11 that is similar within errors to the value of ~17 estimated or predicted by the best lensing models of the massive cluster Abell S1063. We also compiled, from the literature, luminosities and velocity dispersions for a set of lensed compact star-forming regions. There is more scatter in the L-σ correlation for these lensed systems, but on the whole the results tend to support the lensing model estimates of the magnification. Our result indicates that the amplification can be independently measured using the L - σ relation in lensed giant HII regions or HII galaxies. It also supports the suggestion, even if lensing is model dependent, that the L - σ relation is valid for low luminosity high-z objects. Ad hoc observations of lensed star-forming systems are required to determine the lensing amplification accurately.

  4. The Rich Globular Cluster System of Abell 1689 and the Radial Dependence of the Globular Cluster Formation Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Jee, M. J.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Jordán, A.; Meurer, G. R.; Peng, E. W.; West, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z = 0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach a magnitude I 814 = 29 with gsim90% completeness and sample the brightest ~5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N^total_GC = 162{,}850^{+75,450}_{-51,310} GCs within a projected radius of 400 kpc. As many as half of the GCs may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this system is by far the largest GC population studied to date. The specific frequency SN is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from SN ≈ 5 near the center to ~12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase SN by ~20% at z = 0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the mass fractions as a function of radius. The estimated mass in GCs, {M}_GC^total = 3.9 × 1010 M ⊙, is comparable to ~80% of the total stellar mass of the Milky Way. The shape of the GC mass profile appears intermediate between those of the stellar light and total cluster mass. Despite the extreme nature of this system, the ratios of the GC mass to the baryonic and total masses, and thus the GC formation efficiency, are typical of those in other rich clusters when comparing at the same physical radii. The GC formation efficiency is not constant, but varies with radius, in a manner that appears similar for different clusters; we speculate on the reasons for this similarity in profile.

  5. Thermoelectric properties of inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.; Poilvert, N.; Crespi, V. H.

    2016-02-01

    Rayleigh's method [Philos. Mag. Ser. 5 34, 481 (1892)] is used to solve for the classical thermoelectric equations in inverse opals. His theory predicts that in an inverse opal, with periodic holes, the Seebeck coefficient and the figure of merit are identical to that of the bulk material. We also provide a major revision to Rayleigh's method, in using the electrochemical potential as an important variable, instead of the electrostatic potential. We also show that in some cases, the thermal boundary resistance is important in the effective thermal conductivity.

  6. Darwin's "strange inversion of reasoning".

    PubMed

    Dennett, Daniel

    2009-06-16

    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection unifies the world of physics with the world of meaning and purpose by proposing a deeply counterintuitive "inversion of reasoning" (according to a 19th century critic): "to make a perfect and beautiful machine, it is not requisite to know how to make it" [MacKenzie RB (1868) (Nisbet & Co., London)]. Turing proposed a similar inversion: to be a perfect and beautiful computing machine, it is not requisite to know what arithmetic is. Together, these ideas help to explain how we human intelligences came to be able to discern the reasons for all of the adaptations of life, including our own. PMID:19528651

  7. Do pulsar radio fluxes violate the inverse-square law?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shantanu

    2016-04-01

    Singleton et al. (arXiv:0912.0350, 2009) have argued that the flux of pulsars measured at 1400 MHz shows an apparent violation of the inverse-square law with distance (r), and instead the flux scales as 1/r. They deduced this from the fact that the convergence error obtained in reconstructing the luminosity function of pulsars using an iterative maximum likelihood procedure is about 105 times larger for a distance exponent of two (corresponding to the inverse-square law) compared to an exponent of one. When we applied the same technique to this pulsar dataset with two different values for the trial luminosity function in the zeroth iteration, we find that neither of them can reproduce a value of 105 for the ratio of the convergence error between these distance exponents. We then reconstruct the differential pulsar luminosity function using Lynden-Bell's C- method after positing both inverse-linear and inverse-square scalings with distance. We show that this method cannot help in discerning between the two exponents. Finally, when we tried to estimate the power-law exponent with a Bayesian regression procedure, we do not get a best-fit value of one for the distance exponent. The model residuals obtained from our fitting procedure are larger for the inverse-linear law compared to the inverse-square law. Moreover, the observed pulsar flux cannot be parameterized only by power-law functions of distance, period, and period derivative. Therefore, we conclude from our analysis using multiple methods that there is no evidence that the pulsar radio flux at 1400 MHz violates the inverse-square law or that the flux scales inversely with distance.

  8. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  9. DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food scientists use standards and calibrations to relate the concentration of a compound of interest to the instrumental response. The techniques used include classical, single point, and inverse calibrations, as well as standard addition and internal standards. Several fundamental criteria -- sel...

  10. Some special cases of the electromagnetic inverse problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weston, V. H.

    1972-01-01

    A review of exact techniques for determining the surface of a three-dimensional perfectly conducting body is given, followed by some new results on the uniqueness question concerning the number of measurements that may be required to explicitly determine the surface of the body. It is then shown that the inhomogeneous but spherically symmetric dielectric electromagnetic case is reducible to a scalar inverse problem that can be treated by known techniques.

