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Sample records for abell cluster supernova

  1. Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katgert, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Abell clusters are the most conspicuous groupings of galaxies identified by George Abell on the plates of the first photographic survey made with the SCHMIDT TELESCOPE at Mount Palomar in the 1950s. Sometimes, the term Abell clusters is used as a synonym of nearby, optically selected galaxy clusters....

  2. The X-ray cluster Abell 744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gioia, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray and optical observations of the cluster of galaxies Abell 744 are presented. The X-ray flux (assuming H(0) = 100 km/s per Mpc) is about 9 x 10 to the 42nd erg/s. The X-ray source is extended, but shows no other structure. Photographic photometry (in Kron-Cousins R), calibrated by deep CCD frames, is presented for all galaxies brighter than 19th magnitude within 0.75 Mpc of the cluster center. The luminosity function is normal, and the isopleths show little evidence of substructure near the cluster center. The cluster has a dominant central galaxy, which is classified as a normal brightest-cluster elliptical on the basis of its luminosity profile. New redshifts were obtained for 26 galaxies in the vicinity of the cluster center; 20 appear to be cluster members. The spatial distribution of redshifts is peculiar; the dispersion within the 150 kpc core radius is much greater than outside. Abell 744 is similar to the nearby cluster Abell 1060.

  3. RELICS Discovery of a Probable Lens-magnified SN behind Galaxy Cluster Abell 1763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, S.; Coe, D.; Bradley, L.; Strolger, L.; Brammer, G.; Avila, R.; Ryan, R.; Ogaz, S.; Riess, A.; Sharon, K.; Johnson, T.; Paterno-Mahler, R.; Molino, A.; Graham, M.; Kelly, P.; Filippenko, A.; Frye, B.; Foley, R.; Schmidt, K.; Umetsu, K.; Czakon, N.; Weiner, B.; Stark, D.; Mainali, R.; Zitrin, A.; Sendra, I.; Graur, O.; Grillo, C.; Hjorth, J.; Selsing, J.; Christensen, L.; Rosati, P.; Nonino, M.; Balestra, I.; Vulcani, B.; McCully, C.; Dawson, W.; Bouwens, R.; Lam, D.; Trenti, M.; Nunez, D. Carrasco; Matheson, T.; Merten, J.; Jha, S.; Jones, C.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Salmon, B.; Bradac, M.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.; Wang, X.; Oesch, P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of a likely supernova (SN) in the background field of the galaxy cluster Abell 1763 (a.k.a. RXC J1335.3+4059, ZwCl 1333.7+4117). The SN candidate was detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations collected on June 17, 2016 as part of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS, HST program ID: 14096, PI: D.Coe).

  4. Are Abell Clusters Correlated with Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Laros, J.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A recent study has presented marginal statistical evidence that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources are correlated with Abell clusters, based on analyses of bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog. Using precise localization information from the Third Interplanetary Network, we have reanalyzed this possible correlation. We find that most of the Abell clusters that are in the relatively large 3B error circles are not in the much smaller IPN/BATSE error regions. We believe that this argues strongly against an Abell cluster-GRB correlation.

  5. Chandra View of Galaxy Cluster Abell 2554

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kıyami Erdim, Muhammed; Hudaverdi, Murat

    2016-07-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 2554 at z = 0.11, which is a member of Aquarius Super cluster using the Chandra archival data. The X-ray peak coincides with a bright elliptical cD galaxy. Slightly elongated X-ray plasma has an average temperature and metal abundance values of ˜6 keV and 0.28 solar, respectively. We observe small-scale temperature variations in the ICM. There is a significantly hot wall-like structure with 9 keV at the SE and also radio-lope locates at the tip of this hot region. A2554 is also part of a trio-cluster. Its close neighbors A2550 (at SW) and A2556 (at SE) have only 2 Mpc and 1.5 Mpc separations with A2554. Considering the temperature fluctuations and the dynamical environment of super cluster, we examine the possible ongoing merger scenarios within A2554.

  6. The magnitude-redshift relation for 561 Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.; Henry, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble diagram for the 561 Abell clusters with measured redshifts has been examined using Abell's (1958) corrected photo-red magnitudes for the tenth-ranked cluster member (m10). After correction for the Scott effect and K dimming, the data are in good agreement with a linear magnitude-redshift relation with a slope of 0.2 out to z = 0.1. New redshift data are also presented for 20 Abell clusters. Abell's m10 is suitable for redshift estimation for clusters with m10 of no more than 16.5. At fainter m10, the number of foreground galaxies expected within an Abell radius is large enough to make identification of the tenth-ranked galaxy difficult. Interlopers bias the estimated redshift toward low values at high redshift. Leir and van den Bergh's (1977) redshift estimates suffer from this same bias but to a smaller degree because of the use of multiple cluster parameters. Constraints on deviations of cluster velocities from the mean cosmological flow require greater photometric accuracy than is provided by Abell's m10 magnitudes.

  7. A 1400-MHz survey of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. N.; White, R. A.; Hilldrup, K. C.; Hanisch, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies with the NRAO 91-m telescope at 1400 MHz are reported. The measured beam shape was deconvolved from the measured source Gaussian fits in order to estimate the source size and position angle. All detected sources within 0.5 corrected Abell cluster radii are listed, including the cluster number, richness class, distance class, magnitude of the tenth brightest galaxy, redshift estimate, corrected cluster radius in arcmin, right ascension and error, declination and error, total flux density and error, and angular structure for each source.

  8. Disentangling Structures in the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 133

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamical analysis of the structure of the cluster of galaxies Abell 133 will be presented using multi-wavelength data combined from multiple space and earth based observations. New and familiar statistical clustering techniques are used in combination in an attempt to gain a fully consistent picture of this interesting nearby cluster of galaxies. The type of analysis presented should be typical of cluster studies in the future, especially those to come from the surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2DF.

  9. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21(sub -0.47 sup +0.43) on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36(sub -0.17 sup +0.46).

  10. The nearby Abell clusters. III. Luminosity functions for eight rich clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Oegerle, W.R.; Hoessel, J.G. Washburn Observatory, Madison, WI )

    1989-11-01

    Red photographic data on eight rich Abell clusters are combined with previous results on four other Abell clusters to study the luminosity functions of the clusters. The results produce a mean value of the characteristic galaxy magnitude (M asterisk) that is consistent with previous results. No relation is found between the magnitude of the first-ranked cluster galaxy and M asterisk, suggesting that the value of M asterisk is not changed by dynamical evolution. The faint ends of the luminosity functions for many of the clusters are quite flat, validating the nonuniversality in the parametrization of Schechter (1976) functions for rich clusters of galaxies. 40 refs.

  11. Internal dynamics of Abell 2294: a massive, likely merging cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Barrena, R.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The mechanisms giving rise to diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters, and in particular their connection with cluster mergers, are still debated. Aims: We seek to explore the internal dynamics of the cluster Abell 2294, which has been shown to host a radio halo. Methods: Our analysis is mainly based on redshift data for 88 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. We combine galaxy velocities and positions to select 78 cluster galaxies and analyze its internal dynamics. We also use both photometric data acquired at the Isaac Newton Telescope and X-ray data from the Chandra archive. Results: We re-estimate the redshift of the large, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) obtaining < z > = 0.1690, which closely agrees with the mean cluster redshift. We estimate a quite large line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion σ_V ~ 1400 km s-1 and X-ray temperature TX ~ 10 keV. Our optical and X-ray analyses detect substructure. Our results imply that the cluster is composed of two massive subclusters separated by a LOS rest frame velocity difference Vrf ~ 2000 km s-1, very closely projected in the plane of sky along the SE-NW direction. This observational picture, interpreted in terms of the analytical two-body model, suggests that Abell 2294 is a cluster merger elongated mainly in the LOS direction and captured during the bound outgoing phase, a few fractions of Gyr after the core crossing. We find that Abell 2294 is a very massive cluster with a range of M = 2-4 × 1015 h70-1 M⊙, depending on the adopted model. In contrast to previous findings, we find no evidence of Hα emission in the spectrum of the BCG galaxy. Conclusions: The emerging picture of Abell 2294 is that of a massive, quite “normal” merging cluster, like many clusters hosting diffuse radio sources. However, perhaps because of its particular geometry, more data are needed for reach a definitive, more quantitative conclusion.

  12. Analysis of LAC Observations of Clusters of Galaxies and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J.

    1996-01-01

    The following publications are included and serve as the final report: The X-ray Spectrum of Abell 665; Clusters of Galaxies; Ginga Observation of an Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant; Ginga Observations of the Coma Cluster and Studies of the Spatial Distribution of Iron; A Measurement of the Hubble Constant from the X-ray Properties and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect of Abell 2218; Non-polytropic Model for the Coma Cluster; and Abundance Gradients in Cooling Flow Clusters: Ginga LAC (Large Area Counter) and Einstein SSS (Solid State Spectrometer) Spectra of A496, A1795, A2142, and A2199.

  13. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts.

  14. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts. PMID:17082451

  15. Internal dynamics of Abell 1240: a galaxy cluster with symmetric double radio relics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrena, R.; Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Dasí, M.

    2009-08-01

    Context: The mechanisms giving rise to diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters, and in particular their connection with cluster mergers, are still debated. Aims: We aim to obtain new insights into the internal dynamics of the cluster Abell 1240, which appears to contain two roughly symmetric radio relics, separated by ~2 h_70-1 Mpc. Methods: Our analysis is based mainly on redshift data for 145 galaxies mostly acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and on new photometric data acquired at the Isaac Newton Telescope. We also use X-ray data from the Chandra archive and photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data Release 7). We combine galaxy velocities and positions to select 89 cluster galaxies and analyze the internal dynamics of the Abell 1237 + Abell 1240 cluster complex, Abell 1237 being a close companion of Abell 1240 in its southern direction. Results: We estimate similar redshifts for Abell 1237 and Abell 1240, < z > = 0.1935 and < z > = 0.1948, respectively. For Abell 1237, we estimate a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion of σV ~ 740 km s-1and a mass of M ~ 6 × 1014 h_70-1 M⊙. For Abell 1240, we estimate a LOS σV ~ 870 km s-1and a mass in the range M ~ 0.9-1.9 × 1015 h_70-1 M⊙, which takes account of its complex dynamics. Abell 1240 is shown to have a bimodal structure with two galaxy clumps roughly aligned along its N-S direction, the same as defined by the elongation of its X-ray surface brightness and the axis of symmetry of the relics. The two brightest galaxies of Abell 1240, associated with the northern and southern clumps, are separated by a LOS rest-frame velocity difference Vrf ~ 400 km s-1and a projected distance D ~ 1.2 h_70-1 Mpc. The two-body model agrees with the hypothesis that we are looking at a cluster merger that occurred largely in the plane of the sky, the two galaxy clumps being separated by a rest-frame velocity difference Vrf ~ 2000 km s-1at a time of 0.3 Gyr after the crossing core, while Abell 1237

  16. THE GALAXY POPULATION OF LOW-REDSHIFT ABELL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Yee, H. K. C.; Lopez-Cruz, Omar E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.c

    2009-10-01

    We present a study of the luminosity and color properties of galaxies selected from a sample of 57 low-redshift Abell clusters. We utilize the non-parametric dwarf-to-giant ratio (DGR) and the blue galaxy fraction (f{sub b} ) to investigate the clustercentric radial-dependent changes in the cluster galaxy population. Composite cluster samples are combined by scaling the counting radius by r {sub 200} to minimize radius selection bias. The separation of galaxies into a red and blue population was achieved by selecting galaxies relative to the cluster color-magnitude relation. The DGR of the red and blue galaxies is found to be independent of cluster richness (B {sub gc}), although the DGR is larger for the blue population at all measured radii. A decrease in the DGR for the red and red+blue galaxies is detected in the cluster core region, while the blue galaxy DGR is nearly independent of radius. The f{sub b} is found not to correlate with B {sub gc}; however, a steady decline toward the inner-cluster region is observed for the giant galaxies. The dwarf galaxy f{sub b} is approximately constant with clustercentric radius except for the inner-cluster core region where f{sub b} decreases. The clustercentric radial dependence of the DGR and the galaxy blue fraction indicates that it is unlikely that a simple scenario based on either pure disruption or pure fading/reddening can describe the evolution of infalling dwarf galaxies; both outcomes are produced by the cluster environment.

  17. On sky characterization of the BAORadio wide band digital backend. Search for HI emission in Abell85, Abell1205 and Abell2440 galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Campagne, J. E.; Colom, P.; Ferrari, C.; Magneville, Ch.; Martin, J. M.; Moniez, M.; Torrentó, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    We have observed regions of three galaxy clusters at z˜[0.06÷0.09] (Abell85, Abell1205, Abell2440) with the Nançay radiotelescope (NRT) to search for 21 cm emission and to fully characterize the FPGA based BAORadio digital backend. We have tested the new BAORadio data acquisition system by observing sources in parallel with the NRT standard correlator (ACRT) back-end over several months. BAORadio enables wide band instantaneous observation of the [1250,1500] MHz frequency range, as well as the use of powerful RFI mitigation methods thanks to its fine time sampling. A number of questions related to instrument stability, data processing and calibration are discussed. We have obtained the radiometer curves over the integration time range [0.01,10 000] seconds and we show that sensitivities of few mJy over most of the wide frequency band can be reached with the NRT. It is clearly shown that in blind line search, which is the context of H I intensity mapping for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, the new acquisition system and processing pipeline outperforms the standard one. We report a positive detection of 21 cm emission at 3 σ-level from galaxies in the outer region of Abell85 at ≃1352 MHz (14400 km/s) corresponding to a line strength of ≃0.8 Jy km/s. We also observe an excess power around ≃1318 MHz (21600 km/s), although at lower statistical significance, compatible with emission from Abell1205 galaxies. Detected radio line emissions have been cross matched with optical catalogs and we have derived hydrogen mass estimates.

  18. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s-1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX-TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  19. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s‑1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX–TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  20. ASCA Temperature Maps of Three Clusters of Galaxies: Abell 1060, AWM 7, and the Centaurus Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusho, Tae; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ohashi, Takaya; Shibata, Ryo; Kagei, Tomohiro; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Ezawa, Hajime; Ikebe, Yasushi

    2001-06-01

    We present two-dimensional temperature maps of three bright clusters of galaxies (Abell 1060, AWM 7, and the Centaurus cluster), based on multi-pointing observations with the ASCA GIS. The temperatures were derived from hardness ratios by taking into account the XRT response. For the Centaurus cluster, we subtracted the central cool component using the previous ASCA and ROSAT results, and the metallicity gradients observed in AWM 7 and the Centaurus cluster were included in deriving the temperatures. The intracluster medium in Abell 1060 and AWM 7 is almost isothermal from the center to the outer regions with temperatures of 3.3 and 3.9 keV, respectively. The Centaurus cluster exhibits remarkable hot regions within about 30' from the cluster center, showing a temperature increase of ×0.8 keV from the surrounding level of 3.5keV, and the outer cool regions with lower temperatures by -1.3 keV. These results imply that a strong merger has occurred in the Centaurus in the recent 2-3Gyr, and that the central cool component has survived it. In contrast, the gas in Abell 1060 was well-mixed in an early period, which probably has prevented the development of a central cool component. In AWM 7, mixing of the gas should have occurred in a period earlier than the epoch of metal enrichment.

  1. The merging cluster Abell 1758: an optical and dynamical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro-Oliveira, Rogerio; Serra Cypriano, Eduardo; Machado, Rubens; Lima Neto, Gastao B.

    2015-08-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 1758-North (z=0.28) is a binary system composed by the sub-structures NW and NE. This is supposed to be a post-merging cluster due to observed detachment between the NE BCG and the respective X-ray emitting hot gas clump in a scenario very close to the famous Bullet Cluster. On the other hand, the projected position of the NW BCG coincides with the local hot gas peak. This system was been targeted previously by several studies, using multiple wavelengths and techniques, but there is still no clear picture of the scenario that could have caused this unusual configuration. To help solving this complex puzzle we added some pieces: firstly, we have used deep B, RC and z' Subaru images to perform both weak lensing shear and magnification analysis of A1758 (including here the South component that is not in interaction with A1758-North) modeling each sub-clump as an NFW profile in order to constrain masses and its center positions through MCMC methods; the second piece is the dynamical analysis using radial velocities available in the literature (143) plus new Gemini-GMOS/N measurements (68 new redshifts).From weak lensing we found that independent shear and magnification mass determinations are in excellent agreement between them and combining both we could reduce mass error bar by ~30% compared to shear alone. By combining this two weak-lensing probes we found that the position of both Northern BCGs are consistent with the masses centers within 2σ and and the NE hot gas peak to be offseted of the respective mass peak (M200=5.5 X 1014 M⊙) with very high significance. The most massive structure is NW (M200=7.95 X 1014 M⊙ ) where we observed no detachment between gas, DM and BCG.We have calculated a low line-of-sight velocity difference (<300 km/s) between A1758 NW and NE. We have combined it with the projected velocity of 1600 km/s which was estimated by previous X-ray analysis (David & Kempner 2004) and we have obtained a small angle between

  2. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and the distribution of galaxy orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Owen, Frazer N.

    1987-01-01

    The present data on the orientations of the tails with respect to the cluster centers of a sample of 70 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters show the distribution of tail angles to be inconsistent with purely radial or circular orbits in all the samples, while being consistent with isotropic orbits in (1) the whole sample, (2) the sample of NATs far from the cluster center, and (3) the samples of morphologically regular Abell clusters. Evidence for very radial orbits is found, however, in the sample of NATs near the cluster center. If these results can be generalized to all cluster galaxies, then the presence of radial orbits near the center of Abell clusters suggests that violent relaxation may not have been fully effective even within the cores of the regular clusters.

  3. MUSE observations of the lensing cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, D.; Pelló, R.; Richard, J.; Lewis, J.; Patrício, V.; Cantalupo, S.; Herenz, E. C.; Soto, K.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Bacon, R.; Vernet, J. D. R.; Wisotzki, L.; Clément, B.; Cuby, J. G.; Lagattuta, D. J.; Soucail, G.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-05-01

    Context. This paper presents the results obtained with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) for the core of the lensing cluster Abell 1689, as part of MUSE's commissioning at the ESO Very Large Telescope. Aims: Integral-field observations with MUSE provide a unique view of the central 1 × 1 arcmin2 region at intermediate spectral resolution in the visible domain, allowing us to conduct a complete census of both cluster galaxies and lensed background sources. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of all sources found in the MUSE data cube. Two hundred and eighty-two objects were systematically extracted from the cube based on a guided-and-manual approach. We also tested three different tools for the automated detection and extraction of line emitters. Cluster galaxies and lensed sources were identified based on their spectral features. We investigated the multiple-image configuration for all known sources in the field. Results: Previous to our survey, 28 different lensed galaxies displaying 46 multiple images were known in the MUSE field of view, most of them were detected through photometric redshifts and lensing considerations. Of these, we spectroscopically confirm 12 images based on their emission lines, corresponding to 7 different lensed galaxies between z = 0.95 and 5.0. In addition, 14 new galaxies have been spectroscopically identified in this area thanks to MUSE data, with redshifts ranging between 0.8 and 6.2. All background sources detected within the MUSE field of view correspond to multiple-imaged systems lensed by A1689. Seventeen sources in total are found at z ≥ 3 based on their Lyman-α emission, with Lyman-α luminosities ranging between 40.5 ≲ log (Lyα) ≲ 42.5 after correction for magnification. This sample is particularly sensitive to the slope of the luminosity function toward the faintest end. The density of sources obtained in this survey is consistent with a steep value of α ≤ -1.5, although this result still

  4. The distribution of dark and luminous matter in the unique galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lindsay J.; Clowe, Douglas I.; Coleman, Joseph E.; Russell, Helen R.; Santana, Rebecca; White, Jacob A.; Canning, Rebecca E. A.; Deering, Nicole J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Lee, Brandyn E.; Li, Baojiu; McNamara, Brian R.

    2016-06-01

    Abell 2146 (z = 0.232) consists of two galaxy clusters undergoing a major merger. The system was discovered in previous work, where two large shock fronts were detected using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, consistent with a merger close to the plane of the sky, caught soon after first core passage. A weak gravitational lensing analysis of the total gravitating mass in the system, using the distorted shapes of distant galaxies seen with Advanced Camera for Surveys - Wide Field Channel on Hubble Space Telescope, is presented. The highest peak in the reconstruction of the projected mass is centred on the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 2146-A. The mass associated with Abell 2146-B is more extended. Bootstrapped noise mass reconstructions show the mass peak in Abell 2146-A to be consistently centred on the BCG. Previous work showed that BCG-A appears to lag behind an X-ray cool core; although the peak of the mass reconstruction is centred on the BCG, it is also consistent with the X-ray peak given the resolution of the weak lensing mass map. The best-fitting mass model with two components centred on the BCGs yields M200 = 1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.4} × 1015 and 3^{+1}_{-2} × 1014 M⊙ for Abell 2146-A and Abell 2146-B, respectively, assuming a mass concentration parameter of c = 3.5 for each cluster. From the weak lensing analysis, Abell 2146-A is the primary halo component, and the origin of the apparent discrepancy with the X-ray analysis where Abell 2146-B is the primary halo is being assessed using simulations of the merger.

  5. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  6. The photometric properties of brightest cluster galaxies. I - Absolute magnitudes in 116 nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, J. G.; Gunn, J. E.; Thuan, T. X.

    1980-01-01

    Two-color aperture photometry of the brightest galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters is presented. The results are used to anchor the bright end of the Hubble diagram; essentially the entire formal error for this method is then due to the sample of distant clusters used. New determinations of the systematic trend of galaxy absolute magnitude with the cluster properties of richness and Bautz-Morgan type are derived. When these new results are combined with the Gunn and Oke (1975) data on high-redshift clusters, a formal value (without accounting for any evolution) of q sub 0 = -0.55 + or - 0.45 (1 standard deviations) is found.

  7. Galaxy Luminosity Function of the Dynamically Young Abell 119 Cluster: Probing the Cluster Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngdae; Rey, Soo-Chang; Hilker, Michael; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the galaxy luminosity function (LF) of the Abell 119 cluster down to {M}r˜ -14 mag based on deep images in the u, g, and r bands taken by using MOSAIC II CCD mounted on the Blanco 4 m telescope at the CTIO. The cluster membership was accurately determined based on the radial velocity information and on the color-magnitude relation for bright galaxies and the scaling relation for faint galaxies. The overall LF exhibits a bimodal behavior with a distinct dip at r˜ 18.5 mag ({M}r˜ -17.8 mag), which is more appropriately described by a two-component function. The shape of the LF strongly depends on the clustercentric distance and on the local galaxy density. The LF of galaxies in the outer, low-density region exhibits a steeper slope and more prominent dip compared with that of counterparts in the inner, high-density region. We found evidence for a substructure in the projected galaxy distribution in which several overdense regions in the Abell 119 cluster appear to be closely associated with the surrounding, possible filamentary structure. The combined LF of the overdense regions exhibits a two-component function with a distinct dip, while the LF of the central region is well described by a single Schechter function. We suggest that, in the context of the hierarchical cluster formation scenario, the observed overdense regions are the relics of galaxy groups, retaining their two-component LFs with a dip, which acquired their shapes through a galaxy merging process in group environments, before they fall into a cluster.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 1400-MHz Survey of 1478 Abell Clusters of Galaxies (Owen+ 1982)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, F. N.; White, R. A.; Hilldrup, K. C.; Hanisch, R. J.

    1994-03-01

    This catalog contains observations of Abell clusters of galaxies which were obtained with the Green Bank 91-m telescope at 1400 MHz with an angular resolution of 10'x11' (RAxDEC). This catalog extends the sample of clusters originally published in Owen (1974AJ.....79..427O). The primary goals of this survey were to observe all Abell (1958ApJS....3..211A, Cat. VII/4) clusters with m10 (magnitude of the tenth brightest galaxy in the cluster) less than or equal to 17.0 and declinations north of -19 degrees, to observe all clusters with richness>=3 regardless of m10, and to obtain observations of a representative sample of the rest of the catalog (m10>=17.0; richness<=2). The abelclus.dat file contains ALL 957 detected sources (also beyond 0.5 corrected Abell radii). It contains 525 sources within 0.5 corrected Abell radii, while the published table1.dat file contains 487 entries corresponding to 485 distinct sources (in 442 clusters). The catalog entries contains the flux density at 1400 MHz, the Abell cluster number, richness class, distance class, m10, redshift estimate (z), corrected Abell cluster radius, right ascension (B1950), declination (B1950), deconvolved major and minor source axis lengths, position angle, and distance of the source from the cluster center. (2 data files).

  9. Intracluster Supernovae in the Multi-epoch Nearby Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, David J.; Graham, Melissa L.; Bildfell, Chris; Foley, Ryan J.; Pritchet, Chris; Zaritsky, Dennis; Hoekstra, Henk; Just, Dennis W.; Herbert-Fort, Stéphane; Sivanandam, Suresh

    2011-03-01

    The Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey has discovered 23 cluster Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the 58 X-ray-selected galaxy clusters (0.05 lsimzlsim 0.15) surveyed. Four of our SN Ia events have no host galaxy on close inspection, and are likely intracluster SNe. Although one of the candidates, Abell399_3_14_0, appears to be associated in projection with the outskirts of a nearby red sequence galaxy, its velocity offset of ~1000 km s-1 indicates that it is unbound and therefore an intracluster SN. Another of our candidates, Abell85_6_08_0, has a spectrum consistent with an SN1991bg-like object, suggesting that at least some portion of intracluster stars belong to an old stellar population. Deep image stacks at the location of the candidate intracluster SNe put upper limits on the luminosities of faint hosts, with Mr >~ -13.0 mag and Mg >~ -12.5 mag in all cases. For such limits, the fraction of the cluster luminosity in faint dwarfs below our detection limit is lsim0.1%, assuming a standard cluster luminosity function. All four events occurred within ~600 kpc of the cluster center (projected), as defined by the position of the brightest cluster galaxy, and are more centrally concentrated than the cluster SN Ia population as a whole. After accounting for several observational biases that make intracluster SNe easier to discover and spectroscopically confirm, we calculate an intracluster stellar mass fraction of 0.16+0.13 -0.09 (68% confidence limit) for all objects within R 200. If we assume that the intracluster stellar population is exclusively old, and the cluster galaxies themselves have a mix of stellar ages, we derive an upper limit on the intracluster stellar mass fraction of <0.47 (84% one-sided confidence limit). When combined with the intragroup SNe results of McGee & Balogh, we confirm the declining intracluster stellar mass fraction as a function of halo mass reported by Gonzalez and collaborators.

  10. The Extraordinary Amount of Substructure in the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauzac, M.; Eckert, D.; Schwinn, J.; Harvey, D.; Baugh, C. M.; Robertson, A.; Bose, S.; Massey, R.; Owers, M.; Ebeling, H.; Shan, H. Y.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Richard, J.; Atek, H.; Clément, B.; Egami, E.; Israel, H.; Knowles, K.; Limousin, M.; Natarajan, P.; Rexroth, M.; Taylor, P.; Tchernin, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a joint optical/X-ray analysis of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z=0.308). Our strong- and weak-lensing analysis within the central region of the cluster, i.e., at R < 1 Mpc from the brightest cluster galaxy, reveals eight substructures, including the main core. All of these dark-matter halos are detected with a significance of at least 5σ and feature masses ranging from 0.5 to 1.4× 1014M⊙ within R < 150 kpc. Merten et al. (2011) and Medezinski et al. (2016) substructures are also detected by us. We measure a slightly higher mass for the main core component than reported previously and attribute the discrepancy to the inclusion of our tightly constrained strong-lensing mass model built on Hubble Frontier Fields data. X-ray data obtained by XMM-Newton reveal four remnant cores, one of them a new detection, and three shocks. Unlike Merten et al. (2011), we find all cores to have both dark and luminous counterparts. A comparison with clusters of similar mass in the MXXL simulations yields no objects with as many massive substructures as observed in Abell 2744, confirming that Abell 2744 is an extreme system. We stress that these properties still do not constitute a challenge to ΛCDM, as caveats apply to both the simulation and the observations: for instance, the projected mass measurements from gravitational lensing and the limited resolution of the sub-haloes finders. We discuss implications of Abell 2744 for the plausibility of different dark-matter candidates and, finally, measure a new upper limit on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter of σDM < 1.28 cm2g-1(68% CL), in good agreement with previous results from Harvey et al. (2015).

  11. UV Observations of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1795 with the Optical Monitor on XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittaz, J. P. D.; Kaastra, J. S.; Tamura, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, F.; Peterson, J. R.; Ikebe, Y.; Lumb, D. H.; Paerels, F.; Stewart, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of broad band UV observations of the central regions of Abell 1795 observed with the optical monitor on XMM-Newton. As have been found with other UV observations of the central regions of clusters of galaxies, we find evidence for star formation. However, we also find evidence for absorption in the cD galaxy on a more extended scale than has been seen with optical imaging. We also report the first UV observation of part of the filamentary structure seen in H-alpha, X-rays and very deep U band imaging. The part of the filament we see is very blue with UV colours consistent with a very early (O/B) stellar population. This is the first direct evidence of a dominant population of early type stars at the centre of Abell 1795 and implies very recent star formation. The relationship of this emission to emission at other wavebands is discussed.

  12. A combined optical/X-ray study of the Galaxy cluster Abell 2256

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabricant, Daniel G.; Kent, Stephen M.; Kurtz, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of Abell 2256 is investigated by combining X-ray observations of the intracluster gas with optical observations of the galaxy distribution and kinematics. Magnitudes and positions are presented for 172 galaxies and new redshifts for 75. Abell 2256 is similar to the Coma Cluster in its X-ray luminosity, mass, and galaxy density. Both the X-ray surface brightness and the galaxy surface density distributions exhibit an elliptical morphology. The radial galaxy distribution is steeper than the density profile of the X-ray-emitting gas, yet the galaxy velocity dispersion is higher than the equivalent value for the gas. Under the simplest assumptions that the galaxy velocity distribution is isotropic and the gas is isothermal, the galaxies and gas cannot be in hydrostatic equilibrium in a common gravitational potential. Models consistent with available data have mass-to-light ratios which increase with radius and galaxy orbits that are anisotropic with a radial bias.

  13. Star formation in the massive cluster merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawle, T. D.; Altieri, B.; Egami, E.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Richard, J.; Santos, J. S.; Valtchanov, I.; Walth, G.; Bouy, H.; Haines, C. P.; Okabe, N.

    2014-07-01

    We present a comprehensive study of star-forming (SF) galaxies in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Frontier Field recent cluster merger A2744 (z = 0.308). Wide-field, ultraviolet-infrared (UV-IR) imaging enables a direct constraint of the total star formation rate (SFR) for 53 cluster galaxies, with SFRUV+IR = 343 ± 10 M⊙ yr-1. Within the central 4 arcmin (1.1 Mpc) radius, the integrated SFR is complete, yielding a total SFRUV+IR = 201 ± 9 M⊙ yr-1. Focusing on obscured star formation, this core region exhibits a total SFRIR = 138 ± 8 M⊙ yr-1, a mass-normalized SFRIR of ΣSFR = 11.2 ± 0.7 M⊙ yr-1 per 1014 M⊙ and a fraction of IR-detected SF galaxies f_SF = 0.080^{+0.010}_{-0.037}. Overall, the cluster population at z ˜ 0.3 exhibits significant intrinsic scatter in IR properties (total SFRIR, Tdust distribution) apparently unrelated to the dynamical state: A2744 is noticeably different to the merging Bullet cluster, but similar to several relaxed clusters. However, in A2744 we identify a trail of SF sources including jellyfish galaxies with substantial unobscured SF due to extreme stripping (SFRUV/SFRIR up to 3.3). The orientation of the trail, and of material stripped from constituent galaxies, indicates that the passing shock front of the cluster merger was the trigger. Constraints on star formation from both IR and UV are crucial for understanding galaxy evolution within the densest environments.

  14. Suzaku observation of a high-entropy cluster Abell 548W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Kato, Yuichi; Gu, Liyi; Kawaharada, Madoka; Takizawa, Motokazu; Fujita, Yutaka; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    Abell 548W, one of the galaxy clusters located in the Abell 548 region, has about an order of magnitude lower X-ray luminosity compared to ordinal clusters in view of the well-known intracluster medium (ICM) temperature vs. X-ray luminosity (kT-LX) relation. The cluster hosts a pair of diffuse radio sources to the northwest and north, both about 10' apart from the cluster center. They are candidate radio relics, frequently associated with merging clusters. A Suzaku deep observation with exposure of 84.4 ks was performed to search for signatures of merging in this cluster. The XIS detectors successfully detected the ICM emission out to 16' from the cluster center. The temperature is ˜ 3.6 keV around its center, and ˜ 2 keV at the outermost regions. The hot region (˜ 6 keV) beside the relic candidates shifted to the cluster center reported by XMM-Newton was not seen in the Suzaku data, although its temperature of 3.6 keV itself is higher than the average temperature of 2.5 keV around the radio sources. In addition, the signature of a cool (kT ˜ 0.9 keV) component was found around the northwest source. A marginal temperature jump at its outer edge was also found, consistent with the canonical idea of the shock acceleration origin of the radio relics. The cluster has among the highest central entropy of ˜ 400 keV cm2 and is one of the so-called low surface brightness clusters. Taking into account the fact that its shape itself is relatively circular and smooth and also that its temperature structure is nearly flat, possible scenarios for merging are discussed.

  15. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and evidence for radial orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Owen, Frazer N.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1986-01-01

    Published observational data on the tail orientations (TOs) of 60 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters of galaxies are analyzed statistically using a maximum-likelihood approach. The results are presented in a table, and it is found that the observed TO distributions in the whole sample and in subsamples of morphologically regular NATs and NATs with pericentric distances d greater than 500 kpc are consistent with isotropic orbits, whereas the TOs for NATs with d less than 500 kpc are consistent with highly radial orbits. If radial orbits were observed near the centers of other types of cluster galaxies as well, it could be inferred that violent relaxation during cluster formation was incomplete, and that clusters form by spherical collapse and secondary infall, as proposed by Gunn (1977).

  16. Weak lensing mass reconstruction of the galaxy cluster Abell 209

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulin-Henriksson, S.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Haines, C. P.; Radovich, M.; Mercurio, A.; Becciani, U.

    2007-05-01

    Context: Weak lensing applied to deep optical images of clusters of galaxies provides a powerful tool to reconstruct the distribution of the gravitating mass associated to these structures. Aims: We use the shear signal extracted by an analysis of deep exposures of a region centered around the galaxy cluster ABCG 209, at redshift z˜ 0.2, to derive both a map of the projected mass distribution and an estimate of the total mass within a characteristic radius. Methods: We use a series of deep archival R-band images from CFHT-12k, covering an area of 0.3 deg^2. We determine the shear of background galaxy images using a new implementation of the modified Kaiser-Squires-Broadhurst KSB+ pipeline for shear determination, which we has been tested against the "Shear TEsting Program 1 and 2'' simulations. We use mass aperture statistics to produce maps of the 2 dimensional density distribution, and parametric fits using both Navarro-Frenk-White and singular-isothermal-sphere profiles to constrain the total mass. Results: The projected mass distribution shows a pronounced asymmetry, with an elongated structure extending from the SE to the NW. This is in general agreement with the optical distribution previously found by other authors. A similar elongation was previously detected in the X-ray emission map, and in the distribution of galaxy colours. The circular NFW mass profile fit gives a total mass of M200 = 7.7+4.3-2.7× 1014 {M}_⊙ inside the virial radius r200 = 1.8± 0.3 Mpc. Conclusions: The weak lensing profile reinforces the evidence for an elongated structure of ABCG 209, as previously suggested by studies of the galaxy distribution and velocities. This project has been partly supported by a Marie Curie Transfer of Knowledge Fellowship of the European Community's Sixth Framework Programme, under contract: MTKD-CT-002995 COSMOCT. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada

  17. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived From Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From analysis of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging data we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the SZE toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster.

  18. X-ray constraints on the shape of the dark matter in five Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buote, David A.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray observations obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to constrain the shape of the dark matter in the inner regions of Abell clusters A401, A426, A1656, A2029, and A2199, each of which exhibits highly flattened optical isopleths. The dark matter is modeled as an ellipsoid with a mass density of about r exp -2. The possible shapes of the dark matter is constrained by comparing these model isophotes to the image isophotes. The X-ray isophotes, and therefore the gravitational potentials, have ellipticities of about 0.1-0.2. The dark matter within the central 1 Mpc is found to be substantially rounder for all the clusters. It is concluded that the shape of the galaxy distributions in these clusters traces neither the gravitational potential nor the gravitating matter.

  19. An Hα survey of eight Abell clusters: the dependence of tidally induced star formation on cluster density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, C.; Whittle, M.

    2000-09-01

    We have undertaken a survey of Hα emission in a substantially complete sample of CGCG galaxies of types Sa and later within 1.5 Abell radii of the centres of eight low-redshift Abell clusters (Abell 262, 347, 400, 426, 569, 779, 1367 and 1656). Some 320 galaxies were surveyed, of which 116 were detected in emission (39 per cent of spirals, 75 per cent of peculiars). Here we present previously unpublished data for 243 galaxies in seven clusters. Detected emission is classified as `compact' or `diffuse'. From an analysis of the full survey sample, we confirm our previous identification of compact and diffuse emission with circumnuclear starburst and disc emission respectively. The circumnuclear emission is associated either with the presence of a bar, or with a disturbed galaxy morphology indicative of ongoing tidal interactions (whether galaxy-galaxy, galaxy-group, or galaxy-cluster). The frequency of such tidally induced (circumnuclear) starburst emission in spirals increases from regions of lower to higher local galaxy surface density, and from clusters with lower to higher central galaxy space density. The percentages of spirals classed as disturbed and of galaxies classified as peculiar show a similar trend. These results suggest that tidal interactions for spirals are more frequent in regions of higher local density and for clusters with higher central galaxy density. The prevalence of such tidal interactions in clusters is expected from recent theoretical modelling of clusters with a non-static potential undergoing collapse and infall. Furthermore, in accord with this picture, we suggest that peculiar galaxies are predominantly ongoing mergers. We conclude that tidal interactions are likely to be the main mechanism for the transformation of spirals to S0s in clusters. This mechanism operates more efficiently in higher density environments, as is required by the morphological type-local surface density (T-Σ) relation for galaxies in clusters. For regions of

  20. A redshift survey of the strong-lensing cluster ABELL 383

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kurtz, Michael J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Coe, Dan; Rines, Kenneth J. E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu

    2014-03-01

    Abell 383 is a famous rich cluster (z = 0.1887) imaged extensively as a basis for intensive strong- and weak-lensing studies. Nonetheless, there are few spectroscopic observations. We enable dynamical analyses by measuring 2360 new redshifts for galaxies with r {sub Petro} ≤ 20.5 and within 50' of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG; R.A.{sub 2000} = 42.°014125, decl.{sub 2000} = –03.°529228). We apply the caustic technique to identify 275 cluster members within 7 h {sup –1} Mpc of the hierarchical cluster center. The BCG lies within –11 ± 110 km s{sup –1} and 21 ± 56 h {sup –1} kpc of the hierarchical cluster center; the velocity dispersion profile of the BCG appears to be an extension of the velocity dispersion profile based on cluster members. The distribution of cluster members on the sky corresponds impressively with the weak-lensing contours of Okabe et al. especially when the impact of foreground and background structure is included. The values of R {sub 200} = 1.22 ± 0.01 h {sup –1} Mpc and M {sub 200} = (5.07 ± 0.09) × 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} obtained by application of the caustic technique agree well with recent completely independent lensing measures. The caustic estimate extends direct measurement of the cluster mass profile to a radius of ∼5 h {sup –1} Mpc.

