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Sample records for abel transform inversion

  1. Improved Abel transform inversion: First application to COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon-Angel, A.; Hernandez-Pajares, M.; Juan, J.; Sanz, J.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the first results of Ionospheric Tomographic inversion are presented, using the Improved Abel Transform on the COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 constellation of 6 LEO satellites, carrying on-board GPS receivers.[- 4mm] The Abel transform inversion is a wide used technique which in the ionospheric context makes it possible to retrieve electron densities as a function of height based of STEC (Slant Total Electron Content) data gathered from GPS receivers on board of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellites. Within this precise use, the classical approach of the Abel inversion is based on the assumption of spherical symmetry of the electron density in the vicinity of an occultation, meaning that the electron content varies in height but not horizontally. In particular, one implication of this assumption is that the VTEC (Vertical Total Electron Content) is a constant value for the occultation region. This assumption may not always be valid since horizontal ionospheric gradients (a very frequent feature in some ionosphere problematic areas such as the Equatorial region) could significantly affect the electron profiles. [- 4mm] In order to overcome this limitation/problem of the classical Abel inversion, a studied improvement of this technique can be obtained by assuming separability in the electron density (see Hernández-Pajares et al. 2000). This means that the electron density can be expressed by the multiplication of VTEC data and a shape function which assumes all the height dependency in it while the VTEC data keeps the horizontal dependency. Actually, it is more realistic to assume that this shape fuction depends only on the height and to use VTEC information to take into account the horizontal variation rather than considering spherical symmetry in the electron density function as it has been carried out in the classical approach of the Abel inversion.[-4mm] Since the above mentioned improved Abel inversion technique has already been tested and proven to be a useful

  2. Abel inversion method for cometary atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Benoit; Opitom, Cyrielle; Hutsemekers, Damien; Jehin, Emmanuel; Munhoven, Guy; Manfroid, Jean; Bisikalo, Dmitry V.; Shematovich, Valery I.

    2016-04-01

    Remote observation of cometary atmospheres produces a measurement of the cometary emissions integrated along the line of sight joining the observing instrument and the gas of the coma. This integration is the so-called Abel transform of the local emission rate. We develop a method specifically adapted to the inversion of the Abel transform of cometary emissions, that retrieves the radial profile of the emission rate of any unabsorbed emission, under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry of the coma. The method uses weighted least squares fitting and analytical results. A Tikhonov regularization technique is applied to reduce the possible effects of noise and ill-conditioning, and standard error propagation techniques are implemented. Several theoretical tests of the inversion techniques are carried out to show its validity and robustness, and show that the method is only weakly dependent on any constant offset added to the data, which reduces the dependence of the retrieved emission rate on the background subtraction. We apply the method to observations of three different comets observed using the TRAPPIST instrument: 103P/ Hartley 2, F6/ Lemmon and A1/ Siding spring. We show that the method retrieves realistic emission rates, and that characteristic lengths and production rates can be derived from the emission rate for both CN and C2 molecules. We show that the emission rate derived from the observed flux of CN emission at 387 nm and from the C2 emission at 514.1 nm of comet Siding Spring both present an easily-identifiable shoulder that corresponds to the separation between pre- and post-outburst gas. As a general result, we show that diagnosing properties and features of the coma using the emission rate is easier than directly using the observed flux. We also determine the parameters of a Haser model fitting the inverted data and fitting the line-of-sight integrated observation, for which we provide the exact analytical expression of the line-of-sight integration

  3. The Filtered Abel Transform and Its Application in Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    Many non-intrusive combustion diagnosis methods generate line-of-sight projections of a flame field. To reconstruct the spatial field of the measured properties, these projections need to be deconvoluted. When the spatial field is axisymmetric, commonly used deconvolution method include the Abel transforms, the onion peeling method and the two-dimensional Fourier transform method and its derivatives such as the filtered back projection methods. This paper proposes a new approach for performing the Abel transform method is developed, which possesses the exactness of the Abel transform and the flexibility of incorporating various filters in the reconstruction process. The Abel transform is an exact method and the simplest among these commonly used methods. It is evinced in this paper that all the exact reconstruction methods for axisymmetric distributions must be equivalent to the Abel transform because of its uniqueness and exactness. Detailed proof is presented to show that the two dimensional Fourier methods when applied to axisymmetric cases is identical to the Abel transform. Discrepancies among various reconstruction method stem from the different approximations made to perform numerical calculations. An equation relating the spectrum of a set of projection date to that of the corresponding spatial distribution is obtained, which shows that the spectrum of the projection is equal to the Abel transform of the spectrum of the corresponding spatial distribution. From the equation, if either the projection or the distribution is bandwidth limited, the other is also bandwidth limited, and both have the same bandwidth. If the two are not bandwidth limited, the Abel transform has a bias against low wave number components in most practical cases. This explains why the Abel transform and all exact deconvolution methods are sensitive to high wave number noises. The filtered Abel transform is based on the fact that the Abel transform of filtered projection data is equal

  4. Order preserving contact transformations and dynamical symmetries of scalar and coupled Riccati and Abel chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin Pradeep, R.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Mohanasubha, R.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-07-01

    We identify contact transformations which linearize the given equations in the Riccati and Abel chains of nonlinear scalar and coupled ordinary differential equations to the same order. The identified contact transformations are not of Cole-Hopf type and are new to the literature. The linearization of Abel chain of equations is also demonstrated explicitly for the first time. The contact transformations can be utilized to derive dynamical symmetries of the associated nonlinear ODEs. The wider applicability of identifying this type of contact transformations and the method of deriving dynamical symmetries by using them is illustrated through two dimensional generalizations of the Riccati and Abel chains as well.

  5. Fast algorithm for computing the Abel inversion integral in broadband reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, F.D.

    1995-10-01

    The application of the Hansen--Jablokow recursive technique is proposed for the numerical computation of the Abel inversion integral which is used in ({ital O}-mode) frequency-modulated broadband reflectometry to evaluate plasma density profiles. Compared to the usual numerical methods the recursive algorithm allows substantial time savings that can be important when processing massive amounts of data aiming to control the plasma in real time. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. A new asymmetric Abel-inversion method for plasma interferometry in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1989-02-01

    In order to get precise local electron density information from chordal interferometric measurement of a tokamak plasma, a self- consistent and reliable inversion method is necessary. In this paper, a new asymmetric Abel-inversion method is introduced. This method includes flexible boundary conditions, application to a non-circular geometry, and estimation of the plasma in the scrape-off layer. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by comparison with other methods. This new inversion method is applied to a parametric study which includes dependence on the Shafranov shift and elongation of the profile. The inverted results are integrated along different views and compared with other density measurements. This new method can also be applied to plasma spectroscopy. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  7. A generalized Abel inversion method for gamma-ray imaging of thermonuclear plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.; Pavone, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Schoepf, K.; Yavorskij, V.

    2016-03-01

    A method to determine the gamma-ray emissivity profile from measurements along a few multiple collimated lines of sight in thermonuclear plasmas is presented. The algorithm is based on a generalisation of the known Abel inversion and takes into account the non circular shape of the plasma flux surfaces and the limited number of data points available. The method is applied to synthetic experimental measurements originating from parabolic and non parabolic JET gamma-ray emissivity profiles, where the aim is to compare the results of the inversion with the original, known input parameters. We find that profile parameters, such as the peak value, width and centre of the emissivity, are determined with an accuracy between 1 and 20% for parabolic and 2 to 25% for non parabolic profiles, respectively, which compare to an error at the 10% level for the input data. The results presented in this paper are primarily of relevance for the reconstruction of emissivity profiles from radiation measurements in tokamaks, but the method can also be applied to measurements along a sparse set of collimated lines of sight in general applications, provided that the surfaces at constant emissivity are known to have rotational simmetry.

  8. Mechanisms for Galaxy Transformation in the Complex Environment of SuperGroup Abell 1882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Aparajita; Keel, W. C.; Morrison, G. E.; Windhorst, R. A.; Smith, B.

    2013-01-01

    We present our results from a multi-wavelength study of galaxy transformations in the outskirts of SuperGroup Abell 1882, a highly filamentary and clumpy structure caught in the early stages of coalescing into a Coma-like cluster. Our data have been drawn from MMT, GMOS, WIYN, SDSS, SARA, CFHT, GALEX, Spitzer and Chandra. Clusters grow by accretion through filaments, and these accreted galaxies undergo transformations due to environmental effects. Radial locations of these transformations in cluster outskirts can be mapped to a time sequence. In relaxed clusters, several evolutionary mechanisms take effect on similar spatial and temporal scales, thus making it almost impossible to disentangle different local and global mechanisms. A SuperGroup, on the other hand, has shallower Dark Matter potential. Here, the accreting galaxies are subjected to evolutionary mechanisms over larger time and spatial scales. This separates processes that are otherwise superimposed in rich cluster-filament interfaces. We have studied transformations in Specific Star Formation Rate, birth rate parameter, color and morphological properties of 342 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies of Abell 1882, as they make their journey through the feeding filaments into the high density core of the structure, as a function of their local galaxy density and structure-centric distance. Our results show that significant transformations in galaxies begin to occur much before the galaxies reach the X-ray gas environments of the dense groups. This indicates that ram pressure stripping is unlikely driver of early galaxy transformations in proto-clusters.

  9. Inversion and approximation of Laplace transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    A method of inverting Laplace transforms by using a set of orthonormal functions is reported. As a byproduct of the inversion, approximation of complicated Laplace transforms by a transform with a series of simple poles along the left half plane real axis is shown. The inversion and approximation process is simple enough to be put on a programmable hand calculator.

  10. Mass dependent galaxy transformation mechanisms in the complex environment of SuperGroup Abell 1882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Aparajita

    We present our data and results from panchromatic photometry and optical spectrometry of the nearest (extremely rich) filamentary large scale structure, SuperGroup Abell 1882. It is a precursor of a cluster and is an inevitable part of the narrative in the study of galaxy transformations. There has been strong empirical evidence over the past three decades that galaxy environment affects galaxy properties. Blue disky galaxies transform into red bulge-like galaxies as they traverse into the deeper recesses of a cluster. However, we have little insight into the story of galaxy evolution in the early stages of cluster formation. Besides, in relaxed clusters that have been studied extensively, several evolutionary mechanisms take effect on similar spatial and temporal scales, making it almost impossible to disentangle different local and global mechanisms. A SuperGroup on the other hand, has a shallower dark-matter potential. Here, the accreting galaxies are subjected to evolutionary mechanisms over larger time and spatial scales. This separates processes that are otherwise superimposed in rich cluster-filament interfaces. As has been found from cluster studies, galaxy color and morphology tie very strongly with local galaxy density even in a complex and nascent structure like Abell 1882. Our major results indicate that there is a strong dependence of galaxy transformations on the galaxy masses themselves. Mass- dependent evolutionary mechanisms affect galaxies at different spatial scales. The galaxy color also varies with radial projected distance from the assumed center of the structure for a constant local galaxy density, indicating the underlying large scale structure as a second order evolutionary driver. We have looked for clues to the types of mechanisms that might cause the transformations at various mass regimes. We have found the thoroughly quenched low mass galaxies confined to the groups, whereas there are evidences of intermediate-mass quenched galaxies

  11. Mathematics of Radiation Propagation in Planetary Atmospheres: Absorption, Refraction, Time Delay, Occultation, and Abel Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.

    Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths curved by refraction. The inverse problem, determining the altitude profile of mass density (index of refraction) or the concentration of an individual chemical species (absorption), from occultation data, also has its mathematically interesting (i.e., difficult) aspects. Now we automatically have noise and thus statistical analysis is just as important as calculus and numerical analysis. Here we will describe a new approach of least-squares fitting occultation data to an expansion over compact basis functions. This approach, which avoids numerical differentiation and singular integrals, was originally developed to analyze laboratory imaging data.Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths

  12. An approximation for inverse Laplace transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Programmable calculator runs simple finite-series approximation for Laplace transform inversions. Utilizing family of orthonormal functions, approximation is used for wide range of transforms, including those encountered in feedback control problems. Method works well as long as F(t) decays to zero as it approaches infinity and so is appliable to most physical systems.

  13. An efficient and flexible Abel-inversion method for noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhin, Igor I.

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient and flexible method for solving Abel integral equation of the first kind, frequently appearing in many fields of astrophysics, physics, chemistry, and applied sciences. This equation represents an ill-posed problem, thus solving it requires some kind of regularization. Our method is based on solving the equation on a so-called compact set of functions and/or using Tikhonov's regularization. A priori constraints on the unknown function, defining a compact set, are very loose and can be set using simple physical considerations. Tikhonov's regularization on itself does not require any explicit a priori constraints on the unknown function and can be used independently of such constraints or in combination with them. Various target degrees of smoothness of the unknown function may be set, as required by the problem at hand. The advantage of the method, apart from its flexibility, is that it gives uniform convergence of the approximate solution to the exact solution, as the errors of input data tend to zero. The method is illustrated on several simulated models with known solutions. An example of astrophysical application of the method is also given.

  14. Some inversion formulas for the cone transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzioglu, Fatma

    2015-11-01

    Several novel imaging applications have lead recently to a variety of Radon type transforms, where integration is made over a family of conical surfaces. We call them cone transforms (in 2D they are also called V-line or broken ray transforms). Most prominently, they are present in the so called Compton camera imaging that arises in medical diagnostics, astronomy, and lately in homeland security applications. Several specific incarnations of the cone transform have been considered separately. In this paper, we address the most general (and overdetermined) cone transform, obtain integral relations between cone and Radon transforms in {{{R}}}n, and a variety of inversion formulas. In many applications (e.g., in homeland security), the signal to noise ratio is very low. So, if overdetermined data is collected (as in the case of Compton imaging), attempts to reduce the dimensionality might lead to essential elimination of the signal. Thus, our main concentration is on obtaining formulas involving overdetermined data.

  15. An Abel transform for deriving line-of-sight wind profiles from LEO-LEO infrared laser occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syndergaard, S.; Kirchengast, G.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a formula for the retrieval of the line-of-sight (l.o.s.) wind speed from future low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-to-satellite infrared laser occultation measurements. The formula involves an Abelian integral transform akin to the Abel transform widely used for deriving refractive index from bending angle in Global Navigation Satellite System radio occultation measurements. Besides the Abelian integral transform, the formula is derived from a truncated series expansion of the volume absorption coefficient as a function of frequency and includes a simple absorption-line-asymmetry correction term. A first-order formulation (referred to as the standard formula) is complemented by higher-order terms that can be used for high-accuracy computations. Under the assumptions of spherical symmetry and perfect knowledge of spectroscopy, the residual l.o.s. wind error from using the standard formula rather than the high-accuracy formula is assessed to be small compared to that anticipated from measurement errors in a real experiment. Applying the new formula just in standard form to future infrared laser transmission profiles would therefore enable the retrieval of l.o.s. stratospheric wind profiles with an accuracy limited mainly by measurement errors, residual spectroscopic errors, and deviations from spherical symmetry.

  16. Rapid Inversion of Angular Deflection Data for Certain Axisymmetric Refractive Index Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R.; Greenberg, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Certain functions useful for representing axisymmetric refractive-index distributions are shown to have exact solutions for Abel transformation of the resulting angular deflection data. An advantage of this procedure over direct numerical Abel inversion is that least-squares curve fitting is a smoothing process that reduces the noise sensitivity of the computation

  17. The duality principle and inversion of Laplace-Stielties transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental relation between the Laplace transform, the Stielties transform, and the generalized integral equation of refraction is revealed, and a duality principle is formulated for the solution of inverse problems of radio physics. New formulas of the Laplace-transform inversion satisfying the duality principle are obtained. There is no necessity of contour integration in a complex plane for the relations found, which considerably simplifies the reconstruction of originals and makes it possible to control systematic errors in the experimental data.

  18. Abel reconstruction of piecewise constant radial density profiles from x-ray radiographs.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, M; Notea, A; Pal, D

    1989-08-01

    We present a method for reconstructing the radial density profile of a cylindrically symmetric object from a single x-ray projection, when the profile consists of a number of different constant sections. A forward Abel transform based algorithm is employed whereby the profile is recovered recursively, onion peelinglike, starting from the outside diameter of the object and moving in. Distortions originating in the Gibbs phenomenon, unavoidable in most available Abel inversion methods, are completely eliminated. The method is simple enough to be carried out on a handheld calculator or a spreadsheet program on a personal computer, and no elaborate computer fits or application programming are required. The method is demonstrated by inverting a simulated three-section noisy set of data and is shown to yield results of a quality equal to that of a recent powerful Abel inversion method, based on full nonlinear least-squares computer fits. PMID:20555668

  19. Numerical Laplace Transform Inversion Employing the Gaver-Stehfest Algorithm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacquot, Raymond G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Presents a technique for the numerical inversion of Laplace Transforms and several examples employing this technique. Limitations of the method in terms of available computer word length and the effects of these limitations on approximate inverse functions are also discussed. (JN)

  20. General inversion formulas for wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschneider, Matthias

    1993-09-01

    This article is the continuation of a series of articles about group theory and wavelet analysis [A. Grossmann, J. Morlet, and T. Paul, J. Math. Phys. 26, 2473 (1985)]. As is well-known in the case of the afine group, the reconstruction wavelet and the analyzing wavelet need not be identic. In this article it is shown that this holds for arbitrary groups. In addition it is shown that even for nonadmissible analyzing wavelets the wavelet transform may be inverted. Accordingly the image of the wavelet transform can be characterized by many different reproducing kernels.

  1. Book review: Nonlinear ocean waves and the inverse scattering transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear Ocean Waves and the Inverse Scattering Transform is a comprehensive examination of ocean waves built upon the theory of nonlinear Fourier analysis. The renowned author, Alfred R. Osborne, is perhaps best known for the discovery of internal solitons in the Andaman Sea during the 1970s. In this book, he provides an extensive treatment of nonlinear water waves based on a nonlinear spectral theory known as the inverse scattering transform. The writing is exceptional throughout the book, which is particularly useful in explaining some of the more difficult mathematical concepts.  Review info: Nonlinear Ocean Waves and the Inverse Scattering Transform. By Alfred R. Osborne, 2010. ISBN: 978-125286299, 917 pp.

  2. Fast transforms: Banded matrices with banded inverses

    PubMed Central

    Strang, Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    It is unusual for both A and A-1 to be banded—but this can be a valuable property in applications. Block-diagonal matrices F are the simplest examples; wavelet transforms are more subtle. We show that every example can be factored into A = F1…FN where N is controlled by the bandwidths of A and A-1 (but not by their size, so this extends to infinite matrices and leads to new matrix groups). PMID:20615937

  3. Wavelet transform analysis of the small-scale X-ray structure of the cluster Abell 1367

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebeney, S. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a new technique based on a wavelet transform analysis to quantify the small-scale (less than a few arcminutes) X-ray structure of clusters of galaxies. We apply this technique to the ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) and Einstein high-resolution imager (HRI) images of the central region of the cluster Abell 1367 to detect sources embedded within the diffuse intracluster medium. In addition to detecting sources and determining their fluxes and positions, we show that the wavelet analysis allows a characterization of the sources extents. In particular, the wavelet scale at which a given source achieves a maximum signal-to-noise ratio in the wavelet images provides an estimate of the angular extent of the source. To account for the widely varying point response of the ROSAT PSPC as a function of off-axis angle requires a quantitative measurement of the source size and a comparison to a calibration derived from the analysis of a Deep Survey image. Therefore, we assume that each source could be described as an isotropic two-dimensional Gaussian and used the wavelet amplitudes, at different scales, to determine the equivalent Gaussian Full Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) (and its uncertainty) appropriate for each source. In our analysis of the ROSAT PSPC image, we detect 31 X-ray sources above the diffuse cluster emission (within a radius of 24 min), 16 of which are apparently associated with cluster galaxies and two with serendipitous, background quasars. We find that the angular extents of 11 sources exceed the nominal width of the PSPC point-spread function. Four of these extended sources were previously detected by Bechtold et al. (1983) as 1 sec scale features using the Einstein HRI. The same wavelet analysis technique was applied to the Einstein HRI image. We detect 28 sources in the HRI image, of which nine are extended. Eight of the extended sources correspond to sources previously detected by Bechtold et al. Overall, using both the

  4. Application of inverse, strict conformal transformation to design waveguide devices.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y G; Wang, N; Ong, C K

    2010-05-01

    Integration of transformation optics with development of metamaterials offers great opportunities to create exotic material with electromagnetic functionality absent from nature. It has already led to several significant advancements in physical conceptions and technological applications such as invisible cloaking. Unfortunately practical application is often restricted by the complex requirements on material properties imposed by the general optical transformation theory. It is therefore necessary to relax the stringent requirements of materials properties in order to practicably use the power of transformation optics to design exotic optical devices. Development of new coordinate transformation mathematics to compromise between the stringent materials properties and the ultimate performance required by a useful novel device is required. In this work the authors employed strict conformal transformation to design physical materials that could guide light in a predetermined way. A simple and efficient numerical approach based on unusual inverse transformation is proposed here to quickly solve partial differential equations and construct the mapping relationship. The results showed that a transformed optical device could be made by purely using isotropic dielectric materials. Two application examples were numerically proposed to verify the versatility of conformal transformation and the robustness of the inverse approach. One was a 90 degrees waveguide beam bend, and the other was a waveguide-type beam splitter or coupler. PMID:20448761

  5. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    SciTech Connect

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion (d{sup 2}X)/(dt{sup 2}) +(dU)/(dX) =0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27–29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A=(1/√(π))∫{sub 0}{sup E}dU/√(E−U) is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = T{sub A}(E) + T{sub N}(E) where τ is a constant period, T{sub A}(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and T{sub N}(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function X{sub A}(U) is determined from T{sub A}(E) via the Abel-transform relation X{sub A}(U) ∝ A[T{sub A}(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential U{sub N}(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing

  6. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion {d^2X}/{dt^2} + {dU}/{dX} = 0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27-29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A = (1/sqrt{π })int 0E {dU}/sqrt{E-U} is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = TA(E) + TN(E) where τ is a constant period, TA(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and TN(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function XA(U) is determined from TA(E) via the Abel-transform relation XA(U) ∝ A[TA(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential UN(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing the isochronicity problem, there has been no attempt of N-type regions that are

  7. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, C

    2004-02-05

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060.

  8. Approximate inverse and Sobolev estimates for the attenuated Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaud, G.; Lakhal, A.

    2015-10-01

    The ill-posedness of the attenuated Radon transform is a challenging issue in practice due to the Poisson noise and the high level of attenuation. The investigation of the smoothing properties of the underlying operator is essential for developing a stable inversion. In this paper, we consider the framework of Sobolev spaces and derive analytically a reconstruction algorithm based on the method of the approximate inverse. The derived method inherits the efficiency and stability of the approximate inverse and supplies a method of extraction of contours. These algorithms appear to be efficient for an attenuation of human body type. However, for higher attenuations the ill-posedness increases exponentially what deteriorates accordingly the quality of reconstructions. Nevertheless, a high attenuation map affects less the contour extraction of a high contrast function and so can be neglected. This leads to simplifying the proposed method and circumvents in this case the artifacts due to the attenuation as attested by simulation results.

  9. Inversion transformations in geometrical optics and allied subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornbleet, S.

    Practical application of the inversion transformation to two problems in the field of perfectly imaging optics, (1) the basic reflection/refraction process and (2) imaging in a spherically symmetrical nonuniform medium, is discussed. The refraction construction involved in the "zero distance phase front" and the application of Damien's theorem to it are addressed, and the propagation of rays through spherical lenses is analyzed. Transformation of the spherical medium is considered, and the mechanical analogue to the optical concept of the phase front is discussed.

  10. Digital signal processing based on inverse scattering transform.

    PubMed

    Turitsyna, Elena G; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2013-10-15

    Through numerical modeling, we illustrate the possibility of a new approach to digital signal processing in coherent optical communications based on the application of the so-called inverse scattering transform. Considering without loss of generality a fiber link with normal dispersion and quadrature phase shift keying signal modulation, we demonstrate how an initial information pattern can be recovered (without direct backward propagation) through the calculation of nonlinear spectral data of the received optical signal. PMID:24321955

  11. Local inversion of the sonar transform regularized by the approximate inverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Eric Todd; Rieder, Andreas; Schuster, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    A new reconstruction method is given for the spherical mean transform with centers on a plane in {{ R}^3} which is also called the sonar transform. Standard inversion formulas require data over all spheres, but typically, the data are limited in the sense that the centers and radii are in a compact set. Our reconstruction operator is local because, to reconstruct at \\mathbf {x}, one needs only spheres that pass near \\mathbf {x}, and the operator reconstructs singularities, such as object boundaries. The microlocal properties of the reconstruction operator, including its symbol as a pseudodifferential operator, are given. The method is implemented using the approximate inverse, and reconstructions are given. They are evaluated in light of the microlocal properties of the reconstruction operator.

  12. Real Variable Inversion of Laplace Transforms: An Application in Plasma Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohn, C. L.; Flynn, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Laplace transform techniques and explains an alternative to them: the Widder's real inversion. To illustrate the power of this new technique, it is applied to a difficult inversion: the problem of Landau damping. (GA)

  13. A numerical inversion of a the Laplace transform solution to radial dispersion in a porous medium.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.; Ogata, A.

    1981-01-01

    A special form of the numerical inversion of the Laplace transform described by Stehfest (1970) is applied to the transformed solution of dispersion in a radial flow system in a porous medium. The inversion is extremely simple to use because the weighting coefficients depend only on the number of terms used in the computation and not upon the transform solution as required by most numerical inversion techniques.-from Authors

  14. Semi-local inversion of the geodesic ray transform in the hyperbolic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courdurier, Matias; Saez, Mariel

    2013-06-01

    The inversion of the ray transform on the hyperbolic plane has applications in geophysical exploration and in medical imaging techniques (such as electrical impedance tomography). The geodesic ray transform has been studied in more general geometries and including attenuation, but all of the available inversion formulas require knowledge of the ray transform for all the geodesics. In this paper we present a different inversion formula for the ray transform on the hyperbolic plane, which has the advantage of only requiring knowledge of the ray transform in a reduced family of geodesics. The required family of geodesics is directly related to the set where the original function is to be recovered.

  15. Fair and Square Computation of Inverse "Z"-Transforms of Rational Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, M. V.; Basilio, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    All methods presented in textbooks for computing inverse "Z"-transforms of rational functions have some limitation: 1) the direct division method does not, in general, provide enough information to derive an analytical expression for the time-domain sequence "x"("k") whose "Z"-transform is "X"("z"); 2) computation using the inversion integral…

  16. Optimal inversion of the generalized Anscombe transformation for Poisson-Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Mäkitalo, Markku; Foi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Many digital imaging devices operate by successive photon-to-electron, electron-to-voltage, and voltage-to-digit conversions. These processes are subject to various signal-dependent errors, which are typically modeled as Poisson-Gaussian noise. The removal of such noise can be effected indirectly by applying a variance-stabilizing transformation (VST) to the noisy data, denoising the stabilized data with a Gaussian denoising algorithm, and finally applying an inverse VST to the denoised data. The generalized Anscombe transformation (GAT) is often used for variance stabilization, but its unbiased inverse transformation has not been rigorously studied in the past. We introduce the exact unbiased inverse of the GAT and show that it plays an integral part in ensuring accurate denoising results. We demonstrate that this exact inverse leads to state-of-the-art results without any notable increase in the computational complexity compared to the other inverses. We also show that this inverse is optimal in the sense that it can be interpreted as a maximum likelihood inverse. Moreover, we thoroughly analyze the behavior of the proposed inverse, which also enables us to derive a closed-form approximation for it. This paper generalizes our work on the exact unbiased inverse of the Anscombe transformation, which we have presented earlier for the removal of pure Poisson noise. PMID:22692910

  17. Inversion formula and Parseval theorem for complex continuous wavelet transforms studied by entangled state representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Yun; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2010-07-01

    In a preceding letter (2007 Opt. Lett. 32 554) we propose complex continuous wavelet transforms and found Laguerre-Gaussian mother wavelets family. In this work we present the inversion formula and Parseval theorem for complex continuous wavelet transform by virtue of the entangled state representation, which makes the complex continuous wavelet transform theory complete. A new orthogonal property of mother wavelet in parameter space is revealed.

  18. Arikan and Alamouti matrices based on fast block-wise inverse Jacket transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moon Ho; Khan, Md Hashem Ali; Kim, Kyeong Jin

    2013-12-01

    Recently, Lee and Hou (IEEE Signal Process Lett 13: 461-464, 2006) proposed one-dimensional and two-dimensional fast algorithms for block-wise inverse Jacket transforms (BIJTs). Their BIJTs are not real inverse Jacket transforms from mathematical point of view because their inverses do not satisfy the usual condition, i.e., the multiplication of a matrix with its inverse matrix is not equal to the identity matrix. Therefore, we mathematically propose a fast block-wise inverse Jacket transform of orders N = 2 k , 3 k , 5 k , and 6 k , where k is a positive integer. Based on the Kronecker product of the successive lower order Jacket matrices and the basis matrix, the fast algorithms for realizing these transforms are obtained. Due to the simple inverse and fast algorithms of Arikan polar binary and Alamouti multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) non-binary matrices, which are obtained from BIJTs, they can be applied in areas such as 3GPP physical layer for ultra mobile broadband permutation matrices design, first-order q-ary Reed-Muller code design, diagonal channel design, diagonal subchannel decompose for interference alignment, and 4G MIMO long-term evolution Alamouti precoding design.

  19. Composite Weibull-Inverse Transformed Gamma distribution and its actuarial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Mastoureh; Bakar, Shaiful Anuar Abu; Hamzah, Nor Aishah

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces a new composite model, namely, composite Weibull-Inverse Transformed Gamma distribution which assumes Weibull distribution for the head up to a specified threshold and inverse transformed gamma distribution beyond it. The closed form of probability density function (pdf) as well as the estimation of parameters by maximum likelihood method is presented. The model is compared with several benchmark distributions and their performances are measured. A well-known data set, Danish fire loss data, is used for this purpose and it's Value at Risk (VaR) using the new model is computed. In comparison to several standard models, the composite Weibull- Inverse Transformed Gamma model proved to be a competitor candidate.

  20. Performance of Dower's inverse transform and Frank lead system for Identification of Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Aranda, A; Bonizzi, P; Karel, J; Peeters, R

    2015-08-01

    This study performs a comparison between Dower's inverse transform and Frank lead system for Myocardial Infarction (MI) identification. We have selected a set of relevant features for MI detection from the vectorcardiogram and used the lasso method after that to build a model for the Dower's inverse transform and one for the Frank leads system. Then we analyzed the performance between both models on MI detection. The proposed methods have been tested using PhysioNet PTB database that contains 550 records from which 368 are MIs. Two main conclusions are coming from this study. The first one is that Dower's inverse transform performs equally well than Frank leads in identification of MI patients. The second one is that lead positions have a large influence on the accuracy of MI patient identification. PMID:26737293

  1. Single- and coupled-channel radial inverse scattering with supersymmetric transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baye, Daniel; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Pupasov-Maksimov, Andrey M.; Samsonov, Boris F.

    2014-06-01

    The present status of the three-dimensional inverse-scattering method with supersymmetric transformations is reviewed for the coupled-channel case. We first revisit in a pedagogical way the single-channel case, where the supersymmetric approach is shown to provide a complete, efficient and elegant solution to the inverse-scattering problem for the radial Schrödinger equation with short-range interactions. A special emphasis is put on the differences between conservative and non-conservative transformations, i.e. transformations that do or do not conserve the behaviour of solutions of the radial Schrödinger equation at the origin. In particular, we show that for the zero initial potential, a non-conservative transformation is always equivalent to a pair of conservative transformations. These single-channel results are illustrated on the inversion of the neutron-proton triplet eigenphase shifts for the S- and D-waves. We then summarize and extend our previous works on the coupled-channel case, i.e. on systems of coupled radial Schrödinger equations, and stress remaining difficulties and open questions of this problem by putting it in perspective with the single-channel case. We mostly concentrate on two-channel examples to illustrate general principles while keeping mathematics as simple as possible. In particular, we discuss the important difference between the equal-threshold and different-threshold problems. For equal thresholds, conservative transformations can provide non-diagonal Jost and scattering matrices. Iterations of such transformations in the two-channel case are studied and shown to lead to practical algorithms for inversion. A convenient particular technique where the mixing parameter can be fitted without modifying the eigenphases is developed with iterations of pairs of conjugate transformations. This technique is applied to the neutron-proton triplet S-D scattering matrix, for which exactly-solvable matrix potential models are constructed. For

  2. Evaluation of minor hysteresis loops using Langevin transforms in modified inverse Jiles-Atherton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamimid, M.; Mimoune, S. M.; Feliachi, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we present a Langevin transforms model which evaluates accurately minor hysteresis loops for the modified inverse Jiles-Atherton model by using appropriate expressions in order to improve minor hysteresis loops characteristics. The parameters of minor hysteresis loops are then related to the parameters of the major hysteresis loop according to each level of maximal induction by using Langevin transforms expressions. The stochastic optimization method “simulated annealing” is used for the determination of the Langevin transforms coefficients. This model needs only two experimental tests to generate all hysteresis loops. The validity of the Langevin transforms model is justified by comparison of calculated minor hysteresis loops to measured ones and good agreements are obtained with better results than the exponential transforms model (Hamimid et al., 2011 [4]).

  3. A real-time inverse quantised transform for multi-standard with dynamic resolution support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chi-Chia; Lin, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Ce

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a real-time configurable intelligent property (IP) core is presented for image/video decoding process in compatibility with the standard MPEG-4 Visual and the standard H.264/AVC. The inverse quantised discrete cosine and integer transform can be used to perform inverse quantised discrete cosine transform and inverse quantised inverse integer transforms which only required shift and add operations. Meanwhile, COordinate Rotation DIgital Computer iterations and compensation steps are adjustable in order to compensate for the video compression quality regarding various data throughput. The implementations are embedded in publicly available software XVID Codes 1.2.2 for the standard MPEG-4 Visual and the H.264/AVC reference software JM 16.1, where the experimental results show that the balance between the computational complexity and video compression quality is retained. At the end, FPGA synthesised results show that the proposed IP core can bring advantages to low hardware costs and also provide real-time performance for Full HD and 4K-2K video decoding.

  4. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  5. Inverse analyses of transport of chlorinated hydrocarbons subject to sequential transformation reactions.

    PubMed

    Casey, F X; Simůnek, J

    2001-01-01

    Chemical and biological transformations can significantly affect contaminant transport in the subsurface. To better understand such transformation reactions, an equilibrium-nonequilibrium sorption transport model, HYDRUS-1D, was modified by including inverse solutions for multiple breakthrough curves resulting from the transport of solutes undergoing sequential transformations. The inverse solutions were applied to miscible-displacement experiments involving dissolved concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) undergoing reduction and/or transformations in the presence of zero-valent metal porous media (i.e., iron or copper-coated iron filings) to produce ethylene. The inverse model solutions provided a reasonable description of the transport and transformation processes. Simultaneous fitting of multiple breakthrough curves of TCE and ethylene placed additional constraints on the inverse solution and improved the reliability of parameter estimates. Confidence intervals of optimized parameters were reduced significantly in comparison with those obtained by fitting TCE breakthrough curves independently. Further evidence for accurate parameter estimates was given when the parameter values agreed with previously reported values from independent batch and degradation experiments. Optimized values of the normalized degradation rates for the equilibrium (1.4 x 10(-4) to 7.2 x 10(-5) L h(-1)m(-2)) and nonequilibrium (1.2 x 10(-4) to 5.5 x 10(-5)L h(-1)m(-2)) models compared well with values (0.03 to 6.5 x 10(-5) L h(-1) m(-2)) obtained from previous studies. The estimated TCE-iron sorption coefficients (0.52 to 2.85 L kg(-1)) were also consistent with a previously reported value (1.47 L kg(-1)). PMID:11476514

  6. Joint transform correlator optical encryption system: Extensions of the recorded encrypted signal and its inverse Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galizzi, Gustavo E.; Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian

    2015-10-01

    In this work we study the joint transform correlator setup, finding two analytical expressions for the extensions of the joint power spectrum and its inverse Fourier transform. We found that an optimum efficiency is reached, when the bandwidth of the key code is equal to the sum of the bandwidths of the image plus the random phase mask (RPM). The quality of the decryption is also affected by the ratio between the bandwidths of the RPM and the input image, being better as this ratio increases. In addition, the effect on the decrypted image when the detection area is lower than the encrypted signal extension was analyzed. We illustrate these results through several numerical examples.

  7. Multiple Plane Phase Retrieval Based On Inverse Regularized Imaging and Discrete Diffraction Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migukin, Artem; Katkovnik, Vladimir; Astola, Jaakko

    2010-04-01

    The phase retrieval is formulated as an inverse problem, where the forward propagation is defined by Discrete Diffraction Transform (DDT) [1], [2]. This propagation model is precise and aliasing free for pixelwise invariant (pixelated) wave field distributions in the sensor and object planes. Because of finite size of sensors DDT can be ill-conditioned and the regularization is an important component of the inverse. The proposed algorithm is designed for multiple plane observations and can be treated as a generalization of the Gerchberg-Saxton iterative algorithm. The proposed algorithm is studied by numerical experiments produced for phase and amplitude modulated object distributions. Comparison versus the conventional forward propagation models such as the angular spectrum decomposition and the convolutional model used in the algorithm of the same structure shows a clear advantage of DDT enabling better accuracy and better imaging.

  8. Reconstructing Folding Energy Landscape Profiles from Nonequilibrium Pulling Curves with an Inverse Weierstrass Integral Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Megan C.; Ritchie, Dustin B.; Foster, Daniel A. N.; Beach, Kevin S. D.; Woodside, Michael T.

    2014-12-01

    The energy landscapes that drive structure formation in biopolymers are difficult to measure. Here we validate experimentally a novel method to reconstruct landscape profiles from single-molecule pulling curves using an inverse Weierstrass transform (IWT) of the Jarzysnki free-energy integral. The method was applied to unfolding measurements of a DNA hairpin, replicating the results found by the more-established weighted histogram (WHAM) and inverse Boltzmann methods. Applying both WHAM and IWT methods to reconstruct the folding landscape for a RNA pseudoknot having a stiff energy barrier, we found that landscape features with sharper curvature than the force probe stiffness could not be recovered with the IWT method. The IWT method is thus best for analyzing data from stiff force probes such as atomic force microscopes.

  9. Dynamics of Structural Transformations between Lamellar and Inverse Bicontinuous Cubic Lyotropic Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, Charlotte E.; Ces, Oscar; Mulet, Xavier; Seddon, John M.; Templer, Richard H.; Finet, Stephanie; Winter, Roland

    2006-03-17

    The liquid crystalline lamellar (L{sub {alpha}}) to double-diamond inverse bicontinuous cubic (Q{sub II}{sup D}) phase transition for the amphiphile monoelaidin in excess water exhibits a remarkable sequence of structural transformations for pressure or temperature jumps. Our data imply that the transition dynamics depends on a coupling between changes in molecular shape and the geometrical and topological constraints of domain size. We propose a qualitative model for this coupling based on theories of membrane fusion via stalks and existing knowledge of the structure and energetics of bicontinuous cubic phases.

  10. Prediction inverse d'un front de solidification dans un four de transformation a haute temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marois, Marc-Andre

    Ce projet de recherche porte sur une methode numerique permettant de predire l'evolution du profil 2D de la couche solide qui recouvre l'interieur des parois de plusieurs fours de transformation a haute temperature. Un modele mathematique base sur la formulation faible de l'energie est d'abord developpe et valide. Une methode de transfert thermique inverse reposant sur ce modele est ensuite developpee afin d'obtenir une mesure rapide et continue de l'evolution du profil de cette couche solide. Vu la grande inertie thermique du systeme a l'etude, differentes strategies sont proposees afin de faciliter la mise en uvre de cette methode numerique. Finalement, cette approche inverse est confrontee aux resultats experimentaux obtenus a l'aide d'un reacteur metallurgique. Une etude preliminaire montre que les fours de transformation presentent une tres grande inertie thermique qui limite grandement l'utilisation des methodes inverses. En effet, la sensibilite de cette methode numerique repose essentiellement sur le delai temporel observe entre la variation du profil du banc et la fluctuation de la temperature a la surface externe de la paroi du four. Les resultats obtenus demontrent qu'une partie de ce delai est proportionnel a la chaleur latente de fusion lorsque le materiau a changement de phase est constitue d'un melange non eutectique. Afin de limiter l'impact de ce delai temporel, deux astuces numeriques sont proposees : reutiliser plus d'une fois les mesures de temperature et modifier le probleme thermique dans les regions pateuse et liquide. D'une part, le concept de chevauchement propose permet de reduire le temps d'acquisition des donnees entre chacune des predictions. D'autre part, l'approche virtuelle developpee permet de reduire l'inertie thermique du systeme et, par le fait meme, le delai temporel associe a la diffusion de la chaleur. Ces deux strategies ont permis de predire efficacement l'evolution 1D de l'epaisseur de la couche de gelee qui se solidifie a

  11. A comparison of techniques for inversion of radio-ray phase data in presence of ray bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallio, H. A.; Grossi, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Derivations are presented of the straight-line Abel transform and the seismological Herglotz-Wiechert transform (which takes ray bending into account) that are used in the reconstruction of refractivity profiles from radio-wave phase data. Profile inversion utilizing these approaches, performed in computer-simulated experiments, are compared for cases of positive, zero, and negative ray bending. For thin atmospheres and ionospheres, such as the Martian atmosphere and ionosphere, radio wave signals are shown to be inverted accurately with both methods. For dense media, such as the solar corona or the lower Venus atmosphere, the refractive recovered by the seismological Herglotz-Wiechert transform provide a significant improvement compared with the straight-line Abel transform.

  12. A systolic array for efficient execution of the radon and inverse radon transforms

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, A.J.; Azevedo, S.G.; Schneberk, D.J.; Johansson, E.M.; Parker, S.R.

    1988-08-11

    The Systolic Processor with a Reconfigurable Interconnection Network of Transputers (SPRINT) is a sixty-four-element multiprocessor developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to evaluate systolic algorithms and architectures experimentally. The processors are interconnected in a reconfigurable network which can emulate networks such as the two-dimensional mesh, the triangular mesh, the tree, and the shuffle-exchange network. New systolic algorithms and architectures are described which perform the Radon transform and inverse Radon transform with efficiency arbitrarily close to 100%. High efficiency is possible with any connected network topology, even with low communication bandwidth. The results of the algorithms executed on the SPRINT compare closely with theory. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Stability estimates for the regularized inversion of the truncated Hilbert transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaifari, Rima; Defrise, Michel; Katsevich, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    In limited data computerized tomography, the 2D or 3D problem can be reduced to a family of 1D problems using the differentiated backprojection method. Each 1D problem consists of recovering a compactly supported function f\\in {L}2({ F }), where { F } is a finite interval from its partial Hilbert transform data. When the Hilbert transform is measured on a finite interval { G } that only overlaps but does not cover { F }, this inversion problem is known to be severely ill-posed (Alaifari et al 2015 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 47 797–824). In this paper, we study the reconstruction of f restricted to the overlap region { F }\\cap { G }. We show that with this restriction and by assuming prior knowledge on the L 2 norm or on the variation of f, better stability with Hölder continuity (typical for mildly ill-posed problems) can be obtained.

  14. Oncogenic transformation through the cell cycle and the LET dependent inverse dose rate effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geard, C. R.; Miller, R. C.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.; Wachholz, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Synchronised populations of mouse C3H/10T-1/2 cells were obtained by a stringent mitotic dislodgment procedure. Mitotic cells rapidly attach and progress sequentially through the cell cycle. Irradiation (3 Gy of X rays) was carried out at intervals from 0 to 18 h after initiating cell cycle progression of the mitotic cells. Oncogenic transformation was enhanced 10-fold over cells irradiated soon after replating (G1 and S phases) for cells in a near 2 h period corresponding to cells in G2 phase but not in mitosis. The cell surviving fraction had a 2-1/2-fold variation with resistant peaks corresponding to the late G1 and late S phases. These findings provide experimental support for the hypothesis initiated by Rossi and Kellerer and developed by Brenner and Hall to explain the LET dependent inverse dose rate effect for oncogenic transformation.

  15. Even more inversion formulas for the 2D Radon Transform of functions of compact and convex support.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, M-S Ould; Mennessier, C; Clackdoyle, R

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, Clackdoyle and Noo published a class of inversion formulas for the 2D Radon Transform which depends on the known radius of support of the unknown function. In this work, we extend this class of inversion formulas from functions of circular support to functions with any compact and convex support. We point out the potential benefits of these new inversion formulas in the context of reconstruction from truncated projections. A preliminary implementation of these new inversion formulas is also presented. PMID:18002982

  16. Seismic inversion with generalized Radon transform based on local second-order approximation of scattered field in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Xuelei; Li, Wuqun

    2014-08-01

    Sound velocity inversion problem based on scattering theory is formulated in terms of a nonlinear integral equation associated with scattered field. Because of its nonlinearity, in practice, linearization algorisms (Born/single scattering approximation) are widely used to obtain an approximate inversion solution. However, the linearized strategy is not congruent with seismic wave propagation mechanics in strong perturbation (heterogeneous) medium. In order to partially dispense with the weak perturbation assumption of the Born approximation, we present a new approach from the following two steps: firstly, to handle the forward scattering by taking into account the second-order Born approximation, which is related to generalized Radon transform (GRT) about quadratic scattering potential; then to derive a nonlinear quadratic inversion formula by resorting to inverse GRT. In our formulation, there is a significant quadratic term regarding scattering potential, and it can provide an amplitude correction for inversion results beyond standard linear inversion. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the linear single scattering inversion is only good in amplitude for relative velocity perturbation () of background media up to 10 %, and its inversion errors are unacceptable for the perturbation beyond 10 %. In contrast, the quadratic inversion can give more accurate amplitude-preserved recovery for the perturbation up to 40 %. Our inversion scheme is able to manage double scattering effects by estimating a transmission factor from an integral over a small area, and therefore, only a small portion of computational time is added to the original linear migration/inversion process.

  17. Interpretation of gravity data using 2-D continuous wavelet transformation and 3-D inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandel Kahoo, Amin; Nejati Kalateh, Ali; Salajegheh, Farshad

    2015-10-01

    Recently the continuous wavelet transform has been proposed for interpretation of potential field anomalies. In this paper, we introduced a 2D wavelet based method that uses a new mother wavelet for determination of the location and the depth to the top and base of gravity anomaly. The new wavelet is the first horizontal derivatives of gravity anomaly of a buried cube with unit dimensions. The effectiveness of the proposed method is compared with Li and Oldenburg inversion algorithm and is demonstrated with synthetics and real gravity data. The real gravity data is taken over the Mobrun massive sulfide ore body in Noranda, Quebec, Canada. The obtained results of the 2D wavelet based algorithm and Li and Oldenburg inversion on the Mobrun ore body had desired similarities to the drill-hole depth information. In all of the inversion algorithms the model non-uniqueness is the challenging problem. Proposed method is based on a simple theory and there is no model non-uniqueness on it.

  18. Inversion of the broken ray transform in the case of energy-dependent attenuation.

    PubMed

    Krylov, R; Katsevich, A

    2015-06-01

    Broken Ray transform (BRT) arises when one considers a narrow x-ray beam propagating through medium under the assumption of single scattering. Previous algorithms for inverting the BRT assumed that the medium is characterized by a single attenuation coefficient μ. However x-rays lose their energy after Compton scattering and the energy loss depends on the scattering angle. Since the attenuation coefficient depends on energy, the μ's before and after scattering are different. When there are three or more detectors one should distinguish not only between μ's that are 'seen' by x-rays before and after scattering, but also between μ's that are 'seen' by x-rays traveling towards different detectors.The main thrust of this paper is inversion of the BRT with N ⩾ 3 detectors under the assumption that the attenuation coefficient can be accurately approximated by a linear function of energy within the window of relevant energies. When the number of detectors is four or greater, we derive a family of inversion formulas. If N > 4, we find the optimal formula, which provides the best stability with respect to noise in the data. If N = 4, the family collapses into a single formula and no optimization is possible. If μ is independent of energy, N = 3 is sufficient for inversion. We also develop iterative reconstruction algorithms that can use global and local data. The results of testing the algorithms are presented. PMID:25974246

  19. Fetal head detection and measurement in ultrasound images by a direct inverse randomized Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Tan, Jinglu; Floyd, Randall C.

    2005-04-01

    Object detection in ultrasound fetal images is a challenging task for the relatively low resolution and low signal-to-noise ratio. A direct inverse randomized Hough transform (DIRHT) is developed for filtering and detecting incomplete curves in images with strong noise. The DIRHT combines the advantages of both the inverse and the randomized Hough transforms. In the reverse image, curves are highlighted while a large number of unrelated pixels are removed, demonstrating a "curve-pass filtering" effect. Curves are detected by iteratively applying the DIRHT to the filtered image. The DIRHT was applied to head detection and measurement of the biparietal diameter (BPD) and head circumference (HC). No user input or geometric properties of the head were required for the detection. The detection and measurement took 2 seconds for each image on a PC. The inter-run variations and the differences between the automatic measurements and sonographers" manual measurements were small compared with published inter-observer variations. The results demonstrated that the automatic measurements were consistent and accurate. This method provides a valuable tool for fetal examinations.

  20. Isotropic-resolution linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography through inverse Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Xia, Jun; Li, Lei; Wang, Lidai; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Linear transducer arrays are readily available for ultrasonic detection in photoacoustic computed tomography. They offer low cost, hand-held convenience, and conventional ultrasonic imaging. However, the elevational resolution of linear transducer arrays, which is usually determined by the weak focus of the cylindrical acoustic lens, is about one order of magnitude worse than the in-plane axial and lateral spatial resolutions. Therefore, conventional linear scanning along the elevational direction cannot provide high-quality three-dimensional photoacoustic images due to the anisotropic spatial resolutions. Here we propose an innovative method to achieve isotropic resolutions for three-dimensional photoacoustic images through combined linear and rotational scanning. In each scan step, we first elevationally scan the linear transducer array, and then rotate the linear transducer array along its center in small steps, and scan again until 180 degrees have been covered. To reconstruct isotropic three-dimensional images from the multiple-directional scanning dataset, we use the standard inverse Radon transform originating from X-ray CT. We acquired a three-dimensional microsphere phantom image through the inverse Radon transform method and compared it with a single-elevational-scan three-dimensional image. The comparison shows that our method improves the elevational resolution by up to one order of magnitude, approaching the in-plane lateral-direction resolution. In vivo rat images were also acquired.

  1. The inverse transformation of angular spectrum propagation algorithm and its application to phase retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lisheng; Jiang, Zhenhua; Wang, Tingfeng; Guo, Jin

    2015-03-01

    An angular spectrum propagation (ASP) algorithm with a scaling parameter to simulate optical diffraction propagation through optical systems is studied. The alterable observation size is obtained by adding the scaling parameter to the Collins formula. A directly mathematical inverse transformation of the ASP algorithm (IASP) is proposed to calculate the source optical field from the known observation optical field, and the results are proved more precise. The IASP algorithm is applied to execute the phase retrieval to derive the aberrations of optical systems from intensity profiles measured in the observation plane. The derived aberrations are fitted by Zernike polynomials under the constraint that the wavefront aberrations are smooth. Numerical simulations are performed to test the accuracy of this method.

  2. Rank-Based Inverse Normal Transformations are Increasingly Used, But are They Merited?

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, T. Mark; Erickson, Stephen; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Many complex traits studied in genetics have markedly non-normal distributions. This often implies that the assumption of normally distributed residuals has been violated. Recently, inverse normal transformations (INTs) have gained popularity among genetics researchers and are implemented as an option in several software packages. Despite this increasing use, we are unaware of extensive simulations or mathematical proofs showing that INTs have desirable statistical properties in the context of genetic studies. We show that INTs do not necessarily maintain proper Type 1 error control and can also reduce statistical power in some circumstances. Many alternatives to INTs exist. Therefore, we contend that there is a lack of justification for performing parametric statistical procedures on INTs with the exceptions of simple designs with moderate to large sample sizes, which makes permutation testing computationally infeasible and where maximum likelihood testing is used. Rigorous research evaluating the utility of INTs seems warranted. PMID:19526352

  3. Inverse scattering transform for the time dependent Schrödinger equation with applications to the KPI equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin

    1990-03-01

    For the direct-inverse scattering transform of the time dependent Schrödinger equation, rigorous results are obtained based on an opertor-triangular-factorization approach. By viewing the equation as a first order operator equation, similar results as for the first order n x n matrix system are obtained. The nonlocal Riemann-Hilbert problem for inverse scattering is shown to have solution.

  4. Generalized Hough transform for the stress inversion of calcite twin data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Since the mechanical twinning along calcite e-planes has a critical resolved shear stress, not only principal stress axes but also differential stress can be determined from the orientations of twin lamellae. Based on the five-dimensional stress space that fulfills the principle of coordinate invariance, it is shown in this article that the inversion of twin and untwin data is comparable with fitting a spherical cap to data points on a unit sphere in the space. The principal stress orientations and stress ratio are indicated by the center of the cap, whereas differential stress is denoted by the size of the cap. Based on this geometrical interpretation, the generalized Hough transform was applied to the inversion of the data in this study. The new method is demonstrated to be robust to sampling bias, variability in the critical resolved shear stress. The determination of differential stress was difficult when the differential stress to be detected was ∼10 times larger than the critical resolved shear stress. Stresses were separated by the method from heterogeneous data successfully as long as the spherical caps corresponding to the stresses to be detected had no or a small intersection.

  5. Spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray tubes using laplace inverse transform of the attenuation curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malezan, A.; Tomal, A.; Antoniassi, M.; Watanabe, P. C. A.; Albino, L. D.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a spectral reconstruction methodology for diagnostic X-ray, using Laplace inverse transform of the attenuation, was successfully applied to dental X-ray equipments. The attenuation curves of 8 commercially available dental X-ray equipment, from 3 different manufactures (Siemens, Gnatus and Dabi Atlante), were obtained by using an ionization chamber and high purity aluminium filters, while the kVp was obtained with a specific meter. A computational routine was implemented in order to adjust a model function, whose inverse Laplace transform is analytically known, to the attenuation curve. This methodology was validated by comparing the reconstructed and the measured (using semiconductor detector of cadmium telluride) spectra of a given dental X-ray unit. The spectral reconstruction showed the Dabi Atlante equipments generating similar shape spectra. This is a desirable feature from clinic standpoint because it produces similar levels of image quality and dose. We observed that equipments from Siemens and Gnatus generate significantly different spectra, suggesting that, for a given operating protocol, these units will present different levels of image quality and dose. This fact claims for the necessity of individualized operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose. The proposed methodology is suitable to perform a spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray equipments from the simple measurements of attenuation curve and kVp. The simplified experimental apparatus and the low level of technical difficulty make this methodology accessible to a broad range of users. The knowledge of the spectral distribution can help in the development of operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose.

  6. An inversion formula for the spherical transform in S2 for a special family of circles of integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Yehonatan

    2016-03-01

    In this article, an inversion formula is obtained for the spherical transform which integrates functions, defined on the unit sphere S2, on circles. The inversion formula is for the case where the circles of integration are obtained by intersections of S2 with hyperplanes passing through a common point overline{a} strictly inside S2. In particular, this yields inversion formulas for two well-known special cases. The first inversion formula is for the special case where the family of circles of integration consists of great circles; this formula is obtained by taking overline{a} = 0. The second inversion formula is for the special case where the circles of integration pass through a common point p on S2; this formula is obtained by taking the limit overline{a}→ p.