  11. Tensor Inversion of Intrinsic Permeabilities for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    An inverse method has been developed using hybrid formulations and coordinate transform techniques to simultaneously estimate multiple intrinsic permeability tensors (k), flow field, and boundary conditions for a heterogeneous reservoir under non-pumping or pumping conditions [Jiao & Zhang, 2013]. Unlike the objective-function-based approaches, the inverse method does not require forward flow simulations to assess the data-model misfits; thus the knowledge of reservoir boundary conditions is not needed. The method directly incorporates noisy observed data (i.e., fluid heads, Darcy fluxes, or well rates) at the measurement locations, without solving a boundary value problem. Given sufficient measurement data, it yields well-posed systems of equations that can be solved efficiently with coarse inverse grids and nonlinear optimization. When pumping and injection are active, the well rates can be used as measurements and subsurface flux sampling is not needed. Also, local grid refinement at the well locations is not needed for the inversion to succeed. The method is successfully tested for reservoir problems with regular and irregular geometries, different petrofacies patterns, and permeability anisotropy ratios. All problems yield stable solutions under increasing measurement errors. For a given set of the observation data, inversion accuracy is most affected by the permeability anisotropy ratio. Accuracy in estimating k is also affected by the flow pattern: within a given petrofacies, when the Darcy flux component is extremely small, the corresponding directional permeability perpendicular to streamlines becomes less identifiable. Finally, inversion is successful even if the location of the reservoir boundaries is unknown. In this case, the problem domain for inversion is defined by the location of the measurement data. Select problems are presented below in a set of figures and a table (the relevant quantities have a consistent set of units and are thus not labeled

  12. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A. )

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  13. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A. ); Sandweiss, J. )

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  14. Action Understanding as Inverse Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Chris L.; Saxe, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2009-01-01

    Humans are adept at inferring the mental states underlying other agents' actions, such as goals, beliefs, desires, emotions and other thoughts. We propose a computational framework based on Bayesian inverse planning for modeling human action understanding. The framework represents an intuitive theory of intentional agents' behavior based on the…

  15. DEVELOPING SEASONAL AMMONIA EMISSION ESTIMATES WITH AN INVERSE MODELING TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant uncertainty exists in magnitude and variability of ammonia (NH3) emissions, which are needed for air quality modeling of aerosols and deposition of nitrogen compounds. Approximately 85% of NH3 emissions are estimated to come from agricultural non-point sources. We sus...

  16. Optimisation in radiotherapy. II: Programmed and inversion optimisation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ebert, M

    1997-12-01

    This is the second article in a three part examination of optimisation in radiotherapy. The previous article established the bases of optimisation in radiotherapy, and the formulation of the optimisation problem. This paper outlines several algorithms that have been used in radiotherapy, for searching for the best irradiation strategy within the full set of possible strategies. Two principle classes of algorithm are considered--those associated with mathematical programming which employ specific search techniques, linear programming-type searches or artificial intelligence--and those which seek to perform a numerical inversion of the optimisation problem, finishing with deterministic iterative inversion. PMID:9503694

  17. Inversion of canopy reflectance models for estimation of vegetation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Narendra S.

    1987-01-01

    One of the keys to successful remote sensing of vegetation is to be able to estimate important agronomic parameters like leaf area index (LAI) and biomass (BM) from the bidirectional canopy reflectance (CR) data obtained by a space-shuttle or satellite borne sensor. One approach for such an estimation is through inversion of CR models which relate these parameters to CR. The feasibility of this approach was shown. The overall objective of the research carried out was to address heretofore uninvestigated but important fundamental issues, develop the inversion technique further, and delineate its strengths and limitations.

  18. Tabu for matched-field source localization and geoacoustic inversion.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Ghosh-Dastidar, Urmi

    2004-01-01

    Tabu is a global optimization technique that has been very successful in operations research. In this paper, a Tabu-based method is developed for source localization and geoacoustic inversion with underwater sound data; the method relies on memory to guide the multiparameter search. Tabu is evaluated through a comparison to simulating annealing. Both methods are tested by inverting synthetic data for various numbers of unknown parameters. Tabu is found to be superior to the simulated annealing variant implemented here in terms both of accuracy and efficiency. Inversion results from the SWellEX-96 data set are also presented. PMID:14759004

  19. Two and three dimensional magnetotelluric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.R.

    1994-07-01

    Improved imaging of underground electrical structure has wide practical importance in exploring for groundwater, mineral and geothermal resources, and in characterizing oil fields and waste sites. Because the electromagnetic inverse problem for natural sources is generally multi-dimensional, most imaging algorithms saturate available computer power long before they can deal with complete data sets. We have developed an algorithm to directly invert large multi-dimensional magnetotelluric data sets that is orders of magnitude faster than competing methods. In the past year, we have extended the two- dimensional (2D) version to permit incorporation of geological constraints, have developed ways to assess model resolution and have completed work on an accurate and fast three-dimensional (3D) forward algorithm. We are proposing to further enhance the capabilities of the 2D code and to incorporate the 3D forward code in a fully 3D inverse algorithm. Finally, we will embark on an investigation of related EM imaging techniques which may have the potential for further increasing resolution.

  20. An X-ray survey of clusters of galaxies. IV - A survey of southern clusters and a compilation of upper limits for both Abell and southern clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Wood, K. S.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the HEAO 1 A-1 X-ray survey of galaxy clusters are reported. X-ray error boxes and intensities are presented for all clusters in the Abell catalog and for the catalog of southern clusters and groups compiled by Duus and Newell (1977). A correlation is derived on the basis of the X-ray luminosity function for 2-6 keV which may be used to calculate the contribution of clusters to the diffuse X-ray background at different energies. The cluster X-ray is estimated to be 9.3 percent (+ 1.9 or - 1.5 percent). Correlations between X-ray luminosity and other cluster properties are exmained, and it is found that the distribution of upper limits may be applied to obtaining a more precise estimate of the average X-ray luminosity of clusters. The Abell richness class and southern cluster concentrations were strongly correlated with X-ray luminosity. Correlations between optical x-ray luminosity and optical radius velocity dispersion, spiral fraction, and radio power are analyzed. The evidence for all these correlations was considered to be weak because of poor scatter in the data.