  1. Deep spectroscopy of nearby galaxy clusters - I. Spectroscopic luminosity function of Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Dominguez Palmero, L.; Yu, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new deep spectroscopic catalogue for Abell 85, within 3.0 × 2.6 Mpc2 and down to Mr ˜ Mr^{ast } +6. Using the Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope and the AutoFiber 2 at the William Herschel Telescope, we obtained almost 1430 new redshifts for galaxies with mr ≤ 21 mag and <μe,r> ≤ 24 mag arcsec-2. These redshifts, together with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and NASA/IPAC Extragaalctic Database spectroscopic information, result in 460 confirmed cluster members. This data set allows the study of the luminosity function (LF) of the cluster galaxies covering three orders of magnitudes in luminosities. The total and radial LFs are best modelled by a double Schechter function. The normalized LFs show that their bright (Mr ≤ -21.5) and faint (Mr ≥ -18.0) ends are independent of clustercentric distance and similar to the field LFs unlike the intermediate luminosity range (-21.5 ≤ Mr ≤ -18.0). Similar results are found for the LFs of the dominant types of galaxies: red, passive, virialized and early-infall members. On the contrary, the LFs of blue, star forming, non-virialized and recent-infall galaxies are well described by a single Schechter function. These populations contribute to a small fraction of the galaxy density in the innermost cluster region. However, in the outskirts of the cluster, they have similar densities to red, passive, virialized and early-infall members at the LF faint end. These results confirm a clear dependence of the colour and star formation of Abell 85 members in the cluster centric distance.

  2. Kinematics and stellar populations of low-luminosity early-type galaxies in the Abell 496 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, I. V.; Cayatte, V.; Durret, F.; Adami, C.; Balkowski, C.; Chemin, L.; Laganá, T. F.; Prugniel, P.

    2008-07-01

    internal mechanisms such as supernova-driven winds. The violent tidal stripping of intermediate-luminosity, early-type galaxies in the cluster core can explain the properties of the peculiar elliptical galaxies surrounding the cD galaxy. Based on observations obtained with ESO VLT (program 074.A-0533) and MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (program 03BF12), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. All the spectral and imaging data used in this paper are available through the VO-Paris Data Centre: http://voplus.obspm.fr/DataCollections/Abell0496/ Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Dirac neutrino mass from a neutrino dark matter model for the galaxy cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus Maria

    2016-03-01

    The dark matter in the galaxy cluster Abell 1689 is modelled as an isothermal sphere of neutrinos. New data on the 2d mass density allow an accurate description of its core and halo. The model has no “missing baryon problem” and beyond 2.1 Mpc the baryons have the cosmic mass abundance. Combination of cluster data with the cosmic dark matter fraction - here supposed to stem from the neutrinos - leads to a solution of the dark matter riddle by left and right handed neutrinos with mass (1.861 ± 0.016)h 70 -2eV/c 2. The thus far observed absence of neutrinoless double beta decay points to (quasi-) Dirac neutrinos: uncharged electrons with different flavour and mass eigenbasis, as for quarks. Though the cosmic microwave background spectrum is matched up to some 10% accuracy only, the case is not ruled out because the plasma phase of the early Universe may be turbulent.

  4. A Cosmic Train Wreck: JVLA Radio Observations of the HST Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Connor; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Kraft, Ralph P.; Dawson, William; Brüggen, Marcus; Roediger, Elke; Bulbul, Esra; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The galaxy cluster mergers observed in the HST Frontier Fields represent some of the most energetic events in the Universe. Major cluster mergers leave distinct signatures in the ICM in the form of shocks, turbulence, and diffuse cluster radio sources. These diffuse radio sources, so-called radio relics and halos, provide evidence for the acceleration of relativistic particles and the presence of large scale magnetic fields in the ICM. Observations of these halos and relics allow us to (i) study the physics of particle acceleration and its relation with shocks and turbulence in the ICM and (ii) constrain the dynamical evolution of the merger eventsWe present Jansky Very Large Array 1-4 GHz observations of the Frontier cluster Abell 2744. We confirm the presence of the known giant radio halo and radio relic via our deep radio images. Owing to the much greater sensitivity of the JVLA compared to previous observations, we are able to detect a previously unobserved long Mpc-size filament of synchrotron emission to the south west of the cluster core. We also present a radio spectral index image of the diffuse cluster emission to test the origin of the radio relic and halo, related to the underlying particle acceleration mechanism. Finally, we carry out a search for radio emission from the 'jellyfish' galaxies in A2744 to estimate their star formation rate. These highly disturbed galaxies are likely influenced by the cluster merger event, although the precise origin of these galaxies is still being debated.

  5. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 1795 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamura, T.; Kaastra, J. S.; Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F.; Mittaz, J. P. D.; Trudolyubov, S. P.; Stewart, G.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Lumb, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    The initial results from XMM-Newton observations of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 1795 are presented. The spatially-resolved X-ray spectra taken by the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) show a temperature drop at a radius of - 200 kpc from the cluster center, indicating that the ICM is cooling. Both the EPIC and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) spectra extracted from the cluster center can be described by an isothermal model with a temperature of approx. 4 keV. The volume emission measure of any cool component (less than 1 keV) is less than a few % of the hot component at the cluster center. A strong O VIII Lyman alpha line was detected with the RGS from the cluster core. The O abundance of the ICM is 0.2-0.5 times the solar value. The O to Fe ratio at the cluster center is 0.5 - 1.5 times the solar ratio.

  6. Peculiar radio structures in the central regions of galaxy cluster Abell 585

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamrozy, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Marchenko, V.; Kuźmicz, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Sikora, M.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyse the peculiar radio structure observed across the central region of the galaxy cluster Abell 585 (z = 0.12). In the low-resolution radio maps, this structure appears uniform and diffuse on angular scales of ˜3 arcmin, and is seemingly related to the distant (z = 2.5) radio quasar B3 0727+409 rather than to the cluster itself. However, after a careful investigation of the unpublished archival radio data with better angular resolution, we resolve the structure into two distinct arcmin-scale features, which resemble typical lobes of cluster radio galaxies with no obvious connection to the background quasar. We support this conclusion by examining the spectral and polarization properties of the features, demonstrating in addition that the analysed structure can hardly be associated with any sort of a radio mini-halo or relics of the cluster. Yet at the same time we are not able to identify host galaxies of the radio lobes in the available optical and infrared surveys. We consider some speculative explanations for our findings, including gravitational wave recoil kicks of supermassive black holes responsible for the lobes' formation in the process of merging massive ellipticals within the central parts of a rich cluster environment, but we do not reach any robust conclusions regarding the origin of the detected radio features.

  7. On the Merging Cluster Abell 578 and Its Central Radio Galaxy 4C+67.13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, K.; Stawarz, Ł.; Siemiginowska, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Szostek, A.; Madejski, G.; Harris, D. E.; Simionescu, A.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-06-01

    Here we analyze radio, optical, and X-ray data for the peculiar cluster Abell 578. This cluster is not fully relaxed and consists of two merging sub-systems. The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), CGPG 0719.8+6704, is a pair of interacting ellipticals with projected separation ˜10 kpc, the brighter of which hosts the radio source 4C+67.13. The Fanaroff-Riley type-II radio morphology of 4C+67.13 is unusual for central radio galaxies in local Abell clusters. Our new optical spectroscopy revealed that both nuclei of the CGPG 0719.8+6704 pair are active, albeit at low accretion rates corresponding to the Eddington ratio ˜ {{10}-4} (for the estimated black hole masses of ˜ 3× {{10}8} {{M}⊙ } and ˜ {{10}9} {{M}⊙ }). The gathered X-ray (Chandra) data allowed us to confirm and to quantify robustly the previously noted elongation of the gaseous atmosphere in the dominant sub-cluster, as well as a large spatial offset (˜60 kpc projected) between the position of the BCG and the cluster center inferred from the modeling of the X-ray surface brightness distribution. Detailed analysis of the brightness profiles and temperature revealed also that the cluster gas in the vicinity of 4C+67.13 is compressed (by a factor of about ˜1.4) and heated (from ≃ 2.0 keV up to 2.7 keV), consistent with the presence of a weak shock (Mach number ˜1.3) driven by the expanding jet cocoon. This would then require the jet kinetic power of the order of ˜ {{10}45} erg s-1, implying either a very high efficiency of the jet production for the current accretion rate, or a highly modulated jet/accretion activity in the system. Based on service observations made with the WHT operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  8. THE DISTRIBUTION OF DARK MATTER OVER THREE DECADES IN RADIUS IN THE LENSING CLUSTER ABELL 611

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S.; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Sand, David J.; Richard, Johan; Capak, Peter; Miyazaki, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the baryonic and dark matter distribution in the lensing cluster Abell 611 (z = 0.288), with the goal of determining the dark matter profile over an unprecedented range of cluster-centric distance. By combining three complementary probes of the mass distribution, weak lensing from multi-color Subaru imaging, strong lensing constraints based on the identification of multiply imaged sources in Hubble Space Telescope images, and resolved stellar velocity dispersion measures for the brightest cluster galaxy secured using the Keck telescope, we extend the methodology for separating the dark and baryonic mass components introduced by Sand et al. Our resulting dark matter profile samples the cluster from approx3 kpc to 3.25 Mpc, thereby providing an excellent basis for comparisons with recent numerical models. We demonstrate that only by combining our three observational techniques can degeneracies in constraining the form of the dark matter profile be broken on scales crucial for detailed comparisons with numerical simulations. Our analysis reveals that a simple Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile is an unacceptable fit to our data. We confirm earlier claims based on less extensive analyses of other clusters that the inner profile of the dark matter profile deviates significantly from the NFW form and find a inner logarithmic slope beta flatter than 0.3 (68%; where rho{sub DM} propor to r{sup -b}eta at small radii). In order to reconcile our data with cluster formation in a LAMBDACDM cosmology, we speculate that it may be necessary to revise our understanding of the nature of baryon-dark matter interactions in cluster cores. Comprehensive weak and strong lensing data, when coupled with kinematic information on the brightest cluster galaxy, can readily be applied to a larger sample of clusters to test the universality of these results.

  9. RADIO AND DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISTURBED COOL CORE CLUSTER ABELL 133

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, S. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Owers, M. S.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2010-10-10

    We present results based on new Chandra and multi-frequency radio observations of the disturbed cool core cluster Abell 133. The diffuse gas has a complex bird-like morphology, with a plume of emission extending from two symmetric wing-like features. The plume is capped with a filamentary radio structure that has been previously classified as a radio relic. X-ray spectral fits in the region of the relic indicate the presence of either high-temperature gas or non-thermal emission, although the measured photon index is flatter than would be expected if the non-thermal emission is from inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background by the radio-emitting particles. We find evidence for a weak elliptical X-ray surface brightness edge surrounding the core, which we show is consistent with a sloshing cold front. The plume is consistent with having formed due to uplift by a buoyantly rising radio bubble, now seen as the radio relic, and has properties consistent with buoyantly lifted plumes seen in other systems (e.g., M87). Alternatively, the plume may be a gas sloshing spiral viewed edge-on. Results from spectral analysis of the wing-like features are inconsistent with the previous suggestion that the wings formed due to the passage of a weak shock through the cool core. We instead conclude that the wings are due to X-ray cavities formed by displacement of X-ray gas by the radio relic. The central cD galaxy contains two small-scale cold gas clumps that are slightly offset from their optical and UV counterparts, suggestive of a galaxy-galaxy merger event. On larger scales, there is evidence for cluster substructure in both optical observations and the X-ray temperature map. We suggest that the Abell 133 cluster has recently undergone a merger event with an interloping subgroup, initialing gas sloshing in the core. The torus of sloshed gas is seen close to edge-on, leading to the somewhat ragged appearance of the elliptical surface brightness edge. We show

  10. Submillimetre observations of galaxy clusters with the BLAST: the star formation activity in Abell 3112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, Filiberto G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Edge, Alastair; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C.; Hughes, David H.; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ngo, Henry; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Valiante, Elisabetta; Viero, Marco P.; Wiebe, Donald V.

    2011-04-01

    We present observations at 250, 350 and 500 μm of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 3112 (z= 0.075) carried out with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope. Five cluster members are individually detected as bright submillimetre (submm) sources. Their far-infrared spectral energy distributions and optical colours identify them as normal star-forming galaxies of high mass, with globally evolved stellar populations. They all have (B-R) colours of 1.38 ± 0.08, transitional between the blue, active population and the red, evolved galaxies that dominate the cluster core. We stack to estimate the mean submm emission from all cluster members, which is determined to be 16.6 ± 2.5, 6.1 ± 1.9 and 1.5 ± 1.3 mJy at 250, 350 and 500 μm, respectively. Stacking analyses of the submm emission of cluster members reveal trends in the mean far-infrared luminosity with respect to clustercentric radius and KS-band magnitude. We find that a large fraction of submm emission comes from the boundary of the inner, virialized region of the cluster, at clustercentric distances around R500. Stacking also shows that the bulk of the submm emission arises in intermediate-mass galaxies with KS magnitude ˜1 mag fainter than the characteristic magnitude ?. The results and constraints obtained in this work will provide a useful reference for the forthcoming surveys to be conducted on galaxy clusters by Herschel.

  11. Abell 262 and RXJ0341: Two Brightest Cluster Galaxies with Line Emission Blanketing a Cool Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Heng, Renita

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, integral field (IFU) analysis of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in several cool core clusters has revealed the central regions of these massive old red galaxies to be far from dead. Bright line emission alongside extended X-ray emission links nearby galaxies, is superposed upon vast dust lanes and extends out in long thin filaments from the galaxy core. Yet, to date no unifying picture has come into focus, and the activity across systems is currently seen as a grab-bag of possibile emission line mechanisms. Our primary goal is to work toward a consistent picture for why the BCGs seem are undergoing a renewed level of activity. One problem is most of the current data remains focused on mapping the very core of the BCG, but neglects surrounding galaxies. We propose to discover the full extent of line emission in a complementary pair of BCGs. In Abell 262, an extensive dust patch screens large portions of an otherwise smooth central galaxy, whereas RXJ0341 appears to be a double-core dust free BCG. We will map the full extent of the line emission in order to deduce whether the line emission is a product of local interactions, or the large-scale cluster X-ray gas. The narrow band filter set and large FOV afforded by the the Mayall MOSAIC-1 (MOSA) imager allows us to concurrently conduct an emission line survey of both clusters, locating all line emitting members and beginning a search for the effect of the environment of the different regions (outskirts vs. cluster core) out to the virial radius. We will combine our results with publically available data from 2MASS to determine the upper limits on specific star formation in the BCG and other cluster galaxies within the cluster virial radius.

  12. The rates and time-delay distribution of multiply imaged supernovae behind lensing clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xue; Hjorth, Jens; Richard, Johan E-mail: jens@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-11-01

    Time delays of gravitationally lensed sources can be used to constrain the mass model of a deflector and determine cosmological parameters. We here present an analysis of the time-delay distribution of multiply imaged sources behind 17 strong lensing galaxy clusters with well-calibrated mass models. We find that for time delays less than 1000 days, at z = 3.0, their logarithmic probability distribution functions are well represented by P(log Δt) = 5.3 × 10{sup −4}Δt{sup β-tilde}/M{sub 250}{sup 2β-tilde}, with β-tilde = 0.77, where M{sub 250} is the projected cluster mass inside 250 kpc (in 10{sup 14}M{sub ☉}), and β-tilde is the power-law slope of the distribution. The resultant probability distribution function enables us to estimate the time-delay distribution in a lensing cluster of known mass. For a cluster with M{sub 250} = 2 × 10{sup 14}M{sub ☉}, the fraction of time delays less than 1000 days is approximately 3%. Taking Abell 1689 as an example, its dark halo and brightest galaxies, with central velocity dispersions σ≥500kms{sup −1}, mainly produce large time delays, while galaxy-scale mass clumps are responsible for generating smaller time delays. We estimate the probability of observing multiple images of a supernova in the known images of Abell 1689. A two-component model of estimating the supernova rate is applied in this work. For a magnitude threshold of m{sub AB} = 26.5, the yearly rate of Type Ia (core-collapse) supernovae with time delays less than 1000 days is 0.004±0.002 (0.029±0.001). If the magnitude threshold is lowered to m{sub AB} ∼ 27.0, the rate of core-collapse supernovae suitable for time delay observation is 0.044±0.015 per year.

  13. HUBBLE CAPTURES VIEW OF SUPERNOVA BLAST IN REMOTE GALAXY CLUSTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In March 1996, the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 just happened to be pointed at the faraway galaxy cluster MS1054-0321 when it captured the light from an exploding star, called supernova 1996CL. The cluster is 8 billion light-years from Earth. The Hubble telescope can clearly distinguish the supernova light from the glow of its parent galaxy. The larger image on the left shows the entire cluster of galaxies. The galaxy where the supernova was discovered is located in the boxed area. The bright knot of light from the supernova and the fainter glow from the parent galaxy are shown in the inset image on the right. The arrow points to the light from the supernova explosion. The supernova was discovered by members of the Supernova Cosmology Project, led by Saul Perlmutter of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in California. Perlmutter and his team made this discovery using images from the Hubble telescope and ground-based observatories. The Hubble data were furnished by Megan Donahue of the Space Telescope Science Institute. Donahue was using the Hubble telescope to study galaxy cluster MS1054-0321. Members of the Supernova Project use ground-based telescopes to search for distant supernovae, such as 1996CL, by comparing multiple, wide-field images of galaxies and clusters of galaxies taken at different times. Supernovae are named for the year and the order in which they are found. Supernova 1996CL is a Type Ia supernova. Exploding stars of this type are particularly useful for cosmology because they share a standard maximum brightness. By measuring this brightness, astronomers can determine a Type Ia's distance from Earth. Astronomers use this information to measure the expansion rate of the universe.

  14. Systematic Uncertainties in Characterizing Cluster Outskirts: The Case of Abell 133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, Jennie; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Nulsen, Paul; Farrah, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    The outskirts of galaxy clusters have low surface brightness compared to the X-ray background, making accurate background subtraction particularly important for analyzing cluster spectra out to and beyond the virial radius. We analyze the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) of Abell 133 and assess the extent to which uncertainties on background subtraction affect measured quantities. We implement two methods of analyzing the ICM spectra: one in which the blank-sky background is subtracted, and another in which the sky background is modeled. We find that the two methods are consistent within the 90% confidence ranges. We were able to measure the thermodynamic properties of the cluster up to R500. Even at R500, the systematic uncertainties associated with the sky background in the direction of A133 are small, despite the ICM signal constituting only ~25% of the total signal. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution. GAO acknowledges support by NASA through a Hubble Fellowship grant HST-HF2-51345.001-A awarded by the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  15. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  16. Linking star formation and galaxy kinematics in the massive cluster Abell 2163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menacho, Veronica; Verdugo, Miguel

    2015-02-01

    The origin of the morphology-density relation is still an open question in galaxy evolution. It is most likely driven by the combination of the efficient star formation in the highest peaks of the mass distribution at high-z and the transformation by environmental processes at later times as galaxies fall into more massive halos. To gain additional insights about these processes we study the kinematics, star formation and structural properties of galaxies in Abell 2163 a very massive (~4×1015 M⊙, Holz & Perlmutter 2012) merging cluster at z = 0.2. We use high resolution spectroscopy with VLT/VIMOS to derive rotation curves and dynamical masses for galaxies that show regular kinematics. Galaxies that show irregular rotation are also analysed to study the origin of their distortion. This information is combined with stellar masses and structural parameters obtained from high quality CFHT imaging. From narrow band photometry (2.2m/WFI), centered on the redshifted Hα line, we obtain star formation rates. Although our sample is still small, field and cluster galaxies lie in a similar Tully-Fisher relation as local galaxies. Controlling by additional parameters like SFRs or bulge-to-disk ratio do not affect this result. We find however that ~50% of the cluster galaxies display irregular kinematics in contrast to what is found in the field at similar redshifts (~30%, Böhm et al. 2004) and in agreement with other studies in clusters (e.g. Bösch et al. 2013, Kutdemir et al. 2010) which points out to additional processes operating in clusters that distort the galaxy kinematics.

  17. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  18. The complex structure of Abell 2345: a galaxy cluster with non-symmetric radio relics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschin, W.; Barrena, R.; Girardi, M.

    2010-10-01

    Context. The connection of cluster mergers with the presence of extended, diffuse radio sources in galaxy clusters is still debated. Aims: We aim to obtain new insights into the internal dynamics of the cluster Abell 2345. This cluster exhibits two non-symmetric radio relics well studied through recent, deep radio data. Methods: Our analysis is based on redshift data for 125 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and on new photometric data acquired at the Isaac Newton Telescope. We also use ROSAT/HRI archival X-ray data. We combine galaxy velocities and positions to select 98 cluster galaxies and analyze the internal dynamics of the cluster. Results: We estimate a mean redshift < z > = 0.1789 and a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion σV ~ 1070 km s-1. The two-dimensional galaxy distribution reveals the presence of three significant peaks within a region of ~1 h70-1 Mpc (the E, NW, and SW peaks). The spectroscopic catalog confirms the presence of these three clumps. The SW and NW clumps have similar mean velocities, while the E clump has a larger mean velocity (Δ Vrf ~ 800 km s-1); this structure causes the presence of the two peaks we find in the cluster velocity distribution. The difficulty in separating the galaxy clumps leads to a very uncertain mass estimate M ~ 2 × 1015 h70-1 M⊙. Moreover, the E clump well coincides with the main mass peak as recovered from the weak gravitational lensing analysis and is off-set to the east from the BCG by ~1.3´. The ROSAT X-ray data also show a very complex structure, mainly elongated in the E-W direction, with two (likely three) peaks in the surface brightness distribution, which, however, are off-set from the position of the peaks in the galaxy density. The observed phenomenology agrees with the hypothesis that we are looking at a complex cluster merger occurring along two directions: a major merger along the ~E-W direction (having a component along the LOS) and a minor merger in the western cluster

  19. JVLA S- and X-band polarimetry of the merging cluster Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Takeaki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Akahori, Takuya; Anraku, Kenta; Takizawa, Motokazu; Takahashi, Ikumi; Onodera, Sachiko; Tsuda, Yuya; Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2015-12-01

    We report on polarimetry results of a merging cluster of galaxies, Abell 2256, with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). We performed new observations with JVLA at the S band (2051-3947 MHz) and X band (8051-9947 MHz) in the C array configuration, and detected significant polarized emissions from the radio relic, Source A, and Source B in this cluster. We calculated the total magnetic-field strengths toward the radio relic using revised equipartition formula, which is 1.8-5.0 μG. With dispersions of Faraday rotation measure, the magnetic-field strengths toward Sources A and B are estimated to be 0.63-1.26 μG and 0.11-0.21 μG, respectively. An extremely high degree of linear polarization, as high as ˜ 35%, about a half of the maximum polarization, was detected toward the radio relic, which indicates highly ordered magnetic lines of force over the beam sizes (˜ 52 kpc). The fractional polarization of the radio relic decreases from ˜ 35% to ˜ 20% at around 3 GHz as the frequency decreases, and is nearly constant between 1.37 and 3 GHz. Both analyses with depolarization models and Faraday tomography suggest multiple depolarization components toward the radio relic and imply the existence of turbulent magnetic fields.

  20. Origin of galactic bulges, the evolution of groups, and the distribution of Abell clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Various dynamical topics connected with the origins of galaxies and large scale structure were studied. In Chapter 1 the hypothesis that galactic bulges are simply ellipticals modified by the gravitational field of exponential disks is tested with N-body experiments and an analysis of S. Kent's data-set. The author concludes that, unless disks have improbably low M/L ratios, bulges were not ellipticals; disk fields should produce significant effects, but generally in the wrong direction to explain the differences between bulges and ellipticals. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 explore the evolution of groups of galaxies under the general assumption that galaxies possess massive halos. A sequence of increasingly realistic techniques are employed, culminating in an extensive series of large direct-summation N-body simulations. It is shown that groups of halo-galaxies evolve rapidly, the galaxies becoming segregated at the center of the system. This induces a systematic bias in the observed virial parameters, underestimating the total mass of the system, which may account for the relative M/L ratios of groups and rich clusters, and for the general trend of M/L with scale size between approx.0.1 and approx.1.0 Mpc. Groups with apparent crossing times of approx.0.1 H/sub 0//sup -1/ have probably only just collapsed and are rapidly evolving toward multiple-merger systems. Chapter 5 compares the clustering statistics of rich clusters in N-body simulations with recent observations for Abell clusters. It was found that models with significant power on large scales, such as the cold particle models have the best chance of accounting for the observations.

  1. The growth of the galaxy cluster Abell 85: mergers, shocks, stripping and seeding of clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinohe, Y.; Werner, N.; Simionescu, A.; Allen, S. W.; Canning, R. E. A.; Ehlert, S.; Mernier, F.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of deep Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 85, which is currently undergoing at least two mergers, and in addition shows evidence for gas sloshing which extends out to r ≈ 600 kpc. One of the two infalling subclusters, to the south of the main cluster centre, has a dense, X-ray bright cool core and a tail extending to the south-east. The northern edge of this tail is strikingly smooth and sharp (narrower than the Coulomb mean free path of the ambient gas) over a length of 200 kpc, while towards the south-west the boundary of the tail is blurred and bent, indicating a difference in the plasma transport properties between these two edges. The thermodynamic structure of the tail strongly supports an overall north-westward motion. We propose, that a sloshing-induced tangential, ambient, coherent gas flow is bending the tail eastwards. The brightest galaxy of this subcluster is at the leading edge of the dense core, and is trailed by the tail of stripped gas, suggesting that the cool core of the subcluster has been almost completely destroyed by the time it reached its current radius of r ≈ 500 kpc. The surface-brightness excess, likely associated with gas stripped from the infalling southern subcluster, extends towards the south-east out to at least r500 of the main cluster, indicating that the stripping of infalling subclusters may seed gas inhomogeneities. The second merging subcluster appears to be a diffuse non-cool-core system. Its merger is likely supersonic with a Mach number of ≈1.4.

  2. Diffuse light and building history of the galaxy cluster Abell 2667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covone, G.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Kneib, J.-P.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Slezak, E.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.We searched for diffuse intracluster light in the galaxy cluster Abell 2667 (z=0.233) from HST images in three broad band-filters. Methods: .We applied an iterative multi-scale wavelet analysis and reconstruction technique to these images, which allows to subtract stars and galaxies from the original images. Results: .We detect a zone of diffuse emission southwest of the cluster center (DS1) and a second faint object (ComDif) within DS1. Another diffuse source (DS2) may be detected at lower confidence level northeast of the center. These sources of diffuse light contribute to 10-15% of the total visible light in the cluster. Whether they are independent entities or part of the very elliptical external envelope of the central galaxy remains unclear. Deep VLT VIMOS integral field spectroscopy reveals a faint continuum at the positions of DS1 and ComDif but do not allow a redshift to be computed, so we conclude if these sources are part of the central galaxy or not. A hierarchical substructure detection method reveals the presence of several galaxy pairs and groups defining a similar direction to the one drawn by the DS1 - central galaxy - DS2 axis. The analysis of archive XMM-Newton and Chandra observations shows X-ray emission elongated in the same direction. The X-ray temperature map shows the presence of a cool core, a broad cool zone stretching from north to south, and hotter regions towards the northeast, southwest, and northwest. This might suggest shock fronts along these directions produced by infalling material, even if uncertainties remain quite large on the temperature determination far from the center. Conclusions: .These various data are consistent with a picture in which diffuse sources are concentrations of tidal debris and harassed matter expelled from infalling galaxies by tidal stripping and undergoing an accretion process onto the central cluster galaxy; as such, they are expected to be found along the main infall directions. Note, however

  3. THE RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF ABELL 1689 AND THE RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Jee, M. J.; Jordán, A.; Meurer, G. R.; Peng, E. W.; West, M. J.

    2013-09-20

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z = 0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach a magnitude I{sub 814} = 29 with ∼>90% completeness and sample the brightest ∼5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N{sup total}{sub GC}= 162,850{sup +75,450}{sub -51,310} GCs within a projected radius of 400 kpc. As many as half of the GCs may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this system is by far the largest GC population studied to date. The specific frequency S{sub N} is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from S{sub N} ≈ 5 near the center to ∼12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase S{sub N} by ∼20% at z = 0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the mass fractions as a function of radius. The estimated mass in GCs, M{sub GC}{sup total} = 3.9 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, is comparable to ∼80% of the total stellar mass of the Milky Way. The shape of the GC mass profile appears intermediate between those of the stellar light and total cluster mass. Despite the extreme nature of this system, the ratios of the GC mass to the baryonic and total masses, and thus the GC formation efficiency, are typical of those in other rich clusters when comparing at the same physical radii. The GC formation efficiency is not constant, but varies with radius, in a manner that appears similar for different clusters; we speculate on the reasons for this similarity in profile.

  4. The ESO nearby Abell cluster survey. VII. Galaxy density profiles of rich clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Mazure, A.; Katgert, P.; Biviano, A.

    1998-08-01

    We have analyzed the projected galaxy distributions in a subset of the ENACS cluster sample, viz. in those 77 clusters that have z < 0.1 and R_ACO >= 1 and for which ENACS and COSMOS data are available. For 20 % of these, the distribution of galaxies in the COSMOS catalogue does not allow a reliable centre position to be determined. For the other 62 clusters, we first determined the centre and elongation of the galaxy distribution. Subsequently, we made Maximum-Likelihood fits to the distribution of COSMOS galaxies for 4 theoretical profiles, two with `cores' (generalized King- and Hubble-profiles) and two with `cusps' (generalized Navarro, Frenk and White, or NFW, and de Vaucouleurs profiles). We obtain average core radii (or characteristic radii for the profiles without core) of 128, 189, 292 and 1582 kpc for fits with King, Hubble, NFW and de Vaucouleurs profiles respectively, with dispersions around these average values of 88, 116, 191 and 771 kpc. The surface density of background galaxies is about 4 10(-5) gals arcsec(-2) (with a spread of about 2 10(-5) ), and there is very good agreement between the values found for the 4 profiles. There is also very good agreement on the outer logarithmic slope of the projected galaxy distribution, which is that for the non-generalized King- and Hubble-profile (i.e. beta_ {King} = beta_ {Hubble} = 1, with the corresponding values for the two other model-profiles). We use the Likelihood ratio to investigate whether the observations are significantly better described by profiles with cusps or by profiles with cores. Taking the King and NFW profiles as `model' of either class, we find that about 75 % of the clusters are better fit by the King profile than by the NFW profile. However, for the individual clusters the preference for the King profile is rarely significant at a confidence level of more than 90 %. When we limit ourselves to the central regions it appears that the signifance increases drastically, with 65 % of the

  5. Globular Clusters, Ultracompact Dwarfs, and Dwarf Galaxies in Abell 2744 at a Redshift of 0.308

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung

    2016-11-01

    We report a photometric study of globular clusters (GCs), ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs), and dwarf galaxies in the giant merging galaxy cluster Abell 2744 at z = 0.308. Color–magnitude diagrams of the point sources derived from deep F814W (rest frame r‧) and F105W (rest frame I) images of Abell 2744 in the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field show a rich population of point sources, which have colors that are similar to those of typical GCs. These sources are as bright as -14.9\\lt {M}r\\prime ≤slant -11.4 (26.0 < F814W(Vega) ≤ 29.5) mag, being mostly UCDs and bright GCs in Abell 2744. The luminosity function (LF) of these sources shows a break at {M}r\\prime ≈ -12.9 (F814W ≈ 28.0) mag, indicating a boundary between UCDs and bright GCs. The numbers of GCs and UCDs are estimated to be 1,711,640+589,760 ‑430,500 and 147 ± 26, respectively. The clustercentric radial number density profiles of the UCDs and bright GCs show similar slopes, but these profiles are much steeper than those of the dwarf galaxies and the mass density profile based on gravitational lensing analysis. We derive an LF of the red sequence galaxies for -22.9\\lt {M}r\\prime ≤slant -13.9 mag. The faint end of this LF is fit well by a flat power law with α =-1.14+/- 0.08, showing no faint upturn. These results support the galaxy-origin scenario for bright UCDs: they are the nuclei of dwarf galaxies that are stripped when they pass close to the center of massive galaxies or a galaxy cluster, while some of the faint UCDs are at the bright end of the GCs.

  6. See Change: First Results from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Brian; Aldering, Greg Scott; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle H.; Boehringer, Hans; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Deustua, Susana E.; Dixon, Samantha; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Fagrelius, Parker; Fassbender, Rene; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Gladders, Michael; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Goobar, Ariel; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hilton, Matt; Hoekstra, Henk; Hook, Isobel; Huang, Xiaosheng; Huterer, Dragan; Jee, James; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Lidman, Chris; Linder, Eric; Luther, Kyle; Meyers, Joshua; Muzzin, Adam; Nordin, Jakob; Pain, Reynald; Perlmutter, Saul; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Rozo, Eduardo; Rubin, David; Rykoff, Eli S.; Santos, Joana; Saunders, Clare; Sofiatti, Caroline; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Suzuki, Nao; Wechsler, Risa H.; Willis, Jon; Wilson, Gillian; Yen, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope, the Supernova Cosmology Project is performing a type Ia supernova search in the highest-redshift, most massive clusters known to date. This large HST program spans Cycles 22-23. It will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z ~ 1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, the SNe clusters observed also will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With Cycle 22 completed, we present preliminary supernova light curves above z=1.1 and discuss the number of supernovae discovered compared to our expectations from different SN rates models. Our HST imaging and extensive ground-based campaign are already producing unique results; we have spectroscopically confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members to-date, and confirmed one of the most massive clusters at z~1.2 expected over the entire sky.

  7. A 2163: Merger events in the hottest Abell galaxy cluster. I. Dynamical analysis from optical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurogordato, S.; Cappi, A.; Ferrari, C.; Benoist, C.; Mars, G.; Soucail, G.; Arnaud, M.; Pratt, G. W.; Bourdin, H.; Sauvageot, J.-L.

    2008-04-01

    Context: A 2163 is among the richest and most distant Abell clusters, presenting outstanding properties in different wavelength domains. X-ray observations have revealed a distorted gas morphology and strong features have been detected in the temperature map, suggesting that merging processes are important in this cluster. However, the merging scenario is not yet well-defined. Aims: We have undertaken a complementary optical analysis, aiming to understand the dynamics of the system, to constrain the merging scenario and to test its effect on the properties of galaxies. Methods: We present a detailed optical analysis of A 2163 based on new multicolor wide-field imaging and medium-to-high resolution spectroscopy of several hundred galaxies. Results: The projected galaxy density distribution shows strong subclustering with two dominant structures: a main central component (A), and a northern component (B), visible both in optical and in X-ray, with two other substructures detected at high significance in the optical. At magnitudes fainter than R=19, the galaxy distribution shows a clear elongation approximately with the east-west axis extending over 4~h70-1 Mpc, while a nearly perpendicular bridge of galaxies along the north-south axis appears to connect (B) to (A). The (A) component shows a bimodal morphology, and the positions of its two density peaks depend on galaxy luminosity: at magnitudes fainter than R = 19, the axis joining the peaks shows a counterclockwise rotation (from NE/SW to E-W) centered on the position of the X-ray maximum. Our final spectroscopic catalog of 512 objects includes 476 new galaxy redshifts. We have identified 361 galaxies as cluster members; among them, 326 have high precision redshift measurements, which allow us to perform a detailed dynamical analysis of unprecedented accuracy. The cluster mean redshift and velocity dispersion are respectively z= 0.2005 ± 0.0003 and 1434 ± 60 km s-1. We spectroscopically confirm that the northern

  8. Numerical Simulations Challenged on the Prediction of Massive Subhalo Abundance in Galaxy Clusters: The Case of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, E.; Grillo, C.; De Lucia, G.; Biviano, A.; Annunziatella, M.; Borgani, S.; Lombardi, M.; Mercurio, A.; Rosati, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter we compare the abundance of the member galaxies of a rich, nearby (z = 0.09) galaxy cluster, Abell 2142, with that of halos of comparable virial mass extracted from sets of state-of-the-art numerical simulations, both collisionless at different resolutions and with the inclusion of baryonic physics in the form of cooling, star formation, and feedback by active galactic nuclei. We also use two semi-analytical models to account for the presence of orphan galaxies. The photometric and spectroscopic information, taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 database, allows us to estimate the stellar velocity dispersion of member galaxies of Abell 2142. This quantity is used as proxy for the total mass of secure cluster members and is properly compared with that of subhalos in simulations. We find that simulated halos have a statistically significant (≳ 7 sigma confidence level) smaller amount of massive (circular velocity above 200 {km} {{{s}}}-1) subhalos, even before accounting for the possible incompleteness of observations. These results corroborate the findings from a recent strong lensing study of the Hubble Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416 and suggest that the observed difference is already present at the level of dark matter (DM) subhalos and is not solved by introducing baryonic physics. A deeper understanding of this discrepancy between observations and simulations will provide valuable insights into the impact of the physical properties of DM particles and the effect of baryons on the formation and evolution of cosmological structures.

  9. MUSE integral-field spectroscopy towards the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063. I. Data products and redshift identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karman, W.; Caputi, K. I.; Grillo, C.; Balestra, I.; Rosati, P.; Vanzella, E.; Coe, D.; Christensen, L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Krühler, T.; Lombardi, M.; Mercurio, A.; Nonino, M.; van der Wel, A.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first observations of the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063 taken with the newly commissioned Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field spectrograph. Because of the relatively large field of view (1 arcmin2), MUSE is ideal to simultaneously target multiple galaxies in blank and cluster fields over the full optical spectrum. We analysed the four hours of data obtained in the science verification phase on this cluster and measured redshifts for 53 galaxies. We confirm the redshift of five cluster galaxies, and determine the redshift of 29 other cluster members. Behind the cluster, we find 17 galaxies at higher redshift, including three previously unknown Lyman-α emitters at z> 3, and five multiply-lensed galaxies. We report the detection of a new z = 4.113 multiply lensed galaxy, with images that are consistent with lensing model predictions derived for the Frontier Fields. We detect C iii], C iv, and He ii emission in a multiply lensed galaxy at z = 3.116, suggesting the likely presence of an active galactic nucleus. We also created narrow-band images from the MUSE datacube to automatically search for additional line emitters corresponding to high-redshift candidates, but we could not identify any significant detections other than those found by visual inspection. With the new redshifts, it will become possible to obtain an accurate mass reconstruction in the core of Abell S1063 through refined strong lensing modelling. Overall, our results illustrate the breadth of scientific topics that can be addressed with a single MUSE pointing. We conclude that MUSE is a very efficient instrument to observe galaxy clusters, enabling their mass modelling, and to perform a blind search for high-redshift galaxies.

  10. Optical spectroscopy and the UV luminosity function of galaxies in the Abell 1367, Coma and Virgo clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Boselli, A.; Carrasco, L.

    2003-04-01

    Optical spectroscopy of 93 galaxies, 60 projected in the direction of Abell 1367, 21 onto the Coma cluster and 12 on Virgo, is reported. The targets were selected because they were detected in previous Hα , UV or r' surveys. The present observations bring to 100% the redshift completeness of Hα selected galaxies in the Coma region and to 75% in Abell 1367. All observed galaxies except one show Hα emission and belong to the clusters. This confirms previous determinations of the Hα luminosity function of the two clusters that were based on the assumption that all Hα detected galaxies were cluster members. Using the newly obtained data we re-determine the UV luminosity function of Coma and we compute for the first time the UV luminosity function of A1367. Their faint end slopes remain uncertain (-2.00clusters (Iglesias-Paramo et al. \\cite{lha}). We discover a point-like Hα source in the Virgo cluster, associated with the giant galaxy VCC873, possibly an extragalactic HII region similar to the one recently observed in Virgo by Gerhard et al. (\\cite{Gerhard}). Based on observations obtained with the Loiano telescope belonging to the University of Bologna (Italy), with the G. Haro telescope of the INAOE (Mexico) and with the Calar Alto observatory operated by the Centro Astronomico Hispano Aleman (Spain).