  7. A Brief Historical Introduction to Solitons and the Inverse Scattering Transform--A Vision of Scott Russell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with a brief introduction to major remarkable discoveries of the "soliton" and the "inverse scattering transform" in the 1960s. The discovery of the soliton (or the solitary waves) began with the famous physical experiments of the Scottish Engineer and Naval Architect John Scott Russell in the Glasgow-Edinburgh Canal in 1834. The…

  8. Fast and Scalable Computation of the Forward and Inverse Discrete Periodic Radon Transform.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Cesar; Llamocca, Daniel; Pattichis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The discrete periodic radon transform (DPRT) has extensively been used in applications that involve image reconstructions from projections. Beyond classic applications, the DPRT can also be used to compute fast convolutions that avoids the use of floating-point arithmetic associated with the use of the fast Fourier transform. Unfortunately, the use of the DPRT has been limited by the need to compute a large number of additions and the need for a large number of memory accesses. This paper introduces a fast and scalable approach for computing the forward and inverse DPRT that is based on the use of: a parallel array of fixed-point adder trees; circular shift registers to remove the need for accessing external memory components when selecting the input data for the adder trees; an image block-based approach to DPRT computation that can fit the proposed architecture to available resources; and fast transpositions that are computed in one or a few clock cycles that do not depend on the size of the input image. As a result, for an N × N image (N prime), the proposed approach can compute up to N(2) additions per clock cycle. Compared with the previous approaches, the scalable approach provides the fastest known implementations for different amounts of computational resources. For example, for a 251×251 image, for approximately 25% fewer flip-flops than required for a systolic implementation, we have that the scalable DPRT is computed 36 times faster. For the fastest case, we introduce optimized just 2N + ⌈log(2) N⌉ + 1 and 2N + 3 ⌈log(2) N⌉ + B + 2 cycles, architectures that can compute the DPRT and its inverse in respectively, where B is the number of bits used to represent each input pixel. On the other hand, the scalable DPRT approach requires more 1-b additions than for the systolic implementation and provides a tradeoff between speed and additional 1-b additions. All of the proposed DPRT architectures were implemented in VHSIC Hardware Description Language

  9. The dynamics of Abell 2634

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkney, J.; Rhee, George F.; Burns, Jack O.; Batuski, D.; Hill, J. M.; Hintzen, P.; Oegerle, W.

    1993-01-01

    We have amassed a large sample of velocity data for the cluster of galaxies Abell 2634 which contains the wide-angle tail (WAT) radio source 3C 465. Robust indicators of location and scale and their confidence intervals are used to determine if the cD galaxy, containing the WAT, has a significant peculiar motion. We find a cD peculiar radial velocity of 219 plus or minus 98 km s(exp -1). Further dynamical analyses, including substructure and normality tests, suggest that A 2634 is an unrelaxed cluster whose radio source structure may be bent by the turbulent gas of a recent cluster-subcluster merger.

  10. Inverse scattering transform analysis of rogue waves using local periodization procedure.

    PubMed

    Randoux, Stéphane; Suret, Pierre; El, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) stands out as the dispersive nonlinear partial differential equation that plays a prominent role in the modeling and understanding of the wave phenomena relevant to many fields of nonlinear physics. The question of random input problems in the one-dimensional and integrable NLSE enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, and the specific question of the formation of rogue waves (RWs) has been recently extensively studied in this context. The determination of exact analytic solutions of the focusing 1D-NLSE prototyping RW events of statistical relevance is now considered as the problem of central importance. Here we address this question from the perspective of the inverse scattering transform (IST) method that relies on the integrable nature of the wave equation. We develop a conceptually new approach to the RW classification in which appropriate, locally coherent structures are specifically isolated from a globally incoherent wave train to be subsequently analyzed by implementing a numerical IST procedure relying on a spatial periodization of the object under consideration. Using this approach we extend the existing classifications of the prototypes of RWs from standard breathers and their collisions to more general nonlinear modes characterized by their nonlinear spectra. PMID:27385164

  11. Inverse scattering transform analysis of rogue waves using local periodization procedure

    PubMed Central

    Randoux, Stéphane; Suret, Pierre; El, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) stands out as the dispersive nonlinear partial differential equation that plays a prominent role in the modeling and understanding of the wave phenomena relevant to many fields of nonlinear physics. The question of random input problems in the one-dimensional and integrable NLSE enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, and the specific question of the formation of rogue waves (RWs) has been recently extensively studied in this context. The determination of exact analytic solutions of the focusing 1D-NLSE prototyping RW events of statistical relevance is now considered as the problem of central importance. Here we address this question from the perspective of the inverse scattering transform (IST) method that relies on the integrable nature of the wave equation. We develop a conceptually new approach to the RW classification in which appropriate, locally coherent structures are specifically isolated from a globally incoherent wave train to be subsequently analyzed by implementing a numerical IST procedure relying on a spatial periodization of the object under consideration. Using this approach we extend the existing classifications of the prototypes of RWs from standard breathers and their collisions to more general nonlinear modes characterized by their nonlinear spectra. PMID:27385164

  12. Third-order symplectic integration method with inverse time dispersion transform for long-term simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yingjie; Zhang, Jinhai; Yao, Zhenxing

    2016-06-01

    The symplectic integration method is popular in high-accuracy numerical simulations when discretizing temporal derivatives; however, it still suffers from time-dispersion error when the temporal interval is coarse, especially for long-term simulations and large-scale models. We employ the inverse time dispersion transform (ITDT) to the third-order symplectic integration method to reduce the time-dispersion error. First, we adopt the pseudospectral algorithm for the spatial discretization and the third-order symplectic integration method for the temporal discretization. Then, we apply the ITDT to eliminate time-dispersion error from the synthetic data. As a post-processing method, the ITDT can be easily cascaded in traditional numerical simulations. We implement the ITDT in one typical exiting third-order symplectic scheme and compare its performances with the performances of the conventional second-order scheme and the rapid expansion method. Theoretical analyses and numerical experiments show that the ITDT can significantly reduce the time-dispersion error, especially for long travel times. The implementation of the ITDT requires some additional computations on correcting the time-dispersion error, but it allows us to use the maximum temporal interval under stability conditions; thus, its final computational efficiency would be higher than that of the traditional symplectic integration method for long-term simulations. With the aid of the ITDT, we can obtain much more accurate simulation results but with a lower computational cost.

  13. A marginal rank-based inverse normal transformation approach to comparing multiple clinical trial endpoints.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaoyu; Li, Huiyun; Liu, Aiyi

    2016-08-30

    The increase in incidence of obesity and chronic diseases and their health care costs have raised the importance of quality diet on the health policy agendas. The healthy eating index is an important measure for diet quality which consists of 12 components derived from ratios of dependent variables with distributions hard to specify, measurement errors and excessive zero observations difficult to model parametrically. Hypothesis testing involving data of such nature poses challenges because the widely used multiple comparison procedures such as Hotelling's T(2) test and Bonferroni correction may suffer from substantial loss of efficiency. We propose a marginal rank-based inverse normal transformation approach to normalizing the marginal distribution of the data before employing a multivariate test procedure. Extensive simulation was conducted to demonstrate the ability of the proposed approach to adequately control the type I error rate as well as increase the power of the test, with data particularly from non-symmetric or heavy-tailed distributions. The methods are exemplified with data from a dietary intervention study for type I diabetic children. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26990442

  14. Inverse scattering transform analysis of rogue waves using local periodization procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randoux, Stéphane; Suret, Pierre; El, Gennady

    2016-07-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) stands out as the dispersive nonlinear partial differential equation that plays a prominent role in the modeling and understanding of the wave phenomena relevant to many fields of nonlinear physics. The question of random input problems in the one-dimensional and integrable NLSE enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, and the specific question of the formation of rogue waves (RWs) has been recently extensively studied in this context. The determination of exact analytic solutions of the focusing 1D-NLSE prototyping RW events of statistical relevance is now considered as the problem of central importance. Here we address this question from the perspective of the inverse scattering transform (IST) method that relies on the integrable nature of the wave equation. We develop a conceptually new approach to the RW classification in which appropriate, locally coherent structures are specifically isolated from a globally incoherent wave train to be subsequently analyzed by implementing a numerical IST procedure relying on a spatial periodization of the object under consideration. Using this approach we extend the existing classifications of the prototypes of RWs from standard breathers and their collisions to more general nonlinear modes characterized by their nonlinear spectra.

  15. Mass Substructure in Abell 3128

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleary, J.; dell'Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  16. Transformation of a Gaussian pulse when interacting with a one-dimensional photonic crystal with an inversion defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasedkina, Yuliya F.; Eliseeva, Svetlana V.; Sementsov, Dmitry I.

    2016-04-01

    A computer analysis of transformation of Gaussian pulse profile after transmission and reflection at a photonic-crystal structure containing an inversion type defect has been performed. The deformation mode depends significantly on duration of the incident pulse and its carrier frequency values. Deformation for short pulses and pulses whose carrier frequency is close to one of the PBG boundaries or coincides with the defective miniband frequency are most significant.

  17. A direct application of the non-linear inverse transformation flight control system design on a STOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W. W.; Mcneill, W. E.; Stortz, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear inverse transformation flight control system design method is applied to the Lockheed Ft. Worth Company's E-7D short takeoff and vertical land (STOVL) supersonic fighter/attack aircraft design with a modified General Electric F110 engine which has augmented propulsive lift capability. The system is fully augmented to provide flight path control and velocity control, and rate command attitude hold for angular axes during the transition and hover operations. In cruise mode, the flight control system is configured to provide direct thrust command, rate command attitude hold for pitch and roll axes, and sideslip command with turn coordination. A control selector based on the nonlinear inverse transformation method is designed specifically to be compatible with the propulsion system's physical configuration which has a two dimensional convergent-divergent aft nozzle, a vectorable ventral nozzle, and a thrust augmented ejector. The nonlinear inverse transformation is used to determine the propulsive forces and nozzle deflections, which in combination with the aerodynamic forces and moments (including propulsive induced contributions), and gravitational force, are required to achieve the longitudinal and vertical acceleration commands. The longitudinal control axes are fully decoupled within the propulsion system's performance envelope. A piloted motion-base flight simulation was conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at NASA Ames Research Center to examine the handling qualities of this design. Based on results of the simulation, refinements to the control system have been made and will also be covered in the report.

  18. SHOCKING TAILS IN THE MAJOR MERGER ABELL 2744

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare 'jellyfish' galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging 'Bullet-like' subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  19. Shocking Tails in the Major Merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare "jellyfish" galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging "Bullet-like" subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  20. Stored waveform inverse Fourier transform (SWIFT) ion excitation in trapped-ion mass spectometry: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shenheng; Marshall, Alan G.

    1996-12-01

    Stored waveform excitation produced by inverse Fourier transformation of a specified magnitude/phase excitation spectrum offers the most general and versatile means for broadband mass-selective excitation and ejection in Penning (FT-ICR) and Paul (quadrupole) ion trap mass spectrometry. Since the last comprehensive review of SWIFT excitation in 1987, the technique has been adopted, modified, and extended widely in both the ICR and quadrupole ion trap communities. Here, we review the principles, variations, algorithms, hardware implementation, and some applications of SWIFT for both ICR and quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. We show that the most desirable SWIFT waveform is that optimized to reduce both the time-domain SWIFT maximum amplitude and the amplitude near the start and end of the SWIFT waveform. We examine the "true" magnitude excitation spectrum, obtained by zero-filling and forward Fourier transforming the SWIFT time-domain waveform, in order to evaluate the trade-off between spectral magnitude uniformity and frequency (mass) selectivity. Apodization of the SWIFT waveform is optimally conducted by smoothing the excitation magnitude spectrum prior to generation of the SWIFT waveform by inverse FT. When (as for broadband ejection in a quadrupole ion trap) it is important that ions be excited near-simultaneously over a wide mass range, the phase spectrum (before inverse FT to generate the SWIFT waveform) may be overmodulated or randomly modulated ("filtered noise field"), with the recognition that very substantial non-uniformity in the "true" excitation magnitude spectrum will result.

  1. The solution to the nuclear reactor kinetic equations with a continuous slowing down model using numerical Laplace transform inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.; Ganapol, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand the influence of prompt and delayed neutrons on nuclear reactor dynamics, a continuous slowing down model based on Fermi age theory was developed several years ago. This model was easily incorporated into the one-group diffusion equation and provided a realistic physical picture of how delayed and prompt neutrons slow down and simultaneously diffuse throughout a medium. The model allows for different slowing down times for each delayed neutron group as well as for prompt neutrons and for spectral differences between the two typed of neutrons. Because of its generality, this model serves not only a a useful predictive tool to anticipate reactor transients, but also as an excellent educational tool to demonstrate the effect of delayed neutrons in reactor kinetics. However, because of numerical complications, the slowing down model could not be developed to its full potential. In particular, the major limitation was the inversion of the Laplace transform, which relied on a knowledge of the poles associated with the resulting transformed flux. For this reason, only one group of delayed neutrons and times longer than the slowing down times could be considered. As is shown, the new inversion procedure removes the short time limitation as well as allows for any number of delayed neutron groups. The inversion technique is versatile and is useful in teaching numerical methods in nuclear science.

  2. Dwarf busting in Abell 868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon

    1999-07-01

    We request 24 orbits to obtain a deep mosaic {6 * 4-orbit pointings} of the central region of A868, a rich Abell cluster which we have imaged comprehensively from the ground. The objective is to identify and characterise the morphological nature of the dwarf galaxy population{s} responsible for the steep upturn seen in this cluster's luminosity function. While similar upturns have been reported in many clusters, the specifics of the dwarf population remain unknown as these objects cannot be resolved from the ground. What type of dwarf galaxies are they ? Is there more than one population contributing ? How are they clustered ? By obtaining deep high-resolution HST WFPC2 imaging over a central field roughly 7.5' * 3.75' we will be able to measure morphologies, light- profiles and the clustering properties of the dwarf population{s} down to M_I = -16 mags {H_o=75kms^-1Mpc^-1}. Although we shall primarily concentrate on the dwarf galaxies, we will also recover the cluster's morphological luminosity distributions for elliptical, spirals and irregulars over a broad absolute magnitude range {-24 < M_I < -16 mags} as well as the more quantitative bivariate brightness distribution {- 24 < M_I < -16 mags, 17.0 < mu_e^I < 25 mags per sq arcsec}. Comparing these results to those recently derived for the general field will provide an insight into the environmental influences on morphology and surface brightness.

  3. Gravity data inversion to determine 3D topographycal density contrast of Banten area, Indonesia based on fast Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhari, Ayuty; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-01

    The 3D inversion gravity anomaly to estimate topographical density using a matlab source code from gridded data provided by Parker Oldenburg algorithm based on fast Fourier transform was computed. We extend and improved the source code of 3DINVERT.M invented by Gomez Ortiz and Agarwal (2005) using the relationship between Fourier transform of the gravity anomaly and the sum of the Fourier transform from the topography density. We gave density contrast between the two media to apply the inversion. FFT routine was implemented to construct amplitude spectrum to the given mean depth. The results were presented as new graphics of inverted topography density, the gravity anomaly due to the inverted topography and the difference between the input gravity data and the computed ones. It terminates when the RMS error is lower than pre-assigned value used as convergence criterion or until maximum of iterations is reached. As an example, we used the matlab program on gravity data of Banten region, Indonesia.

  4. The Lambert Way to Gaussianize Heavy-Tailed Data with the Inverse of Tukey's h Transformation as a Special Case

    PubMed Central

    Goerg, Georg M.

    2015-01-01

    I present a parametric, bijective transformation to generate heavy tail versions of arbitrary random variables. The tail behavior of this heavy tail Lambert  W × FX random variable depends on a tail parameter δ ≥ 0: for δ = 0, Y ≡ X, for δ > 0 Y has heavier tails than X. For X being Gaussian it reduces to Tukey's h distribution. The Lambert W function provides an explicit inverse transformation, which can thus remove heavy tails from observed data. It also provides closed-form expressions for the cumulative distribution (cdf) and probability density function (pdf). As a special case, these yield analytic expression for Tukey's h pdf and cdf. Parameters can be estimated by maximum likelihood and applications to S&P 500 log-returns demonstrate the usefulness of the presented methodology. The R package LambertW implements most of the introduced methodology and is publicly available on CRAN. PMID:26380372

  5. Non centered minor hysteresis loops evaluation based on exponential parameters transforms of the modified inverse Jiles-Atherton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamimid, M.; Mimoune, S. M.; Feliachi, M.; Atallah, K.

    2014-10-01

    In this present work, a non centered minor hysteresis loops evaluation is performed using the exponential transforms (ET) of the modified inverse Jiles-Atherton model parameters. This model improves the non centered minor hysteresis loops representation. The parameters of the non centered minor hysteresis loops are obtained from exponential expressions related to the major ones. The parameters of minor loops are obtained by identification using the stochastic optimization method “simulated annealing”. The four parameters of JA model (a,α, k and c) obtained by this transformation are applied only in both ascending and descending branches of the non centered minor hysteresis loops while the major ones are applied to the rest of the cycle. This proposal greatly improves both branches and consequently the minor loops. To validate this model, calculated non-centered minor hysteresis loops are compared with measured ones and good agreements are obtained.

  6. The Lambert Way to Gaussianize Heavy-Tailed Data with the Inverse of Tukey's h Transformation as a Special Case.

    PubMed

    Goerg, Georg M

    2015-01-01

    I present a parametric, bijective transformation to generate heavy tail versions of arbitrary random variables. The tail behavior of this heavy tail Lambert W × F X random variable depends on a tail parameter δ ≥ 0: for δ = 0, Y ≡ X, for δ > 0 Y has heavier tails than X. For X being Gaussian it reduces to Tukey's h distribution. The Lambert W function provides an explicit inverse transformation, which can thus remove heavy tails from observed data. It also provides closed-form expressions for the cumulative distribution (cdf) and probability density function (pdf). As a special case, these yield analytic expression for Tukey's h pdf and cdf. Parameters can be estimated by maximum likelihood and applications to S&P 500 log-returns demonstrate the usefulness of the presented methodology. The R package Lambert W implements most of the introduced methodology and is publicly available on CRAN. PMID:26380372

  7. A fast algorithm for parabolic PDE-based inverse problems based on Laplace transforms and flexible Krylov solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhos, Tania; Saibaba, Arvind K.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2015-10-15

    We consider the problem of estimating parameters in large-scale weakly nonlinear inverse problems for which the underlying governing equations is a linear, time-dependent, parabolic partial differential equation. A major challenge in solving these inverse problems using Newton-type methods is the computational cost associated with solving the forward problem and with repeated construction of the Jacobian, which represents the sensitivity of the measurements to the unknown parameters. Forming the Jacobian can be prohibitively expensive because it requires repeated solutions of the forward and adjoint time-dependent parabolic partial differential equations corresponding to multiple sources and receivers. We propose an efficient method based on a Laplace transform-based exponential time integrator combined with a flexible Krylov subspace approach to solve the resulting shifted systems of equations efficiently. Our proposed solver speeds up the computation of the forward and adjoint problems, thus yielding significant speedup in total inversion time. We consider an application from Transient Hydraulic Tomography (THT), which is an imaging technique to estimate hydraulic parameters related to the subsurface from pressure measurements obtained by a series of pumping tests. The algorithms discussed are applied to a synthetic example taken from THT to demonstrate the resulting computational gains of this proposed method.

  8. Application and sensitivity investigation of Fourier transforms for microwave radiometric inversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. J.; Balanis, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Existing microwave radiometer technology now provides a suitable method for remote determination of the ocean surface's absolute brightness temperature. To extract the brightness temperature of the water from the antenna temperature equation, an unstable Fredholm integral equation of the first kind was solved. Fast Fourier Transform techniques were used to invert the integral after it is placed into a cross-correlation form. Application and verification of the methods to a two-dimensional modeling of a laboratory wave tank system were included. The instability of the Fredholm equation was then demonstrated and a restoration procedure was included which smooths the resulting oscillations. With the recent availability and advances of Fast Fourier Transform techniques, the method presented becomes very attractive in the evaluation of large quantities of data. Actual radiometric measurements of sea water are inverted using the restoration method, incorporating the advantages of the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm for computations.

  9. Abel's Theorem Simplifies Reduction of Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We give an alternative to the standard method of reduction or order, in which one uses one solution of a homogeneous, linear, second order differential equation to find a second, linearly independent solution. Our method, based on Abel's Theorem, is shorter, less complex and extends to higher order equations.

  10. Electron irradiation induced buckling, morphological transformation, and inverse Ostwald ripening in nanorod filled inside carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anshika; Kumari, Reetu; Kumar, Vinay; Krishnia, Lucky; Naqvi, Zainab; Panwar, Amrish K.; Bhatta, Umananda M.; Ghosh, Arnab; Satyam, P. V.; Tyagi, Pawan K.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to deduce the in-situ response of iron carbide (Fe3C) nanorod filled inside carbon nanotube (CNT) under electron irradiation. Electron irradiation on Fe3C filled-CNT at both high and room temperature (RT) has been performed inside transmission electron microscope. At high temperature (HT), it has been found that γ-Fe atoms in lattice of Fe3C nanorod accumulate first and then form the cluster. These clusters follow the inverse Ostwald ripening whereas if e-irradiation is performed at RT then only the morphological changes in both carbon nanotube as well as nanorod are observed. Compression generated either by electron beam heating or by shrinkage of CNT walls is observed to be a decisive factor.

  11. The clusters Abell 222 and Abell 223: a multi-wavelength view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Laganá, T. F.; Adami, C.; Bertin, E.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The Abell 222 and 223 clusters are located at an average redshift z ~ 0.21 and are separated by 0.26 deg. Signatures of mergers have been previously found in these clusters, both in X-rays and at optical wavelengths, thus motivating our study. In X-rays, they are relatively bright, and Abell 223 shows a double structure. A filament has also been detected between the clusters both at optical and X-ray wavelengths. Aims: We analyse the optical properties of these two clusters based on deep imaging in two bands, derive their galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs) and correlate these properties with X-ray characteristics derived from XMM-Newton data. Methods: The optical part of our study is based on archive images obtained with the CFHT Megaprime/Megacam camera, covering a total region of about 1 deg2, or 12.3 × 12.3 Mpc2 at a redshift of 0.21. The X-ray analysis is based on archive XMM-Newton images. Results: The GLFs of Abell 222 in the g' and r' bands are well fit by a Schechter function; the GLF is steeper in r' than in g'. For Abell 223, the GLFs in both bands require a second component at bright magnitudes, added to a Schechter function; they are similar in both bands. The Serna & Gerbal method allows to separate well the two clusters. No obvious filamentary structures are detected at very large scales around the clusters, but a third cluster at the same redshift, Abell 209, is located at a projected distance of 19.2 Mpc. X-ray temperature and metallicity maps reveal that the temperature and metallicity of the X-ray gas are quite homogeneous in Abell 222, while they are very perturbed in Abell 223. Conclusions: The Abell 222/Abell 223 system is complex. The two clusters that form this structure present very different dynamical states. Abell 222 is a smaller, less massive and almost isothermal cluster. On the other hand, Abell 223 is more massive and has most probably been crossed by a subcluster on its way to the northeast. As a consequence, the

  12. Wavelet transform fast inverse light scattering analysis for size determination of spherical scatterers

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Derek; Kim, Sanghoon; Drake, Tyler K.; Eldridge, Will J.; Wax, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We present a fast approach for size determination of spherical scatterers using the continuous wavelet transform of the angular light scattering profile to address the computational limitations of previously developed sizing techniques. The potential accuracy, speed, and robustness of the algorithm were determined in simulated models of scattering by polystyrene beads and cells. The algorithm was tested experimentally on angular light scattering data from polystyrene bead phantoms and MCF-7 breast cancer cells using a 2D a/LCI system. Theoretical sizing of simulated profiles of beads and cells produced strong fits between calculated and actual size (r2 = 0.9969 and r2 = 0.9979 respectively), and experimental size determinations were accurate to within one micron. PMID:25360350

  13. The application of distance transformation on parameter optimization of inverse planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-01-01

    In inverse planning for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the dose specification and related weighting factor of an objective function for involved organs is usually predefined by a single value and then iteratively optimized, subject to a set of dose-volume constraints. Because the actual dose distribution is essentially non-uniform and considerably affected by the geometric shape and distribution of the anatomic structures involved, the spatial information regarding those structures should be incorporated such that the predefined parameter distribution is made to approach the clinically expected distribution. Ideally, these parameter distributions should be predefined on a voxel basis in a manual method. However, such an approach is too time-consuming to be feasible in routine use. In the present study, we developed a computer-aided method to achieve the goal described above, producing a non-uniform parameter distribution based on spatial information about the anatomic structures involved. The method consists of two steps: Use distance transformation technique to calculate the distance distribution of the structures. Based on the distance distribution, produce the parameter distribution via a function guided by prior knowledge. We use two simulated cases to examine the effectiveness of the method. The results indicate that application of a non-uniform parameter distribution produced by distance transformation clearly improves dose-sparing of critical organs without compromising dose coverage of the planning target. PMID:18714279

  14. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasadia, S.; Sun, M.; Sarazin, C.; Morandi, A.; Markevitch, M.; Wik, D.; Feretti, L.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    Deep (103 ks) Chandra observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of M = 3.0 ± 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell 665 the second cluster, after the Bullet cluster, where a strong merger shock of M ≈ 3 has been detected. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 ± 0.7) × 103 km s-1. The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the re-acceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  15. The X-ray cluster Abell 744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gioia, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray and optical observations of the cluster of galaxies Abell 744 are presented. The X-ray flux (assuming H(0) = 100 km/s per Mpc) is about 9 x 10 to the 42nd erg/s. The X-ray source is extended, but shows no other structure. Photographic photometry (in Kron-Cousins R), calibrated by deep CCD frames, is presented for all galaxies brighter than 19th magnitude within 0.75 Mpc of the cluster center. The luminosity function is normal, and the isopleths show little evidence of substructure near the cluster center. The cluster has a dominant central galaxy, which is classified as a normal brightest-cluster elliptical on the basis of its luminosity profile. New redshifts were obtained for 26 galaxies in the vicinity of the cluster center; 20 appear to be cluster members. The spatial distribution of redshifts is peculiar; the dispersion within the 150 kpc core radius is much greater than outside. Abell 744 is similar to the nearby cluster Abell 1060.

  16. Gridding-based direct Fourier inversion of the three-dimensional ray transform.

    PubMed

    Penczek, Pawel A; Renka, Robert; Schomberg, Hermann

    2004-04-01

    We describe a fast and accurate direct Fourier method for reconstructing a function f of three variables from a number of its parallel beam projections. The main application of our method is in single particle analysis, where the goal is to reconstruct the mass density of a biological macromolecule. Typically, the number of projections is extremely large, and each projection is extremely noisy. The projection directions are random and initially unknown. However, it is possible to determine both the directions and f by an iterative procedure; during each stage of the iteration, one has to solve a reconstruction problem of the type considered here. Our reconstruction algorithm is distinguished from other direct Fourier methods by the use of gridding techniques that provide an efficient means to compute a uniformly sampled version of a function g from a nonuniformly sampled version of Fg, the Fourier transform of g, or vice versa. We apply the two-dimensional reverse gridding method to each available projection of f, the function to be reconstructed, in order to obtain Ff on a special spherical grid. Then we use the three-dimensional gridding method to reconstruct f from this sampled version of Ff. This stage requires a proper weighting of the samples of Ff to compensate for their nonuniform distribution. We use a fast method for computing appropriate weights that exploits the special properties of the spherical sampling grid for Ff and involves the computation of a Voronoi diagram on the unit sphere. We demonstrate the excellent speed and accuracy of our method by using simulated data. PMID:15078020

  17. ROSAT HRI images of Abell 85 and Abell 496: Evidence for inhomogeneities in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Guimond, Stephen J.; Luginbuhl, Christian; Joy, Marshall

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT HRI images of two clusters of galaxies with cooling flows, Abell 496 and Abell 85. In these clusters, x-ray emission on small scales above the general cluster emission is significant at the 3 sigma level. There is no evidence for optical counterparts. The enhancements may be associated with lumps of gas at a lower temperature and higher density than the ambient medium, or hotter, denser gas perhaps compressed by magnetic fields. These observations can be used to test models of how thermal instabilities form and evolve in cooling flows.

  18. An improved inversion for FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC ionosphere electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.

    2015-10-01

    An improved method to retrieve electron density profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) data is presented and applied to Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) observations. The improved inversion uses a monthly grid of COSMIC F region peak densities (NmF2), which are obtained via the standard Abel inversion, to aid the Abel inversion by providing information on the horizontal gradients in the ionosphere. This lessens the impact of ionospheric gradients on the retrieval of GPS RO electron density profiles, reducing the dominant error source in the standard Abel inversion. Results are presented that demonstrate the NmF2 aided retrieval significantly improves the quality of the COSMIC electron density profiles. Improvements are most notable at E region altitudes, where the improved inversion reduces the artificial plasma cave that is generated by the Abel inversion spherical symmetry assumption at low latitudes during the daytime. Occurrence of unphysical negative electron densities at E region altitudes is also reduced. Furthermore, the NmF2 aided inversion has a positive impact at F region altitudes, where it results in a more distinct equatorial ionization anomaly. COSMIC electron density profiles inverted using our new approach are currently available through the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research COSMIC Data Analysis and Archive Center. Owing to the significant improvement in the results, COSMIC data users are encouraged to use electron density profiles based on the improved inversion rather than those inverted by the standard Abel inversion.

  19. The cluster of galaxies Abell 2670

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shambrook, Anouk Aimee

    2001-10-01

    The rich cluster of galaxies Abell 2670 provides a laboratory in which to observe how galaxy properties change as a function of environment. Though initially considered a relaxed cluster, Abell 2670 exhibits substructure in optical, x-ray, and radio 21 cm H I line data. The cluster hosts a plethora of elliptical galaxies as well as spiral galaxies including galaxies rich in cold gas (some with more than 1010 Msolar in H I), and K+A galaxies. A group of galaxies rich in cold gas may be entering the cluster environment for the first time, making Abell 2670 a valuable case study. This thesis presents a catalog of UBV RI colors for objects located in an area 1° x 1° centered on Abell 2670, based on observations using the CTIO 0.9-m Schmidt telescope. Follow up observations using the Keck II 10-m and the CTIO 4-m telescopes will enable the classification of galaxy morphology. Using evolutionary synthesis models by Poggianti and Barbaro, a photometric redshift analysis yields a best- fit redshift and spectral energy distribution for each galaxy. The results are checked with galaxies observed by Sharples, Ellis, and Gray, which are known cluster members. Radial density profiles of cluster and field galaxies are modeled by King and uniform distributions respectively. A set of simulated galaxies, drawn from a combination of the two models, is compared to the data; for each redshift classification (based on the photometric redshift analysis), Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests characterize the probable fraction of cluster galaxies relative to the total. For the galaxies classified by the photometric redshift analysis as E, Sa, and Sc, an overdensity value is calculated, quantifying the density-morphology relation for this sample. A detailed study of this low redshift (z = 0.076) cluster may inform future studies of high redshift clusters. The optical UBV RI catalog is an important part of a multiwavelength set of data on Abell 2670 which in the future will probably lend itself well

  20. Tauberian theorems for Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Enes; ćoşkun, Hüsamettin

    2015-09-01

    We give some conditions under which Abel summable sequences of fuzzy numbers are convergent. As corollaries we obtain the results given in [E. Yavuz, Ö. Talo, Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers, Soft computing 2014, doi: 10.1007/s00500-014-1563-7].

  1. Sources of distortion product otoacoustic emissions revealed by suppression experiments and inverse fast Fourier transforms in normal ears.

    PubMed

    Konrad-Martin, D; Neely, S T; Keefe, D H; Dorn, P A; Gorga, M P

    2001-06-01

    Primary and secondary sources combine to produce the 2f1-f2 distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) measured in the ear canals of humans. DPOAEs were obtained in nine normal-hearing subjects using a fixed-f2 paradigm in which f1 was varied. The f2 was 2 or 4 kHz, and absolute and relative primary levels were varied. Data were obtained with and without a third tone (f3) placed 15.6 Hz below 2f1-f2. The level of f3 was varied in order to suppress the stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) coming from the 2f1-f2 place. These data were converted from the complex frequency domain into an equivalent time representation using an inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT). IFFTs of unsuppressed DPOAE data were characterized by two or more peaks. Relative amplitudes of these peaks depended on overall primary level and on primary-level differences. The suppressor eliminated later peaks, but early peaks remained relatively unaltered. Results are interpreted to mean that the DPOAE measured in humans includes components from the f2 place (intermodulation distortion) and DP place (in the form of a SFOAE). These findings build on previous work by providing evidence that multiple peaks in the IFFT are due to a secondary source at the DP place. PMID:11425129

  2. X-ray morphologies of Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. L. W.; Kowalski, M. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented for X-ray measurements made with the Einstein Observatory's IPC for a sample of 49 Abell clusters, which were used to determine quantitative measures of two morphological parameters of these clusters, the orientation and ellipticity. Consideration is given to the techniques used for estimating and removing background noise in the images and for determining the variation of these parameters with the flux level of a cluster. It was found that most clusters are clearly flattened; for 20 of these clusters, the orientation was unambiguously determined. A catalog of cluster properties is presented.

  3. Mapping the intracluster medium of Abell 3627

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, Julie; Koribalski, Baerbel; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Wong, O. Ivy; Serra, Paolo; Schnitzeler, Dominic; Dehghan, Siamak

    2013-10-01

    Galaxy clusters are among the largest structures in the Universe. They provide a high density environment where galaxies undergo high-speed collisions, ram pressure stripping, and tidal interactions. The resulting debris can sometimes be detected in the form of neutral or ionised intergalactic filaments. Abell 3627 lies at a distance of ~66kpc right in the heart of the Great Attractor and is one of the most massive clusters known. We propose to map an area of 1 sq. deg. around Abell 3627 at 1 - 3 GHz to study the polarised emission in and between cluster members and search for HI absorption of neutral intracluster gas. We will be able to: (1) test cluster magnetic field turbulence on very small scales; (2) examine rotation measure (RM) spectra to understand the effect of radio sources in cluster environments; (3) detect the intracluster medium (ICM) magnetic field; (4) determine the magnetic field strength of the cluster and place upper limits on the age; and (5) constrain the HI column density in the ICM. All of these goals together will provide information to understand how the large-scale structure of the Universe evolves.

  4. The expression of heat shock protein hsp27 and a complexed 22-kilodalton protein is inversely correlated with oncogenicity of adenovirus-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zantema, A; de Jong, E; Lardenoije, R; van der Eb, A J

    1989-01-01

    We isolated a monoclonal antibody that immunoprecipitated two proteins of 22 and 27 kilodaltons (kDa) from nononcogenic adenovirus type 5 early region 1 (E1)-transformed rat cells but not from oncogenic adenovirus type 12 E1-transformed rat cells. In a variety of adenovirus-transformed cells including cells transformed by E1A and the c-H-ras oncogene, we found a perfect, inverse correlation between the presence of these two proteins and the oncogenicity of these cells in syngeneic immunocompetent rats. Characterization of the two proteins revealed that they occur in a large (700-kDa) complex and that the 27-kDa protein is identical to the already known 27-kDa (28-kDa) heat shock protein hsp27. The suppression of the hsp27 protein in oncogenic cells is further demonstrated by the fact that its mRNA is absent even after heat-shock induction. Images PMID:2746733

  5. An inversion formula for the exponential Radon transform in spatial domain with variable focal-length fan-beam collimation geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Junhai; Liang Zhengrong

    2006-03-15

    Inverting the exponential Radon transform has a potential use for SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging in cases where a uniform attenuation can be approximated, such as in brain and abdominal imaging. Tretiak and Metz derived in the frequency domain an explicit inversion formula for the exponential Radon transform in two dimensions for parallel-beam collimator geometry. Progress has been made to extend the inversion formula for fan-beam and varying focal-length fan-beam (VFF) collimator geometries. These previous fan-beam and VFF inversion formulas require a spatially variant filtering operation, which complicates the implementation and imposes a heavy computing burden. In this paper, we present an explicit inversion formula, in which a spatially invariant filter is involved. The formula is derived and implemented in the spatial domain for VFF geometry (where parallel-beam and fan-beam geometries are two special cases). Phantom simulations mimicking SPECT studies demonstrate its accuracy in reconstructing the phantom images and efficiency in computation for the considered collimator geometries.

  6. When Deriving the Spatial QRS-T Angle from the 12-lead ECG, which Transform is More Frank: Regression or Inverse Dower?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Cortez, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Our primary objective was to ascertain which commonly used 12-to-Frank-lead transformation yields spatial QRS-T angle values closest to those obtained from simultaneously collected true Frank-lead recordings. Simultaneous 12-lead and Frank XYZ-lead recordings were analyzed for 100 post-myocardial infarction patients and 50 controls. Relative agreement, with true Frank-lead results, of 12-to-Frank-lead transformed results for the spatial QRS-T angle using Kors regression versus inverse Dower was assessed via ANOVA, Lin s concordance and Bland-Altman plots. Spatial QRS-T angles from the true Frank leads were not significantly different than those derived from the Kors regression-related transformation but were significantly smaller than those derived from the inverse Dower-related transformation (P less than 0.001). Independent of method, spatial mean QRS-T angles were also always significantly larger than spatial maximum (peaks) QRS-T angles. Spatial QRS-T angles are best approximated by regression-related transforms. Spatial mean and spatial peaks QRS-T angles should also not be used interchangeably.

  7. Precision improvement of chlorophyll-a remote sensing inversion by data transformation in turbidity water under low concentration: a case of Taihu Lake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuchun; Cheng, Chunmei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jing

    2010-10-01

    Estimation and monitoring Chlorophyll-a concentration (CHLA), especially low CHLA in lake using remote sensing data is very important for early warning of blue-green algal bloom. In spite of better overall goodness fit in three-band CHLA inversion model of turbidity water proposed by Gitelson, the estimation errors of samples with low CHLA are often higher, and this kind of error has great influence on the evaluation of lake nutritional status. In this paper, two methods of data transformation-logarithm of CHLA and continuum removal of spectrum-were used to decrease model error. Data set includes the routine monitoring sampling data collected from June to September, 2004 in Taihu Lake and field data in March, 2010 in Meiliangwan of Taihu Lake. Water surface spectrum data were measured in situ by ASD FieldPro. Comparative analysis showed that both logarithm transformation (LT) and continuum removal transformation (CRT) can increase model's accuracy. For all sample data, the average relative accuracy of model built by data after LT increased by 30%, and that of model built by data after LT and CRT increased by 35%. For the samples with CHLA lower than 50μg/L, the average relative error decreased from 76% of model built by data without transformation to 36% of LT and 27% of LT and CRT. The paper concluded that data transform is a simple and effective method to increase precision of CHLA remote sensing inversion.

  8. Are Abell Clusters Correlated with Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Laros, J.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A recent study has presented marginal statistical evidence that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources are correlated with Abell clusters, based on analyses of bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog. Using precise localization information from the Third Interplanetary Network, we have reanalyzed this possible correlation. We find that most of the Abell clusters that are in the relatively large 3B error circles are not in the much smaller IPN/BATSE error regions. We believe that this argues strongly against an Abell cluster-GRB correlation.

  9. Quantification of Substructure in Nearby Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriessler, J. R.; Beers, T. C.; Odewahn, S. C.

    1995-05-01

    Theory, as well as numerical simulations, suggests that Omega_o may be observationally constrained by the amount of substructure observed in present-day clusters of galaxies. We have therefore begun a study of the 116 Abell clusters with richness class greater than or equal to 1 and distance class less than or equal to 4, the so-called ``volume-limited'' sample of Hoessel, Gunn, & Thuan 1980 (ApJ 241, 486) to determine the prevalence of substructure in the clusters' projected galaxy positions. We use positions of galaxies identified by the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner to obtain contour plots of the available clusters using an adaptive kernel routine. Significance of substructure is evaluated using the 2-D Lee test as well as a likelihood-ratio test on fits made with mixtures of two-dimensional gaussians. We also present nonparametric density profile estimates obtained with the program MAPEL (Merritt and Tremblay 1994, AJ 108, 514).

  10. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21(sub -0.47 sup +0.43) on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36(sub -0.17 sup +0.46).

  11. The magnitude-redshift relation for 561 Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.; Henry, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble diagram for the 561 Abell clusters with measured redshifts has been examined using Abell's (1958) corrected photo-red magnitudes for the tenth-ranked cluster member (m10). After correction for the Scott effect and K dimming, the data are in good agreement with a linear magnitude-redshift relation with a slope of 0.2 out to z = 0.1. New redshift data are also presented for 20 Abell clusters. Abell's m10 is suitable for redshift estimation for clusters with m10 of no more than 16.5. At fainter m10, the number of foreground galaxies expected within an Abell radius is large enough to make identification of the tenth-ranked galaxy difficult. Interlopers bias the estimated redshift toward low values at high redshift. Leir and van den Bergh's (1977) redshift estimates suffer from this same bias but to a smaller degree because of the use of multiple cluster parameters. Constraints on deviations of cluster velocities from the mean cosmological flow require greater photometric accuracy than is provided by Abell's m10 magnitudes.

  12. Separating the BL Lac and cluster X-ray emissions in Abell 689 with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, P. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Lancaster, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a Chandra observation of the galaxy cluster Abell 689 (z = 0.279). Abell 689 is one of the most luminous clusters detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS), but was flagged as possibly including significant point source contamination. The small point spread function of the Chandra telescope allows us to confirm this and separate the point source from the extended cluster X-ray emission. For the cluster, we determine a bolometric luminosity of Lbol= (3.3 ± 0.3) × 1044 erg s-1 and a temperature of kT = 5.1+2.2- 1.3 keV when including a physically motivated background model. We compare our measured luminosity for A689 to that quoted in the RASS, and find L0.1-2.4 keV= 2.8 × 1044 erg s-1, a value ˜10 times lower than the ROSAT measurement. Our analysis of the point source shows evidence for significant pile-up, with a pile-up fraction of ≃60 per cent. Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images lead us to the conclusion that the point source within Abell 689 is a BL Lac object. Using radio and optical observations from the Very Large Array and HST archives, we determine αro= 0.50, αox= 0.77 and αrx= 0.58 for the BL Lac, which would classify it as being of 'high-energy peak BL Lac' type. Spectra extracted of A689 show a hard X-ray excess at energies above 6 keV that we interpret as inverse-Compton emission from aged electrons that may have been transported into the cluster from the BL Lac.

  13. The determination of gravity anomalies from geoid heights using the inverse Stokes' formula, Fourier transforms, and least squares collocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, R.; Sjoeberg, L.; Rapp, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical method for the determination of gravity anomalies from geoid heights is described using the inverse Stokes formula. This discrete form of the inverse Stokes formula applies a numerical integration over the azimuth and an integration over a cubic interpolatory spline function which approximates the step function obtained from the numerical integration. The main disadvantage of the procedure is the lack of a reliable error measure. The method was applied on geoid heights derived from GEOS-3 altimeter measurements in the calibration area of the GEOS-3 satellite.

  14. Inversion of the 3D exponential x-ray transform for a half equatorial band and other semi-circular geometries.

    PubMed

    Noo, Frédéric; Clackdoyle, Rolf; Wagner, Jean-Marc

    2002-08-01

    This work presents new mathematical results on the inversion of the exponential x-ray transform. It is shown that a reconstruction formula can be obtained for any dataset whose projection directions consist of a union of half great circles on the unit sphere. A basic example of such a dataset is the semi-equatorial band. The discussion in the paper is mostly focused on this example. The reconstruction formula takes the form of a Neumann (geometric) series and is both exact and stable. The exponential x-ray transform has been mainly studied in SPECT imaging. In this context, our results demonstrate mathematically that fully 3D image reconstruction in SPECT with non-zero attenuation does not always require symmetric datasets (opposing views). PMID:12200935

  15. Chandra View of Galaxy Cluster Abell 2554

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kıyami Erdim, Muhammed; Hudaverdi, Murat

    2016-07-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 2554 at z = 0.11, which is a member of Aquarius Super cluster using the Chandra archival data. The X-ray peak coincides with a bright elliptical cD galaxy. Slightly elongated X-ray plasma has an average temperature and metal abundance values of ˜6 keV and 0.28 solar, respectively. We observe small-scale temperature variations in the ICM. There is a significantly hot wall-like structure with 9 keV at the SE and also radio-lope locates at the tip of this hot region. A2554 is also part of a trio-cluster. Its close neighbors A2550 (at SW) and A2556 (at SE) have only 2 Mpc and 1.5 Mpc separations with A2554. Considering the temperature fluctuations and the dynamical environment of super cluster, we examine the possible ongoing merger scenarios within A2554.

  16. Abell 1033: birth of a radio phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperin, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Dawson, W. A.; Brüggen, M.; Bonafede, A.; Simionescu, A.

    2015-04-01

    Extended steep-spectrum radio emission in a galaxy cluster is usually associated with a recent merger. However, given the complex scenario of galaxy cluster mergers, many of the discovered sources hardly fit into the strict boundaries of a precise taxonomy. This is especially true for radio phoenixes that do not have very well defined observational criteria. Radio phoenixes are aged radio galaxy lobes whose emission is reactivated by compression or other mechanisms. Here, we present the detection of a radio phoenix close to the moment of its formation. The source is located in Abell 1033, a peculiar galaxy cluster which underwent a recent merger. To support our claim, we present unpublished Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Chandra observations together with archival data from the Very Large Array and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We discover the presence of two subclusters displaced along the N-S direction. The two subclusters probably underwent a recent merger which is the cause of a moderately perturbed X-ray brightness distribution. A steep-spectrum extended radio source very close to an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is proposed to be a newly born radio phoenix: the AGN lobes have been displaced/compressed by shocks formed during the merger event. This scenario explains the source location, morphology, spectral index, and brightness. Finally, we show evidence of a density discontinuity close to the radio phoenix and discuss the consequences of its presence.

  17. The SAMI Pilot Survey: stellar kinematics of galaxies in Abell 85, 168 and 2399

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, L. M. R.; Scott, N.; Owers, M. S.; Croom, S. M.; Bekki, K.; Houghton, R. C. W.; van de Sande, J.; D'Eugenio, F.; Cecil, G. N.; Colless, M. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cortese, L.; Davies, R. L.; Jones, D. H.; Pracy, M.; Allen, J. T.; Bryant, J. J.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Richards, S.; Sharp, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present the SAMI Pilot Survey, consisting of integral field spectroscopy of 106 galaxies across three galaxy clusters, Abell 85, Abell 168 and Abell 2399. The galaxies were selected by absolute magnitude to have Mr < -20.25 mag. The survey, using the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI), comprises observations of galaxies of all morphological types with 75 per cent of the sample being early-type galaxies (ETGs) and 25 per cent being late-type galaxies (LTGs). Stellar velocity and velocity dispersion maps are derived for all 106 galaxies in the sample. The λR parameter, a proxy for the specific stellar angular momentum, is calculated for each galaxy in the sample. We find a trend between λR and galaxy concentration such that LTGs are less concentrated higher angular momentum systems, with the fast-rotating ETGs (FRs) more concentrated and lower in angular momentum. This suggests that some dynamical processes are involved in transforming LTGs to FRs, though a significant overlap between the λR distributions of these classes of galaxies implies that this is just one piece of a more complicated picture. We measure the kinematic misalignment angle, Ψ, for the ETGs in the sample, to probe the intrinsic shapes of the galaxies. We find the majority of FRs (83 per cent) to be aligned, consistent with them being oblate spheroids (i.e. discs). The slow rotating ETGs (SRs), on the other hand, are significantly more likely to show kinematic misalignment (only 38 per cent are aligned). This confirms previous results that SRs are likely to be mildly triaxial systems.

  18. Stored waveform inverse fourier-transform (SWIFT) excitation for water-suppressed whole-body slice-selected proton chemical shift spectra at 1.5 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Annjia T.; Hunter, William W.; Schmalbrock, Petra; Marshall, Alan G.

    Proton NMR spectroscopy for the in vivo study of metabolites in a spatially resolved region with a clinical NMR imaging device must contend with the 70% hydration of normal man. Theoretical and experimental comparisons of several excitation waveforms designed to suppress the H 2O signal in proton NMR spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging have been conducted. In particular, we have compared the 1 overline33 overline1 and 1 overline1 pulse sequences with those obtained via a stored waveform inverse Fourier-transform (SWIFT) time-domain apodized waveform generated by inverse Fourier transformation of a quadratically phase-encoded excitation magnitude spectrum. Theoretical excitation profiles are compared to those measured in a slice selected with a General Electric Signa 1.5 T whole-body imaging system, and demonstrated for a phantom (toluene, dioxane, and dichloromethane). The SWIFT waveform is theoretically and experimentally superior to 1 overline1 and 1 overline33 overline1 for selective suppression of one spectral segment with simultaneous uniform excitation over the rest of the spectral frequency range. SWIFT-excited water-suppressed depth-resolved chemical shift spectra are demonstrated for human brain and human calf muscle of normal volunteers.

  19. Structure and evolution of the Demerara Plateau, offshore French Guiana: Rifting, tectonic inversion and post-rift tilting at transform-divergent margins intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, C.; Maillard, A.; Patriat, M.; Gaullier, V.; Loncke, L.; Roest, W.; Mercier de Lépinay, M.; Pattier, F.

    2013-04-01

    We present the structure and evolution of the eastern part of the Demerara plateau, offshore French Guiana, from the analysis of geophysical data collected during GUYAPLAC cruise. This area is located at the intersection of a transform segment and a divergent segment of a continental margin related to the Early Cretaceous opening of the Equatorial Atlantic. The main structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE trending normal faults on the eastern edge of the plateau, and WNW-ESE to NW-SE trending acoustic basement ridges on its northern edge. When replaced in their Albian position, these structures appear to be parallel to the coeval oceanic accretion axis and transform faults, respectively. The most striking structures are related to a post-rift but syn-transform tectonic inversion, producing E-W to WNW-ESE trending folds, sealed by a regional unconformity. This shortening cannot be related to ridge push, but is probably related to a plate kinematic change 105 My ago, that modified the deformation in the vicinity of the transform fault. Late post-rift evolution also includes a significant Tertiary oceanward tilt of the edge of the Demerara plateau. The driving mechanism of this late tilt is unclear, but may be related to a lithospheric flexure resulting from the loading of the abyssal plain by the Orinoco and Amazon deep-sea fans.

  20. On sky characterization of the BAORadio wide band digital backend. Search for HI emission in Abell85, Abell1205 and Abell2440 galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Campagne, J. E.; Colom, P.; Ferrari, C.; Magneville, Ch.; Martin, J. M.; Moniez, M.; Torrentó, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    We have observed regions of three galaxy clusters at z˜[0.06÷0.09] (Abell85, Abell1205, Abell2440) with the Nançay radiotelescope (NRT) to search for 21 cm emission and to fully characterize the FPGA based BAORadio digital backend. We have tested the new BAORadio data acquisition system by observing sources in parallel with the NRT standard correlator (ACRT) back-end over several months. BAORadio enables wide band instantaneous observation of the [1250,1500] MHz frequency range, as well as the use of powerful RFI mitigation methods thanks to its fine time sampling. A number of questions related to instrument stability, data processing and calibration are discussed. We have obtained the radiometer curves over the integration time range [0.01,10 000] seconds and we show that sensitivities of few mJy over most of the wide frequency band can be reached with the NRT. It is clearly shown that in blind line search, which is the context of H I intensity mapping for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, the new acquisition system and processing pipeline outperforms the standard one. We report a positive detection of 21 cm emission at 3 σ-level from galaxies in the outer region of Abell85 at ≃1352 MHz (14400 km/s) corresponding to a line strength of ≃0.8 Jy km/s. We also observe an excess power around ≃1318 MHz (21600 km/s), although at lower statistical significance, compatible with emission from Abell1205 galaxies. Detected radio line emissions have been cross matched with optical catalogs and we have derived hydrogen mass estimates.

  1. TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  2. Recovering four-component solutions by the inverse transformation of the infinite-order two-component wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Barysz, Maria; Mentel, Lukasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2009-04-28

    The two-component Hamiltonian of the infinite-order two-component (IOTC) theory is obtained by a unitary block-diagonalizing transformation of the Dirac-Hamiltonian. Once the IOTC spin orbitals are calculated, they can be back transformed into four-component solutions. The transformed four component solutions are then used to evaluate different moments of the electron density distribution. This formally exact method may, however, suffer from certain approximations involved in its numerical implementation. As shown by the present study, with sufficiently large basis set of Gaussian functions, the Dirac values of these moments are fully recovered in spite of using the approximate identity resolution into eigenvectors of the p{sup 2} operator.

  3. A 1400-MHz survey of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. N.; White, R. A.; Hilldrup, K. C.; Hanisch, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies with the NRAO 91-m telescope at 1400 MHz are reported. The measured beam shape was deconvolved from the measured source Gaussian fits in order to estimate the source size and position angle. All detected sources within 0.5 corrected Abell cluster radii are listed, including the cluster number, richness class, distance class, magnitude of the tenth brightest galaxy, redshift estimate, corrected cluster radius in arcmin, right ascension and error, declination and error, total flux density and error, and angular structure for each source.

  4. Radio Galaxies in Abell Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, M. J.

    1994-05-01

    We have defined a complete sample of radio galaxies chosen from Abell's northern catalog consisting of all clusters with measured redshifts < 0.09. This sample consists of nearly 300 clusters. A multiwavelength survey including optical CCD R-Band imaging, optical spectroscopy, and VLA 20 cm radio maps has been compiled. I have used this database to study the optical/radio properties of radio galaxies in the cluster environment. In particular, optical properties have been compared to a radio-quiet selected sample to look for optical signatures which may distinguish radio galaxies from normal radio-quiet ellipticals. The correlations between radio morphology and galaxy type, the optical dependence of the FR I/II break, and the univariate and bivariate luminosity functions have been examined for this sample. This study is aimed at understanding radio galaxies as a population and examining their status in the AGN heirarchy. The results of this work will be applied to models of radio source evolution. The results from the optical data analysis suggest that radio galaxies, as a class, cannot be distinguished from non-radio selected elliptical galaxies. The magnitude/size relationship, the surface-brightness profiles, the fundamental plane, and the intrinsic shape of the radio galaxies are consistent between our radio galaxy and control sample. The radio galaxies also trace the elliptical galaxy optical luminosity function in clusters very well; with many more L(*) galaxies than brightest cluster members. Combined with the results of the spectroscopy, the data are consistent with the idea that all elliptical galaxies may at some point in their lifetimes become radio sources. In conclusion, I present a new observational picture for radio galaxies and discuss the important properties which may determine the evolution of individual sources.

  5. LensPerfect Analysis of Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan A.

    2007-12-01

    I present the first massmap to perfectly reproduce the position of every gravitationally-lensed multiply-imaged galaxy detected to date in ACS images of Abell 1689. This massmap was obtained using a powerful new technique made possible by a recent advance in the field of Mathematics. It is the highest resolution assumption-free Dark Matter massmap to date, with the resolution being limited only by the number of multiple images detected. We detect 8 new multiple image systems and identify multiple knots in individual galaxies to constrain a grand total of 168 knots within 135 multiple images of 42 galaxies. No assumptions are made about mass tracing light, and yet the brightest visible structures in A1689 are reproduced in our massmap, a few with intriguing positional offsets. Our massmap probes radii smaller than that resolvable in current Dark Matter simulations of galaxy clusters. And at these radii, we observe slight deviations from the NFW and Sersic profiles which describe simulated Dark Matter halos so well. While we have demonstrated that our method is able to recover a known input massmap (to limited resolution), further tests are necessary to determine the uncertainties of our mass profile and positions of massive subclumps. I compile the latest weak lensing data from ACS, Subaru, and CFHT, and attempt to fit a single profile, either NFW or Sersic, to both the observed weak and strong lensing. I confirm the finding of most previous authors, that no single profile fits extremely well to both simultaneously. Slight deviations are revealed, with the best fits slightly over-predicting the mass profile at both large and small radius. Our easy-to-use software, called LensPerfect, will be made available soon. This research was supported by the European Commission Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant 017288-BPZ and the PNAYA grant AYA2005-09413-C02.