  11. Supernovae contributions to metals in intra-cluster medium observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kosuke; Tokoi, Kazuyo; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ishida, Manabu; Ohashi, Takaya

    2008-05-01

    We studied the properties of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in two clusters of galaxies (AWM 7 and Abell 1060) and two groups (HCG 62 and NGC 507) observed with the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomical satellite, Suzaku. We measured for the first time precise cumulative ICM metal masses and distributions for various elements, such as O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Fe, within 0.1 and ~0.3 r180. Because of the good XIS sensitivity to emission lines, especially below 2 keV, we directly measured O and Mg line intensities and obtained abundances. Comparing our results with supernova nucleosynthesis models, the number ratio of Type II (SNe II) to Type Ia (SNe Ia) is estimated to be ~3.5, assuming the metal mass in the ICM is represented by the sum of products synthesized in SNe Ia and SNe II. Normalized by the K-band luminosities of present galaxies, and including the metals in stars, the integrated number of past SNe II explosions is estimated to be close to or somewhat higher than the star formation rate determined from Hubble Deep Field observations.

  12. XMM-Newton and Chandra Observations of the Remarkable Dynamics of the Intracluster Medium and Radio Sources in the Clusters Abell 2061 and 3667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, C.; Hogge, T.; Chatzikos, M.; Wik, D.; Giacintucci, S.; Clarke, T.; Wong, K.; Gitti, M.; Finoguenov, A.

    2014-07-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of remarkable dynamic structures in the X-ray gas and connected radio sources in three clusters are presented. Abell 2061 is a highly irregular, merging cluster in the Corona Borealis supercluster. X-ray observations show that there is a plume of very cool gas (˜1 keV) to the NE of the cluster, and a hot (7.6 keV) shock region just NE of the center. There is a very bright radio relic to the far SW of the cluster, and a central radio halo/relic with an extension to the NE. Comparison to SLAM simulations show that this is an offset merger of a ˜5 × 10^{13} M⊙ subcluster with a ˜2.5 × 10^{14} M⊙ cluster seen after first core passage. The plume is the cool-core gas from the subcluster, which has been ``slingshot'' to the NE of the cluster. The plume gas is now falling back into the cluster center, and shocks when it hits the central gas. The model predicts a strong shock to the SW at the location of the bright radio relic, and another shock at the NE radio extension. Time permitting, the observations of Abell 2626 and Abell 3667 will also be presented.

  13. Enrichment by supernovae in globular clusters with multiple populations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Woo; Kang, Young-Woon; Lee, Jina; Lee, Young-Wook

    2009-11-26

    The most massive globular cluster in the Milky Way, omega Centauri, is thought to be the remaining core of a disrupted dwarf galaxy, as expected within the model of hierarchical merging. It contains several stellar populations having different heavy elemental abundances supplied by supernovae-a process known as metal enrichment. Although M 22 appears to be similar to omega Cen, other peculiar globular clusters do not. Therefore omega Cen and M 22 are viewed as exceptional, and the presence of chemical inhomogeneities in other clusters is seen as 'pollution' from the intermediate-mass asymptotic-giant-branch stars expected in normal globular clusters. Here we report Ca abundances for seven globular clusters and compare them to omega Cen. Calcium and other heavy elements can only be supplied through numerous supernovae explosions of massive stars in these stellar systems, but the gravitational potentials of the present-day clusters cannot preserve most of the ejecta from such explosions. We conclude that these globular clusters, like omega Cen, are most probably the relics of more massive primeval dwarf galaxies that merged and disrupted to form the proto-Galaxy. PMID:19940919

  14. Three Gravitationally Lensed Supernovae Behind Clash Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurbh W.; Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Merten, Julian; Zitrin, Adi; Riess, Adam G.; Matheson, Thomas; Sako, Masao; Holoien, Thomas W. -S.; Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bartelmann, Matthias; Balestra, Italo; Benitez, Narciso; Bouwens, Rychard; Bradley, Larry; Broadhurst, Tom; Cenko, Stephen Bradley; Donahue, Megan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ford, Holland; Garnavich, Peter; Grillo, Claudio; Infante, Leopoldo; Jouvel, Stephanie; Kelson, Daniel; Koekemoer, Anton; Lahav, Ofer; Lemze, Doron; Maoz, Dan; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Molino, Alberto; Moustakas, John; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Nonino, Mario; Rosati, Piero; Seitz, Stella; Strolger, Louis G.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was approx. 1.0 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is approx. 0.2 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log10 µ): 0.83 +/- 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 +/- 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 +/- 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  15. First LOFAR observations at very low frequencies of cluster-scale non-thermal emission: the case of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rafferty, D. A.; Pizzo, R.; Bonafede, A.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Ferrari, C.; Orrù, E.; Heald, G.; McKean, J. P.; Tasse, C.; de Gasperin, F.; Bîrzan, L.; van Zwieten, J. E.; van der Tol, S.; Shulevski, A.; Jackson, N.; Offringa, A. R.; Conway, J.; Intema, H. T.; Clarke, T. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Miley, G. K.; White, G. J.; Hoeft, M.; Cassano, R.; Macario, G.; Morganti, R.; Wise, M. W.; Horellou, C.; Valentijn, E. A.; Wucknitz, O.; Kuijken, K.; Enßlin, T. A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Boonstra, A.-J.; Brentjens, M.; van de Brink, R. H.; Broderick, J.; Brouw, W. N.; Butcher, H. R.; van Cappellen, W.; Ciardi, B.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Garrett, M. A.; Gerbers, M.; Gunst, A.; van Haarlem, M. P.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Millenaar, R.; Munk, H.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J. E.; Pandey, V. N.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Polatidis, A.; Reich, W.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schoenmakers, A.; Sluman, J.; Stappers, B. W.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Vermeulen, R.; de Vos, M.; van Haarlem, M. P.

    2012-07-01

    Abell 2256 is one of the best known examples of a galaxy cluster hosting large-scale diffuse radio emission that is unrelated to individual galaxies. It contains both a giant radio halo and a relic, as well as a number of head-tail sources and smaller diffuse steep-spectrum radio sources. The origin of radio halos and relics is still being debated, but over the last years it has become clear that the presence of these radio sources is closely related to galaxy cluster merger events. Here we present the results from the first LOFAR low band antenna (LBA) observations of Abell 2256 between 18 and 67 MHz. To our knowledge, the image presented in this paper at 63 MHz is the deepest ever obtained at frequencies below 100 MHz in general. Both the radio halo and the giant relic are detected in the image at 63 MHz, and the diffuse radio emission remains visible at frequencies as low as 20 MHz. The observations confirm the presence of a previously claimed ultra-steep spectrum source to the west of the cluster center with a spectral index of -2.3 ± 0.4 between 63 and 153 MHz. The steep spectrum suggests that this source is an old part of a head-tail radio source in the cluster. For the radio relic we find an integrated spectral index of -0.81 ± 0.03, after removing the flux contribution from the other sources. This is relatively flat which could indicate that the efficiency of particle acceleration at the shock substantially changed in the last ~0.1 Gyr due to an increase of the shock Mach number. In an alternative scenario, particles are re-accelerated by some mechanism in the downstream region of the shock, resulting in the relatively flat integrated radio spectrum. In the radio halo region we find indications of low-frequency spectral steepening which may suggest that relativistic particles are accelerated in a rather inhomogeneous turbulent region.

  16. Lensed Type Ia supernovae as probes of cluster mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, J.; Rubin, D.; Richard, J.; Rykoff, E.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Atek, H.; Barbary, K.; Deustua, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Goobar, A.; Hook, I.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Huang, X.; Kneib, J.-P.; Lidman, C.; Meyers, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Saunders, C.; Spadafora, A. L.; Suzuki, N.; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2014-05-01

    Using three magnified Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) detected behind CLASH (Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble) clusters, we perform a first pilot study to see whether standardizable candles can be used to calibrate cluster mass maps created from strong lensing observations. Such calibrations will be crucial when next-generation Hubble Space Telescope cluster surveys (e.g. Frontier) provide magnification maps that will, in turn, form the basis for the exploration of the high-redshift Universe. We classify SNe using combined photometric and spectroscopic observations, finding two of the three to be clearly of Type Ia and the third probable. The SNe exhibit significant amplification, up to a factor of 1.7 at ˜5σ significance (SN-L2). We conducted this as a blind study to avoid fine-tuning of parameters, finding a mean amplification difference between SNe and the cluster lensing models of 0.09 ± 0.09stat ± 0.05sys mag. This impressive agreement suggests no tension between cluster mass models and high-redshift-standardized SNe Ia. However, the measured statistical dispersion of σμ = 0.21 mag appeared large compared to the dispersion expected based on statistical uncertainties (0.14). Further work with the SN and cluster lensing models, post-unblinding, reduced the measured dispersion to σμ = 0.12. An explicit choice should thus be made as to whether SNe are used unblinded to improve the model, or blinded to test the model. As the lensed SN samples grow larger, this technique will allow improved constraints on assumptions regarding e.g. the structure of the dark matter halo.

  17. Application of a XMM-Newton EPIC Monte Carlo to Analysis And Interpretation of Data for Abell 1689, RXJ0658-55 And the Centaurus Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Karl E.; Peterson, J.R.; Madejski, G.M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-17

    We propose a new Monte Carlo method to study extended X-ray sources with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard XMM Newton. The Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI) technique, described in a companion paper, is applied here to the EPIC data for the clusters of galaxies Abell 1689, Centaurus and RXJ 0658-55 (the ''bullet cluster''). We aim to show the advantages of this method of simultaneous spectral-spatial modeling over traditional X-ray spectral analysis. In Abell 1689 we confirm our earlier findings about structure in temperature distribution and produce a high resolution temperature map. We also confirm our findings about velocity structure within the gas. In the bullet cluster, RXJ 0658-55, we produce the highest resolution temperature map ever to be published of this cluster allowing us to trace what looks like the motion of the bullet in the cluster. We even detect a south to north temperature gradient within the bullet itself. In the Centaurus cluster we detect, by dividing up the luminosity of the cluster in bands of gas temperatures, a striking feature to the north-east of the cluster core. We hypothesize that this feature is caused by a subcluster left over from a substantial merger that slightly displaced the core. We conclude that our method is very powerful in determining the spatial distributions of plasma temperatures and very useful for systematic studies in cluster structure.

  18. Near-infrared photometry and stellar populations of first-ranked galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinx X.; Puschell, Jeffery J.

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-four brightest cluster members (BCMs) in the complete sample of high Galactic latitude nearby Abell clusters of Hoessel, Gunn, and Thuan (HGT) are investigated. The stellar populations in BCMs using near-infrared and optical-near-infrared colors are studied. Brighter BCMs have redder (J-K) and (V-K) colors, suggesting a metallicity increase in brighter galaxies. The larger dispersion of their colors implies that BCMs possess more heterogeneous stellar populations than their lower luminosity counterparts, the normal elliptical galaxies. Special attention is paid to BCMs associated with cooling flows. BCMs with larger accretion rates have bluer (V-K) colors due to ultraviolet excesses and are brighter in the visual wavelength region, but not in the infrared. It is suggested that part of the X-ray emitting cooling gas is converted into high- and intermediate-mass stars emitting in the blue and visible, but not in the infrared. The properties of BCMs as standard candles in the near-infrared are examined and compared with those in the optical.

  19. X-ray cavities and temperature jumps in the environment of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkamble, S. S.; Vagshette, N. D.; Pawar, P. K.; Patil, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present results based on the systematic analysis of high resolution 95 ks Chandra observations of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390 at the redshift of z = 0.228 that hosts an energetic radio AGN. This analysis has enabled us to investigate five X-ray deficient cavities in the atmosphere of Abell 2390 within central 30''. Presence of these cavities have been confirmed through a variety of image processing techniques like, the surface brightness profiles, unsharp masked image, as well as 2D elliptical model subtracted residual map. Temperature profile as well as 2D temperature map revealed structures in the distribution of ICM, in the sense that ICM in the NW direction is cooler than that on the SE direction. Temperature jump in all directions is evident near 25'' (90.5 kpc) corresponding to the average Mach number 1.44± 0.05, while another jump from 7.47 keV to 9.10 keV at 68'' (246 kpc) in the north-west direction, corresponding to Mach number 1.22± 0.06 and these jumps are associated with the cold fronts. Tricolour map as well as hardness ratio map detects cool gas clumps in the central 30 kpc region of temperature 4.45_{-0.10}^{+0.16} keV. The entropy profile derived from the X-ray analysis is found to fall systematically inward in a power-law fashion and exhibits a floor near 12.20± 2.54 keV cm2 in the central region. This flattening of the entropy profile in the core region confirms the intermittent heating at the centre by AGN. The diffuse radio emission map at 1.4 GHz using VLA L-band data exhibits highly asymmetric morphology with an edge in the north-west direction coinciding with the X-ray edge seen in the unsharp mask image. The mechanical power injected by the AGN in the form of X-ray cavities is found to be 5.94× 10^{45} erg s^{-1} and is roughly an order of magnitude higher than the energy lost by the ICM in the form of X-ray emission, confirming that AGN feedback is capable enough to quench the cooling flow in this cluster.

  20. The kinematics and dynamics of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 539

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Huchra, John P.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A sample of 289 redshifts within 10 deg of the center of the cluster A539 have been obtained in order to investigate the cluster kinematics and dynamics. Within 1 Mpc of the center, the physical parameters of A539 are found to be typical of those of rich clusters. It is shown that early-type galaxies are more concentrated toward the cluster center and that the velocity distributions of early-type and late-type galaxies differ marginally.

  1. Three gravitationally lensed supernovae behind clash galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S.; Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Riess, Adam G.; Merten, Julian; Zitrin, Adi; Matheson, Thomas; Sako, Masao; Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry; Bartelmann, Matthias; Balestra, Italo; Benítez, Narciso; Bouwens, Rychard; Broadhurst, Tom; and others

    2014-05-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was ∼1.0 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is ∼0.2 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log{sub 10}μ): 0.83 ± 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 ± 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 ± 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  2. A CHANDRA X-RAY ANALYSIS OF ABELL 1664: COOLING, FEEDBACK, AND STAR FORMATION IN THE CENTRAL CLUSTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Kazemzadeh, F.; Cavagnolo, K. W.; Rafferty, D. A.; BIrzan, L.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Wise, M. W.; Gitti, M.

    2009-05-20

    The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the Abell 1664 cluster is unusually blue and is forming stars at a rate of {approx} 23 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The BCG is located within 5 kpc of the X-ray peak, where the cooling time of 3.5 x 10{sup 8} yr and entropy of 10.4 keV cm{sup 2} are consistent with other star-forming BCGs in cooling flow clusters. The center of A1664 has an elongated, 'barlike' X-ray structure whose mass is comparable to the mass of molecular hydrogen, {approx}10{sup 10} M {sub sun} in the BCG. We show that this gas is unlikely to have been stripped from interloping galaxies. The cooling rate in this region is roughly consistent with the star formation rate, suggesting that the hot gas is condensing onto the BCG. We use the scaling relations of BIrzan et al. to show that the active galactic nucleus (AGN) is underpowered compared to the central X-ray cooling luminosity by roughly a factor of three. We suggest that A1664 is experiencing rapid cooling and star formation during a low state of an AGN feedback cycle that regulates the rates of cooling and star formation. Modeling the emission as a single-temperature plasma, we find that the metallicity peaks 100 kpc from the X-ray center, resulting in a central metallicity dip. However, a multi-temperature cooling flow model improves the fit to the X-ray emission and is able to recover the expected, centrally peaked metallicity profile.

  3. Internal dynamics of the galaxy cluster Abell 545. The ideal case where to study the simultaneous formation of a galaxy system and its brightest galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrena, R.; Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; de Grandi, S.; Eckert, D.; Rossetti, M.

    2011-05-01

    Context. The mechanisms giving rise to diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters, and in particular their connection with cluster mergers, are still debated. Aims: We seek to explore the internal dynamics of the cluster Abell 545, which has been shown to host a radio halo. Abell 545 is also peculiar for hosting in its center a very bright, red, diffuse intracluster light due to an old, presumably metal-rich stellar population, so bright to be named as "star pile". Methods: Our analysis is mainly based on redshift data for 110 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. We identify 95 cluster members and analyze the cluster internal dynamics by combining galaxy velocities and positions. We also use both multiband photometric data acquired at the Isaac Newton Telescope and X-ray data from the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Results: We estimate the cluster redshift, ⟨ z ⟩ = 0.1580, a large line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion σV ~ 1200 km s-1, and ICM temperature kTX ~ 8 keV. Our optical and X-ray analyses detect substructures. Optical data reveal three main galaxy clumps (one at the center hosting the peak of X-ray emission; one at NNW, and one at NE); and possibly a fourth clump at South. There is not a dominant galaxy and the four brightest galaxies avoid the cluster core - ≳ 0.4 h70-1 Mpcdistant from the cluster center - and are ≳ 1500 km s-1far from the mean cluster velocity. Two of these brightest galaxies are located in the NNW and NE clumps. The analysis of the X-ray surface brightness distribution provides us evidence of a disturbed dynamical phase: the strong NNW-SSE elongation, a western excess, and a sharp discontinuity in the northern region which is the likely signature of a shock. Located in the star pile region there is the brightest galaxy of the cluster core (CBCG) and a very compact elliptical galaxy, likely a M32-like dwarf. We show that the star pile, which has a previously determined redshift, has a similar redshift to that of

  4. An X-ray and optical study of the cluster of galaxies Abell 754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabricant, D.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gorenstein, P.; Huchra, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray and optical data for A754 are used to study the relative distribution of the luminous and dark matter in this dense, rich cluster of galaxies with X-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Coma Cluster. A quantitative statistical comparison is made of the galaxy positions with the total mass responsible for maintaining the X-ray emitting gas in hydrostatic equilibrium. A simple bimodal model which fits both the X-ray and optical data suggests that the galaxies are distributed consistently with the projected matter distribution within the region covered by the X-ray map (0.5-1 Mpc). The X-ray and optical estimates of the mass in the central region of the cluster are 2.9 x 10 to the 14th and 3.6 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the 14th solar masses, respectively.

  5. Radio emission at the centre of the galaxy cluster Abell 3560: evidence for core sloshing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, T.; Rossetti, M.; Bardelli, S.; Giacintucci, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Cornacchia, M.; Kantharia, N. G.

    2013-10-01

    Context. We study the interplay between the radio emission associated with the dominant galaxy in clusters and the properties of the surrounding intracluster medium on the basis of its X-ray emission. Aims: Previous radio observations of the galaxy cluster A 3560, located in the Shapley Concentration core, revealed complex radio emission associated with the brightest cluster member. To understand the origin of this radio emission we performed a detailed multiwavelength study with high-quality proprietary data in the radio and X-ray bands and by means of optical data available in the literature. Methods: We observed the cluster with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, the Very Large Array, and the Australia Telescope Compact array at 240 and 610 MHz, 1.28, 1.4, 2.3, 4.8, and 8.4 GHz, and performed a detailed morphological and spectral study of the radio emission associated with the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). Furthermore, we observed the cluster with the XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories to derive the properties of the intracluster gas. Finally, we made use of literature data to obtain the bidimensional distribution of the galaxies in the cluster. Results: The radio emission, associated with the north-eastern nucleus of the dumb-bell BCG, is the result of two components: an active radio galaxy, with jets and lobes, plus aged diffuse emission, which is not refurbished with new electrons at present. Our Chandra data show that the radio active nucleus of the BCG has extended X-ray emission, which we classify as a low-luminosity corona. A residual image of the XMM-Newton brightness distribution shows a spiral-like feature, which we interpret as the signature of gas sloshing. A sub-group is clearly visible in the surface brightness residual map, and this is also supported by the XMM-Newton temperature analysis. The optical bidimensional analysis shows substructure in A 3560. A galaxy clump was detected at the location of the X-ray sub-group, and another group is

  6. Abell 3560, a galaxy cluster at the edge of a major merging event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardelli, S.; Venturi, T.; Zucca, E.; De Grandi, S.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.

    2002-12-01

    In this paper we study A3560, a rich cluster at the southern periphery of the A3558 complex, a chain of interacting clusters in the central part of the Shapley Concentration supercluster. From a ROSAT-PSPC map we find that the X-ray surface brightness distribution of A3560 is well described by two components, an elliptical King law and a more peaked and fainter structure, which has been modeled with a Gaussian. The main component, corresponding to the cluster, is elongated with the major axis pointing toward the A3558 complex. The second component, centered on the Dumb-bell galaxy which dominates the cluster, appears significantly offset (by ~ 0.15 h-1 Mpc) from the cluster X-ray centroid. From a Beppo-SAX observation we derive the radial temperature profile, finding that the temperature is constant (at kT ~ 3.7 keV) up to 8 arcmin, corresponding to 0.3 h-1 Mpc: for larger distances, the temperature significantly drops to kT ~ 1.7 keV. We analyze also temperature maps, dividing the cluster into 4 sectors and deriving the temperature profiles in each sector: we find that the temperature drop is more sudden in the sectors which point towards the A3558 complex. From VLA radio data, at 20 and 6 cm, we find a peculiar bright extended radio source (J1332-3308), composed of a core (centered on the northern component of the Dumb-bell galaxy), two lobes, a ``filament" and a diffuse component. The morphology of the source could be interpreted either by a strong interaction of the radio source with the intracluster medium or by the model of intermittency of the central engine.

  7. The dynamics of the merger in the Frontier Field cluster Abell 2744.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, Matt S.

    2015-08-01

    In this talk I will present results from a combined analysis of deep Chandra X-ray observations and a comprehensive redshift survey of the frontier field cluster A2744. From the redshift information, 343 cluster members are selected which are projected within 3 Mpc of the cluster center. Combining positions and velocities, two major substructures are identified, corresponding to the remnants of two major subclusters. The data are consistent with a post-core-passage, major merger taking place along an axis that is tilted well out of the plane of the sky, together with an interloping minor merger. Supporting this interpretation, the X-ray data reveal enriched, low entropy gas from the core of the approaching, major subcluster, lying ~2 north of the cluster center, and a shock front to the southeast of the previously known bright, compact core associated with the receding subcluster. The X-ray morphology of the compact core is consistent with a Bullet-like cluster viewed from within ~45 degrees of the merger axis. An X-ray peak ~3 arcminutes northwest of the cluster center, with an associated cold front to the northeast and a trail of low entropy gas to the south, is interpreted as the remnant of an interloping minor merger taking place roughly in the plane of the sky. The new data taken for the Frontier Fields has allowed precise measurements of the peaks in the projected mass distribution. I will discuss these new results in the context of our redshift and X-ray information and our inferred merger scenario. I will also present preliminary results on the impact of the merger on the galaxy populations bsed on our spectroscopy.

  8. Dynamics of cD Clusters of Galaxies. 4; Conclusion of a Survey of 25 Abell Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Hill, John M.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present the final results of a spectroscopic study of a sample of cD galaxy clusters. The goal of this program has been to study the dynamics of the clusters, with emphasis on determining the nature and frequency of cD galaxies with peculiar velocities. Redshifts measured with the MX Spectrometer have been combined with those obtained from the literature to obtain typically 50 - 150 observed velocities in each of 25 galaxy clusters containing a central cD galaxy. We present a dynamical analysis of the final 11 clusters to be observed in this sample. All 25 clusters are analyzed in a uniform manner to test for the presence of substructure, and to determine peculiar velocities and their statistical significance for the central cD galaxy. These peculiar velocities were used to determine whether or not the central cD galaxy is at rest in the cluster potential well. We find that 30 - 50% of the clusters in our sample possess significant subclustering (depending on the cluster radius used in the analysis), which is in agreement with other studies of non-cD clusters. Hence, the dynamical state of cD clusters is not different than other present-day clusters. After careful study, four of the clusters appear to have a cD galaxy with a significant peculiar velocity. Dressler-Shectman tests indicate that three of these four clusters have statistically significant substructure within 1.5/h(sub 75) Mpc of the cluster center. The dispersion 75 of the cD peculiar velocities is 164 +41/-34 km/s around the mean cluster velocity. This represents a significant detection of peculiar cD velocities, but at a level which is far below the mean velocity dispersion for this sample of clusters. The picture that emerges is one in which cD galaxies are nearly at rest with respect to the cluster potential well, but have small residual velocities due to subcluster mergers.

  9. Galaxy clusters with multiple components. I - The dynamics of Abell 98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The nature and evolution of rich galaxy clusters containing multiple condensations is studied. Velocities for 13 members of A98 are presented and the determination of dynamical properties of the individual subclusters is substantially improved. The application of techniques for quantifying gravitational scale lengths are stressed without invocation of the symmetry arguments demanded by the usual parameter fitting procedures. The entire A98 cluster is modeled as a two-body system. The probability that A98 is bound is found to be 98 percent. From this model and the results of previous N-body simulations, it is shown that the most likely description of the system is that it reached maximum expansion about 3.5 billion years ago and is presently in a state of collapse. The subclusters will merge in another three billion years.

  10. A remarkable double-ring galaxy in the cluster Abell 2199

    SciTech Connect

    Pence, W.D.; Oegerle, W.; Borne, K.D. )

    1990-12-01

    B and R CCD images have been obtained of the morphologically peculiar galaxy A1627 + 39, which lies near the center of the rich cluster of galaxies A2199. The galaxy is determined to be a nearly face-on barred S0 galaxy containing two nonconcentric rings. The rings are quite unusual in that they are displaced in opposite directions from the galactic center. There is no color difference across the rings, indicating no recent burst of star formation. Two hypotheses for the origin of the rings have been investigated: (1) a resonance effect with the central bar, and (2) the result of an off-axis, deeply penetrating collision with another cluster member. Models of such a collision are presented, which can reproduce the observed rings. However, neither hypothesis can provide a completely satisfactory explanation of all the observations reported here. 32 refs.

  11. On the Origin of Temperature Substructure within Merging Clusters of Galaxies: Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack O.; Pinkney, Jason

    1995-11-01

    Recent ROSA T PSPC and ASCA observations of several rich clusters of galaxies have revealed complex temperature substructure within the X-ray emitting gas. One of the best and most detailed examples is A2256. Briel & Henry (1994) show four distinct temperature components within the central (<12') of A2256. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a plausible model, within reasonable parameter space, that explains the origin of the hottest (>8 keV) gas near the core of A2256. We find the temperature substructure in A2256 to be consistent with a model in which A2256 is currently in the early stages of a merger. We attempt to quantify this model by comparison with results from our parameter study of merging clusters of galaxies conducted with a numerical Hydro/N-body code. From this, we estimate that A2256 is actually two systems with a 2:1 mass ratio, whose cores are separated by ˜0.5 Mpc with a relative velocity of nearly 3000 km s-1. The proposed merger axis is projected into the plane of the sky by 45°-50° such that the less massive of the two clusters is approaching the observer. Within the frame work of this model, we find the hot gas (>8 keV) to be the result of shock heating during the merger event. We also use this model to explain the discrepancy between X-ray and galaxy-based mass estimates for A2256.

  12. X-ray Observation of an Ongoing Merger at the Galaxy Cluster Abell 3653

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar, Turgay; Hudaverdi, Murat

    2016-07-01

    We present structural analysis results of A3653 based on XMM-Newton and Chandra archival data. The X-ray emission is elongated SE to NW, which gives an impression of a binary system. The cluster central plasma has an average temperature of 4.6 keV and 0.2 solar abundance values. There is NW cool clump with 3.2 keV temperature. Both XMM-Newton and Chandra observations show temperature fluctuations, which can be interpreted as recent merger. There are cool regions coinciding with the binary like structures with 4.4 keV and 3.2 keV temperature values, respectively. There is a ˜6.5 keV hot region between SE and NW clumps, which is probably shock heated by a recent dynamical activities. Our analysis results suggest A3653 is clearly not a relaxed system and has an ongoing merger along SE to NW direction.

  13. Galaxy clusters, type Ia supernovae and the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Busti, V. C.; Colaço, L. R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Landau, S. J.

    2016-08-01

    As is well known, measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect can be combined with observations of the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters to estimate the angular diameter distance to these structures. In this paper, we show that this technique depends on the fine structure constant, α. Therefore, if α is a time-dependent quantity, e.g., α = α0phi(z), where phi is a function of redshift, we argue that current data do not provide the real angular diameter distance, DA(z), to the cluster, but instead DAdata(z) = phi(z)2 DA(z). We use this result to derive constraints on a possible variation of α for a class of dilaton runaway models considering a sample of 25 measurements of DAdata(z) in redshift range 0.023 < z < 0.784 and estimates of DA(z) from current type Ia supernovae observations. We find no significant indication of variation of α with the present data.

  14. Wavelet transform analysis of the small-scale X-ray structure of the cluster Abell 1367

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebeney, S. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a new technique based on a wavelet transform analysis to quantify the small-scale (less than a few arcminutes) X-ray structure of clusters of galaxies. We apply this technique to the ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) and Einstein high-resolution imager (HRI) images of the central region of the cluster Abell 1367 to detect sources embedded within the diffuse intracluster medium. In addition to detecting sources and determining their fluxes and positions, we show that the wavelet analysis allows a characterization of the sources extents. In particular, the wavelet scale at which a given source achieves a maximum signal-to-noise ratio in the wavelet images provides an estimate of the angular extent of the source. To account for the widely varying point response of the ROSAT PSPC as a function of off-axis angle requires a quantitative measurement of the source size and a comparison to a calibration derived from the analysis of a Deep Survey image. Therefore, we assume that each source could be described as an isotropic two-dimensional Gaussian and used the wavelet amplitudes, at different scales, to determine the equivalent Gaussian Full Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) (and its uncertainty) appropriate for each source. In our analysis of the ROSAT PSPC image, we detect 31 X-ray sources above the diffuse cluster emission (within a radius of 24 min), 16 of which are apparently associated with cluster galaxies and two with serendipitous, background quasars. We find that the angular extents of 11 sources exceed the nominal width of the PSPC point-spread function. Four of these extended sources were previously detected by Bechtold et al. (1983) as 1 sec scale features using the Einstein HRI. The same wavelet analysis technique was applied to the Einstein HRI image. We detect 28 sources in the HRI image, of which nine are extended. Eight of the extended sources correspond to sources previously detected by Bechtold et al. Overall, using both the

  15. Unsupervised Clustering of Type II Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2016-09-01

    As new facilities come online, the astronomical community will be provided with extremely large data sets of well-sampled light curves (LCs) of transients. This motivates systematic studies of the LCs of supernovae (SNe) of all types, including the early rising phase. We performed unsupervised k-means clustering on a sample of 59 R-band SN II LCs and find that the rise to peak plays an important role in classifying LCs. Our sample can be divided into three classes: slowly rising (II-S), fast rise/slow decline (II-FS), and fast rise/fast decline (II-FF). We also identify three outliers based on the algorithm. The II-FF and II-FS classes are disjoint in their decline rates, while the II-S class is intermediate and “bridges the gap.” This may explain recent conflicting results regarding II-P/II-L populations. The II-FS class is also significantly less luminous than the other two classes. Performing clustering on the first two principal component analysis components gives equivalent results to using the full LC morphologies. This indicates that Type II LCs could possibly be reduced to two parameters. We present several important caveats to the technique, and find that the division into these classes is not fully robust. Moreover, these classes have some overlap, and are defined in the R band only. It is currently unclear if they represent distinct physical classes, and more data is needed to study these issues. However, we show that the outliers are actually composed of slowly evolving SN IIb, demonstrating the potential of such methods. The slowly evolving SNe IIb may arise from single massive progenitors.

  16. Appearance of light clusters in post-bounce evolution of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Roepke, Gerd

    2008-05-15

    We explore the abundance of light clusters in core-collapse supernovae at post-bounce stage in a quantum statistical approach. Adopting the profile of a supernova core from detailed numerical simulations, we study the distribution of light bound clusters up to {alpha} particles (2{<=}A{<=}4) as well as heavy nuclei (A>4) in dense matter at finite temperature. Within the frame of a cluster-mean-field approach, the abundances of light clusters are evaluated accounting for self-energy, Pauli blocking, and effects of continuum correlations. We find that deuterons and tritons, in addition to {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, appear abundantly in a wide region from the surface of the proto-neutron star to the position of the shock wave. The appearance of light clusters may modify the neutrino emission in the cooling region and the neutrino absorption in the heating region and, thereby, influence the supernova mechanism.

  17. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived from Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From an analysis of X-ray spectroscopy and imaging data, we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster. The X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect observations are combined to determine the angular diameter distance to the cluster of D(sub A) = 1294(sup +294 +438, sub -283 -458) Mpc (Statistical followed by systematic uncertainty), implying a Hubble constant of H(sub 0) = 52.2(sup +11.4 +18.5, sub -11.9 -17.7) km/s.Mpc for Omega(sub M) = 0.3 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0.7. We find a best-fit H(sub 0) of 46 km/s.Mpc for the Omega(sub M) = 1 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0 cosmology, and 48 km/s.Mpc for Omega(sub M) = 0.3 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0.0. The X-ray data are also used to derive a total cluster mass of M(sup HSE, sub tot)(r(sub 500)) = 5.18(sup +0.62, sub -0.48) x 10(exp 14)/h solar mass; the optical velocity dispersion yields an independent and consistent estimate of M(sup virial, sub tot)(r(sub 500)) = 6.35(sup +1.51, sub -1.19) X 10(exp 14) /h solar mass. Both of the total mass estimates are evaluated at a fiducial radius, r(sub 500) = 830 /h kpc, where the overdensity is 500 times the critical density. The total cluster mass is then combined with gas mass measurements to determine a cluster gas mass fraction of F(sub g) = 0.056(sup +0.010, sub -0.013) /h(sup 3/2) in combination with recent baryon density constraints, the measured gas mass fraction yields an upper limit on the mass density parameter of Omega(sub M) h(sup 1/2) <= 0.34(sup +/0.06, sub 0.05.

  18. Gemini Frontier Fields: Wide-field Adaptive Optics Ks-band Imaging of the Galaxy Clusters MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; Pessev, P.; Garrel, V.; Winge, C.; Neichel, B.; Vidal, F.

    2015-04-01

    We have observed two of the six Frontier Fields galaxy clusters, MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744, using the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) and the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI). With 0.″ 08-0.″ 10 FWHM our data are nearly diffraction-limited over a 100\\prime\\prime × 100\\prime\\prime wide area. GeMS/GSAOI complements the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) redwards of 1.6 μm with twice the angular resolution. We reach a 5σ depth of {{K}s}˜ 25.6 mag (AB) for compact sources. In this paper, we describe the observations, data processing, and initial public data release. We provide fully calibrated, co-added images matching the native GSAOI pixel scale as well as the larger plate scales of the HST release, adding to the legacy value of the Frontier Fields. Our work demonstrates that even for fields at high galactic latitude where natural guide stars are rare, current multi-conjugated adaptive optics technology at 8 m telescopes has opened a new window on the distant universe. Observations of a third Frontier Field, Abell 370, are planned. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal Observatories, Chile.

  19. Substructure lensing in galaxy clusters as a constraint on low-mass sterile neutrinos in tensor-vector-scalar theory: The straight arc of Abell 2390

    SciTech Connect

    Feix, Martin; Zhao Hongsheng; Fedeli, Cosimo; Hoekstra, Henk

    2010-12-15

    Certain covariant theories of the modified Newtonian dynamics paradigm seem to require an additional hot dark matter (HDM) component--in the form of either heavy ordinary neutrinos or more recently light sterile neutrinos (SNs) with a mass around 11 eV--to be relieved of problems ranging from cosmological scales down to intermediate ones relevant for galaxy clusters. Here we suggest using gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters to test such a marriage of neutrino HDM and modified gravity, adopting the framework of tensor-vector-scalar theory (TeVeS). Unlike conventional cold dark matter (CDM), such HDM is subject to strong phase-space constraints, which allows one to check cluster lens models inferred within the modified framework for consistency. Since the considered HDM particles cannot collapse into arbitrarily dense clumps and only form structures well above the galactic scale, systems which indicate the need for dark substructure are of particular interest. As a first example, we study the cluster lens Abell 2390 and its impressive straight arc with the help of numerical simulations. Based on our results, we outline a general and systematic approach to model cluster lenses in TeVeS which significantly reduces the calculation complexity. We further consider a simple bimodal lens configuration, capable of producing the straight arc, to demonstrate our approach. We find that such a model is marginally consistent with the hypothesis of 11 eV SNs. Future work including more detailed and realistic lens models may further constrain the necessary SN distribution and help to conclusively assess this point. Cluster lenses could therefore provide an interesting discriminator between CDM and such modified gravity scenarios supplemented by SNs or other choices of HDM.

  20. A runaway collision in a young star cluster as the origin of the brightest supernova.

    PubMed

    Portegies Zwart, Simon F; van den Heuvel, Edward P J

    2007-11-15

    Supernova SN 2006gy in the galaxy NGC 1260 is the most luminous recorded. Its progenitor might have been a very massive (>100 Mo, where is the mass of the Sun) star, but that interpretation is incompatible with hydrogen in the spectrum of the supernova; stars >40 Moare believed to have shed their hydrogen envelopes several hundred thousand years before the explosion. Alternatively, the progenitor might have arisen from the merger of two massive stars. Here we show that the collision frequency of massive stars in a dense and young cluster (of the kind to be expected near the centre of a galaxy) is sufficient to provide a reasonable chance that SN 2006gy resulted from such a bombardment. If this is the correct explanation, then we predict that when the supernova fades (in a year or so) a dense cluster of massive stars will become visible at the site of the explosion.

  1. Astrophysics. Multiple images of a highly magnified supernova formed by an early-type cluster galaxy lens.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick L; Rodney, Steven A; Treu, Tommaso; Foley, Ryan J; Brammer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Kasper B; Zitrin, Adi; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Filippenko, Alexei V; Jha, Saurabh W; Riess, Adam G; Bradac, Marusa; Weiner, Benjamin J; Scolnic, Daniel; Malkan, Matthew A; von der Linden, Anja; Trenti, Michele; Hjorth, Jens; Gavazzi, Raphael; Fontana, Adriano; Merten, Julian C; McCully, Curtis; Jones, Tucker; Postman, Marc; Dressler, Alan; Patel, Brandon; Cenko, S Bradley; Graham, Melissa L; Tucker, Bradley E

    2015-03-01

    In 1964, Refsdal hypothesized that a supernova whose light traversed multiple paths around a strong gravitational lens could be used to measure the rate of cosmic expansion. We report the discovery of such a system. In Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we have found four images of a single supernova forming an Einstein cross configuration around a redshift z = 0.54 elliptical galaxy in the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster. The cluster's gravitational potential also creates multiple images of the z = 1.49 spiral supernova host galaxy, and a future appearance of the supernova elsewhere in the cluster field is expected. The magnifications and staggered arrivals of the supernova images probe the cosmic expansion rate, as well as the distribution of matter in the galaxy and cluster lenses.