  6. The Merger Dynamics of Abell 2061

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Avery; Sarazin, Craig L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Hogge, Taylor; Wik, Daniel R.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnsworth, Damon; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brown, Shea

    2016-04-01

    Abell 2061, a galaxy cluster at a redshift of z=.0784 in the Corona Borealis Supercluster, displays features in both the X-ray and radio indicative of merger activity. Observations by the GBT and the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) have indicated the presence of an extended, central radio halo/relic coincident with the cluster's main X-ray emission and a bright radio relic to the SW of the center of the cluster. Previous observations by ROSAT, Beppo-SAX, and Chandra show an elongated structure (referred to as the ‘Plume’), emitting in the soft X-ray and stretching to the NE of the cluster’s center. The Beppo-SAX and Chandra observations also suggest the presence of a hard X-ray shock slightly NE of the cluster’s center. Here we present the details of an August 2013 XMM-Newton observation of A2061 which has greater field of view and longer exposure (48.6 ks) than the previous Chandra observation. We present images displaying the cluster’s soft and hard X-ray emission and also a temperature map of the cluster. This temperature map highlights the presence of a previously unseen cool region of the cluster which we hypothesize to be the cool core of one of the subclusters involved in this merger. We also discuss the structural similarity of this cluster with a simulated high mass-ratio offset cluster merger taken from the Simulation Library of Astrophysical cluster Mergers (SLAM). This simulation would suggest that the Plume is gas from the cool core of a subcluster which is now falling back into the center of the cluster after initial core passage.

  7. The Numerical Inversion of the Laplace Transform in Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces for Ill-Posed Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iqbal, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we have converted the Laplace transform into an integral equation of the first kind of convolution type, which is an ill-posed problem, and used a statistical regularization method to solve it. The method is applied to three examples. It gives a good approximation to the true solution and compares well with the method given by…

  8. TRANSFORMER

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-25

    Transformers of a type adapted for use with extreme high power vacuum tubes where current requirements may be of the order of 2,000 to 200,000 amperes are described. The transformer casing has the form of a re-entrant section being extended through an opening in one end of the cylinder to form a coaxial terminal arrangement. A toroidal multi-turn primary winding is disposed within the casing in coaxial relationship therein. In a second embodiment, means are provided for forming the casing as a multi-turn secondary. The transformer is characterized by minimized resistance heating, minimized external magnetic flux, and an economical construction.

  9. Caffeine toxicity is inversely related to DNA repair in simian virus 40-transformed xeroderma pigmentosum cells irradiated with ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E. )

    1989-01-01

    Human cells transformed by simian virus 40 (SV40) are more sensitive to killing by ultraviolet light when grown in caffeine after irradiation. The degree of sensitization at 2 mM caffeine (expressed as the ratio of the 37% survival dose for control cells divided by the 37% survival dose for cells grown in caffeine, i.e., the dose modification factor) was approximately 1.9 in transformed normal cells and 3.8-5.8 in excision-defective xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) groups A, C, and D cells. A large dose modification factor of 12 was observed in a transformed XP variant cell line. Chinese hamster ovary cells were not significantly different from transformed normal human cells, with a maximum dose modification factor of 1.5. Two radioresistant XP revertants that do not excise cyclobutane dimers gave different responses; one resembled its group A parent in being sensitized by caffeine, and one did not. These results can be interpreted on the basis of a single hypothesis that cells are killed as a result of attempts to replicate damaged DNA. Increased replication rates caused by transformation, increased numbers of replication forks in DNA caused by caffeine, and increased numbers of damaged sites ahead of replication forks in excision-defective cells are all processes that will consequently increase killing according to this hypothesis. A corollary is that the XP variant may be highly sensitized to caffeine because of excision defects at the DNA replication forks, an idea that may be important in designing cloning strategies for the XP variant gene.

  10. Mass Profile of Abell 2204 An X-Ray Analysis of Abell 2204 using XMM-Newton Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Travis

    2003-09-05

    The vast majority of the matter in the universe is of an unknown type. This matter is called dark matter by astronomers. The dark matter manifests itself only through gravitational interaction and is otherwise undetectable. The distribution of this matter in can be better understood by studying the mass profile of galaxy clusters. The X-ray emissions of the galaxy cluster Abell 2204 were analyzed using archived data from the XMM-Newton space telescope. We analyze a 40ks observation of Abell 2204 and present a radial temperature and radial mass profile based on hydrostatic equilibrium calculations.

  11. FFTDC2: a one-dimensional Fourier transform with forward and inverse data conditioning for non-complex data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bracken, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    A subroutine (FFTDC2) coded in Fortran 77 is described, which performs a Fast Fourier Transform or Discrete Fourier Transform together with necessary conditioning steps of trend removal, extension, and windowing. The source code for the entire library of required subroutines is provided with the digital release of this report. But, there is only one required entry point, the subroutine call to FFTDC2; all the other subroutines are operationally transparent to the user. Complete instructions for use of FFTDC2.F (as well as for all the other subroutines) and some practical theoretical discussions are included as comments at the beginning of the source code. This subroutine is intended to be an efficient tool for the programmer in a variety of production-level signal-processing applications.

  12. Parallel Fortran-MPI software for numerical inversion of the Laplace transform and its application to oscillatory water levels in groundwater environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhan, X.

    2005-01-01

    A parallel Fortran-MPI (Message Passing Interface) software for numerical inversion of the Laplace transform based on a Fourier series method is developed to meet the need of solving intensive computational problems involving oscillatory water level's response to hydraulic tests in a groundwater environment. The software is a parallel version of ACM (The Association for Computing Machinery) Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS) Algorithm 796. Running 38 test examples indicated that implementation of MPI techniques with distributed memory architecture speedups the processing and improves the efficiency. Applications to oscillatory water levels in a well during aquifer tests are presented to illustrate how this package can be applied to solve complicated environmental problems involved in differential and integral equations. The package is free and is easy to use for people with little or no previous experience in using MPI but who wish to get off to a quick start in parallel computing. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. AGES Observations of Abell1367 and its Outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Minchin, R. F.; Auld, R. R.; Davies, J. I.; Catinella, B.; Momjian, E.; Rosenberg, J. L.; O'Neil, K.

    2007-05-01

    The Arecibo Galactic Environment Survey (AGES) will map over the next years ˜200 square degrees using the ALFA feed array at the 305-m Arecibo Telescope. AGES is specifically designed to investigate various galactic environments from local voids to interacting groups and cluster of galaxies. AGES will map 20 square degrees in the Coma-Abell1367 supercluster covering all the Abell cluster 1367 and its outskirts (˜2 virial radii). In Spring 2006 we nearly completed the observations of 5 square degrees in the range (11:34Abell1367 (˜92 Mpc). An HI selected sample has been extracted from the datacube obtaining a complete catalogue of fluxes, recessional velocities, positions and velocity widths. We will present a preliminary analysis of the properties of the HI sources and report the discovery of HI diffuse features within interacting groups at the periphery of Abell1367.

  14. Retrieval Performance and Indexing Differences in ABELL and MLAIB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Vince

    2012-01-01

    Searches for 117 British authors are compared in the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (ABELL) and the Modern Language Association International Bibliography (MLAIB). Authors are organized by period and genre within the early modern era. The number of records for each author was subdivided by format, language of publication,…

  15. Droplet size spectra and water-vapor concentration of laboratory water clouds: inversion of Fourier transform infrared (500-5000 cm(-1)) optical-depth measurement.

    PubMed

    Arnott, W P; Schmitt, C; Liu, Y; Hallett, J

    1997-07-20

    Infrared extinction optical depth (500-5000 cm(-1)) has been measured with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for clouds produced with an ultrasonic nebulizer. Direct measurement of the cloud droplet size spectra agree with size spectra retrieved from inversion of the extinction measurements. Both indicate that the range of droplet sizes is 1-14 mum. The retrieval was accomplished with an iterative algorithm that simultaneously obtains water-vapor concentration. The basis set of droplet extinction functions are computed once by using numerical integration of the Lorenz-Mie theory over narrow size bins, and a measured water-vapor extinction curve was used. Extinction and size spectra are measured and computed for both steady-state and dissipating clouds. It is demonstrated that anomalous diffraction theory produces relatively poor droplet size and synthetic extinction spectra and that extinction measurements are helpful in assessing the validity of various theories. Calculations of cloud liquid-water content from retrieved size distributions agree with a parameterization based on optical-depth measurements at a wave number of 906 cm(-1) for clouds that satisfy the size spectral range assumptions of the parameterization. Significance of droplet and vapor contribution to the total optical depth is used to evaluate the reliability of spectral inversions. PMID:18259335

  16. The Morphological Decomposition of Abell 868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, S. P.; Odewahn, S. C.; Echevarria, L.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Phillipps, S.; Couch, W. J.

    2003-12-01

    We report on the morphological luminosity functions (LFs) and radial profiles derived for the galaxy population within the rich cluster Abell 868 (z=0.153) based purely on Hubble Space Telescope imaging in F606W. We recover Schechter functions (-24.0

  17. The structure of casein aggregates during renneting studied by indirect Fourier transformation and inverse Laplace transformation of static and dynamic light scattering data, respectively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, R.; Hansen, M.; Hansen, S.; Øgendal, L.; Lomholt, S.; Qvist, K.; Horne, D.

    1995-08-01

    Aggregation of casein micelles after addition of the proteolytic enzyme chymosin has been studied by static and dynamic light scattering at three different concentrations of casein corresponding to dilutions 1:100, 1:500, and 1:1000 of native milk. The static light scattering data have been analyzed by an indirect Fourier transformation method which gives the distance distributions as a function of time. From these curves radius of gyration and an average number of casein micelles in the aggregates have been derived as a function of time. The dynamic light scattering experiments give the hydrodynamic radius as a function of time after the addition of rennet. The initial radius of gyration for the intact casein micelles is 140 nm. The corresponding hydrodynamic radius is also 140 nm. This shows that the casein micelles are not solid spheres. Inspection of a plot of relative mass versus radius of gyration for the aggregates appearing after the addition of chymosin shows that two processes take place. First extended linear aggregates are built up to a relative mass of the aggregates of about 10 and then restructuring of aggregates occurs such that increasingly compact objects are formed. Whereas the first process exhibits a relatively fast growth in size, the aggregates grow slowly in size during the second process. Further evidence of the formation of linear aggregates followed by more dense aggregates was obtained by forming the ratio between the radius of gyration and the hydrodynamic radius. This ratio increases to values of about 2.5 (indicating that linearly extended molecules are present followed) by a decrease to about 1. The log-log plot of mass versus radius of gyration is linear up to relative masses of about 10 with a slope of about 2. This extends up to sizes of 1 μm in diameter. The slope then increases to values indicating branching and thereby the formation of more compact aggregates. For relative masses below 10 and sizes below 1 μm sedimentation is

  18. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, B; Ruiz, C L

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution. PMID:23902066

  19. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1482156 is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  20. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-15

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20–25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  1. Lithospheric Velocity Structure Along the Dead Sea Transform From the Joint Inversion of P- and S-Wave Receiver Functions and Dispersion Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julia, J.; Nyblade, A.; Pasyanos, M. E.; Matzel, E.; Rodgers, A.; Al-Amri, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Dead Sea Transform (DST) is a ~1000 km long fault system that separates the Arabian and African plates and links the active spreading center of the Red Sea with the continental collision zone in the Zagros mountains. Independent thermo-mechanical modeling had suggested that a mantle plume intruding from the south might have eroded the lithosphere East of the DST, but recent results from a number of temporary seismic deployments in the area have found little variation in lithospheric thickness to support it and proposed that such geodynamic processes might have operated on both sides of the DST. Those lithospheric thickness estimates have been obtained through the stack and migration of Sp conversions in S-receiver functions, which assumes a global background velocity model to calibrate the depth-scale that might not represent mantle structure under the DST accurately. In this study, we obtain lithospheric and sub-lithospheric S-velocity structure under several permanent broadband stations along the DST from the joint inversion of P- and S-wave receiver functions and tomographic surface-wave dispersion velocities. The joint inversion approach simultaneously models S-P times and Ps amplitudes in P-receiver functions, P-S times and Sp amplitudes in S-receiver functions, and fundamental-mode, Rayleigh-wave group velocities, providing local 1D models of S-velocity under individual recording stations. Our velocity models display interesting variations in crustal thickness along the DST, with values under 40 km in the southern portions and values well over 40 km more to the North, near Lebanon. The models also display S-velocity values in the lithospheric mantle that are generally slow, in the 4.3-4.4 km/s range, sometimes overlaying a relatively shallow asthenospheric low velocity channel, above 150 km depth.

  2. X-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Abell 1835

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Kaastra, J. S.; Arnaud, M.; Reiprich T. H.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Jernigan, J. G.; Sakelliou, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopy results of the observation of Abell 1835 using the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton observatory. Abell 1835 is a luminous (10(exp 46)ergs/s), medium redshift (z = 0.2523), X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. The observations support the interpretation that large amounts of cool gas are present in a multi-phase medium surrounded by a hot (kT(sub e) = 8.2 keV) outer envelope. We detect O VIII Ly(alpha) and two Fe XXIV complexes in the RGS spectrum. The emission measure of the cool gas below kT(sub e) = 2.7 keV is much lower than expected from standard cooling-flow models, suggesting either a more complicated cooling process than simple isobaric radiative cooling or differential cold absorption of the cooler gas.

  3. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    PubMed

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  4. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics

    PubMed Central

    Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the “core team”, facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  5. Generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation induced from position-dependent effective mass quantum models and mass-deformed soliton solution through inverse scattering transform

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, A. E-mail: aganguly@maths.iitkgp.ernet.in; Das, A.

    2014-11-15

    We consider one-dimensional stationary position-dependent effective mass quantum model and derive a generalized Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation in (1+1) dimension through Lax pair formulation, one being the effective mass Schrödinger operator and the other being the time-evolution of wave functions. We obtain an infinite number of conserved quantities for the generated nonlinear equation and explicitly show that the new generalized KdV equation is an integrable system. Inverse scattering transform method is applied to obtain general solution of the nonlinear equation, and then N-soliton solution is derived for reflectionless potentials. Finally, a special choice has been made for the variable mass function to get mass-deformed soliton solution. The influence of position and time-dependence of mass and also of the different representations of kinetic energy operator on the nature of such solitons is investigated in detail. The remarkable features of such solitons are demonstrated in several interesting figures and are contrasted with the conventional KdV-soliton associated with constant-mass quantum model.

  6. Selective injection and isolation of ions in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry using notched waveforms created using the inverse Fourier transform

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, M.H.; Cooks, R.G. )

    1994-08-01

    Broad-band excitation of ions is accomplished in the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer using notched waveforms created by the SWIFT (stored waveform inverse Fourier transform) technique. A series of notched SWIFT pulses are applied during the period of ion injection from an external Cs[sup +] source to resonantly eject all ions whose resonance frequencies fall within the frequency range of the pulse while injecting only those analyte ions whose resonance frequencies fall within the limits of the notch. This allows selective injection and accumulation of the ions of interest and continuous ejection of the unwanted ions. This is shown to result in significant improvement in S/N ratio, resolution, and sensitivity for the analyte ions of interest. Selective ion injection is demonstrated by injecting the protonated molecules of peptides VSV and gramicidin S and the intact cation of l-carnitine hydrochloride, using singly notched SWIFT pulses. Multiply notched SWIFT pulses are used to simultaneously inject ions of different m/z values of l-carnitine hydrochloride into the ion trap. A new coarse/fine ion isolation procedure, which employs a doubly notched SWIFT pulse, is demonstrated for isolating ions of a single m/z value of 4-bromobiphenyl from a population of trapped ions. 36 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. RADIO AND DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISTURBED COOL CORE CLUSTER ABELL 133

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, S. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Owers, M. S.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2010-10-10

    We present results based on new Chandra and multi-frequency radio observations of the disturbed cool core cluster Abell 133. The diffuse gas has a complex bird-like morphology, with a plume of emission extending from two symmetric wing-like features. The plume is capped with a filamentary radio structure that has been previously classified as a radio relic. X-ray spectral fits in the region of the relic indicate the presence of either high-temperature gas or non-thermal emission, although the measured photon index is flatter than would be expected if the non-thermal emission is from inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background by the radio-emitting particles. We find evidence for a weak elliptical X-ray surface brightness edge surrounding the core, which we show is consistent with a sloshing cold front. The plume is consistent with having formed due to uplift by a buoyantly rising radio bubble, now seen as the radio relic, and has properties consistent with buoyantly lifted plumes seen in other systems (e.g., M87). Alternatively, the plume may be a gas sloshing spiral viewed edge-on. Results from spectral analysis of the wing-like features are inconsistent with the previous suggestion that the wings formed due to the passage of a weak shock through the cool core. We instead conclude that the wings are due to X-ray cavities formed by displacement of X-ray gas by the radio relic. The central cD galaxy contains two small-scale cold gas clumps that are slightly offset from their optical and UV counterparts, suggestive of a galaxy-galaxy merger event. On larger scales, there is evidence for cluster substructure in both optical observations and the X-ray temperature map. We suggest that the Abell 133 cluster has recently undergone a merger event with an interloping subgroup, initialing gas sloshing in the core. The torus of sloshed gas is seen close to edge-on, leading to the somewhat ragged appearance of the elliptical surface brightness edge. We show

  8. Stellar populations of BCGs, close companions and intracluster light in Abell 85, Abell 2457 and IIZw108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. O. V.; Alpert, H. S.; Trierweiler, I. L.; Abraham, T.; Beizer, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first results from an integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey of a ˜75 kpc region around three brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), combining over 100 IFU fibres to study the intracluster light (ICL). We fit population synthesis models to estimate age and metallicity. For Abell 85 and Abell 2457, the ICL is best-fit with a fraction of old, metal-rich stars like in the BCG, but requires 30-50 per cent young and metal-poor stars, a component not found in the BCGs. This is consistent with the ICL having been formed by a combination of interactions with less massive, younger, more metal-poor cluster members in addition to stars that form the BCG. We find that the three galaxies are in different stages of evolution and may be the result of different formation mechanisms. The BCG in Abell 85 is near a relatively young, metal-poor galaxy, but the dynamical friction time-scale is long and the two are unlikely to be undergoing a merger. The outer regions of Abell 2457 show a higher relative fraction of metal-poor stars, and we find one companion, with a higher fraction of young, metal-poor stars than the BCG, which is likely to merge within a gigayear. Several luminous red galaxies are found at the centre of the cluster IIZw108, with short merger time-scales, suggesting that the system is about to embark on a series of major mergers to build up a dominant BCG. The young, metal-poor component found in the ICL is not found in the merging galaxies.

  9. Stellar Populations of BCGs, Close Companions and Intracluster Light in Abell 85, Abell 2457 and IIZw108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. O. V.; Alpert, H. S.; Trierweiler, I. L.; Abraham, T.; Beizer, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first results from an integral field (IFU) spectroscopic survey of a ˜75 kpc region around three Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs), combining over 100 IFU fibres to study the intracluster light (ICL). We fit population synthesis models to estimate age and metallicity. For Abell 85 and Abell 2457, the ICL is best-fit with a fraction of old, metal-rich stars like in the BCG, but requires 30-50% young and metal-poor stars, a component not found in the BCGs. This is consistent with the ICL having been formed by a combination of interactions with less massive, younger, more metal-poor cluster members in addition to stars that form the BCG. We find that the three galaxies are in different stages of evolution and may be the result of different formation mechanisms. The BCG in Abell 85 is near a relatively young, metal-poor galaxy, but the dynamical friction timescale is long and the two are unlikely to be undergoing a merger. The outer regions of Abell 2457 show a higher relative fraction of metal-poor stars, and we find one companion, with a higher fraction of young, metal-poor stars than the BCG, which is likely to merge within a gigayear. Several luminous red galaxies are found at the centre of the cluster IIZw108, with short merger timescales, suggesting the system is about to embark on a series of major mergers to build up a dominant BCG. The young, metal-poor component found in the ICL is not found in the merging galaxies.

  10. Application of Abel-Plana Formula for Collapse and Revival of Rabi Oscillations in Jaynes-Cummings Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Hiroo

    In this paper, we give an analytical treatment to study the behavior of the collapse and the revival of the Rabi oscillations in the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM). The JCM is an exactly soluble quantum mechanical model, which describes the interaction between a two-level atom and a single cavity mode of the electromagnetic field. If we prepare the atom in the ground state and the cavity mode in a coherent state initially, the JCM causes the collapse and the revival of the Rabi oscillations many times in a complicated pattern in its time-evolution. In this phenomenon, the atomic population inversion is described with an intractable infinite series. (When the electromagnetic field is resonant with the atom, the nth term of this infinite series is given by a trigonometric function for √ {n} t, where t is a variable of the time.) According to Klimov and Chumakov's method, using the Abel-Plana formula, we rewrite this infinite series as a sum of two integrals. We examine the physical meanings of these two integrals and find that the first one represents the initial collapse (the semi-classical limit) and the second one represents the revival (the quantum correction) in the JCM. Furthermore, we evaluate the first- and second-order perturbations for the time-evolution of the JCM with an initial thermal coherent state for the cavity mode at low temperature, and write down their correction terms as sums of integrals by making use of the Abel-Plana formula.

  11. Disentangling Structures in the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 133

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamical analysis of the structure of the cluster of galaxies Abell 133 will be presented using multi-wavelength data combined from multiple space and earth based observations. New and familiar statistical clustering techniques are used in combination in an attempt to gain a fully consistent picture of this interesting nearby cluster of galaxies. The type of analysis presented should be typical of cluster studies in the future, especially those to come from the surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2DF.

  12. Buoyant Bubbles and the Disturbed Cool Core of Abell 133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, T.; Nulsen, P.; Owers, M.; Sarazin, C.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    2010-03-01

    X-ray cavities, often filled with radio-emitting plasma, are routinely observed in the intracluster medium of clusters of galaxies. These cavities, or "bubbles", are evacuated by jets from central AGN and subsequently rise buoyantly, playing a vital role in the "AGN feedback" model now commonly evoked to explain the balance between heating and radiative cooling in cluster cores. As the bubbles rise, they can displace cool central gas, promoting mixing and the redistribution of metals. I will show a few examples of buoyant bubbles, then argue that the peculiar morphology of the Abell 133 is due to buoyant lifting of cool central gas by a radio-filled bubble.

  13. The discovery of diffuse steep spectrum sources in Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Intema, H. T.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Clarke, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Hierarchical galaxy formation models indicate that during their lifetime galaxy clusters undergo several mergers. An example of such a merging cluster is Abell 2256. Here we report on the discovery of three diffuse radio sources in the periphery of Abell 2256, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Aims: The aim of the observations was to search for diffuse ultra-steep spectrum radio sources within the galaxy cluster Abell 2256. Methods: We have carried out GMRT 325 MHz radio continuum observations of Abell 2256. V, R and I band images of the cluster were taken with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). Results: We have discovered three diffuse elongated radio sources located about 1 Mpc from the cluster center. Two are located to the west of the cluster center, and one to the southeast. The sources have a measured physical extent of 170, 140 and 240 kpc, respectively. The two western sources are also visible in deep low-resolution 115-165 MHz Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) images, although they are blended into a single source. For the combined emission of the blended source we find an extreme spectral index (α) of -2.05 ± 0.14 between 140 and 351 MHz. The extremely steep spectral index suggests these two sources are most likely the result of adiabatic compression of fossil radio plasma due to merger shocks. For the source to the southeast, we find that {α < -1.45} between 1369 and 325 MHz. We did not find any clear optical counterparts to the radio sources in the WHT images. Conclusions: The discovery of the steep spectrum sources implies the existence of a population of faint diffuse radio sources in (merging) clusters with such steep spectra that they have gone unnoticed in higher frequency (⪆1 GHz) observations. Simply considering the timescales related to the AGN activity, synchrotron losses, and the presence of shocks, we find that most massive clusters should possess similar sources. An exciting possibility

  14. A Unified Method of Finding Laplace Transforms, Fourier Transforms, and Fourier Series. [and] An Inversion Method for Laplace Transforms, Fourier Transforms, and Fourier Series. Integral Transforms and Series Expansions. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Units 324 and 325.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, C. A.

    This document contains two units that examine integral transforms and series expansions. In the first module, the user is expected to learn how to use the unified method presented to obtain Laplace transforms, Fourier transforms, complex Fourier series, real Fourier series, and half-range sine series for given piecewise continuous functions. In…

  15. An alternative Shell inversion technique - Analysis and validation based on COSMIC and ionosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Wu, Yun; Qiao, Xuejun; Zhou, Yiyan

    2012-01-01

    Multi-channel Global Positioning System (GPS) carrier phase signals, received by the six low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) program, were used to undertake active limb sounding of the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere via radio occultation. In the ionospheric radio occultation (IRO) data processing, the standard Shell inversion technique (SIT), transformed from the traditional Abel inversion technique (AIT), is widely used, and can retrieve good electron density profiles. In this paper, an alternative SIT method is proposed. The comparison between different inversion techniques will be discussed, taking advantage of the availability of COSMIC datasets. Moreover, the occultation results obtained from the SIT and alternative SIT at 500 km and 800 km, are compared with ionosonde measurements. The electron densities from the alternative SIT show excellent consistency to those from the SIT, with strong correlations over 0.996 and 0.999 at altitudes of 500 km and 800 km, respectively, and the peak electron densities (NmF2) from the alternative SIT are equivalent to the SIT, with 0.839 vs. 0.844, and 0.907 vs. 0.909 correlation coefficients when comparing to those by the ionosondes. These results show that: (1) the NmF2 and hmF2 retrieved from the SIT and alternative SIT are highly consistent, and in a good agreement with those measured by ionosondes, (2) no matter which inversion technique is used, the occultation results at the higher orbits (˜800 km) are better than those at the lower orbits (˜500 km).

  16. Exact travelling wave solutions of non-linear reaction-convection-diffusion equations—An Abel equation based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, T.; Mak, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    We consider quasi-stationary (travelling wave type) solutions to a general nonlinear reaction-convection-diffusion equation with arbitrary, autonomous coefficients. The second order nonlinear equation describing one dimensional travelling waves can be reduced to a first kind first order Abel equation. By using two integrability conditions for the Abel equation (the Chiellini lemma and the Lemke transformation), several classes of exact travelling wave solutions of the general reaction-convection-diffusion equation are obtained, corresponding to different functional relations imposed between the diffusion, convection and reaction functions. In particular, we obtain travelling wave solutions for two non-linear second order partial differential equations, representing generalizations of the standard diffusion equation and of the classical Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, to which they reduce for some limiting values of the model parameters. The models correspond to some specific, power law type choices of the reaction and convection functions, respectively. The travelling wave solutions of these two classes of differential equation are investigated in detail by using both numerical and semi-analytical methods.

  17. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Métayer, Olivier; Saurel, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOS named "Noble Abel stiffened gas," this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular "Stiffened Gas (SG)" EOS. It is a combination of the so-called "Noble-Abel" and "stiffened gas" equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.

  18. Hierarchical Velocity Structure in the Core of Abell 2597

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, Martin; Mushotzky, Richard

    2004-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton RGS and EPIC data of the putative cooling flow cluster Abell 2597. Velocities of the low-ionization emission lines in the spectrum are blue shifted with respect to the high-ionization lines by 1320 (sup +660) (sub -210) kilometers per second, which is consistent with the difference in the two peaks of the galaxy velocity distribution and may be the signature of bulk turbulence, infall, rotation or damped oscillation in the cluster. A hierarchical velocity structure such as this could be the direct result of galaxy mergers in the cluster core, or the injection of power into the cluster gas from a central engine. The uniform X-ray morphology of the cluster, the absence of fine scale temperature structure and the random distribution of the the galaxy positions, independent of velocity, suggests that our line of sight is close to the direction of motion. These results have strong implications for cooling flow models of the cluster Abell 2597. They give impetus to those models which account for the observed temperature structure of some clusters using mergers instead of cooling flows.

  19. A critical appraisal of asymptotic 3D-to-2D data transformation filters and the potential of complex frequency 2.5-D modeling in seismic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, L.; Greenhalgh, S. A.; Maurer, H. R.; Marelli, S.; Nuber, A.

    2012-04-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is often based on forward modeling in the computationally attractive 2-D domain. Any solution of the 2-D cartesian wave equation inherently carries the implicit assumption of a line source extended in the out-of-plane medium invariant direction. This implies that the source energy in homogeneous media spreads over the surface of an approximately expanding cylinder, such that the wavefield amplitudes (at least in the far field) scale inversely with the square-root of distance. However, realistic point sources like explosives or airguns, fired in a 3-D medium, generate amplitudes that decay inversely with the first power of distance, since the wavefield expands quasi-spherically in all three dimensions. Usually, practitioners correct for this amplitude difference and the associated phase shift of π/4 by transforming the recorded 3-D field data to the approximate 2-D situation by using simplistic, asymptotic filter algorithms. Such filters operate on a square root of time-sample convolutional basis and implicitly assume straight ray paths and a constant velocity medium. The unsubstantiated usage of these asymptotic filters is in contradiction to their well known limitations. In this study, we present an extensive quantitative appraisal of 3D-to-2D data transformation procedures. Our analysis relies on a simple numerical modeling study, based on propagating 3-D and 2-D wavefields through 2-D media and comparing the true 2-D and the filtered 3-D synthetic data. It is shown that the filtering errors are moderate in purely acoustic situations but become substantial in complex media when arrivals overlap each other or ray paths deviate strongly from straight lines. Normalized root-mean-square deviations up to 5% and maximum relative time domain errors of up to 40% were found in high contrast media, when full elastic treatment was considered. In order to examine if this error translates into a deficient model reconstruction in full waveform

  20. Brig. Gen. Richard F. Abel and Col. Natan J. Lindsay answering questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Brigadier General Richard F. Abel, right, director of public affairs for the Air Force, and Colonel Nathan J. Lindsay of the USAF's space division, answer questions concerning STS-4 during a press conference at JSC on May 20, 1982.

  1. Large Scale Diffuse X-ray Emission from Abell 3571

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the Luman alpha forest suggest that there are many more baryons at high redshift than we can find in the Universe nearby. The largest known concentration of baryons in the nearby Universe is the Shapley supercluster. We scanned the Shapley supercluster to search for large scale diffuse emission with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and found some evidence for such emission. Large scale diffuse emission may be associated to the supercluster, or the clusters of galaxies within the supercluster. In this paper we present results of scans near Abell 3571. We found that the sum of a cooling flow and an isothermal beta model adequately describes the X-ray emission from the cluster. Our results suggest that diffuse emission from A3571 extends out to about two virial radii. We briefly discuss the importance of the determination of the cut off radius of the beta model.

  2. The cD galaxy in Abell cluster 1775

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. J. E.; Bhattacharya, B.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, a number of workers have studied the multiple nuclei cD galaxy in the rich Abell cluster 1775, trying to discover its nature. In all the cases though, very little has been published concerning its morphology. The majority of arguments about the nature of this object have been based on the relative radial velocities of the 2 components with each other and with the other galaxies in the cluster, or its radio morphology. Very little work has been done on the optical morphology. To rectify that lack of data, the authors have obtained charge coupled device (CCD) images of the cD. The authors find from the CCD data that the cD is unlikely to be a bound object and that there is strong evidence for a collision.

  3. Comparison of four stable numerical methods for Abel's integral equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murio, Diego A.; Mejia, Carlos E.

    1991-01-01

    The 3-D image reconstruction from cone-beam projections in computerized tomography leads naturally, in the case of radial symmetry, to the study of Abel-type integral equations. If the experimental information is obtained from measured data, on a discrete set of points, special methods are needed in order to restore continuity with respect to the data. A new combined Regularized-Adjoint-Conjugate Gradient algorithm, together with two different implementations of the Mollification Method (one based on a data filtering technique and the other on the mollification of the kernal function) and a regularization by truncation method (initially proposed for 2-D ray sample schemes and more recently extended to 3-D cone-beam image reconstruction) are extensively tested and compared for accuracy and numerical stability as functions of the level of noise in the data.

  4. Diffuse Radio Emission in the Galaxy Cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a low frequency (<1.4GHz) study of the diffuse radio halo and relic emission in the galaxy cluster Abell 0754. Images at 150 MHz made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) revealed 4 diffuse features; 3 of which are new. Images at 330 and 1363 MHz were created using archival data from the GMRT and the VLA respectively. These yield synchrotron spectral indices, α (S ∝ν-α), steeper than 2 for the new features. Adiabatic compression of fossil radio galaxy cocoon by shocks can lead to the formation of radio relics (Ensslin & Gopal-Krishna, 2001). In the framework of this model we find that the relic in A754 can be explained as a lurking cocoon of a radio galaxy; no shock compression is required to produce this emission. The implications of this result to the merger scenario in A754 are discussed.

  5. A shock front at the radio relic of Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.; Jauzac, M.; Vazza, F.; Owers, M. S.; Kneib, J.-P.; Tchernin, C.; Intema, H.; Knowles, K.

    2016-09-01

    Radio relics are Mpc-scale diffuse radio sources at the peripheries of galaxy clusters which are thought to trace outgoing merger shocks. We present XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.306), which reveal the presence of a shock front 1.5 Mpc east of the cluster core. The surface-brightness jump coincides with the position of a known radio relic. Although the surface-brightness jump indicates a weak shock with a Mach number M=1.7_{-0.3}^{+0.5}, the plasma in the post-shock region has been heated to a very high temperature (˜13 keV) by the passage of the shock wave. The low-acceleration efficiency expected from such a weak shock suggests that mildly relativistic electrons have been re-accelerated by the passage of the shock front.

  6. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts. PMID:17082451

  7. Single florescent nanodiamond in a three dimensional ABEL trap

    PubMed Central

    Kayci, Metin; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional single particle trapping and manipulation is an outstanding challenge in various fields ranging from basic physics to life sciences. By monitoring the response of a trapped particle to a designed environment one can extract its characteristics. In addition, quantum dynamics of a spatially scanned well-known particle can provide environmental information. Precise tracking and positioning of such a particle in aqueous environment is crucial task for achieving nano-scale resolution. Here we experimentally demonstrate three dimensional ABEL trap operating at high frequency by employing a hybrid approach in particle tracking. The particle location in the transverse plane is detected via a scanning laser beam while the axial position is determined by defocused imaging. The scanning of the trapped particle is accomplished through a nano positioning stage integrated to the trap platform. PMID:26559890

  8. The central star of the planetary nebula Abell 78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaler, J. B.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The ultraviolet spectrum of the nucleus of Abell 78, one of the two planetaries known to contain zones of nearly pure helium, is studied. The line spectrum and wind velocities are examined, the determination of interstellar extinction for assessing circumstellar dust is improved, and the temperature, luminosity, and core mass are derived. The results for A78 are compared with results for A30, and it is concluded that the dust distributions around the two central stars are quite different. The temperature of the A78 core is not as high as previously believed, and almost certainly lies between 67,000 K and 130,000 K. The most likely temperature range is 77,000-84,000 K. The core mass lies between 0.56 and 0.70 solar mass, with the most likely values between 0.56 and 0.58 solar mass.

  9. Properties of the Blue Galaxy Population in Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rix, H.-W.; Caldwell, N.

    2000-12-01

    Do star-forming spirals accreted recently by massive clusters evolve in a few Gyrs. into smooth disk galaxies with little or no current star formation? Hierarchical models of large-scale structure and the observed effect of the cluster environment on galaxy morphologies and star formation rates have given rise to many theories predicting such cluster galaxy evolution. Depending on the star formation truncation mechanism timescale, the more recent cluster arrivals should still have relatively young stellar populations and thus bluer colors (esp. in U-V) than the older, red early-types (E/S0) that define the cluster color-magnitude relation. Yet to date no significant population of bluer S0's has been found in local clusters, though we note previous studies have concentrated on the inner regions (R<0.5Mpc) of nearby clusters, which are expected to be dominated by older members. Therefore, we have obtained wide-field (R>0.6/h Mpc) UVI imaging for 10 local (z<0.06) Abell clusters, with 100's of spectroscopically confirmed members, to search the cluster outskirts for bluer S0's which may be recently accreted spirals. From our detailed photometry, we have measured structural parameters for a sample of over 300 U-band selected, spectroscopically confirmed members, by fitting each galaxy surface brightness profile with a PSF-convolved, de Vaucouleur's bulge plus exponential disk model. We have found a population of blue, disk-dominated galaxies, that are predominately in the outskirts (>0.75/h Mpc projected radius) of our first analyzed cluster, Abell 754 at z=0.053. We present the photometric and structural properties of this blue population.

  10. The distribution of dark and luminous matter in the unique galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lindsay J.; Clowe, Douglas I.; Coleman, Joseph E.; Russell, Helen R.; Santana, Rebecca; White, Jacob A.; Canning, Rebecca E. A.; Deering, Nicole J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Lee, Brandyn E.; Li, Baojiu; McNamara, Brian R.

    2016-06-01

    Abell 2146 (z = 0.232) consists of two galaxy clusters undergoing a major merger. The system was discovered in previous work, where two large shock fronts were detected using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, consistent with a merger close to the plane of the sky, caught soon after first core passage. A weak gravitational lensing analysis of the total gravitating mass in the system, using the distorted shapes of distant galaxies seen with Advanced Camera for Surveys - Wide Field Channel on Hubble Space Telescope, is presented. The highest peak in the reconstruction of the projected mass is centred on the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 2146-A. The mass associated with Abell 2146-B is more extended. Bootstrapped noise mass reconstructions show the mass peak in Abell 2146-A to be consistently centred on the BCG. Previous work showed that BCG-A appears to lag behind an X-ray cool core; although the peak of the mass reconstruction is centred on the BCG, it is also consistent with the X-ray peak given the resolution of the weak lensing mass map. The best-fitting mass model with two components centred on the BCGs yields M200 = 1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.4} × 1015 and 3^{+1}_{-2} × 1014 M⊙ for Abell 2146-A and Abell 2146-B, respectively, assuming a mass concentration parameter of c = 3.5 for each cluster. From the weak lensing analysis, Abell 2146-A is the primary halo component, and the origin of the apparent discrepancy with the X-ray analysis where Abell 2146-B is the primary halo is being assessed using simulations of the merger.

  11. Radon transforms and Gegenbauer-Chebyshev integrals, I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Boris

    2016-04-01

    We suggest new modifications of the Helgason's support theorem and description of the kernel for the hyperplane Radon transform and its dual. The assumptions for functions are formulated in integral terms and close to minimal. The proofs rely on the properties of the Gegenbauer-Chebyshev integrals which generalize Abel type fractional integrals on the positive half-line.

  12. The merging cluster Abell 1758: an optical and dynamical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro-Oliveira, Rogerio; Serra Cypriano, Eduardo; Machado, Rubens; Lima Neto, Gastao B.

    2015-08-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 1758-North (z=0.28) is a binary system composed by the sub-structures NW and NE. This is supposed to be a post-merging cluster due to observed detachment between the NE BCG and the respective X-ray emitting hot gas clump in a scenario very close to the famous Bullet Cluster. On the other hand, the projected position of the NW BCG coincides with the local hot gas peak. This system was been targeted previously by several studies, using multiple wavelengths and techniques, but there is still no clear picture of the scenario that could have caused this unusual configuration. To help solving this complex puzzle we added some pieces: firstly, we have used deep B, RC and z' Subaru images to perform both weak lensing shear and magnification analysis of A1758 (including here the South component that is not in interaction with A1758-North) modeling each sub-clump as an NFW profile in order to constrain masses and its center positions through MCMC methods; the second piece is the dynamical analysis using radial velocities available in the literature (143) plus new Gemini-GMOS/N measurements (68 new redshifts).From weak lensing we found that independent shear and magnification mass determinations are in excellent agreement between them and combining both we could reduce mass error bar by ~30% compared to shear alone. By combining this two weak-lensing probes we found that the position of both Northern BCGs are consistent with the masses centers within 2σ and and the NE hot gas peak to be offseted of the respective mass peak (M200=5.5 X 1014 M⊙) with very high significance. The most massive structure is NW (M200=7.95 X 1014 M⊙ ) where we observed no detachment between gas, DM and BCG.We have calculated a low line-of-sight velocity difference (<300 km/s) between A1758 NW and NE. We have combined it with the projected velocity of 1600 km/s which was estimated by previous X-ray analysis (David & Kempner 2004) and we have obtained a small angle between

  13. Searching for Young S0 Galaxies in Abell 2052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rix, H.-W.; Caldwell, N.

    1999-12-01

    Numerous studies have established strong observational evidence for evolution in cluster member color and morphology. Such evolution is predicted by hierarchical structure formation scenarios where galaxy clusters evolve via accretion of mass from the field. It has been hypothesized that recently accreted large surface brightness spirals will rapidly evolve via some star formation (SF) truncation mechanism into smooth disk galaxies with little or no current SF, but relatively young stellar populations. These younger S0's (hereafter bluer S0's = BS0's) would have bluer colors than the older early-types (E/S0) that define the mean cluster color-magnitude relation (CMR). The existence of such galaxies provides explanations for the disappearance of the blue, star-forming disk galaxies that were common in clusters at z 0.5 (the Butcher-Oemler effect), and the increased fraction of S0's in present-day clusters. To date a significant population of BS0's in nearby clusters has not been found. Therefore, we have obtained wide field (R > 0.6 Mpc), high precision UVI photometry for a sample of 14 local (z < 0.06) Abell clusters, most with over <100 spectroscopically confirmed members. We present photometric results for our first completely reduced cluster, Abell 2052. We have selected candidate BS0's as those early-type members that deviate blueward from the CMR by more than the intrinsic CMR scatter. We used 2-D bulge/disk (B/D) decomposition as an indicator of morphology to refine our sample. This spring, we will obtain spectroscopy of this sample to confirm the relative youth of the stellar populations. In addition, we will use the B/D decompositions of these candidate BS0's to address the following questions: (1) do BS0's make up a significant fraction of the early-type members that deviated from the cluster mean CMR; (2) do BS0's avoid the inner cluster; (3) are BS0's bluer in their disks or bulges; (4) do BS0's exhibit a range of B/D ratios similar to that found in

  14. A Jacobi-Legendre polynomial-based method for the stable solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammari, Amara; Karoui, Abderrazek

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we build a stable scheme for the solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type. This scheme is obtained by further developing the orthogonal polynomial-based techniques for solving the Abel integral equation of Ammari and Karoui (2010 Inverse Problems 26 105005). More precisely, this method is based on the simultaneous use of the two families of orthogonal polynomials of the Legendre and Jacobi types. In particular, we provide an explicit formula for the computation of the Legendre expansion coefficients of the solution. This explicit formula is based on some known formulae for the exact computation of the integrals of the product of some Jacobi polynomials with the derivatives of the Legendre polynomials. Besides the explicit and the exact computation of the expansion coefficients of the solution, our proposed method has the advantage of ensuring the stability of the solution under a fairly weak condition on the functional space to which the data function belongs. Finally, we provide the reader with some numerical examples that illustrate the results of this work.

  15. Assessment of the chemical changes during storage of phenol-formaldehyde resins pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry, inverse gas chromatography and Fourier transform infra red methods.

    PubMed

    Strzemiecka, B; Voelkel, A; Zięba-Palus, J; Lachowicz, T

    2014-09-12

    The chemical changes occurring in the phenol-formaldehyde resins (resol and novolac type) during their storage were investigated. In this paper the FT-IR, py-GCMS and inverse gas chromatography methods were applied for assessment of the changes occurring during storage of the phenolic resins. We have found that during storage some examined resins occurred partial curing. The results from all techniques applied are consistent. Py-GCMS is useful technique for screening the storage processes but IGC seems to be most sensitive one. PMID:25092596

  16. An ionospheric occultation inversion technique based on epoch difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Xiong, Jing; Zhu, Fuying; Yang, Jian; Qiao, Xuejun

    2013-09-01

    Of the ionospheric radio occultation (IRO) electron density profile (EDP) retrievals, the Abel based calibrated TEC inversion (CTI) is the most widely used technique. In order to eliminate the contribution from the altitude above the RO satellite, it is necessary to utilize the calibrated TEC to retrieve the EDP, which introduces the error due to the coplanar assumption. In this paper, a new technique based on the epoch difference inversion (EDI) is firstly proposed to eliminate this error. The comparisons between CTI and EDI have been done, taking advantage of the simulated and real COSMIC data. The following conclusions can be drawn: the EDI technique can successfully retrieve the EDPs without non-occultation side measurements and shows better performance than the CTI method, especially for lower orbit mission; no matter which technique is used, the inversion results at the higher altitudes are better than those at the lower altitudes, which could be explained theoretically.

  17. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Cooray, Asantha R.; Holzappel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect toward the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas distribution to be strongly aspherical, as do the X-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction in two ways. We first compare the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deprojecting the three-dimensional gas density distribution and deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods and find that they agree within the errors of the measurement. We discuss the possible system- atic errors in the gas mass fraction measurement and the constraints it places on the matter density parameter, Omega(sub M).

  18. A shock at the radio relic position in Abell 115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botteon, A.; Gastaldello, F.; Brunetti, G.; Dallacasa, D.

    2016-07-01

    We analysed a deep Chandra observation (334 ks) of the galaxy cluster Abell 115 and detected a shock cospatial with the radio relic. The X-ray surface brightness profile across the shock region presents a discontinuity, corresponding to a density compression factor {C}=2.0± 0.1, leading to a Mach number {M}=1.7± 0.1 ({M}=1.4-2 including systematics). Temperatures measured in the upstream and downstream regions are consistent with what expected for such a shock: T_u=4.3^{+1.0}_{-0.6}{keV} and T_d=7.9^{+1.4}_{-1.1}{keV}, respectively, implying a Mach number {M}=1.8^{+0.5}_{-0.4}. So far, only few other shocks discovered in galaxy clusters are consistently detected from both density and temperature jumps. The spatial coincidence between this discontinuity and the radio relic edge strongly supports the view that shocks play a crucial role in powering these synchrotron sources. We suggest that the relic is originated by shock re-acceleration of relativistic electrons rather than acceleration from the thermal pool. The position and curvature of the shock and the associated relic are consistent with an off-axis merger with unequal mass ratio where the shock is expected to bend around the core of the less massive cluster.

  19. ABELL 1201: A MINOR MERGER AT SECOND CORE PASSAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Chengjiun; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Owers, Matt; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-06-20

    We present an analysis of the structures and dynamics of the merging cluster Abell 1201, which has two sloshing cold fronts around a cooling core, and an offset gas core approximately 500 kpc northwest of the center. New Chandra and XMM-Newton data reveal a region of enhanced brightness east of the offset core, with breaks in surface brightness along its boundary to the north and east. This is interpreted as a tail of gas stripped from the offset core. Gas in the offset core and the tail is distinguished from other gas at the same distance from the cluster center chiefly by having higher density, hence lower entropy. In addition, the offset core shows marginally lower temperature and metallicity than the surrounding area. The metallicity in the cool core is high and there is an abrupt drop in metallicity across the southern cold front. We interpret the observed properties of the system, including the placement of the cold fronts, the offset core, and its tail in terms of a simple merger scenario. The offset core is the remnant of a merging subcluster, which first passed pericenter southeast of the center of the primary cluster and is now close to its second pericenter passage, moving at {approx_equal} 1000 km s{sup -1}. Sloshing excited by the merger gave rise to the two cold fronts and the disposition of the cold fronts reveals that we view the merger from close to the plane of the orbit of the offset core.

  20. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Spectrum of Abell 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaRoque, S. J.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Reese, E. D.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Joy, M.; Grego, L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present an interferometric measurement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) at 1 cm for the galaxy cluster Abell 2163. We combine this data point with previous measurements at 1.1, 1.4, and 2.1 mm from the SuZIE experiment to construct the most complete SZE spectrum to date. The intensity in four wavelength bands is fit to determine the Compton y-parameter (y(sub 0)) and the peculiar velocity (v(sub p)) for this cluster. Our results are y(sub 0) = 3.56((sup +0.41+0.27)(sub -0.41-0.19)) X 10(exp -4) and v(sub p) = 410((sup +1030+460) (sub -850-440)) km s(exp -1) where we list statistical and systematic uncertainties, respectively, at 68% confidence. These results include corrections for contamination by Galactic dust emission. We find less contamination by dust emission than previously reported. The dust emission is distributed over much larger angular scales than the cluster signal and contributes little to the measured signal when the details of the SZE observing strategy are taken into account.

  1. Dynamical analysis of galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.; Canning, R. E. A.; King, L. J.; Lee, B. E.; Russell, H. R.; Baum, S. A.; Clowe, D. I.; Coleman, J. E.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; McNamara, B. R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Sanders, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the merging galaxy cluster system Abell 2146 using spectroscopy obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini North telescope. As revealed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the system is undergoing a major merger and has a gas structure indicative of a recent first core passage. The system presents two large shock fronts, making it unique amongst these rare systems. The hot gas structure indicates that the merger axis must be close to the plane of the sky and that the two merging clusters are relatively close in mass, from the observation of two shock fronts. Using 63 spectroscopically determined cluster members, we apply various statistical tests to establish the presence of two distinct massive structures. With the caveat that the system has recently undergone a major merger, the virial mass estimate is M_vir= 8.5^{+4.3}_{-4.7} × 10^{14} M_{⊙} for the whole system, consistent with the mass determination in a previous study using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal. The newly calculated redshift for the system is z = 0.2323. A two-body dynamical model gives an angle of 13°-19° between the merger axis and the plane of the sky, and a time-scale after first core passage of ≈0.24-0.28 Gyr.

  2. An optical analysis of the merging cluster Abell 3888

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakouri, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Dehghan, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present new AAOmega spectroscopy of 254 galaxies within a 30 arcmin radius around Abell 3888. We combine these data with the existing redshifts measured in a one degree radius around the cluster and performed a substructure analysis. We confirm 71 member galaxies within the core of A3888 and determine a new average redshift and velocity dispersion for the cluster of 0.1535 ± 0.0009 and 1181 ± 197 km s-1, respectively. The cluster is elongated along an East-West axis and we find the core is bimodal along this axis with two subgroups of 26 and 41 members detected. Our results suggest that A3888 is a merging system putting to rest the previous conjecture about the morphological status of the cluster derived from X-ray observations. In addition to the results on A3888 we also present six newly detected galaxy overdensities in the field, three of which we classify as new galaxy clusters.

  3. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootaninia, Zahra

    2015-05-01

    This thesis presents a study of the radio luminosity function and the evolution of galaxies in the Abell 2256 cluster (z=0.058, richness class 2). Using the NED database and VLA deep data with an rms sensitivity of 18 mu Jy.beam--1, we identified 257 optical galaxies as members of A2256, of which 83 are radio galaxies. Since A2256 is undergoing a cluster-cluster merger, it is a good candidate to study the radio activity of galaxies in the cluster. We calculated the Univariate and Bivariate radio luminosity functions for A2256, and compared the results to studies on other clusters. We also used the SDSS parameter fracDev to roughly classify galaxies as spirals and ellipticals, and investigated the distribution and structure of galaxies in the cluster. We found that most of the radio galaxies in A2256 are faint, and are distributed towards the outskirts of the cluster. On the other hand, almost all very bright radio galaxies are ellipticals which are located at the center of the cluster. We also found there is an excess in the number of radio spiral galaxies in A2256 compared to the number of radio ellipticals, counting down to a radio luminosity of log(luminosity)=20.135 W/Hz..

  4. Measuring Galaxy Properties in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2007-10-01

    We develop a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties, as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and we have already obtained spectroscopic redshifts for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. We fit a world coordinate system to the images using the software ``WCStools.'' We use ``SExtractor'' to extract sources from the images. We create software for merging catalogs in such a way as to avoid double counting, to reject cosmic rays, and to combine redundant measurements. The measured properties include magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We investigate the efficacy of our separation of galaxies and stars and find that it begins breaking down around R=19.0. We attempt to separate cluster members from foreground and background galaxies using the color-magnitude relation. In future work, we will investigate substructure (clumping) within clusters and its correlation with galaxy properties (especially color, size and morphology).

  5. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2009-04-01

    We have developed a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and redshifts exist for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. We fitted a world coordinate system to the images using the software ``WCStools,'' then used ``Source Extractor'' to extract sources from the images. We have created software for merging catalogs in such a way as to avoid double counting, to reject cosmic rays, and to combine redundant measurements. The software also corrects magnitude differences by comparing the mean difference and adding this to each individual catalog before merging it to a master catalog. The measured properties included in this study were magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We investigate the efficacy of our separation of galaxies and stars and find that it begins breaking down around R=19.0. We divide our master catalog into several subsamples for substructure analysis. For one subsample, we attempt to separate cluster members from foreground and background galaxies using the color-magnitude relation. We compare the results of substructure diagnostics for the subsamples. In future work, we will examine correlation of substructure with galaxy properties (especially color, size and morphology).

  6. Shedding light on the matter of Abell 781

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, D.; Dawson, William; Benson, Bryant

    2014-02-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 781 West has been viewed as a challenge to weak gravitational lensing mass calibration, as Cook & dell'Antonio found that the weak lensing signal-to-noise ratio in three independent sets of observations was consistently lower than expected from mass models based on X-ray and dynamical measurements. We correct some errors in statistical inference in Cook & dell'Antonio and show that their own results agree well with the dynamical mass and exhibit at most 2.2-2.9σ low compared to the X-ray mass, similar to the tension between the dynamical and X-ray masses. Replacing their simple magnitude cut with weights based on source photometric redshifts eliminates the tension between lensing and X-ray masses; in this case the weak lensing mass estimate is actually higher than, but still in agreement with, the dynamical estimate. A comparison of lensing analyses with and without photometric redshifts shows that a 1-2σ chance alignment of low-redshift sources lowers the signal-to-noise ratio observed by all previous studies which used magnitude cuts rather than photometric redshifts. The fluctuation is unexceptional, but appeared to be highly significant in Cook & dell'Antonio due to the errors in statistical interpretation.

  7. Infrared observations of gravitational lensing in Abell 2219 with CIRSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Meghan E.; Ellis, Richard S.; Refregier, Alexandre; Bézecourt, Jocelyn; McMahon, Richard G.; Beckett, Martin G.; Mackay, Craig D.; Hoenig, Michael D.

    2000-10-01

    We present the first detection of a gravitational depletion signal at near-infrared wavelengths, based on deep panoramic images of the cluster Abell 2219 (z=0.22) taken with the Cambridge Infrared Survey Instrument (CIRSI) at the prime focus of the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. Infrared studies of gravitational depletion offer a number of advantages over similar techniques applied at optical wavelengths, and can provide reliable total masses for intermediate-redshift clusters. Using the maximum-likelihood technique developed by Schneider, King & Erben, we detect the gravitational depletion at the 3σ confidence level. By modelling the mass distribution as a singular isothermal sphere and ignoring the uncertainty in the unlensed number counts, we find an Einstein radius of θE ~= 13.7+3.9-4.2 arcsec (66per cent confidence limit). This corresponds to a projected velocity dispersion of σv~800kms-1, in agreement with constraints from strongly lensed features. For a Navarro, Frenk & White mass model, the radial dependence observed indicates a best-fitting halo scalelength of 125h-1kpc. We investigate the uncertainties arising from the observed fluctuations in the unlensed number counts, and show that clustering is the dominant source of error. We extend the maximum-likelihood method to include the effect of incompleteness, and discuss the prospects of further systematic studies of lensing in the near-infrared band.

  8. Chandra Observations of Point Sources in Abell 2255

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David S.; Miller, Neal A.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    In our search for "hidden" AGN we present results from a Chandra observation of the nearby cluster Abell 2255. Eight cluster galaxies are associated with point-like X-ray emission, and we classify these galaxies based on their X-ray, radio, and optical properties. At least three are associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN) with no optical signatures of nuclear activity, with a further two being potential AGN. Of the potential AGN, one corresponds to a galaxy with a post-starburst optical spectrum. The remaining three X-ray detected cluster galaxies consist of two starbursts and an elliptical with luminous hot gas. Of the eight cluster galaxies five are associated with luminous (massive) galaxies and the remaining three lie in much lower luminosity systems. We note that the use of X-ray to optical flux ratios for classification of X-ray sources is often misleading, and strengthen the claim that the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting an AGN based on optical data is significantly lower than the fraction based on X-ray and radio data.

  9. U(1)-invariant membranes: The geometric formulation, Abel, and pendulum differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltukhin, A. A.; Trzetrzelewski, M.

    2010-06-15

    The geometric approach to study the dynamics of U(1)-invariant membranes is developed. The approach reveals an important role of the Abel nonlinear differential equation of the first type with variable coefficients depending on time and one of the membrane extendedness parameters. The general solution of the Abel equation is constructed. Exact solutions of the whole system of membrane equations in the D=5 Minkowski space-time are found and classified. It is shown that if the radial component of the membrane world vector is only time dependent, then the dynamics is described by the pendulum equation.