  2. Astrophysics. Multiple images of a highly magnified supernova formed by an early-type cluster galaxy lens.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick L; Rodney, Steven A; Treu, Tommaso; Foley, Ryan J; Brammer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Kasper B; Zitrin, Adi; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Filippenko, Alexei V; Jha, Saurabh W; Riess, Adam G; Bradac, Marusa; Weiner, Benjamin J; Scolnic, Daniel; Malkan, Matthew A; von der Linden, Anja; Trenti, Michele; Hjorth, Jens; Gavazzi, Raphael; Fontana, Adriano; Merten, Julian C; McCully, Curtis; Jones, Tucker; Postman, Marc; Dressler, Alan; Patel, Brandon; Cenko, S Bradley; Graham, Melissa L; Tucker, Bradley E

    2015-03-01

    In 1964, Refsdal hypothesized that a supernova whose light traversed multiple paths around a strong gravitational lens could be used to measure the rate of cosmic expansion. We report the discovery of such a system. In Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we have found four images of a single supernova forming an Einstein cross configuration around a redshift z = 0.54 elliptical galaxy in the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster. The cluster's gravitational potential also creates multiple images of the z = 1.49 spiral supernova host galaxy, and a future appearance of the supernova elsewhere in the cluster field is expected. The magnifications and staggered arrivals of the supernova images probe the cosmic expansion rate, as well as the distribution of matter in the galaxy and cluster lenses. PMID:25745167

  3. THE GRISM LENS-AMPLIFIED SURVEY FROM SPACE (GLASS). IV. MASS RECONSTRUCTION OF THE LENSING CLUSTER ABELL 2744 FROM FRONTIER FIELD IMAGING AND GLASS SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Schmidt, K. B.; Jones, T. A.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.-H.; Bradac, M.; Treu, T.; Brammer, G. B.; Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Vulcani, B.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Trenti, M.

    2015-09-20

    We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain five high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and two tentative ones. We confirm one strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all three multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometric redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.

  4. The Grism Lens-amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). IV. Mass Reconstruction of the Lensing Cluster Abell 2744 from Frontier Field Imaging and GLASS Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.-H.; Treu, T.; Bradač, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Brammer, G. B.; Vulcani, B.; Jones, T. A.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Trenti, M.

    2015-09-01

    We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain five high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and two tentative ones. We confirm one strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all three multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometric redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.

  5. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  6. A MEASUREMENT OF THE RATE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, LluIs; Miquel, Ramon; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Ihara, Yutaka; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; Marriner, John; Molla, Mercedes

    2010-06-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {<=} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {<=} z {<=} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sup +0.17+0.01} {sub -0.12-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.55{sup +0.13+0.02} {sub -0.11-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12} L {sup -1} {sub xsun} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sup +0.18+0.01} {sub -0.12-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.49{sup +0.15+0.02} {sub -0.11-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sup +1.99+0.07} {sub -1.11-0.04}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.36{sup +0.84+0.01} {sub -0.30-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sup +1.31+0.043} {sub -0.91-0.015} and 3.02{sup +1.31+0.062} {sub -1.03-0.048}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sup +0.15} {sub -0.14})+(0.91{sup +0.85} {sub -0.81}) x z] SNuB h {sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most three hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe

  7. Three supernova shells around a young M33 star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps-Fariña, A.; Beckman, J. E.; Font, J.; Borlaff, A.; Zaragoza-Cardiel, J.; Amram, P.

    2016-09-01

    Using a specialized technique sensitive to the presence of expanding ionized gas, we have detected a set of three concentric expanding shells in an H II region in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. After mapping the kinematics in Hα with Fabry-Perot spectroscopy, we used slit spectra to measure the intensities of the [S II] doublet at λλ671.9, 673.1 nm and the [N II] doublet at λλ645.8, 658.3 nm to corroborate the kinematics and apply diagnostic tests using line ratios. These showed that the expanding shells are shock dominated as would be the case if they had originated with supernova explosions. Estimating their kinetic energies, we find fairly low values, indicating a fairly advanced stage of evolution. We obtain density, mass and parent star mass estimates, which, along with the kinetic energies, are inconsistent with the simplest models of shock-interstellar medium interaction. We propose that the presence and properties of an inhomogeneous medium offer a scenario which can account for these observations, and discuss the implications. Comparing our results with data from the literature supports the combined presence of an H II region and supernova remnant material at the observed position.

  8. Type-Ia supernova rates to redshift 2.4 from clash: The cluster lensing and supernova survey with Hubble

    SciTech Connect

    Graur, O.; Rodney, S. A.; Riess, A. G.; Medezinski, E.; Maoz, D.; Jha, S. W.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; McCully, C.; Patel, B.; Postman, M.; Dahlen, T.; Strolger, L.-G.; Coe, D.; Bradley, L.; Koekemoer, A.; Benítez, N.; Molino, A.; Jouvel, S.; Nonino, M.; Balestra, I.; and others

    2014-03-01

    We present the supernova (SN) sample and Type-Ia SN (SN Ia) rates from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have imaged 25 galaxy-cluster fields and parallel fields of non-cluster galaxies. We report a sample of 27 SNe discovered in the parallel fields. Of these SNe, ∼13 are classified as SN Ia candidates, including four SN Ia candidates at redshifts z > 1.2. We measure volumetric SN Ia rates to redshift 1.8 and add the first upper limit on the SN Ia rate in the range 1.8 < z < 2.4. The results are consistent with the rates measured by the HST/GOODS and Subaru Deep Field SN surveys. We model these results together with previous measurements at z < 1 from the literature. The best-fitting SN Ia delay-time distribution (DTD; the distribution of times that elapse between a short burst of star formation and subsequent SN Ia explosions) is a power law with an index of −1.00{sub −0.06(0.10)}{sup +0.06(0.09)} (statistical){sub −0.08}{sup +0.12} (systematic), where the statistical uncertainty is a result of the 68% and 95% (in parentheses) statistical uncertainties reported for the various SN Ia rates (from this work and from the literature), and the systematic uncertainty reflects the range of possible cosmic star-formation histories. We also test DTD models produced by an assortment of published binary population synthesis (BPS) simulations. The shapes of all BPS double-degenerate DTDs are consistent with the volumetric SN Ia measurements, when the DTD models are scaled up by factors of 3-9. In contrast, all BPS single-degenerate DTDs are ruled out by the measurements at >99% significance level.

  9. Type-Ia Supernova Rates to Redshift 2.4 from Clash: The Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graur, O.; Rodney, S. A.; Maoz, D.; Riess, A. G.; Jha, S. W.; Postman, M.; Dahlen, T.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; McCully, C.; Patel, B.; Strolger, L.-G.; Benitez, N.; Coe, D.; Jouvel, S.; Medezinski, E.; Molino, A.; Nonino, M.; Bradley, L.; Koehemoer, A.; Balestra, I.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Dickinson, M. E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Frederiksen, T. F.; Garnavich, P.; Hjorth, J.; Jones, D. O.; Leibundgut, B.; Matheson, T.; Mobasher, B.; Rosati, P.; Silverman, J. M.; U., V.; Jedruszczuk, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present the supernova (SN) sample and Type-Ia SN (SN Ia) rates from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have imaged 25 galaxy-cluster fields and parallel fields of non-cluster galaxies. We report a sample of 27 SNe discovered in the parallel fields. Of these SNe, approximately 13 are classified as SN Ia candidates, including four SN Ia candidates at redshifts z greater than 1.2.We measure volumetric SN Ia rates to redshift 1.8 and add the first upper limit on the SN Ia rate in the range z greater than 1.8 and less than 2.4. The results are consistent with the rates measured by the HST/ GOODS and Subaru Deep Field SN surveys.We model these results together with previous measurements at z less than 1 from the literature. The best-fitting SN Ia delay-time distribution (DTD; the distribution of times that elapse between a short burst of star formation and subsequent SN Ia explosions) is a power law with an index of 1.00 (+0.06(0.09))/(-0.06(0.10)) (statistical) (+0.12/-0.08) (systematic), where the statistical uncertainty is a result of the 68% and 95% (in parentheses) statistical uncertainties reported for the various SN Ia rates (from this work and from the literature), and the systematic uncertainty reflects the range of possible cosmic star-formation histories. We also test DTD models produced by an assortment of published binary population synthesis (BPS) simulations. The shapes of all BPS double-degenerate DTDs are consistent with the volumetric SN Ia measurements, when the DTD models are scaled up by factors of 3-9. In contrast, all BPS single-degenerate DTDs are ruled out by the measurements at greater than 99% significance level.

  10. High-Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rates in Galaxy Cluster and Field Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbary, Kyle Harris

    This thesis presents Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rates from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey, a program designed to efficiently detect and observe high-redshift supernovae by targeting massive galaxy clusters at redshifts 0.9 < z < 1.46. Among other uses, measurements of the rate at which SNe Ia occur can be used to help constrain the SN Ia "progenitor scenario." The progenitor scenario, the process that leads to a SN~Ia, is a particularly poorly understood aspect of these events. Fortunately, the progenitor is directly linked to the delay time between star formation and supernova explosion. Supernova rates can be used to measure the distribution of these delay times and thus yield information about the elusive progenitors. Galaxy clusters, with their simpler star formation histories, offer an ideal environment for measuring the delay time distribution. In this thesis the SN Ia rate in clusters is calculated based on 8 +/- 1 cluster SNe Ia discovered in the HST Cluster Supernova Survey. This is the first cluster SN Ia rate measurement with detected z > 0.9 SNe. The SN Ia rate is found to be 0.50+0.23-0.19 (stat) +0.10-0.09 (sys) h 702 SNuB (SNuB = 10-12 SNe Lsun,B-1 yr-1), or in units of stellar mass, 0.36+0.16-0.13 (stat) +0.07-0.06 (sys) h 702 SNuM (SNuM = 10-12 SNe M sun-1 yr-1). This represents a factor of approximately 5 +/- 2 increase over measurements of the cluster rate at z < 0.2 and is the first significant detection of a changing cluster SN Ia rate with redshift. Parameterizing the late-time SN Ia delay time distribution with a power law in time with index s, this measurement in combination with lower-redshift cluster SN Ia rates constrains s = -1.41+0.47 -0.40, under the approximation of a single-burst cluster formation redshift of zf = 3. This is generally consistent with expectations for the "double degenerate" progenitor scenario and inconsistent with some models for the "single degenerate" progenitor scenario predicting a

  11. MASS SUBSTRUCTURE IN ABELL 3128

    SciTech Connect

    McCleary, J.; Dell’Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-20

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  12. Mass Substructure in Abell 3128

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleary, J.; dell'Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  13. Supernovae and Their Expanding Blast Waves during the Early Evolution of Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Silich, Sergiy; Cassisi, Santi

    2015-11-01

    Our arguments deal with the early evolution of Galactic globular clusters and show why only a few of the supernovae (SNe) products were retained within globular clusters and only in the most massive cases (M ≥ 106 M⊙), while less massive clusters were not contaminated at all by SNe. Here, we show that SN blast waves evolving in a steep density gradient undergo blowout and end up discharging their energy and metals into the medium surrounding the clusters. This inhibits the dispersal and the contamination of the gas left over from a first stellar generation. Only the ejecta from well-centered SNe that evolve into a high-density medium available for a second stellar generation (2SG) in the most massive clusters would be retained. These are likely to mix their products with the remaining gas, eventually leading in these cases to an Fe-contaminated 2SG.

  14. SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR EXPANDING BLAST WAVES DURING THE EARLY EVOLUTION OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Cassisi, Santi E-mail: cmt@iac.es

    2015-11-20

    Our arguments deal with the early evolution of Galactic globular clusters and show why only a few of the supernovae (SNe) products were retained within globular clusters and only in the most massive cases (M ≥ 10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}), while less massive clusters were not contaminated at all by SNe. Here, we show that SN blast waves evolving in a steep density gradient undergo blowout and end up discharging their energy and metals into the medium surrounding the clusters. This inhibits the dispersal and the contamination of the gas left over from a first stellar generation. Only the ejecta from well-centered SNe that evolve into a high-density medium available for a second stellar generation (2SG) in the most massive clusters would be retained. These are likely to mix their products with the remaining gas, eventually leading in these cases to an Fe-contaminated 2SG.

  15. CLASH-VLT: Environment-driven evolution of galaxies in the z = 0.209 cluster Abell 209

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annunziatella, M.; Mercurio, A.; Biviano, A.; Girardi, M.; Nonino, M.; Balestra, I.; Rosati, P.; Bartosch Caminha, G.; Brescia, M.; Gobat, R.; Grillo, C.; Lombardi, M.; Sartoris, B.; De Lucia, G.; Demarco, R.; Frye, B.; Fritz, A.; Moustakas, J.; Scodeggio, M.; Kuchner, U.; Maier, C.; Ziegler, B.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The analysis of galaxy properties, such as stellar masses, colors, sizes and morphologies, and the relations among them and the environment, in which the galaxies reside, can be used to investigate the physical processes driving galaxy evolution. Aims: We conduct a thorough study of the cluster A209 with a new large spectro-photometric dataset to investigate possible environmental effects on galaxy properties that can provide information on galaxy evolution in cluster hostile environments. Methods: We use the dataset obtained as part of the CLASH-VLT spectroscopic survey, supplemented with Subaru/SuprimeCam high-quality imaging in BVRIz-bands, which yields 1916 cluster members (50% of them spectroscopically confirmed) down to a stellar mass M⋆ = 108.6 M⊙. We determine the stellar mass function of these galaxies in different regions of the cluster, by separating the sample into star-forming and passive cluster members. We then determine the intra-cluster light and its properties. We also derive the orbits of low- (M⋆ ≤ 1010.0 M⊙) and high-mass (M⋆ > 1010.0 M⊙) passive galaxies and study the effect of the environment on the mass-size relation of early-type galaxies, selected according to their Sérsic index; the effects are studied separately for the galaxies in each mass range. Finally, we compare the cluster stellar mass density profile with the number density and total-mass density profiles. Results: The stellar mass function of the star-forming cluster galaxies does not depend on the environment. The slope found for passive galaxies becomes flatter in the densest cluster region, which implies that the low-mass component starts to dominate when moving away from the cluster center. The color distribution of the intra-cluster light is consistent with the color of passive cluster members. The analysis of the dynamical orbits of passive galaxies shows that low-mass galaxies have tangential orbits, avoiding small pericenters around the BCG. The

  16. The influence of inelastic neutrino interactions with light clusters on core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-12-01

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light clusters in hot nuclear matter on core-collapse supernova simulations. These interactions have been neglected in most hydrodynamical supernova simulations. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations in addition to the ordinary charged- current interactions with nucleons. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. The time evolutions of shock waves are calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as ~ 10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hand, alpha particles heat the matter near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light clusters have different evolutions from those without it in non-linear evolution phase. The matter in the gain region has various densities and temperatures and there appear regions that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. These results indicate that the inelastic reactions of light clusters, especially deuterons, should be incorporated in the simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  17. Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Marisa

    2014-03-01

    We live in a Universe that is getting bigger faster. This astonishing discovery of Universal acceleration was made in the late 1990s by two teams who made observations of a special type of exploded star known as a `Supernova Type Ia'. (SNeIa) Since the discovery of the accelerating Universe, one of the biggest questions in modern cosmology has been to determine the cause of that acceleration - the answer to this question will have far reaching implications for our theories of cosmology and fundamental physics more broadly. The two main competing explanations for this apparent late time acceleration of the Universe are modified gravity and dark energy. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) has been designed and commissioned to find to find answers to these questions about the nature of dark energy and modified gravity. The new 570 megapixel Dark Energy Camera is currently operating with the Cerro-Tololo Inter American Observatory's 4m Blanco teleccope, carrying out a systematic search for SNeIa, and mapping out the large scale structure of the Universe by making observations of galaxies. The DES science program program which saw first light in September 2013 will run for five years in total. DES SNeIa data in combination with the other DES observations of large scale structure will enable us to put increasingly accurate constraints on the expansion history of the Universe and will help us distinguish between competing theories of dark energy and modified gravity. As we draw to the close of the first observing season of DES in March 2014, we will report on the current status of the DES supernova survey, presenting first year supernovae data, preliminary results, survey strategy, discovery pipeline, spectroscopic target selection and data quality. This talk will give the first glimpse of the DES SN first year data and initial results as we begin our five year survey in search of dark energy. On behalf of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration.

  18. Dusty supernovae running the thermodynamics of the matter reinserted within young and massive super stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Martínez-González, Sergio; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Palouš, Jan; Wünsch, Richard E-mail: cmt@ll.iac.es

    2013-12-01

    Following the observational and theoretical evidence that points at core-collapse supernovae (SNe) as major producers of dust, here we calculate the hydrodynamics of the matter reinserted within young and massive super stellar clusters under the assumption of gas and dust radiative cooling. The large SN rate expected in massive clusters allows for a continuous replenishment of dust immersed in the high temperature thermalized reinserted matter and warrants a stationary presence of dust within the cluster volume during the type II SN era. We first show that such a balance determines the range of the dust-to-gas-mass ratio, and thus the dust cooling law. We then search for the critical line that separates stationary cluster winds from the bimodal cases in the cluster mechanical luminosity (or cluster mass) versus cluster size parameter space. In the latter, strong radiative cooling reduces considerably the cluster wind mechanical energy output and affects particularly the cluster central regions, leading to frequent thermal instabilities that diminish the pressure and inhibit the exit of the reinserted matter. Instead, matter accumulates there and is expected to eventually lead to gravitational instabilities and to further stellar formation with the matter reinserted by former massive stars. The main outcome of the calculations is that the critical line is almost two orders of magnitude or more, depending on the assumed value of V {sub A∞}, lower than when only gas radiative cooling is applied. And thus, many massive clusters are predicted to enter the bimodal regime.

  19. Documentation for the machine-readable version of a table of Redshifts for Abell clusters (Sarazin, Rood and Struble 1982)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The machine readable catalog is described. The machine version contains the same data as the published table, which includes a second file with the notes. The computerized data files are prepared at the Astronomical Data Center. Detected discrepancies and cluster identifications based on photometric estimators are included.

  20. The nearby Abell clusters. II - Luminosity and spatial distribution of galaxies in A2175, A2256, and A2384

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Jewison, Michael S.; Hoessel, John G.

    1987-03-01

    A study of the luminosity functions and spatial distributions of galaxies in the clusters A2175, A2256, and A2384 has been carried out, based on data obtained at the Palomar 1.2 m Schmidt and 1.5 m telescopes. The authors have also investigated in detail the accuracy of an automated star/galaxy classifier, by comparing the results obtained from the Schmidt plates of A2175 and A2384 with higher-spatial-resolution results from the 1.5 m telescope. Fits of Schechter functions to the luminosity functions of A2384 and A2256 yield values of Mr* ≡ -22, which is in good agreement with the "universal" value of Mr*. However, for these two clusters, slopes of the faint ends of the luminosity functions are distinctly flatter than the canonical value of α = -1.25. The best fit to the luminosity function of A2175 indicates a fairly steep faint end (α = -1.60). The spatial distributions of galaxies in these three clusters are well described by power laws, with no evidence for constant-density cores. These results, taken together with those reported by Beers and Tonry (1986), indicate a strong correlation between the density distribution of galaxies and the presence of a dominant D or cD galaxy in the cluster.

  1. The evolution of Red Supergiants to supernova in the LMC cluster NGC 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasor, Emma R.; Davies, Ben

    2016-08-01

    The mass loss rates of red supergiants (RSGs) govern their evolution towards supernova and dictate the appearance of the resulting explosion. To study how mass-loss rates change with evolution we measure the mass-loss rates (dot{M}) and extinctions of 19 red supergiants in the young massive cluster NGC2100 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. By targeting stars in a coeval cluster we can study the mass-loss rate evolution whilst keeping the variables of mass and metallicity fixed. Mass-loss rates were determined by fitting DUSTY models to mid-IR photometry from WISE and Spitzer/IRAC. We find that the dot{M} in red supergiants increases as the star evolves, and is well described by dot{M} prescription of de Jager, used widely in stellar evolution calculations. We find the extinction caused by the warm dust is negligible, meaning the warm circumstellar material of the inner wind cannot explain the higher levels of extinction found in the RSGs compared to other cluster stars. We discuss the implications of this work in terms of supernova progenitors and stellar evolution theory. We argue there is little justification for substantially increasing the dot{M} during the RSG phase, as has been suggested recently in order to explain the absence of high mass Type IIP supernova progenitors. We also argue that an increase in reddening towards the end of the RSG phase, as observed for the two most evolved cluster stars, may provide a solution to the red supergiant problem.

  2. Light clusters, pasta phases, and phase transitions in core-collapse supernova matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Helena; Chiacchiera, Silvia; Providência, Constança

    2015-05-01

    The pasta phase in core-collapse supernova matter (finite temperatures and fixed proton fractions) is studied within relativistic mean-field models. Three different calculations are used for comparison: the Thomas-Fermi, the coexisting phases, and the compressible liquid drop approximations. The effects of including light clusters in nuclear matter and the densities at which the transitions between pasta configurations and to uniform matter occur are also investigated. The free energy, pressure, entropy, and chemical potentials in the range of particle number densities and temperatures expected to cover the pasta region are calculated. Finally, a comparison with a finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculation is drawn.

  3. Are Superluminous Supernovae and Long GRBs the Products of Dynamical Processes in Young Dense Star Clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, E. P. J.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) occur almost exclusively in small galaxies (Small/Large Magellanic Cloud (SMC/LMC)-like or smaller), and the few SLSNe observed in larger star-forming galaxies always occur close to the nuclei of their hosts. Another type of peculiar and highly energetic supernovae are the broad-line Type Ic SNe (SN Ic-BL) that are associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). Also these have a strong preference for occurring in small (SMC/LMC-like or smaller) star-forming galaxies, and in these galaxies LGRBs always occur in the brightest spots. Studies of nearby star-forming galaxies that are similar to the hosts of LGRBs show that these brightest spots are giant H II regions produced by massive dense young star clusters with many hundreds of O- and Wolf-Rayet-type stars. Such dense young clusters are also found in abundance within a few hundred parsecs from the nucleus of larger galaxies like our own. We argue that the SLSNe and the SNe Ic-BL/LGRBs are exclusive products of two types of dynamical interactions in dense young star clusters. In our model the high angular momentum of the collapsing stellar cores required for the engines of an SN Ic-BL results from the post-main-sequence mergers of dynamically produced cluster binaries with almost equal-mass components. The merger produces a critically rotating single helium star with sufficient angular momentum to produce an LGRB; the observed "metal aversion" of LGRBs is a natural consequence of the model. We argue that, on the other hand, SLSNe could be the products of runaway multiple collisions in dense clusters, and we present (and quantize) plausible scenarios of how the different types of SLSNe can be produced.

  4. Are superluminous supernovae and long GRBs the products of dynamical processes in young dense star clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Heuvel, E. P. J.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2013-12-20

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) occur almost exclusively in small galaxies (Small/Large Magellanic Cloud (SMC/LMC)-like or smaller), and the few SLSNe observed in larger star-forming galaxies always occur close to the nuclei of their hosts. Another type of peculiar and highly energetic supernovae are the broad-line Type Ic SNe (SN Ic-BL) that are associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). Also these have a strong preference for occurring in small (SMC/LMC-like or smaller) star-forming galaxies, and in these galaxies LGRBs always occur in the brightest spots. Studies of nearby star-forming galaxies that are similar to the hosts of LGRBs show that these brightest spots are giant H II regions produced by massive dense young star clusters with many hundreds of O- and Wolf-Rayet-type stars. Such dense young clusters are also found in abundance within a few hundred parsecs from the nucleus of larger galaxies like our own. We argue that the SLSNe and the SNe Ic-BL/LGRBs are exclusive products of two types of dynamical interactions in dense young star clusters. In our model the high angular momentum of the collapsing stellar cores required for the engines of an SN Ic-BL results from the post-main-sequence mergers of dynamically produced cluster binaries with almost equal-mass components. The merger produces a critically rotating single helium star with sufficient angular momentum to produce an LGRB; the observed 'metal aversion' of LGRBs is a natural consequence of the model. We argue that, on the other hand, SLSNe could be the products of runaway multiple collisions in dense clusters, and we present (and quantize) plausible scenarios of how the different types of SLSNe can be produced.

  5. On Iron Enrichment, Star Formation, and Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The nature of star formation and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in galaxies in the field and in rich galaxy clusters are contrasted by juxtaposing the buildup of heavy metals in the universe inferred from observed star formation and supernovae rate histories with data on the evolution of Fe abundances in the intracluster medium (ICM). Models for the chemical evolution of Fe in these environments are constructed, subject to observational constraints, for this purpose. While models with a mean delay for SNIa of 3 Gyr and standard initial mass function (IMF) are fully consistent with observations in the field, cluster Fe enrichment immediately tracked a rapid, top-heavy phase of star formation - although transport of Fe into the ICM may have been more prolonged and star formation likely continued beyond redshift 1. The means of this prompt enrichment consisted of SNII yielding greater than or equal to 0.1 solar mass per explosion (if the SNIa rate normalization is scaled down from its value in the field according to the relative number of candidate progenitor stars in the 3 - 8 solar mass range) and/or SNIa with short delay times originating during the rapid star formation epoch. Star formation is greater than 3 times more efficient in rich clusters than in the field, mitigating the overcooling problem in numerical cluster simulations. Both the fraction of baryons cycled through stars, and the fraction of the total present-day stellar mass in the form of stellar remnants, are substantially greater in clusters than in the field.

  6. EVIDENCE FOR ENRICHMENT BY SUPERNOVAE IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6273

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sang-Il; Lim, Dongwook; Seo, Hyunju; Lee, Young-Wook

    2015-11-10

    In our recent investigation, we showed that narrowband photometry can be combined with low-resolution spectroscopy to effectively search for globular clusters (GCs) with supernova (SN) enrichments. Here we apply this technique to the metal-poor bulge GC NGC 6273 and find that the red giant branch stars in this GC are clearly divided into two distinct subpopulations with different calcium abundances. The Ca rich subpopulation in this GC is also enhanced in CN and CH, showing a positive correlation between them. This trend is identical to the result we found in M22, suggesting that this might be a ubiquitous nature of GCs more strongly affected by SNe in their chemical evolution. Our results suggest that NGC 6273 was massive enough to retain SN ejecta, which would place this cluster in the growing group of GCs with Galactic building block characteristics, such as ω Centauri and Terzan 5.

  7. CLASH-VLT: A highly precise strong lensing model of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 (Abell S1063) and prospects for cosmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminha, G. B.; Grillo, C.; Rosati, P.; Balestra, I.; Karman, W.; Lombardi, M.; Mercurio, A.; Nonino, M.; Tozzi, P.; Zitrin, A.; Biviano, A.; Girardi, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Melchior, P.; Meneghetti, M.; Munari, E.; Suyu, S. H.; Umetsu, K.; Annunziatella, M.; Borgani, S.; Broadhurst, T.; Caputi, K. I.; Coe, D.; Delgado-Correal, C.; Ettori, S.; Fritz, A.; Frye, B.; Gobat, R.; Maier, C.; Monna, A.; Postman, M.; Sartoris, B.; Seitz, S.; Vanzella, E.; Ziegler, B.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We perform a comprehensive study of the total mass distribution of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 (z = 0.348) with a set of high-precision strong lensing models, which take advantage of extensive spectroscopic information on many multiply lensed systems. In the effort to understand and quantify inherent systematics in parametric strong lensing modelling, we explore a collection of 22 models in which we use different samples of multiple image families, different parametrizations of the mass distribution and cosmological parameters. Methods: As input information for the strong lensing models, we use the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) imaging data and spectroscopic follow-up observations, with the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) and Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), to identify and characterize bona fide multiple image families and measure their redshifts down to mF814W ≃ 26. A total of 16 background sources, over the redshift range 1.0-6.1, are multiply lensed into 47 images, 24 of which are spectroscopically confirmed and belong to ten individual sources. These also include a multiply lensed Lyman-α blob at z = 3.118. The cluster total mass distribution and underlying cosmology in the models are optimized by matching the observed positions of the multiple images on the lens plane. Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques are used to quantify errors and covariances of the best-fit parameters. Results: We show that with a careful selection of a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed multiple images, the best-fit model can reproduce their observed positions with a rms scatter of 0.̋3 in a fixed flat ΛCDM cosmology, whereas the lack of spectroscopic information or the use of inaccurate photometric redshifts can lead to biases in the values of the model parameters. We find that the best-fit parametrization for the cluster total mass distribution is composed of an

  8. The Type Ia Supernova Rate in Redshift 0.5-0.9 Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Keren; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Maoz, Dan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Foley, Ryan J.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Ebeling, Harald; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Ofek, Eran O.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Donahue, Megan; Ellis, Richard S.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Mulchaey, John S.; Sarajedini, Vicki L.; Voit, G. Mark

    2010-08-01

    Supernova (SN) rates are potentially powerful diagnostics of metal enrichment and SN physics, particularly in galaxy clusters with their deep, metal-retaining potentials and relatively simple star formation histories. We have carried out a survey for SNe in galaxy clusters, at a redshift range of 0.5 < z < 0.9, using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. We reimaged a sample of 15 clusters that were previously imaged by ACS, thus obtaining two to three epochs per cluster in which we discovered five likely cluster SNe, six possible cluster Type Ia supernovae, two hostless SN candidates, and several background and foreground events. Keck spectra of the host galaxies were obtained to establish cluster membership. We conducted detailed efficiency simulations, and measured the stellar luminosities of the clusters using Subaru images. We derive a cluster SN rate of 0.35SNu B +0.17 -0.12(statistical) ±0.13(classification) ±0.01(systematic) (where SNu B = SNe (100 yr 1010 L B,sun)-1) and 0.112SNu M +0.055 -0.039(statistical) ±0.042(classification) ±0.005(systematic) (where SNu M = SNe (100 yr 1010 M sun)-1). As in previous measurements of cluster SN rates, the uncertainties are dominated by small-number statistics. The SN rate in this redshift bin is consistent with the SN rate in clusters at lower redshifts (to within the uncertainties), and shows that there is, at most, only a slight increase of cluster SN rate with increasing redshift. The low and fairly constant SN Ia rate out to z ≈ 1 implies that the bulk of the iron mass in clusters was already in place by z ≈ 1. The recently observed doubling of iron abundances in the intracluster medium between z = 1 and 0, if real, is likely to be the result of redistribution of existing iron, rather than new production of iron. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of

  9. A New Method to Constrain Supernova Fractions Using X-ray Observations of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulbul, Esra; Smith, Randall K.; Loewenstein, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Supernova (SN) explosions enrich the intracluster medium (ICM) both by creating and dispersing metals. We introduce a method to measure the number of SNe and relative contribution of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and core-collapse supernovae (SNe cc) by directly fitting X-ray spectral observations. The method has been implemented as an XSPEC model called snapec. snapec utilizes a single-temperature thermal plasma code (apec) to model the spectral emission based on metal abundances calculated using the latest SN yields from SN Ia and SN cc explosion models. This approach provides a self-consistent single set of uncertainties on the total number of SN explosions and relative fraction of SN types in the ICM over the cluster lifetime by directly allowing these parameters to be determined by SN yields provided by simulations. We apply our approach to XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC), Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS), and 200 ks simulated Astro-H observations of a cooling flow cluster, A3112.We find that various sets of SN yields present in the literature produce an acceptable fit to the EPIC and RGS spectra of A3112. We infer that 30.3% plus or minus 5.4% to 37.1% plus or minus 7.1% of the total SN explosions are SNe Ia, and the total number of SN explosions required to create the observed metals is in the range of (1.06 plus or minus 0.34) x 10(exp 9), to (1.28 plus or minus 0.43) x 10(exp 9), fromsnapec fits to RGS spectra. These values may be compared to the enrichment expected based on well-established empirically measured SN rates per star formed. The proportions of SNe Ia and SNe cc inferred to have enriched the ICM in the inner 52 kiloparsecs of A3112 is consistent with these specific rates, if one applies a correction for the metals locked up in stars. At the same time, the inferred level of SN enrichment corresponds to a star-to-gas mass ratio that is several times greater than the 10% estimated globally for clusters in the A3112 mass range.

  10. The Abell 85 BCG: A Nucleated, Coreless Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Juan P.; Donzelli, Carlos J.

    2016-03-01

    New high-resolution r-band imaging of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 85 (Holm 15A) was obtained using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph. These data were taken with the aim of deriving an accurate surface brightness profile of the BCG of Abell 85, in particular, its central region. The new Gemini data show clear evidence of a previously unreported nuclear emission that is evident as a distinct light excess in the central kiloparsec of the surface brightness profile. We find that the light profile is never flat nor does it present a downward trend toward the center of the galaxy. That is, the new Gemini data show a different physical reality from the featureless, “evacuated core” recently claimed for the Abell 85 BCG. After trying different models, we find that the surface brightness profile of the BCG of Abell 85 is best fit by a double Sérsic model.

  11. Radioactive Probes of the Supernova-contaminated Solar Nebula: Evidence that the Sun Was Born in a Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looney, Leslie W.; Tobin, John J.; Fields, Brian D.

    2006-12-01

    We construct a simple model for radioisotopic enrichment of the protosolar nebula by injection from a nearby supernova, based on the inverse square law for ejecta dispersion. In this parameter study, the presolar radioisotopic abundances (i.e., in solar masses) demand a nearby supernova: its distance D can be no larger than 66 times the radius of the protosolar nebula, at a 90% confidence level, assuming 1 Msolar of protosolar material. The relevant size of the nebula depends on its state of evolution at the time of radioactivity injection. In one scenario, a collection of low-mass stars, including our Sun, formed in a group or cluster with a high-mass star that ended its life as a supernova while our Sun was still a protostar, a starless core, or perhaps a diffuse cloud. Using recent observations of protostars to estimate the size of the protosolar nebula constrains the distance of the supernova to D~0.02-1.6 pc. This supernova distance limit is consistent with the scales of low-mass star formation around one or more massive stars, but it is closer than expected were the Sun formed in an isolated, solitary state. Consequently, if any presolar radioactivities originated via supernova injection, we must conclude that our Sun was a member of such a group or cluster that has since dispersed; thus, solar system formation should be understood in this context. The temporal choreography from supernova ejecta to meteorites is important, as the modeled timescale is <=1.8 Myr. Finally, the model does not distinguish between progenitor masses from 15 to 25 Msolar, although the 20 Msolar model is somewhat preferred.

  12. Consistent use of type Ia supernovae highly magnified by galaxy clusters to constrain the cosmological parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zitrin, Adi; Redlich, Matthias; Broadhurst, Tom

    2014-07-01

    We discuss how Type Ia supernovae (SNe) strongly magnified by foreground galaxy clusters should be self-consistently treated when used in samples fitted for the cosmological parameters. While the cluster lens magnification of a SN can be well constrained from sets of multiple images of various background galaxies with measured redshifts, its value is typically dependent on the fiducial set of cosmological parameters used to construct the mass model. In such cases, one should not naively demagnify the observed SN luminosity by the model magnification into the expected Hubble diagram, which would create a bias, but instead take into account the cosmological parameters a priori chosen to construct the mass model. We quantify the effect and find that a systematic error of typically a few percent, up to a few dozen percent per magnified SN may be propagated onto a cosmological parameter fit unless the cosmology assumed for the mass model is taken into account (the bias can be even larger if the SN is lying very near the critical curves). We also simulate how such a bias propagates onto the cosmological parameter fit using the Union2.1 sample supplemented with strongly magnified SNe. The resulting bias on the deduced cosmological parameters is generally at the few percent level, if only few biased SNe are included, and increases with the number of lensed SNe and their redshift. Samples containing magnified Type Ia SNe, e.g., from ongoing cluster surveys, should readily account for this possible bias.

  13. Mass Profile of Abell 2204 An X-Ray Analysis of Abell 2204 using XMM-Newton Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Travis

    2003-09-05

    The vast majority of the matter in the universe is of an unknown type. This matter is called dark matter by astronomers. The dark matter manifests itself only through gravitational interaction and is otherwise undetectable. The distribution of this matter in can be better understood by studying the mass profile of galaxy clusters. The X-ray emissions of the galaxy cluster Abell 2204 were analyzed using archived data from the XMM-Newton space telescope. We analyze a 40ks observation of Abell 2204 and present a radial temperature and radial mass profile based on hydrostatic equilibrium calculations.

  14. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE CLUSTER SUPERNOVA SURVEY. III. CORRELATED PROPERTIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR HOSTS AT 0.9 < z < 1.46

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, J.; Barbary, K.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Goldhaber, G.; Aldering, G.; Faccioli, L.; Hsiao, E.; Barrientos, L. F.; Brodwin, M.; Dawson, K. S.; Deustua, S.; Fruchter, A. S.; Doi, M.; Ihara, Y.; Eisenhardt, P.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Hattori, T.; Kashikawa, N.; Collaboration: Supernova Cosmology Project; and others

    2012-05-01

    Using the sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey and augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields, we search for correlations between the properties of SNe and their host galaxies at high redshift. We use galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters and develop a model to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, we identify 6 SN Ia hosts that are early-type cluster members and 11 SN Ia hosts that are early-type field galaxies. We confirm for the first time at z > 0.9 that SNe Ia hosted by early-type galaxies brighten and fade more quickly than SNe Ia hosted by late-type galaxies. We also show that the two samples of hosts produce SNe Ia with similar color distributions. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions expected for passive galaxies enable us to measure stellar masses of early-type SN hosts. In combination with stellar mass estimates of late-type GOODS SN hosts from Thomson and Chary, we investigate the correlation of host mass with Hubble residual observed at lower redshifts. Although the sample is small and the uncertainties are large, a hint of this relation is found at z > 0.9. By simultaneously fitting the average cluster galaxy formation history and dust content to the red-sequence scatters, we show that the reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely E(B - V) {approx}< 0.06. The similarity of the field and cluster early-type host samples suggests that field early-type galaxies that lie on the red sequence may also be minimally affected by dust. Hence, the early-type-hosted SNe Ia studied here occupy a more favorable environment to use as well-characterized high-redshift standard candles than other SNe Ia.

  15. FIRST EVIDENCE OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION FROM THE EJECTA OF PROMPT TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Bekki, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations of globular clusters (GCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have discovered that one of the intermediate-age GCs, NGC 1718, with [Fe/H] = -0.7 has an extremely low [Mg/Fe] ratio of {approx}-0.9. We propose that NGC 1718 was formed from the ejecta of Type Ia supernovae mixed with very metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-1.3) gas about {approx}2 Gyr ago. The proposed scenario is shown to be consistent with the observed abundances of Fe-group elements such as Cr, Mn, and Ni. In addition, compelling evidence for asymptotic giant branch stars playing a role in chemical enrichment during this GC formation is found. We suggest that the origin of the metal-poor gas is closely associated with efficient gas transfer from the outer gas disk of the Small Magellanic Cloud to the LMC disk. We anticipate that the outer part of the LMC disk contains field stars exhibiting significantly low [Mg/Fe] ratios, formed through the same process as NGC 1718.

  16. Feedback from winds and supernovae in massive stellar clusters - II. X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, H.; Pittard, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray emission from a simulated massive stellar cluster is investigated. The emission is calculated from a 3D hydrodynamical model which incorporates the mechanical feedback from the stellar winds of three O stars embedded in a giant molecular cloud (GMC) clump containing 3240 M⊙ of molecular material within a 4 pc radius. A simple prescription for the evolution of the stars is used, with the first supernova (SN) explosion at t = 4.4 Myr. We find that the presence of the GMC clump causes short-lived attenuation effects on the X-ray emission of the cluster. However, once most of the material has been ablated away by the winds, the remaining dense clumps do not have a noticeable effect on the attenuation compared with the assumed interstellar medium (ISM) column. We determine the evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity, LX, and spectra, and generate synthetic images. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity drops from nearly 1034 erg s-1 while the winds are `bottled up', to a near-constant value of 1.7 × 1032 erg s-1 between t = 1 and 4 Myr. LX reduces slightly during each star's red supergiant stage due to the depressurization of the hot gas. However, LX increases to ≈1034 erg s-1 during each star's Wolf-Rayet stage. The X-ray luminosity is enhanced by two to three orders of magnitude to ˜1037 erg s-1 for at least 4600 yr after each SN explosion, at which time the blast wave leaves the grid and the X-ray luminosity drops. The X-ray luminosity of our simulation is generally considerably fainter than predicted from spherically symmetric bubble models, due to the leakage of hot gas material through gaps in the outer shell. This process reduces the pressure within our simulation and thus the X-ray emission. However, the X-ray luminosities and temperatures which we obtain are comparable to similarly powerful massive young clusters.

  17. TESTING THE DISTANCE-DUALITY RELATION WITH GALAXY CLUSTERS AND TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Lima, J. A. S.; Ribeiro, M. B.

    2010-10-20

    In this Letter, we propose a new and model-independent cosmological test for the distance-duality (DD) relation, {eta} = D{sub L} (z)(1 + z){sup -2}/D{sub A} (z) = 1, where D{sub L} and D{sub A} are, respectively, the luminosity and angular diameter distances. For D{sub L} we consider two sub-samples of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) taken from Constitution data whereas D{sub A} distances are provided by two samples of galaxy clusters compiled by De Filippis et al. and Bonamente et al. by combining Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and X-ray surface brightness. The SNe Ia redshifts of each sub-sample were carefully chosen to coincide with the ones of the associated galaxy cluster sample ({Delta}z < 0.005), thereby allowing a direct test of the DD relation. Since for very low redshifts, D{sub A} (z) ape D{sub L} (z), we have tested the DD relation by assuming that {eta} is a function of the redshift parameterized by two different expressions: {eta}(z) = 1 + {eta}{sub 0} z and {eta}(z) = 1 + {eta}{sub 0} z/(1 + z), where {eta}{sub 0} is a constant parameter quantifying a possible departure from the strict validity of the reciprocity relation ({eta}{sub 0} = 0). In the best scenario (linear parameterization), we obtain {eta}{sub 0} = -0.28{sup +0.44} {sub -0.44} (2{sigma}, statistical + systematic errors) for the De Filippis et al. sample (elliptical geometry), a result only marginally compatible with the DD relation. However, for the Bonamente et al. sample (spherical geometry) the constraint is {eta}{sub 0} = -0.42{sup +0.34} {sub -0.34} (3{sigma}, statistical + systematic errors), which is clearly incompatible with the duality-distance relation.

  18. Galaxy clustering, CMB and supernova data constraints on ϕCDM model with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Xu, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a scalar field dark energy model (i.e., ϕCDM model) with massive neutrinos, where the scalar field possesses an inverse power-law potential, i.e., V (ϕ) ∝ϕ-α (α > 0). We find that the sum of neutrino masses Σmν has significant impacts on the CMB temperature power spectrum and on the matter power spectrum. In addition, the parameter α also has slight impacts on the spectra. A joint sample, including CMB data from Planck 2013 and WMAP9, galaxy clustering data from WiggleZ and BOSS DR11, and JLA compilation of Type Ia supernova observations, is adopted to confine the parameters. Within the context of the ϕCDM model under consideration, the joint sample determines the cosmological parameters to high precision: the angular size of the sound horizon at recombination, the Thomson scattering optical depth due to reionization, the physical densities of baryons and cold dark matter, and the scalar spectral index are estimated to be θ* = (1.0415-0.0011+0.0012) ×10-2, τ =0.0914-0.0242+0.0266, Ωbh2 = 0.0222 ± 0.0005, Ωch2 = 0.1177 ± 0.0036, and ns =0.9644-0.0119+0.0118, respectively, at 95% confidence level (CL). It turns out that α < 4.995 at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model. And yet, the ΛCDM scenario corresponding to α = 0 is not ruled out at 95% CL. Moreover, we get Σmν < 0.262 eV at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model, while the corresponding one for the ΛCDM model is Σmν < 0.293 eV. The allowed scale of Σmν in the ϕCDM model is a bit smaller than that in the ΛCDM model. It is consistent with the qualitative analysis, which reveals that the increases of α and Σmν both can result in the suppression of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, when α is larger, in order to avoid suppressing the matter power spectrum too much, the value of Σmν should be smaller.

  19. The Merger Dynamics of Abell 2061

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Avery; Sarazin, Craig L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Hogge, Taylor; Wik, Daniel R.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnsworth, Damon; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brown, Shea

    2016-04-01

    Abell 2061, a galaxy cluster at a redshift of z=.0784 in the Corona Borealis Supercluster, displays features in both the X-ray and radio indicative of merger activity. Observations by the GBT and the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) have indicated the presence of an extended, central radio halo/relic coincident with the cluster's main X-ray emission and a bright radio relic to the SW of the center of the cluster. Previous observations by ROSAT, Beppo-SAX, and Chandra show an elongated structure (referred to as the ‘Plume’), emitting in the soft X-ray and stretching to the NE of the cluster’s center. The Beppo-SAX and Chandra observations also suggest the presence of a hard X-ray shock slightly NE of the cluster’s center. Here we present the details of an August 2013 XMM-Newton observation of A2061 which has greater field of view and longer exposure (48.6 ks) than the previous Chandra observation. We present images displaying the cluster’s soft and hard X-ray emission and also a temperature map of the cluster. This temperature map highlights the presence of a previously unseen cool region of the cluster which we hypothesize to be the cool core of one of the subclusters involved in this merger. We also discuss the structural similarity of this cluster with a simulated high mass-ratio offset cluster merger taken from the Simulation Library of Astrophysical cluster Mergers (SLAM). This simulation would suggest that the Plume is gas from the cool core of a subcluster which is now falling back into the center of the cluster after initial core passage.

  20. Stellar populations of BCGs, close companions and intracluster light in Abell 85, Abell 2457 and IIZw108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. O. V.; Alpert, H. S.; Trierweiler, I. L.; Abraham, T.; Beizer, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first results from an integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey of a ˜75 kpc region around three brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), combining over 100 IFU fibres to study the intracluster light (ICL). We fit population synthesis models to estimate age and metallicity. For Abell 85 and Abell 2457, the ICL is best-fit with a fraction of old, metal-rich stars like in the BCG, but requires 30-50 per cent young and metal-poor stars, a component not found in the BCGs. This is consistent with the ICL having been formed by a combination of interactions with less massive, younger, more metal-poor cluster members in addition to stars that form the BCG. We find that the three galaxies are in different stages of evolution and may be the result of different formation mechanisms. The BCG in Abell 85 is near a relatively young, metal-poor galaxy, but the dynamical friction time-scale is long and the two are unlikely to be undergoing a merger. The outer regions of Abell 2457 show a higher relative fraction of metal-poor stars, and we find one companion, with a higher fraction of young, metal-poor stars than the BCG, which is likely to merge within a gigayear. Several luminous red galaxies are found at the centre of the cluster IIZw108, with short merger time-scales, suggesting that the system is about to embark on a series of major mergers to build up a dominant BCG. The young, metal-poor component found in the ICL is not found in the merging galaxies.

  1. Frontier Field Abell 370

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Tom; Capak, Peter

    2014-08-01

    After considering valuable advice from the astronomical community and broad range of open questions in galaxy evolution an advisory committee unanimously recommended HST undertake a program of six deep fields centered on strong lensing galaxy clusters in p arallel with six deep blank fields". The key science goals of these twelve new frontier fields are: 1) to reveal hitherto inaccessible populations of z = 5 - 10 galaxies thatare 10 - 50 times fainter intrinsically than any presently known. 2) to solidify our understanding of the stellar masses and star formation histories of sub-L* galaxies at the earliest times 3) to provide the first statistically meaningful morphological characterization of star forming galaxies at z > 5 4) to find z > 8 galaxies stretched out enough by cluster lensing to discern internal structure and/or magnified enough by cluster lensing for spectroscopic follow-up. Spitzer data are essential to meeting these goals because it enables mass and physical parameter estimates for the high redshift sources and differentiates between low and high redshift galaxies. As a result Spitzer has committed to observing these fields as a major DDT program. The first 4 galaxies clusters and the first 4 deep "blank fields" will be observed by Spitzer over cycles 9 and 10.

  2. X-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Abell 1835

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Kaastra, J. S.; Arnaud, M.; Reiprich T. H.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Jernigan, J. G.; Sakelliou, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopy results of the observation of Abell 1835 using the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton observatory. Abell 1835 is a luminous (10(exp 46)ergs/s), medium redshift (z = 0.2523), X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. The observations support the interpretation that large amounts of cool gas are present in a multi-phase medium surrounded by a hot (kT(sub e) = 8.2 keV) outer envelope. We detect O VIII Ly(alpha) and two Fe XXIV complexes in the RGS spectrum. The emission measure of the cool gas below kT(sub e) = 2.7 keV is much lower than expected from standard cooling-flow models, suggesting either a more complicated cooling process than simple isobaric radiative cooling or differential cold absorption of the cooler gas.

  3. LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS WITH SIGNS OF SUPERNOVA ENRICHMENT: M22, NGC 1851, AND NGC 288

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Dongwook; Han, Sang-Il; Lee, Young-Wook; Roh, Dong-Goo; Sohn, Young-Jong; Chun, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Woo; Johnson, Christian I.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of multiple red giant branches (RGBs) in the color-magnitude diagrams of massive globular clusters (GCs). In order to investigate the origin of this split on the RGB, we have performed new narrow-band Ca photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy for M22, NGC 1851, and NGC 288. We find significant differences (more than 4σ) in calcium abundance from the spectroscopic HK' index for M22 and NGC 1851. We also find more than 8σ differences in CN-band strength between the Ca-strong and Ca-weak subpopulations for these GCs. For NGC 288, however, a large difference is detected only in the CN strength. The calcium abundances of RGB stars in this GC are identical to within the errors. This is consistent with the conclusion from our new Ca photometry where the RGB splits are confirmed in M22 and NGC 1851, but not in NGC 288. We also find interesting differences in the CN-CH correlations among these GCs. While CN and CH are anti-correlated in NGC 288, they show a positive correlation in M22. NGC 1851, however, shows no difference in CH between the two groups of stars with different CN strengths. We suggest that all of these systematic differences would be best explained by how strongly Type II supernovae enrichment has contributed to the chemical evolution of these GCs.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Deep spectroscopy of Abell 85 (Agulli+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sanchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Palmero, L. D.; Yu, H.

    2016-07-01

    File a85_memb.dat contains 5 columns with the sky coordinates (RA;DE), the r and g band magnitudes and the recessional velocities for each 460 confirmed members of Abell 85 cluster. Details on the data set can be found in the paper. (1 data file).

  5. Triaxiality, principal axis orientation and non-thermal pressure in Abell 383

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, Andrea; Limousin, Marceau

    2012-04-01

    While clusters of galaxies are regarded as one of the most important cosmological probes, the conventional spherical modelling of the intracluster medium and the dark matter (DM), and the assumption of strict hydrostatic equilibrium (i.e. the equilibrium gas pressure is provided entirely by thermal pressure) are very approximate at best. Extending our previous works, we developed further a method to reconstruct for the first time the full 3D structure (triaxial shape and principal-axis orientation) of both DM and intracluster (IC) gas, and the level of non-thermal pressure of the IC gas. We outline an application of our method to the galaxy cluster Abell 383, taken as part of the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble (CLASH) multicycle treasury programme, presenting results of a joint analysis of X-ray and strong lensing measurements. We find that the intermediate-major and minor-major axis ratios of the DM are 0.71 ± 0.10 and 0.55 ± 0.06, respectively, and the major axis of the DM halo is inclined with respect to the line of sight of 21?1 ± 10?1. The level of non-thermal pressure has been evaluated to be about 10 per cent of the total energy budget. We discuss the implications of our method for the viability of the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario, focusing on the concentration parameter C and the inner slope of the DM, γ, since the cuspiness of DM density profiles in the central regions is one of the critical tests of the CDM paradigm for structure formation: we measure γ= 1.02 ± 0.06 on scales down to 25 Kpc, and C= 4.76 ± 0.51, values which are close to the predictions of the standard model, and providing further evidences that support the CDM scenario. Our method allows us to recover the 3D physical properties of clusters in a bias-free way, overcoming the limitations of the standard spherical modelling and enhancing the use of clusters as more precise cosmological probes.

  6. Type Ia and II Supernovae Contributions to Metal Enrichment in the Intracluster Medium Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kosuke; Tokoi, Kazuyo; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ishida, Manabu; Ohashi, Takaya

    2007-09-01

    We studied the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) in two clusters of galaxies (AWM 7 and Abell 1060) and two groups (HCG 62 and NGC 507) with the X-ray observatory Suzaku. Based on spatially resolved energy spectra, we measured for the first time precise cumulative ICM metal masses within 0.1 and ~0.3r180. Comparing our results with supernova nucleosynthesis models, the number ratio of Type II (SNe II) to Type Ia (SNe Ia) is estimated to be ~3.5, assuming the metal mass in the ICM is represented by the sum of products synthesized in SNe Ia and SNe II. Normalized by the K-band luminosities of present galaxies, and including the metals in stars, the integrated number of past SN II explosions is estimated to be close to or somewhat higher than the star formation rate determined from Hubble Deep Field observations.

  7. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Spectrum of Abell 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaRoque, S.; Reese, E. D.; Holder, G. P.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Joy, M. K.; Grego, L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a measurement of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) at 30 GHz for the galaxy cluster Abell 2163. Combining this data point with previous measurements at 140, 220, and 270 GHz from the SuZIE and Daibolo experiments, we construct them most complete SZE spectrum to date. The spectrum is fitted to determine the compton y parameter and the peculiar velocity for this cluster; our results are y_0=3.6 x 10(circumflex)4 and v_p=360 km s(circumflex)-1. These results include corrections for contamination by Galactic dust emission; we find the contamination level to be much less than previously reported. The dust emission, while strong, is distributed over much larger angular scales than the cluster signal and contributes little to the measured signal when the proper SZE observing strategy is taken into account.

  8. A shock front at the radio relic of Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.; Jauzac, M.; Vazza, F.; Owers, M. S.; Kneib, J.-P.; Tchernin, C.; Intema, H.; Knowles, K.

    2016-09-01

    Radio relics are Mpc-scale diffuse radio sources at the peripheries of galaxy clusters which are thought to trace outgoing merger shocks. We present XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.306), which reveal the presence of a shock front 1.5 Mpc east of the cluster core. The surface-brightness jump coincides with the position of a known radio relic. Although the surface-brightness jump indicates a weak shock with a Mach number M=1.7_{-0.3}^{+0.5}, the plasma in the post-shock region has been heated to a very high temperature (˜13 keV) by the passage of the shock wave. The low-acceleration efficiency expected from such a weak shock suggests that mildly relativistic electrons have been re-accelerated by the passage of the shock front.

  9. A wide-field spectroscopic survey of Abell 1689 and Abell 1835 with VIMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czoske, Oliver

    2004-12-01

    Spectroscopic surveys can add a third dimension, velocity, to the galaxy distribution in and PoS(BDMH2004)099 around clusters. The largest wide-field spectroscopic samples at present exist for near-by clusters. Czoske et al. (2001: A&A 372, 391; 2002: A&A 386, 31) present a catalogue of redshifts for 300 cluster members with V < 22 in Cl0024+1654 at z = 0.395, the largest currently available cluster ˜ redshift catalogue at such a high redshift. In that case, it was only the redshift information ex- tending to large cluster-centric distances which revealed the complex structure of what appeared in other observations to be a relaxed rich cluster. The recent advent of high-multiplex spectrographs on 8 10 meter class telescopes has made it possible to obtain large numbers of high-quality spectra of galaxies and around clusters of galaxies in a short amount of time. The data described by Czoske et al. (2001) were obtained over the course of four years. Samples larger by a factor of 2 . . . 3 can now be obtained in ˜ 10 hours of observation time. Here I present the first results from a spectroscopic survey of the two X-ray luminous clusters Abell 1689 (z = 0.185) and Abell 1835 (z = 0.25). We use the VIsible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on VLT UT3/Melipal. The field of view of VIMOS available for spectroscopy consists of four quadrants of ˜ 7 × 7 , the separa- tion between the quadrants is ˜ 2 . Using the LR-Blue grism, one can place ˜ 100 . . . 150 slits per quadrant. The resulting spectra cover the wavelength range 3700 . . . 6700 Å with a resolution R 200. We use as the basis for object selection panoramic multi-colour images obtained with the CFH12k camera on CFHT (Czoske, 2002, PhD thesis), covering 40 × 30 in BRI for A1689 and VRI for A1835. The input catalogue has been cleaned of stars. We attempted to cover the entire CFH12k field of view by using 10 VIMOS pointings for each cluster. Due to technical problems with VIMOS only 8 and 9 masks

  10. A UNIFORM CONTRIBUTION OF CORE-COLLAPSE AND TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE TO THE CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT PATTERN IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Simionescu, A.; Ichinohe, Y.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2015-10-01

    We present the first measurements of the abundances of α-elements (Mg, Si, and S) extending out beyond the virial radius of a cluster of galaxies. Our results, based on Suzaku Key Project observations of the Virgo Cluster, show that the chemical composition of the intracluster medium is consistent with being constant on large scales, with a flat distribution of the Si/Fe, S/Fe, and Mg/Fe ratios as a function of radius and azimuth out to 1.4 Mpc (1.3 r{sub 200}). Chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium due solely to core-collapse supernovae (SNcc) is excluded with very high significance; instead, the measured metal abundance ratios are generally consistent with the solar value. The uniform metal abundance ratios observed today are likely the result of an early phase of enrichment and mixing, with both SNcc and SNe Ia contributing to the metal budget during the period of peak star formation activity at redshifts of 2–3. We estimate the ratio between the number of SNe Ia and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 12% and 37%, broadly consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy or with the SN Ia contribution estimated for the cluster cores.

  11. A uniform contribution of core-collapse and type Ia supernovae to the chemical enrichment pattern in the outskirts of the Virgo Cluster

    DOE PAGES

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Ichinohe, Y.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2015-09-24

    We present the first measurements of the abundances of α-elements (Mg, Si, and S) extending out beyond the virial radius of a cluster of galaxies. Our results, based on Suzaku Key Project observations of the Virgo Cluster, show that the chemical composition of the intracluster medium is consistent with being constant on large scales, with a flat distribution of the Si/Fe, S/Fe, and Mg/Fe ratios as a function of radius and azimuth out to 1.4 Mpc (1.3 r200). Chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium due solely to core-collapse supernovae (SNcc) is excluded with very high significance; instead, the measured metalmore » abundance ratios are generally consistent with the solar value. The uniform metal abundance ratios observed today are likely the result of an early phase of enrichment and mixing, with both SNcc and SNe Ia contributing to the metal budget during the period of peak star formation activity at redshifts of 2–3. Furthermore, we estimate the ratio between the number of SNe Ia and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 12% and 37%, broadly consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy or with the SN Ia contribution estimated for the cluster cores.« less

  12. A uniform contribution of core-collapse and type Ia supernovae to the chemical enrichment pattern in the outskirts of the Virgo Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Ichinohe, Y.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2015-09-24

    We present the first measurements of the abundances of α-elements (Mg, Si, and S) extending out beyond the virial radius of a cluster of galaxies. Our results, based on Suzaku Key Project observations of the Virgo Cluster, show that the chemical composition of the intracluster medium is consistent with being constant on large scales, with a flat distribution of the Si/Fe, S/Fe, and Mg/Fe ratios as a function of radius and azimuth out to 1.4 Mpc (1.3 r200). Chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium due solely to core-collapse supernovae (SNcc) is excluded with very high significance; instead, the measured metal abundance ratios are generally consistent with the solar value. The uniform metal abundance ratios observed today are likely the result of an early phase of enrichment and mixing, with both SNcc and SNe Ia contributing to the metal budget during the period of peak star formation activity at redshifts of 2–3. Furthermore, we estimate the ratio between the number of SNe Ia and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 12% and 37%, broadly consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy or with the SN Ia contribution estimated for the cluster cores.

  13. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootaninia, Zahra

    2015-05-01

    This thesis presents a study of the radio luminosity function and the evolution of galaxies in the Abell 2256 cluster (z=0.058, richness class 2). Using the NED database and VLA deep data with an rms sensitivity of 18 mu Jy.beam--1, we identified 257 optical galaxies as members of A2256, of which 83 are radio galaxies. Since A2256 is undergoing a cluster-cluster merger, it is a good candidate to study the radio activity of galaxies in the cluster. We calculated the Univariate and Bivariate radio luminosity functions for A2256, and compared the results to studies on other clusters. We also used the SDSS parameter fracDev to roughly classify galaxies as spirals and ellipticals, and investigated the distribution and structure of galaxies in the cluster. We found that most of the radio galaxies in A2256 are faint, and are distributed towards the outskirts of the cluster. On the other hand, almost all very bright radio galaxies are ellipticals which are located at the center of the cluster. We also found there is an excess in the number of radio spiral galaxies in A2256 compared to the number of radio ellipticals, counting down to a radio luminosity of log(luminosity)=20.135 W/Hz..

  14. X-ray astrophysics: Constraining thermal conductivity in intracluster gas in clusters of galaxies and placing limits on progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Brock Richard

    X-ray astrophysics provides a great many opportunities to study astronomical structures with large energies or high temperatures. This dissertation will describe two such applications: the use of Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) data to analyze the interaction between a supernova shock and the circumstellar medium, and the use of a straightforward computer simulation to model the dynamics of intracluster gas in clusters of galaxies and constrain the thermal conduction coefficient. Stars emit stellar wind at varying rates throughout their lifetimes. This wind populates the circumstellar medium (CSM) with gas. When the supernova explodes, the shock wave propogates outward through this CSM and heats it to X-ray emitting temperatures. By analyzing X-ray observations of the immediate post-supernova environment, we are able to determine whether any significant CSM is present. By stacking a large number of Swift observations of SNe Ia, we increase the sensitivity. We find no X-rays, with an upper limit of 1.7 x 1038 erg s-1 and a 3 sigma upper limit on the mass loss rate of progenitor systems 1.1 x 10-6 solar masses per year x (vw)/(10 km s -1). This low upper limit precludes a massive progenitor as the binary companion in the supernova progenitor system, unless that star is in Roche lobe overflow. The hot Intracluster Medium (ICM) is composed of tenuous gas which is gravitationally-bound to the cluster of galaxies. This gas is not initially of uniform temperature, and experiences thermal conduction while maintaining hydrostatic equilibrium. However, magnetic field lines present in the ionized gas inhibit the full thermal conduction. In this dissertation, we present the results of a new one-dimensional simulation that models this conduction (and includes cooling while maintaining hydrostatic equilibrium). By comparing the results of this model with the observed gas temperature profiles and recent accurate constraints on the scatter of the gas fraction, we are able to constrain

  15. SHOCKING TAILS IN THE MAJOR MERGER ABELL 2744

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare 'jellyfish' galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging 'Bullet-like' subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  16. Shocking Tails in the Major Merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare "jellyfish" galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging "Bullet-like" subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  17. LensPerfect Analysis of Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan A.

    2007-12-01

    I present the first massmap to perfectly reproduce the position of every gravitationally-lensed multiply-imaged galaxy detected to date in ACS images of Abell 1689. This massmap was obtained using a powerful new technique made possible by a recent advance in the field of Mathematics. It is the highest resolution assumption-free Dark Matter massmap to date, with the resolution being limited only by the number of multiple images detected. We detect 8 new multiple image systems and identify multiple knots in individual galaxies to constrain a grand total of 168 knots within 135 multiple images of 42 galaxies. No assumptions are made about mass tracing light, and yet the brightest visible structures in A1689 are reproduced in our massmap, a few with intriguing positional offsets. Our massmap probes radii smaller than that resolvable in current Dark Matter simulations of galaxy clusters. And at these radii, we observe slight deviations from the NFW and Sersic profiles which describe simulated Dark Matter halos so well. While we have demonstrated that our method is able to recover a known input massmap (to limited resolution), further tests are necessary to determine the uncertainties of our mass profile and positions of massive subclumps. I compile the latest weak lensing data from ACS, Subaru, and CFHT, and attempt to fit a single profile, either NFW or Sersic, to both the observed weak and strong lensing. I confirm the finding of most previous authors, that no single profile fits extremely well to both simultaneously. Slight deviations are revealed, with the best fits slightly over-predicting the mass profile at both large and small radius. Our easy-to-use software, called LensPerfect, will be made available soon. This research was supported by the European Commission Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant 017288-BPZ and the PNAYA grant AYA2005-09413-C02.

  18. Combining Strong and Weak Gravitational Lensing in Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limousin, Marceau; Richard, Johan; Jullo, Eric; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Fort, Bernard; Soucail, Geneviève; Elíasdóttir, Árdís; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Ellis, Richard S.; Smail, Ian; Czoske, Oliver; Smith, Graham P.; Hudelot, Patrick; Bardeau, Sébastien; Ebeling, Harald; Egami, Eiichi; Knudsen, Kirsten K.

    2007-10-01

    We present a reconstruction of the mass distribution of galaxy cluster Abell 1689 at z=0.18 using detected strong lensing features from deep ACS observations and extensive ground based spectroscopy. Earlier analyses have reported up to 32 multiply imaged systems in this cluster, of which only 3 were spectroscopically confirmed. In this work, we present a parametric strong lensing mass reconstruction using 34 multiply imaged systems of which 24 have newly determined spectroscopic redshifts, which is a major step forward in building a robust mass model. In turn, the new spectroscopic data allows a more secure identification of multiply imaged systems. The resultant mass model enables us to reliably predict the redshifts of additional multiply imaged systems for which no spectra are currently available, and to use the location of these systems to further constrain the mass model. Using our strong lensing mass model, we predict on larger scale a shear signal which is consistent with that inferred from our large scale weak lensing analysis derived using CFH12K wide field images. Thanks to a new method for reliably selecting a well defined background lensed galaxy population, we resolve the discrepancy found between the NFW concentration parameters derived from earlier strong and weak lensing analysis. The derived parameters for the best fit NFW profile is found to be c200=7.6+/-1.6 and r200=2.16+/-0.10 h-170 Mpc (corresponding to a 3D mass equal to M200=[1.32+/-0.2]×1015 h70 Msolar). The large number of new constraints incorporated in this work makes Abell 1689 the most reliably reconstructed cluster to date. This well calibrated mass model, which we here make publicly available, will enable us to exploit Abell 1689 efficiently as a gravitational telescope, as well as to potentially constrain cosmology. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des

  19. Chandra Observations of Point Sources in Abell 2255

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David S.; Miller, Neal A.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    In our search for "hidden" AGN we present results from a Chandra observation of the nearby cluster Abell 2255. Eight cluster galaxies are associated with point-like X-ray emission, and we classify these galaxies based on their X-ray, radio, and optical properties. At least three are associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN) with no optical signatures of nuclear activity, with a further two being potential AGN. Of the potential AGN, one corresponds to a galaxy with a post-starburst optical spectrum. The remaining three X-ray detected cluster galaxies consist of two starbursts and an elliptical with luminous hot gas. Of the eight cluster galaxies five are associated with luminous (massive) galaxies and the remaining three lie in much lower luminosity systems. We note that the use of X-ray to optical flux ratios for classification of X-ray sources is often misleading, and strengthen the claim that the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting an AGN based on optical data is significantly lower than the fraction based on X-ray and radio data.

  20. An X-ray temperature map of Abell 754: A major merger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. Patrick; Briel, Ulrich G.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first two-dimensional X-ray temperature map of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 754. We also present an X-ray surface brightness map with improved spatial resolution and sensitivity compared with previous maps. Both the temperature map and the surface brightness map show that A754 is in the throes of a violent merger; it is probably far from hydrostatic equilibrium.

  1. Abel's Theorem Simplifies Reduction of Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We give an alternative to the standard method of reduction or order, in which one uses one solution of a homogeneous, linear, second order differential equation to find a second, linearly independent solution. Our method, based on Abel's Theorem, is shorter, less complex and extends to higher order equations.

  2. Photometric Observations of the Binary Nuclei of Three Abell Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afşar, M.; Ibanoǧlu, C.

    2004-07-01

    CCD photometric observations of the three Abell planetary nebulae (Abell 63, Abell 46 and Abell 41) nuclei are presented. These systems are binary systems which allow us to derive model-independent parameters. Also the results of the light curve solution of UU Sge (binary nucleus of Abell 63) are discussed.

  3. Black holes a-wandering in Abell 2261

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spolaor, Sarah; Ford, Holland; Gultekin, Kayhan; Lauer, Tod R.; Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Loeb, Abraham; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Postman, Marc; Taylor, Joanna M.

    2016-01-01

    The brightest cluster galaxy in Abell 2261 (BCG2261) has an exceptionally large, flat, and asymmetric core, thought to have been shaped by a binary supermassive black hole inspiral and subsequent gravitational recoil. BCG2261 should contain a 10^10 Msun black hole, but it lacks the central cusp that should mark such a massive black hole. Based on the presence of central radio emission, we have explored the core of this galaxy with HST and the VLA to identify the presence and location of the active nucleus in this galaxy's core. We present our exploration of whether this system in fact contains direct evidence of a recoiling binary supermassive black hole. A recoiling core in this system would represent a pointed observational test of three preeminent theoretical predictions: that scouring forms cores, that SMBHs may recoil after coalescence, and that recoil can strongly influence core formation and morphology.

  4. The galaxy population of Abell 1367: photometric and spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriwattanawong, W.; Moss, C.; James, P. A.; Carter, D.

    2011-03-01

    Aims: Photometric and spectroscopic observations of the galaxy population of the galaxy cluster Abell 1367 have been obtained, over a field of 34' × 90', covering the cluster centre out to a radius of ~2.2 Mpc. Optical broad- and narrow-band imaging was used to determine galaxy luminosities, diameters and morphologies, and to study current star formation activity of a sample of cluster galaxies. Near-infrared imaging was obtained to estimate integrated stellar masses, and to aid the determination of mean stellar ages and metallicities for the future investigation of the star formation history of those galaxies. Optical spectroscopic observations were also taken, to confirm cluster membership of galaxies in the sample through their recession velocities. Methods.U, B and R broad-band and Hα narrow-band imaging observations were carried out using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, covering the field described above. J and K near-infrared imaging was obtained using the Wide Field Camera (WFCAM) on the 3.8 m UK Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea, covering a somewhat smaller field of 0.75 square degrees on the cluster centre. The spectroscopic observations were carried out using a multifibre spectrograph (WYFFOS) on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telecope on La Palma, over the same field as the optical imaging observations. Results: Our photometric data give optical and near-infrared isophotal magnitudes for 303 galaxies in our survey regions, down to stated diameter and B-band magnitude limits, determined within R24 isophotal diameters. Our spectroscopic data of 328 objects provide 84 galaxies with detections of emission and/or absorption lines. Combining these with published spectroscopic data gives 126 galaxies within our sample for which recession velocities are known. Of these, 72 galaxies are confirmed as cluster members of Abell 1367, 11 of which are identified in this study and 61 are reported in the literature. Hα equivalent

  5. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Cooray, Asantha R.; Holzappel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect toward the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas distribution to be strongly aspherical, as do the X-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction in two ways. We first compare the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deprojecting the three-dimensional gas density distribution and deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods and find that they agree within the errors of the measurement. We discuss the possible system- atic errors in the gas mass fraction measurement and the constraints it places on the matter density parameter, Omega(sub M).

  6. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Holzapfel, William L.; Cooray, Asantha K.

    1999-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect towards the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas is strongly aspherical, on agreement with the morphology revealed by x-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction by comparing the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods. The Hubble constant derived for this cluster, when the known systematic uncertainties are included, has a very wide range of values and therefore does not provide additional constraints on the validity of the assumptions. We examine carefully the possible systematic errors in the gas fraction measurement. The gas fraction is a lower limit to the cluster's baryon fraction and so we compare the gas mass fraction, calibrated by numerical simulations to approximately the virial radius, to measurements of the global mass fraction of baryonic matter, OMEGA(sub B)/OMEGA(sub matter). Our lower limit to the cluster baryon fraction is f(sub B) = (0.043 +/- 0.014)/h (sub 100). From this, we derive an upper limit to the universal matter density, OMEGA(sub matter) <= 0.72/h(sub 100), and a likely value of OMEGA(sub matter) <= (0.44(sup 0.15, sub -0.12)/h(sub 100).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hα galaxies in Abell 1367 and Coma (Iglesias-Paramo+, 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Boselli, A.; Cortese, L.; Vilchez, J. M.; Gavazzi, G.

    2002-04-01

    We present a deep wide field Hα imaging survey of the central regions of the two nearby clusters of galaxies Coma and Abell 1367, taken with the WFC at the Prime Focus at the NT 2.5m telescope located at Observatorio de El Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma), on April 26th and 28th 2000. We determine for the first time the Schechter parameters of the Hα luminosity function (LF) of cluster galaxies. (2 data files).

  8. A shock at the radio relic position in Abell 115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botteon, A.; Gastaldello, F.; Brunetti, G.; Dallacasa, D.

    2016-07-01

    We analysed a deep Chandra observation (334 ks) of the galaxy cluster Abell 115 and detected a shock cospatial with the radio relic. The X-ray surface brightness profile across the shock region presents a discontinuity, corresponding to a density compression factor {C}=2.0± 0.1, leading to a Mach number {M}=1.7± 0.1 ({M}=1.4-2 including systematics). Temperatures measured in the upstream and downstream regions are consistent with what expected for such a shock: T_u=4.3^{+1.0}_{-0.6}{keV} and T_d=7.9^{+1.4}_{-1.1}{keV}, respectively, implying a Mach number {M}=1.8^{+0.5}_{-0.4}. So far, only few other shocks discovered in galaxy clusters are consistently detected from both density and temperature jumps. The spatial coincidence between this discontinuity and the radio relic edge strongly supports the view that shocks play a crucial role in powering these synchrotron sources. We suggest that the relic is originated by shock re-acceleration of relativistic electrons rather than acceleration from the thermal pool. The position and curvature of the shock and the associated relic are consistent with an off-axis merger with unequal mass ratio where the shock is expected to bend around the core of the less massive cluster.

  9. Abell 1201: A Minor Merger at Second Core Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Owers, Matt; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-06-01

    We present an analysis of the structures and dynamics of the merging cluster Abell 1201, which has two sloshing cold fronts around a cooling core, and an offset gas core approximately 500 kpc northwest of the center. New Chandra and XMM-Newton data reveal a region of enhanced brightness east of the offset core, with breaks in surface brightness along its boundary to the north and east. This is interpreted as a tail of gas stripped from the offset core. Gas in the offset core and the tail is distinguished from other gas at the same distance from the cluster center chiefly by having higher density, hence lower entropy. In addition, the offset core shows marginally lower temperature and metallicity than the surrounding area. The metallicity in the cool core is high and there is an abrupt drop in metallicity across the southern cold front. We interpret the observed properties of the system, including the placement of the cold fronts, the offset core, and its tail in terms of a simple merger scenario. The offset core is the remnant of a merging subcluster, which first passed pericenter southeast of the center of the primary cluster and is now close to its second pericenter passage, moving at ~= 1000 km s-1. Sloshing excited by the merger gave rise to the two cold fronts and the disposition of the cold fronts reveals that we view the merger from close to the plane of the orbit of the offset core.

  10. ABELL 1201: A MINOR MERGER AT SECOND CORE PASSAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Chengjiun; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Owers, Matt; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-06-20

    We present an analysis of the structures and dynamics of the merging cluster Abell 1201, which has two sloshing cold fronts around a cooling core, and an offset gas core approximately 500 kpc northwest of the center. New Chandra and XMM-Newton data reveal a region of enhanced brightness east of the offset core, with breaks in surface brightness along its boundary to the north and east. This is interpreted as a tail of gas stripped from the offset core. Gas in the offset core and the tail is distinguished from other gas at the same distance from the cluster center chiefly by having higher density, hence lower entropy. In addition, the offset core shows marginally lower temperature and metallicity than the surrounding area. The metallicity in the cool core is high and there is an abrupt drop in metallicity across the southern cold front. We interpret the observed properties of the system, including the placement of the cold fronts, the offset core, and its tail in terms of a simple merger scenario. The offset core is the remnant of a merging subcluster, which first passed pericenter southeast of the center of the primary cluster and is now close to its second pericenter passage, moving at {approx_equal} 1000 km s{sup -1}. Sloshing excited by the merger gave rise to the two cold fronts and the disposition of the cold fronts reveals that we view the merger from close to the plane of the orbit of the offset core.

  11. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Spectrum of Abell 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaRoque, S. J.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Reese, E. D.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Joy, M.; Grego, L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present an interferometric measurement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) at 1 cm for the galaxy cluster Abell 2163. We combine this data point with previous measurements at 1.1, 1.4, and 2.1 mm from the SuZIE experiment to construct the most complete SZE spectrum to date. The intensity in four wavelength bands is fit to determine the Compton y-parameter (y(sub 0)) and the peculiar velocity (v(sub p)) for this cluster. Our results are y(sub 0) = 3.56((sup +0.41+0.27)(sub -0.41-0.19)) X 10(exp -4) and v(sub p) = 410((sup +1030+460) (sub -850-440)) km s(exp -1) where we list statistical and systematic uncertainties, respectively, at 68% confidence. These results include corrections for contamination by Galactic dust emission. We find less contamination by dust emission than previously reported. The dust emission is distributed over much larger angular scales than the cluster signal and contributes little to the measured signal when the details of the SZE observing strategy are taken into account.

  12. Aspherical supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    2004-05-21

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3) And

  13. Aspherical supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must be undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new breakthroughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi- dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3) And

  14. GSFC Contributions to the NATO X-ray Astronomy Institute, Erice, July 1979. [X-ray spectra of supernova remants, galactic X-ray sources, active galactic nuclei, and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of X-ray astronomical spectroscopy in general is presented and results obtained by HEAO 1 and 2 as well as earlier spacecraft are examined. Particular emphasis is given to the spectra of supernova remnants; galactic binary X-ray sources, cataclysmic variables, bulges, pulsars, and stars; the active nuclei of Seyfert 1 galaxy, BL Lac, and quasars; the diffuse X-ray background; and galactic clusters.

  15. The Texas Supernova Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimby, Robert

    2006-12-01

    Supernovae (SNe) are popular tools to explore the cosmological expansion of the Universe owing to their bright peak magnitudes and reasonably high rates; however, even the relatively homogeneous Type Ia supernovae are not perfect standard candles intrinsically. Their absolute peak brightness must be established by corrections that have been largely empirical. Hundreds of SNe are now found every year, shrinking the statistical errors in the cosmological terms, but most of these distant discoveries do little to further the physical understanding of SNe, which may illuminate unknown systematics. This talk will describe recent results from the The Texas Supernova Search, a campaign designed to discover not the most SNe nor the most distant SNe, but instead to amass a small collection of well-observed nearby SNe with detailed, multi-epoch spectral observations beginning at the earliest possible phases. For the past two years, we have pointed ROTSE-IIIb's 1.85 x 1.85 degree field of view at nearby galaxy clusters and searched thousands of galaxies, covering hundreds of square degrees on the sky, for supernovae. With ToO time on the neighboring 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope, we have captured SNe spectra at some of the earliest phases ever. I will discuss the implications of these data on the physics of SNe explosions, including the propagation of the burning front and the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  16. Tauberian theorems for Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Enes; ćoşkun, Hüsamettin

    2015-09-01

    We give some conditions under which Abel summable sequences of fuzzy numbers are convergent. As corollaries we obtain the results given in [E. Yavuz, Ö. Talo, Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers, Soft computing 2014, doi: 10.1007/s00500-014-1563-7].