  10. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Holzapfel, William L.; Cooray, Asantha K.

    1999-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect towards the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas is strongly aspherical, on agreement with the morphology revealed by x-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction by comparing the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods. The Hubble constant derived for this cluster, when the known systematic uncertainties are included, has a very wide range of values and therefore does not provide additional constraints on the validity of the assumptions. We examine carefully the possible systematic errors in the gas fraction measurement. The gas fraction is a lower limit to the cluster's baryon fraction and so we compare the gas mass fraction, calibrated by numerical simulations to approximately the virial radius, to measurements of the global mass fraction of baryonic matter, OMEGA(sub B)/OMEGA(sub matter). Our lower limit to the cluster baryon fraction is f(sub B) = (0.043 +/- 0.014)/h (sub 100). From this, we derive an upper limit to the universal matter density, OMEGA(sub matter) <= 0.72/h(sub 100), and a likely value of OMEGA(sub matter) <= (0.44(sup 0.15, sub -0.12)/h(sub 100).

  11. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2008-10-01

    We continue development of a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties, as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and we have already obtained spectroscopic redshifts for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. For each CCD frame we fit a WCS (world coordinate system), remove bright cosmic rays, and extract sources using ``SExtractor.'' We create software for merging source catalogs in such a way as to reject residual cosmic rays and other invalid sources, and to combine redundant measurements without double counting. The measured properties include magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We compare our data to those of the HST (Hubble Space Telescope) and SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) archives to examine the accuracy of our star/galaxy separation and our color measurements. For our substructure investigation, we draw several subsamples of galaxies based on stellarity index, color (the color-magnitude relation), magnitude and velocity. The smallest subsample of spectroscopically confirmed members produces significant substructure signals from 1D (velocity) and 3D (x,y,velocity) diagnostics - a small, offset group may be the culprit. The 2D (x,y) diagnostics applied to the larger samples produce some significant statistics, the cause does not seem to be a large-scale merger, but perhaps several small groups. This is consistent with previous X-ray data showing X-ray emitting gas clumped around small groupings of galaxies.

  12. Advances in the Natural transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgacem, F. B. M.; Silambarasan, R.

    2012-11-01

    The literature review of the Natural transform and the existing definitions and connections to the Laplace and Sumudu transforms are discussed in this communication. Along with the complex inverse Natural transform and Heaviside's expansion formula, the relation of Bessel's function to Natural transform (and hence Laplace and Sumudu transforms) are defined.

  13. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Deep spectroscopy of Abell 85 (Agulli+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sanchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Palmero, L. D.; Yu, H.

    2016-07-01

    File a85_memb.dat contains 5 columns with the sky coordinates (RA;DE), the r and g band magnitudes and the recessional velocities for each 460 confirmed members of Abell 85 cluster. Details on the data set can be found in the paper. (1 data file).

  15. Abell 58 - a Planetary Nebula with an ONe-rich knot: a signature of binary interaction? .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, H. H. B.; De Marco, O.; Liu, X.-W.

    We have investigated the possibility that binary evolution is involved in the formation of the planetary nebula Abell 58. In particular, we assume a neon nova is responsible for the observed high oxygen and neon abundances of the central hydrogen-deficient knot of the H-deficient planetary nebula Abell 58 and the ejecta from the explosion are mixed with the planetary nebula. We have investigated different scenarios involving mergers and wind accretion and found that the most promising formation scenario involves a primary SAGB star that ends its evolution as an ONe white dwarf with an AGB companion at a moderately close separation. Mass is deposited on the white dwarf through wind accretion. So neon novae could occur just after the secondary AGB companion undergoes its final flash. However, the initial separation has to be fine-tuned. To estimate the frequency of such systems we evolve a population of binary systems and find that that Abell 58-like objects should indeed be rare and the fraction of Abell-58 planetary nebula is on the order of 10-4, or lower, among all planetary nebulae.

  16. Dark matter distribution in the merging cluster Abell 2163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucail, G.

    2012-04-01

    Context. The cluster Abell 2163 is a merging system of several subclusters with complex dynamics. It presents exceptional X-rays properties (high temperature and luminosity), suggesting that it is a very massive cluster. Recent 2D analysis of the gas distribution has revealed a complex and multiphase structure. Aims: This paper presents a wide-field weak lensing study of the dark matter distribution in the cluster in order to provide an alternative vision of the merging status of the cluster. The 2D mass distribution was built and compared to the galaxies and gas distributions. Methods: A Bayesian method, implemented in the Im2shape software, was used to fit the shape parameters of the faint background galaxies and to correct for PSF smearing. A careful color selection on the background galaxies was applied to retrieve the weak lensing signal. Shear signal was measured out to more than 2 Mpc (≃12' from the center). The radial shear profile was fit with different parametric mass profiles. The 2D mass map was built from the shear distribution and used to identify the different mass components. Results: The 2D mass map agrees with the galaxy distribution, while the total mass inferred from weak lensing shows a strong discrepancy to the X-ray deduced mass. Regardless of the method used, the virial mass M200 falls in the range 8 to 14 × 1014 h70-1 M⊙, a value that is two times less than the mass deduced from X-rays. The central mass clump appears bimodal in the dark matter distribution, with a mass ratio ~3:1 between the two components. The infalling clump A2163-B is detected in weak lensing as an independent entity. All these results are interpreted in the context of a multiple merger seen less than 1 Gyr after the main crossover. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of

  17. MUSE observations of the lensing cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, D.; Pelló, R.; Richard, J.; Lewis, J.; Patrício, V.; Cantalupo, S.; Herenz, E. C.; Soto, K.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Bacon, R.; Vernet, J. D. R.; Wisotzki, L.; Clément, B.; Cuby, J. G.; Lagattuta, D. J.; Soucail, G.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-05-01

    Context. This paper presents the results obtained with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) for the core of the lensing cluster Abell 1689, as part of MUSE's commissioning at the ESO Very Large Telescope. Aims: Integral-field observations with MUSE provide a unique view of the central 1 × 1 arcmin2 region at intermediate spectral resolution in the visible domain, allowing us to conduct a complete census of both cluster galaxies and lensed background sources. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of all sources found in the MUSE data cube. Two hundred and eighty-two objects were systematically extracted from the cube based on a guided-and-manual approach. We also tested three different tools for the automated detection and extraction of line emitters. Cluster galaxies and lensed sources were identified based on their spectral features. We investigated the multiple-image configuration for all known sources in the field. Results: Previous to our survey, 28 different lensed galaxies displaying 46 multiple images were known in the MUSE field of view, most of them were detected through photometric redshifts and lensing considerations. Of these, we spectroscopically confirm 12 images based on their emission lines, corresponding to 7 different lensed galaxies between z = 0.95 and 5.0. In addition, 14 new galaxies have been spectroscopically identified in this area thanks to MUSE data, with redshifts ranging between 0.8 and 6.2. All background sources detected within the MUSE field of view correspond to multiple-imaged systems lensed by A1689. Seventeen sources in total are found at z ≥ 3 based on their Lyman-α emission, with Lyman-α luminosities ranging between 40.5 ≲ log (Lyα) ≲ 42.5 after correction for magnification. This sample is particularly sensitive to the slope of the luminosity function toward the faintest end. The density of sources obtained in this survey is consistent with a steep value of α ≤ -1.5, although this result still

  18. A weak-lensing analysis of the Abell 383 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Radovich, M.; Grado, A.; Puddu, E.; Romano, A.; Limatola, L.; Fu, L.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We use deep CFHT and SUBARU uBVRIz archival images of the Abell 383 cluster (z = 0.187) to estimate its mass by weak-lensing. Methods: To this end, we first use simulated images to check the accuracy provided by our Kaiser-Squires-Broadhurst (KSB) pipeline. These simulations include shear testing programme (STEP) 1 and 2 simulations, as well as more realistic simulations of the distortion of galaxy shapes by a cluster with a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. From these simulations we estimate the effect of noise on shear measurement and derive the correction terms. The R-band image is used to derive the mass by fitting the observed tangential shear profile with an NFW mass profile. Photometric redshifts are computed from the uBVRIz catalogs. Different methods for the foreground/background galaxy selection are implemented, namely selection by magnitude, color, and photometric redshifts, and the results are compared. In particular, we developed a semi-automatic algorithm to select the foreground galaxies in the color-color diagram, based on the observed colors. Results: Using color selection or photometric redshifts improves the correction of dilution from foreground galaxies: this leads to higher signals in the inner parts of the cluster. We obtain a cluster mass Mvir = 7.5+2.7_{-1.9 × 1014} M⊙: this value is 20% higher than previous estimates and is more consistent the mass expected from X-ray data. The R-band luminosity function of the cluster is computed and gives a total luminosity Ltot = (2.14 ± 0.5) × 1012 L⊙ and a mass-to-luminosity ratio M/L 300 M⊙/L⊙. Based on: data collected with the Subaru Telescope (University of Tokyo) and obtained from the SMOKA, which is operated by the Astronomy Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada

  19. Crazy heart: kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, R.; Richtler, T.; West, M. J.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Lloyd-Davies, E.; Schuberth, Y.

    2011-04-01

    We study the structure and internal kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545 - a low surface brightness structure lying in the center of the cluster. We have obtained deep long-slit spectroscopy of the star pile using VLT/FORS2 and Gemini/GMOS, which is analyzed in conjunction with deep multiband CFHT/MEGACAM imaging. As presented in a previous study the star pile has a flat luminosity profile and its color is consistent with the outer parts of elliptical galaxies. Its velocity map is irregular, with parts being seemingly associated with an embedded nucleus, and others which have significant velocity offsets to the cluster systemic velocity with no clear kinematical connection to any of the surrounding galaxies. This would make the star pile a dynamically defined stellar intra-cluster component. The complicated pattern in velocity and velocity dispersions casts doubts on the adequacy of using the whole star pile as a dynamical test for the innermost dark matter profile of the cluster. This status is fulfilled only by the nucleus and its nearest surroundings which lie at the center of the cluster velocity distribution. Based on observations taken at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, under programme ID 080.B-0529. Also based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and SECYT (Argentina); and on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National

  20. Inversion of vegetation canopy reflectance models for estimating agronomic variables. II - Use of angle transforms and error analysis as illustrated by Suits' model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, N. S.; Thompson, R. L.; Strebel, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for inverting a vegetation canopy reflectance model described earlier (Goel and Strebel, 1983) is investigated further. The novel concept of an 'angle transform' is introduced. This concept allows the formation of functions of reflectances at different view zenith and azimuth angles, which are either sensitive or insensitive to a certain agronomic parameter. A proper combination of these functions can allow determination of all the important agronomic and spectral parameters from measured canopy reflectance data. The technique is demonstrated using Suits' (1972) model for homogeneous canopies. It is shown that leaf area index, leaf reflectance and transmittance, and average leaf angle all can be determined from the canopy reflectance at a set of selected view zenith and azimuth angles. A sensitivity analysis of the calculated values to the errors in the data is also carried out. Guidelines are formulated for the number and types of observations required to obtain the values of a particular canopy variable to within a given degree of accuracy for a given level of error in the measurement of canopy reflectance.

  1. Inverse Floatation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Anish; Chatterjee, Souvick; Ganguly, Ranjan; Sen, Swarnendu; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    We have observed that capillarity forces may cause floatation in a few non-intuitive configurations. These may be divided into 2 categories: i) floatation of heavier liquid droplets on lighter immiscible ones and ii) fully submerged floatation of lighter liquid droplets in a heavier immiscible medium. We call these counter-intuitive because of the inverse floatation configuration. For case (i) we have identified and studied in detail the several factors affecting the shape and maximum volume of the floating drop. We used water and vegetable oil combinations as test fluids and established the relation between Bond Number and maximum volume contained in a floating drop (in the order of μL). For case (ii), we injected vegetable oil drop-wise into a pool of water. The fully submerged configuration of the drop is not stable and a slight perturbation to the system causes the droplet to burst and float in partially submerged condition. Temporal variation of a characteristic length of the droplet is analyzed using MATLAB image processing. The constraint of small Bond Number establishes the assumption of lubrication regime in the thin gap. A brief theoretical formulation also shows the temporal variation of the gap thickness. Jadavpur University, Jagadis Bose Centre of Excellence, Virginia Tech.

  2. The nature of the driving mechanism in the pulsating hybrid PG 1159 star Abell 43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, P.-O.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2005-10-01

    We extend our previous pulsational stability analyses of PG 1159 stars by modeling the hybrid PG 1159 type star Abell 43. We show that the standard κ-mechanism due to the ionization of C and O in the envelope of this H-rich PG 1159 star is perfectly able to drive g-mode pulsations. Thus, contrary to a recent suggestion, there is no need to invoke any new or exotic mechanism to explain the pulsational instabilities observed in this particular star. Our expected instability band for l=1 modes extends in period from ~2604 s to ~5529 s, which is consistent with the available photometric observations of Abell 43. We also suggest that efforts to detect luminosity variations in its sibling NGC 7094 be pursued.

  3. UV Observations of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1795 with the Optical Monitor on XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittaz, J. P. D.; Kaastra, J. S.; Tamura, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, F.; Peterson, J. R.; Ikebe, Y.; Lumb, D. H.; Paerels, F.; Stewart, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of broad band UV observations of the central regions of Abell 1795 observed with the optical monitor on XMM-Newton. As have been found with other UV observations of the central regions of clusters of galaxies, we find evidence for star formation. However, we also find evidence for absorption in the cD galaxy on a more extended scale than has been seen with optical imaging. We also report the first UV observation of part of the filamentary structure seen in H-alpha, X-rays and very deep U band imaging. The part of the filament we see is very blue with UV colours consistent with a very early (O/B) stellar population. This is the first direct evidence of a dominant population of early type stars at the centre of Abell 1795 and implies very recent star formation. The relationship of this emission to emission at other wavebands is discussed.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Halpha measurements in Abell 2465 (Wegner+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, G. A.; Chu, D. S.; Hwang, H. S.

    2015-07-01

    The wavelength of the Hα line at the redshift of Abell 2465 is near 817nm in a clear spectral region between the many telluric emission lines. A custom narrow-band filter for observing Hα was obtained from the Andover Corp. It has a peak transmission at 817.7nm (m817) and a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 8.77nm. The wide filter was a Gunn i (ig) filter with nearly the same central wavelength of 820nm and a FWHM of 185nm, and was manufactured by Custom Scientific. Hα observations of Abell 2465 were obtained 2012 September 19-23 using the 2.4m Hiltner telescope at the MDM Observatory on Kitt Peak. The 'Nellie' CCD was used. (1 data file).

  5. A survey by HEAO 1 of clusters of galaxies. III - The complete Abell catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. W.; Cruddace, R. G.; Wood, K. S.; Ulmer, M. P.; Kowalski, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    A catalog of 128 X-ray emitting clusters, including the Virgo Cluster, is presented. Ninety-one of these are new identifications. The catalog was obtained by searching the HEAO 1 survey observations for coincidences of X-ray sources with Abell clusters. The distribution of these sources in the sky has been examined in search of associations with other Abell clusters, with a null result. The X-ray luminosity has been correlated with cluster richness, but no association with Bautz-Morgan class has been found. The cluster luminosity function has been evaluated, and using this function the contribution of clusters to the diffuse X-ray background radiation has been estimated. It amounts to less than 15% at 2 keV and 3% at 6 keV.

  6. A combined optical/X-ray study of the Galaxy cluster Abell 2256

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabricant, Daniel G.; Kent, Stephen M.; Kurtz, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of Abell 2256 is investigated by combining X-ray observations of the intracluster gas with optical observations of the galaxy distribution and kinematics. Magnitudes and positions are presented for 172 galaxies and new redshifts for 75. Abell 2256 is similar to the Coma Cluster in its X-ray luminosity, mass, and galaxy density. Both the X-ray surface brightness and the galaxy surface density distributions exhibit an elliptical morphology. The radial galaxy distribution is steeper than the density profile of the X-ray-emitting gas, yet the galaxy velocity dispersion is higher than the equivalent value for the gas. Under the simplest assumptions that the galaxy velocity distribution is isotropic and the gas is isothermal, the galaxies and gas cannot be in hydrostatic equilibrium in a common gravitational potential. Models consistent with available data have mass-to-light ratios which increase with radius and galaxy orbits that are anisotropic with a radial bias.

  7. An X-ray temperature map of Abell 754: A major merger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. Patrick; Briel, Ulrich G.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first two-dimensional X-ray temperature map of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 754. We also present an X-ray surface brightness map with improved spatial resolution and sensitivity compared with previous maps. Both the temperature map and the surface brightness map show that A754 is in the throes of a violent merger; it is probably far from hydrostatic equilibrium.

  8. Statistical analysis of catalogs of extragalactic objects. II - The Abell catalog of rich clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, M. G.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a power-spectrum analysis are presented for the distribution of clusters in the Abell catalog. Clear and direct evidence is found for superclusters with small angular scale, in agreement with the recent study of Bogart and Wagoner (1973). It is also found that the degree and angular scale of the apparent superclustering varies with distance in the manner expected if the clustering is intrinsic to the spatial distribution rather than a consequence of patchy local obscuration.

  9. RELICS Discovery of a Probable Lens-magnified SN behind Galaxy Cluster Abell 1763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, S.; Coe, D.; Bradley, L.; Strolger, L.; Brammer, G.; Avila, R.; Ryan, R.; Ogaz, S.; Riess, A.; Sharon, K.; Johnson, T.; Paterno-Mahler, R.; Molino, A.; Graham, M.; Kelly, P.; Filippenko, A.; Frye, B.; Foley, R.; Schmidt, K.; Umetsu, K.; Czakon, N.; Weiner, B.; Stark, D.; Mainali, R.; Zitrin, A.; Sendra, I.; Graur, O.; Grillo, C.; Hjorth, J.; Selsing, J.; Christensen, L.; Rosati, P.; Nonino, M.; Balestra, I.; Vulcani, B.; McCully, C.; Dawson, W.; Bouwens, R.; Lam, D.; Trenti, M.; Nunez, D. Carrasco; Matheson, T.; Merten, J.; Jha, S.; Jones, C.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Salmon, B.; Bradac, M.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.; Wang, X.; Oesch, P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of a likely supernova (SN) in the background field of the galaxy cluster Abell 1763 (a.k.a. RXC J1335.3+4059, ZwCl 1333.7+4117). The SN candidate was detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations collected on June 17, 2016 as part of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS, HST program ID: 14096, PI: D.Coe).

  10. The Extraordinary Amount of Substructure in the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauzac, M.; Eckert, D.; Schwinn, J.; Harvey, D.; Baugh, C. M.; Robertson, A.; Bose, S.; Massey, R.; Owers, M.; Ebeling, H.; Shan, H. Y.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Richard, J.; Atek, H.; Clément, B.; Egami, E.; Israel, H.; Knowles, K.; Limousin, M.; Natarajan, P.; Rexroth, M.; Taylor, P.; Tchernin, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a joint optical/X-ray analysis of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z=0.308). Our strong- and weak-lensing analysis within the central region of the cluster, i.e., at R < 1 Mpc from the brightest cluster galaxy, reveals eight substructures, including the main core. All of these dark-matter halos are detected with a significance of at least 5σ and feature masses ranging from 0.5 to 1.4× 1014M⊙ within R < 150 kpc. Merten et al. (2011) and Medezinski et al. (2016) substructures are also detected by us. We measure a slightly higher mass for the main core component than reported previously and attribute the discrepancy to the inclusion of our tightly constrained strong-lensing mass model built on Hubble Frontier Fields data. X-ray data obtained by XMM-Newton reveal four remnant cores, one of them a new detection, and three shocks. Unlike Merten et al. (2011), we find all cores to have both dark and luminous counterparts. A comparison with clusters of similar mass in the MXXL simulations yields no objects with as many massive substructures as observed in Abell 2744, confirming that Abell 2744 is an extreme system. We stress that these properties still do not constitute a challenge to ΛCDM, as caveats apply to both the simulation and the observations: for instance, the projected mass measurements from gravitational lensing and the limited resolution of the sub-haloes finders. We discuss implications of Abell 2744 for the plausibility of different dark-matter candidates and, finally, measure a new upper limit on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter of σDM < 1.28 cm2g-1(68% CL), in good agreement with previous results from Harvey et al. (2015).

  11. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software

    PubMed Central

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the ’omics’ context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  12. The Two-Point Spatial Correlation Function for the MX Northern Abell Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.; Slinglend, K. A.; Batuski, D. J.; Hill, J.

    1997-12-01

    The results from the COBE satellite show the existence of structure in the cosmic microwave background radiation on scales ~ 10% or more of the horizon scale of the Universe. Rich clusters of galaxies from the Abell/ACO catalogs show evidence of structure on scales of 100h(-1) Mpc and hold the promise of confirming structure on the scale of the COBE results. However, previous analyses for large-scale structure based on the clusters in these catalogs suffer from small sample sizes, imcomplete samples, and large uncertainties in the measured data. Our efforts with the MX Cluster Redshift Survey have resulted in galaxy redshifts for 95 rich Abell clusters returning 88 positive cluster identifications. Five cluster fields did not supply enough data for cluster positions and two clusters were found to be simply projections of galaxies strung out along the line of sight. By obtaining an average of 9 member galaxy redshifts per cluster, we have greatly reduced uncertainty in cluster locations. The Abell catalog is now 98% complete out to m10 <= 16.8. This complete sample has provided us with the necessary data to calculate the two-point spatial correlation function, xi (r), characterized by the slope of its power-law fit gamma and a scale length r_o. Preliminary results give gamma = -2.26+/-0.14 and r_o = 21.9+/- 1.5 h(-1) Mpc. These results are then compared with other spatial analyses based on different samples.

  13. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software.

    PubMed

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the 'omics' context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  14. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s‑1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX–TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  15. Deciphering the bipolar planetary nebula Abell 14 with 3D ionization and morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akras, S.; Clyne, N.; Boumis, P.; Monteiro, H.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Redman, M. P.; Williams, S.

    2016-04-01

    Abell 14 is a poorly studied object despite being considered a born-again planetary nebula. We performed a detailed study of its 3D morphology and ionization structure using the SHAPE and MOCASSIN codes. We found that Abell 14 is a highly evolved, bipolar nebula with a kinematical age of ˜19 400 yr for a distance of 4 kpc. The high He abundance, and N/O ratio indicate a progenitor of 5 M⊙ that has experienced the third dredge-up and hot bottom burning phases. The stellar parameters of the central source reveal a star at a highly evolved stage near to the white dwarf cooling track, being inconsistent with the born-again scenario. The nebula shows unexpectedly strong [N I] λ5200 and [O I] λ6300 emission lines indicating possible shock interactions. Abell 14 appears to be a member of a small group of highly evolved, extreme type-I planetary nebulae (PNe). The members of this group lie at the lower-left corner of the PNe regime on the [N II]/Hα versus [S II]/Hα diagnostic diagram, where shock-excited regions/objects are also placed. The low luminosity of their central stars, in conjunction with the large physical size of the nebulae, result in a very low photoionization rate, which can make any contribution of shock interaction easily perceptible, even for small velocities.

  16. ASCA Temperature Maps of Three Clusters of Galaxies: Abell 1060, AWM 7, and the Centaurus Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusho, Tae; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ohashi, Takaya; Shibata, Ryo; Kagei, Tomohiro; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Ezawa, Hajime; Ikebe, Yasushi

    2001-06-01

    We present two-dimensional temperature maps of three bright clusters of galaxies (Abell 1060, AWM 7, and the Centaurus cluster), based on multi-pointing observations with the ASCA GIS. The temperatures were derived from hardness ratios by taking into account the XRT response. For the Centaurus cluster, we subtracted the central cool component using the previous ASCA and ROSAT results, and the metallicity gradients observed in AWM 7 and the Centaurus cluster were included in deriving the temperatures. The intracluster medium in Abell 1060 and AWM 7 is almost isothermal from the center to the outer regions with temperatures of 3.3 and 3.9 keV, respectively. The Centaurus cluster exhibits remarkable hot regions within about 30' from the cluster center, showing a temperature increase of ×0.8 keV from the surrounding level of 3.5keV, and the outer cool regions with lower temperatures by -1.3 keV. These results imply that a strong merger has occurred in the Centaurus in the recent 2-3Gyr, and that the central cool component has survived it. In contrast, the gas in Abell 1060 was well-mixed in an early period, which probably has prevented the development of a central cool component. In AWM 7, mixing of the gas should have occurred in a period earlier than the epoch of metal enrichment.

  17. Probing single biomolecules in solution using the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Goldsmith, Randall H; Jiang, Yan; Bockenhauer, Samuel D; Moerner, W E

    2012-11-20

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements allow researchers to study asynchronous dynamics and expose molecule-to-molecule structural and behavioral diversity, which contributes to the understanding of biological macromolecules. To provide measurements that are most consistent with the native environment of biomolecules, researchers would like to conduct these measurements in the solution phase if possible. However, diffusion typically limits the observation time to approximately 1 ms in many solution-phase single-molecule assays. Although surface immobilization is widely used to address this problem, this process can perturb the system being studied and contribute to the observed heterogeneity. Combining the technical capabilities of high-sensitivity single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, real-time feedback control and electrokinetic flow in a microfluidic chamber, we have developed a device called the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap to significantly prolong the observation time of single biomolecules in solution. We have applied the ABEL trap method to explore the photodynamics and enzymatic properties of a variety of biomolecules in aqueous solution and present four examples: the photosynthetic antenna allophycocyanin, the chaperonin enzyme TRiC, a G protein-coupled receptor protein, and the blue nitrite reductase redox enzyme. These examples illustrate the breadth and depth of information which we can extract in studies of single biomolecules with the ABEL trap. When confined in the ABEL trap, the photosynthetic antenna protein allophycocyanin exhibits rich dynamics both in its emission brightness and its excited state lifetime. As each molecule discontinuously converts from one emission/lifetime level to another in a primarily correlated way, it undergoes a series of state changes. We studied the ATP binding stoichiometry of the multi-subunit chaperonin enzyme TRiC in the ABEL trap by counting the number of hydrolyzed Cy3-ATP using stepwise

  18. GENERATING FRACTAL PATTERNS BY USING p-CIRCLE INVERSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.; Zlobec, Borut Jurčič

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the p-circle inversion which generalizes the classical inversion with respect to a circle (p = 2) and the taxicab inversion (p = 1). We study some basic properties and we also show the inversive images of some basic curves. We apply this new transformation to well-known fractals such as Sierpinski triangle, Koch curve, dragon curve, Fibonacci fractal, among others. Then we obtain new fractal patterns. Moreover, we generalize the method called circle inversion fractal be means of the p-circle inversion.

  19. The merging cluster Abell 1758 revisited: multi-wavelength observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Laganá, T. F.; Haider, M.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Cluster properties can be more distinctly studied in pairs of clusters, where we expect the effects of interactions to be strong. Aims: We here discuss the properties of the double cluster Abell 1758 at a redshift z ~ 0.279. These clusters show strong evidence for merging. Methods: We analyse the optical properties of the North and South cluster of Abell 1758 based on deep imaging obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) archive Megaprime/Megacam camera in the g' and r' bands, covering a total region of about 1.05 × 1.16 deg2, or 16.1 × 17.6 Mpc2. Our X-ray analysis is based on archive XMM-Newton images. Numerical simulations were performed using an N-body algorithm to treat the dark-matter component, a semi-analytical galaxy-formation model for the evolution of the galaxies and a grid-based hydrodynamic code with a parts per million (PPM) scheme for the dynamics of the intra-cluster medium. We computed galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs) and 2D temperature and metallicity maps of the X-ray gas, which we then compared to the results of our numerical simulations. Results: The GLFs of Abell 1758 North are well fit by Schechter functions in the g' and r' bands, but with a small excess of bright galaxies, particularly in the r' band; their faint-end slopes are similar in both bands. In contrast, the GLFs of Abell 1758 South are not well fit by Schechter functions: excesses of bright galaxies are seen in both bands; the faint-end of the GLF is not very well defined in g'. The GLF computed from our numerical simulations assuming a halo mass-luminosity relation agrees with those derived from the observations. From the X-ray analysis, the most striking features are structures in the metal distribution. We found two elongated regions of high metallicity in Abell 1758 North with two peaks towards the centre. In contrast, Abell 1758 South shows a deficit of metals in its central regions. Comparing observational results to those derived from numerical

  20. Two long H I tails in the outskirts of Abell 1367

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, T. C.; Cortese, L.; Brinks, E.; Bravo-Alfaro, H.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R.

    2012-01-01

    We present VLA D-array H I observations of the RSCG 42 and FGC 1287 galaxy groups, in the outskirts of the Abell 1367 cluster. These groups are projected ˜1.8 and 2.7 Mpc west from the cluster centre. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey provided evidence for H I extending over as much as 200 kpc in both groups. Our new, higher resolution observations reveal that the complex H I features detected by Arecibo are in reality two extraordinary long H I tails extending for ˜160 and 250 kpc, respectively, i.e. among the longest H I structures ever observed in groups of galaxies. Although in the case of RSCG 42 the morphology and dynamics of the H I tail, as well as the optical properties of the group members, support a low-velocity tidal interaction scenario, less clear is the origin of the unique features associated with FGC 1287. This galaxy displays an exceptionally long 'dog leg' H I tail, and the large distance from the X-ray-emitting region of Abell 1367 makes a ram-pressure stripping scenario highly unlikely. At the same time, a low-velocity tidal interaction seems unable to explain the extraordinary length of the tail and the lack of any sign of disturbance in the optical properties of FGC 1287. An intriguing possibility could be that this galaxy might have recently experienced a high-speed interaction with another member of the Coma-Abell 1367 Great Wall. We searched for the interloper responsible for this feature and, although we find a possible candidate, we show that without additional observations it is impossible to settle this issue. While the mechanism responsible for this extraordinary H I tail remains to be determined, our discovery highlights how little we know about environmental effects in galaxy groups.

  1. Temperature and elemental abundances in the Abell cluster A 576 derived from X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenflug, R.; Vigroux, L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of Einstein solid state spectrometer observations of the central region of Abell 576 combined with HEAO 1 spectra of the total cluster are given. Line emission was detected due to Fe, Si, and S from a hot plasma in the central region. The temperature of the total cluster spectrum may be in conflict with the central temperature. This difference can be explained either if cooling takes place in the center, or if part of the measured emission is due to individual galaxies. If the X-ray emission comes from the intergalactic gas only, there is some difficulty in producing all the silicon observed in the galaxies of A 576.

  2. Morphological study of three Abell's planetary nebulae - A33, A36, and A79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, C. T.; Nguyen-Trong, T.

    1983-01-01

    The Abell list discovered in the Palomar Sky Survey includes the three objects A33, A36 and A79, which have been classified as old planetary nebulae. The monochromatic images of these three objects in H-alpha, H-beta, and the forbidden lines N II 6584 A and S II 6717 A, are presented and discussed. The forbidden line N II/H-alpha intensity ratio is found to be useful because of its implications in the evolutionary behavior of planetary nebulae.

  3. The hydrogen-deficient knot of the `born-again' planetary nebula Abell 58 (V605 Aql)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, R.; Barlow, M. J.; Liu, X.-W.; Storey, P. J.; Ercolano, B.; De Marco, O.

    2008-02-01

    We have analysed deep optical spectra of the `born-again' planetary nebula Abell 58 and its hydrogen-deficient knot, surrounding V605 Aql, which underwent a nova-like eruption in 1919. Our analysis shows that the extinction towards the central knot is much higher than previously thought, with c(Hβ) = 2.0. The outer nebula is less reddened, with c(Hβ) = 1.04. We find that the outer nebula has a Ne/O ratio higher than the average PN value. The electron temperature we derive for the central knot varies widely depending on the diagnostic used. The [OIII] nebular-to-auroral transition ratio gives a temperature of 20800K, while the ratio of the [NII] nebular and auroral lines gives Te = 15200K. The helium line ratios λ5876/λ4471 and λ6678/λ4471 imply temperatures of 350 and 550K, respectively. Weakly temperature-sensitive OII recombination line ratios imply similarly low electron temperatures. Abundances derived from recombination lines are vastly higher than those found from collisionally excited lines, with the abundance discrepancy factor (ADF) for O2+ reaching 89 - the second highest known value after that found for the hydrogen-deficient knots in Abell 30. The observed temperature diagnostics and abundances support the idea that, like Abell 30, the knot of Abell 58 contains some very cold ionized material. Although the central star is carbon-rich (C/O > 1), the knot is found to be oxygen-rich, a situation not predicted by the single-star `born-again' theory of its formation. We compare the known properties of Abell 58 to those of Abell 30, Sakurai's Object and several novae and nova remnants. We argue that the abundances in the ejecta observed in A30 and A58 have more in common with neon novae than with Sakurai's Object, which is believed to have undergone a final helium flash. In particular, the C/O ratio of less than unity and the presence of substantial quantities of neon in the ejecta of both Abell 30 and Abell 58 are not predicted by very late thermal

  4. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  5. Uniform upper bounds for the cyclicity of the zero solution of the Abel differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenkov, Dmitry; Binyamini, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Given two polynomials P, q we consider the following question: "how large can the index of the first non-zero moment m˜k = ∫ab Pk q be, assuming the sequence is not identically zero?" The answer K to this question is known as the moment Bautin index, and we provide the first general upper bound: K ⩽ 2 + deg ⁡ q + 3(deg ⁡ P - 1) 2. The proof is based on qualitative analysis of linear ODEs, applied to Cauchy-type integrals of certain algebraic functions. The moment Bautin index plays an important role in the study of bifurcations of periodic solution in the polynomial Abel equation y‧ = py2 + εqy3 for p, q polynomials and ε ≪ 1. In particular, our result implies that for p satisfying a well-known generic condition, the number of periodic solutions near the zero solution does not exceed 5 + deg ⁡ q + 3deg2 ⁡ p. This is the first such bound depending solely on the degrees of the Abel equation.

  6. The double galaxy cluster Abell 2465 - II. Star formation in the cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Gary A.; Chu, Devin S.; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the star formation rate and its location in the major merger cluster Abell 2465 at z = 0.245. Optical properties of the cluster are described in Paper I. Measurements of the Hα and infrared dust emission of galaxies in the cluster were made with an interference filter centred on the redshifted line at a wavelength of 817 nm and utilized data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer satellite 12 μm band. Imaging in the Johnson U and B bands was obtained, and along with Sloan Digital Sky Survey u and r was used to study the blue fraction, which appears enhanced, as a further signature of star formation in the cluster. Star formation rates were calculated using standard calibrations. The total star formation rate normalized by the cluster mass, ΣSFR/Mcl compared to compilations for other clusters indicate that the components of Abell 2465 lie above the mean z and Mcl relations, suggestive that interacting galaxy clusters have enhanced star formation. The projected radial distribution of the star-forming galaxies does not follow an NFW profile and is relatively flat indicating that fewer star-forming galaxies are in the cluster centre. The morphologies of the Hα sources within R200 for the cluster as a whole indicate that many are disturbed or merging, suggesting that a combination of merging or harassment is working.

  7. The Utility and Psychometric Properties of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasingame, Gerry D.; Abel, Gene G.; Jordan, Alan; Wiegel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and utility of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "individuals with intellectual disabilities" (ABID) for assessment of sexual interest and problematic sexual behaviors. The study examined the preliminary psychometric properties and evaluated the clinical utility of the ABID based on a sample of 495…

  8. Spatio-kinematic modelling of Abell 65, a double-shelled planetary nebula with a binary central star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckvale, L.; Prouse, B.; Jones, D.; Lloyd, M.; Pollacco, D.; López, J. A.; O'Brien, T. J.; Sabin, L.; Vaytet, N. M. H.

    2013-09-01

    We present the first detailed spatio-kinematical analysis and modelling of the planetary nebula Abell 65, which is known to host a post-common envelope, binary, central star system. As such, this object is of great interest in studying the link between nebular morphology and central star binarity. [O III]5007 Å and Hα+[N II]6584 Å longslit spectra and imagery of Abell 65 were obtained with the Manchester Échelle Spectrometer on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Martír Observatory (MES-SPM). Further [O III]5007 Å longslit spectra were obtained with the Ultraviolet and Visual Échelle Spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT-UVES). These data were used to develop a spatio-kinematical model for the [O III]5007 Å emission from Abell 65. A `best-fitting' model was found by comparing synthetic spectra and images rendered from the model to the data. The model comprises an outer shell and an inner shell, with kinematical ages of 15000 ± 5000 yr kpc-1 and 8000 ± 3000 yr kpc-1, respectively. Both shells have peanut-shaped bipolar structures with symmetry axes at inclinations of (55 ± 10)° (to the line of sight) for the outer shell and (68 ± 10)° for the inner shell. The near alignment between the nebular shells and the binary orbital inclination [of (68 ± 2)°] is strongly indicative that the binary is responsible for shaping the nebula. Abell 65 is one of a growing number of planetary nebulae (seven to date, including Abell 65 itself) for which observations and modelling support the shaping influence of a central binary.

  9. A Statistical Study of Multiply Imaged Systems in the Lensing Cluster Abell 68

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jullo, Eric; Covone, Giovanni; Limousin, Marceau; Ellis, Richard; Stark, Daniel; Bundy, Kevin; Czoske, Oliver; Ebeling, Harald; Soucail, Geneviève

    2007-06-01

    We have carried out an extensive spectroscopic survey with the Keck and VLT telescopes, targeting lensed galaxies in the background of the massive cluster Abell 68. Spectroscopic measurements are obtained for 26 lensed images, including a distant galaxy at z=5.4. Redshifts have been determined for 5 out of 7 multiple-image systems. Through a careful modeling of the mass distribution in the strongly lensed regime, we derive a mass estimate of 5.3×1014 Msolar within 500 kpc. Our mass model is then used to constrain the redshift distribution of the remaining multiply imaged and singly imaged sources. This enables us to examine the physical properties for a subsample of 7 Lyα emitters at 1.7<~z<~5.5, whose unlensed luminosities of ~=1041 ergs s-1 are fainter than similar objects found in blank fields. Of particular interest is an extended Lyα emission region surrounding a highly magnified source at z=2.6, detected in VIMOS integral field spectroscopy data. The physical scale of the most distant lensed source at z=5.4 is very small (<300 pc), similar to the lensed z~5.6 emitter reported by Ellis et al. in Abell 2218. New photometric data available for Abell 2218 allow for a direct comparison between these two unique objects. Our survey illustrates the practicality of using lensing clusters to probe the faint end of the z~2-5 Lyα luminosity function in a manner that is complementary to blank-field narrowband surveys. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Also based on observations collected at the Very Large Telescope (Antu/UT1 and Melipal/UT3), European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programs 070.A-0643 and 073.A-0774), the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

  10. Quasi MT Inversion of Short-Offset Transient Electromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-ying; Xue, Guo-qiang; Khan, Muhammad Younis

    2016-07-01

    The short-offset transient electromagnetic method (SOTEM) has been extensively used for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration and hydrogeological investigations due to its ease of use and capability to generate diagnostic subsurface information. At present, the data processing methods of SOTEM are mainly focused on one dimensional inversion. To apply the proven inversion methods of frequency domain electromagnetic methods to SOTEM data, this paper presents a new transformation relation from time to frequency based on the similarity between SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity and magnetotelluric (MT) apparent resistivity. Results show that the transformation coefficients depend on the variation trend of SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity curves. Bostick inversion and conjugate gradient inversion techniques were applied to transformed SOTEM data and the results were validated by some simulated calculations and field measured data. This study provides a novel method to SOTEM data processing and a useful aid to join inversion with MT data.

  11. Quasi MT Inversion of Short-Offset Transient Electromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-ying; Xue, Guo-qiang; Khan, Muhammad Younis

    2016-03-01

    The short-offset transient electromagnetic method (SOTEM) has been extensively used for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration and hydrogeological investigations due to its ease of use and capability to generate diagnostic subsurface information. At present, the data processing methods of SOTEM are mainly focused on one dimensional inversion. To apply the proven inversion methods of frequency domain electromagnetic methods to SOTEM data, this paper presents a new transformation relation from time to frequency based on the similarity between SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity and magnetotelluric (MT) apparent resistivity. Results show that the transformation coefficients depend on the variation trend of SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity curves. Bostick inversion and conjugate gradient inversion techniques were applied to transformed SOTEM data and the results were validated by some simulated calculations and field measured data. This study provides a novel method to SOTEM data processing and a useful aid to join inversion with MT data.

  12. A "voice inversion effect?".

    PubMed

    Bédard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-07-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an "auditory face" rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a "voice inversion effect," by analogy to the classical "face inversion effect," which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted of a gender identification task on two syllables pronounced by 90 speakers (boys, girls, men, and women). Experiment 2 consisted of a speaker discrimination task on pairs of syllables (8 men and 8 women). Experiment 3 consisted of an instrument discrimination task on pairs of melodies (8 string and 8 wind instruments). In all three experiments, stimuli were presented in 4 conditions: (1) no inversion; (2) temporal inversion (e.g., backwards speech); (3) frequency inversion centered around 4000 Hz; and (4) around 2500 Hz. Results indicated a significant decrease in performance caused by sound inversion, with a much stronger effect for frequency than for temporal inversion. Interestingly, although frequency inversion markedly affected timbre for both voices and instruments, subjects' performance was still above chance. However, performance at instrument discrimination was much higher than for voices, preventing comparison of inversion effects for voices vs. non-vocal stimuli. Additional experiments will be necessary to conclude on the existence of a possible "voice inversion effect." PMID:15177788

  13. Dirac neutrino mass from a neutrino dark matter model for the galaxy cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus Maria

    2016-03-01

    The dark matter in the galaxy cluster Abell 1689 is modelled as an isothermal sphere of neutrinos. New data on the 2d mass density allow an accurate description of its core and halo. The model has no “missing baryon problem” and beyond 2.1 Mpc the baryons have the cosmic mass abundance. Combination of cluster data with the cosmic dark matter fraction - here supposed to stem from the neutrinos - leads to a solution of the dark matter riddle by left and right handed neutrinos with mass (1.861 ± 0.016)h 70 -2eV/c 2. The thus far observed absence of neutrinoless double beta decay points to (quasi-) Dirac neutrinos: uncharged electrons with different flavour and mass eigenbasis, as for quarks. Though the cosmic microwave background spectrum is matched up to some 10% accuracy only, the case is not ruled out because the plasma phase of the early Universe may be turbulent.

  14. The photometric properties of brightest cluster galaxies. I - Absolute magnitudes in 116 nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, J. G.; Gunn, J. E.; Thuan, T. X.

    1980-01-01

    Two-color aperture photometry of the brightest galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters is presented. The results are used to anchor the bright end of the Hubble diagram; essentially the entire formal error for this method is then due to the sample of distant clusters used. New determinations of the systematic trend of galaxy absolute magnitude with the cluster properties of richness and Bautz-Morgan type are derived. When these new results are combined with the Gunn and Oke (1975) data on high-redshift clusters, a formal value (without accounting for any evolution) of q sub 0 = -0.55 + or - 0.45 (1 standard deviations) is found.

  15. An Approximation to the Periodic Solution of a Differential Equation of Abel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    2011-10-01

    The Abel equation, in canonical form, is y^' = sint- y^3 (*) and corresponds to the singular (ɛ --> 0) limit of the nonlinear, forced oscillator ɛy^'' + y^' + y^3 = sint, ɛ-> 0. (**) Equation (*) has the property that it has a unique periodic solution defined on (-∞,∞). Further, as t increases, all solutions are attracted into the strip |y| < 1 and any two different solutions y1(t) and y2(t) satisfy the condition Lim [y1(t) - y2(t)] = 0, (***) t --> ∞ and for t negatively decreasing, each solution, except for the periodic solution, becomes unbounded.ootnotetextU. Elias, American Mathematical Monthly, vol.115, (Feb. 2008), pps. 147-149. Our purpose is to calculate an approximation to the unique periodic solution of Eq. (*) using the method of harmonic balance. We also determine an estimation for the blow-up time of the non-periodic solutions.

  16. New bibenzyl glycosides from leaves of Camellia oleifera Abel. with cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuelong; Tang, Ling; Feng, Baomin; Shi, Liying; Wang, Huiguo; Wang, Yongqi

    2011-04-01

    Studies on the chemical constituents of leaves of Camellia oleifera Abel. led to the isolation of 3 new bibenzyl glycosides. Their structures have been elucidated as 1-(3',5'-dihydroxy)phenyl-2-(4″-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)phenylethane (1), 1-(3',5'-dimethoxy)phenyl-2-(4″-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)phenylethane (2) and 1-(3',5'-dimethoxy)phenyl-2-[4″-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(6→1)-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl]phenylethane (3) through spectral studies including HR-ESI-MS, ((1))H NMR, ((13))C NMR and 2D NMR experiments. All the above 3 bibenzyl glycosides showed cytotoxic activities to Hela and hep2 cell lines. PMID:21219989

  17. X-ray constraints on the shape of the dark matter in five Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buote, David A.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray observations obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to constrain the shape of the dark matter in the inner regions of Abell clusters A401, A426, A1656, A2029, and A2199, each of which exhibits highly flattened optical isopleths. The dark matter is modeled as an ellipsoid with a mass density of about r exp -2. The possible shapes of the dark matter is constrained by comparing these model isophotes to the image isophotes. The X-ray isophotes, and therefore the gravitational potentials, have ellipticities of about 0.1-0.2. The dark matter within the central 1 Mpc is found to be substantially rounder for all the clusters. It is concluded that the shape of the galaxy distributions in these clusters traces neither the gravitational potential nor the gravitating matter.

  18. Temperature and elemental abundances in the Abell cluster A576 derived from X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenflug, R.; Vigroux, L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the Einstein Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) observations of the central region of Abell 576 combined with HEAO 1 spectra of the total cluster are reported. Line emission due to Fe, Si, and S from a hot plasma in the central region of the object are detected. Abundances roughly one-half of the solar value are derived for these elements. The total cluster spectrum is well fitted by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with a temperature of 4 +3.5 or -1.4 x 10 to the 7th K. This temperature is in conflict with the SSS temperature determination for the center of the cluster. This difference can be explained if cooling takes place in the central part of the cluster, or if the X-ray emission in the center is dominated by the emission of a single galaxy.

  19. A Chandra Study of the Large-Scale Shock Front in Abell 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Steven

    2011-09-01

    Abell 2219 (z=0.225) is the third galaxy cluster in which a clear, large-scale shock front, viewed approximately edge-on and generated by ongoing merging activity, has been discovered. It is highly X-ray luminous and 2.5 times brighter in X-rays than either 1E0657-56 or A520. We propose a 150ks ACIS-I observation to obtain the first precise measurements of the pre- and post-shock gas temperature, enabling improved estimates of the Mach number and shock velocity. The observed gradient of the temperature jump across the shock will constrain the process of post-shock electron-ion equilibration. We will probe the origin of very hot (kT>20 keV) gas observed in the cluster center. High quality radio, optical-dynamical, and ground- and space-based gravitational lensing data are in hand.

  20. Beneficial Effects of Camellia Oil (Camellia oleifera Abel.) on Hepatoprotective and Gastroprotective Activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that increased dietary intake of natural antioxidants is beneficial for health because of their bioactivities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammation actions. Camellia oil made from tea seed (Camellia oleifera Abel.) is commonly used as an edible oil and a traditional medicine in Taiwan and China. Until now, the camellia oil has been widely considered as a dietary oil for heath. In this review, we summarize the protective effects of camellia oil with antioxidant activity against oxidative stress leading to hepatic damage and gastrointestinal ulcers. The information in this review leads to the conclusion that camellia oil is not only an edible oil but also a vegetable oil with a potential function for human health. PMID:26598814

  1. Sloshing, Shocks, and Bubbles in the Cool Core Cluster Abell 2052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, S. W.; Clarke, T. E.; Sarazin, C. L.; McNamara, B. R.; Douglass, E. M.; McDonald, M.

    2011-05-01

    We present results from a very deep (650 ksec) Chandra X-ray observation of Abell 2052, as well as archival VLA radio observations. The data reveal exquisite detail in the inner parts of the cluster, including bubbles evacuated by the AGN's radio lobes, compressed bubble rims, filaments, and loops. Two concentric shocks are seen, and a temperature rise is measured for the innermost one. On larger scales, an excess surface brightness spiral feature is detected. The spiral has cooler temperatures and higher abundances than its surroundings, and is likely the result of sloshing gas initiated by a previous cluster-cluster or sub-cluster merger. Initial evidence for previously unseen bubbles at larger radii related to earlier outbursts from the AGN is presented. Support for this work was provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, through Chandra Award Number GO9-0147X.

  2. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and evidence for radial orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Owen, Frazer N.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1986-01-01

    Published observational data on the tail orientations (TOs) of 60 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters of galaxies are analyzed statistically using a maximum-likelihood approach. The results are presented in a table, and it is found that the observed TO distributions in the whole sample and in subsamples of morphologically regular NATs and NATs with pericentric distances d greater than 500 kpc are consistent with isotropic orbits, whereas the TOs for NATs with d less than 500 kpc are consistent with highly radial orbits. If radial orbits were observed near the centers of other types of cluster galaxies as well, it could be inferred that violent relaxation during cluster formation was incomplete, and that clusters form by spherical collapse and secondary infall, as proposed by Gunn (1977).

  3. The Mass of Abell 1060 and AWM 7 from Spatially Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenstein, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1996-11-01

    Using X-ray temperature and surface brightness profiles of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) derived from ASCA (Astro-D) and ROSAT observations, we place constraints on the dark matter (DM) and baryon fraction distributions in the poor clusters Abell 1060 (A1060) and AWM 7. Although their total mass distributions are similar, AWM 7 has twice the baryon fraction of A1060 in the best-fit models. The functional form of the DM distribution is ill determined; however, mass models where the baryon fractions in A1060 and AWM 7 significantly overlap are excluded. Such variations in baryon fraction are not predicted by standard models and imply that some mechanism in addition to gravity plays a major role in organizing matter on cluster scales.

  4. Television documentary, history and memory. An analysis of Sergio Zavoli's The Gardens of Abel

    PubMed Central

    Foot, John

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a celebrated documentary made for Italian state TV in 1968 and transmitted in 1969 to an audience of millions. The programme – The Gardens of Abel – looked at changes introduced by the radical psychiatrist Franco Basaglia in an asylum in the north-east of Italy (Gorizia). The article examines the content of this programme for the first time, questions some of the claims that have been made for it, and outlines the sources used by the director, Sergio Zavoli. The article argues that the film was as much an expression of Zavoli's vision and ideas as it was linked to those of Franco Basaglia himself. Finally, the article highlights the way that this programme has become part of historical discourse and popular memory. PMID:25937804

  5. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  6. The galaxy population of Abell 1367: the stellar mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhcine, M.; Kriwattanawong, W.; James, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    Using wide baseline broad-band photometry, we analyse the stellar population properties of a sample of 72 galaxies, spanning a wide range of stellar masses and morphological types, in the nearby spiral-rich and dynamically young galaxy cluster Abell 1367. The sample galaxies are distributed from the cluster centre out to approximately half the cluster Abell radius. The optical/near-infrared colours are compared with simple stellar population synthesis models from which the luminosity-weighted stellar population ages and metallicities are determined. The locus of the colours of elliptical galaxies traces a sequence of varying metallicity at a narrow range of luminosity-weighted stellar ages. Lenticular galaxies in the red sequence, however, exhibit a substantial spread of luminosity-weighted stellar metallicities and ages. For red-sequence lenticular galaxies and blue cloud galaxies, low-mass galaxies tend to be on average dominated by stellar populations of younger luminosity-weighted ages. Sample galaxies exhibit a strong correlation between integrated stellar mass and luminosity-weighted stellar metallicity. Galaxies with signs of morphological disturbance and ongoing star formation activity, tend to be underabundant with respect to passive galaxies in the red sequence of comparable stellar masses. We argue that this could be due to tidally driven gas flows towards the star-forming regions, carrying less enriched gas and diluting the pre-existing gas to produce younger stellar populations with lower metallicities than would be obtained prior to the interaction. Finally, we find no statistically significant evidence for changes in the luminosity-weighted ages and metallicities for either red-sequence or blue-cloud galaxies, at fixed stellar mass, with location within the cluster. We dedicate this work to the memory of our friend and colleague C. Moss who died suddenly recently.

  7. Revisiting Abell 2744: a powerful synergy of the GLASS spectroscopy and the HFF photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Borello Schmidt, Kasper; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-08-01

    We present new emission line identifications and improve the strong lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744 using the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) observations and the full depth of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging. We performed a blind and targeted search for emission lines in objects within the full field of view (FoV) of the GLASS prime pointings, including all the previously known multiple arc images. We report over 50 high quality spectroscopic redshifts, 4 of which are for the arc images. We also present an extensive analysis based on the HFF photometry, measuring the colors and photometric redshifts of all objects within the FoV, and comparing the spectroscopic and photometric results of the same ensemble of sources. In order to improve the lens model of Abell 2744, we develop a rigorous alogorithm to screen arc images, based on their colors and morphology, and selecting the most reliable ones to use. As a result, 21 systems (corresponding to 59 images) pass the screening process and are used to reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive mesh. The resulting total mass distribution is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data in a fashion very similar to the reduction of the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP) clusters, in order to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made publicly available in the standard HFF format.

  8. Deep spectroscopy of nearby galaxy clusters - I. Spectroscopic luminosity function of Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Dominguez Palmero, L.; Yu, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new deep spectroscopic catalogue for Abell 85, within 3.0 × 2.6 Mpc2 and down to Mr ˜ Mr^{ast } +6. Using the Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope and the AutoFiber 2 at the William Herschel Telescope, we obtained almost 1430 new redshifts for galaxies with mr ≤ 21 mag and <μe,r> ≤ 24 mag arcsec-2. These redshifts, together with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and NASA/IPAC Extragaalctic Database spectroscopic information, result in 460 confirmed cluster members. This data set allows the study of the luminosity function (LF) of the cluster galaxies covering three orders of magnitudes in luminosities. The total and radial LFs are best modelled by a double Schechter function. The normalized LFs show that their bright (Mr ≤ -21.5) and faint (Mr ≥ -18.0) ends are independent of clustercentric distance and similar to the field LFs unlike the intermediate luminosity range (-21.5 ≤ Mr ≤ -18.0). Similar results are found for the LFs of the dominant types of galaxies: red, passive, virialized and early-infall members. On the contrary, the LFs of blue, star forming, non-virialized and recent-infall galaxies are well described by a single Schechter function. These populations contribute to a small fraction of the galaxy density in the innermost cluster region. However, in the outskirts of the cluster, they have similar densities to red, passive, virialized and early-infall members at the LF faint end. These results confirm a clear dependence of the colour and star formation of Abell 85 members in the cluster centric distance.

  9. Suzaku observation of a high-entropy cluster Abell 548W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Kato, Yuichi; Gu, Liyi; Kawaharada, Madoka; Takizawa, Motokazu; Fujita, Yutaka; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    Abell 548W, one of the galaxy clusters located in the Abell 548 region, has about an order of magnitude lower X-ray luminosity compared to ordinal clusters in view of the well-known intracluster medium (ICM) temperature vs. X-ray luminosity (kT-LX) relation. The cluster hosts a pair of diffuse radio sources to the northwest and north, both about 10' apart from the cluster center. They are candidate radio relics, frequently associated with merging clusters. A Suzaku deep observation with exposure of 84.4 ks was performed to search for signatures of merging in this cluster. The XIS detectors successfully detected the ICM emission out to 16' from the cluster center. The temperature is ˜ 3.6 keV around its center, and ˜ 2 keV at the outermost regions. The hot region (˜ 6 keV) beside the relic candidates shifted to the cluster center reported by XMM-Newton was not seen in the Suzaku data, although its temperature of 3.6 keV itself is higher than the average temperature of 2.5 keV around the radio sources. In addition, the signature of a cool (kT ˜ 0.9 keV) component was found around the northwest source. A marginal temperature jump at its outer edge was also found, consistent with the canonical idea of the shock acceleration origin of the radio relics. The cluster has among the highest central entropy of ˜ 400 keV cm2 and is one of the so-called low surface brightness clusters. Taking into account the fact that its shape itself is relatively circular and smooth and also that its temperature structure is nearly flat, possible scenarios for merging are discussed.