  17. Supernova Flashback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    The Cassiopeia A supernova's first flash of radiation makes six clumps of dust (circled in annotated version) unusually hot. The supernova remnant is the large white ball in the center. This infrared picture was taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

  18. Digging Deep in Pandora's Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakeslee, John P.; Alamo-Martinez, Karla; Toloba, Elisa; Barro, Guillermo; Peng, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    Abell 2744, the first and nearest (z=0.31) of the Hubble Frontier Fields, is extraordinarily rich in the number and variety of galaxies it contains. Nicknamed "Pandora's Cluster," it exhibits multiple peaks in the dark matter, X-ray, and galaxy density distributions, suggesting an ongoing collision of several massive clusters. The exceptional depth of the Hubble Frontier Field imaging now makes it possible to throw open Pandora's cluster and peer deep inside. To do this, we first model and remove the stellar light of the cluster galaxies; underneath we find not only distant background galaxies, but (like the Hope that lay at the bottom of Pandora's box) a large population of globular star clusters and compact cluster members within Abell 2744 itself. Our earlier work on the massive lensing cluster Abell 1689 (Alamo-Martinez et al. 2013) revealed the largest known population of globular clusters, with a spatial profile intermediate between the galaxy light and the dark matter. Abell 2744 is similarly massive, but far less regular in its density distribution; we examine what implications this has for the copious globular clusters coursing through its multiple cores.

  19. Alignments of the Dominant Galaxies in Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Todd M.; West, Michael J.; Bridges, Terry J.

    1999-07-01

    We have examined the orientations of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in poor MKW (Morgan, Kayser, and White) and AWM (Albert, White, and Morgan) clusters and find that, like their counterparts in richer Abell clusters, poor cluster BCGs exhibit a strong propensity to be aligned with the principal axes of their host clusters as well as the surrounding distribution of nearby (<=20 h-1 Mpc) Abell clusters. The processes responsible for dominant galaxy alignments are therefore independent of cluster richness. We argue that these alignments most likely arise from anisotropic infall of material into clusters along large-scale filaments.

  20. Major axis alignments of poor cluster dominant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, T.; West, M.; Bridges, T.

    1996-12-01

    The MKW and AWM poor clusters are very different environments from rich Abell clusters. We obtained images with the Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope of 21 brightest cluster members (BCM) of the MKW/AWM clusters and determined that the major axis of the BCMs exhibits alignments similar to those in rich cluster dominant galaxies. Specifically, the major axes of the poor cluster BCMs point to nearby (< 20 Mpc) Abell clusters. Using the Kolmolgorov-Smirnov test, we reject the hypothesis that the position angles are randomly distributed at the 97% confidence level. The processes responsible for dominant galaxy alignments are therefore independent of cluster richness.

  1. Data-driven approach to Type Ia supernovae: variable selection on the peak luminosity and clustering in visual analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Makoto; Kawabata, Koji S.; Ikeda, Shiro; Maeda, Keiichi; Wu, Hsiang-Yun; Watanabe, Kazuho; Takahashi, Shigeo; Fujishiro, Issei

    2016-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) have an almost uniform peak luminosity, so that they are used as “standard candle” to estimate distances to galaxies in cosmology. In this article, we introduce our two recent works on SNIa based on data-driven approach. The diversity in the peak luminosity of SNIa can be reduced by corrections in several variables. The color and decay rate have been used as the explanatory variables of the peak luminosity in past studies. However, it is proposed that their spectral data could give a better model of the peak luminosity. We use cross-validation in order to control the generalization error and a LASSO-type estimator in order to choose the set of variables. Using 78 samples and 276 candidates of variables, we confirm that the peak luminosity depends on the color and decay rate. Our analysis does not support adding any other variables in order to have a better generalization error. On the other hand, this analysis is based on the assumption that SNIa originate in a single population, while it is not trivial. Indeed, several sub-types possibly having different nature have been proposed. We used a visual analytics tool for the asymmetric biclustering method to find both a good set of variables and samples at the same time. Using 14 variables and 132 samples, we found that SNIa can be divided into two categories by the expansion velocity of ejecta. Those examples demonstrate that the data-driven approach is useful for high-dimensional large-volume data which becomes common in modern astronomy.

  2. Supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the /sup 56/Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: r' photometry of Abell 1367 and Coma (Iglesias-Paramo+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Boselli, A.; Gavazzi, G.; Cortese, L.; Vilchez, J. M.

    2002-11-01

    We provide the total r'-band galaxy counts corresponding to our observed fields of the clusters of galaxies Abell 1367 and Coma, as well as the r'-band background counts from Yasuda et al. (2001AJ....122.1104Y). We also provide some basic properties of the galaxies detected in our r'-band survey of the clusters of galaxies Abell 1367 and Coma: coordinates, r'-band magnitudes and surface brightness, position angles, recession velocities and ellipticities are provided. The observations were carried out with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) attached to the Prime Focus of the INT 2.5m located at Observatorio de El Roque de los Muchachos, on 26 and 28 April 2000, under photometric conditions, excepting the last half of the second night. (3 data files).

  4. Supernova Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knödlseder, J.

    This lecture gives an introduction to the topic of supernova nucleosynthesis which is at the origin of almost all nuclear species that we encounter in the Universe. It starts with an overview over the relevant nuclear physics, with some emphasise on nuclear stability and nuclear reactions. The central part of the lecture is devoted to the synthesis of new elements in the interiors of stars, either during their quiescent live or during their violent explosion as supernova. The different types of supernova explosions are exposed and their key nucleosynthesis products are summarised. The lecture closes with an overview over gamma-ray line diagnostics which provides a modern tool to study supernova nucleosynthesis by the measurement of freshly produced radioactive isotopes.

  5. A plethora of diffuse steep spectrum radio sources in Abell 2034 revealed by LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimwell, T. W.; Luckin, J.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Intema, H. T.; Owers, M. S.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Stroe, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; Cassano, R.; de Gasperin, F.; Heald, G. H.; Hoang, D. N.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Sridhar, S. S.; Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Bonafede, A.; Chyży, K. T.; Enßlin, T. A.; Ferrari, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; McKean, J. P.; Morabito, L. K.; Orrù, E.; Pizzo, R.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; White, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations, we have discovered a diverse assembly of steep spectrum emission that is apparently associated with the intracluster medium (ICM) of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2034. Such a rich variety of complex emission associated with the ICM has been observed in few other clusters. This not only indicates that Abell 2034 is a more interesting and complex system than previously thought but it also demonstrates the importance of sensitive and high-resolution, low-frequency observations. These observations can reveal emission from relativistic particles which have been accelerated to sufficient energy to produce observable emission or have had their high energy maintained by mechanisms in the ICM. The most prominent feature in our maps is a bright bulb of emission connected to two steep spectrum filamentary structures, the longest of which extends perpendicular to the merger axis for 0.5 Mpc across the south of the cluster. The origin of these objects is unclear, with no shock detected in the X-ray images and no obvious connection with cluster galaxies or AGNs. We also find that the X-ray bright region of the cluster coincides with a giant radio halo with an irregular morphology and a very steep spectrum. In addition, the cluster hosts up to three possible radio relics, which are misaligned with the cluster X-ray emission. Finally, we have identified multiple regions of emission with a very steep spectral index that seem to be associated with either tailed radio galaxies or a shock.

  6. COSMOLOGICAL-MODEL-INDEPENDENT TESTS FOR THE DISTANCE-DUALITY RELATION FROM GALAXY CLUSTERS AND TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengxiang; Yu Hongwei; Wu Puxun

    2011-03-01

    We perform a cosmological-model-independent test for the distance-duality (DD) relation {eta}(z) = D{sub L} (z)(1 + z){sup -2}/D{sub A} (z), where D{sub L} and D{sub A} are the luminosity distance and angular diameter distance, respectively, with a combination of observational data for D{sub L} taken from the latest Union2 SNe Ia and that for D{sub A} provided by two galaxy cluster samples compiled by De Filippis et al. and Bonamente et al. Two parameterizations for {eta}(z), i.e., {eta}(z) = 1 + {eta}{sub 0} z and {eta}(z) = 1 + {eta}{sub 0} z/(1 + z), are used. We find that the DD relation can be accommodated at 1{sigma} confidence level (CL) for the De Filippis et al. sample and at 3{sigma} CL for the Bonamente et al. sample. We also examine the DD relation by postulating two more general parameterizations: {eta}(z) = {eta}{sub 0} + {eta}{sub 1} z and {eta}(z) = {eta}{sub 0} + {eta}{sub 1} z/(1 + z), and find that the DD relation is compatible with the results from the De Filippis et al. and the Bonamente et al. samples at 1{sigma} and 2{sigma} CLs, respectively. Thus, we conclude that the DD relation is compatible with present observations.

  7. Two long H I tails in the outskirts of Abell 1367

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, T. C.; Cortese, L.; Brinks, E.; Bravo-Alfaro, H.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R.

    2012-01-01

    We present VLA D-array H I observations of the RSCG 42 and FGC 1287 galaxy groups, in the outskirts of the Abell 1367 cluster. These groups are projected ˜1.8 and 2.7 Mpc west from the cluster centre. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey provided evidence for H I extending over as much as 200 kpc in both groups. Our new, higher resolution observations reveal that the complex H I features detected by Arecibo are in reality two extraordinary long H I tails extending for ˜160 and 250 kpc, respectively, i.e. among the longest H I structures ever observed in groups of galaxies. Although in the case of RSCG 42 the morphology and dynamics of the H I tail, as well as the optical properties of the group members, support a low-velocity tidal interaction scenario, less clear is the origin of the unique features associated with FGC 1287. This galaxy displays an exceptionally long 'dog leg' H I tail, and the large distance from the X-ray-emitting region of Abell 1367 makes a ram-pressure stripping scenario highly unlikely. At the same time, a low-velocity tidal interaction seems unable to explain the extraordinary length of the tail and the lack of any sign of disturbance in the optical properties of FGC 1287. An intriguing possibility could be that this galaxy might have recently experienced a high-speed interaction with another member of the Coma-Abell 1367 Great Wall. We searched for the interloper responsible for this feature and, although we find a possible candidate, we show that without additional observations it is impossible to settle this issue. While the mechanism responsible for this extraordinary H I tail remains to be determined, our discovery highlights how little we know about environmental effects in galaxy groups.

  8. Crazy heart: kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, R.; Richtler, T.; West, M. J.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Lloyd-Davies, E.; Schuberth, Y.

    2011-04-01

    We study the structure and internal kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545 - a low surface brightness structure lying in the center of the cluster. We have obtained deep long-slit spectroscopy of the star pile using VLT/FORS2 and Gemini/GMOS, which is analyzed in conjunction with deep multiband CFHT/MEGACAM imaging. As presented in a previous study the star pile has a flat luminosity profile and its color is consistent with the outer parts of elliptical galaxies. Its velocity map is irregular, with parts being seemingly associated with an embedded nucleus, and others which have significant velocity offsets to the cluster systemic velocity with no clear kinematical connection to any of the surrounding galaxies. This would make the star pile a dynamically defined stellar intra-cluster component. The complicated pattern in velocity and velocity dispersions casts doubts on the adequacy of using the whole star pile as a dynamical test for the innermost dark matter profile of the cluster. This status is fulfilled only by the nucleus and its nearest surroundings which lie at the center of the cluster velocity distribution. Based on observations taken at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, under programme ID 080.B-0529. Also based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and SECYT (Argentina); and on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National

  9. Supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decourchelle, A.

    2016-06-01

    Supernova remnants result from the explosion of a star and keep trace, in their young ejecta-dominated phase, both of the explosion mechanism and to a lesser extent of the nature of the progenitor. They inject a large amount of energy into their surroundings, which impacts significantly the interstellar medium and to a larger extent the working of the galaxy by distributing heavy elements, heating to tens of million degrees large fractions of gas, accelerating high-energy particles, generating turbulence and amplification of the magnetic field. I will review the observational results on supernova remnants and their related scientific issues before suggesting directions for future ambitious XMM-Newton observations.

  10. Mass dependent galaxy transformation mechanisms in the complex environment of SuperGroup Abell 1882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Aparajita

    We present our data and results from panchromatic photometry and optical spectrometry of the nearest (extremely rich) filamentary large scale structure, SuperGroup Abell 1882. It is a precursor of a cluster and is an inevitable part of the narrative in the study of galaxy transformations. There has been strong empirical evidence over the past three decades that galaxy environment affects galaxy properties. Blue disky galaxies transform into red bulge-like galaxies as they traverse into the deeper recesses of a cluster. However, we have little insight into the story of galaxy evolution in the early stages of cluster formation. Besides, in relaxed clusters that have been studied extensively, several evolutionary mechanisms take effect on similar spatial and temporal scales, making it almost impossible to disentangle different local and global mechanisms. A SuperGroup on the other hand, has a shallower dark-matter potential. Here, the accreting galaxies are subjected to evolutionary mechanisms over larger time and spatial scales. This separates processes that are otherwise superimposed in rich cluster-filament interfaces. As has been found from cluster studies, galaxy color and morphology tie very strongly with local galaxy density even in a complex and nascent structure like Abell 1882. Our major results indicate that there is a strong dependence of galaxy transformations on the galaxy masses themselves. Mass- dependent evolutionary mechanisms affect galaxies at different spatial scales. The galaxy color also varies with radial projected distance from the assumed center of the structure for a constant local galaxy density, indicating the underlying large scale structure as a second order evolutionary driver. We have looked for clues to the types of mechanisms that might cause the transformations at various mass regimes. We have found the thoroughly quenched low mass galaxies confined to the groups, whereas there are evidences of intermediate-mass quenched galaxies

  11. Astronomical Resources: Supernovae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1987-01-01

    Contains a partially annotated, nontechnical bibliography of recent materials about supernovae, including some about the discovery of a supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Includes citations of general books and articles about supernovae, articles about Supernova 1987A, and a few science fiction stories using supernovae. (TW)

  12. The SAMI Pilot Survey: stellar kinematics of galaxies in Abell 85, 168 and 2399

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, L. M. R.; Scott, N.; Owers, M. S.; Croom, S. M.; Bekki, K.; Houghton, R. C. W.; van de Sande, J.; D'Eugenio, F.; Cecil, G. N.; Colless, M. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cortese, L.; Davies, R. L.; Jones, D. H.; Pracy, M.; Allen, J. T.; Bryant, J. J.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Richards, S.; Sharp, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present the SAMI Pilot Survey, consisting of integral field spectroscopy of 106 galaxies across three galaxy clusters, Abell 85, Abell 168 and Abell 2399. The galaxies were selected by absolute magnitude to have Mr < -20.25 mag. The survey, using the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI), comprises observations of galaxies of all morphological types with 75 per cent of the sample being early-type galaxies (ETGs) and 25 per cent being late-type galaxies (LTGs). Stellar velocity and velocity dispersion maps are derived for all 106 galaxies in the sample. The λR parameter, a proxy for the specific stellar angular momentum, is calculated for each galaxy in the sample. We find a trend between λR and galaxy concentration such that LTGs are less concentrated higher angular momentum systems, with the fast-rotating ETGs (FRs) more concentrated and lower in angular momentum. This suggests that some dynamical processes are involved in transforming LTGs to FRs, though a significant overlap between the λR distributions of these classes of galaxies implies that this is just one piece of a more complicated picture. We measure the kinematic misalignment angle, Ψ, for the ETGs in the sample, to probe the intrinsic shapes of the galaxies. We find the majority of FRs (83 per cent) to be aligned, consistent with them being oblate spheroids (i.e. discs). The slow rotating ETGs (SRs), on the other hand, are significantly more likely to show kinematic misalignment (only 38 per cent are aligned). This confirms previous results that SRs are likely to be mildly triaxial systems.

  13. The Filtered Abel Transform and Its Application in Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    Many non-intrusive combustion diagnosis methods generate line-of-sight projections of a flame field. To reconstruct the spatial field of the measured properties, these projections need to be deconvoluted. When the spatial field is axisymmetric, commonly used deconvolution method include the Abel transforms, the onion peeling method and the two-dimensional Fourier transform method and its derivatives such as the filtered back projection methods. This paper proposes a new approach for performing the Abel transform method is developed, which possesses the exactness of the Abel transform and the flexibility of incorporating various filters in the reconstruction process. The Abel transform is an exact method and the simplest among these commonly used methods. It is evinced in this paper that all the exact reconstruction methods for axisymmetric distributions must be equivalent to the Abel transform because of its uniqueness and exactness. Detailed proof is presented to show that the two dimensional Fourier methods when applied to axisymmetric cases is identical to the Abel transform. Discrepancies among various reconstruction method stem from the different approximations made to perform numerical calculations. An equation relating the spectrum of a set of projection date to that of the corresponding spatial distribution is obtained, which shows that the spectrum of the projection is equal to the Abel transform of the spectrum of the corresponding spatial distribution. From the equation, if either the projection or the distribution is bandwidth limited, the other is also bandwidth limited, and both have the same bandwidth. If the two are not bandwidth limited, the Abel transform has a bias against low wave number components in most practical cases. This explains why the Abel transform and all exact deconvolution methods are sensitive to high wave number noises. The filtered Abel transform is based on the fact that the Abel transform of filtered projection data is equal

  14. The Mass of Abell 1060 and AWM 7 from Spatially Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenstein, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1996-11-01

    Using X-ray temperature and surface brightness profiles of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) derived from ASCA (Astro-D) and ROSAT observations, we place constraints on the dark matter (DM) and baryon fraction distributions in the poor clusters Abell 1060 (A1060) and AWM 7. Although their total mass distributions are similar, AWM 7 has twice the baryon fraction of A1060 in the best-fit models. The functional form of the DM distribution is ill determined; however, mass models where the baryon fractions in A1060 and AWM 7 significantly overlap are excluded. Such variations in baryon fraction are not predicted by standard models and imply that some mechanism in addition to gravity plays a major role in organizing matter on cluster scales.

  15. The galaxy population of Abell 1367: the stellar mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhcine, M.; Kriwattanawong, W.; James, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    Using wide baseline broad-band photometry, we analyse the stellar population properties of a sample of 72 galaxies, spanning a wide range of stellar masses and morphological types, in the nearby spiral-rich and dynamically young galaxy cluster Abell 1367. The sample galaxies are distributed from the cluster centre out to approximately half the cluster Abell radius. The optical/near-infrared colours are compared with simple stellar population synthesis models from which the luminosity-weighted stellar population ages and metallicities are determined. The locus of the colours of elliptical galaxies traces a sequence of varying metallicity at a narrow range of luminosity-weighted stellar ages. Lenticular galaxies in the red sequence, however, exhibit a substantial spread of luminosity-weighted stellar metallicities and ages. For red-sequence lenticular galaxies and blue cloud galaxies, low-mass galaxies tend to be on average dominated by stellar populations of younger luminosity-weighted ages. Sample galaxies exhibit a strong correlation between integrated stellar mass and luminosity-weighted stellar metallicity. Galaxies with signs of morphological disturbance and ongoing star formation activity, tend to be underabundant with respect to passive galaxies in the red sequence of comparable stellar masses. We argue that this could be due to tidally driven gas flows towards the star-forming regions, carrying less enriched gas and diluting the pre-existing gas to produce younger stellar populations with lower metallicities than would be obtained prior to the interaction. Finally, we find no statistically significant evidence for changes in the luminosity-weighted ages and metallicities for either red-sequence or blue-cloud galaxies, at fixed stellar mass, with location within the cluster. We dedicate this work to the memory of our friend and colleague C. Moss who died suddenly recently.

  16. Revisiting Abell 2744: a powerful synergy of the GLASS spectroscopy and the HFF photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Borello Schmidt, Kasper; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-08-01

    We present new emission line identifications and improve the strong lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744 using the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) observations and the full depth of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging. We performed a blind and targeted search for emission lines in objects within the full field of view (FoV) of the GLASS prime pointings, including all the previously known multiple arc images. We report over 50 high quality spectroscopic redshifts, 4 of which are for the arc images. We also present an extensive analysis based on the HFF photometry, measuring the colors and photometric redshifts of all objects within the FoV, and comparing the spectroscopic and photometric results of the same ensemble of sources. In order to improve the lens model of Abell 2744, we develop a rigorous alogorithm to screen arc images, based on their colors and morphology, and selecting the most reliable ones to use. As a result, 21 systems (corresponding to 59 images) pass the screening process and are used to reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive mesh. The resulting total mass distribution is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data in a fashion very similar to the reduction of the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP) clusters, in order to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made publicly available in the standard HFF format.

  17. The Multiply Imaged Strongly Lensed Supernova Refsdal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In 1964, Sjur Refsdal first considered the possibility that the light from a background supernova could traverse multiple paths around a strong gravitational lens towards us. He showed that the arrival times of the supernova's light would depend on the cosmic expansion rate, as well as the distribution of matter in the lens. I will discuss the discovery of the first such multiply imaged supernova, which exploded behind the MACS J1149.6+2223 galaxy cluster. We have obtained Hubble Space Telescope grism and ground-based spectra of the four images of the supernova, which form an Einstein Cross configuration around an elliptical cluster member. These spectra as well as rest-frame optical light curves have allowed us to learn about the properties of the peculiar core-collapse supernova explosion, and contain information about the lenses' matter distribution as well as their stellar populations. A delayed image of the supernova is expected close to the galaxy cluster center as early as Fall 2015, and will serve as an unprecedented probe of the potential of a massive galaxy cluster.

  18. Supernova hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1981-11-01

    The physics as well as astrophysics of the supernova (SN) phenomenon are illustrated with the appropriate numbers. The explosion of a star, a supernova, occurs at the end of its evolution when the nuclear fuel in its core is almost, or completely, consumed. The star may explode due to a small residual thermonuclear detonation, type I SN, or it may collapse, type I and type II SN, leaving a neutron star remnant. The type I progenitor is thought to be an old accreting white dwarf, 1.4 interior mass, with a close companion star. A type II SN is thought to be a massive young star, 6 to 10 interior mass. The mechanism of explosion is still a challenge to model, being the most extreme conditions of matter and hydrodynamics that occur presently and excessively in the universe.

  19. The Dark Matter filament between Abell 222/223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Jörg P.; Werner, Norbert; Clowe, Douglas; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kitching, Tom; Miller, Lance; Simionescu, Aurora

    2016-10-01

    Weak lensing detections and measurements of filaments have been elusive for a long time. The reason is that the low density contrast of filaments generally pushes the weak lensing signal to unobservably low scales. To nevertheless map the dark matter in filaments exquisite data and unusual systems are necessary. SuprimeCam observations of the supercluster system Abell 222/223 provided the required combination of excellent seeing images and a fortuitous alignment of the filament with the line-of-sight. This boosted the lensing signal to a detectable level and led to the first weak lensing mass measurement of a large-scale structure filament. The filament connecting Abell 222 and Abell 223 is now the only one traced by the galaxy distribution, dark matter, and X-ray emission from the hottest phase of the warm-hot intergalactic medium. The combination of these data allows us to put the first constraints on the hot gas fraction in filaments.

  20. Measurement of the Elemental Abundances in Four Rich Clusters of Galaxies. I. Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushotzky, R.; Loewenstein, M.; Arnaud, K. A.; Tamura, T.; Fukazawa, Y.; Matsushita, K.; Kikuchi, K.; Hatsukade, I.

    1996-08-01

    The elemental abundances of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Ar, and Fe for four clusters of galaxies (Abell 496, 1060, 2199, and AWM 7) are determined from X-ray spectra derived from Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics performance verification phase observations. Since the gas in the outer parts of the cluster is optically thin and virtually isothermal, the abundance analysis is very straightforward compared to the analysis of stellar or H II region spectra. We find that the abundance ratios of all four clusters are very similar. The mean abundances of O, Ne, Si, S, and Fe are 0.48, 0.62, 0.65, 0.25, and 0.32, respectively, relative to solar. The abundances of Si, S, and Fe are unaffected by the uncertainties in the atomic physics of the Fe L shell. The abundances of Ne and Mg and to a lesser extent O are affected by the present uncertainties in Fe L physics and are thus somewhat more uncertain. The Fe abundances derived from the Fe L lines agree well with those derived from the Fe K lines for these clusters. The observed ratio of the relative abundance of elements is consistent with an origin of all the metals in Type II supernovae. The presence of large numbers of Type II supernovae during the early stages of evolution of cluster galaxies is a very strong constraint on all models of galaxy and chemical evolution and implies either a very flat initial mass function or bimodal star formation during the period when most of the metals were created.

  1. Detailed modeling of cluster galaxies in free-form lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The main goal of the Frontier Fields is to characterize the population of high redshift galaxies that are gravitationally lensed and magnified by foreground massive galaxy clusters. The magnification received by lensed images has to be accurately quantified in order to derive the correct science results. The magnification is in turn computed from lens models, which are constructed from various constraints, most commonly the positions and redshifts of multiply-lensed galaxies.The locations and magnification of multiple images that appear near cluster galaxies are very sensitive to the mass distribution of those individual galaxies. In current free-form lens models, they are at best crudely approximated by arbitrary mass halos and are usually being completely neglected. Given sufficient free parameters and iterations, such models may be highly consistent but their predictive power would be rather limited. This shortcoming is particularly pronounced in light of the recent discovery of the first multiply-lensed supernova in the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ1149. The proximity of its images to cluster galaxies mandates detailed modeling on galaxy-scales, where free-form methods solely based on grid solutions simply fail.We present a hybrid free-form lens model of Abell 2744, which for the first time incorporates a detailed mass component modeled by GALFIT that accurately captures the stellar light distribution of the hundred brightest cluster galaxies. The model better reproduces the image positions than a previous version, which modeled cluster galaxies with simplistic NFW halos. Curiously, this improvement is found in all but system 2, which has two radial images appearing around the BCG. Despite its complex light profile is being captured by GALFIT, the persistent discrepancies suggest considering mass distributions that may be largely offset from the stellar light distribution.

  2. On VI Observations of Galaxy Clusters: Evidence for Modest Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Fabian, A. C.; Miller, Eric D.; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2006-05-01

    A prediction of the galaxy-cluster cooling flow model is that as gas cools from the ambient cluster temperature, emission lines are produced in gas at subsequently decreasing temperatures. Gas passing through 105.5 K emits in the lines of O VI λλ1032, 1035, and here we report a FUSE study of these lines in three cooling flow clusters, Abell 426, Abell 1795, and AWM 7. No emission was detected from AWM 7, but O VI is detected from the centers of Abell 426 and Abell 1795, and possibly to the south of the center in Abell 1795, where X-ray and optical emission line filaments lie. In Abell 426 these line luminosities imply a cooling rate of 32+/-6 Msolar yr-1 within the central r=6.2 kpc region, while for Abell 1795 the central cooling rate is 26+/-7 Msolar yr-1 (within r=22 kpc), and about 42+/-9 Msolar yr-1 including the southern pointing. Including other studies, three of six clusters have O VI emission, and they also have star formation as well as emission lines from 104 K gas. These observations are generally consistent with the cooling flow model, but at a rate closer to 30 Msolar yr-1 than to the originally suggested values of 102-10 3 Msolar yr-1.

  3. A HIGH FIDELITY SAMPLE OF COLD FRONT CLUSTERS FROM THE CHANDRA ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Markevitch, Maxim; Couch, Warrick J.

    2009-10-20

    This paper presents a sample of 'cold front' clusters selected from the Chandra archive. The clusters are selected based purely on the existence of surface brightness edges in their Chandra images which are modeled as density jumps. A combination of the derived density and temperature jumps across the fronts is used to select nine robust examples of cold front clusters: 1ES0657 - 558, Abell 1201, Abell 1758N, MS1455.0+2232, Abell 2069, Abell 2142, Abell 2163, RXJ1720.1+2638, and Abell 3667. This sample is the subject of an ongoing study aimed at relating cold fronts to cluster merger activity, and understanding how the merging environment affects the cluster constituents. Here, temperature maps are presented along with the Chandra X-ray images. A dichotomy is found in the sample in that there exists a subsample of cold front clusters which are clearly mergers based on their X-ray morphologies, and a second subsample of clusters which harbor cold fronts, but have surprisingly relaxed X-ray morphologies, and minimal evidence for merger activity at other wavelengths. For this second subsample, the existence of a cold front provides the sole evidence for merger activity at X-ray wavelengths. We discuss how cold fronts can provide additional information which may be used to constrain merger histories, and also the possibility of using cold fronts to distinguish major and minor mergers.

  4. Peculiar velocities of cD galaxies - MX spectroscopy of Abell 1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Hintzen, Paul; Oegerle, W. R.; Romanishin, W.; Lesser, M. P.; Eisenhamer, J. D.; Batuski, D. J.

    1988-09-01

    Spectroscopic observations of galaxies in the Abell 1795 field have been obtained using the MX multiple-object spectrograph on the Steward Observatory 2.3 m telescope. Redshifts are presented for 46 galaxies, including 41 cluster members. It is found that the A1795 cD galaxy is not at rest in the cluster gravitational potential well; it has a peculiar radial velocity, cz, of 365 km/s, and the hypothesis that the mean cluster velocity is as large as the cD's velocity can be rejected at the 99.5 percent confidence level. This conclusion is supported by spectroscopic data for the 'cooling flow' gas found in the central region of the cluster; this gas, except for the portion coincident with the cD nucleus, lies at the velocity derived for the cluster mean. It is suggested that current models of the formation of cD galaxies are unlikely to account for the large peculiar velocities of the cD galaxies in A1795 and A2670 unless substantial subclustering is still present. However, the available data show no evidence for velocity subclustering in either A1795 or A2670.

  5. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING BY THE SUPER-MASSIVE cD GALAXY IN ABELL 3827

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, E. R.; Gomez, P. L.; Lee, H.; Diaz, R.; Bergmann, M.; Turner, J. E. H.; Miller, B. W.; West, M. J.; Verdugo, T.

    2010-06-01

    We have discovered strong gravitational lensing features in the core of the nearby cluster Abell 3827 by analyzing Gemini South GMOS images. The most prominent strong lensing feature is a highly magnified, ring-shaped configuration of four images around the central cD galaxy. GMOS spectroscopic analysis puts this source at z {approx} 0.2. Located {approx}20'' away from the central galaxy is a secondary tangential arc feature which has been identified as a background galaxy with z {approx} 0.4. We have modeled the gravitational potential of the cluster core, taking into account the mass from the cluster, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and other galaxies. We derive a total mass of (2.7 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 13} M {sub sun} within 37 h {sup -1} kpc. This mass is an order of magnitude larger than that derived from X-ray observations. The total mass derived from lensing data suggests that the BCG in this cluster is perhaps the most massive galaxy in the nearby universe.

  6. Retrieval Performance and Indexing Differences in ABELL and MLAIB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Vince

    2012-01-01

    Searches for 117 British authors are compared in the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (ABELL) and the Modern Language Association International Bibliography (MLAIB). Authors are organized by period and genre within the early modern era. The number of records for each author was subdivided by format, language of publication,…

  7. Reconstructing the projected gravitational potential of Abell 1689 from X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernin, Céline; Majer, Charles L.; Meyer, Sven; Sarli, Eleonora; Eckert, Dominique; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters can be used as cosmological probes, but to this end, they need to be thoroughly understood. Combining all cluster observables in a consistent way will help us to understand their global properties and their internal structure. Aims: We provide proof of the concept that the projected gravitational potential of galaxy clusters can directly be reconstructed from X-ray observations. We also show that this joint analysis can be used to locally test the validity of the equilibrium assumptions in galaxy clusters. Methods: We used a newly developed reconstruction method, based on Richardson-Lucy deprojection, that allows reconstructing projected gravitational potentials of galaxy clusters directly from X-ray observations. We applied this algorithm to the well-studied cluster Abell 1689 and compared the gravitational potential reconstructed from X-ray observables to the potential obtained from gravitational lensing measurements. We also compared the X-ray deprojected profiles obtained by the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm with the findings from the more conventional onion-peeling technique. Results: Assuming spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium, the potentials recovered from gravitational lensing and from X-ray emission agree very well beyond 500 kpc. Owing to the fact that the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm allows deprojecting each line of sight independently, this result may indicate that non-gravitational effects and/or asphericity are strong in the central regions of the clusters. Conclusions: We demonstrate the robustness of the potential reconstruction method based on the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm and show that gravitational lensing and X-ray emission lead to consistent gravitational potentials. Our results illustrate the power of combining galaxy-cluster observables in a single, non-parametric, joint reconstruction of consistent cluster potentials that can be used to locally constrain the physical state

  8. ULTRA DEEP AKARI OBSERVATIONS OF ABELL 2218: RESOLVING THE 15 {mu}m EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, R.; Serjeant, S.; Negrello, M.; Pearson, C.; Egami, E.; Im, M.; Ko, J.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, M. G.; Kneib, J.-P.; Matsuhara, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Takagi, T.; Smail, I.

    2010-06-10

    We present extragalactic number counts and a lower limit estimate for the cosmic infrared background (CIRB) at 15 {mu}m from AKARI ultra deep mapping of the gravitational lensing cluster Abell 2218. These data are the deepest taken by any facility at this wavelength and uniquely sample the normal galaxy population. We have de-blended our sources, to resolve photometric confusion, and de-lensed our photometry to probe beyond AKARI's blank-field sensitivity. We estimate a de-blended 5{sigma} sensitivity of 28.7 {mu}Jy. The resulting 15 {mu}m galaxy number counts are a factor of 3 fainter than previous results, extending to a depth of {approx} 0.01 mJy and providing a stronger lower limit constraint on the CIRB at 15 {mu}m of 1.9 {+-} 0.5 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1}.

  9. Disentangling the ICL with the CHEFs: Abell 2744 as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Dupke, R.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of the intracluster light (ICL) are still prone to methodological ambiguities, and there are multiple techniques in the literature to address them, mostly based on the binding energy, the local density distribution, or the surface brightness. A common issue with these methods is the a priori assumption of a number of hypotheses on either the ICL morphology, its surface brightness level, or some properties of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). The discrepancy in the results is high, and numerical simulations just place a boundary on the ICL fraction in present-day galaxy clusters in the range 10%-50%. We developed a new algorithm based on the Chebyshev-Fourier functions to estimate the ICL fraction without relying on any a priori assumption about the physical or geometrical characteristics of the ICL. We are able to not only disentangle the ICL from the galactic luminosity but mark out the limits of the BCG from the ICL in a natural way. We test our technique with the recently released data of the cluster Abell 2744, observed by the Frontier Fields program. The complexity of this multiple merging cluster system and the formidable depth of these images make it a challenging test case to prove the efficiency of our algorithm. We found a final ICL fraction of 19.17 ± 2.87%, which is very consistent with numerical simulations.

  10. Detecting thermal neutrinos from supernovae with DUMAND

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, C.; Roos, C.E.; Webster, M.S.

    1988-06-01

    The Deep Underwater Muon and Neutrino Detector (DUMAND) could be made sensitive to the thermal (about 10-MeV) neutrinos from a supernova, as well as the TeV neutrinos for which it was originally designed, by clustering the photomultiplier tubes used to detect the Cerenkov light produced by neutrino interactions into nodes of four tubes. Requiring coincident counts from three or four of the tubes at a node would reduce the background from bioluminescence enough to allow the detection of the neutrinos from a supernova. A modified DUMAND using quadruple coincidence would have detected roughly eight neutrinos from SN 1987A and would detect about 280 neutrinos from a Galactic supernova at a distance of 9 kpc. Triple coincidence could be used with a Galactic supernova and would detect about 1500 neutrinos. 26 references.

  11. Supernova neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, K.

    2015-07-15

    In this presentation I summarize the main detection channels for neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae, and describe current status of and future prospects for supernova-neutrino-sensitive detectors worldwide.

  12. Supernova frequency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the frequency of type I and II supernovae occurring in galaxies of different types are derived from observational material acquired by the supernova patrol of the Shternberg Astronomical Institute.

  13. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics

    PubMed Central

    Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the “core team”, facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  14. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    PubMed

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination.

  15. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    PubMed

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  16. SPECTRAL INDEX STUDIES OF THE DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN ABELL 2256: IMPLICATIONS FOR MERGER ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S. E-mail: dwaraka@rri.res.i

    2010-08-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the merging rich cluster of galaxies, Abell 2256 (A2256). We have observed A2256 at 150 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and successfully detected the diffuse radio halo and the relic emission over a {approx}1.2 Mpc{sup 2} extent. Using this 150 MHz image and the images made using archival observations from the Very Large Array (VLA; 1369 MHz) and the Westerbrok Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT; 330 MHz), we have produced spectral index images of the diffuse radio emission in A2256. These spectral index images show a distribution of flat spectral index (S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup {alpha}}, {alpha} in the range -0.7 to -0.9) plasma in the region NW of the cluster center. Regions showing steep spectral indices ({alpha} in the range -1.0 to -2.3) are toward the SE of the cluster center. These spectral indices indicate synchrotron lifetimes for the relativistic plasmas in the range 0.08-0.4 Gyr. We interpret this spectral behavior as resulting from a merger event along the direction SE to NW within the last 0.5 Gyr or so. A shock may be responsible for the NW relic in A2256 and the megaparsec scale radio halo toward the SE is likely to be generated by the turbulence injected by mergers. Furthermore, the diffuse radio emission shows spectral steepening toward lower frequencies. This low-frequency spectral steepening is consistent with a combination of spectra from two populations of relativistic electrons created at two epochs (two mergers) within the last {approx}0.5 Gyr. Earlier interpretations of the X-ray and the optical data also suggested that there were two mergers in Abell 2256 in the last 0.5 Gyr, consistent with the current findings. Also highlighted in this study is the futility of correlating the average temperatures of thermal gas and the average spectral indices of diffuse radio emission in the respective clusters.

  17. DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN ABELL 754

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S. E-mail: dwaraka@rri.res.in

    2009-07-10

    We present a low-frequency study of the diffuse radio emission in the galaxy cluster A754. We present a new 150 MHz image of the galaxy cluster A754 made with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and discuss the detection of four diffuse features. We compare the 150 MHz image with the images at 74, 330, and 1363 MHz; one new diffuse feature is detected. The flux density upper limits at 330 and 1363 MHz imply a synchrotron spectral index, {alpha}>2 (S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup -{alpha}}), for the new feature. The 'west relic' detected at 74 MHz is not detected at 150 MHz and is thus consistent with its nondetection at 1363 MHz and 330 MHz. Integrated spectra of all the diffuse features are presented. The fourth diffuse feature is located along the proposed merger axis in A754 and 0.7 Mpc away from the peak of X-ray emission; we refer to it as a relic. We have made use of the framework of the adiabatic compression model to obtain spectra. We show that the spectrum of the fourth diffuse feature is consistent with that of a cocoon of a radio galaxy lurking for about 9 x 10{sup 7} yr; no shock compression is required. The other three diffuse emission have spectra steeper than 1.5 and could be cocoons lurking for longer time. We discuss other possibilities such as shocks and turbulent reacceleration being responsible for the diffuse emission in A754.

  18. Structure and Formation of cD Galaxies: NGC 6166 in ABELL 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Ralf; Kormendy, John; Cornell, Mark E.; Fisher, David B.