  10. Discovery of an overlapping cluster in the Abell 1674 field with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tawa, Noriaki; Koyama, Katsuji

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a Suzaku observation of Abell 1674, an optically very rich (richness class 3) cluster cataloged as z = 0.1066. We discover the He-like Fe K-shell line from the central region for the first time, and find that the X-ray spectrum yields a high redshift of 0.215^{+0.007}_{-0.006}. On the other hand, the spectrum of the south-western region is fitted with a redshift of 0.11 ± 0.02 by the He-like Fe L-shell lines, consistent with the optically determined value. The gas temperature, metal abundance, and core radius of the X-ray emission in the central region are 3.8 ± 0.2 keV, 0.20 ± 0.05 Z⊙, and 450 ± 40 kpc, respectively, while those in the south-western region are 2.0 ± 0.2 keV, 0.41^{+0.17}_{-0.13} Z⊙, and 220^{+90}_{-70} kpc, respectively. These parameters are typical for clusters. We thus conclude that Abell 1674 consists of two independent clusters, A 1674-C at z ˜ 0.22 and A 1674-SW at z ˜ 0.11, overlapping along the line of sight. The X-ray luminosity of A 1674-C within r = 2 Mpc is (15.9 ± 0.6) × 1043 erg s-1 in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band, while that for A 1674-SW is (1.25 ± 0.07) × 1043 erg s-1. Both are consistent with those expected from the L-T relation of clusters within a factor of 2. This is another supporting factor for our conclusion.

  11. A plethora of diffuse steep spectrum radio sources in Abell 2034 revealed by LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimwell, T. W.; Luckin, J.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Intema, H. T.; Owers, M. S.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Stroe, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; Cassano, R.; de Gasperin, F.; Heald, G. H.; Hoang, D. N.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Sridhar, S. S.; Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Bonafede, A.; Chyży, K. T.; Enßlin, T. A.; Ferrari, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; McKean, J. P.; Morabito, L. K.; Orrù, E.; Pizzo, R.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; White, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations, we have discovered a diverse assembly of steep spectrum emission that is apparently associated with the intracluster medium (ICM) of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2034. Such a rich variety of complex emission associated with the ICM has been observed in few other clusters. This not only indicates that Abell 2034 is a more interesting and complex system than previously thought but it also demonstrates the importance of sensitive and high-resolution, low-frequency observations. These observations can reveal emission from relativistic particles which have been accelerated to sufficient energy to produce observable emission or have had their high energy maintained by mechanisms in the ICM. The most prominent feature in our maps is a bright bulb of emission connected to two steep spectrum filamentary structures, the longest of which extends perpendicular to the merger axis for 0.5 Mpc across the south of the cluster. The origin of these objects is unclear, with no shock detected in the X-ray images and no obvious connection with cluster galaxies or AGNs. We also find that the X-ray bright region of the cluster coincides with a giant radio halo with an irregular morphology and a very steep spectrum. In addition, the cluster hosts up to three possible radio relics, which are misaligned with the cluster X-ray emission. Finally, we have identified multiple regions of emission with a very steep spectral index that seem to be associated with either tailed radio galaxies or a shock.

  12. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-04-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  13. Galaxy Luminosity Function of the Dynamically Young Abell 119 Cluster: Probing the Cluster Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngdae; Rey, Soo-Chang; Hilker, Michael; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the galaxy luminosity function (LF) of the Abell 119 cluster down to {M}r∼ -14 mag based on deep images in the u, g, and r bands taken by using MOSAIC II CCD mounted on the Blanco 4 m telescope at the CTIO. The cluster membership was accurately determined based on the radial velocity information and on the color–magnitude relation for bright galaxies and the scaling relation for faint galaxies. The overall LF exhibits a bimodal behavior with a distinct dip at r∼ 18.5 mag ({M}r∼ -17.8 mag), which is more appropriately described by a two-component function. The shape of the LF strongly depends on the clustercentric distance and on the local galaxy density. The LF of galaxies in the outer, low-density region exhibits a steeper slope and more prominent dip compared with that of counterparts in the inner, high-density region. We found evidence for a substructure in the projected galaxy distribution in which several overdense regions in the Abell 119 cluster appear to be closely associated with the surrounding, possible filamentary structure. The combined LF of the overdense regions exhibits a two-component function with a distinct dip, while the LF of the central region is well described by a single Schechter function. We suggest that, in the context of the hierarchical cluster formation scenario, the observed overdense regions are the relics of galaxy groups, retaining their two-component LFs with a dip, which acquired their shapes through a galaxy merging process in group environments, before they fall into a cluster.

  14. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived From Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From analysis of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging data we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the SZE toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster.

  15. Inverse scattering theory: Inverse scattering series method for one dimensional non-compact support potential

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jie; Lesage, Anne-Cécile; Hussain, Fazle; Bodmann, Bernhard G.; Kouri, Donald J.

    2014-12-15

    The reversion of the Born-Neumann series of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation is one of the standard ways to solve the inverse acoustic scattering problem. One limitation of the current inversion methods based on the reversion of the Born-Neumann series is that the velocity potential should have compact support. However, this assumption cannot be satisfied in certain cases, especially in seismic inversion. Based on the idea of distorted wave scattering, we explore an inverse scattering method for velocity potentials without compact support. The strategy is to decompose the actual medium as a known single interface reference medium, which has the same asymptotic form as the actual medium and a perturbative scattering potential with compact support. After introducing the method to calculate the Green’s function for the known reference potential, the inverse scattering series and Volterra inverse scattering series are derived for the perturbative potential. Analytical and numerical examples demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Besides, to ensure stability of the numerical computation, the Lanczos averaging method is employed as a filter to reduce the Gibbs oscillations for the truncated discrete inverse Fourier transform of each order. Our method provides a rigorous mathematical framework for inverse acoustic scattering with a non-compact support velocity potential.

  16. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  17. Seismic Inversion Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason

    2009-09-16

    With the rapid advances in sophisticated solar modeling and the abundance of high-quality solar pulsation data, efficient and robust inversion techniques are crucial for seismic studies. We present some aspects of an efficient Fourier Optimally Localized Averaging (OLA) inversion method with an example applied to time-distance helioseismology.

  18. Inverse structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Bruce R.; Water, Willem van de

    2005-03-01

    While the ordinary structure function in turbulence is concerned with the statistical moments of the velocity increment {delta}u measured over a distance r, the inverse structure function is related to the distance r where the turbulent velocity exits the interval {delta}u. We study inverse structure functions of wind-tunnel turbulence which covers a range of Reynolds numbers Re{sub {lambda}}=400-1100. We test a recently proposed relation between the scaling exponents of the ordinary structure functions and those of the inverse structure functions [S. Roux and M. H. Jensen, Phys. Rev. E 69, 16309 (2004)]. The relatively large range of Reynolds numbers in our experiment also enables us to address the scaling with Reynolds number that is expected to highlight the intermediate dissipative range. While we firmly establish the (relative) scaling of inverse structure functions, our experimental results fail both predictions. Therefore, the question of the significance of inverse structure functions remains open.

  19. Generalized Uncertainty Quantification for Linear Inverse Problems in X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Michael James

    2014-04-25

    In industrial and engineering applications, X-ray radiography has attained wide use as a data collection protocol for the assessment of material properties in cases where direct observation is not possible. The direct measurement of nuclear materials, particularly when they are under explosive or implosive loading, is not feasible, and radiography can serve as a useful tool for obtaining indirect measurements. In such experiments, high energy X-rays are pulsed through a scene containing material of interest, and a detector records a radiograph by measuring the radiation that is not attenuated in the scene. One approach to the analysis of these radiographs is to model the imaging system as an operator that acts upon the object being imaged to produce a radiograph. In this model, the goal is to solve an inverse problem to reconstruct the values of interest in the object, which are typically material properties such as density or areal density. The primary objective in this work is to provide quantitative solutions with uncertainty estimates for three separate applications in X-ray radiography: deconvolution, Abel inversion, and radiation spot shape reconstruction. For each problem, we introduce a new hierarchical Bayesian model for determining a posterior distribution on the unknowns and develop efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for sampling from the posterior. A Poisson likelihood, based on a noise model for photon counts at the detector, is combined with a prior tailored to each application: an edge-localizing prior for deconvolution; a smoothing prior with non-negativity constraints for spot reconstruction; and a full covariance sampling prior based on a Wishart hyperprior for Abel inversion. After developing our methods in a general setting, we demonstrate each model on both synthetically generated datasets, including those from a well known radiation transport code, and real high energy radiographs taken at two U. S. Department of Energy

  20. Spatial Analyses of a Complete Sample of Rich Abell/ACO Clusters to z=0.14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    1999-12-01

    Galaxy clusters act as excellent mass tracers in our local Universe. They are bright, contain hundreds of galaxies, and are easy to observe. The most recognized galaxy cluster catalogs are those of Abell (1958) and Abell, Corwin and Olowin (1989-ACO). I will present the results of a new survey of Abell/ACO cluster redshifts that extends our knowledge of the large-scale mass distribution to a redshift of z = 0.14. The volume of the Universe traced by this survey is four times larger than any of its predecessors. The large number of clusters within the survey boundaries ( 560) as well as the large volume traced, allow for statistical analyses on scales never before probed. I will present the cluster power spectrum to scales approaching 1000h-1Mpc. I will also demonstrate the high-level of completeness for this survey, which allows one to study the effects of large-scale structure on internal cluster properties. I will then summarize some recent collaborative efforts which show that (1) Wide-Angle Tail radio jets are ``blown'' in the direction of the local large-scale axis; (2) High dM/dt cooling flow clusters reside in crowded environments; (3) Clusters with close near-neighbors are also close to the fundamental plane created from Lo, Lx and Ro. CM was funded in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Maine Science and Technology Foundation.

  1. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  2. Inverse Common-Reflection-Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroud, H.; Tygel, M.; Freitas, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Common-Reflection-Surface (CRS) stack method is a powerful tool to produce high-quality stacked images of multicoverage seismic data. As a result of the CRS stack, not only a stacked section, but also a number of attributes defined at each point of that section, are produced. In this way, one can think of the CRS stack method as a transformation from data space to attribute space. Being a purely kinematic method, the CRS stack lacks amplitude information that can be useful for many purposes. Here we propose to fill this gap by means of a combined use of a zero-offset section (that could be a short-offset or amplitude-corrected stacked section) and common midpoint gather. We present an algorithm for an inverse CRS transformation, namely one that (approximately) transforms the CRS attributes back to data space. First synthetic tests provide satisfying results for the two simple cases of single dipping-plane and single circular reflectors with a homogeneous overburden, and provide estimates of the range of applicability, in both midpoint and offset directions. We further present an application for interpolating missing traces in a near-surface, high-resolution seismic experiment, conducted in the alluvial plain of the river Gave de Pau, near Assat, southern France, showing its ability to build coherent signals, where recording was not available. A somewhat unexpected good feature of the algorithm, is that it seems capable to reconstruct signals even in muted parts of the section.

  3. A Census of Star Formation and Active Galactic Nuclei Populations in Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Logan H.; Atlee, David Wesley

    2016-01-01

    A recent survey of low-z galaxy clusters observed a disjunction between X-ray and mid-infrared selected populations of active galactic nuclei (X-ray and IR AGNs) (Atlee+ 2011, ApJ 729, 22.). Here we present an analysis of near-infrared spectroscopic data of star-forming galaxies in cluster Abell 1689 in order to confirm the identity of some of their IR AGN and to provide a check on their reported star formation rates. Our sample consists of 24 objects in Abell 1689. H and K band spectroscopic observations of target objects and standard stars were obtained by David Atlee between 2010 May 17 and 2011 June 6 using the Large Binocular Telescope's LUCI instrument. After undergoing initial reductions, standard stars were corrected for telluric absorption using TelFit (Gullikson+ 2014, AJ, 158, 53). Raw detector counts were converted to physical units using the wavelength-dependent response of the grating and the star's reported H and K band magnitudes to produce conversion factors that fully correct for instrumental effects. Target spectra were flux-calibrated using the airmass-corrected transmission profiles produced by TelFit and the associated H band conversion factor (or the average of the two factors, for nights with two standard stars). Star formation rates were calculated using the SFR-L(Ha) relation reported in Kennicutt (1998), with the measured luminosity of the Pa-a emission line at the luminosity distance of the cluster used as a proxy for L(Ha) (Kennicutt 1998, ARA&A 36, 189; Hummer & Stoney 1987, MNRAS 346, 1055). The line ratios H2 2.121 mm/Brg and [FeII]/Pab were used to classify targets as starburst galaxies, AGNs, or LINERs (Rodriguez-Ardila+ 2005, MNRAS, 364, 1041). Jones was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  4. On the Merging Cluster Abell 578 and Its Central Radio Galaxy 4C+67.13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, K.; Stawarz, Ł.; Siemiginowska, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Szostek, A.; Madejski, G.; Harris, D. E.; Simionescu, A.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-06-01

    Here we analyze radio, optical, and X-ray data for the peculiar cluster Abell 578. This cluster is not fully relaxed and consists of two merging sub-systems. The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), CGPG 0719.8+6704, is a pair of interacting ellipticals with projected separation ˜10 kpc, the brighter of which hosts the radio source 4C+67.13. The Fanaroff-Riley type-II radio morphology of 4C+67.13 is unusual for central radio galaxies in local Abell clusters. Our new optical spectroscopy revealed that both nuclei of the CGPG 0719.8+6704 pair are active, albeit at low accretion rates corresponding to the Eddington ratio ˜ {{10}-4} (for the estimated black hole masses of ˜ 3× {{10}8} {{M}⊙ } and ˜ {{10}9} {{M}⊙ }). The gathered X-ray (Chandra) data allowed us to confirm and to quantify robustly the previously noted elongation of the gaseous atmosphere in the dominant sub-cluster, as well as a large spatial offset (˜60 kpc projected) between the position of the BCG and the cluster center inferred from the modeling of the X-ray surface brightness distribution. Detailed analysis of the brightness profiles and temperature revealed also that the cluster gas in the vicinity of 4C+67.13 is compressed (by a factor of about ˜1.4) and heated (from ≃ 2.0 keV up to 2.7 keV), consistent with the presence of a weak shock (Mach number ˜1.3) driven by the expanding jet cocoon. This would then require the jet kinetic power of the order of ˜ {{10}45} erg s-1, implying either a very high efficiency of the jet production for the current accretion rate, or a highly modulated jet/accretion activity in the system. Based on service observations made with the WHT operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  5. SPECTRAL INDEX STUDIES OF THE DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN ABELL 2256: IMPLICATIONS FOR MERGER ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S. E-mail: dwaraka@rri.res.i

    2010-08-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the merging rich cluster of galaxies, Abell 2256 (A2256). We have observed A2256 at 150 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and successfully detected the diffuse radio halo and the relic emission over a {approx}1.2 Mpc{sup 2} extent. Using this 150 MHz image and the images made using archival observations from the Very Large Array (VLA; 1369 MHz) and the Westerbrok Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT; 330 MHz), we have produced spectral index images of the diffuse radio emission in A2256. These spectral index images show a distribution of flat spectral index (S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup {alpha}}, {alpha} in the range -0.7 to -0.9) plasma in the region NW of the cluster center. Regions showing steep spectral indices ({alpha} in the range -1.0 to -2.3) are toward the SE of the cluster center. These spectral indices indicate synchrotron lifetimes for the relativistic plasmas in the range 0.08-0.4 Gyr. We interpret this spectral behavior as resulting from a merger event along the direction SE to NW within the last 0.5 Gyr or so. A shock may be responsible for the NW relic in A2256 and the megaparsec scale radio halo toward the SE is likely to be generated by the turbulence injected by mergers. Furthermore, the diffuse radio emission shows spectral steepening toward lower frequencies. This low-frequency spectral steepening is consistent with a combination of spectra from two populations of relativistic electrons created at two epochs (two mergers) within the last {approx}0.5 Gyr. Earlier interpretations of the X-ray and the optical data also suggested that there were two mergers in Abell 2256 in the last 0.5 Gyr, consistent with the current findings. Also highlighted in this study is the futility of correlating the average temperatures of thermal gas and the average spectral indices of diffuse radio emission in the respective clusters.

  6. Characterizing the inverses of block tridiagonal, block Toeplitz matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffi, Nicholas M.; Hill, Judith C.; Reuter, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the inversion of block tridiagonal, block Toeplitz matrices and comment on the behaviour of these inverses as one moves away from the diagonal. Using matrix Möbius transformations, we first present an O(1) representation (with respect to the number of block rows and block columns) for the inverse matrix and subsequently use this representation to characterize the inverse matrix. There are four symmetry-distinct cases where the blocks of the inverse matrix (i) decay to zero on both sides of the diagonal, (ii) oscillate on both sides, (iii) decay on one side and oscillate on the other and (iv) decay on one side and grow on the other. This characterization exposes the necessary conditions for the inverse matrix to be numerically banded and may also aid in the design of preconditioners and fast algorithms. Finally, we present numerical examples of these matrix types.

  7. Generalized emissivity inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Ming, DengMing; Wen, Tao; Dai, XianXi; Dai, JiXin; Evenson, William E

    2002-04-01

    Inverse problems have recently drawn considerable attention from the physics community due to of potential widespread applications [K. Chadan and P. C. Sabatier, Inverse Problems in Quantum Scattering Theory, 2nd ed. (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1989)]. An inverse emissivity problem that determines the emissivity g(nu) from measurements of only the total radiated power J(T) has recently been studied [Tao Wen, DengMing Ming, Xianxi Dai, Jixin Dai, and William E. Evenson, Phys. Rev. E 63, 045601(R) (2001)]. In this paper, a new type of generalized emissivity and transmissivity inverse (GETI) problem is proposed. The present problem differs from our previous work on inverse problems by allowing the unknown (emissivity) function g(nu) to be temperature dependent as well as frequency dependent. Based on published experimental information, we have developed an exact solution formula for this GETI problem. A universal function set suggested for numerical calculation is shown to be robust, making this inversion method practical and convenient for realistic calculations. PMID:12005916

  8. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  9. Direct and indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, Jean; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Operto, Stéphane; Ribodetti, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    A bridge is highlighted between the direct inversion and the indirect inversion. They are based on fundamental different approaches: one is looking after a projection from the data space to the model space while the other one is reducing a misfit between observed data and synthetic data obtained from a given model. However, it is possible to obtain similar structures for model perturbation, and we shall focus on P-wave velocity reconstruction. This bridge is built up through the Born approximation linearizing the forward problem with respect to model perturbation and through asymptotic approximations of the Green functions of the wave propagation equation. We first describe the direct inversion and its ingredients and then we focus on a specific misfit function design leading to a indirect inversion. Finally, we shall compare this indirect inversion with more standard least-squares inversion as the FWI, enabling the focus on small weak velocity perturbations on one side and the speed-up of the velocity perturbation reconstruction on the other side. This bridge has been proposed by the group led by Raul Madariaga in the early nineties, emphasizing his leading role in efficient imaging workflows for seismic velocity reconstruction, a drastic requirement at that time.

  10. X-ray Emission from the Born-Again Planetary Nebula Abell 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    The planetary nebula (PN) Abell 30 underwent a very late thermal pulse that resulted in the ejection of knots of hydrogen-poor material. ROSAT detected soft X-ray emission from these knots. We present deep Chandra and XMM-Newton observations that show this X-ray emission to consist of two components: a point-source at the central star and diffuse emission associated with the hydrogen-poor knots and the cloverleaf structure inside the nebular shell. The spatial distribution and spectral properties of the diffuse X-ray emission suggest that it is generated by the shock-heated plasma produced by the interaction of the present stellar wind with the hydrogen-poor ejecta of the born-again event. Charge-exchange reactions between the ions of the stellar winds and the born-again ejecta may also contribute to this emission. The origin of the X-ray emission from the central star of A 30 is puzzling: shocks in the present fast stellar wind and photospheric emission can be ruled out, while the development of a new, compact hot bubble confining the fast stellar wind seems implausible.

  11. Peculiar velocities of cD galaxies - MX spectroscopy of Abell 1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Hintzen, Paul; Oegerle, W. R.; Romanishin, W.; Lesser, M. P.; Eisenhamer, J. D.; Batuski, D. J.

    1988-09-01

    Spectroscopic observations of galaxies in the Abell 1795 field have been obtained using the MX multiple-object spectrograph on the Steward Observatory 2.3 m telescope. Redshifts are presented for 46 galaxies, including 41 cluster members. It is found that the A1795 cD galaxy is not at rest in the cluster gravitational potential well; it has a peculiar radial velocity, cz, of 365 km/s, and the hypothesis that the mean cluster velocity is as large as the cD's velocity can be rejected at the 99.5 percent confidence level. This conclusion is supported by spectroscopic data for the 'cooling flow' gas found in the central region of the cluster; this gas, except for the portion coincident with the cD nucleus, lies at the velocity derived for the cluster mean. It is suggested that current models of the formation of cD galaxies are unlikely to account for the large peculiar velocities of the cD galaxies in A1795 and A2670 unless substantial subclustering is still present. However, the available data show no evidence for velocity subclustering in either A1795 or A2670.

  12. On the X-ray spectrum of the volume emissivity arising from Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stottlemyer, A. R.; Boldt, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    HEAO 1 A-2 X-ray spectra (2-15 keV) for an optically selected sample of Abell clusters of galaxies with z less than 0.1 have been analyzed to determine the energy dependence of the cosmological X-ray volume emissivity arising from such clusters. This spectrum is well fitted by an isothermal-bremsstrahlung model with kT = 7.4 + or - 1.5 KeV. This result is a test of the isothermal-volume-emissivity spectrum to be inferred from the conjecture that all contributing clusters may be characterized by kT = 7 keV, as assumed by McKee et al. (1980) in estimating the underlying luminosity function for the same sample. Although satisfied at the statistical level indicated, the analysis of a low-luminosity subsample suggests that this assumption of identical isothermal spectra would lead to a systematic error for a more statistically precise determination of the luminosity function's form.

  13. A redshift survey of the strong-lensing cluster ABELL 383

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kurtz, Michael J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Coe, Dan; Rines, Kenneth J. E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu

    2014-03-01

    Abell 383 is a famous rich cluster (z = 0.1887) imaged extensively as a basis for intensive strong- and weak-lensing studies. Nonetheless, there are few spectroscopic observations. We enable dynamical analyses by measuring 2360 new redshifts for galaxies with r {sub Petro} ≤ 20.5 and within 50' of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG; R.A.{sub 2000} = 42.°014125, decl.{sub 2000} = –03.°529228). We apply the caustic technique to identify 275 cluster members within 7 h {sup –1} Mpc of the hierarchical cluster center. The BCG lies within –11 ± 110 km s{sup –1} and 21 ± 56 h {sup –1} kpc of the hierarchical cluster center; the velocity dispersion profile of the BCG appears to be an extension of the velocity dispersion profile based on cluster members. The distribution of cluster members on the sky corresponds impressively with the weak-lensing contours of Okabe et al. especially when the impact of foreground and background structure is included. The values of R {sub 200} = 1.22 ± 0.01 h {sup –1} Mpc and M {sub 200} = (5.07 ± 0.09) × 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} obtained by application of the caustic technique agree well with recent completely independent lensing measures. The caustic estimate extends direct measurement of the cluster mass profile to a radius of ∼5 h {sup –1} Mpc.

  14. Population Analysis of Seyfert Galaxies in the Coma Abell-1367 Supercluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Megan; Wilcots, E. M.; Hess, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    In the hopes of finding a possible source of intergalactic heating, we are studying the population of active galaxies residing in and out of groups along the Coma-Abell 1367 supercluster to look at the occurrence of Seyfert galaxies. We report on the distribution of Seyfert galaxies as a function of environment across the supercluster and probe the characteristics of the population of groups that currently host at least one Seyfert. Of the 66 groups sampled, there are 11 groups containing one Seyfert and 6 groups containing multiple Seyferts, which leaves 49 groups without any activity. We have yet to determine whether the occurrence of Seyferts is dependent on environmental factors. So far, we have not identified a correlation between environment and AGN activity; activity occurs pretty evenly both within and outside of galaxy groups. However, there does seem to be some correlation between the size of the group and the the percentage of Seyfert activity; one group with over 250 members has a much smaller amount of Seyferts by percentage (9 Seyferts) than other groups with 10 or less members. We explore the effect of Seyfert activity on the intergalactic medium in galaxy groups.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abell 496 gri photometry (Moretti+, 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Molinari, E.; Chincarini, G.; de Grandi, S.

    2000-04-01

    We initiated a large project aimed to estimate the Luminosity Function of galaxies in clusters and to evaluate its relation to cluster morphology. With this paper we deem necessary to outline the general procedures of the data reduction and details of the data analysis. The cluster sample includes the brightest southern ROSAT all-sky survey clusters with z<0.1 . These have been observed in three colours g, r, i, and mapped up to a few core radii using a mosaic of CCD frames. E/S0 galaxies in the cluster core are singled out both by morphology (for the brightest galaxies), and by colour. The details of the data reduction procedure are illustrated via the analysis of the cluster Abell 496, which has been used as a pilot cluster for the whole program. The related photometric catalogue consists of 2355 objects. The limiting magnitudes (the reference Surface Brightness is given in parenthesis) in the various colours are respectively g(25.5)=24.14, r(25.5)=24.46, i(25.0)=23.75. These correspond to the limiting absolute magnitudes -12.28, -11.96 and -12.67 (H0=50km/s/Mpc). (1 data file).

  16. A Cosmic Train Wreck: JVLA Radio Observations of the HST Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Connor; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Kraft, Ralph P.; Dawson, William; Brüggen, Marcus; Roediger, Elke; Bulbul, Esra; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The galaxy cluster mergers observed in the HST Frontier Fields represent some of the most energetic events in the Universe. Major cluster mergers leave distinct signatures in the ICM in the form of shocks, turbulence, and diffuse cluster radio sources. These diffuse radio sources, so-called radio relics and halos, provide evidence for the acceleration of relativistic particles and the presence of large scale magnetic fields in the ICM. Observations of these halos and relics allow us to (i) study the physics of particle acceleration and its relation with shocks and turbulence in the ICM and (ii) constrain the dynamical evolution of the merger eventsWe present Jansky Very Large Array 1-4 GHz observations of the Frontier cluster Abell 2744. We confirm the presence of the known giant radio halo and radio relic via our deep radio images. Owing to the much greater sensitivity of the JVLA compared to previous observations, we are able to detect a previously unobserved long Mpc-size filament of synchrotron emission to the south west of the cluster core. We also present a radio spectral index image of the diffuse cluster emission to test the origin of the radio relic and halo, related to the underlying particle acceleration mechanism. Finally, we carry out a search for radio emission from the 'jellyfish' galaxies in A2744 to estimate their star formation rate. These highly disturbed galaxies are likely influenced by the cluster merger event, although the precise origin of these galaxies is still being debated.

  17. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING BY THE SUPER-MASSIVE cD GALAXY IN ABELL 3827

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, E. R.; Gomez, P. L.; Lee, H.; Diaz, R.; Bergmann, M.; Turner, J. E. H.; Miller, B. W.; West, M. J.; Verdugo, T.

    2010-06-01

    We have discovered strong gravitational lensing features in the core of the nearby cluster Abell 3827 by analyzing Gemini South GMOS images. The most prominent strong lensing feature is a highly magnified, ring-shaped configuration of four images around the central cD galaxy. GMOS spectroscopic analysis puts this source at z {approx} 0.2. Located {approx}20'' away from the central galaxy is a secondary tangential arc feature which has been identified as a background galaxy with z {approx} 0.4. We have modeled the gravitational potential of the cluster core, taking into account the mass from the cluster, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and other galaxies. We derive a total mass of (2.7 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 13} M {sub sun} within 37 h {sup -1} kpc. This mass is an order of magnitude larger than that derived from X-ray observations. The total mass derived from lensing data suggests that the BCG in this cluster is perhaps the most massive galaxy in the nearby universe.

  18. Systematic Uncertainties in Characterizing Cluster Outskirts: The Case of Abell 133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, Jennie; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Nulsen, Paul; Farrah, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    The outskirts of galaxy clusters have low surface brightness compared to the X-ray background, making accurate background subtraction particularly important for analyzing cluster spectra out to and beyond the virial radius. We analyze the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) of Abell 133 and assess the extent to which uncertainties on background subtraction affect measured quantities. We implement two methods of analyzing the ICM spectra: one in which the blank-sky background is subtracted, and another in which the sky background is modeled. We find that the two methods are consistent within the 90% confidence ranges. We were able to measure the thermodynamic properties of the cluster up to R500. Even at R500, the systematic uncertainties associated with the sky background in the direction of A133 are small, despite the ICM signal constituting only ~25% of the total signal. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution. GAO acknowledges support by NASA through a Hubble Fellowship grant HST-HF2-51345.001-A awarded by the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  19. MMTF-Halpha AND HST-FUV IMAGING OF THE FILAMENTARY COMPLEX IN ABELL 1795

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2009-10-01

    We have obtained deep, high spatial resolution images of the central region of Abell 1795 at Halpha and [N II] lambda6583 with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter (MMTF), and in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys solar blind channel on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The superb image quality of the MMTF data has made it possible to resolve the known SE filament into a pair of thin, intertwined filaments extending for {approx}50 kpc, with a width <1 kpc. The presence of these thin, tangled strands is suggestive of a cooling wake where runaway cooling is taking place, perhaps aided by an enhanced magnetic field in this region. The HST data further resolve these strands into chains of FUV-bright stellar clusters, indicating that these filaments are indeed sites of ongoing star formation, but at a rate {approx}2 orders of magnitude smaller than the mass-deposition rates predicted from the X-ray data. The elevated [N II]/Halpha ratio and large spatial variations of the FUV/Halpha flux ratio across the filaments indicate that O-star photoionization is not solely responsible for the ionization. The data favor collisional heating by cosmic rays either produced in situ by magnetohydrodynamical processes or conducted from the surrounding intracluster medium.

  20. Diffuse radio emission in the complex merging galaxy cluster Abell2069

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabent, A.; Hoeft, M.; Pizzo, R. F.; Bonafede, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Klein, U.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters with signs of a recent merger in many cases show extended diffuse radio features. This emission originates from relativistic electrons that suffer synchrotron losses due to the intracluster magnetic field. The mechanisms of particle acceleration and the properties of the magnetic field are still poorly understood. Aims: We search for diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters. Here, we study the complex galaxy cluster Abell 2069, for which X-ray observations indicate a recent merger. Methods: We investigate the cluster's radio continuum emission by deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations at 346 MHz and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations at 322 MHz. Results: We find an extended diffuse radio feature roughly coinciding with the main component of the cluster. We classify this emission as a radio halo and estimate its lower limit flux density at 25 ± 9 mJy. Moreover, we find a second extended diffuse source located at the cluster's companion and estimate its flux density at 15 ± 2 mJy. We speculate that this is a small halo or a mini-halo. If true, this cluster is the first example of a double-halo in a single galaxy cluster.

  1. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 1795 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamura, T.; Kaastra, J. S.; Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F.; Mittaz, J. P. D.; Trudolyubov, S. P.; Stewart, G.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Lumb, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    The initial results from XMM-Newton observations of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 1795 are presented. The spatially-resolved X-ray spectra taken by the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) show a temperature drop at a radius of - 200 kpc from the cluster center, indicating that the ICM is cooling. Both the EPIC and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) spectra extracted from the cluster center can be described by an isothermal model with a temperature of approx. 4 keV. The volume emission measure of any cool component (less than 1 keV) is less than a few % of the hot component at the cluster center. A strong O VIII Lyman alpha line was detected with the RGS from the cluster core. The O abundance of the ICM is 0.2-0.5 times the solar value. The O to Fe ratio at the cluster center is 0.5 - 1.5 times the solar ratio.

  2. Two new triterpenoid glycosides from the stems of Camellia oleifera Abel.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing-Wei; Fu, Hui-Zheng; Luo, Yue-Hua; Zhou, Guo-Ping; Wan, Kai-Hua; Zhong, Rui-Jian

    2016-07-01

    Two new oleanane-type triterpenoid glycosides, 3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)-[β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-22α-angeloyloxyolean-12-ene-15α,16α,28-triol(1) and 3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)-[β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21β-acetyl-22α-angeloyloxyolean-12-ene-16α,28-diol (2) were isolated from the stems of Camellia oleifera Abel. Their structures were elucidated by means of spectroscopic methods and chemical evidence. The cytotoxic activities of compounds 1-2 were evaluated against five human tumour cell lines (HCT-8, BGC-823, A5049, and A2780). Compounds 1-2 showed cytotoxic activity against five human cancer cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 3.15 to 7.32 μM. PMID:26610161

  3. Transformer design tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    In space, power system transformer components are frequently the heaviest and bulkiest items in the power conversion circuit. They also have a significant effect upon the overall performance and efficiency of the system. Accordingly, the design of such transformers has an important effect on overall system weight, power-inversion efficiency, and cost. Relationships were between the parameters used by transformer designers that can be used as new tools to standardize and simplify transformer design. They can be used to optimize the design either for small size and weight or efficiency. The metric system of units, rather than the familiar English units, is used; however, material is presented to assist the reader in the transition from one system to the other.

  4. An Algorithm to Generating Inverse S-box for Rijndael Encryption Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Iqtadar; Gondal, Muhammad Asif

    2014-12-01

    The S-box transformation is very important step for advanced encryption standard algorithm. The S-box values are generated from the multiplicative inverse of finite field with an affine transform. There are many techniques in literature to generate the multiplicative inverse values. In this paper, a software method of producing the multiplicative inverse values, which is the generator of S-box values will be discussed. The proposed technique is based on the mathematical concept of log and antilog.

  5. Zero-order bows in radially inhomogeneous spheres: direct and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    Adam, John A

    2011-10-01

    Zero-order ray paths are examined in radially inhomogeneous spheres with differentiable refractive index profiles. It is demonstrated that zero-order and sometimes twin zero-order bows can exist when the gradient of refractive index is sufficiently negative. Abel inversion is used to "recover" the refractive index profiles; it is therefore possible in principle to specify the nature and type of bows and determine the refractive index profile that induces them. This may be of interest in the field of rainbow refractometry and optical fiber studies. This ray-theoretic analysis has direct similarities with the phenomenon of "orbiting" and other phenomena in scattering theory and also in seismological, surface gravity wave, and gravitational "lensing" studies. For completeness these topics are briefly discussed in the appendixes; they may also be of pedagogic interest. PMID:22016245

  6. An Approach to Poetry Through Transformational Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Charles Lamar; Weiner, Charles

    1972-01-01

    Author details why the psychological studies of Jean Piaget have specific relevance to the teaching of poetry, especially his thought matrix which consists of four transformational processes: identity, inversion, reciprocity and correlation. (Author)

  7. Electromagnetic inverse scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bojarski, N. N.

    1972-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic inverse scattering identity, based on the physical optics approximation, is developed for the monostatic scattered far field cross section of perfect conductors. Uniqueness of this inverse identity is proven. This identity requires complete scattering information for all frequencies and aspect angles. A nonsingular integral equation is developed for the arbitrary case of incomplete frequence and/or aspect angle scattering information. A general closed-form solution to this integral equation is developed, which yields the shape of the scatterer from such incomplete information. A specific practical radar solution is presented. The resolution of this solution is developed, yielding short-pulse target resolution radar system parameter equations. The special cases of two- and one-dimensional inverse scattering and the special case of a priori knowledge of scatterer symmetry are treated in some detail. The merits of this solution over the conventional radar imaging technique are discussed.

  8. Structure and Formation of cD Galaxies: NGC 6166 in ABELL 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Ralf; Kormendy, John; Cornell, Mark E.; Fisher, David B.

    2015-07-01

     Hobby–Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy is used to measure the velocity dispersion profile of the nearest prototypical cD galaxy, NGC 6166 in the cluster Abell 2199. We also present composite surface photometry from many telescopes. We confirm the defining feature of a cD galaxy; i.e., (we suggest), a halo of stars that fills the cluster center and that is controlled dynamically by cluster gravity, not by the central galaxy. Our HET spectroscopy shows that the velocity dispersion of NGC 6166 rises from σ ≃ 300 km s‑1 in the inner r∼ 10\\prime\\prime to σ =865+/- 58 km s‑1 at r ∼ 100″ in the cD halo. This extends published observations of an outward σ increase and shows for the first time that σ rises all the way to the cluster velocity dispersion of 819 ± 32 km s‑1. We also observe that the main body of NGC 6166 moves at +206 ± 39 km s‑1 with respect to the cluster mean velocity, but the velocity of the inner cD halo is ∼70 km s‑1 closer to the cluster velocity. These results support our picture that cD halos consist of stars that were stripped from individual cluster galaxies by fast tidal encounters.  However, our photometry does not confirm the widespread view that cD halos are identifiable as an extra, low-surface-brightness component that is photometrically distinct from the inner, steep-Sérsic-function main body of an otherwise-normal giant elliptical galaxy. Instead, all of the brightness profile of NGC 6166 outside its core is described to ±0.037 V mag arcsec‑2 by a single Sérsic function with index n≃ 8.3. The cD halo is not recognizable from photometry alone. This blurs the distinction between cluster-dominated cD halos and the similarly-large-Sérsic-index halos of giant, core-boxy-nonrotating ellipticals. These halos are believed to be accreted onto compact, high-redshift progenitors (“red nuggets”) by large numbers of minor mergers. They belong dynamically to their central galaxies. Still, cDs and core

  9. The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey. II. The distribution of velocity dispersions of rich galaxy clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazure, A.; Katgert, P.; den Hartog, R.; Biviano, A.; Dubath, P.; Escalera, E.; Focardi, P.; Gerbal, D.; Giuricin, G.; Jones, B.; Le Fevre, O.; Moles, M.; Perea, J.; Rhee, G.

    1996-06-01

    The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (the ENACS) has yielded 5634 redshifts for galaxies in the directions of 107 rich, Southern clusters selected from the ACO catalogue (Abell et al. 1989). By combining these data with another 1000 redshifts from the literature, of galaxies in 37 clusters, we construct a volume-limited sample of 128 R_ACO_>=1 clusters in a solid angle of 2.55sr centered on the South Galactic Pole, out to a redshift z=0.1. For a subset of 80 of these clusters we can calculate a reliable velocity dispersion, based on at least 10 (but very often between 30 and 150) redshifts. We deal with the main observational problem that hampers an unambiguous interpretation of the distribution of cluster velocity dispersions, namely the contamination by fore- and background galaxies. We also discuss in detail the completeness of the cluster samples for which we derive the distribution of cluster velocity dispersions. We find that a cluster sample which is complete in terms of the field-corrected richness count given in the ACO catalogue gives a result that is essentially identical to that based on a smaller and more conservative sample which is complete in terms of an intrinsic richness count that has been corrected for superposition effects. We find that the large apparent spread in the relation between velocity dispersion and richness count (based either on visual inspection or on machine counts) must be largely intrinsic; i.e. this spread is not primarily due to measurement uncertainties. One of the consequences of the (very) broad relation between cluster richness and velocity dispersion is that all samples of clusters that are defined complete with respect to richness count are unavoidably biased against low-σ_V_ clusters. For the richness limit of our sample this bias operates only for velocity dispersions less than =~800km/sec. We obtain a statistically reliable distribution of global velocity dispersions which, for velocity dispersions σ_V_>800km/s, is

  10. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Titanium GTA Welds Using Multiple Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.; Shabaev, A.; Huang, L.

    2015-06-01

    Inverse thermal analysis of titanium gas-tungsten-arc welds using multiple constraint conditions is presented. This analysis employs a methodology that is in terms of numerical-analytical basis functions for inverse thermal analysis of steady-state energy deposition in plate structures. The results of this type of analysis provide parametric representations of weld temperature histories that can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, such as those for prediction of solid-state phase transformations. In addition, these temperature histories can be used to construct parametric function representations for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other process parameters or welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that provides for the inclusion of constraint conditions associated with both solidification and phase transformation boundaries.

  11. THE DISTRIBUTION OF DARK MATTER OVER THREE DECADES IN RADIUS IN THE LENSING CLUSTER ABELL 611

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S.; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Sand, David J.; Richard, Johan; Capak, Peter; Miyazaki, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the baryonic and dark matter distribution in the lensing cluster Abell 611 (z = 0.288), with the goal of determining the dark matter profile over an unprecedented range of cluster-centric distance. By combining three complementary probes of the mass distribution, weak lensing from multi-color Subaru imaging, strong lensing constraints based on the identification of multiply imaged sources in Hubble Space Telescope images, and resolved stellar velocity dispersion measures for the brightest cluster galaxy secured using the Keck telescope, we extend the methodology for separating the dark and baryonic mass components introduced by Sand et al. Our resulting dark matter profile samples the cluster from approx3 kpc to 3.25 Mpc, thereby providing an excellent basis for comparisons with recent numerical models. We demonstrate that only by combining our three observational techniques can degeneracies in constraining the form of the dark matter profile be broken on scales crucial for detailed comparisons with numerical simulations. Our analysis reveals that a simple Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile is an unacceptable fit to our data. We confirm earlier claims based on less extensive analyses of other clusters that the inner profile of the dark matter profile deviates significantly from the NFW form and find a inner logarithmic slope beta flatter than 0.3 (68%; where rho{sub DM} propor to r{sup -b}eta at small radii). In order to reconcile our data with cluster formation in a LAMBDACDM cosmology, we speculate that it may be necessary to revise our understanding of the nature of baryon-dark matter interactions in cluster cores. Comprehensive weak and strong lensing data, when coupled with kinematic information on the brightest cluster galaxy, can readily be applied to a larger sample of clusters to test the universality of these results.

  12. Exploring the origin of a large cavity in Abell 1795 using deep Chandra observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Kosec, P.

    2014-12-01

    We examine deep stacked Chandra observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 1795 (over 700 ks) to study in depth a large (34 kpc radius) cavity in the X-ray emission. Curiously, despite the large energy required to form this cavity (4PV = 4 × 1060 erg), there is no obvious counterpart to the cavity on the opposite side of the cluster, which would be expected if it has formed due to jets from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) inflating bubbles. There is also no radio emission associated with the cavity, and no metal enhancement or filaments between it and the brightest cluster galaxy, which are normally found for bubbles inflated by AGN which have risen from the core. One possibility is that this is an old ghost cavity, and that gas sloshing has dominated the distribution of metals around the core. Projection effects, particularly the long X-ray bright filament to the south-east, may prevent us from seeing the companion bubble on the opposite side of the cluster core. We calculate that such a companion bubble would easily have been able to uplift the gas in the southern filament from the core. Interestingly, it has recently been found that inside the cavity is a highly variable X-ray point source coincident with a small dwarf galaxy. Given the remarkable spatial correlation of this point source and the X-ray cavity, we explore the possibility that an outburst from this dwarf galaxy in the past could have led to the formation of the cavity, but find this to be an unlikely scenario.

  13. Dynamics of cD clusters of galaxies. II: Analysis of seven Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Hill, John M.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of the seven Abell clusters A193, A399, A401, A1795, A1809, A2063, and A2124, based on redshift data reported previously by us (Hill & Oegerle, (1993)). These papers present the initial results of a survey of cD cluster kinematics, with an emphasis on studying the nature of peculiar velocity cD galaxies and their parent clusters. In the current sample, we find no evidence for significant peculiar cD velocities, with respect to the global velocity distribution. However, the cD in A2063 has a significant (3 sigma) peculiar velocity with respect to galaxies in the inner 1.5 Mpc/h, which is likely due to the merger of a subcluster with A2063. We also find significant evidence for subclustering in A1795, and a marginally peculiar cD velocity with respect to galaxies within approximately 200 kpc/h of the cD. The available x-ray, optical, and galaxy redshift data strongly suggest that a subcluster has merged with A1795. We propose that the subclusters which merged with A1795 and A2063 were relatively small, with shallow potential wells, so that the cooling flows in these clusters were not disrupted. Two-body gravitational models of the A399/401 and A2063/MKW3S systems indicate that A399/401 is a bound pair with a total virial mass of approximately 4 x 10(exp 15) solar mass/h, while A2063 and MKW3S are very unlikely to be bound.

  14. Reconstructing the projected gravitational potential of Abell 1689 from X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernin, Céline; Majer, Charles L.; Meyer, Sven; Sarli, Eleonora; Eckert, Dominique; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters can be used as cosmological probes, but to this end, they need to be thoroughly understood. Combining all cluster observables in a consistent way will help us to understand their global properties and their internal structure. Aims: We provide proof of the concept that the projected gravitational potential of galaxy clusters can directly be reconstructed from X-ray observations. We also show that this joint analysis can be used to locally test the validity of the equilibrium assumptions in galaxy clusters. Methods: We used a newly developed reconstruction method, based on Richardson-Lucy deprojection, that allows reconstructing projected gravitational potentials of galaxy clusters directly from X-ray observations. We applied this algorithm to the well-studied cluster Abell 1689 and compared the gravitational potential reconstructed from X-ray observables to the potential obtained from gravitational lensing measurements. We also compared the X-ray deprojected profiles obtained by the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm with the findings from the more conventional onion-peeling technique. Results: Assuming spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium, the potentials recovered from gravitational lensing and from X-ray emission agree very well beyond 500 kpc. Owing to the fact that the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm allows deprojecting each line of sight independently, this result may indicate that non-gravitational effects and/or asphericity are strong in the central regions of the clusters. Conclusions: We demonstrate the robustness of the potential reconstruction method based on the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm and show that gravitational lensing and X-ray emission lead to consistent gravitational potentials. Our results illustrate the power of combining galaxy-cluster observables in a single, non-parametric, joint reconstruction of consistent cluster potentials that can be used to locally constrain the physical state

  15. The growth of the galaxy cluster Abell 85: mergers, shocks, stripping and seeding of clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinohe, Y.; Werner, N.; Simionescu, A.; Allen, S. W.; Canning, R. E. A.; Ehlert, S.; Mernier, F.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of deep Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 85, which is currently undergoing at least two mergers, and in addition shows evidence for gas sloshing which extends out to r ≈ 600 kpc. One of the two infalling subclusters, to the south of the main cluster centre, has a dense, X-ray bright cool core and a tail extending to the south-east. The northern edge of this tail is strikingly smooth and sharp (narrower than the Coulomb mean free path of the ambient gas) over a length of 200 kpc, while towards the south-west the boundary of the tail is blurred and bent, indicating a difference in the plasma transport properties between these two edges. The thermodynamic structure of the tail strongly supports an overall north-westward motion. We propose, that a sloshing-induced tangential, ambient, coherent gas flow is bending the tail eastwards. The brightest galaxy of this subcluster is at the leading edge of the dense core, and is trailed by the tail of stripped gas, suggesting that the cool core of the subcluster has been almost completely destroyed by the time it reached its current radius of r ≈ 500 kpc. The surface-brightness excess, likely associated with gas stripped from the infalling southern subcluster, extends towards the south-east out to at least r500 of the main cluster, indicating that the stripping of infalling subclusters may seed gas inhomogeneities. The second merging subcluster appears to be a diffuse non-cool-core system. Its merger is likely supersonic with a Mach number of ≈1.4.

  16. Red population of Abell 1314 : A rest-frame narrowband photometric evolutionary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, Yuvraj Harsha

    2014-06-01

    Red sequence galaxies form with an intense burst of star formation in the early universe to evolve passively into massive, metal rich, old galaxies at z ˜ 0. But Abell 1314 (z=0.034) is found to host almost all red sequence galaxy members - identified using the mz index, classified using the Principle Component Analysis technique and SDSS colour correlations - some of which show properties of low-mass, star forming, and metal rich galaxies. The variably spread Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) near the core forms a vital part in influencing the evolution of these members. To study their evolution, I correlated different parameters of the rest-frame narrowband photometry and the derived luminosity-weighted mean Single Stellar Population model ages and metallicities. The study finds the member galaxies evolve differently in three different sections of the cluster: 1. the region of ≤ 200 kpc hosts passively evolving old, massive systems which accumulate mass by dry, minor mergers, 2. the zone between 200-500 kpc shows stripped systems (or in the process of being gas stripped) by ram pressure with moderate star formation history, 3. the outer regions (≥ 500 kpc) show low-mass red objects with blue, star forming Butcher-Oemler galaxy like colours. This sort of environmental condition is known to harbour hybrid systems, like, the pseudo bulges, blue sequence E/S0 and Butcher-Oemler like satellite cluster galaxies. Overall, the cluster is found to be poor, quiescent with galaxies to have formed by the monolithic structure formation in the early universe and are now evolving with mergers and gas stripping processes by ram pressure.

  17. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  18. Abell 262 and RXJ0341: Two Brightest Cluster Galaxies with Line Emission Blanketing a Cool Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Heng, Renita

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, integral field (IFU) analysis of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in several cool core clusters has revealed the central regions of these massive old red galaxies to be far from dead. Bright line emission alongside extended X-ray emission links nearby galaxies, is superposed upon vast dust lanes and extends out in long thin filaments from the galaxy core. Yet, to date no unifying picture has come into focus, and the activity across systems is currently seen as a grab-bag of possibile emission line mechanisms. Our primary goal is to work toward a consistent picture for why the BCGs seem are undergoing a renewed level of activity. One problem is most of the current data remains focused on mapping the very core of the BCG, but neglects surrounding galaxies. We propose to discover the full extent of line emission in a complementary pair of BCGs. In Abell 262, an extensive dust patch screens large portions of an otherwise smooth central galaxy, whereas RXJ0341 appears to be a double-core dust free BCG. We will map the full extent of the line emission in order to deduce whether the line emission is a product of local interactions, or the large-scale cluster X-ray gas. The narrow band filter set and large FOV afforded by the the Mayall MOSAIC-1 (MOSA) imager allows us to concurrently conduct an emission line survey of both clusters, locating all line emitting members and beginning a search for the effect of the environment of the different regions (outskirts vs. cluster core) out to the virial radius. We will combine our results with publically available data from 2MASS to determine the upper limits on specific star formation in the BCG and other cluster galaxies within the cluster virial radius.

  19. Can standard cosmological models explain the observed Abell cluster bulk flow?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Michael A.; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Laure, Tod R.; Postman, Marc

    1995-01-01

    Lauer and Postman (LP) observed that all Abell clusters with redshifts less than 15,000 km/s appear to be participating in a bulk flow of 689 km/s with respect to the cosmic microwave background. We find this result difficult to reconcile with all popular models for large-scale structure formation that assume Gaussian initial conditions. This conclusion is based on Monte Carlo realizations of the LP data, drawn from large particle-mesh N-body simulations for six different models of the initial power spectrum (standard, tilted, and Omega(sub 0) = 0.3 cold dark matter, and two variants of the primordial baryon isocurvature model). We have taken special care to treat properly the longest-wavelength components of the power spectra. The simulations are sampled, 'observed,' and analyzed as identically as possible to the LP cluster sample. Large-scale bulk flows as measured from clusters in the simulations are in excellent agreement with those measured from the grid: the clusters do not exhibit any strong velocity bias on large scales. Bulk flows with amplitude as large as that reported by LP are not uncommon in the Monte Carlo data stes; the distribution of measured bulk flows before error bias subtraction is rougly Maxwellian, with a peak around 400 km/s. However the chi squared of the observed bulk flow, taking into account the anisotropy of the error ellipsoid, is much more difficult to match in the simulations. The models examined are ruled out at confidence levels between 94% and 98%.

  20. Creation of cosmic structure in the complex galaxy cluster merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, J.; Coe, D.; Dupke, R.; Massey, R.; Zitrin, A.; Cypriano, E. S.; Okabe, N.; Frye, B.; Braglia, F. G.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Rhodes, J.; Meneghetti, M.; Moustakas, L. A.; Sodré, L., Jr.; Krick, J.; Bregman, J. N.

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed strong-lensing, weak-lensing and X-ray analysis of Abell 2744 (z= 0.308), one of the most actively merging galaxy clusters known. It appears to have unleashed 'dark', 'ghost', 'bullet' and 'stripped' substructures, each ˜1014 M⊙. The phenomenology is complex and will present a challenge for numerical simulations to reproduce. With new, multiband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, we identify 34 strongly lensed images of 11 galaxies around the massive Southern 'core'. Combining this with weak-lensing data from HST, VLT and Subaru, we produce the most detailed mass map of this cluster to date. We also perform an independent analysis of archival Chandra X-ray imaging. Our analyses support a recent claim that the Southern core and Northwestern substructure are post-merger and exhibit morphology similar to the Bullet Cluster viewed from an angle. From the separation between X-ray emitting gas and lensing mass in the Southern core, we derive a new and independent constraint on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter particles σ/m < 3 ± 1 cm2 g-1. In the Northwestern substructure, the gas, dark matter and galaxy components have become separated by much larger distances. Most curiously, the 'ghost' clump (primarily gas) leads the 'dark' clump (primarily dark matter) by more than 150 kpc. We propose an enhanced 'ram-pressure slingshot' scenario which may have yielded this reversal of components with such a large separation, but needs further confirmation by follow-up observations and numerical simulations. A secondary merger involves a second 'bullet' clump in the North and an extremely 'stripped' clump to the West. The latter appears to exhibit the largest separation between dark matter and X-ray emitting baryons detected to date in our sky.

  1. Suzaku Constraints on Soft and Hard Excess Emissions from Abell 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaharada, Madoka; Makishima, Kazuo; Kitaguchi, Takao; Okuyama, Sho; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi

    2010-02-01

    The nearby (z = 0.03015) cluster of galaxies Abell 2199 was observed by Suzaku in X-rays, with five pointings for ˜20ks each. From the XIS data, the temperature and metal abundance profiles were derived out to ˜700 kpc (0.4 times the virial radius). Both of these quantities decrease gradually from the center to peripheries by a factor of ˜2, while the oxygen abundance tends to be flat. The temperature within 12' (˜430 kpc) is ˜4 keV, and the 0.5-10 keV X-ray luminosity integrated up to 30' is (2.9±0.1) × 1044 erg s-1, in agreement with previous XMM-Newton measurements. Above this thermal emission, no significant excess was found either in the XIS range below ˜1 keV, or in the HXD-PIN range above ˜15 keV. The 90%-confidence upper limit on the emission measure of an assumed 0.2 keV warm gas is (3.7-7.5) × 1062 cm-3 arcmin-2, which is 3.7-7.6 times tighter than the detection reported with XMM-Newton. The 90%-confidence upper limit on the 20-80 keV luminosity of any power-law component is 1.8 × 1043 erg s-1, assuming a photon index of 2.0. Although this upper limit does not reject the possible 2.1σ detection by the BeppoSAX PDS, it is a factor of 2.1 tighter than that of the PDS if both are considered upper limits. The non-detection of the hard excess can be reconciled with the upper limit on diffuse radio emission, without invoking very low magnetic fields (<0.073μG) which were suggested previously.

  2. Inverse temperature in Superstatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loguercio, Humberto; Davis, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    In this work, it is shown that there are (at least) three alternative definitions of the inverse temperature for a non-canonical ensemble. These definitions coincide in expectation but, in general, not in their higher moments. We explore in detail the application to the recent formalism of Superstatistics (C. Beck, 2003), and, in particular, to the configurational probability distribution in the microcanonical ensemble.

  3. AVO inversion based on inverse operator estimation in trust region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xing-Yao; Deng, Wei; Zong, Zhao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude variation with offset (AVO) inversion is widely utilized in exploration geophysics, especially for reservoir prediction and fluid identification. Inverse operator estimation in the trust region algorithm is applied for solving AVO inversion problems in which optimization and inversion directly are integrated. The L1 norm constraint is considered on the basis of reasonable initial model in order to improve effciency and stability during the AVO inversion process. In this study, high-order Zoeppritz approximation is utilized to establish the inversion objective function in which variation of {{v}\\text{p}}/{{v}\\text{s}} with time is taken into consideration. A model test indicates that the algorithm has a relatively higher stability and accuracy than the damp least-squares algorithm. Seismic data inversion is feasible and inversion values of three parameters ({{v}\\text{p}},{{v}\\text{s}},ρ ) maintain good consistency with logging curves.

  4. Illuminating a Dark Lens : A Type Ia Supernova Magnified by the Frontier Fields Galaxy Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Patel, Brandon; Scolnic, Daniel; Foley, Ryan J.; Molino, Alberto; Brammer, Gabriel; Jauzac, Mathilde; Bradač, Maruša; Broadhurst, Tom; Coe, Dan; Diego, Jose M.; Graur, Or; Hjorth, Jens; Hoag, Austin; Jha, Saurabh W.; Johnson, Traci L.; Kelly, Patrick; Lam, Daniel; McCully, Curtis; Medezinski, Elinor; Meneghetti, Massimo; Merten, Julian; Richard, Johan; Riess, Adam; Sharon, Keren; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Treu, Tommaso; Wang, Xin; Williams, Liliya L. R.; Zitrin, Adi

    2015-09-01

    SN HFF14Tom is a Type Ia SN discovered at z=1.3457+/- 0.0001 behind the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). In a cosmology-independent analysis, we find that HFF14Tom is 0.77 ± 0.15 mag brighter than unlensed Type Ia SNe at similar redshift, implying a lensing magnification of {μ }{obs}=2.03+/- 0.29. This observed magnification provides a rare opportunity for a direct empirical test of galaxy cluster lens models. Here we test 17 lens models, 13 of which were generated before the SN magnification was known, qualifying as pure “blind tests.” The models are collectively fairly accurate: 8 of the models deliver median magnifications that are consistent with the measured μ to within 1σ. However, there is a subtle systematic bias: the significant disagreements all involve models overpredicting the magnification. We evaluate possible causes for this mild bias, and find no single physical or methodological explanation to account for it. We do find that model accuracy can be improved to some extent with stringent quality cuts on multiply imaged systems, such as requiring that a large fraction have spectroscopic redshifts. In addition to testing model accuracies as we have done here, Type Ia SN magnifications could also be used as inputs for future lens models of Abell 2744 and other clusters, providing valuable constraints in regions where traditional strong- and weak-lensing information is unavailable.

  5. Numerical Simulations Challenged on the Prediction of Massive Subhalo Abundance in Galaxy Clusters: The Case of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, E.; Grillo, C.; De Lucia, G.; Biviano, A.; Annunziatella, M.; Borgani, S.; Lombardi, M.; Mercurio, A.; Rosati, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter we compare the abundance of the member galaxies of a rich, nearby (z = 0.09) galaxy cluster, Abell 2142, with that of halos of comparable virial mass extracted from sets of state-of-the-art numerical simulations, both collisionless at different resolutions and with the inclusion of baryonic physics in the form of cooling, star formation, and feedback by active galactic nuclei. We also use two semi-analytical models to account for the presence of orphan galaxies. The photometric and spectroscopic information, taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 database, allows us to estimate the stellar velocity dispersion of member galaxies of Abell 2142. This quantity is used as proxy for the total mass of secure cluster members and is properly compared with that of subhalos in simulations. We find that simulated halos have a statistically significant (≳ 7 sigma confidence level) smaller amount of massive (circular velocity above 200 {km} {{{s}}}-1) subhalos, even before accounting for the possible incompleteness of observations. These results corroborate the findings from a recent strong lensing study of the Hubble Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416 and suggest that the observed difference is already present at the level of dark matter (DM) subhalos and is not solved by introducing baryonic physics. A deeper understanding of this discrepancy between observations and simulations will provide valuable insights into the impact of the physical properties of DM particles and the effect of baryons on the formation and evolution of cosmological structures.

  6. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach. PMID:18025701

  7. Silk inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Mitropoulos, Alexander N.; Spitzberg, Joshua D.; Tao, Hu; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-12-01

    Periodic nanostructures provide the facility to control and manipulate the flow of light through their lattices. Three-dimensional photonic crystals enable the controlled design of structural colour, which can be varied by infiltrating the structure with different (typically liquid) fillers. Here, we report three-dimensional photonic crystals composed entirely of a purified natural protein (silk fibroin). The biocompatibility of this protein, as well as its favourable material properties and ease of biological functionalization, present opportunities for otherwise unattainable device applications such as bioresorbable integration of structural colour within living tissue or lattice functionalization by means of organic and inorganic material doping. We present a silk inverse opal that demonstrates a pseudo-photonic bandgap in the visible spectrum and show its associated structural colour beneath biological tissue. We also leverage silk's facile dopability to manufacture a gold nanoparticle silk inverse opal and demonstrate patterned heating mediated by enhancement of nanoparticle absorption at the band-edge frequency of the photonic crystal.

  8. Vitamins and Violence: Can Micronutrients Make Students Behave, Schools Safer and Test Scores Better? The Abell Report. Volume 23, No.6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joann Ellison

    2010-01-01

    The notion that vitamins, minerals, and other "supplemental" nutrients profoundly change behavior, mood, and intellect has origins as old as recorded history. Research has indeed suggested connections between nutrient deficiencies and behavior problems, but correlations are not the same as causality. This "Abell Report" is an…

  9. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  10. Diffuse light and building history of the galaxy cluster Abell 2667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covone, G.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Kneib, J.-P.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Slezak, E.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.We searched for diffuse intracluster light in the galaxy cluster Abell 2667 (z=0.233) from HST images in three broad band-filters. Methods: .We applied an iterative multi-scale wavelet analysis and reconstruction technique to these images, which allows to subtract stars and galaxies from the original images. Results: .We detect a zone of diffuse emission southwest of the cluster center (DS1) and a second faint object (ComDif) within DS1. Another diffuse source (DS2) may be detected at lower confidence level northeast of the center. These sources of diffuse light contribute to 10-15% of the total visible light in the cluster. Whether they are independent entities or part of the very elliptical external envelope of the central galaxy remains unclear. Deep VLT VIMOS integral field spectroscopy reveals a faint continuum at the positions of DS1 and ComDif but do not allow a redshift to be computed, so we conclude if these sources are part of the central galaxy or not. A hierarchical substructure detection method reveals the presence of several galaxy pairs and groups defining a similar direction to the one drawn by the DS1 - central galaxy - DS2 axis. The analysis of archive XMM-Newton and Chandra observations shows X-ray emission elongated in the same direction. The X-ray temperature map shows the presence of a cool core, a broad cool zone stretching from north to south, and hotter regions towards the northeast, southwest, and northwest. This might suggest shock fronts along these directions produced by infalling material, even if uncertainties remain quite large on the temperature determination far from the center. Conclusions: .These various data are consistent with a picture in which diffuse sources are concentrations of tidal debris and harassed matter expelled from infalling galaxies by tidal stripping and undergoing an accretion process onto the central cluster galaxy; as such, they are expected to be found along the main infall directions. Note, however

  11. Inverse avalanches on Abelian sandpiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, H.F. Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801-3080 )

    1994-11-01

    A simple and computationally efficient way of finding inverse avalanches for Abelian sandpiles, called the inverse particle addition operator, is presented. In addition, the method is shown to be optimal in the sense that it requires the minimum amount of computation among methods of the same kind. The method is also conceptually succinct because avalanche and inverse avalanche are placed in the same footing.

  12. Multiscale full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Trampert, Jeannot; Cupillard, Paul; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay; Capdeville, Yann; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We develop and apply a full waveform inversion method that incorporates seismic data on a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, thereby constraining the details of both crustal and upper-mantle structure. This is intended to further our understanding of crust-mantle interactions that shape the nature of plate tectonics, and to be a step towards improved tomographic models of strongly scale-dependent earth properties, such as attenuation and anisotropy. The inversion for detailed regional earth structure consistently embedded within a large-scale model requires locally refined numerical meshes that allow us to (1) model regional wave propagation at high frequencies, and (2) capture the inferred fine-scale heterogeneities. The smallest local grid spacing sets the upper bound of the largest possible time step used to iteratively advance the seismic wave field. This limitation leads to extreme computational costs in the presence of fine-scale structure, and it inhibits the construction of full waveform tomographic models that describe earth structure on multiple scales. To reduce computational requirements to a feasible level, we design a multigrid approach based on the decomposition of a multiscale earth model with widely varying grid spacings into a family of single-scale models where the grid spacing is approximately uniform. Each of the single-scale models contains a tractable number of grid points, which ensures computational efficiency. The multi-to-single-scale decomposition is the foundation of iterative, gradient-based optimization schemes that simultaneously and consistently invert data on all scales for one multi-scale model. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in a full waveform inversion for Eurasia, with a special focus on Anatolia where coverage is particularly dense. Continental-scale structure is constrained by complete seismic waveforms in the 30-200 s period range. In addition to the well-known structural elements of the Eurasian mantle

  13. Optical properties of silicon inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hong

    Silicon inverse opals are artificial structures in which nearly monodisperse, close-packed air bubbles are embedded in a silicon matrix. If properly tailored, this structure can exhibit a photonic band gap (PBG) in the near infrared spectral region. The PBG can block light propagation in any direction, allowing the control of light flow in the material. Silicon inverse opals can be fabricated by infiltrating amorphous silicon into silica colloidal crystals and then etching away the silica. In this thesis, the structural defects of silica colloidal crystals and the optical properties of silicon inverse opals are studied. First, by using laser-scanning confocal microscopy, the concentration and distribution of stacking faults and vacancies were quantified in silica colloidal crystals. It's shown that silica colloidal crystals show strong tendency toward face-center-cubic structure with the vacancy density as small as 5 x 10-4. Second, by combining optical microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, the transmission and reflection spectra of silicon inverse opals along the [111] direction were measured. Combined with the calculation of transmission and reflection spectra by Transfer Matrix Methods, it is concluded that the strong light attenuation in silicon inverse opals is due to the enhanced absorption (>600%) in silicon materials. Third, by using optical pump-probe techniques, the photo-induced ultra-fast reflection changes in silicon inverse opals were examined. The pump-generated free carriers cause the reflection in the band gap region to change after ˜0.5 ps. For the first few ps, the main effect is a decrease in reflectivity due to nonlinear absorption. After ˜5 ps, this effect disappears and an unexpected blue spectral shift is seen in the photonic band gap. The refractive index decreases due to optically-induced strain born the thermal expansion mismatch between silicon and its native oxide. Finally, by infiltrating silicon inverse

  14. Neighborhood inverse consistency preprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Freuder, E.C.; Elfe, C.D.

    1996-12-31

    Constraint satisfaction consistency preprocessing methods are used to reduce search effort. Time and especially space costs limit the amount of preprocessing that will be cost effective. A new form of consistency preprocessing, neighborhood inverse consistency, can achieve more problem pruning than the usual arc consistency preprocessing in a cost effective manner. There are two basic ideas: (1) Common forms of consistency enforcement basically operate by identifying and remembering solutions to subproblems for which a consistent value cannot be found for some additional problem variable. The space required for this memory can quickly become prohibitive. Inverse consistency basically operates by removing values for variables that are not consistent with any solution to some subproblem involving additional variables. The space requirement is at worst linear. (2) Typically consistency preprocessing achieves some level of consistency uniformly throughout the problem. A subproblem solution will be tested against each additional variable that constrains any subproblem variable. Neighborhood consistency focuses attention on the subproblem formed by the variables that are all constrained by the value in question. By targeting highly relevant subproblems we hope to {open_quotes}skim the cream{close_quotes}, obtaining a high payoff for a limited cost.

  15. A robust inverse inviscid method for airfoil design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaviaropoulos, P.; Dedoussis, V.; Papailiou, K. D.

    An irrotational inviscid compressible inverse design method for two-dimensional airfoil profiles is described. The method is based on the potential streamfunction formulation, where the physical space on which the boundaries of the airfoil are sought, is mapped onto the (phi, psi) space via a body-fitted coordinate transformation. A novel procedure based on differential geometry arguments is employed to derive the governing equations for the inverse problem, by requiring the curvature of the flat 2-D Euclidean space to be zero. An auxiliary coordinate transformation permits the definition of C-type computational grids on the (phi, psi) plane resulting to a more accurate description of the leading edge region. Geometry is determined by integrating Frenet equations along the grid lines. To validate the method inverse calculation results are compared to direct, `reproduction', calculation results. The design procedure of a new airfoil shape is also presented.

  16. Inverse scattering for a specific resonating group model nonlocality

    SciTech Connect

    Pantis, G.; Sofianos, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    An inverse scattering method of Lipperheide and Fiedeldey [Z. Phys. A {bold 286}, 45 (1978); {bold 301}, 81 (1981)] has been used to construct an energy-dependent potential from the elastic-scattering phase shifts of the recently developed {ital K} model of Kaneko, LeMere, and Tang [Phys. Rev. C {bold 44}, 1588 (1991); {bold 46}, 298 (1992)] for the {ital n}{minus}{alpha} and {ital n}{minus}{sup 40}Ca systems. The local momentum of the inversion potential is subsequently used to recover the Wigner transforms of the {ital K} model. The results obtained indicate that it is possible to find, via inversion, an {ital l}-independent Wigner transform, which, when calculated at all energies, can provide us with the full nonlocality. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Inverse scattering for a specific resonating group model nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantis, G.; Sofianos, S. A.

    1996-10-01

    An inverse scattering method of Lipperheide and Fiedeldey [Z. Phys. A 286, 45 (1978); 301, 81 (1981)] has been used to construct an energy-dependent potential from the elastic-scattering phase shifts of the recently developed K model of Kaneko, LeMere, and Tang [Phys. Rev. C 44, 1588 (1991); 46, 298 (1992)] for the n-α and n-40Ca systems. The local momentum of the inversion potential is subsequently used to recover the Wigner transforms of the K model. The results obtained indicate that it is possible to find, via inversion, an l-independent Wigner transform, which, when calculated at all energies, can provide us with the full nonlocality.

  18. On nonsingular potentials of Cox-Thompson inversion scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Palmai, Tamas; Apagyi, Barnabas

    2010-02-15

    We establish a condition for obtaining nonsingular potentials using the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering method with one phase shift. The anomalous singularities of the potentials are avoided by maintaining unique solutions of the underlying Regge-Newton integral equation for the transformation kernel. As a by-product, new inequality sequences of zeros of Bessel functions are discovered.

  19. On nonsingular potentials of Cox-Thompson inversion scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálmai, Tamás; Apagyi, Barnabás

    2010-02-01

    We establish a condition for obtaining nonsingular potentials using the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering method with one phase shift. The anomalous singularities of the potentials are avoided by maintaining unique solutions of the underlying Regge-Newton integral equation for the transformation kernel. As a by-product, new inequality sequences of zeros of Bessel functions are discovered.

  20. OSO-7 observations of a high-latitude X-ray source associated with Abell cluster A2052

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinz, C. J.; Clark, G. W.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Schnopper, H. W.; Sprott, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    An X-ray source with a flux of 1.6 times 10 to the -10th power ergs per sec/sq cm (2-10 keV) has been observed at high galactic latitude by the MIT X-ray detectors on the OSO-7 satellite. Designated GX 8+50, its position is 15 hr 14.2 min right ascension, 6 deg 51 min declination, with a 90 percent confidence error circle of area 0.5 sq deg. The data are consistent with a power-law spectrum with an exponent 1.2 (plus or minus 0.2) or a thermal-bremsstrahlung spectrum with kT = 4 plus or minus 1 keV. A likely identification is the Abell cluster A2052, whose center coincides with the radio source 3C 317.

  1. Summability of trigonometric Fourier series at d-points and a generalization of the Abel-Poisson method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigub, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    We study the convergence of linear means of the Fourier series \\sumk=-∞+∞λk,\\varepsilon\\hat{f}_keikx of a function f\\in L1 \\lbrack -π,π \\rbrack to f(x) as \\varepsilon\\searrow0 at all points at which the derivative \\bigl(\\int_0^xf(t) dt\\bigr)' exists (i.e. at the d-points). Sufficient conditions for the convergence are stated in terms of the factors \\{λk,\\varepsilon\\} and, in the case of λk,\\varepsilon=\\varphi(\\varepsilon k), in terms of the condition that the functions \\varphi and x\\varphi'(x) belong to the Wiener algebra A( R). We also study a new problem concerning the convergence of means of the Abel-Poisson type, \\sumk=-∞^∞r\\psi(\\vert k\\vert)\\hat{f}_keikx, as r\

  2. A 2163: Merger events in the hottest Abell galaxy cluster. I. Dynamical analysis from optical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurogordato, S.; Cappi, A.; Ferrari, C.; Benoist, C.; Mars, G.; Soucail, G.; Arnaud, M.; Pratt, G. W.; Bourdin, H.; Sauvageot, J.-L.

    2008-04-01

    Context: A 2163 is among the richest and most distant Abell clusters, presenting outstanding properties in different wavelength domains. X-ray observations have revealed a distorted gas morphology and strong features have been detected in the temperature map, suggesting that merging processes are important in this cluster. However, the merging scenario is not yet well-defined. Aims: We have undertaken a complementary optical analysis, aiming to understand the dynamics of the system, to constrain the merging scenario and to test its effect on the properties of galaxies. Methods: We present a detailed optical analysis of A 2163 based on new multicolor wide-field imaging and medium-to-high resolution spectroscopy of several hundred galaxies. Results: The projected galaxy density distribution shows strong subclustering with two dominant structures: a main central component (A), and a northern component (B), visible both in optical and in X-ray, with two other substructures detected at high significance in the optical. At magnitudes fainter than R=19, the galaxy distribution shows a clear elongation approximately with the east-west axis extending over 4~h70-1 Mpc, while a nearly perpendicular bridge of galaxies along the north-south axis appears to connect (B) to (A). The (A) component shows a bimodal morphology, and the positions of its two density peaks depend on galaxy luminosity: at magnitudes fainter than R = 19, the axis joining the peaks shows a counterclockwise rotation (from NE/SW to E-W) centered on the position of the X-ray maximum. Our final spectroscopic catalog of 512 objects includes 476 new galaxy redshifts. We have identified 361 galaxies as cluster members; among them, 326 have high precision redshift measurements, which allow us to perform a detailed dynamical analysis of unprecedented accuracy. The cluster mean redshift and velocity dispersion are respectively z= 0.2005 ± 0.0003 and 1434 ± 60 km s-1. We spectroscopically confirm that the northern

  3. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. I. Multiwavelength photometry of Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Buitrago, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Lotz, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Frontier Fields survey is a pioneering observational program aimed at collecting photometric data, both from space (Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope) and from ground-based facilities (VLT Hawk-I), for six deep fields pointing at clusters of galaxies and six nearby deep parallel fields, in a wide range of passbands. The analysis of these data is a natural outcome of the Astrodeep project, an EU collaboration aimed at developing methods and tools for extragalactic photometry and creating valuable public photometric catalogues. Aims: We produce multiwavelength photometric catalogues (from B to 4.5 μm) for the first two of the Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416 (plus their parallel fields). Methods: To detect faint sources even in the central regions of the clusters, we develop a robust and repeatable procedure that uses the public codes Galapagos and Galfit to model and remove most of the light contribution from both the brightest cluster members, and the intra-cluster light. We perform the detection on the processed HST H160 image to obtain a pure H-selected sample, which is the primary catalogue that we publish. We also add a sample of sources which are undetected in the H160 image but appear on a stacked infrared image. Photometry on the other HST bands is obtained using SExtractor, again on processed images after the procedure for foreground light removal. Photometry on the Hawk-I and IRAC bands is obtained using our PSF-matching deconfusion code t-phot. A similar procedure, but without the need for the foreground light removal, is adopted for the Parallel fields. Results: The procedure of foreground light subtraction allows for the detection and the photometric measurements of ~2500 sources per field. We deliver and release complete photometric H-detected catalogues, with the addition of the complementary sample of infrared-detected sources. All objects have multiwavelength coverage including B to H HST bands, plus K

  4. Waveform inversion in the Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Changsoo; Ha, Wansoo

    2010-05-01

    We present a review of full waveform inversion in the Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domains. Since Tarantola's pioneering work on waveform inversion, the practical application of full waveform inversions to real field data in the time or frequency domain has been nominal. The main hindrances in recovering a long-wavelength velocity model through full waveform inversion originate from a lack of low-frequency information in the data and the high non-linearity of the objective functions. The Laplace-domain wave equation can be obtained simply by changing the real frequencies from the Fourier transform into imaginary numbers. In terms of numerical integration, the Laplace-transformed wavefield is the sum of the damped wavefield from zero to infinity. Hence, Laplace-domain wavefields for each Laplace frequency can be treated as zero-frequency components of damped wavefields. The Laplace-transformed wavefield resembles a direct current field where only the source is used for Poisson's equation. The logarithmic objective function, combined with the Laplace transformed wavefield, has no local minima and a smoother convex form than conventional objective functions in the time or frequency domain. These characteristics of the Laplace domain wavefields and the objective function make Laplace domain inversions robust for real data, allowing us to start from scratch and recover smooth velocity models. Moreover, coarse grids, compared with time or frequency domain numerical modeling, can be used in the Laplace-domain inversion without sacrificing accuracy. The choice of Laplace frequencies to be used for inversion is roughly determined by inspecting a kernel of the Green's function for a horizontally two-layered media. Just as the zero-frequency component is exploited in a Laplace-domain inversion, a Laplace-Fourier domain inversion utilizes low, medium and high frequency information of damped wavefields. By introducing complex-valued frequencies in the Fourier transform and

  5. The near-infrared Tully-Fisher relation - A preliminary study of the Coma and Abell 400 clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Bernstein, Gary; Raychaudhury, Somak; Haynes, Martha; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Herter, Terry; Vogt, Nicole

    1993-01-01

    We have started a large project to study the NIR Tully-Fisher (TF) relation using H- and I-band surface photometry of spiral galaxies. A preliminary study of 20 spirals in the Coma and Abell 400 clusters is presented. The NIR images have been used to derive accurate inclinations and total magnitudes, and rotational linewidths are measured from high-quality 21-cm Arecibo data. The scatter in the Coma TF plot is found to be 0.19 mag in the H band and 0.20 mag in the I band for a set of 13 galaxies, if we assume that they are all at the same distance. The deviation of the Coma galaxies from the best-fit Tully-Fisher relation is correlated with their redshift, indicating that some of the galaxies are not bound to the cluster. Indeed, if we treat all the galaxies in the Coma sample as undergoing free Hubble expansion, the TF scatter drops to 0.12 and 0.13 mag for the H- and I-band datasets, respectively. The Abell 400 sample is best fit by a common distance model, yielding a scatter of 0.12 mag for seven galaxies in H using a fixed TF slope. We are in the process of studying cluster and field spirals out to about 10,000 km/s in order to calibrate the NIR TF relation and will apply it to more nearby galaxies to measure the peculiar velocity field in the local universe.

  6. Möbius transformational high dimensional model representation on multi-way arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özay, Evrim Korkmaz

    2012-09-01

    Transformational High Dimensional Model Representation has been used for continous structures with different transformations before. This work is inventive because not only for the transformation type but also its usage. Möbius Transformational High Dimensional Model Representation has been used at multi-way arrays, by using truncation approximant and inverse transformation an approximation has been obtained for original multi-way array.

  7. Analysis of Raman lasing without inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Paul Martin

    1999-12-01

    Properties of lasing without inversion were studied analytically and numerically using Maple computer assisted algebra software. Gain for probe electromagnetic field without population inversion in detuned three level atomic schemes has been found. Matter density matrix dynamics and coherence is explored using Pauli matrices in 2-level systems and Gell-Mann matrices in 3-level systems. It is shown that extreme inversion produces no coherence and hence no lasing. Unitary transformation from the strict field-matter Hamiltonian to an effective two-photon Raman Hamiltonian for multilevel systems has been derived. Feynman diagrams inherent in the derivation show interesting physics. An additional picture change was achieved and showed cw gain possible. Properties of a Raman-like laser based on injection of 3- level coherently driven Λ-type atoms whose Hamiltonian contains the Raman Hamiltonian and microwave coupling the two bottom states have been studied in the limits of small and big photon numbers in the drive field. Another picture change removed the microwave coupler to all orders and simplified analysis. New possibilities of inversionless generation were found.

  8. Inverse Compton for Compton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suortti, Pekka

    2016-04-01

    A novel concept for a high resolution Compton spectrometer is introduced. 88 keV radiation from an Inverse Compton Compact Source is focused using crossed cylindrically bent Laue-type Si perfect crystals, and dispersed on the sample with a constant energy gradient. Dispersion is compensated exactly at a Ge crystal analyzer, so that the same wavelength shift is observed for all wavelengths of the incident beam. The ThomX source is used as a concrete example. Detailed dimensions and flux estimates at successive locations of the spectrometer are given, and the performance is compared with the dispersion compensating spectrometer at ID15 of the ESRF. The momentum resolution is better than 0.1 atomic units in both cases. The intensity of scattering with the compact source is an order of magnitude smaller, but still adequate for high resolution Compton profile measurements.

  9. Inverse magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arco, L; López-López, M T; Zubarev, A Y; Gdula, K; Durán, J D G

    2014-09-01

    We report a new kind of field-responsive fluid consisting of suspensions of diamagnetic (DM) and ferromagnetic (FM) microparticles in ferrofluids. We designate them as inverse magnetorheological (IMR) fluids for analogy with inverse ferrofluids (IFFs). Observations on the particle self-assembly in IMR fluids upon magnetic field application showed that DM and FM microparticles were assembled into alternating chains oriented along the field direction. We explain such assembly on the basis of the dipolar interaction energy between particles. We also present results on the rheological properties of IMR fluids and, for comparison, those of IFFs and bidispersed magnetorheological (MR) fluids. Interestingly, we found that upon magnetic field application, the rheological properties of IMR fluids were enhanced with respect to bidispersed MR fluids with the same FM particle concentration, by an amount greater than the sum of the isolated contribution of DM particles. Furthermore, the field-induced yield stress was moderately increased when up to 30% of the total FM particle content was replaced with DM particles. Beyond this point, the dependence of the yield stress on the DM content was non-monotonic, as expected for FM concentrations decreasing to zero. We explain these synergistic results by two separate phenomena: the formation of exclusion areas for FM particles due to the perturbation of the magnetic field by DM particles and the dipole-dipole interaction between DM and FM particles, which enhances the field-induced structures. Based on the second phenomenon, we present a theoretical model for the yield stress that semi-quantitatively predicts the experimental results. PMID:25022363

  10. Discrete implementations of scale transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurdjanovic, Dragan; Williams, William J.; Koh, Christopher K.

    1999-11-01

    Scale as a physical quantity is a recently developed concept. The scale transform can be viewed as a special case of the more general Mellin transform and its mathematical properties are very applicable in the analysis and interpretation of the signals subject to scale changes. A number of single-dimensional applications of scale concept have been made in speech analysis, processing of biological signals, machine vibration analysis and other areas. Recently, the scale transform was also applied in multi-dimensional signal processing and used for image filtering and denoising. Discrete implementation of the scale transform can be carried out using logarithmic sampling and the well-known fast Fourier transform. Nevertheless, in the case of the uniformly sampled signals, this implementation involves resampling. An algorithm not involving resampling of the uniformly sampled signals has been derived too. In this paper, a modification of the later algorithm for discrete implementation of the direct scale transform is presented. In addition, similar concept was used to improve a recently introduced discrete implementation of the inverse scale transform. Estimation of the absolute discretization errors showed that the modified algorithms have a desirable property of yielding a smaller region of possible error magnitudes. Experimental results are obtained using artificial signals as well as signals evoked from the temporomandibular joint. In addition, discrete implementations for the separable two-dimensional direct and inverse scale transforms are derived. Experiments with image restoration and scaling through two-dimensional scale domain using the novel implementation of the separable two-dimensional scale transform pair are presented.

  11. Wavelet Sparse Approximate Inverse Preconditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tang, W.-P.; Wan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using sparse approximate inverses as preconditioners for Krylov subspace iterative methods. Recent studies of Grote and Huckle and Chow and Saad also show that sparse approximate inverse preconditioner can be effective for a variety of matrices, e.g. Harwell-Boeing collections. Nonetheless a drawback is that it requires rapid decay of the inverse entries so that sparse approximate inverse is possible. However, for the class of matrices that, come from elliptic PDE problems, this assumption may not necessarily hold. Our main idea is to look for a basis, other than the standard one, such that a sparse representation of the inverse is feasible. A crucial observation is that the kind of matrices we are interested in typically have a piecewise smooth inverse. We exploit this fact, by applying wavelet techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse in the wavelet basis. We shall justify theoretically and numerically that our approach is effective for matrices with smooth inverse. We emphasize that in this paper we have only presented the idea of wavelet approximate inverses and demonstrated its potential but have not yet developed a highly refined and efficient algorithm.

  12. Inverse problem for Bremsstrahlung radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, K.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1991-10-01

    For certain predominantly one-dimensional distribution functions, an analytic inversion has been found which yields the velocity distribution of superthermal electrons given their Bremsstrahlung radiation. 5 refs.

  13. Characterizing the Retrieval of Cloud Optical Thickness and Droplet Effective Radius to Overlying Aerosols Using a General Inverse Theory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.

    2013-12-01

    The upwelling shortwave irradiance measured by the airborne Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) flying above a cloud and aerosol layer is influenced by the properties of the cloud and aerosol particles below, just as would the radiance measured from satellite. Unlike satellite measurements, those from aircraft provide the unique capability to fly a lower-level leg above the cloud, yet below the aerosol layer, to characterize the extinction of the aerosol layer and account for its impact on the measured cloud albedo. Previous work [Coddington et al., 2010] capitalized on this opportunity to test the effects of aerosol particles (or more appropriately, the effects of neglecting aerosols in forward modeling calculations) on cloud retrievals using data obtained during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment/Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation of anthropogenic pollution (INTEX-A/ITCT) study. This work showed aerosols can cause a systematic bias in the cloud retrieval and that such a bias would need to be distinguished from a true aerosol indirect effect (i.e. the brightening of a cloud due to aerosol effects on cloud microphysics) as theorized by Haywood et al., [2004]. The effects of aerosols on clouds are typically neglected in forward modeling calculations because their pervasiveness, variable microphysical properties, loading, and lifetimes makes forward modeling calculations under all possible combinations completely impractical. Using a general inverse theory technique, which propagates separate contributions from measurement and forward modeling errors into probability distributions of retrieved cloud optical thickness and droplet effective radius, we have demonstrated how the aerosol presence can be introduced as a spectral systematic error in the distributions of the forward modeling solutions. The resultant uncertainty and bias in cloud properties induced by the aerosols is identified by the shape and peak of the posteriori

  14. Reading Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    The parents of students who attend Decatur High School thought that there was little hope of their kids going on to college. After a year or so in Decatur's reading program, their sons and daughters were both transformed and college bound. In this article, the author describes how Decatur was able to successfully transform their students. Seven…

  15. Practical considerations for Abel inverting of photographic data with application to the analysis of a 15-kW wall-stabilized arc-light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Temperature profiles were measured for agron atmospheric pressure by using absolute line and continuum intensity and were compared with stark width and shift measurements. A detailed analysis of the engineering aspects of setting up for Abel inverting deta photographically is presented. The merits of using photographic detection and of using continuum radiation for temperature profile analysis are discussed. The importance of empirically determining the optical depth is emphasized by discrepancies between measured (two-path) and calculated estimates.

  16. Application Of Hadamard, Haar, And Hadamard-Haar Transformation To Image Coding And Bandwidth Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choras, Ryszard S.

    1983-03-01

    The paper presents a numerical techniques of transform image coding for the image codklg for the image bandwidth compression. Unitary transformations called Hadamard, Haar and Hadamard-Haar transformations are definied and developed. 'Te described the construction of the transformation matrices and presents algorithms for computation of the transformations and theirs inverse. Considered transformations are asolied to iiaa e processing and theirs utility and effectiveness are compared with other discrete transforms on the basic of some standard performance criteria.

  17. Inverse Problems of Thermoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Luste, O. J.; Kuz, R. V.; Strutinsky, M. N.

    2011-05-01

    Classical thermoelectricity is based on the use of the Seebeck and Thomson effects that occur in the near-contact areas between n- and p-type materials. A conceptually different approach to thermoelectric power converter design that is based on the law of thermoelectric induction of currents is also known. The efficiency of this approach has already been demonstrated by its first applications. More than 10 basically new types of thermoelements were discovered with properties that cannot be achieved by thermocouple power converters. Therefore, further development of this concept is of practical interest. This paper provides a classification and theory for solving the inverse problems of thermoelectricity that form the basis for devising new thermoelement types. Computer methods for their solution for anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are elaborated. Regularities related to thermoelectric current excitation in anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are established. The possibility of obtaining eddy currents of a particular configuration through control of the temperature field and material parameters for the creation of new thermo- element types is demonstrated for three-dimensional (3D) models of anisotropic and inhomogeneous media.

  18. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  19. Lightweight transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Swallom, D.W.; Enos, G.

    1990-05-01

    The technical effort described in this report relates to the program that was performed to design, fabricate, and test a lightweight transformer for Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) mission requirements. The objectives of this program were two-fold: (1) design and fabricate a lightweight transformer using liquid hydrogen as the coolant; and (2) test the completed transformer assembly with a low voltage, dc power source. Although the full power testing with liquid helium was not completed, the program demonstrated the viability of the design approach. The lightweight transformer was designed and fabricated, and low and moderate power testing was completed. The transformer is a liquid hydrogen cooled air core transformer that uses thin copper for its primary and secondary windings. The winding mass was approximately 12 kg, or 0.03 kg/kW. Further refinements of the design to a partial air core transformer could potentially reduce the winding mass to as low as 4 or 5 kg, or 0.0125 kg/kW. No attempt was made on this program to reduce the mass of the related structural components or cryogenic container. 8 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Rainbow Fourier Transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel technique for remote sensing of cloud droplet size distributions. Polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg exhibit a sharply defined rainbow structure, the shape of which is determined mostly by single scattering properties of cloud particles, and therefore, can be modeled using the Mie theory. Fitting the observed rainbow with such a model (computed for a parameterized family of particle size distributions) has been used for cloud droplet size retrievals. We discovered that the relationship between the rainbow structures and the corresponding particle size distributions is deeper than it had been commonly understood. In fact, the Mie theory-derived polarized reflectance as a function of reduced scattering angle (in the rainbow angular range) and the (monodisperse) particle radius appears to be a proxy to a kernel of an integral transform (similar to the sine Fourier transform on the positive semi-axis). This approach, called the rainbow Fourier transform (RFT), allows us to accurately retrieve the shape of the droplet size distribution by the application of the corresponding inverse transform to the observed polarized rainbow. While the basis functions of the proxy-transform are not exactly orthogonal in the finite angular range, this procedure needs to be complemented by a simple regression technique, which removes the retrieval artifacts. This non-parametric approach does not require any a priori knowledge of the droplet size distribution functional shape and is computationally fast (no look-up tables, no fitting, computations are the same as for the forward modeling).

  1. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.B.; Marshall, T.C.; LaPointe, M.A.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM{sub 01} fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5{pi}mm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM{sub 01} mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Use of switched capacitor filters to implement the discrete wavelet transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Kraig E.; Peterson, James N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper analyzes the use of IIR switched capacitor filters to implement the discrete wavelet transform and the inverse transform, using quadrature mirror filters (QMF) which have the necessary symmetry for reconstruction of the data. This is done by examining the sensitivity of the QMF transforms to the manufacturing variance in the desired capacitances. The performance is evaluated at the outputs of the separate filter stages and the error in the reconstruction of the inverse transform is compared with the desired results.

  3. Triple transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Farrukh I.; Schinn, Dustin S.

    2013-08-01

    A new business plan that enables policy transformation and resource mobilization at the national and international level, while improving access to resources, will allow the Green Climate Fund to integrate development goals and action on climate change.

  4. Covariant Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisil, Vladimir V.

    2011-03-01

    Dedicated to the memory of Cora Sadosky The paper develops theory of covariant transform, which is inspired by the wavelet construction. It was observed that many interesting types of wavelets (or coherent states) arise from group representations which are not square integrable or vacuum vectors which are not admissible. Covariant transform extends an applicability of the popular wavelets construction to classic examples like the Hardy space H2, Banach spaces, covariant functional calculus and many others.

  5. A WEAK-LENSING AND NEAR-INFRARED STUDY OF A3192: DISASSEMBLING A RICHNESS CLASS 3 ABELL CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton-Morris, Victoria; Smith, Graham P.; Haines, C. P.; Sanderson, A. J. R.; Edge, A. C.; Egami, E.; Marshall, P. J.; Targett, T. A. E-mail: gps@star.sr.bham.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    We present a joint gravitational lensing and near-infrared study of the galaxy cluster Abell 3192 (A3192) that has been associated both with galaxies at z = 0.168 and with the X-ray luminous cluster RXC J0358.8-2955 (RXC J0358) at z = 0.425. Weak-lensing analysis of our Hubble Space Telescope snapshot observation with the Advanced Camera for Surveys detects two mass over-densities separated by {approx}2 arcmin, one adjacent to the optical position of A3192 (4.4{sigma} significance) and the other adjacent to the X-ray position of RXC J0358 (6.2{sigma} significance). These mass peaks coincide with peaks in the K-band luminosity density of galaxies with near-infrared colors consistent with the red sequence at z = 0.168 and z 0.425, respectively. Moreover, the Bayesian evidence of parameterized mass models that include two cluster/group-scale halos centered on the respective mass peaks exceeds that of single-halo models by a factor of {>=}10. The total projected mass of each galaxy system within 250 kpc of the respective peaks is M{sub WL}(z = 0.168) {approx_equal} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} M{sub Sun} and M{sub WL}(z = 0.425) {approx_equal} 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }, both with total mass-to-light ratios of M{sub WL}/L{sub K} {approx_equal} 20 M{sub Sun }/L{sub Sun }. The original Abell cluster therefore comprises two independent galaxy systems-a foreground group at z = 0.168 and RXC J0358 at z = 0.425. Our results demonstrate the power of combining X-ray, near-infrared, and weak-lensing observations to select massive clusters, place those clusters and interloper galaxy systems along the line of sight, and measure their masses. This combination will be invaluable to robust interpretation of future high-redshift cluster surveys, including eROSITA.

  6. X-ray cavities and temperature jumps in the environment of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkamble, S. S.; Vagshette, N. D.; Pawar, P. K.; Patil, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present results based on the systematic analysis of high resolution 95 ks Chandra observations of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390 at the redshift of z = 0.228 that hosts an energetic radio AGN. This analysis has enabled us to investigate five X-ray deficient cavities in the atmosphere of Abell 2390 within central 30''. Presence of these cavities have been confirmed through a variety of image processing techniques like, the surface brightness profiles, unsharp masked image, as well as 2D elliptical model subtracted residual map. Temperature profile as well as 2D temperature map revealed structures in the distribution of ICM, in the sense that ICM in the NW direction is cooler than that on the SE direction. Temperature jump in all directions is evident near 25'' (90.5 kpc) corresponding to the average Mach number 1.44± 0.05, while another jump from 7.47 keV to 9.10 keV at 68'' (246 kpc) in the north-west direction, corresponding to Mach number 1.22± 0.06 and these jumps are associated with the cold fronts. Tricolour map as well as hardness ratio map detects cool gas clumps in the central 30 kpc region of temperature 4.45_{-0.10}^{+0.16} keV. The entropy profile derived from the X-ray analysis is found to fall systematically inward in a power-law fashion and exhibits a floor near 12.20± 2.54 keV cm2 in the central region. This flattening of the entropy profile in the core region confirms the intermittent heating at the centre by AGN. The diffuse radio emission map at 1.4 GHz using VLA L-band data exhibits highly asymmetric morphology with an edge in the north-west direction coinciding with the X-ray edge seen in the unsharp mask image. The mechanical power injected by the AGN in the form of X-ray cavities is found to be 5.94× 10^{45} erg s^{-1} and is roughly an order of magnitude higher than the energy lost by the ICM in the form of X-ray emission, confirming that AGN feedback is capable enough to quench the cooling flow in this cluster.

  7. Data and two-dimensional scaling relations for galaxies in Abell 1689: a hint of size evolution at z˜ 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, R. C. W.; Davies, Roger L.; Dalla Bontà, E.; Masters, R.

    2012-06-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of Abell 1689 (z= 0.183) from the Gemini multi-object spectrograph (GMOS) on the Gemini North telescope and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We measure integrated photometry from the GMOS g' and r' images (for 531 galaxies) and surface photometry from the HSTF625W image (for 43 galaxies) as well as velocities and velocity dispersions from the GMOS spectra (for 71 galaxies). We construct the Kormendy, Faber-Jackson and colour-magnitude relations for early-type galaxies in Abell 1689 using these data and compare them to those of the Coma cluster. We measure the intrinsic scatter of the colour-magnitude relation in Abell 1689 to be σCMR= 0.054 ± 0.004 mag, which places degenerate constraints on the ratio of the assembly time-scale to the time available (β) and the age of the population. Making the assumption that galaxies in Abell 1689 will evolve into those of Coma over an interval of 2.26 Gyr breaks this degeneracy and limits β to be >0.6 and the age of the red sequence to be >5.5 Gyr (formed at z > 0.55). Without corrections for size evolution but accounting for magnitude cuts and selection effects, the Kormendy and Faber-Jackson relations are inconsistent and disagree at the 2σ level regarding the amount of luminosity evolution in the last 2.26 Gyr. However, after correcting for size evolution the Kormendy and Faber-Jackson relations show similar changes in luminosity (0.22 ± 0.11 mag) that are consistent with the passive evolution of the stellar populations from a single burst of star formation 10.2 ± 3.3 Gyr ago (?). Thus, the changes in the Kormendy, Faber-Jackson and colour-magnitude relations of Abell 1689 relative to Coma all agree and suggest old galaxy populations with little or no synchronization in the star formation histories. Furthermore, the weak evidence for size evolution in the cluster environment in the last 2.26 Gyr places interesting constraints on the possible

  8. A generalized inversion method: Simultaneous source localization and environmental inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Knobles, David P.

    2002-05-01

    The problem of localizing and tracking a source in the shallow ocean is often complicated by uncertainty in the environmental parameters. Likewise, the estimates of environmental parameters in the shallow ocean obtained by inversion methods can be degraded by incorrect information about the source location. To overcome both these common obstacles-environmental mismatch in matched field processing and incorrect source location in geoacoustic inversions-a generalized inversion scheme is developed that includes both source and environmental parameters as unknowns in the inversion. The new technique called systematic decoupling using rotated coordinates (SDRC) expands the original idea of rotated coordinates [M. D. Collins and L. Fishman, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 1637-1644 (1995)] by using multiple sets of coherent broadband rotated coordinates, each corresponding to a different set of bounds, to systematically decouple the unknowns in a series of simulated annealing inversions. The results of applying the SDRC inversion method to data from the Area Characterization Test II experiment performed on the New Jersey continental shelf are presented. [Work supported by ONR.

  9. Temperature Inversions Have Cold Bottoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.; Brown, Gail M.

    1982-01-01

    Uses discussion and illustrations of several demonstrations on air temperature differences and atmospheric stability to explain the phenomena of temperature inversions. Relates this to the smog in Los Angeles and discusses the implications. (DC)

  10. Donor states in inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  11. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-21

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  12. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  13. Uterine Inversion; A case report.

    PubMed

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, Ma

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  14. Uterine Inversion; A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, MA

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  15. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  16. Two New Oleanane-Type Saponins with Anti-Proliferative Activity from Camellia oleifera Abel. Seed Cake.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Fa; Peng, Yun-Ru; Bao, Guan-Hu; Hou, Ru-Yan; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Two new oleanane-type saponins, named oleiferasaponins C₄ (1) and C₅ (2), were isolated from Camellia oleifera Abel. seed cake residue. Their respective structures were identified as 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxymethylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galacto-pyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-galactopyranosy-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosid-uronic acid methyl ester (1) and 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxy-methylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (2) through 1D- and 2D-NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and GC-MS spectroscopic methods. The two compounds exhibited potent cytotoxic activities against five human tumor cell lines (BEL-7402, BGC-823, MCF-7, HL-60 and KB). PMID:26861265

  17. Near-infrared photometry and stellar populations of first-ranked galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinx X.; Puschell, Jeffery J.

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-four brightest cluster members (BCMs) in the complete sample of high Galactic latitude nearby Abell clusters of Hoessel, Gunn, and Thuan (HGT) are investigated. The stellar populations in BCMs using near-infrared and optical-near-infrared colors are studied. Brighter BCMs have redder (J-K) and (V-K) colors, suggesting a metallicity increase in brighter galaxies. The larger dispersion of their colors implies that BCMs possess more heterogeneous stellar populations than their lower luminosity counterparts, the normal elliptical galaxies. Special attention is paid to BCMs associated with cooling flows. BCMs with larger accretion rates have bluer (V-K) colors due to ultraviolet excesses and are brighter in the visual wavelength region, but not in the infrared. It is suggested that part of the X-ray emitting cooling gas is converted into high- and intermediate-mass stars emitting in the blue and visible, but not in the infrared. The properties of BCMs as standard candles in the near-infrared are examined and compared with those in the optical.

  18. Discovery of Ultra-steep Spectrum Giant Radio Galaxy with Recurrent Radio Jet Activity in Abell 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunik, Dominika; Jamrozy, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We report a discovery of a 1.3 Mpc diffuse radio source with extremely steep spectrum fading radio structures in the vicinity of the Abell 449 cluster of galaxies. Its extended diffuse lobes are bright only at low radio frequencies and their synchrotron age is about 160 Myr. The parent galaxy of the extended relic structure, which is the dominant galaxy within the cluster, is starting a new jet activity. There are three weak X-rays sources in the vicinity of the cluster as found in the ROSAT survey, however it is not known if they are connected with this cluster of galaxies. Just a few radio galaxy relics are currently known in the literature, as finding them requires sensitive and high angular resolution low-frequency radio observations. Objects of this kind, which also are starting a new jet activity, are important for understanding the life cycle and evolution of active galactic nuclei. A new 613 MHz map as well as the archival radio data pertaining to this object are presented and analyzed.

  19. The behaviour of dark matter associated with four bright cluster galaxies in the 10 kpc core of Abell 3827

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Williams, Liliya; Smit, Renske; Swinbank, Mark; Kitching, Thomas D.; Harvey, David; Jauzac, Mathilde; Israel, Holger; Clowe, Douglas; Edge, Alastair; Hilton, Matt; Jullo, Eric; Leonard, Adrienne; Liesenborgs, Jori; Merten, Julian; Mohammed, Irshad; Nagai, Daisuke; Richard, Johan; Robertson, Andrew; Saha, Prasenjit; Santana, Rebecca; Stott, John; Tittley, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Galaxy cluster Abell 3827 hosts the stellar remnants of four almost equally bright elliptical galaxies within a core of radius 10 kpc. Such corrugation of the stellar distribution is very rare, and suggests recent formation by several simultaneous mergers. We map the distribution of associated dark matter, using new Hubble Space Telescope imaging and Very Large Telescope/Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer integral field spectroscopy of a gravitationally lensed system threaded through the cluster core. We find that each of the central galaxies retains a dark matter halo, but that (at least) one of these is spatially offset from its stars. The best-constrained offset is 1.62^{+0.47}_{-0.49} kpc, where the 68 per cent confidence limit includes both statistical error and systematic biases in mass modelling. Such offsets are not seen in field galaxies, but are predicted during the long infall to a cluster, if dark matter self-interactions generate an extra drag force. With such a small physical separation, it is difficult to definitively rule out astrophysical effects operating exclusively in dense cluster core environments - but if interpreted solely as evidence for self-interacting dark matter, this offset implies a cross-section σDM/m ˜ (1.7 ± 0.7) × 10-4 cm2 g-1 × (tinfall/109 yr)-2, where tinfall is the infall duration.

  20. 3C28 in Abell 115- A Radio Source With a Twist: Tracing Gas Vortices in a Merging Subcluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Churazov, Eugene

    2014-08-01

    Abell 115 is one of the “bimodal” clusters, first identified from Einstein Observatory X-ray images. The X-ray image is dominated by emission from two subclusters, separated by about 900 kpc, that are in the process of merging. The northern subcluster (A115-N) contains a bright central galaxy that hosts the radio source 3C28. 3C28 has a remarkable morphology. Although there is no evidence of a presently active nucleus, there are two prominent jets connected to a pair of radio lobes, each of which exhibits a radio tail. A115-N shows a classic cold front, the remarkable phenomenon first studied from Chandra cluster observations. We describe the overall structure of the cluster from detailed Chandra observations. We review the gravitational lensing observations and radio observations of the relic and discuss the overall state of the cluster merger. In addition, we exploit the Chandra data and the cold front phenomenon to study the gas motions in and around A115-N that hosts 3C28. The subcluster motion of A115-N through the cluster induces counter-rotating vortices in the subcluster gas that give rise to the unique radio morphology of 3C28 with its two radio tails pointing in the direction of motion of A115-N. Thus, the radio emitting plasma acts as a dye in a fluid tracing the vortices in the X-ray emitting gas, resembling text book pictures of fluid motions.

  1. 3C28 in Abell 115- A Radio Source With a Twist: Tracing Gas Vortices in a Merging Subcluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, William R.; Churazov, Eugene; Heinz, Sebastian; Giacintucci, Simona; Jones, Christine; Bogdan, Akos; David, Laurence P; Kraft, Ralph P.; Murgia, Matteo; Markevitch, Maxim L.; Randall, Scott W.; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2014-06-01

    Abell 115 is one of the “bimodal” clusters, first identified from Einstein Observatory X-ray images. The X-ray image is dominated by emission from two subclusters, separated by about 900 kpc, that are in the process of merging. The northern subcluster (A115-N) contains a bright central galaxy that hosts the radio source 3C28. 3C28 has a remarkable morphology. Although there is no evidence of a presently active nucleus, there are two prominent jets connected to a pair of radio lobes, each of which exhibits a radio tail. A115-N shows a classic cold front, the remarkable phenomenon first studied from Chandra cluster observations. We describe the overall structure of the cluster from detailed Chandra obserations. In addition, we exploit the Chandra data and the cold front phenomenon to study the gas motions in and around A115-N that hosts 3C28. The subcluster motion of A115-N through the cluster induces counter-rotating vortices in the subcluster gas that give rise to the unique radio morphology of 3C28 with its two radio tails pointing in the direction of motion of A115-N. Thus, the radio emitting plasma acts as a dye in a fluid tracing the vortices in the X-ray emitting gas, resembling text book pictures of fluid motions.

  2. Novel triterpenoid saponins from residual seed cake of Camellia oleifera Abel. show anti-proliferative activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jianfa; Wang, Ruilong; Bao, Guanhu; Ling, Tiejun; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Xinfu; Hou, Ruyan

    2015-07-01

    Four oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins were isolated from the seed cake of Camellia oleifera Abel.: camelliasaponin B1 and three new saponins, oleiferasaponin C1-C3 (1-3). Their structures were identified as 22-O-angeloyl-camelliagenin B 3-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-l-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (1); 22-O-angeloyl-camelliagenin A 3-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (2); and 28-O-cinnamoyl-camelliagenin B 3-O-[β-d-galactopyranosylz-(1→2)] [β-d-galactopyranosyl(1→2)-α-l-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (3) through 1D and 2D NMR, HR-ESI-MS, as well as GC-MS spectroscopic methods. The anti-proliferative activities of these four compounds were investigated on five human tumor cell lines (BEL-7402, BGC-823, MCF-7, HL-60 and KB). Compounds 1 and 2 and camelliasaponin B1 showed significant cytotoxic activities. PMID:25958771

  3. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-01-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to Tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed.

  4. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-10-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed.

  5. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midya, Bikashkali; Evrard, Jérémie; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Ramírez Suárez, O. L.; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2015-05-01

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Padé expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schrödinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the 1S0 and 1D2 channels on the [0 -350 ] MeV laboratory energy interval.

  6. SHARP transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Stephan

    2004-08-01

    The U.S. Navy"s SHAred Reconnaissance Pod (SHARP) employs the Recon/Optical, Inc. (ROI) CA-279 dual spectral band (visible/IR) digital cameras operating from an F-18E/F aircraft to perform low-to-high altitude reconnaissance missions. SHARP has proven itself combat worthy, with a rapid transition from development to operational deployment culminating in a highly reliable and effective reconnaissance capability for joint forces operating in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). The U.S. Navy"s intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) roadmap transforms the SHARP system from being solely an independent reconnaissance sensor to a node in the growing Joint ISR network. ROI and the U.S. Navy have combined their resources to ensure the system"s transformation continues to follow the ISR road map. Pre-planned product improvements (P3I) for the CA-270 camera systems will lead the way in that transformation.

  7. Tensor Inversion of Intrinsic Permeabilities for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    An inverse method has been developed using hybrid formulations and coordinate transform techniques to simultaneously estimate multiple intrinsic permeability tensors (k), flow field, and boundary conditions for a heterogeneous reservoir under non-pumping or pumping conditions [Jiao & Zhang, 2013]. Unlike the objective-function-based approaches, the inverse method does not require forward flow simulations to assess the data-model misfits; thus the knowledge of reservoir boundary conditions is not needed. The method directly incorporates noisy observed data (i.e., fluid heads, Darcy fluxes, or well rates) at the measurement locations, without solving a boundary value problem. Given sufficient measurement data, it yields well-posed systems of equations that can be solved efficiently with coarse inverse grids and nonlinear optimization. When pumping and injection are active, the well rates can be used as measurements and subsurface flux sampling is not needed. Also, local grid refinement at the well locations is not needed for the inversion to succeed. The method is successfully tested for reservoir problems with regular and irregular geometries, different petrofacies patterns, and permeability anisotropy ratios. All problems yield stable solutions under increasing measurement errors. For a given set of the observation data, inversion accuracy is most affected by the permeability anisotropy ratio. Accuracy in estimating k is also affected by the flow pattern: within a given petrofacies, when the Darcy flux component is extremely small, the corresponding directional permeability perpendicular to streamlines becomes less identifiable. Finally, inversion is successful even if the location of the reservoir boundaries is unknown. In this case, the problem domain for inversion is defined by the location of the measurement data. Select problems are presented below in a set of figures and a table (the relevant quantities have a consistent set of units and are thus not labeled

  8. Gain-assisted transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiancheng; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hao, Jiaming; Tang, Xiaohong; Zouhdi, Said

    2011-04-25

    Loss severely degrades the cloaking effect of the device designed by traditional transformation. In this letter, we propose gain-assisted transformation optics to overcome the loss problem by introducing gain media into a spherical cloak. The gain media, which can amplify the electromagnetic fields, is controlled precisely to compensate the inherent loss in experimental realization of cloaks. We discuss the significance of controlling embedded gain materials in the context of the inverse design mechanism, which allows us to wisely select realizable materials with constant gain and loss along the radius. For practical realizations, isotropic spherical gain-assisted cloak is designed. Full-wave simulations validate the proposed design concept, which can be utilized to alleviate the inevitable loss problem in transformational optical devices. PMID:21643112

  9. On Lambda and Time Operators: the Inverse Intertwining Problem Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Cubillo, F.; Suchanecki, Z.; Villullas, S.

    2011-07-01

    An exact theory of irreversibility was proposed by Misra, Prigogine and Courbage, based on non-unitary similarity transformations Λ that intertwine reversible dynamics and irreversible ones. This would advocate the idea that irreversible behavior would originate at the microscopic level. Reversible evolution with an internal time operator have the intertwining property. Recently the inverse intertwining problem has been answered in the negative, that is, not every unitary evolution allowing such Λ-transformation has an internal time. This work contributes new results in this direction.

  10. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion.

    PubMed

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion. PMID:27209370

  11. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion.

  12. Transformation Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    The program for the march by librarians on America's capital for the American Library Association (ALA) conference is predictably loaded with lobbying, legislation, and DC tours. It also abounds with professional opportunity and reflects the impact of Leslie Burger, one of the most activist ALA presidents in recent history. Her "Transformation"…

  13. Transformation & Metamorphosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The sculptures of Canadian artist Brian Jungen are a great inspiration for a lesson on creating new forms. Jungen transforms found objects into unique creations without fully concealing their original form or purpose. Frank Stella's sculpture series, including "K.132,2007" made of stainless steel and spray paint, is another great example of…

  14. Transforming Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookson, Peter W., Jr., Ed.; Schneider, Barbara, Ed.

    The authors in this book address the issues that relate to the crisis in American education and review some of the proposed solutions. To transform education, schools must be examined as social systems that are interrelated with families, communities, and the world of work. Following the introduction, section 1, "Conditions for Educational…

  15. The Laplace transform on time scales revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, John M.; Gravagne, Ian A.; Jackson, Billy J.; Marks, Robert J., II; Ramos, Alice A.