    2015-07-01

     Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy is used to measure the velocity dispersion profile of the nearest prototypical cD galaxy, NGC 6166 in the cluster Abell 2199. We also present composite surface photometry from many telescopes. We confirm the defining feature of a cD galaxy; i.e., (we suggest), a halo of stars that fills the cluster center and that is controlled dynamically by cluster gravity, not by the central galaxy. Our HET spectroscopy shows that the velocity dispersion of NGC 6166 rises from σ ≃ 300 km s-1 in the inner r˜ 10\\prime\\prime to σ =865+/- 58 km s-1 at r ˜ 100″ in the cD halo. This extends published observations of an outward σ increase and shows for the first time that σ rises all the way to the cluster velocity dispersion of 819 ± 32 km s-1. We also observe that the main body of NGC 6166 moves at +206 ± 39 km s-1 with respect to the cluster mean velocity, but the velocity of the inner cD halo is ˜70 km s-1 closer to the cluster velocity. These results support our picture that cD halos consist of stars that were stripped from individual cluster galaxies by fast tidal encounters.  However, our photometry does not confirm the widespread view that cD halos are identifiable as an extra, low-surface-brightness component that is photometrically distinct from the inner, steep-Sérsic-function main body of an otherwise-normal giant elliptical galaxy. Instead, all of the brightness profile of NGC 6166 outside its core is described to ±0.037 V mag arcsec-2 by a single Sérsic function with index n≃ 8.3. The cD halo is not recognizable from photometry alone. This blurs the distinction between cluster-dominated cD halos and the similarly-large-Sérsic-index halos of giant, core-boxy-nonrotating ellipticals. These halos are believed to be accreted onto compact, high-redshift progenitors (“red nuggets”) by large numbers of minor mergers. They belong dynamically to their central galaxies. Still, cDs and core-boxy-nonrotating Es

  19. A Census of Star Formation and Active Galactic Nuclei Populations in Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Logan H.; Atlee, David Wesley

    2016-01-01

    A recent survey of low-z galaxy clusters observed a disjunction between X-ray and mid-infrared selected populations of active galactic nuclei (X-ray and IR AGNs) (Atlee+ 2011, ApJ 729, 22.). Here we present an analysis of near-infrared spectroscopic data of star-forming galaxies in cluster Abell 1689 in order to confirm the identity of some of their IR AGN and to provide a check on their reported star formation rates. Our sample consists of 24 objects in Abell 1689. H and K band spectroscopic observations of target objects and standard stars were obtained by David Atlee between 2010 May 17 and 2011 June 6 using the Large Binocular Telescope's LUCI instrument. After undergoing initial reductions, standard stars were corrected for telluric absorption using TelFit (Gullikson+ 2014, AJ, 158, 53). Raw detector counts were converted to physical units using the wavelength-dependent response of the grating and the star's reported H and K band magnitudes to produce conversion factors that fully correct for instrumental effects. Target spectra were flux-calibrated using the airmass-corrected transmission profiles produced by TelFit and the associated H band conversion factor (or the average of the two factors, for nights with two standard stars). Star formation rates were calculated using the SFR-L(Ha) relation reported in Kennicutt (1998), with the measured luminosity of the Pa-a emission line at the luminosity distance of the cluster used as a proxy for L(Ha) (Kennicutt 1998, ARA&A 36, 189; Hummer & Stoney 1987, MNRAS 346, 1055). The line ratios H2 2.121 mm/Brg and [FeII]/Pab were used to classify targets as starburst galaxies, AGNs, or LINERs (Rodriguez-Ardila+ 2005, MNRAS, 364, 1041). Jones was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  20. Properties of unusually luminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tony Shih Arng

    This thesis is a theoretical study of the progenitors, event rates, and observational properties of unusually luminous supernova (SN), and aims to identify promising directions for future observations. In Chapter 2, we present model light curves and spectra of pair-instability supernovae (PISNe) over a range of progenitor masses and envelope structures for Pop III stars. We calculate the rates and detectability of PISNe, core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and Type Ia SNe at the Epoch of Reionization with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which can be used to determine the contribution of Pop III versus Pop II stars toward ionizing the universe. Although CCSNe are the least intrinsically luminous supernovae, Chapter 5 shows that a JWST survey targeting known galaxy clusters with Einstein radii > 35" should discover gravitationally lensed CCSNe at redshifts exceeding z = 7--8. In Chapter 3, we explain the Pop II/I progenitors of observed PISNe in the local universe can be created via mergers in runaway collisions in young, dense star clusters, despite copious mass loss via line-driven winds. The PISN rate from this mechanism is consistent with the observed volumetric rate, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope could discover ~102 such PISNe per year. In Chapter 4, we identify 10 star clusters which may host PISN progenitors with masses up to 600 solar masses formed via runaway collisions. We estimate the probabilities of these very massive stars being in eclipsing binaries to be ≳ 30%, and find that their transits can be detected even under the contamination of the background cluster light, due to mean transit depths of ~10 6 solar luminosities. In Chapter 6, we show that there could be X-ray analogues of optically super-luminous SNe that are powered by the conversion of the kinetic energy of SN ejecta into radiation upon its collision with a dense but optically-thin circumstellar shell. We find shell configurations that can convert a large fraction of the SN

  1. Supernovae and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbergh, S.

    1994-01-01

    Shklovsky and others have suggested that some of the major extinctions in the geological record might have been triggered by explosions of nearby supernovae. The frequency of such extinction events will depend on the galactic supernova frequency and on the distance up to which a supernova explosion will produce lethal effects upon terrestrial life. In the present note it will be assumed that a killer supernova has to occur so close to Earth that it will be embedded in a young, active, supernova remnant. Such young remnants typically have radii approximately less than 3 pc (1 x 10(exp 19) cm). Larger (more pessimistic?) killer radii have been adopted by Ruderman, Romig, and by Ellis and Schramm. From observations of historical supernovae, van den Bergh finds that core-collapse (types Ib and II) supernovae occur within 4 kpc of the Sun at a rate of 0.2 plus or minus 0.1 per century. Adopting a layer thickness of 0.3 kpc for the galacitc disk, this corresponds to a rate of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp -4) supernovae pc(exp -3) g.y.(exp -1). Including supernovae of type Ia will increase the total supernovae rate to approximately 1.5 x 10(exp -4) supernovae pc(exp -3) g.y.(exp -1). For a lethal radius of R pc the rate of killer events will therefore be 1.7 (R/3)(exp 3) x 10(exp -2) supernovae per g.y. However, a frequency of a few extinctions per g.y. is required to account for the extinctions observed during the phanerozoic. With R (extinction) approximately 3 pc, the galactic supernova frequency is therefore too low by 2 orders of magnitude to account for the major extinctions in the geological record.

  2. Bayesian Abel Inversion in Quantitative X-Ray Radiography

    DOE PAGES

    Howard, Marylesa; Fowler, Michael; Luttman, Aaron; Mitchell, Stephen E.; Hock, Margaret C.

    2016-05-19

    A common image formation process in high-energy X-ray radiography is to have a pulsed power source that emits X-rays through a scene, a scintillator that absorbs X-rays and uoresces in the visible spectrum in response to the absorbed photons, and a CCD camera that images the visible light emitted from the scintillator. The intensity image is related to areal density, and, for an object that is radially symmetric about a central axis, the Abel transform then gives the object's volumetric density. Two of the primary drawbacks to classical variational methods for Abel inversion are their sensitivity to the type andmore » scale of regularization chosen and the lack of natural methods for quantifying the uncertainties associated with the reconstructions. In this work we cast the Abel inversion problem within a statistical framework in order to compute volumetric object densities from X-ray radiographs and to quantify uncertainties in the reconstruction. A hierarchical Bayesian model is developed with a likelihood based on a Gaussian noise model and with priors placed on the unknown density pro le, the data precision matrix, and two scale parameters. This allows the data to drive the localization of features in the reconstruction and results in a joint posterior distribution for the unknown density pro le, the prior parameters, and the spatial structure of the precision matrix. Results of the density reconstructions and pointwise uncertainty estimates are presented for both synthetic signals and real data from a U.S. Department of Energy X-ray imaging facility.« less

  3. Red population of Abell 1314 : A rest-frame narrowband photometric evolutionary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, Yuvraj Harsha

    2014-06-01

    Red sequence galaxies form with an intense burst of star formation in the early universe to evolve passively into massive, metal rich, old galaxies at z ˜ 0. But Abell 1314 (z=0.034) is found to host almost all red sequence galaxy members - identified using the mz index, classified using the Principle Component Analysis technique and SDSS colour correlations - some of which show properties of low-mass, star forming, and metal rich galaxies. The variably spread Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) near the core forms a vital part in influencing the evolution of these members. To study their evolution, I correlated different parameters of the rest-frame narrowband photometry and the derived luminosity-weighted mean Single Stellar Population model ages and metallicities. The study finds the member galaxies evolve differently in three different sections of the cluster: 1. the region of ≤ 200 kpc hosts passively evolving old, massive systems which accumulate mass by dry, minor mergers, 2. the zone between 200-500 kpc shows stripped systems (or in the process of being gas stripped) by ram pressure with moderate star formation history, 3. the outer regions (≥ 500 kpc) show low-mass red objects with blue, star forming Butcher-Oemler galaxy like colours. This sort of environmental condition is known to harbour hybrid systems, like, the pseudo bulges, blue sequence E/S0 and Butcher-Oemler like satellite cluster galaxies. Overall, the cluster is found to be poor, quiescent with galaxies to have formed by the monolithic structure formation in the early universe and are now evolving with mergers and gas stripping processes by ram pressure.

  4. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  5. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Métayer, Olivier; Saurel, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOS named "Noble Abel stiffened gas," this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular "Stiffened Gas (SG)" EOS. It is a combination of the so-called "Noble-Abel" and "stiffened gas" equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.

  6. Order preserving contact transformations and dynamical symmetries of scalar and coupled Riccati and Abel chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin Pradeep, R.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Mohanasubha, R.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-07-01

    We identify contact transformations which linearize the given equations in the Riccati and Abel chains of nonlinear scalar and coupled ordinary differential equations to the same order. The identified contact transformations are not of Cole-Hopf type and are new to the literature. The linearization of Abel chain of equations is also demonstrated explicitly for the first time. The contact transformations can be utilized to derive dynamical symmetries of the associated nonlinear ODEs. The wider applicability of identifying this type of contact transformations and the method of deriving dynamical symmetries by using them is illustrated through two dimensional generalizations of the Riccati and Abel chains as well.

  7. VLBA Reveals Dust-Enshrouded "Supernova Factory"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    Using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope, astronomers have discovered a newly-exploded star, or supernova, hidden deep in a dust-enshrouded "supernova factory" in a galaxy some 140 million light-years from Earth. "This supernova is likely to be part of a group of super star clusters that produce one such stellar explosion every two years," said James Ulvestad, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. "We're extremely excited by the tremendous insights into star formation and the early Universe that we may gain by observing this 'supernova factory,'" he added. Ulvestad worked with Susan Neff of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, and Stacy Teng, a graduate student at the University of Maryland, on the project. The scientists presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Nashville, TN. "These super star clusters likely are forming in much the same way that globular clusters formed in the early Universe, and thus provide us with a unique opportunity to learn about how some of the first stars formed billions of years ago," Neff said. The cluster is in an object called Arp 299, a pair of colliding galaxies, where regions of vigorous star formation have been found in past observations. Since 1990, four other supernova explosions have been seen optically in Arp 299. Observations with the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) earlier showed a region near the nucleus of one of the colliding galaxies which had all the earmarks of prolific star formation. The astronomers focused on this region, prosaically dubbed "Source A," with the VLBA and the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in 2002, and found four objects in this dusty cloud that are likely young supernova remnants. When they observed the region again in February 2003, there was a new, fifth, object located only 7 light-years from one of the previously detected objects. More observations on April 30-May

  8. HUBBLE PINPOINTS DISTANT SUPERNOVAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These Hubble Space Telescope images pinpoint three distant supernovae, which exploded and died billions of years ago. Scientists are using these faraway light sources to estimate if the universe was expanding at a faster rate long ago and is now slowing down. Images of SN 1997cj are in the left hand column; SN 1997ce, in the middle; and SN 1997ck, on the right. All images were taken by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The top row of images are wider views of the supernovae. The supernovae were discovered in April 1997 in a ground-based survey at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Once the supernovae were discovered, the Hubble telescope was used to distinguish the supernovae from the light of their host galaxies. A series of Hubble telescope images were taken in May and June 1997 as the supernovae faded. Six Hubble telescope observations spanning five weeks were taken for each supernova. This time series enabled scientists to measure the brightness and create a light curve. Scientists then used the light curve to make an accurate estimate of the distances to the supernovae. Scientists combined the estimated distance with the measured velocity of the supernova's host galaxy to determine the expansion rate of the universe in the past (5 to 7 billion years ago) and compare it with the current rate. These supernovae belong to a class called Type Ia, which are considered reliable distance indicators. Looking at great distances also means looking back in time because of the finite velocity of light. SN 1997ck exploded when the universe was half its present age. It is the most distant supernova ever discovered (at a redshift of 0.97), erupting 7.7 billion years ago. The two other supernovae exploded about 5 billion years ago. SN 1997ce has a redshift of 0.44; SN 1997cj, 0.50. SN 1997ck is in the constellation Hercules, SN 1997ce is in Lynx, just north of Gemini; and SN 1997cj is in Ursa Major, near the Hubble Deep Field

  9. A new Abel inversion by means of the integrals of an input function with noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian-Fang; Huang, Li; Huang, Yong

    2007-01-01

    Abel's integral equations arise in many areas of natural science and engineering, particularly in plasma diagnostics. This paper proposes a new and effective approximation of the inversion of Abel transform. This algorithm can be simply implemented by symbolic computation, and moreover an nth-order approximation reduces to the exact solution when it is a polynomial in r2 of degree less than or equal to n. Approximate Abel inversion is expressed in terms of integrals of input measurement data; so the suggested approach is stable for experimental data with random noise. An error analysis of the approximation of Abel inversion is given. Finally, several test examples used frequently in plasma diagnostics are given to illustrate the effectiveness and stability of this method.

  10. The central star of the planetary nebula Abell 78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaler, J. B.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The ultraviolet spectrum of the nucleus of Abell 78, one of the two planetaries known to contain zones of nearly pure helium, is studied. The line spectrum and wind velocities are examined, the determination of interstellar extinction for assessing circumstellar dust is improved, and the temperature, luminosity, and core mass are derived. The results for A78 are compared with results for A30, and it is concluded that the dust distributions around the two central stars are quite different. The temperature of the A78 core is not as high as previously believed, and almost certainly lies between 67,000 K and 130,000 K. The most likely temperature range is 77,000-84,000 K. The core mass lies between 0.56 and 0.70 solar mass, with the most likely values between 0.56 and 0.58 solar mass.

  11. ABEL description and implementation of cyber net system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiyuan; Jing, Liang

    2013-03-01

    Cyber net system is a subclass of Petri Nets. It has more powerful description capability and more complex properties compared with P/T system. Due to its nonlinear relation, it can't use analysis techniques of other net systems directly. This influences the research on cyber net system. In this paper, the author uses hardware description language to describe cyber net system. Simulation analysis is carried out through EDA software tools to disclose properties of the system. This method is introduced in detail through cyber net system model of computing Fibonacci series. ABEL source codes and simulation wave are also presented. The source codes are compiled, optimized, fit design and downloaded to the Programmable Logic Device. Thus ASIC of computing Fibonacci series is obtained. It will break a new path for the analysis and application study of cyber net system.

  12. Symmetry energy impact in simulations of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Tobias; Hempel, Matthias; Sagert, Irina; Suwa, Yudai; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    We present a review of a broad selection of nuclear matter equations of state (EOSs) applicable in core-collapse supernova studies. The large variety of nuclear matter properties, such as the symmetry energy, which are covered by these EOSs leads to distinct outcomes in supernova simulations. Many of the currently used EOS models can be ruled out by nuclear experiments, nuclear many-body calculations, and observations of neutron stars. In particular the two classical supernova EOS describe neutron matter poorly. Nevertheless, we explore their impact in supernova simulations since they are commonly used in astrophysics. They serve as extremely soft and stiff representative nuclear models. The corresponding supernova simulations represent two extreme cases, e.g., with respect to the protoneutron star (PNS) compactness and shock evolution. Moreover, in multi-dimensional supernova simulations EOS differences have a strong effect on the explosion dynamics. Because of the extreme behaviors of the classical supernova EOSs we also include DD2, a relativistic mean field EOS with density-dependent couplings, which is in satisfactory agreement with many current nuclear and observational constraints. This is the first time that DD2 is applied to supernova simulations and compared with the classical supernova EOS. We find that the overall behaviour of the latter EOS in supernova simulations lies in between the two extreme classical EOSs. As pointed out in previous studies, we confirm the impact of the symmetry energy on the electron fraction. Furthermore, we find that the symmetry energy becomes less important during the post-bounce evolution, where conversely the symmetric part of the EOS becomes increasingly dominating, which is related to the high temperatures obtained. Moreover, we study the possible impact of quark matter at high densities and light nuclear clusters at low and intermediate densities.

  13. The wonderful apparatus of John Jacob Abel called the "artificial kidney".

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2009-01-01

    Hemodialysis, which now provides life-saving therapy to millions of individuals, began as an exploratory attempt to sustain the lives of selected patients in the 1950s. That was a century after the formulation of the concept and determination of the laws governing dialysis. The first step in the translation of the laboratory principles of dialysis to living animals was the "vividiffusion" apparatus developed by John Jacob Abel (1859-1938), dubbed the "artificial kidney" in the August 11, 1913 issue of The Times of London reporting the demonstration of vividiffusion by Abel at University College. The detailed article in the January 18, 1914 of the New York Times, reproduced here, is based on the subsequent medical reports published by Abel et al. Tentative attempts of human dialysis in the decade that followed based on the vividiffusion apparatus of Abel and his materials (collodion, hirudin, and glass) met with failure and had to be abandoned. Practical dialysis became possible in the 1940s and thereafter after cellophane, heparin, and teflon became available. Abel worked in an age of great progress and experimental work in the basic sciences that laid the foundations of science-driven medicine. It was a "Heroic Age of Medicine," when medical discoveries and communicating them to the public were assuming increasing importance. This article provides the cultural, social, scientific, and medical background in which Abel worked, developed and reported his wonderful apparatus called the "artificial kidney."

  14. Neutrino Nucleosynthesis in Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Takashi; Suzuki, Toshio; Chiba, Satoshi; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yokomakura, Hidekazu; Kimura, Keiichi; Takamura, Akira; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    2009-05-04

    Neutrino nucleosynthesis is an important synthesis process for light elements in supernovae. One important physics input of neutrino nucleosynthesis is cross sections of neutrino-nucleus reactions. The cross sections of neutrino-{sup 12}C and {sup 4}He reactions are derived using new shell model Hamiltonians. With the new cross sections, light element synthesis of a supernova is investigated. The appropriate range of the neutrino temperature for supernovae is constrained to be between 4.3 MeV and 6.5 MeV from the {sup 11}B abundance in Galactic chemical evolution. Effects by neutrino oscillations are also discussed.

  15. Disentangling the ICL with the CHEFs: Abell 2744 as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Teja, Yolanda; Dupke, Renato a.

    2015-08-01

    The intracluster light (ICL) is important for understanding the metal enrichment of the intracluster gas and constraining cosmological parameters independently of the other methods. However, its measurement it is not trivial due to the necessity of disentangling the light of stars locked up in galaxies from the proper ICL. Currently, there is no standard method to efficiently measure the ICL (Rudick et al. 2011, ApJ, 732, 48), and different approaches relying on the binding energy of the cluster galaxies, the density of the material, or the surface brightness distribution, have been tried. Moreover, a suitable way to disentangle the limits of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and the ICL still has not been developed.The CHEFs (from Chebyshev-Fourier bases, Jiménez-Teja & Benítez 2012, ApJ, 745, 150) are a mathematical tool especially designed to model the two-dimensional light distribution of galaxies. We use the CHEFs and tools from differential geometry to infer the light contribution of the ICL to the total brightness, without imposing any artificial thresholds and avoiding the ambiguity introduced by free parameters that are usually set in these studies (Rudick et al. 2011).We use the extremely deep optical images from Abell 2744, the Pandora cluster, a multi-cluster merger, observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields project to show the efficiency of this new method. The CHEFs can accurately fit and remove all the galaxies close to the cluster center, including the BCG. The limits of the BCG are marked out by determining the points where the surface curvature changes, thus disentangling the ICL from the BCG light in a completely natural way. Once we have the residual image just containing ICL and background, we extrapolate the value of this latter from images of individual pointings close to the main Pandora field. We finally estimate the ICL to be ~24% of the total light, which is very consistent with the predictions from numerical simulations (Montes

  16. Frontier Field Supernova Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven

    2014-10-01

    The Frontier Fields program presents an extraordinary opportunity for the detection of high redshift supernovae (SNe). The combination of very deep imaging in each epoch with the added boost from gravitational lensing magnification will provide the means to detect both Type Ia SNe (SNIa) and core collapse SNe (CC SNe) out to z~3. We propose to capitalize on this unique new asset by processing and searching all of the Frontier Field data, and then triggering ToO follow-up observations for SNe of interest.We expect to discover ~20 new SNe over the entire 3-year program, including ~5 SNIa at z>1.5 and ~6 with strong lensing magnification. These samples are small but special: the high-z SNIa set has unique leverage for testing SNIa progenitor models through the delay time distribution; the lensed SNIa offer a chance to validate cluster mass models by directly measuring the lensing magnification. We will also be able to extend CCSN rate measurements for the first time beyond z~1, and our search will open up the small but exciting possibility of catching a truly rare event such as a multiply imaged SN or a superluminous SN at z>4.This follow-up program provides the color and light curve information necessary to unlock the science potential of these SNe. It is also designed for high efficiency: broad-band photometry and ground-based spectroscopy will be used to classify and characterize most of the SNe. For a small "New Frontier" sub-set comprising the SNIa candidates at never-before-seen redshifts, we will employ a novel medium band IR imaging strategy. All told, this program will classify and characterize all SNe of interest with just 60 orbits across 3 cycles.

  17. Frontier Field Supernova Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven

    2013-10-01

    The Frontier Fields program presents an extraordinary opportunity for the detection of high redshift supernovae (SNe). The combination of very deep imaging in each epoch with the added boost from gravitational lensing magnification will provide the means to detect both Type Ia SNe (SNIa) and core collapse SNe (CC SNe) out to z~3. We propose to capitalize on this unique new asset by processing and searching all of the Frontier Field data, and then triggering ToO follow-up observations for SNe of interest.We expect to discover ~20 new SNe over the entire 3-year program, including ~5 SNIa at z>1.5 and ~6 with strong lensing magnification. These samples are small but special: the high-z SNIa set has unique leverage for testing SNIa progenitor models through the delay time distribution; the lensed SNIa offer a chance to validate cluster mass models by directly measuring the lensing magnification. We will also be able to extend CCSN rate measurements for the first time beyond z~1, and our search will open up the small but exciting possibility of catching a truly rare event such as a multiply imaged SN or a superluminous SN at z>4.This follow-up program provides the color and light curve information necessary to unlock the science potential of these SNe. It is also designed for high efficiency: broad-band photometry and ground-based spectroscopy will be used to classify and characterize most of the SNe. For a small "New Frontier" sub-set comprising the SNIa candidates at never-before-seen redshifts, we will employ a novel medium band IR imaging strategy. All told, this program will classify and characterize all SNe of interest with just 60 orbits across 3 cycles.

  18. Galaxy Clusters in the Swift/BAT era II: 10 more Clusters detected above 15 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Rebusco, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Reimer, O.; Boehringer, H.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; /Palermo Observ.

    2010-10-27

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/BAT all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are: Bullet, Abell 85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and Abell 3667) we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} as detected in previous studies. For Abell 3667 the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT = {approx}13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely thermal origin.

  19. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  20. Berkeley automated supernova search

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.; Crawford, F.S.; Burns, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982.

  1. Automated search for supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-11-15

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion.

  2. Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Claudia, Travaglio; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    We review our understanding of the nucleosynthesis that occurs in thermonuclear supernovae and their contribution to Galactic Chemical evolution. We discuss the prospects to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis within simulations of these events.

  3. The Historical Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. H.; Stephenson, F. R.

    1982-11-01

    A survey was made of pretelescopic astronomical records from Europe, China, Korea, Japan, Babylon, and the Arab countries to search for historical evidence of supernovae. A Roman, Claudian, reported a new star in 393 AD, the same year that Chinese astronomers noted a new star, together with its location and duration. Most European records were made in monasteries after 1000 AD, and one supernova was sighted in 1006 AD. A similar sighting was made in the Arab world at the same time. A total of twenty candidate events were found in the nearly 2000 yr of Chinese records. An analysis of the recorded events characteristics indicates that in 185, 393, 1006, 1054, 1181, 1572, and 1604 AD supernovae were seen. The 1054 AD explosion was corroborated by Arab records, while all others (except for the 393 AD and 1006 AD supernovae) were confined to Oriental observations.

  4. Supernova feedback in molecular clouds: global evolution and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körtgen, Bastian; Seifried, Daniel; Banerjee, Robi; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Zamora-Avilés, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    We use magnetohydrodynamical simulations of converging warm neutral medium flows to analyse the formation and global evolution of magnetized and turbulent molecular clouds subject to supernova feedback from massive stars. We show that supernova feedback alone fails to disrupt entire, gravitationally bound, molecular clouds, but is able to disperse small-sized (˜10 pc) regions on time-scales of less than 1 Myr. Efficient radiative cooling of the supernova remnant as well as strong compression of the surrounding gas result in non-persistent energy and momentum input from the supernovae. However, if the time between subsequent supernovae is short and they are clustered, large hot bubbles form that disperse larger regions of the parental cloud. On longer time-scales, supernova feedback increases the amount of gas with moderate temperatures (T ≈ 300-3000 K). Despite its inability to disrupt molecular clouds, supernova feedback leaves a strong imprint on the star formation process. We find an overall reduction of the star formation efficiency by a factor of 2 and of the star formation rate by roughly factors of 2-4.

  5. Handbook of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athem Alsabti, Abdul

    2015-08-01

    Since the discovery of pulsars in 1967, few celestial phenomena have fascinated amateur and professional astronomers, and the public, more than supernovae - dying stars that explode spectacularly and, in so doing, may outshine a whole galaxy. Thousands of research papers, reviews, monographs and books have been published on this subject. These publications are often written either for a highly specific level of expertise or education, or with respect to a particular aspect of supernovae research. However, the study of supernovae is a very broad topic involving many integral yet connected aspects, including physics, mathematics, computation, history, theoretical studies and observation. More specifically, areas of study include historical supernovae, the different types and light curves, nucleosynthesis, explosion mechanisms, formation of black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, neutrinos and gravitational waves. Related questions include how supernovae remnants interact with interstellar matter nearby and how do these events affect the formation of new stars or planetary systems? Could they affect existing planetary systems? Closer to home, did any supernovae affect life on earth in the past or could they do so in the future? And on the larger scale, how did supernovae observations help measure the size and expansion of the universe? All these topics, and more, are to be covered in a new reference work, consisting of more than 100 articles and more than 1700 pages. It is intended to cover all the main facets of current supernovae research. It will be pitched at or above the level of a new postgraduate student, who will have successfully studied physics (or a similar scientific subject) to Bachelor degree level. It will be available in both print and electronic (updatable) formats, with the exception of the first section, which will consist of a review of all the topics of the handbook at a level that allows anyone with basic scientific knowledge to grasp the

  6. Physics of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-12-13

    Presupernova models of massive stars are presented and their explosion by ''delayed neutrino transport'' examined. A new form of long duration Type II supernova model is also explored based upon repeated encounter with the electron-positron pair instability in stars heavier than about 60 Msub solar. Carbon deflagration in white dwarfs is discussed as the probable explanation of Type I supernovae and special attention is paid to the physical processes whereby a nuclear flame propagates through degenerate carbon. 89 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Measuring the Hubble constant from Ryle Telescope and X-ray observations, with application to Abell 1413

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grainge, Keith; Jones, Michael E.; Pooley, Guy; Saunders, Richard; Edge, Alastair; Grainger, William F.; Kneissl, Rüdiger

    2002-06-01

    We describe our methods for measuring the Hubble constant from Ryle Telescope (RT) interferometric observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect from a galaxy cluster and observation of the cluster X-ray emission. We analyse the error budget in this method: as well as radio and X-ray random errors, we consider the effects of clumping and temperature differences in the cluster gas, of the kinetic SZ effect, of bremsstrahlung emission at radio wavelengths, of the gravitational lensing of background radio sources and of primary calibration error. Using RT, ASCA and ROSAT observations of the Abell 1413, we find that random errors dominate over systematic ones, and estimate H0=57- 16+23kms- 1Mpc- 1 for a an ΩM=1.0, ΩΛ=0.0 cosmology.

  8. Theoretical cosmic Type Ia supernova rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiante, R.; Matteucci, F.; Recchi, S.; Calura, F.

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this work is the computation of the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates, namely the frequency of Type Ia supernovae per unit time in a unitary volume of the Universe. Our main goal in this work is to predict the Type Ia supernova rates at very high redshifts and to check whether it is possible to select the best delay time distribution model, on the basis of the available observations of Type Ia supernovae. We compute the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates in different scenarios for galaxy formation and predict the expected number of explosions at high redshift ( z⩾2). Moreover, we adopt various progenitor models in order to compute the Type Ia supernova rate in typical elliptical galaxies of initial luminous masses of 1010M⊙,1011M⊙ and 1012M⊙, and compute the total amount of iron produced by Type Ia supernovae in each case. In this analysis we assume that Type Ia supernovae are caused by thermonuclear explosions of C-O white dwarfs in binary systems and we consider the most popular frameworks: the single degenerate and the double degenerate scenarios. The two competing schemes for the galaxy formation, namely the monolithic collapse and the hierarchical clustering, are also taken into account, by considering the histories of star formation increasing and decreasing with redshift, respectively. We calculate the Type Ia supernova rates through an analytical formulation which rests upon the definition of the SN Ia rate following an instantaneous burst of star formation as a function of the time elapsed from the birth of the progenitor system to its explosion as a Type Ia supernova (i.e. the delay time). What emerges from this work is that: (i) we confirm the result of previous papers that it is not easy to select the best delay time distribution scenario from the observational data and this is because the cosmic star formation rate dominates over the distribution function of the delay times; (ii) the monolithic collapse scenario for galaxy formation

  9. Observing Supernovae and Supernova Remnants with JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, George; Temim, Tea; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable near- and mid-infrared studies of supernovae (SN) and supernova remnants (SNR) in the Milky Way and galaxies throughout the local universe and to high redshift. JWST's instrumentation provides imaging, coronography, and spectroscopy (R<3000) over the wavelength range 1-29 microns. The unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution will enable spectroscopic study of new and recent supernovae, including molecule and dust formation, in galaxies at least out to 30 Mpc, and imaging to much greater distances. The Target of Opportunity response time can be as short as 48 hours, enabling quick follow-up observations of important SN events. JWST will be ideal for the study of Galactic and Magellanic Clouds supernova remnants, particularly young remnants with hot dust. Its high angular resolution (0.07" at 2 microns, 0.7" at 20 microns) will allow direct comparison between the IR, optical, and X-ray morphologies, identifying sites of dust emission in both the ejecta and the shocked ISM unresolved by previous IR telescopes. There is a rich spectrum of atomic lines (H, He I, [Si I], [Fe II], [Ni I-III], [Co II-III], [S III-IV], [Ar II-III], [Ne II, III, V], [O IV]) and molecules (CO, SiO, H2) of importance for SN and SNR studies. JWST is a large aperture (6.5m), cryogenic, infrared-optimized space observatory under construction by NASA, ESA, and CSA for launch in 2018. The JWST observatory will be placed in an Earth-Sun L2 orbit by an Ariane 5 launch vehicle provided by ESA. The observatory is designed for a 5-year prime science mission, with consumables for 10 years of science operations. The first call for proposals for JWST observations will be released in 2017.

  10. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  11. Progenitors of Recombining Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  12. The planetary nebula Abell 48 and its [WN] nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, David J.; Bojičić, I. S.; Parker, Q. A.; Stupar, M.; Wachter, S.; DePew, K.; Danehkar, A.; Fitzgerald, M. T.; Douchin, D.

    2014-05-01

    We have conducted a detailed multi-wavelength study of the peculiar nebula Abell 48 and its central star. We classify the nucleus as a helium-rich, hydrogen-deficient star of type [WN4-5]. The evidence for either a massive WN or a low-mass [WN] interpretation is critically examined, and we firmly conclude that Abell 48 is a planetary nebula (PN) around an evolved low-mass star, rather than a Population I ejecta nebula. Importantly, the surrounding nebula has a morphology typical of PNe, and is not enriched in nitrogen, and thus not the `peeled atmosphere' of a massive star. We estimate a distance of 1.6 kpc and a reddening, E(B - V) = 1.90 mag, the latter value clearly showing the nebula lies on the near side of the Galactic bar, and cannot be a massive WN star. The ionized mass (˜0.3 M⊙) and electron density (700 cm-3) are typical of middle-aged PNe. The observed stellar spectrum was compared to a grid of models from the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) grid. The best-fitting temperature is 71 kK, and the atmospheric composition is dominated by helium with an upper limit on the hydrogen abundance of 10 per cent. Our results are in very good agreement with the recent study of Todt et al., who determined a hydrogen fraction of 10 per cent and an unusually large nitrogen fraction of ˜5 per cent. This fraction is higher than any other low-mass H-deficient star, and is not readily explained by current post-AGB models. We give a discussion of the implications of this discovery for the late-stage evolution of intermediate-mass stars. There is now tentative evidence for two distinct helium-dominated post-AGB lineages, separate to the helium- and carbon-dominated surface compositions produced by a late thermal pulse. Further theoretical work is needed to explain these recent discoveries.

  13. Mass, velocity anisotropy, and pseudo phase-space density profiles of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, E.; Biviano, A.; Mamon, G. A.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: We aim to compute the mass and velocity anisotropy profiles of Abell 2142 and, from there, the pseudo phase-space density profile Q(r) and the density slope - velocity anisotropy β - γ relation, and then to compare them with theoretical expectations. Methods: The mass profiles were obtained by using three techniques based on member galaxy kinematics, namely the caustic method, the method of dispersion-kurtosis, and MAMPOSSt. Through the inversion of the Jeans equation, it was possible to compute the velocity anisotropy profiles. Results: The mass profiles, as well as the virial values of mass and radius, computed with the different techniques agree with one another and with the estimates coming from X-ray and weak lensing studies. A combined mass profile is obtained by averaging the lensing, X-ray, and kinematics determinations. The cluster mass profile is well fitted by an NFW profile with c = 4.0 ± 0.5. The population of red and blue galaxies appear to have a different velocity anisotropy configuration, since red galaxies are almost isotropic, while blue galaxies are radially anisotropic, with a weak dependence on radius. The Q(r) profile for the red galaxy population agrees with the theoretical results found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that any bias, relative to the dark matter particles, in velocity dispersion of the red component is independent of radius. The β - γ relation for red galaxies matches the theoretical relation only in the inner region. The deviations might be due to the use of galaxies as tracers of the gravitational potential, unlike the non-collisional tracer used in the theoretical relation.

  14. One-dimensional tomography - A comparison of Abel, onion-peeling, and filtered backprojection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasch, Cameron J.

    1992-03-01

    It is shown that the Abel inversion, onion-peeling, and filtered backprojection methods can be intercompared without assumptions about the object being deconvolved. If the projection data are taken at equally spaced radial positions, the deconvolved field is given by weighted sums of the projections divided by the data spacing. The weighting factors are independent of the data spacing. All the methods are remarkably similar and have Abelian behavior: the field at a radial location is primarily determined by the weighted differences of a few projections around the radial position. Onion-peeling and an Abel inversion using two-point interpolation are similar. When the Shepp-Logan filtered backprojection method is reduced to one dimension, it is essentially identical to an Abel inversion using three-point interpolation. The weighting factors directly determine the relative noise performance: the three-point Abel inversion is the best, while onion peeling is the worst with approximately twice the noise. Based on ease of calculation, robustness, and noise, the three-point Abel inversion is recommended.

  15. The Most Luminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Recent observations have revealed a stunning diversity of extremely luminous supernovae, seemingly increasing in radiant energy without bound. We consider simple approximate limits for what existing models can provide for the peak luminosity and total radiated energy for non-relativistic, isotropic stellar explosions. The brightest possible supernova is a Type I explosion powered by a sub-millisecond magnetar with field strength B ∼ few × {10}13 G. In extreme cases, such models might reach a peak luminosity of 2× {10}46 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 and radiate a total energy of up to 4× {10}52 {erg}. Other less luminous models are also explored, including prompt hyper-energetic explosions in red supergiants, pulsational-pair instability supernovae, pair-instability supernovae, and colliding shells. Approximate analytic expressions and limits are given for each case. Excluding magnetars, the peak luminosity is near 3× {10}44 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 for the brightest models and the corresponding limit on total radiated energy is 3× {10}51 {erg}. Barring new physics, supernovae with a light output over 3× {10}51 erg must be rotationally powered, either during the explosion itself or after, the most obvious candidate being a rapidly rotating magnetar. A magnetar-based model for the recent transient event, ASASSN-15lh is presented that strains, but does not exceed the limits of what the model can provide.

  16. An Analysis of Rich Cluster Redshift Survey Data for Large Scale Structure Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinglend, K.; Batuski, D.; Haase, S.; Hill, J.

    1994-12-01

    The results from the COBE satellite show the existence of structure on scales on the order of 10% or more of the horizon scale of the universe. Rich clusters of galaxies from Abell's catalog show evidence of structure on scales of 100 Mpc and may hold the promise of confirming structure on the scale of the COBE result. However, many Abell clusters have zero or only one measured redshift, so present knowledge of their three dimensional distribution has quite large uncertainties. The shortage of measured redshifts for these clusters may also mask a problem of projection effects corrupting the membership counts for the clusters. Our approach in this effort has been to use the MX multifiber spectrometer on the Steward 2.3m to measure redshifts of at least ten galaxies in each of 80 Abell cluster fields with richness class R>= 1 and mag10 <= 16.8 (estimated z<= 0.12) and zero or one measured redshifts. This work will result in a deeper, more complete (and reliable) sample of positions of rich clusters. Our primary intent for the sample is for two-point correlation and other studies of the large scale structure traced by these clusters in an effort to constrain theoretical models for structure formation. We are also obtaining enough redshifts per cluster so that a much better sample of reliable cluster velocity dispersions will be available for other studies of cluster properties. To date, we have collected such data for 64 clusters, and for most of them, we have seven or more cluster members with redshifts, allowing for reliable velocity dispersion calculations. Velocity histograms and stripe density plots for several interesting cluster fields are presented, along with summary tables of cluster redshift results. Also, with 10 or more redshifts in most of our cluster fields (30({') } square, just about an `Abell diameter' at z ~ 0.1) we have investigated the extent of projection effects within the Abell catalog in an effort to quantify and understand how this may effect

  17. Neutrinos in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1986-10-01

    The role of neutrinos in Type II supernovae is discussed. An overall view of the neutrino luminosity as expected theoretically is presented. The different weak interactions involved are assessed from the standpoint of how they exchange energy, momentum, and lepton number. Particular attention is paid to entropy generation and the path to thermal and chemical equilibration, and to the phenomenon of trapping. Various methods used to calculate the neutrino flows are considered. These include trapping and leakage schemes, distribution-averaged transfer, and multi-energy group methods. The information obtained from the neutrinos caught from Supernova 1987a is briefly evaluated. 55 refs., 7 figs.

  18. What Shapes Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has mounted that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) can have substantial deviations from spherical symmetry; one such piece of evidence is the complex morphologies of supernova remnants (SNRs). However, the relative role of the explosion geometry and the environment in shaping SNRs remains an outstanding question. Recently, we have developed techniques to quantify the morphologies of SNRs, and we have applied these methods to the extensive X-ray and infrared archival images available of Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud SNRs. In this proceeding, we highlight some results from these studies, with particular emphasis on SNR asymmetries and whether they arise from ``nature'' or ``nurture''.