    2007-08-01

    In this work, we reexamine the time scale Laplace transform as defined by Bohner and Peterson [M. Bohner, A. Peterson, Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications, Birkhauser, Boston, 2001; M. Bohner, A. Peterson, Laplace transform and Z-transform: Unification and extension, Methods Appl. Anal. 9 (1) (2002) 155-162]. In particular, we give conditions on the class of functions which have a transform, develop an inversion formula for the transform, and further, we provide a convolution for the transform. The notion of convolution leads to considering its algebraic structure--in particular the existence of an identity element--motivating the development of the Dirac delta functional on time scales. Applications and examples of these concepts are given.

  16. Global inversion for anisotropy during full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debens, H. A.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful tool for quantitative estimation of high-resolution high-fidelity models of subsurface seismic parameters, typically P-wave velocity. The solution to FWI's posed nonlinear inverse problem is obtained via an iterative series of linearized local updates to a start model, assuming this model lies within the basin of attraction to the global minimum. Thanks to many successful published applications to three-dimensional (3D) field datasets, its advance has been rapid and driven in large-part by the oil and gas industry. The consideration of seismic anisotropy during FWI is of vital importance, as it holds influence over both the kinematics and dynamics of seismic waveforms. If not appropriately taken into account then inadequacies in the anisotropy model are likely to manifest as significant error in the recovered velocity model. Conventionally, anisotropic FWI employs either an a priori anisotropy model, held fixed during FWI, or it uses a multi-parameter local inversion scheme to recover the anisotropy as part of the FWI; both of these methods can be problematic. Constructing an anisotropy model prior to FWI often involves intensive (and hence expensive) iterative procedures, such as travel-time tomography or moveout velocity analysis. On the other hand, introducing multiple parameters to FWI itself increases the complexity of what is already an underdetermined inverse problem. We propose that global rather than local FWI can be used to recover the long-wavelength acoustic anisotropy model, and that this can then be followed by more-conventional local FWI to recover the detailed model. We validate this approach using a full 3D field dataset, demonstrating that it avoids problems associated to crosstalk that can bedevil local inversion schemes, and reconciles well with in situ borehole measurements. Although our approach includes a global inversion for anisotropy, it is nonetheless affordable and practical for 3D field data.

  17. Geophysical Inversion Through Hierarchical Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, A.; Huisman, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Geophysical investigation is a powerful tool that allows non-invasive and non-destructive mapping of subsurface states and properties. However, non-uniqueness associated with the inversion process prevents the quantitative use of these methods. One major direction researchers are going is constraining the inverse problem by hydrological observations and models. An alternative to the commonly used direct inversion methods are global optimization schemes (such as genetic algorithms and Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods). However, the major limitation here is the desired high resolution of the tomographic image, which leads to a large number of parameters and an unreasonably high computational effort when using global optimization schemes. Two innovative schemes are presented here. First, a hierarchical approach is used to reduce the computational effort for the global optimization. Solution is achieved for coarse spatial resolution, and this solution is used as the starting point for finer scheme. We show that the computational effort is reduced in this way dramatically. Second, we use a direct ERT inversion as the starting point for global optimization. In this case preliminary results show that the outcome is not necessarily beneficial, probably because of spatial mismatch between the results of the direct inversion and the true resistivity field.

  18. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    A fundamental part of geophysics is to make inferences about the interior of the earth on the basis of data collected at or near the surface of the earth. In almost all cases these measured data are only indirectly related to the properties of the earth that are of interest, so an inverse problem must be solved in order to obtain estimates of the physical properties within the earth. In February of 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a workshop that was intended to examine the methods currently being used to solve geophysical inverse problems and to consider what new approaches should be explored in the future. The interdisciplinary area between inverse problems in geophysics and optimization methods in mathematics was specifically targeted as one where an interchange of ideas was likely to be fruitful. Thus about half of the participants were actively involved in solving geophysical inverse problems and about half were actively involved in research on general optimization methods. This report presents some of the topics that were explored at the workshop and the conclusions that were reached. In general, the objective of a geophysical inverse problem is to find an earth model, described by a set of physical parameters, that is consistent with the observational data. It is usually assumed that the forward problem, that of calculating simulated data for an earth model, is well enough understood so that reasonably accurate synthetic data can be generated for an arbitrary model. The inverse problem is then posed as an optimization problem, where the function to be optimized is variously called the objective function, misfit function, or fitness function. The objective function is typically some measure of the difference between observational data and synthetic data calculated for a trial model. However, because of incomplete and inaccurate data, the objective function often incorporates some additional form of regularization, such as a measure of smoothness

  19. Kinematics and stellar populations of low-luminosity early-type galaxies in the Abell 496 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, I. V.; Cayatte, V.; Durret, F.; Adami, C.; Balkowski, C.; Chemin, L.; Laganá, T. F.; Prugniel, P.

    2008-07-01

    Context: The morphology and stellar populations of low-luminosity early-type galaxies in clusters have until now been limited to a few relatively nearby clusters such as Virgo or Fornax. Scenarii for the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in clusters are therefore not well constrained. Aims: We investigate here the morphology and stellar populations of low-luminosity galaxies in the relaxed richness class 1 cluster Abell 496 (z = 0.0330). Methods: Deep multiband imaging obtained with the CFHT Megacam allowed us to select a sample of faint galaxies, defined here as objects with magnitudes 18 < r' < 22 mag within a 1.2 arcsec fibre (-18.8 < MB < -15.1 mag). We observed 118 galaxies spectroscopically with the ESO VLT FLAMES/Giraffe spectrograph with a resolving power R = 6300. We present structural analysis and colour maps for the 48 galaxies belonging to the cluster. We fit the spectra of 46 objects with PEGASE.HR synthetic spectra to estimate the ages, metallicities, and velocity dispersions. We estimated possible biases by similarly analysing spectra of ~1200 early-type galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6). We computed values of α/Fe abundance ratios from the measurements of Lick indices. We briefly discuss effects of the fixed aperture size on the measurements. Results: For the first time, high-precision estimates of stellar population properties have been obtained for a large sample of faint galaxies in a cluster, allowing for the extension of relations between stellar populations and internal kinematics to the low-velocity dispersion regime. We have revealed a peculiar population of elliptical galaxies in the core of the cluster, resembling massive early-type galaxies by their stellar population properties and velocity dispersions, but having luminosities of about 2 mag fainter. Conclusions: External mechanisms of gas removal (ram pressure stripping and gravitational harassment) are more likely to have occurred than

  20. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  1. A practical Hadamard transform spectrometer for astronomical application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    The mathematical properties of Hadamard matrices and their application to spectroscopy are discussed. A comparison is made between Fourier and Hadamard transform encoding in spectrometry. The spectrometer is described and its laboratory performance evaluated. The algorithm and programming of inverse transform are given. A minicomputer is used to recover the spectrum.

  2. Direct measurement of lensing amplification in Abell S1063 using a strongly lensed high redshift HII galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlevich, Roberto; Melnick, Jorge; Terlevich, Elena; Chávez, Ricardo; Telles, Eduardo; Bresolin, Fabio; Plionis, Manolis; Basilakos, Spyros; Fernández Arenas, David; González Morán, Ana Luisa; Díaz, Ángeles I.; Aretxaga, Itziar

    2016-08-01

    ID11 is an actively star-forming, extremely compact galaxy and Lyα emitter at z = 3.117 that is gravitationally magnified by a factor of ~17 by the cluster of galaxies Hubble Frontier Fields AS1063. The observed properties of this galaxy resemble those of low luminosity HII galaxies or giant HII regions such as 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Using the tight correlation correlation between the Balmer-line luminosities and the width of the emission lines (typically L(Hβ) - σ(Hβ)), which are valid for HII galaxies and giant HII regions to estimate their total luminosity, we are able to measure the lensing amplification of ID11. We obtain an amplification of 23 ± 11 that is similar within errors to the value of ~17 estimated or predicted by the best lensing models of the massive cluster Abell S1063. We also compiled, from the literature, luminosities and velocity dispersions for a set of lensed compact star-forming regions. There is more scatter in the L-σ correlation for these lensed systems, but on the whole the results tend to support the lensing model estimates of the magnification. Our result indicates that the amplification can be independently measured using the L - σ relation in lensed giant HII regions or HII galaxies. It also supports the suggestion, even if lensing is model dependent, that the L - σ relation is valid for low luminosity high-z objects. Ad hoc observations of lensed star-forming systems are required to determine the lensing amplification accurately.

  3. The Rich Globular Cluster System of Abell 1689 and the Radial Dependence of the Globular Cluster Formation Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Jee, M. J.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Jordán, A.; Meurer, G. R.; Peng, E. W.; West, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z = 0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach a magnitude I 814 = 29 with gsim90% completeness and sample the brightest ~5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N^total_GC = 162{,}850^{+75,450}_{-51,310} GCs within a projected radius of 400 kpc. As many as half of the GCs may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this system is by far the largest GC population studied to date. The specific frequency SN is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from SN ≈ 5 near the center to ~12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase SN by ~20% at z = 0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the mass fractions as a function of radius. The estimated mass in GCs, {M}_GC^total = 3.9 × 1010 M ⊙, is comparable to ~80% of the total stellar mass of the Milky Way. The shape of the GC mass profile appears intermediate between those of the stellar light and total cluster mass. Despite the extreme nature of this system, the ratios of the GC mass to the baryonic and total masses, and thus the GC formation efficiency, are typical of those in other rich clusters when comparing at the same physical radii. The GC formation efficiency is not constant, but varies with radius, in a manner that appears similar for different clusters; we speculate on the reasons for this similarity in profile.

  4. Thermoelectric properties of inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.; Poilvert, N.; Crespi, V. H.

    2016-02-01

    Rayleigh's method [Philos. Mag. Ser. 5 34, 481 (1892)] is used to solve for the classical thermoelectric equations in inverse opals. His theory predicts that in an inverse opal, with periodic holes, the Seebeck coefficient and the figure of merit are identical to that of the bulk material. We also provide a major revision to Rayleigh's method, in using the electrochemical potential as an important variable, instead of the electrostatic potential. We also show that in some cases, the thermal boundary resistance is important in the effective thermal conductivity.

  5. Multiphase inverse modeling: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.

    1998-03-01

    Inverse modeling is a technique to derive model-related parameters from a variety of observations made on hydrogeologic systems, from small-scale laboratory experiments to field tests to long-term geothermal reservoir responses. If properly chosen, these observations contain information about the system behavior that is relevant to the performance of a geothermal field. Estimating model-related parameters and reducing their uncertainty is an important step in model development, because errors in the parameters constitute a major source of prediction errors. This paper contains an overview of inverse modeling applications using the ITOUGH2 code, demonstrating the possibilities and limitations of a formalized approach to the parameter estimation problem.

  6. Darwin's "strange inversion of reasoning".

    PubMed

    Dennett, Daniel

    2009-06-16

    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection unifies the world of physics with the world of meaning and purpose by proposing a deeply counterintuitive "inversion of reasoning" (according to a 19th century critic): "to make a perfect and beautiful machine, it is not requisite to know how to make it" [MacKenzie RB (1868) (Nisbet & Co., London)]. Turing proposed a similar inversion: to be a perfect and beautiful computing machine, it is not requisite to know what arithmetic is. Together, these ideas help to explain how we human intelligences came to be able to discern the reasons for all of the adaptations of life, including our own. PMID:19528651

  7. Inverse Thermal Analysis of a Titanium Laser Weld Using Multiple Constraint Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.; Shabaev, A.; Huang, L.

    2014-06-01

    Inverse thermal analysis of a titanium laser weld using multiple constraint conditions is presented. This analysis employs a methodology that is in terms of numerical-analytical basis functions for inverse thermal analysis of steady-state energy deposition in plate structures. The results of this type of analysis provide parametric representations of weld temperature histories that can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, such as those for prediction of solid-state phase transformations. In addition, these temperature histories can be used to construct parametric-function representations for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other process parameters or welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study extends an inverse thermal analysis procedure applied in previous studies. This extension provides for the inclusion of constraint conditions associated with both solidification and phase transformation boundaries.

  8. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Ti-6Al-4V Deep-Penetration Welds Using Volumetric Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2014-11-01

    Case study inverse thermal analyses of Ti-6Al-4V deep-penetration welds are presented. These analyses employ a methodology that is in terms of numerical-analytical basis functions for inverse thermal analysis of steady state energy deposition in plate structures. The results of the case studies provide parametric representations of weld temperature histories that can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, such as those for prediction of solid-state phase transformations. In addition, these temperature histories can be used to construct parametric-function representations for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other process parameters or welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that provides for the inclusion of volumetric constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mappings onto transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification and transformation boundaries.

  9. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A. )

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  10. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A. ); Sandweiss, J. )

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  11. Action Understanding as Inverse Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Chris L.; Saxe, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2009-01-01

    Humans are adept at inferring the mental states underlying other agents' actions, such as goals, beliefs, desires, emotions and other thoughts. We propose a computational framework based on Bayesian inverse planning for modeling human action understanding. The framework represents an intuitive theory of intentional agents' behavior based on the…

  12. Hamlet's Transformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. D.

    1997-12-01

    William Shakespeare's Hamlet has much evidence to suggest that the Bard was aware of the cosmological models of his time, specifically the geocentric bounded Ptolemaic and Tychonic models, and the infinite Diggesian. Moreover, Shakespeare describes how the Ptolemaic model is to be transformed to the Diggesian. Hamlet's "transformation" is the reason that Claudius, who personifies the Ptolemaic model, summons Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who personify the Tychonic. Pantometria, written by Leonard Digges and his son Thomas in 1571, contains the first technical use of the word "transformation." At age thirty, Thomas Digges went on to propose his Perfit Description, as alluded to in Act Five where Hamlet's age is given as thirty. In Act Five as well, the words "bore" and "arms" refer to Thomas' vocation as muster-master and his scientific interest in ballistics. England's leading astronomer was also the father of the poet whose encomium introduced the First Folio of 1623. His oldest child Dudley became a member of the Virginia Company and facilitated the writing of The Tempest. Taken as a whole, such manifold connections to Thomas Digges support Hotson's contention that Shakespeare knew the Digges family. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in Hamlet bear Danish names because they personify the Danish model, while the king's name is latinized like that of Claudius Ptolemaeus. The reason Shakespeare anglicized "Amleth" to "Hamlet" was because he saw a parallel between Book Three of Saxo Grammaticus and the eventual triumph of the Diggesian model. But Shakespeare eschewed Book Four, creating this particular ending from an infinity of other possibilities because it "suited his purpose," viz. to celebrate the concept of a boundless universe of stars like the Sun.

  13. TRANSFORMER APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Wolfgang, F.; Nicol, J.

    1962-11-01

    Transformer apparatus is designed for measuring the amount of a paramagnetic substance dissolved or suspended in a diamagnetic liquid. The apparatus consists of a cluster of tubes, some of which are closed and have sealed within the diamagnetic substance without any of the paramagnetic material. The remaining tubes are open to flow of the mix- ture. Primary and secondary conductors are wrapped around the tubes in such a way as to cancel noise components and also to produce a differential signal on the secondaries based upon variations of the content of the paramagnetic material. (AEC)

  14. Rotary Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLyman, Colonel Wm. T.

    1996-01-01

    None given. From first Par: Many spacecraft (S/C) and surface rovers require the transfer of signals and power across rotating interfaces. Science instruments, antennas and solar arrays are elements needing rotary power transfer for certain (S/C) configurations. Delivery of signal and power has mainly been done by using the simplest means, the slip ring approach. This approach, although simple, leaves debris generating noise over a period of time...The rotary transformer is a good alternative to slip rings for signal and power transfer.

  15. Corn transformed

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, A.S.

    1990-08-10

    Researchers have produced fertile corn transformed with a foreign gene that makes the plants resistant to the herbicide bialaphos. This achievement, is the first report of fertile transgenic corn in the reviewed literature, and it is the capstone of almost a decade's efforts to genetically engineer this country's most important crop. The only other major crop to be so manipulated is rice. The ability produce transgenic corn gives biologists a valuable tool to probe the whys and hows of gene expression and regulation. It may also give plant breeders a way to develop new corn varieties with a speed and predictability that would be impossible with classical breeding techniques.

  16. Atlanta's Successful Charles R. Drew Charter School: The Cornerstone of East Lake's Community Transformation. The Abell Report. Volume 27, No.1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhart, Linda; Barnes, Tara

    2014-01-01

    The community of East Lake, home to Charles R. Drew Charter School (Drew), is 6 miles from downtown Atlanta. In 1995, crime in East Lake was 19 times higher than the national average. Now, violent crime is down 95 percent. In 1995, 88 percent of residents were unemployed. Now, only 5 percent receive welfare. In 1995, just 5 percent of fifth…

  17. Transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Marlow, D L

    1996-01-01

    In these uncertain times in the healthcare industry, administrators are asked to do more with less time and resources. Because of the extended roles they are playing in today's organizations, radiology administrators are looked upon as agents of change. What leadership skills do they need in this turbulent and uncertain healthcare environment? What are the trait's of tomorrow's leaders? The transformational leader is the one who will guide us through this changing healthcare environment. Several behavioral patterns emerge as important traits for tomorrow's leaders to have-individual consideration, intellectual stimulation and charisma. Tomorrow's leader must view each person as an individual, showing genuine concern and belief in each person's ability to perform. Transformational leaders stimulate others by encouraging them to be curious and try new ideas. The final characteristic, charisma, is the ability to inspire others. Luckily, leaders are made, not born: today's leaders can learn to be responsive, to draw out new ideas from employees, and to communicate self-esteem, energy and enthusiasm. PMID:10163135

  18. Solution of Some Types of Differential Equations: Operational Calculus and Inverse Differential Operators

    PubMed Central

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a general method of operational nature to analyze and obtain solutions for a variety of equations of mathematical physics and related mathematical problems. We construct inverse differential operators and produce operational identities, involving inverse derivatives and families of generalised orthogonal polynomials, such as Hermite and Laguerre polynomial families. We develop the methodology of inverse and exponential operators, employing them for the study of partial differential equations. Advantages of the operational technique, combined with the use of integral transforms, generating functions with exponentials and their integrals, for solving a wide class of partial derivative equations, related to heat, wave, and transport problems, are demonstrated. PMID:24892051

  19. Solution of some types of differential equations: operational calculus and inverse differential operators.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, K

    2014-01-01

    We present a general method of operational nature to analyze and obtain solutions for a variety of equations of mathematical physics and related mathematical problems. We construct inverse differential operators and produce operational identities, involving inverse derivatives and families of generalised orthogonal polynomials, such as Hermite and Laguerre polynomial families. We develop the methodology of inverse and exponential operators, employing them for the study of partial differential equations. Advantages of the operational technique, combined with the use of integral transforms, generating functions with exponentials and their integrals, for solving a wide class of partial derivative equations, related to heat, wave, and transport problems, are demonstrated. PMID:24892051

  20. Application of a XMM-Newton EPIC Monte Carlo to Analysis And Interpretation of Data for Abell 1689, RXJ0658-55 And the Centaurus Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Karl E.; Peterson, J.R.; Madejski, G.M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-17

    We propose a new Monte Carlo method to study extended X-ray sources with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard XMM Newton. The Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI) technique, described in a companion paper, is applied here to the EPIC data for the clusters of galaxies Abell 1689, Centaurus and RXJ 0658-55 (the ''bullet cluster''). We aim to show the advantages of this method of simultaneous spectral-spatial modeling over traditional X-ray spectral analysis. In Abell 1689 we confirm our earlier findings about structure in temperature distribution and produce a high resolution temperature map. We also confirm our findings about velocity structure within the gas. In the bullet cluster, RXJ 0658-55, we produce the highest resolution temperature map ever to be published of this cluster allowing us to trace what looks like the motion of the bullet in the cluster. We even detect a south to north temperature gradient within the bullet itself. In the Centaurus cluster we detect, by dividing up the luminosity of the cluster in bands of gas temperatures, a striking feature to the north-east of the cluster core. We hypothesize that this feature is caused by a subcluster left over from a substantial merger that slightly displaced the core. We conclude that our method is very powerful in determining the spatial distributions of plasma temperatures and very useful for systematic studies in cluster structure.

  1. An X-ray survey of clusters of galaxies. IV - A survey of southern clusters and a compilation of upper limits for both Abell and southern clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Wood, K. S.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the HEAO 1 A-1 X-ray survey of galaxy clusters are reported. X-ray error boxes and intensities are presented for all clusters in the Abell catalog and for the catalog of southern clusters and groups compiled by Duus and Newell (1977). A correlation is derived on the basis of the X-ray luminosity function for 2-6 keV which may be used to calculate the contribution of clusters to the diffuse X-ray background at different energies. The cluster X-ray is estimated to be 9.3 percent (+ 1.9 or - 1.5 percent). Correlations between X-ray luminosity and other cluster properties are exmained, and it is found that the distribution of upper limits may be applied to obtaining a more precise estimate of the average X-ray luminosity of clusters. The Abell richness class and southern cluster concentrations were strongly correlated with X-ray luminosity. Correlations between optical x-ray luminosity and optical radius velocity dispersion, spiral fraction, and radio power are analyzed. The evidence for all these correlations was considered to be weak because of poor scatter in the data.

  2. Goal Directed Model Inversion: A Study of Dynamic Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombano, Silvano P.; Compton, Michael; Raghavan, Bharathi; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Goal Directed Model Inversion (GDMI) is an algorithm designed to generalize supervised learning to the case where target outputs are not available to the learning system. The output of the learning system becomes the input to some external device or transformation, and only the output of this device or transformation can be compared to a desired target. The fundamental driving mechanism of GDMI is to learn from success. Given that a wrong outcome is achieved, one notes that the action that produced that outcome 0 "would have been right if the outcome had been the desired one." The algorithm then proceeds as follows: (1) store the action that produced the wrong outcome as a "target" (2) redefine the wrong outcome as a desired goal (3) submit the new desired goal to the system (4) compare the new action with the target action and modify the system by using a suitable algorithm for credit assignment (Back propagation in our example) (5) resubmit the original goal. Prior publications by our group in this area focused on demonstrating empirical results based on the inverse kinematic problem for a simulated robotic arm. In this paper we apply the inversion process to much simpler analytic functions in order to elucidate the dynamic behavior of the system and to determine the sensitivity of the learning process to various parameters. This understanding will be necessary for the acceptance of GDMI as a practical tool.

  3. Inversion of Chelyabinsk Meteorite Micromagnetic Maps - Implication for Inversions of Mars Magnetic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazanec, M.; Kletetschka, G.

    2014-12-01

    The largest fragment of Chelyabinsk meteorite fell into the Russian lake Chebarkul on February 15, 2013. We used magnetic scanner constructed by Youngwood Science and Engineering (YSE, see Kletetschka et al 2013) to obtain micromagnetic maps of one of the Chelyabinsk's meteorite fragment. Our instrument has a Hall effect magnetic sensor and maps vertical component of the magnetic field approximately 0.3 mm above the planar surface of meteorite sample. Advantage of this instrument is a constant background field due to static position of the sensor. We applied fast Fourier transform inversion technique developed by Lima et al (2013). This technique is tailored for scanning magnetic microscopy (SMM), but may be also modified for aeromagnetic or satellite survey. It retrieves planar unidirectional magnetization distribution from micromagnetic field map. With this technique we achieved verifiable information about the source of the magnetic anomalies in our meteorite sample. Specific areas of detected magnetization were used for compositional analyses by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This way we obtain the ground truth for the source of magnetic anomalies of our meteorite thin section. Measurement of chemical composition of magnetic grains can be directly linked to the amount of magnetization for the specific magnetic mineralogy. The inversion technique was extended for interpretation of real magnetic anomalies on Mars. Lima, E. A., B. P. Weiss, L. Baratchart,D. P.Hardin, and E. B. Saff (2013), Fast inversion ofmagnetic field maps of unidirectional planar geological magnetization, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 118, 2723-2752, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50229.Kletetschka, G., Schnabl, P., Sifnerova, K., Tasaryova, Z., Manda, S., and Pruner, P., 2013, Magnetic scanning and interpretation of paleomagnetic data from Prague Synform's volcanics: Studia Geophysica Et Geodaetica, v. 57, no. 1, p. 103-117.

  4. Isotropic probability measures in infinite dimensional spaces: Inverse problems/prior information/stochastic inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George

    1987-01-01

    Let R be the real numbers, R(n) the linear space of all real n-tuples, and R(infinity) the linear space of all infinite real sequences x = (x sub 1, x sub 2,...). Let P sub n :R(infinity) approaches R(n) be the projection operator with P sub n (x) = (x sub 1,...,x sub n). Let p(infinity) be a probability measure on the smallest sigma-ring of subsets of R(infinity) which includes all of the cylinder sets P sub n(-1) (B sub n), where B sub n is an arbitrary Borel subset of R(n). Let p sub n be the marginal distribution of p(infinity) on R(n), so p sub n(B sub n) = p(infinity)(P sub n to the -1(B sub n)) for each B sub n. A measure on R(n) is isotropic if it is invariant under all orthogonal transformations of R(n). All members of the set of all isotropic probability distributions on R(n) are described. The result calls into question both stochastic inversion and Bayesian inference, as currently used in many geophysical inverse problems.

  5. Herbicide Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lanzilotta, R. P.; Pramer, David

    1970-01-01

    A strain of Fusarium solani isolated from soil by enrichment techniques used propanil (3′, 4′-dichloropropionanilide) as a sole source of organic carbon and energy for growth in pure culture. The primary product of the transformation of propanil by F. solani was isolated and identified as 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). This compound accumulated in the medium to a level (80 μg/ml) which stopped further herbicide utilization. Herbicide utilization by F. solani was influenced by various environmental and nutritional factors. It was more sensitive to acid than alkaline pH. Added glucose and yeast extract increased the rate of propanil decomposition, and the reduced aeration retarded growth of the fungus and herbicide utilization. The growth of F. solani on propionate was inhibited by added DCA. Images PMID:5437305

  6. Shock fronts, electron-ion equilibration and intracluster medium transport processes in the merging cluster Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. R.; McNamara, B. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Canning, R. E. A.; Baum, S. A.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; King, L. J.; O'Dea, C. P.

    2012-06-01

    We present a new 400-ks Chandra X-ray observation of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2146. This deep observation reveals detailed structure associated with the major merger event including the Mach number M= 2.3 ± 0.2 bow shock ahead of the dense, ram pressure stripped subcluster core and the first known example of an upstream shock in the intracluster medium (ICM) (M= 1.6 ± 0.1). By measuring the electron temperature profile behind each shock front, we determine the time-scale for the electron population to thermally equilibrate with the shock-heated ions. We find that the temperature profile behind the bow shock is consistent with the time-scale for Coulomb collisional equilibration and the post-shock temperature is lower than expected for instant shock heating of the electrons. Although like the Bullet cluster the electron temperatures behind the upstream shock front are hotter than expected, favouring the instant heating model, the uncertainty on the temperature values is greater here and there is significant substructure complicating the interpretation. We also measured the width of each shock front and the contact discontinuity on the leading edge of the subcluster core to investigate the suppression of transport processes in the ICM. The upstream shock is ˜440 kpc in length but appears remarkably narrow over this distance with a best-fitting width of only 6+5-3 kpc compared with the mean free path of 23 ± 5 kpc. The leading edge of the subcluster core is also narrow with an upper limit on the width of only 2 kpc separating the cool, multiphase gas at 0.5-2 keV from the shock-heated surrounding ICM at ˜6 keV. The strong suppression of diffusion and conduction across this edge suggests a magnetic draping layer may have formed around the subcluster core. The deep Chandra observation has also revealed a cool, dense plume of material extending ˜170 kpc perpendicular to the merger axis, which is likely to be the disrupted remnant of the primary cluster core

  7. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. II. Photometric redshifts and rest frame properties in Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Amorín, R.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; McLure, R. J.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Mortlock, A.; Parsa, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Balestra, I.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Rosati, P.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present the first public release of photometric redshifts, galaxy rest frame properties and associated magnification values in the cluster and parallel pointings of the first two Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416. The released catalogues aim to provide a reference for future investigations of extragalactic populations in these legacy fields: from lensed high-redshift galaxies to cluster members themselves. Methods: We exploit a multiwavelength catalogue, ranging from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to ground-based K and Spitzer IRAC, which is specifically designed to enable detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. The multiband information is used to derive photometric redshifts and physical properties of sources detected either in the H-band image alone, or from a stack of four WFC3 bands. To minimize systematics, median photometric redshifts are assembled from six different approaches to photo-z estimates. Their reliability is assessed through a comparison with available spectroscopic samples. State-of-the-art lensing models are used to derive magnification values on an object-by-object basis by taking into account sources positions and redshifts. Results: We show that photometric redshifts reach a remarkable ~3-5% accuracy. After accounting for magnification, the H-band number counts are found to be in agreement at bright magnitudes with number counts from the CANDELS fields, while extending the presently available samples to galaxies that, intrinsically, are as faint as H ~ 32-33, thanks to strong gravitational lensing. The Frontier Fields allow the galaxy stellar mass distribution to be probed, depending on magnification, at 0.5-1.5 dex lower masses with respect to extragalactic wide fields, including sources at Mstar ~ 107-108 M⊙ at z > 5. Similarly, they allow the detection of objects with intrinsic star formation rates (SFRs) >1 dex lower than in the CANDELS fields reaching 0.1-1 M⊙/yr at z ~ 6-10. The

  8. THE RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF ABELL 1689 AND THE RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Jee, M. J.; Jordán, A.; Meurer, G. R.; Peng, E. W.; West, M. J.

    2013-09-20

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z = 0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach a magnitude I{sub 814} = 29 with ∼>90% completeness and sample the brightest ∼5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N{sup total}{sub GC}= 162,850{sup +75,450}{sub -51,310} GCs within a projected radius of 400 kpc. As many as half of the GCs may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this system is by far the largest GC population studied to date. The specific frequency S{sub N} is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from S{sub N} ≈ 5 near the center to ∼12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase S{sub N} by ∼20% at z = 0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the mass fractions as a function of radius. The estimated mass in GCs, M{sub GC}{sup total} = 3.9 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, is comparable to ∼80% of the total stellar mass of the Milky Way. The shape of the GC mass profile appears intermediate between those of the stellar light and total cluster mass. Despite the extreme nature of this system, the ratios of the GC mass to the baryonic and total masses, and thus the GC formation efficiency, are typical of those in other rich clusters when comparing at the same physical radii. The GC formation efficiency is not constant, but varies with radius, in a manner that appears similar for different clusters; we speculate on the reasons for this similarity in profile.

  9. Analysis of RAE-1 inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedland, D. A.; Degonia, P. K.

    1974-01-01

    The RAE-1 spacecraft inversion performed October 31, 1972 is described based upon the in-orbit dynamical data in conjunction with results obtained from previously developed computer simulation models. The computer simulations used are predictive of the satellite dynamics, including boom flexing, and are applicable during boom deployment and retraction, inter-phase coast periods, and post-deployment operations. Attitude data, as well as boom tip data, were analyzed in order to obtain a detailed description of the dynamical behavior of the spacecraft during and after the inversion. Runs were made using the computer model and the results were analyzed and compared with the real time data. Close agreement between the actual recorded spacecraft attitude and the computer simulation results was obtained.

  10. Simplified, inverse, ejector design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechant, Lawrence J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple lumped parameter based inverse design tool has been developed which provides flow path geometry and entrainment estimates subject to operational, acoustic, and design constraints. These constraints are manifested through specification of primary mass flow rate or ejector thrust, fully-mixed exit velocity, and static pressure matching. Fundamentally, integral forms of the conservation equations coupled with the specified design constraints are combined to yield an easily invertible linear system in terms of the flow path cross-sectional areas. Entrainment is computed by back substitution. Initial comparison with experimental and analogous one-dimensional methods show good agreement. Thus, this simple inverse design code provides an analytically based, preliminary design tool with direct application to High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) design studies.

  11. Broadband synthetic aperture geoacoustic inversion.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bien Aik; Gerstoft, Peter; Yardim, Caglar; Hodgkiss, William S

    2013-07-01

    A typical geoacoustic inversion procedure involves powerful source transmissions received on a large-aperture receiver array. A more practical approach is to use a single moving source and/or receiver in a low signal to noise ratio (SNR) setting. This paper uses single-receiver, broadband, frequency coherent matched-field inversion and exploits coherently repeated transmissions to improve estimation of the geoacoustic parameters. The long observation time creates a synthetic aperture due to relative source-receiver motion. This approach is illustrated by studying the transmission of multiple linear frequency modulated (LFM) pulses which results in a multi-tonal comb spectrum that is Doppler sensitive. To correlate well with the measured field across a receiver trajectory and to incorporate transmission from a source trajectory, waveguide Doppler and normal mode theory is applied. The method is demonstrated with low SNR, 100-900 Hz LFM pulse data from the Shallow Water 2006 experiment. PMID:23862809

  12. Southern California Adjoint Source Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, J.; Kim, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Southern California Centroid-Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions with 9 components (6 moment tensor elements, latitude, longitude, and depth) are sought to minimize a misfit function computed from waveform differences. The gradient of a misfit function is obtained based upon two numerical simulations for each earthquake: one forward calculation for the southern California model, and an adjoint calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers. Conjugate gradient and square-root variable metric methods are used to iteratively improve the earthquake source model while reducing the misfit function. The square-root variable metric algorithm has the advantage of providing a direct approximation to the posterior covariance operator. We test the inversion procedure by perturbing each component of the CMT solution, and see how the algorithm converges. Finally, we demonstrate full inversion capabilities using data for real Southern California earthquakes.

  13. Momentum resolution in inverse photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Zumbülte, A.; Schmidt, A. B.; Donath, M.

    2015-01-15

    We present a method to determine the electron beam divergence, and thus the momentum resolution, of an inverse-photoemission setup directly from a series of spectra measured on Cu(111). Simulating these spectra with different beam divergences shows a distinct influence of the divergence on the appearance of the Shockley surface state. Upon crossing the Fermi level, its rise in intensity can be directly linked with the beam divergence. A comparison of measurement and simulation enables us to quantify the momentum resolution independent of surface quality, energy resolution, and experimental geometry. With spin resolution, a single spectrum taken around the Fermi momentum of a spin-split surface state, e.g., on Au(111), is sufficient to derive the momentum resolution of an inverse-photoemission setup.

  14. Inverse psoriasis treated with ustekinumab.

    PubMed

    Campos, Manuel António; Varela, Paulo; Baptista, Armando; Moreira, Ana Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Inverse psoriasis is characterised by the involvement of flexural skin folds. This form of psoriasis has distinct clinical and therapeutic features. This report refers to the case of a 48-year-old Caucasian man who was observed in our department, with a clinically and biopsy proven diagnosis of inverse psoriasis. For 2 years, the patient was treated with different combinations of corticosteroids, vitamin D analogues and methotrexate, with no satisfactory response. Given the lack of a clinical response and comorbidities, latent tuberculosis was excluded, and we started treatment with ustekinumab. We chose this biological agent because the patient was a long-distance truck driver and refused the possibility of autoinjections. The patient underwent three ustekinumab injections, which resulted in significant improvement of pruritus, erythaematous lesions and quality of life. PMID:27222277

  15. Techniques in Doppler gravity inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The types of Doppler gravity data available for local as opposed to planetwide geophysical modeling are reviewed. Those gravity fields that are determined dynamically in orbit determination programs yield a smoothed representation of the local gravity field that may be used for quantitative modeling. An estimate of the difference between smoothed and true fields can be considered as a noise limitation in generating local gravity models. A nonlinear inversion for the geometry, depth, and density of the Mare Serenitatis mascon using an ellipsoidal model yielded a global least squares minimum in horizontal dimensions, depth, and thickness-density contrast product. It was subsequently found, by using a linear model, that there were an infinite number of solutions corresponding to various combinations of depth and lateral inhomogeneity. Linear modeling was performed by means of generalized inverse theory.

  16. Pyramidal inversion domain boundaries revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Remmele, T.; Albrecht, M.; Irmscher, K.; Fornari, R.; Strassburg, M.

    2011-10-03

    The structure of pyramidal inversion domain boundaries in GaN:Mg was investigated by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. The analysis shows the upper (0001) boundary to consist of a single Mg layer inserted between polarity inverted GaN layers in an abcab stacking. The Mg bound in these defects is at least one order of magnitude lower than the chemical Mg concentration. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements show that up to 27% of the Mg acceptors is electrically compensated.

  17. Stochastic inversion by ray continuation

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, A.; Viallix

    1989-05-01

    The conventional tomographic inversion consists in minimizing residuals between measured and modelled traveltimes. The process tends to be unstable and some additional constraints are required to stabilize it. The stochastic formulation generalizes the technique and sets it on firmer theoretical bases. The Stochastic Inversion by Ray Continuation (SIRC) is a probabilistic approach, which takes a priori geological information into account and uses probability distributions to characterize data correlations and errors. It makes it possible to tie uncertainties to the results. The estimated parameters are interval velocities and B-spline coefficients used to represent smoothed interfaces. Ray tracing is done by a continuation technique between source and receives. The ray coordinates are computed from one path to the next by solving a linear system derived from Fermat's principle. The main advantages are fast computations, accurate traveltimes and derivatives. The seismic traces are gathered in CMPs. For a particular CMP, several reflecting elements are characterized by their time gradient measured on the stacked section, and related to a mean emergence direction. The program capabilities are tested on a synthetic example as well as on a field example. The strategy consists in inverting the parameters for one layer, then for the next one down. An inversion step is divided in two parts. First the parameters for the layer concerned are inverted, while the parameters for the upper layers remain fixed. Then all the parameters are reinverted. The velocity-depth section computed by the program together with the corresponding errors can be used directly for the interpretation, as an initial model for depth migration or for the complete inversion program under development.

  18. Subsonic, transonic, and supersonic nozzle flow by the inverse technique.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    The inverse technique is used to obtain a mathematically and physically consistent solution of the flowfield in a nozzle from the mass generation surface through the supersonic region. The inverse method employs an assumed centerline function which is of the Cauchy type in that the values and the derivatives of the function are known. Since the Cauchy boundary conditions can give rise to numerical instabilities, the governing gasdynamic equations for rotational steady flow were transformed into a form which puts the geometry into a rectangular shape, and which spaces the network of interior points more finely in regions of the greatest gradients of the dependent variables. For arbitrarily specified centerline data, the solution of the governing flow equations may not exist, and if it does it may not depend continuously on the data.

  19. On the Magic Square and Inverse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elzaidi, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    In this note, we give a method for finding the inverse of a three by three magic square matrix without using the usual methods for finding the inverse of a matrix. Also we give a method for finding the inverse of a three by three magic square matrix whose entries are also matrices. By using these ideas, we can construct large matrices whose…

  20. Fast Computation of the Inverse CMH Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A fast computational method based on differential equation approach for inverse DOK model has been extended for the inverse CMH model. Also, a cobweb technique for calculating the inverse CMH model is also presented. The two techniques are differed from the point of view of flexibility and computation time.

  1. Inverse problem for in vivo NMR spatial localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenfeld, A.C.

    1985-11-01

    The basic physical problem of NMR spatial localization is considered. To study diseased sites, one must solve the problem of adequately localizing the NMR signal. We formulate this as an inverse problem. As the NMR Bloch equations determine the motion of nuclear spins in applied magnetic fields, a theoretical study is undertaken to answer the question of how to design magnetic field configurations to achieve these localized excited spin populations. Because of physical constraints in the production of the relevant radiofrequency fields, the problem factors into a temporal one and a spatial one. We formulate the temporal problem as a nonlinear transformation, called the Bloch Transform, from the rf input to the magnetization response. In trying to invert this transformation, both linear (for the Fourier Transform) and nonlinear (for the Bloch Transform) modes of radiofrequency excitation are constructed. The spatial problem is essentially a statics problem for the Maxwell equations of electromagnetism, as the wavelengths of the radiation considered are on the order of ten meters, and so propagation effects are negligible. In the general case, analytic solutions are unavailable, and so the methods of computer simulation are used to map the rf field spatial profiles. Numerical experiments are also performed to verify the theoretical analysis, and experimental confirmation of the theory is carried out on the 0.5 Tesla IBM/Oxford Imaging Spectrometer at the LBL NMR Medical Imaging Facility. While no explicit inverse is constructed to ''solve'' this problem, the combined theoretical/numerical analysis is validated experimentally, justifying the approximations made. 56 refs., 31 figs.

  2. Parallel computation of manipulator inverse dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1991-01-01

    In this article, parallel computation of manipulator inverse dynamics is investigated. A hierarchical graph-based mapping approach is devised to analyze the inherent parallelism in the Newton-Euler formulation at several computational levels, and to derive the features of an abstract architecture for exploitation of parallelism. At each level, a parallel algorithm represents the application of a parallel model of computation that transforms the computation into a graph whose structure defines the features of an abstract architecture, i.e., number of processors, communication structure, etc. Data-flow analysis is employed to derive the time lower bound in the computation as well as the sequencing of the abstract architecture. The features of the target architecture are defined by optimization of the abstract architecture to exploit maximum parallelism while minimizing architectural complexity. An architecture is designed and implemented that is capable of efficient exploitation of parallelism at several computational levels. The computation time of the Newton-Euler formulation for a 6-degree-of-freedom (dof) general manipulator is measured as 187 microsec. The increase in computation time for each additional dof is 23 microsec, which leads to a computation time of less than 500 microsec, even for a 12-dof redundant arm.

  3. Fourier analysis and signal processing by use of the Moebius inversion formula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Irving S.; Yu, Xiaoli; Shih, Ming-Tang; Tufts, Donald W.; Truong, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    A novel Fourier technique for digital signal processing is developed. This approach to Fourier analysis is based on the number-theoretic method of the Moebius inversion of series. The Fourier transform method developed is shown also to yield the convolution of two signals. A computer simulation shows that this method for finding Fourier coefficients is quite suitable for digital signal processing. It competes with the classical FFT (fast Fourier transform) approach in terms of accuracy, complexity, and speed.

  4. An ISOCAM survey through gravitationally lensing galaxy clusters. III. New results from mid-infrared observations of the cluster Abell 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coia, D.; Metcalfe, L.; McBreen, B.; Biviano, A.; Smail, I.; Altieri, B.; Kneib, J.-P.; McBreen, S.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; O'Halloran, B.

    2005-01-01

    The massive cluster of galaxies Abell 2219 (z = 0.228) with two spectacular gravitational lensing arcs was observed at 14.3 μm (hereafter 15 μm) with the Infrared Space Observatory and results were published by Barvainis et al. (\\cite{1999AJ....118..645B}). These observations have been reanalyzed using a method specifically designed for the detection of faint sources that had been applied to other clusters. Five new sources were detected and the resulting cumulative total of ten sources all have optical counterparts. The mid-infrared sources are identified with three cluster members, three foreground galaxies, an Extremely Red Object, a star and two galaxies of unknown redshift. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the galaxies are fit with models from a selection, using the program GRASIL. Best-fits are obtained, in general, with models of galaxies with ongoing star formation. Infrared luminosities and star formation rates are obtained for six sources: the cluster members and the foreground galaxies. For the three cluster members the infrared luminosities derived from the model SEDs are between ˜5.7 × 1010 L⊙ and 1.4 × 1011 L⊙, corresponding to infrared star formation rates between 10 and 24 M⊙ yr-1. The two cluster galaxies that have optical classifications are in the Butcher-Oemler region of the color-magnitude diagramme. The three foreground galaxies have infrared luminosities between 1.5 × 1010 L⊙ and 9.4 × 1010 L⊙ yielding infrared star formation rates between 3 and 16 M⊙ yr-1. Two of the foreground galaxies are located in two foreground galaxy enhancements (Boschin et al. \\cite{2004A&A...416..839B}). Including Abell 2219, six distant clusters of galaxies have been mapped with ISOCAM and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) have been found in three of them. The presence of LIRGs in Abell 2219 strengthens the association between luminous infrared galaxies in clusters and recent or ongoing cluster merger activity. Based on observations

  5. Dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for mobile manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Joanna; Tchoń, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    By analogy to the definition of the dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for robotic manipulators, we have designed a dynamically consistent Jacobian inverse for mobile manipulators built of a non-holonomic mobile platform and a holonomic on-board manipulator. The endogenous configuration space approach has been exploited as a source of conceptual guidelines. The new inverse guarantees a decoupling of the motion in the operational space from the forces exerted in the endogenous configuration space and annihilated by the dual Jacobian inverse. A performance study of the new Jacobian inverse as a tool for motion planning is presented.

  6. Image-guided inversion of electrical resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Revil, A.; Karaoulis, M.; Hale, D.; Doetsch, J.; Cuttler, S.

    2014-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is based on solving a Poisson equation for the electrical potential and is characterized by a good sensitivity only in the vicinity of the electrodes used to gather the data. To provide more information to ERT, we propose an image-guided or structure-constrained inversion of the apparent resistivity data. This approach uses structural information obtained directly from a guiding image. This guiding image can be drawn from a high resolution geophysical method based on the propagation equation (e.g. migrated seismic or ground penetrating radar images) or possibly from a geological cross-section of the subsurface based on some prior geological expertise. The locations and orientations of the structural features can be extracted by image processing methods to determine the structure tensor and the semblances of the guiding image at a set of pixel. Then, we introduce these structural constraints into the inversion of the apparent resistivity data by weighting the four-direction smoothing matrix to smooth along, but not across, structural features. This approach allows preserving both discontinuities and coherences in the inversion of the resistivity data. The image-guided inversion is also combined with an image-guided interpolation approach used to focus a smooth resistivity image. This yields structurally-appealing resistivity tomograms, while the whole process remains computationally efficient. Such a procedure generates a more realistic resistivity distribution (closer to the true ones), which can be, in turn, used quantitatively using appropriate petrophysical transforms, to obtain parameters of interest such as porosity and saturation. We check the validity of this approach using two synthetic case studies as well as two real datasets. For the field data, the image used to guide the inversion of the electrical resistivity data is a GPR section in the first case and a combination of seismic and structural information in the

  7. Complete Gabor transformation for signal representation.

    PubMed

    Yao, J

    1993-01-01

    Properties of the Gabor transformation used for image representation are discussed. The properties can be expressed in matrix notation, and the complete Gabor coefficients can be found by multiplying the inverse of the Gabor (1946) matrix and the signal vector. The Gabor matrix can be decomposed into the product of a sparse constant complex matrix and another sparse matrix that depends only on the window function. A fast algorithm is suggested to compute the inverse of the window function matrix, enabling discrete signals to be transformed into generalized nonorthogonal Gabor representations efficiently. A comparison is made between this method and the analytical method. The relation between the window function matrix and the biorthogonal functions is demonstrated. A numerical computation method for the biorthogonal functions is proposed. PMID:18296205

  8. The continuation inverse problem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, Stephen P.

    1998-06-01

    The non-uniqueness of the continuation of a finite collection of harmonic potential field data to a level surface in the source-free region forces its treatment as an inverse problem. A formalism is proposed for the construction of continuation functions which are extremal by various measures. The problem is cast in such a form that the inverse problem solution is the potential function on the lowest horizontal surface above all sources, serving as the boundary function for the Dirichlet problem in the upper half-plane. The desired continuation, at the higher level of interest, must then be in the range of the upward continuation operator acting on this boundary function, rather than being allowed the full freedom of itself being part of a Dirichlet problem boundary function. Extremal solutions minimize non-linear functionals of the continuation function, which are re-expressed as different functionals of the boundary function. A crux of the method is that there is no essential distinction between the upward and downward continuation inverse problems to levels above or below data locations. Casting the optimization as a Lagrange multiplier problem leads to an integral equation for the boundary function, which is readily solved in the Fourier domain for a certain class of functionals. The desired extremal continuation is then given by upward continuation. It is found that for some functionals, application of the Lagrange multiplier theorem requires a further restriction on the set of allowable boundary functions: bandlimitedness is a natural choice for the continuation problem. With this imposition, the theory is developed in detail for semi-norm functionals penalizing departure from a constant potential, in the 2-norm and Sobelev norm senses, and illustrated by application for a small synthetic Deep Tow magnetic field data set.

  9. The inversion model of soil organic matter of cultivated land based on hyperspectral technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaohe; Wang, Yancang; Song, Xiaoyu; Xu, Xingang

    2015-10-01

    Monitoring soil organic matter (SOM) in the cultivated land quantitively and mastering its spatial change are helpful for the adjustment of fertility and sustainable development of agriculture. The hyperspectral technology could be used to detect the targets quickly and nondestructively. The study aimed to develop a universal method to monitor SOM by hyperspectral data. The main idea of the study could be described as follows. Several mathematical transformations were used to improve the expression ability of hyperspectral data. The correlations between SOM and the hyperspectral reflectivity and its mathematical transformations were analyzed. Then the feature bands and its transformations were screened to develop the optimizing model of monitoring SOM based on the method of multiple linear regressions. The in-situ sample was used to evaluate the accuracy of the model. Results showed that the inversion model with the one differentiation of logarithmic reciprocal transformation ( (1 lg P)') of reflectivity could reach highest correlation coefficient (0.643) with lowest RMSE (2.622 g/kg), which was considered as the optimizing inversion model of SOM. It indicated that the one differentiation of logarithmic reciprocal transformation of hyperspectral had good response with SOM of cultivated land. Based on this transformation, the optimizing inversion model of SOM could reach good accuracy with high stability.

  10. Model-based inverse methods for sizing surface-breaking discontinuities with eddy current probe variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrin, John C.; Shell, Eric B.; Oneida, Erin K.; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Sabbagh, Elias; Murphy, R. Kim; Mazdiyasni, Siamack; Lindgren, Eric A.

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate and validate model-based inversion techniques to characterize length, depth, width and orientation of surface-breaking cracks using eddy current NDE under varying probe conditions. A series of parametric studies of probe characteristics are presented for a fixed set of well-characterized flaws with varying length, depth, opening width and orientation angle. Results show inversion performance differences between probes with the same design specifications. Inversion results were also evaluated for a probe that was selectively controlled for varying probe liftoff, varying tilt in two directions, and orientation. Certain levels of probe tilt and liftoff were found to degrade the performance of the inversion technique. By using a model calibration process that incorporates the matching probe calibration data, better inversion results can be achieved, to a limited degree. There is a need to more appropriately adapt the model through the calibration fit to compensate for varying probe tilt and liftoff. Results are presented for a model transform approach, evaluating scale and phase terms based on the best model fit with the calibration data. The results for certain severe cases of liftoff were improved using the transformed model; however, it does not address all probe conditions. Future work is proposed to use a full model-based transformation approach using more comprehensive meta-model representations.

  11. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xuben; Li, Zhirong; Li, Qiong; Li, Zhengwen

    2009-06-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  12. Parallel inverse iteration with reorthogonalization

    SciTech Connect

    Fann, G.I.; Littlefield, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    A parallel method for finding orthogonal eigenvectors of real symmetric tridiagonal is described. The method uses inverse iteration with repeated Modified Gram-Schmidt (MGS) reorthogonalization of the unconverged iterates for clustered eigenvalues. This approach is more parallelizable than reorthogonalizing against fully converged eigenvectors, as is done by LAPACK's current DSTEIN routine. The new method is found to provide accuracy and speed comparable to DSTEIN's and to have good parallel scalability even for matrices with large clusters of eigenvalues. We present al results for residual and orthogonality tests, plus timings on IBM RS/6000 (sequential) and Intel Touchstone DELTA (parallel) computers.

  13. Parallel inverse iteration with reorthogonalization

    SciTech Connect

    Fann, G.I.; Littlefield, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    A parallel method for finding orthogonal eigenvectors of real symmetric tridiagonal is described. The method uses inverse iteration with repeated Modified Gram-Schmidt (MGS) reorthogonalization of the unconverged iterates for clustered eigenvalues. This approach is more parallelizable than reorthogonalizing against fully converged eigenvectors, as is done by LAPACK`s current DSTEIN routine. The new method is found to provide accuracy and speed comparable to DSTEIN`s and to have good parallel scalability even for matrices with large clusters of eigenvalues. We present al results for residual and orthogonality tests, plus timings on IBM RS/6000 (sequential) and Intel Touchstone DELTA (parallel) computers.

  14. Transformer regulated self-stabilizing chopper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raposa, F. L. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    A self-stabilizing voltage regulator is described. Direct current voltage regulation employing a series transistor rendered conductive during various portions of a cycle is controlled by saturation of an autotransformer. The constant volt-second capacity of the transformer provides conduction time inverse to the input voltage whereby average output voltage is maintained constant. Conduction commenced in response to short gate signals, and resistor feedback for degenerative turn-off of the transistor was after transformer saturation. Standard output filters are also included.

  15. Subband/transform functions for image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Functions for image data processing written for use with the MATLAB(TM) software package are presented. These functions provide the capability to transform image data with block transformations (such as the Walsh Hadamard) and to produce spatial frequency subbands of the transformed data. Block transforms are equivalent to simple subband systems. The transform coefficients are reordered using a simple permutation to give subbands. The low frequency subband is a low resolution version of the original image, while the higher frequency subbands contain edge information. The transform functions can be cascaded to provide further decomposition into more subbands. If the cascade is applied to all four of the first stage subbands (in the case of a four band decomposition), then a uniform structure of sixteen bands is obtained. If the cascade is applied only to the low frequency subband, an octave structure of seven bands results. Functions for the inverse transforms are also given. These functions can be used for image data compression systems. The transforms do not in themselves produce data compression, but prepare the data for quantization and compression. Sample quantization functions for subbands are also given. A typical compression approach is to subband the image data, quantize it, then use statistical coding (e.g., run-length coding followed by Huffman coding) for compression. Contour plots of image data and subbanded data are shown.

  16. Visco-elastic controlled-source full waveform inversion without surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschke, Marco; Krause, Martin; Bleibinhaus, Florian

    2016-04-01

    We developed a frequency-domain visco-elastic full waveform inversion for onshore seismic experiments with topography. The forward modeling is based on a finite-difference time-domain algorithm by Robertsson that uses the image-method to ensure a stress-free condition at the surface. The time-domain data is Fourier-transformed at every point in the model space during the forward modeling for a given set of frequencies. The motivation for this approach is the reduced amount of memory when computing kernels, and the straightforward implementation of the multiscale approach. For the inversion, we calculate the Frechet derivative matrix explicitly, and we implement a Levenberg-Marquardt scheme that allows for computing the resolution matrix. To reduce the size of the Frechet derivative matrix, and to stabilize the inversion, an adapted inverse mesh is used. The node spacing is controlled by the velocity distribution and the chosen frequencies. To focus the inversion on body waves (P, P-coda, and S) we mute the surface waves from the data. Consistent spatiotemporal weighting factors are applied to the wavefields during the Fourier transform to obtain the corresponding kernels. We test our code with a synthetic study using the Marmousi model with arbitrary topography. This study also demonstrates the importance of topography and muting surface waves in controlled-source full waveform inversion.

  17. Simultaneous Gaussian and exponential inversion for improved analysis of shales by NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Kathryn E; Anderssen, Endre; Vogt, Sarah J; Seymour, Joseph D; Birdwell, Justin E; Kirkland, Catherine M; Codd, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is commonly used to provide lithology-independent porosity and pore-size estimates for petroleum resource evaluation based on fluid-phase signals. However in shales, substantial hydrogen content is associated with solid and fluid signals and both may be detected. Depending on the motional regime, the signal from the solids may be best described using either exponential or Gaussian decay functions. When the inverse Laplace transform, the standard method for analysis of NMR relaxometry results, is applied to data containing Gaussian decays, this can lead to physically unrealistic responses such as signal or porosity overcall and relaxation times that are too short to be determined using the applied instrument settings. We apply a new simultaneous Gaussian-Exponential (SGE) inversion method to simulated data and measured results obtained on a variety of oil shale samples. The SGE inversion produces more physically realistic results than the inverse Laplace transform and displays more consistent relaxation behavior at high magnetic field strengths. Residuals for the SGE inversion are consistently lower than for the inverse Laplace method and signal overcall at short T2 times is mitigated. Beyond geological samples, the method can also be applied in other fields where the sample relaxation consists of both Gaussian and exponential decays, for example in material, medical and food sciences. PMID:25459882

  18. Simultaneous Gaussian and exponential inversion for improved analysis of shales by NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Anderssen, Endre; Vogt, Sarah J.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is commonly used to provide lithology-independent porosity and pore-size estimates for petroleum resource evaluation based on fluid-phase signals. However in shales, substantial hydrogen content is associated with solid and fluid signals and both may be detected. Depending on the motional regime, the signal from the solids may be best described using either exponential or Gaussian decay functions. When the inverse Laplace transform, the standard method for analysis of NMR relaxometry results, is applied to data containing Gaussian decays, this can lead to physically unrealistic responses such as signal or porosity overcall and relaxation times that are too short to be determined using the applied instrument settings. We apply a new simultaneous Gaussian-Exponential (SGE) inversion method to simulated data and measured results obtained on a variety of oil shale samples. The SGE inversion produces more physically realistic results than the inverse Laplace transform and displays more consistent relaxation behavior at high magnetic field strengths. Residuals for the SGE inversion are consistently lower than for the inverse Laplace method and signal overcall at short T2 times is mitigated. Beyond geological samples, the method can also be applied in other fields where the sample relaxation consists of both Gaussian and exponential decays, for example in material, medical and food sciences.

  19. Simultaneous Gaussian and exponential inversion for improved analysis of shales by NMR relaxometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Anderssen, Endre; Vogt, Sarah J.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is commonly used to provide lithology-independent porosity and pore-size estimates for petroleum resource evaluation based on fluid-phase signals. However in shales, substantial hydrogen content is associated with solid and fluid signals and both may be detected. Depending on the motional regime, the signal from the solids may be best described using either exponential or Gaussian decay functions. When the inverse Laplace transform, the standard method for analysis of NMR relaxometry results, is applied to data containing Gaussian decays, this can lead to physically unrealistic responses such as signal or porosity overcall and relaxation times that are too short to be determined using the applied instrument settings. We apply a new simultaneous Gaussian-Exponential (SGE) inversion method to simulated data and measured results obtained on a variety of oil shale samples. The SGE inversion produces more physically realistic results than the inverse Laplace transform and displays more consistent relaxation behavior at high magnetic field strengths. Residuals for the SGE inversion are consistently lower than for the inverse Laplace method and signal overcall at short T2 times is mitigated. Beyond geological samples, the method can also be applied in other fields where the sample relaxation consists of both Gaussian and exponential decays, for example in material, medical and food sciences.

  20. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of triterpene saponins from tea seed pomace (Camellia oleifera Abel) and their activities against bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Fu; Yang, Shao-Lan; Han, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Lei; Lu, Gui-Long; Xia, Tao; Gao, Li-Ping

    2014-01-01

    A method using LC-ESI-IT-TOF/MS and LC/UV-ELSD was established to qualitatively analyze triterpene saponins obtained from the tea seed pomace (Camellia oleifera Abel). In addition, the quantitative analysis of oleiferasaponin A1 using LC/UV was developed. The purified total saponins did not exhibit any inhibitory effects at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 mg/mL against the tested bacteria, except for Staphyloccocus aureus and Escherichia coli. By contrast, higher inhibitory activity was seen against the tested fungi, especially against Bipolaris maydis. Following treatment with an MIC value of 250 μg/mL for 24 h, the mycelial morphology was markedly shriveled in appearance or showed flattened and empty hyphae, with fractured cell walls, ruptured plasmalemma and cytoplasmic coagulation or leakage. These structural changes hindered the growth of mycelia. PMID:24914901

  1. The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey. VI. Spatial distribution and kinematics of early- and late-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Theije, P. A. M.; Katgert, P.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the data obtained in the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (ENACS) has shown that the space distribution and kinematics of galaxies with detectable emission lines in their spectra differ significantly from those of galaxies without emission lines. This result, and details of the kinematics, were considered as support for the idea that at least the spirals with emission lines are on orbits that are not isotropic. This might indicate that this subset of late-type galaxies either has `first approach'-orbits towards the dense core of their respective clusters, or has orbits that `avoid' the core. The galaxies with emission lines are essentially all late-type galaxies. On the other hand, the emission-line galaxies represent only about a third of the late-type galaxies, the majority of which do not show detectable emission lines. The galaxies without emission lines are therefore a mix of early- and late-type galaxies. In this paper we attempt to separate early- and late-type galaxies, and we study possible differences in distribution and kinematics of the two galaxy classes. For only about 10% of the galaxies in the ENACS, the morphology is known from imaging. Here, we describe our classification on the basis of the ENACS spectrum. The significant information in each spectrum is compressed into 15 Principal Components, which are used as input for an Artificial Neural Network. The latter is `trained' with 150 of the 270 galaxies for which a morphological type is available from Dressler, and subsequently used to classify each galaxy. This yields a classification for two-thirds of the ENACS galaxies. The Artificial Neural Network has two output classes: early-type (E+S0) and late-type (S+I) galaxies. We do not distinguish E and S0 galaxies, because these cannot be separated very robustly on the basis of the spectrum. The success rate of the classification is estimated from the sample of 120 galaxies with Dressler morphologies which were not used to train the ANN

  2. Frontier Field Abell 370

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Tom; Capak, Peter

    2014-08-01

    After considering valuable advice from the astronomical community and broad range of open questions in galaxy evolution an advisory committee unanimously recommended HST undertake a program of six deep fields centered on strong lensing galaxy clusters in p arallel with six deep blank fields". The key science goals of these twelve new frontier fields are: 1) to reveal hitherto inaccessible populations of z = 5 - 10 galaxies thatare 10 - 50 times fainter intrinsically than any presently known. 2) to solidify our understanding of the stellar masses and star formation histories of sub-L* galaxies at the earliest times 3) to provide the first statistically meaningful morphological characterization of star forming galaxies at z > 5 4) to find z > 8 galaxies stretched out enough by cluster lensing to discern internal structure and/or magnified enough by cluster lensing for spectroscopic follow-up. Spitzer data are essential to meeting these goals because it enables mass and physical parameter estimates for the high redshift sources and differentiates between low and high redshift galaxies. As a result Spitzer has committed to observing these fields as a major DDT program. The first 4 galaxies clusters and the first 4 deep "blank fields" will be observed by Spitzer over cycles 9 and 10.

  3. Rotation and inversion in nitrosamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirste, Karl; Rademacher, Paul

    1981-04-01

    Geometry optimizations of the ground states as well as of the transition states for internal rotation and inversion have been performed by the semiempirical MNDO method for dimethyl nitrosamine (1), perfluordimethyl nitrosamine (2), N-nitroso aziridine (3), and N-nitroso azetidine (4). It was found that the potential barrier to internal rotation about the N-N bond is always of lower energy than that to inversion on the nitroso nitrogen. While the ground states tend to adopt structures which enable mesomerism, the lowest transition state is characterized by a pyramidal sp3-hybridized amino nitrogen. In accordance with experimental results the low barriers to rotation of 2 (7.96 kcal mol -1), 3 (3.38 kcal mol -1) and 4 (9.97 kcal mol -1) in comparison with 1 (12.54 kcal mol -1) indicate that in donor-acceptor molecules the transfer of charge can be limited by electronic and stereochemical effects. In particular, the equivalence of the α-methylene hydrogens which was observed in the NMR-spectrum of 3 is due to unhindered rotation and ring inveirsion.

  4. MOSES Inversions using Multiresolution SMART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Thomas; Fox, Lewis; Kankelborg, Charles; Courrier, Hans; Plovanic, Jacob

    2014-06-01

    We present improvements to the SMART inversion algorithm for the MOSES imaging spectrograph. MOSES, the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph, is a slitless extreme ultraviolet spectrograph designed to measure cotemporal narrowband spectra over a wide field of view via tomographic inversion of images taken at three orders of a concave diffraction grating. SMART, the Smooth Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, relies on a global chi squared goodness of fit criterion, which enables overfit and underfit regions to "balance out" when judging fit quality. "Good" reconstructions show poor fits at some positions and length scales. Here we take a multiresolution approach to SMART, applying corrections to the reconstruction at positions and scales where correction is warranted based on the noise. The result is improved fit residuals that more closely resemble the expected noise in the images. Within the multiresolution framework it is also easy to include a regularized deconvolution of the instrument point spread functions, which we do. Different point spread functions among MOSES spectral orders results in spurious doppler shifts in the reconstructions, most notable near bright compact emission. We estimate the point spread funtions from the data. Deconvolution is done using the Richardson-Lucy method, which is algorithmically similar to SMART. Regularization results from only correcting the reconstruction at positions and scales where correction is warranted based on the noise. We expect the point spread function deconvolution to increase signal to noise and reduce systematic error in MOSES reconstructions.

  5. Multi-Skip Tomographic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Bloom, Joost; Lorenz, Maarten

    2011-06-01

    Inspection of corrosion at pipe support locations is difficult because of accessibility limitations. Recently a screening technique has been developed called Multi-Skip ultrasonics. The method utilizes a pitch-catch set-up. Shear waves are transmitted that reflect multiple times in the pipe wall, from which integral wall thickness information is obtained. The method turns out to be very sensitive in detecting the presence of wall loss, but it turns out to be difficult to determine the extent of the wall loss. If the extent is not known, only a conservative estimate of depth can be derived from the Multi-Skip signals, because of the accumulative nature of the change in arrival time due to wall loss. Multi-Skip tomography appears to be a promising method in addition to Multi-Skip screening as a follow-up inspection technique. It uses full wave field inversion to determine a wall thickness profile at a particular location of the pipe on the support. As with the Multi-Skip screening method, Multi-Skip tomography is applied with the transmitter and receiver on both sides of the pipe support location and waves traveling in the axial pipe direction. The wave field inversion consists of a forward modeling step that predicts the measured wave field after which an iterative comparison process with the actually measured wave field results in an estimate of the wall thickness profile under the support.

  6. Integro-differential method of solving the inverse coefficient heat conduction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. L.; Zasyad'Ko, A. A.; Frolov, G. A.

    2010-03-01

    On the basis of differential transformations, a stable integro-differential method of solving the inverse heat conduction problem is suggested. The method has been tested on the example of determining the thermal diffusivity on quasi-stationary fusion and heating of a quartz glazed ceramics specimen.

  7. Generalization of the relaxation method for the inverse solution of nonlinear and linear transfer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1977-01-01

    A mapping transformation is derived for the inverse solution of nonlinear and linear integral equations of the types encountered in remote sounding studies. The method is applied to the solution of specific problems for the determination of the thermal and composition structure of planetary atmospheres from a knowledge of their upwelling radiance.

  8. Numerical solution of 2D-vector tomography problem using the method of approximate inverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetov, Ivan; Maltseva, Svetlana; Polyakova, Anna

    2016-08-01

    We propose a numerical solution of reconstruction problem of a two-dimensional vector field in a unit disk from the known values of the longitudinal and transverse ray transforms. The algorithm is based on the method of approximate inverse. Numerical simulations confirm that the proposed method yields good results of reconstruction of vector fields.

  9. Gemini Frontier Fields: Wide-field Adaptive Optics Ks-band Imaging of the Galaxy Clusters MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; Pessev, P.; Garrel, V.; Winge, C.; Neichel, B.; Vidal, F.

    2015-04-01

    We have observed two of the six Frontier Fields galaxy clusters, MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744, using the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) and the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI). With 0.″ 08-0.″ 10 FWHM our data are nearly diffraction-limited over a 100\\prime\\prime × 100\\prime\\prime wide area. GeMS/GSAOI complements the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) redwards of 1.6 μm with twice the angular resolution. We reach a 5σ depth of {{K}s}˜ 25.6 mag (AB) for compact sources. In this paper, we describe the observations, data processing, and initial public data release. We provide fully calibrated, co-added images matching the native GSAOI pixel scale as well as the larger plate scales of the HST release, adding to the legacy value of the Frontier Fields. Our work demonstrates that even for fields at high galactic latitude where natural guide stars are rare, current multi-conjugated adaptive optics technology at 8 m telescopes has opened a new window on the distant universe. Observations of a third Frontier Field, Abell 370, are planned. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal Observatories, Chile.

  10. Spectrum reconstruction based on the constrained optimal linear inverse methods.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenyi; Zhang, Chunmin; Mu, Tingkui; Dai, Haishan

    2012-07-01

    The dispersion effect of birefringent material results in spectrally varying Nyquist frequency for the Fourier transform spectrometer based on birefringent prism. Correct spectral information cannot be retrieved from the observed interferogram if the dispersion effect is not appropriately compensated. Some methods, such as nonuniform fast Fourier transforms and compensation method, were proposed to reconstruct the spectrum. In this Letter, an alternative constrained spectrum reconstruction method is suggested for the stationary polarization interference imaging spectrometer (SPIIS) based on the Savart polariscope. In the theoretical model of the interferogram, the noise and the total measurement error are included, and the spectrum reconstruction is performed by using the constrained optimal linear inverse methods. From numerical simulation, it is found that the proposed method is much more effective and robust than the nonconstrained spectrum reconstruction method proposed by Jian, and provides a useful spectrum reconstruction approach for the SPIIS. PMID:22743461

  11. Particle-Filter-Based Multisensor Fusion For Solving Low-Frequency Electromagnetic NDE Inverse Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Dass, Sarat

    2011-06-30

    Flaw profile characterization from NDE measurements is a typical inverse problem. A novel transformation of this inverse problem into a tracking problem, and subsequent application of a sequential Monte Carlo method called particle filtering, has been proposed by the authors in an earlier publication [1]. In this study, the problem of flaw characterization from multi-sensor data is considered. The NDE inverse problem is posed as a statistical inverse problem and particle filtering is modified to handle data from multiple measurement modes. The measurement modes are assumed to be independent of each other with principal component analysis (PCA) used to legitimize the assumption of independence. The proposed particle filter based data fusion algorithm is applied to experimental NDE data to investigate its feasibility.

  12. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Steel Welds Using Solidification-Boundary Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Inverse thermal analyses of structural steel deep-penetration welds are presented. These analyses employ a methodology that is in terms of numerical-analytical basis functions and constraint conditions for inverse thermal analysis of steady-state energy deposition in plate structures. These analyses provide parametric representations of weld temperature histories that can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, such as those for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and mechanical response. In addition, these parameterized temperature histories can be used for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that uses three-dimensional constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mapped within transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification boundaries.

  13. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Steel Welds Using Solidification-Boundary Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2016-05-01

    Inverse thermal analyses of structural steel deep-penetration welds are presented. These analyses employ a methodology that is in terms of numerical-analytical basis functions and constraint conditions for inverse thermal analysis of steady-state energy deposition in plate structures. These analyses provide parametric representations of weld temperature histories that can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, such as those for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and mechanical response. In addition, these parameterized temperature histories can be used for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that uses three-dimensional constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mapped within transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification boundaries.

  14. Recent Advances in Geostatistical Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanidis, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    Inverse problems are common in hydrologic applications, such as in subsurface imaging which is the identification of parameters characterizing geologic formations from hydrologic and geophysical observations. In such problems, the data do not suffice to constrain the solution to be unique. The geostatistical approach utilizes probability theory and statistical inference to assimilate data and information about structure and to explore the range of possible solutions in a systematic way. This is a progress report on recent advances in terms of formulation and computational methods. The standard implementation of the geostatistical approach to the inverse method is computationally very expensive when there are millions of unknowns and hundreds of thousands of observations, as is the case in fusing data from many sources in hydrogeology. However, depending on the specific problem, alternative formulations and numerical methods can reduce the computational problem quite dramatically. One approach can utilize formulations that involve matrices with a very high degree of sparsity combined with indirect methods of solution and strategies that minimize the number of required forward runs. The potential for this method is illustrated with an application to transient hydraulic tomography. Another approach speeds up matrix-vector multiplications by utilizing hierarchical sparsity in commonly encountered matrices, particularly prior covariance matrices. A couple of examples show how the computational cost scales with the size of the problem (number of observations and unknowns) in conventional and newer methods. Yet another fruitful approach is to rely on a large number of realizations to represent ensembles of solutions and we illustrate this approach in fusing data from two different geophysical methods. In all of these approaches, utilizing parallel processors and mixed CPU/GPU programming can significantly reduce the computational cost and make it possible to solve very

  15. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  16. Self-similarity and self-inversion of quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, A. E.

    2014-08-01

    The discovery of quasicrystals played a revolutionary role in the condensed matter science and forced to renounce the dogma of the classical crystallography that the regular filling of the space by identical blocks is reduced solely to the Fedorov space groups. It is shown that aperiodic crystals, apart from the similarity, exhibit the self-inversion property. In a broadened sense, the self-inversion implies the possible composition of the inversion with translations, rotations, and homothety, whereas pure reflection by itself in a circle can be absent as an independent symmetry element. It is demonstrated that the symmetry of aperiodic tilings is described by Schottky groups (which belong to a particular type of Kleinian groups generated by the linear fractional Möbius transformations); in the theory of aperiodic crystals, the Schottky groups play the same role that the Fedorov groups play in the theory of crystal lattices. The local matching rules for the Penrose fractal tiling are derived, the problem of choice of the fundamental region of the group of motions of a quasicrystal is discussed, and the relation between the symmetry of aperiodic tilings and the symmetry of constructive fractals is analyzed.

  17. Dark radiative inverse seesaw mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahriche, Amine; Boucenna, Sofiane M.; Nasri, Salah

    2016-04-01

    We present a minimal model that simultaneously accounts for neutrino masses and the origin of dark matter (DM) and where the electroweak phase transition is strong enough to allow for electroweak baryogenesis. The Standard Model is enlarged with a Majorana fermion, three generations of chiral fermion pairs, and a single complex scalar that plays a central role in DM production and phenomenology, neutrino masses, and the strength of the phase transition. All the new fields are singlets under the SM gauge group. Neutrino masses are generated via a new variant of the radiative inverse seesaw mechanism, where the required small mass term is generated via loops involving DM and no large hierarchy is assumed among the mass scales. The model offers all the advantage of low-scale neutrino mass models as well as a viable dark matter candidate that is testable with direct detection experiments.

  18. Hierarchical Bayesian inverse reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaedeug; Kim, Kee-Eung

    2015-04-01

    Inverse reinforcement learning (IRL) is the problem of inferring the underlying reward function from the expert's behavior data. The difficulty in IRL mainly arises in choosing the best reward function since there are typically an infinite number of reward functions that yield the given behavior data as optimal. Another difficulty comes from the noisy behavior data due to sub-optimal experts. We propose a hierarchical Bayesian framework, which subsumes most of the previous IRL algorithms as well as models the sub-optimality of the expert's behavior. Using a number of experiments on a synthetic problem, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach including the robustness of our hierarchical Bayesian framework to the sub-optimal expert behavior data. Using a real dataset from taxi GPS traces, we additionally show that our approach predicts the driving behavior with a high accuracy. PMID:25291805

  19. Applications of matrix inversion tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warp, Richard J.; Godfrey, Devon J.; Dobbins, James T., III

    2000-04-01

    The improved image quality and characteristics of new flat- panel x-ray detectors have renewed interest in advanced algorithms such as tomosynthesis. Digital tomosynthesis is a method of acquiring and reconstructing a three-dimensional data set with limited-angle tube movement. Historically, conventional tomosynthesis reconstruction has suffered contamination of the planes of interest by blurred out-of- plane structures. This paper focuses on a Matrix Inversion Tomosynthesis (MITS) algorithm to remove unwanted blur from adjacent planes. The algorithm uses a set of coupled equations to solve for the blurring function in each reconstructed plane. This paper demonstrates the use of the MITS algorithm in three imaging applications: small animal microscopy, chest radiography, and orthopedics. The results of the MITS reconstruction process demonstrate an improved reduction of blur from out-of-plane structures when compared to conventional tomosynthesis. We conclude that the MITS algorithm holds potential in a variety of applications to improve three-dimensional image reconstruction.

  20. Forward model nonlinearity versus inverse model nonlinearity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of concern is the impact of forward model nonlinearity on the nonlinearity of the inverse model. The question posed is, "Does increased nonlinearity in the head solution (forward model) always result in increased nonlinearity in the inverse solution (estimation of hydraulic conductivity)?" It is shown that the two nonlinearities are separate, and it is not universally true that increased forward model nonlinearity increases inverse model nonlinearity. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  1. NICOLE: NLTE Stokes Synthesis/Inversion Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socas-Navarro, H.

    2015-08-01

    NICOLE, written in Fortran 90, seeks the model atmosphere that provides the best fit to the Stokes profiles (in a least-squares sense) of an arbitrary number of simultaneously-observes spectral lines from solar/stellar atmospheres. The inversion core used for the development of NICOLE is the LORIEN engine (the Lovely Reusable Inversion ENgine), which combines the SVD technique with the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization method to solve the inverse problem.

  2. Superresolution imaging from nonlinear inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, R. Shane; Fiddy, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Inverse scattering algorithms typically rely on weak scattering approximations and the inversion of far field data on an Ewald sphere. This, in turn, fixes the resolution of the computed image. However, it has long been observed that when multiple scattering occurs in a strongly interacting object, and a nonlinear inversion method is employed to image it, the resulting image can reveal subwavelength resolution. We have observed this phenomenon using a cepstral filtering approach and characterize it more fully here.

  3. Inversion methods for interpretation of asteroid lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko; Lamberg, L.; Lumme, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed methods of inversion that can be used in the determination of the three-dimensional shape or the albedo distribution of the surface of a body from disk-integrated photometry, assuming the shape to be strictly convex. In addition to the theory of inversion methods, we have studied the practical aspects of the inversion problem and applied our methods to lightcurve data of 39 Laetitia and 16 Psyche.

  4. Adaptation through chromosomal inversions in Anopheles.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Diego; Ullastres, Anna; González, Josefa

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal inversions have been repeatedly involved in local adaptation in a large number of animals and plants. The ecological and behavioral plasticity of Anopheles species-human malaria vectors-is mirrored by high amounts of polymorphic inversions. The adaptive significance of chromosomal inversions has been consistently attested by strong and significant correlations between their frequencies and a number of phenotypic traits. Here, we provide an extensive literature review of the different adaptive traits associated with chromosomal inversions in the genus Anopheles. Traits having important consequences for the success of present and future vector control measures, such as insecticide resistance and behavioral changes, are discussed. PMID:24904633

  5. Human inversions and their functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Villatoro, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphic inversions are a type of structural variants that are difficult to analyze owing to their balanced nature and the location of breakpoints within complex repeated regions. So far, only a handful of inversions have been studied in detail in humans and current knowledge about their possible functional effects is still limited. However, inversions have been related to phenotypic changes and adaptation in multiple species. In this review, we summarize the evidences of the functional impact of inversions in the human genome. First, given that inversions have been shown to inhibit recombination in heterokaryotes, chromosomes displaying different orientation are expected to evolve independently and this may lead to distinct gene-expression patterns. Second, inversions have a role as disease-causing mutations both by directly affecting gene structure or regulation in different ways, and by predisposing to other secondary arrangements in the offspring of inversion carriers. Finally, several inversions show signals of being selected during human evolution. These findings illustrate the potential of inversions to have phenotypic consequences also in humans and emphasize the importance of their inclusion in genome-wide association studies. PMID:25998059

  6. Numerical investigation of an analytic solution of a multi-dimensional Lippman-Schwinger seismic inverse problem

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.B.; McMechan, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The analytic solution of the Lippman-Schwinger seismic inverse problem in three spatial dimensions, assuming a point source and a constant-density earth model, is valid in the spatial zero frequency limit. It is expressed as a two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform followed by an inverse Laplace transform. For the case of laterally homogeneous velocity, the analytic solution is correct when applied to a forward solution of the wave equation for a single-interface velocity model. Error surfaces of the non-linear, iterative, least-squares inversions corresponding to multiple, constant-velocity, horizontal layers have an absolute minimum at or near the location of the solution parameters for zero and low frequencies. The error surface for a scattered wavefield dataset generated by 3D finite-difference modeling combined with a priori constraints, produces nearly correct solutions for a range of low frequencies. Thus, this approach has potential for applicability to field data. 24 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Waveform Inversion of Synthetic Ocean Models in the Laplace Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, H.; Blacic, T. M.; Jun, H.; Shin, C.

    2014-12-01

    In seismic oceanography, the processed images show where small temperature changes (as little as 0.03°C) occur, although they do not give absolute temperatures. To get a 2-D temperature map, the data must be inverted for sound speed, which is then converted to temperature using equations of state. Full waveform inversion requires a starting model that is iteratively updated until the residuals converge. Global search algorithms such as Genetic Algorithm do not require a starting model close to the true model, but are computationally exhausting. Local search inversion is less expensive, but requires a reasonably accurate starting model. Unfortunately, most marine seismic data has little associated hydrographic data and so it is difficult to create starting models close enough to the true model for convergence throughout the target area. In addition, the band-limited nature of seismic data makes it inherently challenging to extract the long wavelength sound speed trend directly from seismic data. Laplace domain inversion (LDI) developed by Changsoo Shin and colleagues requires only a rudimentary starting model to produce smooth background sound speed models without requiring prior information about the medium. It works by transforming input data to the Laplace domain, and then examining the zero frequency component of the damped wavefield to extract a smooth sound speed model - basically, removing higher frequency fluctuations to expose background trends. This ability to use frequencies below those effectively propagated by the seismic source is what enables LDI to produce the smooth background trend from the data. We applied LDI to five synthetic data sets based on simplified models of oceanographic features. Using LDI, we were able to recover smoothed versions of our synthetic models, showing the viability of the method for creating sound speed profiles suitable for use as starting models for other methods of inversion that output more detailed models.

  8. Diffractive theorems for the wave equation with inverse square potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Randy Zhigang

    This dissertation investigates the phenomenon of diffraction resulting from the addition of an inverse square potential term to the wave operator. In particular, it explicitly establishes the existence of diffraction for the solution to the wave operator with an inverse square potential in 2-dimensional euclidean space and proves a propagation of smoothness result in two more general settings. Chapter 2 establishes diffraction in the fundamental solutions to the wave operator plus inverse square potential with a Dirac Delta initial condition in 2-dimensional euclidean space. Following methods as described by Cheeger and Taylor, we separate variables, apply spectral transforms to each variable, and employ contour deformation techniques to establish an explicit form for diffractive front in the fundamental solution. Chapter 3 proves a propagation of smoothness result for a related wave operator with potential, where instead of a constant, we put a smooth bounded function in the numerator of the potential. Microlocal energy estimates are used following the basic propagation methods of Duistermaat and Hormander, and employing the heavy refinements due to Melrose, Vasy, and Wunsch to handle propagation through the radial point at the origin. The potential term is estimated using Hardy's Inequality. Chapter 4 extends the propagation of smoothness result to conic manifolds with an inverse square potential concentrated at their boundary. We state a product decomposition theorem for the conic metric due to Melrose and Wunsch, then use the resulting coordinates to deploy our argument from Chapter 3. New terms with dependence on distance to the boundary arise, and we show how to bound them.

  9. Using field inversion to quantify functional errors in turbulence closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anand Pratap; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2016-04-01

    A data-informed approach is presented with the objective of quantifying errors and uncertainties in the functional forms of turbulence closure models. The approach creates modeling information from higher-fidelity simulations and experimental data. Specifically, a Bayesian formalism is adopted to infer discrepancies in the source terms of transport equations. A key enabling idea is the transformation of the functional inversion procedure (which is inherently infinite-dimensional) into a finite-dimensional problem in which the distribution of the unknown function is estimated at discrete mesh locations in the computational domain. This allows for the use of an efficient adjoint-driven inversion procedure. The output of the inversion is a full-field of discrepancy that provides hitherto inaccessible modeling information. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by applying it to a number of problems including channel flow, shock-boundary layer interactions, and flows with curvature and separation. In all these cases, the posterior model correlates well with the data. Furthermore, it is shown that even if limited data (such as surface pressures) are used, the accuracy of the inferred solution is improved over the entire computational domain. The results suggest that, by directly addressing the connection between physical data and model discrepancies, the field inversion approach materially enhances the value of computational and experimental data for model improvement. The resulting information can be used by the modeler as a guiding tool to design more accurate model forms, or serve as input to machine learning algorithms to directly replace deficient modeling terms.

  10. The advantages of logarithmically scaled data for electromagnetic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelock, Brent; Constable, Steven; Key, Kerry

    2015-06-01

    Non-linear inversion algorithms traverse a data misfit space over multiple iterations of trial models in search of either a global minimum or some target misfit contour. The success of the algorithm in reaching that objective depends upon the smoothness and predictability of the misfit space. For any given observation, there is no absolute form a datum must take, and therefore no absolute definition for the misfit space; in fact, there are many alternatives. However, not all misfit spaces are equal in terms of promoting the success of inversion. In this work, we appraise three common forms that complex data take in electromagnetic geophysical methods: real and imaginary components, a power of amplitude and phase, and logarithmic amplitude and phase. We find that the optimal form is logarithmic amplitude and phase. Single-parameter misfit curves of log-amplitude and phase data for both magnetotelluric and controlled-source electromagnetic methods are the smoothest of the three data forms and do not exhibit flattening at low model resistivities. Synthetic, multiparameter, 2-D inversions illustrate that log-amplitude and phase is the most robust data form, converging to the target misfit contour in the fewest steps regardless of starting model and the amount of noise added to the data; inversions using the other two data forms run slower or fail under various starting models and proportions of noise. It is observed that inversion with log-amplitude and phase data is nearly two times faster in converging to a solution than with other data types. We also assess the statistical consequences of transforming data in the ways discussed in this paper. With the exception of real and imaginary components, which are assumed to be Gaussian, all other data types do not produce an expected mean-squared misfit value of 1.00 at the true model (a common assumption) as the errors in the complex data become large. We recommend that real and imaginary data with errors larger than 10 per

  11. Prestack inversion based on anisotropic Markov random field-maximum posterior probability inversion and its application to identify shale gas sweet spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Ning; Sun, Zan-Dong; Dong, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Economic shale gas production requires hydraulic fracture stimulation to increase the formation permeability. Hydraulic fracturing strongly depends on geomechanical parameters such as Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. Fracture-prone sweet spots can be predicted by prestack inversion, which is an ill-posed problem; thus, regularization is needed to obtain unique and stable solutions. To characterize gas-bearing shale sedimentary bodies, elastic parameter variations are regarded as an anisotropic Markov random field. Bayesian statistics are adopted for transforming prestack inversion to the maximum posterior probability. Two energy functions for the lateral and vertical directions are used to describe the distribution, and the expectation-maximization algorithm is used to estimate the hyperparameters of the prior probability of elastic parameters. Finally, the inversion yields clear geological boundaries, high vertical resolution, and reasonable lateral continuity using the conjugate gradient method to minimize the objective function. Antinoise and imaging ability of the method were tested using synthetic and real data.

  12. Particle relabelling transformations in elastodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Attar, David; Crawford, Ophelia

    2016-04-01

    The motion of a self-gravitating hyperelastic body is described through a time-dependent mapping from a reference body into physical space, and its material properties are determined by a referential density and strain-energy function defined relative to the reference body. Points within the reference body do not have a direct physical meaning, but instead act as particle labels that could be assigned in different ways. We use Hamilton's principle to determine how the referential density and strain-energy functions transform when the particle labels are changed, and describe an associated `particle relabelling symmetry'. We apply these results to linearized elastic wave propagation and discuss their implications for seismological inverse problems. In particular, we show that the effects of boundary topography on elastic wave propagation can be mapped exactly into volumetric heterogeneity while preserving the form of the equations of motion. Several numerical calculations are presented to illustrate our results.

  13. Laterally constrained inversion for CSAMT data interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruo; Yin, Changchun; Wang, Miaoyue; Di, Qingyun

    2015-10-01

    Laterally constrained inversion (LCI) has been successfully applied to the inversion of dc resistivity, TEM and airborne EM data. However, it hasn't been yet applied to the interpretation of controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data. In this paper, we apply the LCI method for CSAMT data inversion by preconditioning the Jacobian matrix. We apply a weighting matrix to Jacobian to balance the sensitivity of model parameters, so that the resolution with respect to different model parameters becomes more uniform. Numerical experiments confirm that this can improve the convergence of the inversion. We first invert a synthetic dataset with and without noise to investigate the effect of LCI applications to CSAMT data, for the noise free data, the results show that the LCI method can recover the true model better compared to the traditional single-station inversion; and for the noisy data, the true model is recovered even with a noise level of 8%, indicating that LCI inversions are to some extent noise insensitive. Then, we re-invert two CSAMT datasets collected respectively in a watershed and a coal mine area in Northern China and compare our results with those from previous inversions. The comparison with the previous inversion in a coal mine shows that LCI method delivers smoother layer interfaces that well correlate to seismic data, while comparison with a global searching algorithm of simulated annealing (SA) in a watershed shows that though both methods deliver very similar good results, however, LCI algorithm presented in this paper runs much faster. The inversion results for the coal mine CSAMT survey show that a conductive water-bearing zone that was not revealed by the previous inversions has been identified by the LCI. This further demonstrates that the method presented in this paper works for CSAMT data inversion.

  14. 3D constrained inversion of geophysical and geological information applying Spatial Mutually Constrained Inversion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Ploug, C.; Mendoza, J. A.; Martínez, K.

    2009-05-01

    The need for increaseding accuracy and reduced ambiguities in the inversion results has resulted in focus on the development of more advanced inversion methods of geophysical data. Over the past few years more advanced inversion techniques have been developed to improve the results. Real 3D-inversion is time consuming and therefore often not the best solution in a cost-efficient perspective. This has motivated the development of 3D constrained inversions, where 1D-models are constrained in 3D, also known as a Spatial Constrained Inversion (SCI). Moreover, inversion of several different data types in one inversion has been developed, known as Mutually Constrained Inversion (MCI). In this paper a presentation of a Spatial Mutually Constrained Inversion method (SMCI) is given. This method allows 1D-inversion applied to different geophysical datasets and geological information constrained in 3D. Application of two or more types of geophysical methods in the inversion has proved to reduce the equivalence problem and to increase the resolution in the inversion results. The use of geological information from borehole data or digital geological models can be integrated in the inversion. In the SMCI, a 1D inversion code is used to model soundings that are constrained in three dimensions according to their relative position in space. This solution enhances the accuracy of the inversion and produces distinct layers thicknesses and resistivities. It is very efficient in the mapping of a layered geology but still also capable of mapping layer discontinuities that are, in many cases, related to fracturing and faulting or due to valley fills. Geological information may be included in the inversion directly or used only to form a starting model for the individual soundings in the inversion. In order to show the effectiveness of the method, examples are presented from both synthetic data and real data. The examples include DC-soundings as well as land-based and airborne TEM

  15. Image encryption using the fractional wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilardy, Juan M.; Useche, J.; Torres, C. O.; Mattos, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a technique for the coding of digital images is developed using Fractional Wavelet Transform (FWT) and random phase masks (RPMs). The digital image to encrypt is transformed with the FWT, after the coefficients resulting from the FWT (Approximation, Details: Horizontal, vertical and diagonal) are multiplied each one by different RPMs (statistically independent) and these latest results is applied an Inverse Wavelet Transform (IWT), obtaining the encrypted digital image. The decryption technique is the same encryption technique in reverse sense. This technique provides immediate advantages security compared to conventional techniques, in this technique the mother wavelet family and fractional orders associated with the FWT are additional keys that make access difficult to information to an unauthorized person (besides the RPMs used), thereby the level of encryption security is extraordinarily increased. In this work the mathematical support for the use of the FWT in the computational algorithm for the encryption is also developed.

  16. An exact inverse method for subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daripa, Prabir

    1988-01-01

    A new inverse method for the aerodynamic design of airfoils is presented for subcritical flows. The pressure distribution in this method can be prescribed as a function of the arclength of the still unknown body. It is shown that this inverse problem is mathematically equivalent to solving only one nonlinear boundary value problem subject to known Dirichlet data on the boundary.

  17. Package inspection using inverse diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2008-08-01

    More efficient cost-effective hand-held methods of inspecting packages without opening them are in demand for security. Recent new work in TeraHertz sources,1 millimeter waves, presents new possibilities. Millimeter waves pass through cardboard and styrofoam, common packing materials, and also pass through most materials except those with high conductivity like metals which block light and are easily spotted. Estimating refractive index along the path of the beam through the package from observations of the beam passing out of the package provides the necessary information to inspect the package and is a nonlinear problem. So we use a generalized linear inverse technique that we first developed for finding oil by reflection in geophysics.2 The computation assumes parallel slices in the packet of homogeneous material for which the refractive index is estimated. A beam is propagated through this model in a forward computation. The output is compared with the actual observations for the package and an update computed for the refractive indices. The loop is repeated until convergence. The approach can be modified for a reflection system or to include estimation of absorption.

  18. Inverse problem in radionuclide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste must comply with the performance objectives set forth in 10 CFR 61 for low-level waste (LLW) and 10 CFR 60 for high-level waste (HLW). To determine probable compliance, the proposed disposal system can be modeled to predict its performance. One of the difficulties encountered in such a study is modeling the migration of radionuclides through a complex geologic medium for the long term. Although many radionuclide transport models exist in the literature, the accuracy of the model prediction is highly dependent on the model parameters used. The problem of using known parameters in a radionuclide transport model to predict radionuclide concentrations is a direct problem (DP); whereas the reverse of DP, i.e., the parameter identification problem of determining model parameters from known radionuclide concentrations, is called the inverse problem (IP). In this study, a procedure to solve IP is tested, using the regression technique. Several nonlinear regression programs are examined, and the best one is recommended. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Inverse magnetic/shear catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce "inverse magnetic catalysis", signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials.

  20. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Vansteenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e(-) beam and the 10(exp 11) Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a approximately 1.5 percent/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power CW CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  1. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e- beam and the 1011 Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ≊1.5%/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  2. Inversion based on computational simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; Saquib, S.S.

    1998-09-01

    A standard approach to solving inversion problems that involve many parameters uses gradient-based optimization to find the parameters that best match the data. The authors discuss enabling techniques that facilitate application of this approach to large-scale computational simulations, which are the only way to investigate many complex physical phenomena. Such simulations may not seem to lend themselves to calculation of the gradient with respect to numerous parameters. However, adjoint differentiation allows one to efficiently compute the gradient of an objective function with respect to all the variables of a simulation. When combined with advanced gradient-based optimization algorithms, adjoint differentiation permits one to solve very large problems of optimization or parameter estimation. These techniques will be illustrated through the simulation of the time-dependent diffusion of infrared light through tissue, which has been used to perform optical tomography. The techniques discussed have a wide range of applicability to modeling including the optimization of models to achieve a desired design goal.

  3. Transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin assayed by serum ferritin kinetics in patients with normal iron stores and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hisao

    2015-11-01

    Ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron, total iron stores and transformation rate were determined by serum ferritin kinetics. The transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin is motivated by the potential difference between them. The transformer determines transformation rate according to the potential difference in iron mobilization and deposition. The correlations between transformation rate and iron stores were studied in 11 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), 1 patent with treated iron deficiency anemia (TIDA), 9 patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and 4 patients with transfusion-dependent anemia (TD). The power regression curve of approximation showed an inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron in part and total iron stores in HH. Such an inverse correlation between transformation rate and iron stores implies that the larger the amount of iron stores, the smaller the transformation of iron stores. On the other hand, a minimal inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron and no correlation between transformation rate and hemosiderin iron or total iron stores in CHC indicate the derangement of storage iron metabolism in the cells with CHC. Radio-iron fixation on the iron storing tissue in iron overload was larger than that in normal subjects by ferrokinetics. This is consistent with the inverse correlation between transformation rate and total iron stores in HH. The characteristics of iron turnover between ferritin and hemosiderin were disclosed from the correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron or total iron stores. PMID:26663936

  4. Fast wavelet based sparse approximate inverse preconditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, W.L.

    1996-12-31

    Incomplete LU factorization is a robust preconditioner for both general and PDE problems but unfortunately not easy to parallelize. Recent study of Huckle and Grote and Chow and Saad showed that sparse approximate inverse could be a potential alternative while readily parallelizable. However, for special class of matrix A that comes from elliptic PDE problems, their preconditioners are not optimal in the sense that independent of mesh size. A reason may be that no good sparse approximate inverse exists for the dense inverse matrix. Our observation is that for this kind of matrices, its inverse entries typically have piecewise smooth changes. We can take advantage of this fact and use wavelet compression techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse preconditioner. We shall show numerically that our approach is effective for this kind of matrices.

  5. Phase inversion emulsification: Current understanding and applications.

    PubMed

    Perazzo, A; Preziosi, V; Guido, S

    2015-08-01

    This review is addressed to the phase inversion process, which is not only a common, low-energy route to make stable emulsions for a variety of industrial products spanning from food to pharmaceuticals, but can also be an undesired effect in some applications, such as crude oil transportation in pipelines. Two main ways to induce phase inversion are described in the literature, i.e., phase inversion composition (PIC or catastrophic) and phase inversion temperature (PIT or transitional). In the former, starting from one phase (oil or water) with surfactants, the other phase is more or less gradually added until it reverts to the continuous phase. In PIT, phase inversion is driven by a temperature change without varying system composition. Given its industrial relevance and scientific challenge, phase inversion has been the subject of a number of papers in the literature, including extensive reviews. Due to the variety of applications and the complexity of the problem, most of the publications have been focused either on the phase behavior or the interfacial properties or the mixing process of the two phases. Although all these aspects are quite important in studying phase inversion and much progress has been done on this topic, a comprehensive picture is still lacking. In particular, the general mechanisms governing the inversion phenomenon have not been completely elucidated and quantitative predictions of the phase inversion point are limited to specific systems and experimental conditions. Here, we review the different approaches on phase inversion and highlight some related applications, including future and emerging perspectives. PMID:25632889

  6. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in

  7. Plane Transformations in a Complex Setting III: Similarities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    This is the third part of a study of plane transformations described in a complex setting. After the study of homotheties, translations, rotations and reflections, we proceed now to the study of plane similarities, either direct or inverse. Their group theoretical properties are described, and their action on classical geometrical objects is…

  8. Generalized transformation for decorated spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Onofre; Valverde, J. S.; de Souza, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    The paper discusses the transformation of decorated Ising models into an effective undecorated spin model, using the most general Hamiltonian for interacting Ising models including a long range and high order interactions. The inverse of a Vandermonde matrix with equidistant nodes [-s,s] is used to obtain an analytical expression of the transformation. This kind of transformation is very useful to obtain the partition function of decorated systems. The method presented by Fisher is also extended, in order to obtain the correlation functions of the decorated Ising models transforming into an effective undecorated Ising model. We apply this transformation to a particular mixed spin-(1/2, 1) and (1/2, 2) square lattice with only nearest site interaction. This model could be transformed into an effective uniform spin- S square lattice with nearest and next-nearest interaction, furthermore the effective Hamiltonian also includes combinations of three-body and four-body interactions; in particular we considered spin 1 and 2.

  9. Lie symmetries and their inverse problems of nonholonomic Hamilton systems with fractional derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jing-Li; Fu, Li-Ping; Chen, Ben-Yong; Sun, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This letter focuses on studying Lie symmetries and their inverse problems of the fractional nonholonomic Hamilton systems. Based on the invariance of the fractional motion equations, constraint equations and virtual displacement restrictive conditions of the systems under the infinitesimal transformation with respect to the time and generalized coordinates, the Lie symmetries and conserved quantities of the fractional nonholonomic Hamilton system are discussed and the corresponding definitions, determining equations, limiting equations, additional restricting equations and Lie theorems are given. The letter also systematically studies inverse theorems of Lie symmetries of the fractional nonholonomic Hamilton systems. Finally, an example is discussed to illustrate theses results.

  10. Gravity Inversion with Geological Modeling Constraint and Its Application in the Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.

    2014-12-01

    The satellite altimetry gravity data is used to recover the 3D distribution of oceanic lithosphere density in the Okinawa Trough and its neighbor region. It's difficult to use only gravity data to invert complex geological structure and density distribution by 3D gravity Inversion method. In order to improve the vertical resolution of the density inversion result, 3D geological modeling method is used to build structural model for the inversion, prior constraint conditions can be applied to solve the non-unique problem. In the Okinawa Trough, it is proved by earthquake data that the Philippine plate dives beneath the Okinawa Trough, which result in the upwelling of mantel material and decrease of the crust thickness. The Benioff zone clearly shows the plate's subduction parameter, such as direction, dip, transformation. Therefore, a structural subduction model is created by geological modeling method and works as the initial model and as constraint condition in gravity inversion. The 3D gravity inversion result and seismology CMT data are both used to explain the oceanic lithosphere structure in the Okinawa Trough. The inversion result illustrates high density anomaly under the Okinawa Trough. Affected by small scale mantle convections, the continental lithosphere is separated, which result in the spreading of back-arc basin and the formation of the Okinawa Trough.

  11. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Welds Using Multiple Constraints and Relaxed Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2015-08-01

    Aspects of a methodology for inverse thermal analysis of welds are examined that provide for relaxed model-parameter optimization. These aspects are associated with the inherent insensitivity of temperature fields, obtained by inverse analysis, to local shape variations of constrained boundaries within these fields. The inverse analysis methodology is in terms of numerical-analytical basis functions for construction parametric temperature histories, which can be adopted as input data to computational procedures for further analysis. In addition, these parametric temperature histories can be used for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other process parameters or welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The inverse thermal analysis procedure provides for the inclusion of volumetric constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mappings onto transverse cross sections of experimentally measured boundary conditions, such as solidification and transformation boundaries, and isothermal surfaces associated with thermocouple measurements. Issues concerning relaxed parameter optimization are discussed with respect to inverse thermal analysis of Ti-6Al-4V pulsed-mode laser welds using multiple constraint conditions.

  12. PC-based artificial neural network inversion for airborne time-domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kai-Guang; Ma, Ming-Yao; Che, Hong-Wei; Yang, Er-Wei; Ji, Yan-Ju; Yu, Sheng-Bao; Lin, Jun

    2012-03-01

    Traditionally, airborne time-domain electromagnetic (ATEM) data are inverted to derive the earth model by iteration. However, the data are often highly correlated among channels and consequently cause ill-posed and over-determined problems in the inversion. The correlation complicates the mapping relation between the ATEM data and the earth parameters and thus increases the inversion complexity. To obviate this, we adopt principal component analysis to transform ATEM data into orthogonal principal components (PCs) to reduce the correlations and the data dimensionality and simultaneously suppress the unrelated noise. In this paper, we use an artificial neural network (ANN) to approach the PCs mapping relation with the earth model parameters, avoiding the calculation of Jacobian derivatives. The PC-based ANN algorithm is applied to synthetic data for layered models compared with data-based ANN for airborne time-domain electromagnetic inversion. The results demonstrate the PC-based ANN advantages of simpler network structure, less training steps, and better inversion results over data-based ANN, especially for contaminated data. Furthermore, the PC-based ANN algorithm effectiveness is examined by the inversion of the pseudo 2D model and comparison with data-based ANN and Zhody's methods. The results indicate that PC-based ANN inversion can achieve a better agreement with the true model and also proved that PC-based ANN is feasible to invert large ATEM datasets.

  13. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived from Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From an analysis of X-ray spectroscopy and imaging data, we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster. The X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect observations are combined to determine the angular diameter distance to the cluster of D(sub A) = 1294(sup +294 +438, sub -283 -458) Mpc (Statistical followed by systematic uncertainty), implying a Hubble constant of H(sub 0) = 52.2(sup +11.4 +18.5, sub -11.9 -17.7) km/s.Mpc for Omega(sub M) = 0.3 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0.7. We find a best-fit H(sub 0) of 46 km/s.Mpc for the Omega(sub M) = 1 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0 cosmology, and 48 km/s.Mpc for Omega(sub M) = 0.3 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0.0. The X-ray data are also used to derive a total cluster mass of M(sup HSE, sub tot)(r(sub 500)) = 5.18(sup +0.62, sub -0.48) x 10(exp 14)/h solar mass; the optical velocity dispersion yields an independent and consistent estimate of M(sup virial, sub tot)(r(sub 500)) = 6.35(sup +1.51, sub -1.19) X 10(exp 14) /h solar mass. Both of the total mass estimates are evaluated at a fiducial radius, r(sub 500) = 830 /h kpc, where the overdensity is 500 times the critical density. The total cluster mass is then combined with gas mass measurements to determine a cluster gas mass fraction of F(sub g) = 0.056(sup +0.010, sub -0.013) /h(sup 3/2) in combination with recent baryon density constraints, the measured gas mass fraction yields an upper limit on the mass density parameter of Omega(sub M) h(sup 1/2) <= 0.34(sup +/0.06, sub 0.05.

  14. Astrometry With the Hubble Space Telescope: Trigonometric Parallaxes of Planetary Nebula Nuclei NGC 6853, NGC 7293, ABELL 31, and DeHt 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, G. F.; McArthur, Barbara E.; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Harrison, Thomas E.; Harris, Hugh C.; Nelan, Edmund; Bond, Howard E; Patterson, Richard J.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2009-01-01

    We present absolute parallaxes and relative proper motions for the central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 6853 (The Dumbbell), NGC 7293 (The Helix), Abell 31, and DeHt 5. This paper details our reduction and analysis using DeHt 5 as an example. We obtain these planetary nebula nuclei (PNNi) parallaxes with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors FGS 1r and FGS 3, white-light interferometers on the Hubble Space Telescope. Proper motions, spectral classifications and VJHKT2M and DDO51 photometry of the stars comprising the astrometric reference frames provide spectrophotometric estimates of reference star absolute parallaxes. Introducing these into our model as observations with error, we determine absolute parallaxes for each PNN. Weighted averaging with previous independent parallax measurements yields an average parallax precision, sigma (sub pi)/ pi = 5%. Derived distances are: d(sub NGC6853) = 405(exp +28 sub -25) pc, d(sub NGC7293) = 216(exp +14 sub -12) pc, d(sub Abell31) = 621(exp +91 sub -70) pc, and d(sub DeHt5) = 345(exp +19 sub -17) pc. These PNNi distances are all smaller than previously derived from spectroscopic analyses of the central stars. To obtain absolute magnitudes from these distances requires estimates of interstellar extinction. We average extinction measurements culled from the literature, from reddening based on PNNi intrinsic colors derived from model SEDs, and an assumption that each PNN experiences the same rate of extinction as a function of distance as do the reference stars nearest (in angular separation) to each central star. We also apply Lutz-Kelker bias corrections. The absolute magnitudes and effective temperatures permit estimates of PNNi radii through both the Stefan-Boltzmann relation and Eddington fluxes. Comparing absolute magnitudes with post-AGB models provides mass estimates. Masses cluster around 0.57 solar Mass, close to the peak of the white dwarf mass distribution. Adding a few more PNNi with well

  15. ASTROMETRY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE: TRIGONOMETRIC PARALLAXES OF PLANETARY NEBULA NUCLEI NGC 6853, NGC 7293, ABELL 31, AND DeHt 5

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Harrison, Thomas E.; Harris, Hugh C.; Nelan, Edmund; Bond, Howard E.; Patterson, Richard J.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2009-12-15

    We present absolute parallaxes and relative proper motions for the central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 6853 (The Dumbbell), NGC 7293 (The Helix), Abell 31, and DeHt 5. This paper details our reduction and analysis using DeHt 5 as an example. We obtain these planetary nebula nuclei (PNNi) parallaxes with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors FGS 1r and FGS 3, white-light interferometers on the Hubble Space Telescope. Proper motions, spectral classifications and VJHKT{sub 2}M and DDO51 photometry of the stars comprising the astrometric reference frames provide spectrophotometric estimates of reference star absolute parallaxes. Introducing these into our model as observations with error, we determine absolute parallaxes for each PNN. Weighted averaging with previous independent parallax measurements yields an average parallax precision, {sigma}{sub {pi}}/{pi} = 5%. Derived distances are: d {sub NGC6853} = 405{sup +28} {sub -25} pc, d {sub NGC7293} = 216{sup +14} {sub -12} pc, d {sub Abell31} = 621{sup +91} {sub -70} pc, and d {sub DeHt5} = 345{sup +19}{sub -17} pc. These PNNi distances are all smaller than previously derived from spectroscopic analyses of the central stars. To obtain absolute magnitudes from these distances requires estimates of interstellar extinction. We average extinction measurements culled from the literature, from reddening based on PNNi intrinsic colors derived from model SEDs, and an assumption that each PNN experiences the same rate of extinction as a function of distance as do the reference stars nearest (in angular separation) to each central star. We also apply Lutz-Kelker bias corrections. The absolute magnitudes and effective temperatures permit estimates of PNNi radii through both the Stefan-Boltzmann relation and Eddington fluxes. Comparing absolute magnitudes with post-AGB models provides mass estimates. Masses cluster around 0.57 M{sub odot}, close to the peak of the white dwarf mass distribution. Adding a few more PNNi

  16. Neurotensin inversely modulates maternal aggression.

    PubMed

    Gammie, S C; D'Anna, K L; Gerstein, H; Stevenson, S A

    2009-02-18

    Neurotensin (NT) is a versatile neuropeptide involved in analgesia, hypothermia, and schizophrenia. Although NT is released from and acts upon brain regions involved in social behaviors, it has not been linked to a social behavior. We previously selected mice for high maternal aggression (maternal defense), an important social behavior that protects offspring, and found significantly lower NT expression in the CNS of highly protective females. Our current study directly tested NT's role in maternal defense. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of NT significantly impaired defense in terms of time aggressive and number of attacks at all doses tested (0.05, 0.1, 1.0, and 3.0 microg). Other maternal behaviors, including pup retrieval, were unaltered following NT injections (0.05 microg) relative to vehicle, suggesting specificity of NT action on defense. Further, i.c.v. injections of the NT receptor 1 (NT1) antagonist, SR 48692 (30 microg), significantly elevated maternal aggression in terms of time aggressive and attack number. To understand where NT may regulate aggression, we examined Fos following injection of either 0.1 microg NT or vehicle. Thirteen of 26 brain regions examined exhibited significant Fos increases with NT, including regions expressing NT1 and previously implicated in maternal aggression, such as lateral septum, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, and central amygdala. Together, our results indicate that NT inversely regulates maternal aggression and provide the first direct evidence that lowering of NT signaling can be a mechanism for maternal aggression. To our knowledge, this is the first study to directly link NT to a social behavior. PMID:19118604

  17. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e{sup {minus}} beam and the 10{sup 11} Watt CO{sub 2} laser beam of BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a {approximately} 1.5 %/cm tapered period configuration. The CO{sub 2} laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO{sub 2} laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  18. Support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Safaeinili, A.

    1994-04-24

    This report discusses the following topics on support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering: Minimum support inversion; forward modelling of elastodynamic wave scattering; minimum support linearized acoustic inversion; support minimized nonlinear acoustic inversion without absolute phase; and support minimized nonlinear elastic inversion.

  19. Transforming the Way We Teach Function Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkenberry, Eileen Durand; Faulkenberry, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss "function," a well-defined rule that relates inputs to outputs. They have found that by using the input-output definition of "function," they can examine transformations of functions simply by looking at changes to input or output and the respective changes to the graph. Applying transformations to the input…

  20. Methodology for determining multilayered temperature inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fochesatto, G. J.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature sounding of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and lower troposphere exhibits multilayered temperature inversions specially in high latitudes during extreme winters. These temperature inversion layers are originated based on the combined forcing of local- and large-scale synoptic meteorology. At the local scale, the thermal inversion layer forms near the surface and plays a central role in controlling the surface radiative cooling and air pollution dispersion; however, depending upon the large-scale synoptic meteorological forcing, an upper level thermal inversion can also exist topping the local ABL. In this article a numerical methodology is reported to determine thermal inversion layers present in a given temperature profile and deduce some of their thermodynamic properties. The algorithm extracts from the temperature profile the most important temperature variations defining thermal inversion layers. This is accomplished by a linear interpolation function of variable length that minimizes an error function. The algorithm functionality is demonstrated on actual radiosonde profiles to deduce the multilayered temperature inversion structure with an error fraction set independently.