  19. Nonlocal symmetries of Riccati and Abel chains and their similarity reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzon, M. S.; Gandarias, M. L.; Senthilvelan, M.

    2012-02-01

    We study nonlocal symmetries and their similarity reductions of Riccati and Abel chains. Our results show that all the equations in Riccati chain share the same form of nonlocal symmetry. The similarity reduced Nth order ordinary differential equation (ODE), N = 2, 3, 4, …, in this chain yields (N - 1)th order ODE in the same chain. All the equations in the Abel chain also share the same form of nonlocal symmetry (which is different from the one that exist in Riccati chain) but the similarity reduced Nth order ODE, N = 2, 3, 4, …, in the Abel chain always ends at the (N - 1)th order ODE in the Riccati chain. We describe the method of finding general solution of all the equations that appear in these chains from the nonlocal symmetry.

  20. U(1)-invariant membranes: The geometric formulation, Abel, and pendulum differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltukhin, A. A.; Trzetrzelewski, M.

    2010-06-15

    The geometric approach to study the dynamics of U(1)-invariant membranes is developed. The approach reveals an important role of the Abel nonlinear differential equation of the first type with variable coefficients depending on time and one of the membrane extendedness parameters. The general solution of the Abel equation is constructed. Exact solutions of the whole system of membrane equations in the D=5 Minkowski space-time are found and classified. It is shown that if the radial component of the membrane world vector is only time dependent, then the dynamics is described by the pendulum equation.

  1. Supernovae and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.; Tornambé, A.

    2009-08-01

    A decade ago the observations of thermonuclear supernovae at high-redhifts showed that the expansion rate of the Universe is accelerating and since then, the evidence for cosmic acceleration has gotten stronger. This acceleration requires that the Universe is dominated by dark energy, an exotic component characterized by its negative pressure. Nowadays all the available astronomical data (i.e. thermonuclear supernovae, cosmic microwave background, barionic acoustic oscillations, large scale structure, etc.) agree that our Universe is made of about 70% of dark energy, 25% of cold dark matter and only 5% of known, familiar matter. This Universe is geometrically flat, older than previously thought, its destiny is no longer linked to its geometry but to dark energy, and we ignore about 95% of its components. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today. Current astronomical observations are compatible with dark energy being the vacuum energy. Supernovae have played a fundamental role in modern Cosmology and it is expected that they will contribute to unveil the dark energy. In order to do that it is mandatory to understand the limits of supernovae as cosmological distance indicators, improving their precision by a factor 10.

  2. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  3. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  4. Theoretical models for supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-09-21

    The results of recent numerical simulations of supernova explosions are presented and a variety of topics discussed. Particular emphasis is given to (i) the nucleosynthesis expected from intermediate mass (10sub solar less than or equal to M less than or equal to 100 Msub solar) Type II supernovae and detonating white dwarf models for Type I supernovae, (ii) a realistic estimate of the ..gamma..-line fluxes expected from this nucleosynthesis, (iii) the continued evolution, in one and two dimensions, of intermediate mass stars wherein iron core collapse does not lead to a strong, mass-ejecting shock wave, and (iv) the evolution and explosion of vary massive stars (M greater than or equal to 100 Msub solar of both Population I and III. In one dimension, nuclear burning following a failed core bounce does not appear likely to lead to a supernova explosion although, in two dimensions, a combination of rotation and nuclear burning may do so. Near solar proportions of elements from neon to calcium and very brilliant optical displays may be created by hypernovae, the explosions of stars in the mass range 100 M/sub solar/ to 300 M/sub solar/. Above approx. 300 M/sub solar/ a black hole is created by stellar collapse following carbon ignition. Still more massive stars may be copious producers of /sup 4/He and /sup 14/N prior to their collapse on the pair instability.

  5. Ultraviolet Imaging of the cD Galaxy in Abell 1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Eric P.; Neff, Susan G.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stecher, Thedore P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Roberts, Morton S.

    1995-12-01

    We present an image of the Abell 1795 cD galaxy and its environment obtained with the Goddard Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT). Our ultraviolet (UV) image was obtained during the March 1995 Astro-2 Space Shuttle mission using a filter centered at ~ 1520 Angstroms/ (Delta lambda =354 Angstroms/). The ultraviolet image resulting from a 1310 second exposure has stellar images with ~ 5.0arcsec FWHM. We compare these data to published optical, radio (VLA) and archival HST observations. This richness class 2 cluster is known to contain a large cooling flow (dot {M} 300M_⊙ yr(-1) ) and its cD galaxy contains a relatively bright yet small radio source (4C26.42). Previous optical observations have shown the cD galaxy possesses a system of Hα filaments (van Breugel et al./ 1984, ApJ, 276, 79), whose surface brightness is consistent with models in which the emission--lines arise from radiatively regulated accretion (i.e. cooling X-ray gas). Broad-band optical investigations have revealed the presence of ``blue lobes'' near the cD galaxy center. These regions are posited to contain young stars formed via the interaction of a radio jet and the intercluster medium (McNamara & O'Connell 1993, AJ, 105, 417). The HST observations show the elliptical galaxy has an easily resolved dust lane structure near its center. The cD galaxy is very bright in the ultraviolet (m1520=15.1) and exhibits a strong radial color gradient with the center being bluer. Indeed, UV light is detected from the central 7.6arcsecx16 .1arcsec (8.4x17.7 kpc) which can be compared with the optical extents of 38arcsecx70 arcsec . We discuss the implications that our new UV data have for the high mass star formation rate, and examine how our photometry fits in with previous models for the unusual features present in the system. Most of the other cluster galaxies are not detected. We report photometry and predicted star formation rates for those that were seen along with upper limits for those galaxies not

  6. Red supergiants as type II supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Marco, Amparo

    2015-08-01

    Recent searches for supernova IIp progenitors in external galaxies have led to the identification of red objects with magnitudes and colours indicative of red supergiants, in most cases implying quite low luminosities and hence masses well below 10Msol. Stellar models, on the other hand, do not predict explosions from objects below 9 Msol. What does our knowledge of local red supergiants tells us about the expected properties of such objects?We have carried out a comprehensive spectroscopic and photometric study of a sample of hundreds of red supergiants in the Milky Way and both Magellanic Clouds. We have explored correlations between different parameters and the position of stars in the HR diagrams of open clusters. At solar metallicty, there is strong evidence for a phase of very heavy mass loss at the end of the red supergiant phase, but the existence of such a phase is still not confirmed at SMC metallicities. Objects of ~ 7Msol, on the other hand, become very dusty in the SMC, and appear as very luminous Miras.Among Milky Way clusters, we find a surprising lack of objects readily identifiable as the expected 7 to 10 Msol red supergiants or AGB stars. We are carrying out an open cluster survey aimed at filling this region of the HR diagram with reliable data. Finally, we will discuss the implications of all this findings for the expected properties of supernova progenitors, as it looks unlikely that typical red supergiants may explode without undergoing further evolution.

  7. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    SciTech Connect

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion (d{sup 2}X)/(dt{sup 2}) +(dU)/(dX) =0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27–29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A=(1/√(π))∫{sub 0}{sup E}dU/√(E−U) is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = T{sub A}(E) + T{sub N}(E) where τ is a constant period, T{sub A}(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and T{sub N}(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function X{sub A}(U) is determined from T{sub A}(E) via the Abel-transform relation X{sub A}(U) ∝ A[T{sub A}(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential U{sub N}(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing

  8. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. I. Multiwavelength photometry of Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Buitrago, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Lotz, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Frontier Fields survey is a pioneering observational program aimed at collecting photometric data, both from space (Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope) and from ground-based facilities (VLT Hawk-I), for six deep fields pointing at clusters of galaxies and six nearby deep parallel fields, in a wide range of passbands. The analysis of these data is a natural outcome of the Astrodeep project, an EU collaboration aimed at developing methods and tools for extragalactic photometry and creating valuable public photometric catalogues. Aims: We produce multiwavelength photometric catalogues (from B to 4.5 μm) for the first two of the Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416 (plus their parallel fields). Methods: To detect faint sources even in the central regions of the clusters, we develop a robust and repeatable procedure that uses the public codes Galapagos and Galfit to model and remove most of the light contribution from both the brightest cluster members, and the intra-cluster light. We perform the detection on the processed HST H160 image to obtain a pure H-selected sample, which is the primary catalogue that we publish. We also add a sample of sources which are undetected in the H160 image but appear on a stacked infrared image. Photometry on the other HST bands is obtained using SExtractor, again on processed images after the procedure for foreground light removal. Photometry on the Hawk-I and IRAC bands is obtained using our PSF-matching deconfusion code t-phot. A similar procedure, but without the need for the foreground light removal, is adopted for the Parallel fields. Results: The procedure of foreground light subtraction allows for the detection and the photometric measurements of ~2500 sources per field. We deliver and release complete photometric H-detected catalogues, with the addition of the complementary sample of infrared-detected sources. All objects have multiwavelength coverage including B to H HST bands, plus K

  9. Supernovae and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-09-01

    Nucleosynthesis by rapid neutron capture (the r-process) could be an important diagnostic of the explosive deep interiors of supernovae. The early appearance of r-process elements in the Galaxy, along with energetic requirements, strongly argues in favor of a supernova origin for r-process isotopes. However there is a current conundrum as to the relative contributions from various supernovae environments, e.g. MHD jets or neutrino energized winds. There are also possible contributions from failed supernovae (collapsars) leading to a black hole (BH), or the ejection of material during the mergers of neutron stars in binary systems, i.e. NS+NS or NS+BH systems. In this talk we will review the theoretical underpinnings of each possibility in the quest to deduce the relative contribution of each process. In particular, each model for r-process nucleosynthesis invariably leads to systematic discrepancies with the observed solar-system r-process abundances. For example, although the location of the abundance peaks near nuclear mass numbers A = 130 and 195 identify an environment of rapid neutron capture near closed nuclear shells, the abundances of elements just above and below those peaks are often underproduced by more than an order of magnitude in model calculations. Similarly, most recent neutrino-driven wind simulations produce only the lighter r-process elements, while neutron-star mergers may miss the r-process peaks due to fission recycling. In this talk we demonstrate that the underproduction of elements above and below the r-process peaks can be supplemented via fission fragment distributions from the recycling of material synthesized during neutron star mergers, while the abundance peaks themselves are well reproduced in MHD jets in supernovae and collapsars. Moreover, we show that the relative contributions to the solar-system r-process yields from core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers required by this proposal are consistent with estimates of the

  10. Abell 58 - a Planetary Nebula with an ONe-rich knot: a signature of binary interaction? .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, H. H. B.; De Marco, O.; Liu, X.-W.

    We have investigated the possibility that binary evolution is involved in the formation of the planetary nebula Abell 58. In particular, we assume a neon nova is responsible for the observed high oxygen and neon abundances of the central hydrogen-deficient knot of the H-deficient planetary nebula Abell 58 and the ejecta from the explosion are mixed with the planetary nebula. We have investigated different scenarios involving mergers and wind accretion and found that the most promising formation scenario involves a primary SAGB star that ends its evolution as an ONe white dwarf with an AGB companion at a moderately close separation. Mass is deposited on the white dwarf through wind accretion. So neon novae could occur just after the secondary AGB companion undergoes its final flash. However, the initial separation has to be fine-tuned. To estimate the frequency of such systems we evolve a population of binary systems and find that that Abell 58-like objects should indeed be rare and the fraction of Abell-58 planetary nebula is on the order of 10-4, or lower, among all planetary nebulae.

  11. 3C 323.1 - A QSO in a rich cluster of galaxies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oemler, A., Jr.; Gunn, J. E.; Oke, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The redshift and structural data on the compact cluster Zw Cl 1545.1+2104 have been determined from deep plates of the cluster region and from spectral scans of the central galaxy in the cluster. The cluster is of richness 1 on Abell's (1958) scale, and the redshift of its central galaxy agrees well with that of the quasar 3C 323.1 which lies at a projected distance of 6.5 sec from the center of the cluster. The data indicate that the quasar is a member of the cluster as opposed to the observed trend.

  12. CANGAROO-III SEARCH FOR TeV GAMMA RAYS FROM TWO CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kiuchi, R.; Mori, M.; Enomoto, R.; Kifune, T.; Bicknell, G. V.; Clay, R. W.; Edwards, P. G.; Gunji, S.; Inoue, K.; Hara, S.; Itoh, C.; Hara, T.; Hattori, T.; Kawachi, A.; Hayashi, S.; Kajino, F.; Higashi, Y.; Kabuki, S.; Hirai, Y.; Katagiri, H.

    2009-10-10

    Because accretion and merger shocks in clusters of galaxies may accelerate particles to high energies, clusters are candidate sites for the origin of ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays. A prediction was presented for gamma-ray emission from a cluster of galaxies at a detectable level with the current generation of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray emission was produced via inverse Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons by electron-positron pairs generated by collisions of UHE cosmic rays in the cluster. We observed two clusters of galaxies, Abell 3667 and Abell 4038, searching for very high energy gamma-ray emission with the CANGAROO-III atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system in 2006. The analysis showed no significant excess around these clusters, yielding upper limits on the gamma-ray emission. From a comparison of the upper limit for the northwest radio relic region of Abell 3667 with a model prediction, we derive a lower limit for the magnetic field of the region of approx0.1 muG. This shows the potential of gamma-ray observations in studies of the cluster environment. We also discuss the flux upper limit from cluster center regions using a model of gamma-ray emission from neutral pions produced in hadronic collisions of cosmic-ray protons with the intracluster medium. The derived upper limit of the cosmic-ray energy density within this framework is an order of magnitude higher than that of our Galaxy.

  13. Supernova Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  14. Presupernova models and supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, D.; Nomoto, K.

    1980-01-01

    The present status of theories of presupernova stellar evolution and the triggering mechanisms of supernova explosions are reviewed. The validity of the single-star approximation for stellar core evolution is considered, and the central density and temperature of the stellar core are discussed. Attention is then given to the results of numerical models of supernova explosions by carbon deflagration of an intermediate mass star, resulting in the total disruption of the star; the photodissociation of iron nuclei in a massive star, resulting in neutron star or black hole formation; and stellar core collapse triggered by electron capture in stars of mass ranging between those of the intermediate mass and massive stars, resulting in neutron star formation despite oxygen deflagration. Helium and carbon combustion and detonation in accreting white dwarfs and the gravitational collapse triggered by electron-pair creation in supermassive stars are also discussed, and problems requiring future investigation are indicated.

  15. Abell 41: shaping of a planetary nebula by a binary central star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Lloyd, M.; Santander-García, M.; López, J. A.; Meaburn, J.; Mitchell, D. L.; O'Brien, T. J.; Pollacco, D.; Rubio-Díez, M. M.; Vaytet, N. M. H.

    2010-11-01

    We present the first detailed spatiokinematical analysis and modelling of the planetary nebula Abell 41, which is known to contain the well-studied close-binary system MT Ser. This object represents an important test case in the study of the evolution of planetary nebulae with binary central stars as current evolutionary theories predict that the binary plane should be aligned perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the nebula. Deep narrow-band imaging in the light of [NII]6584Å, [OIII]5007 Å and [SII]6717+6731Å, obtained using ACAM on the William Herschel Telescope, has been used to investigate the ionization structure of Abell 41. Long-slit observations of the Hα and [NII]6584Å emission were obtained using the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer on the 2.1-m San Pedro Mártir Telescope. These spectra, combined with the narrow-band imagery, were used to develop a spatiokinematical model of [NII]6584Å emission from Abell 41. The best-fitting model reveals Abell 41 to have a waisted, bipolar structure with an expansion velocity of ~40 km s-1 at the waist. The symmetry axis of the model nebula is within 5° of perpendicular to the orbital plane of the central binary system. This provides strong evidence that the close-binary system, MT Ser, has directly affected the shaping of its nebula, Abell 41. Although the theoretical link between bipolar planetary nebulae and binary central stars is long established, this nebula is only the second to have this link, between nebular symmetry axis and binary plane, proved observationally. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. E-mail: david.jones-3@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk

  16. Radio emission from supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, K. W.; Panagia, N.; Sramek, R. A.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Stockdale, C. J.; Williams, C. L.

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 30 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85 - 110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements. 2) At a time ˜3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+beta ) beta ˜ -0.7 to beta ˜ -2.7 without change in the spectral index (nu +alpha ; alpha ˜ -0.81). This decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay with an e-folding time of ˜ 1100 days. 3) The best overall fit to all of the data is a model including both non-thermal synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) and a thermal free-free absorbing (FFA) components at early times, evolving to a constant spectral index, optically thin decline rate, until a break in that decline rate at day ˜3100, as mentioned above.

  17. Are There Hidden Supernovae?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Harker, David; Dunham, E.; Rank, David; Temi, Pasquale

    1997-01-01

    Ames Research Center and UCSC have been working on the development of a Mid IR Camera for the KAO in order to search for extra galactic supernovae. The development of the camera and its associated data reduction software have been successfully completed. Spectral Imaging of the Orion Bar at 6.2 and 7.8 microns demonstrates the derotation and data reduction software which was developed.

  18. A multiwavelength view of cooling versus AGN heating in the X-ray luminous cool-core of Abell 3581

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canning, R. E. A.; Sun, M.; Sanders, J. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Fabian, A. C.; Giacintucci, S.; Lal, D. V.; Werner, N.; Allen, S. W.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Salomé, P.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2013-10-01

    We report the results of a multiwavelength study of the nearby galaxy group, Abell 3581 (z = 0.0218). This system hosts the most luminous cool core of any nearby group and exhibits active radio mode feedback from the supermassive black hole in its brightest group galaxy, IC 4374. The brightest galaxy has suffered multiple active galactic nucleus outbursts, blowing bubbles into the surrounding hot gas, which have resulted in the uplift of cool ionized gas into the surrounding hot intragroup medium. High velocities, indicative of an outflow, are observed close to the nucleus and coincident with the radio jet. Thin dusty filaments accompany the uplifted, ionized gas. No extended star formation is observed; however, a young cluster is detected just north of the nucleus. The direction of rise of the bubbles has changed between outbursts. This directional change is likely due to sloshing motions of the intragroup medium. These sloshing motions also appear to be actively stripping the X-ray cool core, as indicated by a spiralling cold front of high-metallicity, low-temperature, low entropy gas.

  19. Type IA Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig

    1992-01-01

    Spectral calculations show that a model based on the thermonuclear explosion of a degenerate carbon/oxygen white dwarf provides excellent agreement with observations of Type Ia supernovae. Identification of suitable evolutionary progenitors remains a severe problem. General problems with estimation of supernova rates are outlined and the origin of Type Ia supernovae from double degenerate systems are discussed in the context of new rates of explosion per H band luminosity, the lack of observed candidates, and the likely presence of H in the vicinity of some SN Ia events. Re-examination of the problems of triggering Type Ia by accretion of hydrogen from a companion shows that there may be an avenue involving cataclysmic variables, especially if extreme hibernation occurs. Novae may channel accreting white dwarfs to a unique locus in accretion rate/mass space. Systems that undergo secular evolution to higher mass transfer rates could lead to just the conditions necessary for a Type Ia explosion. Tests involving fluorescence or absorption in a surrounding circumstellar medium and the detection of hydrogen stripped from a companion, which should appear at low velocity inside the white dwarf ejecta, are suggested. Possible observational confirmation of the former is described.

  20. Interacting supernovae and supernova impostors: Evidence of incoming supernova explosions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, L.

    2015-02-01

    Violent eruptions, and consequently major mass loss, are a common feature of the so-called Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars. During major eruptive episodes LBVs mimic the behavior of real type IIn supernovae (SNe), showing comparable radiated energy and similar spectroscopic properties. For this reason these events are frequently labelled as SN impostors. Type IIn SN spectra are characterized by the presence of prominent narrow Balmer lines in emission. In most cases, SNe IIn arise from massive stars (M>8⊙) exploding in a dense H-rich circumstellar medium (CSM), produced by progenitor's mass loss prior to the SN explosion. Although the mechanisms triggering these eruptions are still unknown, recently we had direct proofs of the connection between very massive stars, their eruptions and ejecta-CSM interacting SNe. SNe 2006jc, 2010mc, 2011ht and the controversial SN 2009ip are famous cases in which we observed the explosion of the star months to years after major outbursts. In this context, the case of a recent transient event, LSQ13zm, is extremely interesting since we observed an outburst just ˜3 weeks before the terminal SN explosion. All of this may suggest that SN impostors occasionally herald true SN explosions. Nonetheless, there are several cases where major eruptions are followed by a quiescent phase in the LBV life. The impostor SN 2007sv is one of these cases, since it showed a single outburst event. Its photometric (a relatively faint absolute magnitude at the maximum) and spectroscopic properties (low velocity and temperature of the ejecta, and the absence of the typical elements produced in the explosive nucleosynthesis) strongly suggest that SN 2007sv was the giant eruption of an LBV, which has then returned in a quiescent stage.

  1. Interacting supernovae and supernova impostors: Evidence of incoming supernova explosions?

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, L.

    2015-02-24

    Violent eruptions, and consequently major mass loss, are a common feature of the so–called Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars. During major eruptive episodes LBVs mimic the behavior of real type IIn supernovae (SNe), showing comparable radiated energy and similar spectroscopic properties. For this reason these events are frequently labelled as SN impostors. Type IIn SN spectra are characterized by the presence of prominent narrow Balmer lines in emission. In most cases, SNe IIn arise from massive stars (M>8{sub ⊙}) exploding in a dense H–rich circumstellar medium (CSM), produced by progenitor’s mass loss prior to the SN explosion. Although the mechanisms triggering these eruptions are still unknown, recently we had direct proofs of the connection between very massive stars, their eruptions and ejecta-CSM interacting SNe. SNe 2006jc, 2010mc, 2011ht and the controversial SN 2009ip are famous cases in which we observed the explosion of the star months to years after major outbursts. In this context, the case of a recent transient event, LSQ13zm, is extremely interesting since we observed an outburst just ∼3 weeks before the terminal SN explosion. All of this may suggest that SN impostors occasionally herald true SN explosions. Nonetheless, there are several cases where major eruptions are followed by a quiescent phase in the LBV life. The impostor SN 2007sv is one of these cases, since it showed a single outburst event. Its photometric (a relatively faint absolute magnitude at the maximum) and spectroscopic properties (low velocity and temperature of the ejecta, and the absence of the typical elements produced in the explosive nucleosynthesis) strongly suggest that SN 2007sv was the giant eruption of an LBV, which has then returned in a quiescent stage.

  2. Subaru Weak Lensing Measurements of Four Strong Lensing Clusters: Are Lensing Clusters Over-Concentrated?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Gladders, Michael D.; Dahle, Haakon; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Dalal, Neal; Koester, Benjamin P.; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew

    2009-01-29

    We derive radial mass profiles of four strong lensing selected clusters which show prominent giant arcs (Abell 1703, SDSS J1446+3032, SDSS J1531+3414, and SDSS J2111-0115), by combining detailed strong lens modeling with weak lensing shear measured from deep Subaru Suprime-cam images. Weak lensing signals are detected at high significance for all four clusters, whose redshifts range from z = 0.28 to 0.64. We demonstrate that adding strong lensing information with known arc redshifts significantly improves constraints on the mass density profile, compared to those obtained from weak lensing alone. While the mass profiles are well fitted by the universal form predicted in N-body simulations of the {Lambda}-dominated cold dark matter model, all four clusters appear to be slightly more centrally concentrated (the concentration parameters c{sub vir} {approx} 8) than theoretical predictions, even after accounting for the bias toward higher concentrations inherent in lensing selected samples. Our results are consistent with previous studies which similarly detected a concentration excess, and increases the total number of clusters studied with the combined strong and weak lensing technique to ten. Combining our sample with previous work, we find that clusters with larger Einstein radii are more anomalously concentrated. We also present a detailed model of the lensing cluster Abell 1703 with constraints from multiple image families, and find the dark matter inner density profile to be cuspy with the slope consistent with -1, in agreement with expectations.

  3. Supernova Discoveries from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory)

    DOE Data Explorer

    SNfactory International Collaboration,

    The Nearby Supernova Factory is an experiment designed to collect data on more Type Ia supernovae than have ever been studied in a single project before, and in so doing, to answer some fundamental questions about the nature of the universe. Type Ia supernovae are extraordinarily bright, remarkably uniform objects which make excellent "standard candles" for measuring the expansion rate of the universe. However, such stellar explosions are very rare, occurring only a couple of times per millenium in a typical galaxy, and remaining bright enough to detect only for a few weeks. Previous studies of Type Ia supernovae led to the discovery of the mysterious "dark energy" that is causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate. To reduce the statistical uncertainties in previous experimental data, extensive spectral and photometric monitoring of more Type Ia supernovae is required. The SNfactory collaboration has built an automated system consisting of specialized software and custom-built hardware that systematically searches the sky for new supernovae, screens potential candidates, then performs multiple spectral and photometric observations on each supernova. These observations are stored in a database to be made available to supernova researchers world-wide for further study and analysis [copied from http://snfactory.lbl.gov/snf/snf-about.html]. Users must register and agree to the open access honor system. Finding charts are in FITS format and may not be accessible through normal browser settings.

  4. Improved Abel transform inversion: First application to COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon-Angel, A.; Hernandez-Pajares, M.; Juan, J.; Sanz, J.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the first results of Ionospheric Tomographic inversion are presented, using the Improved Abel Transform on the COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 constellation of 6 LEO satellites, carrying on-board GPS receivers.[- 4mm] The Abel transform inversion is a wide used technique which in the ionospheric context makes it possible to retrieve electron densities as a function of height based of STEC (Slant Total Electron Content) data gathered from GPS receivers on board of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellites. Within this precise use, the classical approach of the Abel inversion is based on the assumption of spherical symmetry of the electron density in the vicinity of an occultation, meaning that the electron content varies in height but not horizontally. In particular, one implication of this assumption is that the VTEC (Vertical Total Electron Content) is a constant value for the occultation region. This assumption may not always be valid since horizontal ionospheric gradients (a very frequent feature in some ionosphere problematic areas such as the Equatorial region) could significantly affect the electron profiles. [- 4mm] In order to overcome this limitation/problem of the classical Abel inversion, a studied improvement of this technique can be obtained by assuming separability in the electron density (see Hernández-Pajares et al. 2000). This means that the electron density can be expressed by the multiplication of VTEC data and a shape function which assumes all the height dependency in it while the VTEC data keeps the horizontal dependency. Actually, it is more realistic to assume that this shape fuction depends only on the height and to use VTEC information to take into account the horizontal variation rather than considering spherical symmetry in the electron density function as it has been carried out in the classical approach of the Abel inversion.[-4mm] Since the above mentioned improved Abel inversion technique has already been tested and proven to be a useful

  5. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  6. Gravitational Lensing of Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The black hole at the center of the galaxy is a powerful lens for supernova neutrinos. In the very special circumstance of a supernova near the extended line of sight from Earth to the galactic center, lensing could dramatically enhance the neutrino flux at Earth and stretch the neutrino pulse.

  7. Direct measurement of lensing amplification in Abell S1063 using a strongly lensed high redshift HII galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlevich, Roberto; Melnick, Jorge; Terlevich, Elena; Chávez, Ricardo; Telles, Eduardo; Bresolin, Fabio; Plionis, Manolis; Basilakos, Spyros; Fernández Arenas, David; González Morán, Ana Luisa; Díaz, Ángeles I.; Aretxaga, Itziar

    2016-08-01

    ID11 is an actively star-forming, extremely compact galaxy and Lyα emitter at z = 3.117 that is gravitationally magnified by a factor of ~17 by the cluster of galaxies Hubble Frontier Fields AS1063. The observed properties of this galaxy resemble those of low luminosity HII galaxies or giant HII regions such as 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Using the tight correlation correlation between the Balmer-line luminosities and the width of the emission lines (typically L(Hβ) - σ(Hβ)), which are valid for HII galaxies and giant HII regions to estimate their total luminosity, we are able to measure the lensing amplification of ID11. We obtain an amplification of 23 ± 11 that is similar within errors to the value of ~17 estimated or predicted by the best lensing models of the massive cluster Abell S1063. We also compiled, from the literature, luminosities and velocity dispersions for a set of lensed compact star-forming regions. There is more scatter in the L-σ correlation for these lensed systems, but on the whole the results tend to support the lensing model estimates of the magnification. Our result indicates that the amplification can be independently measured using the L - σ relation in lensed giant HII regions or HII galaxies. It also supports the suggestion, even if lensing is model dependent, that the L - σ relation is valid for low luminosity high-z objects. Ad hoc observations of lensed star-forming systems are required to determine the lensing amplification accurately.

  8. Cosmology with superluminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scovacricchi, D.; Nichol, R. C.; Bacon, D.; Sullivan, M.; Prajs, S.

    2016-02-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) as standardizable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z ˜ 3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the `Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae' (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardization values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalize over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ≃100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Ωm by at least 20 per cent (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia and 10 000 LSST-like SLSNe can measure Ωm and w to 2 and 4 per cent, respectively. The real power of SLSNe becomes evident when we consider possible temporal variations in w(a), giving possible uncertainties of only 2, 5 and 14 per cent on Ωm, w0 and wa, respectively, from the combination of DES SNe Ia, LSST-like SLSNe and Planck. These errors are competitive with predicted Euclid constraints, indicating a future role for SLSNe for probing the high-redshift Universe.

  9. Nuclear astrophysics of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, I'll give a general introduction to Supernova Theory, beginning with the presupernova evolution and ending with the later stages of the explosion. This will be distilled from a colloquium type of talk. It is necessary to have the whole supernova picture in one's mind's eye when diving into some of its nooks and crannies, as it is quite a mess of contradictory ingredients. We will have some discussion of supernova 1987a, but will keep our discussion more general. Second, we'll look at the infall and bounce of the star, seeing why it goes unstable, what dynamics it follows as it collapses, and how and why it bounces back. From there, we will go on to look at the equation of state (EOS) in more detail. We'll consider the cases T = 0 and T > 0. We'll focus on /rho/ < /rho//sub 0/, and then /rho/ > /rho//sub 0/ and the EOS of neutron stars, and whether or not they contain cores of strange matter. There are many things we could discuss here and not enough time. If I had more lectures, the remaining time would focus on two more questions of special interest to nuclear physicists: the electron capture reactions and neutrino transport. If time permitted, we'd have some discussion of the nucleosynthetic reactions in the explosion's debris as well. However, we cannot cover such material adequately, and I have chosen these topics because they are analytically tractable, pedagogically useful, and rather important. 23 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Balantekin, A. B.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Kusakabe, M.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Pehlivan, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-06-01

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial 7Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and 7Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like 7Li, 11B, 92Nb, 138La and 180Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ13 with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio 11B/7Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  11. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Balantekin, A. B.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Kusakabe, M.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Pehlivan, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-06-24

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  12. A spatial, kinematical, and dynamical analysis of Abell 400

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Gebhardt, Karl; Huchra, John P.; Forman, William; Jones, Christine; Bothun, Gregory D.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed spatial, kinematical, and dynamical analysis for the cluster A400, based on a nearly complete redshift survey of bright galaxies within 1 Mpc of the cluster center. A dispersed component with a high fraction of spiral galaxies at a velocity of 8200 km/s, and a background group with a mean velocity of 13,400 km/s are identified. It is proposed that the main body of A400 is composed of at least two individual subclusters. If subclustering is ignored, the derived dispersion of the 88 galaxies with measured velocities within 4000 km/s of the bright dumbbell galaxy near the cluster center is 702 km/s. When kinematic information is used to split A400 into likely subclusters, the velocity dispersions of the individual units which make up this cluster are on the order of 200-300 km/s. If A400 is considered a single entity, the inferred blue mass-to-light ratio is 1210 solar masses/solar luminosities. It is argued that A400 is an example of a presently occurring merger, and that the individual components of the dumbbell galaxy were once individual D galaxies within the premerger subclusters.

  13. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Williams, Christopher L.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2007-10-01

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect clumpiness of the circumstellar material. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85-110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements rather well. 2) At mid-cm wavelengths there is often deviation from the fitted radio light curves, particularly near the peak flux density, and considerable shorter term deviations in the declining portion when the emission has become optically thin. 3) At a time ~3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+β)β~-0.7 to β~-2.7 without change in the spectral index (ν+αα~-0.81). However, this decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay starting at day ~3100 with an e-folding time of ~1100 days. 4) The best overall fit to all of the data is

  14. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-05-03

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  15. Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic (ABEL) Trapping of Single High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockenhauer, Samuel; Furstenberg, Alexandre; Wang, Quan; Devree, Brian; Jie Yao, Xiao; Bokoch, Michael; Kobilka, Brian; Sunahara, Roger; Moerner, W. E.

    2010-03-01

    The ABEL trap is a novel device for trapping single biomolecules in solution for extended observation. The trap estimates the position of a fluorescently-labeled object as small as ˜10 nm in solution and then applies a feedback electrokinetic drift every 20 us to trap the object by canceling its Brownian motion. We use the ABEL trap to study HDL particles at the single-copy level. HDL particles, essential in regulation of ``good'' cholesterol in humans, comprise a small (˜10 nm) lipid bilayer disc bounded by a belt of apolipoproteins. By engineering HDL particles with single fluorescent donor/acceptor probes and varying lipid compositions, we are working to study lipid diffusion on small length scales. We also use HDL particles as hosts for single transmembrane receptors, which should enable study of receptor conformational dynamics on long timescales.

  16. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    The Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators to measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion history of the Universe. (SNAP's weak-lensing program is described in a separate White Paper.) The experiment exploits supernova distance measurements up to their fundamental systematic limit; strict requirements on the monitoring of each supernova's properties leads to the need for a space-based mission. Results from pre-SNAP experiments, which characterize fundamental SN Ia properties, will be used to optimize the SNAP observing strategy to yield data, which minimize both systematic and statistical uncertainties. With early R&D funding, we have achieved technological readiness and the collaboration is poised to begin construction. Pre-JDEM AO R&D support will further reduce technical and cost risk. Specific details on the SNAP mission can be found in Aldering et al. (2004, 2005). The primary goal of the SNAP supernova program is to provide a dataset which gives tight constraints on parameters which characterize the dark-energy, e.g. w{sub 0} and w{sub a} where w(a) = w{sub 0} + w{sub a}(1-a). SNAP data can also be used to directly test and discriminate among specific dark energy models. We will do so by building the Hubble diagram of high-redshift supernovae, the same methodology used in the original discovery of the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe that established the existence of dark energy (Perlmutter et al. 1998; Garnavich et al. 1998; Riess et al. 1998; Perlmutter et al. 1999). The SNAP SN Ia program focuses on minimizing the systematic floor of the supernova method through the use of characterized supernovae that can be sorted into subsets based on subtle signatures of heterogeneity. Subsets may be defined based on host-galaxy morphology, spectral-feature strength and velocity, early-time behavior, inter alia. Independent cosmological analysis of each subset of ''like'' supernovae can be

  17. The nearby supernova factory

    SciTech Connect

    Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Aldering, G.; Lee, B.C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Siegrist, J.; Wang, L.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Copin, Y.; Smadja, G.; Gangler, E.; Castera, A.; Adam, G.; Bacon, R.; Lemonnier, J.-P.; Pecontal, A.; Pecontal, E.; Kessler, R.

    2004-01-23

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an ambitious project to find and study in detail approximately 300 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at redshifts 0.03 < z < 0.08. This program will provide an exceptional data set of well-studied SNe in the nearby smooth Hubble flow that can be used as calibration for the current and future programs designed to use SNe to measure the cosmological parameters. The first key ingredient for this program is a reliable supply of Hubble-flow SNe systematically discovered in unprecedented numbers using the same techniques as those used in distant SNe searches. In 2002, 35 SNe were found using our test-bed pipeline for automated SN search and discovery. The pipeline uses images from the asteroid search conducted by the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking group at JPL. Improvements in our subtraction techniques and analysis have allowed us to increase our effective SN discovery rate to {approx}12 SNe/month in 2003.

  18. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  19. Fast algorithm for computing the Abel inversion integral in broadband reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, F.D.

    1995-10-01

    The application of the Hansen--Jablokow recursive technique is proposed for the numerical computation of the Abel inversion integral which is used in ({ital O}-mode) frequency-modulated broadband reflectometry to evaluate plasma density profiles. Compared to the usual numerical methods the recursive algorithm allows substantial time savings that can be important when processing massive amounts of data aiming to control the plasma in real time. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  20. Proof of polar ejection from the close-binary core of the planetary nebula Abell 63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Deborah L.; Pollacco, Don; O'Brien, T. J.; Bryce, M.; López, J. A.; Meaburn, J.; Vaytet, N. M. H.

    2007-02-01

    We present the first detailed kinematical analysis of the planetary nebula Abell 63, which is known to contain the eclipsing close-binary nucleus UU Sge. Abell 63 provides an important test case in investigating the role of close-binary central stars on the evolution of planetary nebulae. Longslit observations were obtained using the Manchester echelle spectrometer combined with the 2.1-m San Pedro Martir Telescope. The spectra reveal that the central bright rim of Abell 63 has a tube-like structure. A deep image shows collimated lobes extending from the nebula, which are shown to be high-velocity outflows. The kinematic ages of the nebular rim and the extended lobes are calculated to be 8400 +/- 500 and 12900 +/- 2800 yr, respectively, which suggests that the lobes were formed at an earlier stage than the nebular rim. This is consistent with expectations that disc-generated jets form immediately after the common envelope phase. A morphological-kinematical model of the central nebula is presented and the best-fitting model is found to have the same inclination as the orbital plane of the central binary system; this is the first proof that a close-binary system directly affects the shaping of its nebula. A Hubble-type flow is well-established in the morphological-kinematical modelling of the observed line profiles and imagery. Two possible formation models for the elongated lobes of Abell 63 are considered, (i) a low-density, pressure-driven jet excavates a cavity in the remnant asymptotic giant branch (AGB) envelope; (ii) high-density bullets form the lobes in a single ballistic ejection event.

  1. Du Pont Classifications of 6 Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, N.; Shappee, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    We report optical spectroscopy (range 370-910 nm) of six supernovae from the Backyard Observatory Supernova Search (BOSS) and the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) using the du Pont 2.5-m telescope (+ WFCCD) at Las Campanas Observatory on June 17 2016 UT. We performed a cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  2. The LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano; Lcogt Supernova Key Project

    2015-01-01

    I present first results from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) Supernova Key Project. LCOGT is a network of 11 robotic one and two meter telescopes spaced around the globe with imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. The supernova key project is a 3 year program to obtain lightcurves and spectra of at least 450 supernovae. About half are expected to be core-collapse supernovae, and half thermonuclear. We will start light curves and spectroscopy within hours of discovery, and focus on those SNe caught soon after explosion. The goals are fivefold: (1) observe supernovae soon after explosion to search for signs of their progenitors, (2) obtain a large homogeneous sample of supernovae for next generation cosmological studies, (3) obtain a large sample of supernovae for statistical studies comparing groups that are split into different populations, (4) obtain some of the first large samples of the recently discovered classes of rare and exotic explosions, (5) obtain the optical light curves and spectroscopy in support of studies at other wavelengths and using other facilities including UV observations, IR imaging and spectroscopy, host galaxy studies, high resolution spectroscopy, and late-time spectroscopy with large telescopes.

  3. SAS 3 and related observations of Abell 2029

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.; Schnopper, H. W.; Delvaille, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray and radio observations of the cluster of galaxies show that the central cD galaxy dominates the emissions. Resolution of the X-ray source shows that its extent is significantly greater than that of the profile of surface brightness of the cD galaxy. Dressler's model of most of the cluster mass with very high M/L(v) is similarly extended. The optically dark mass may provide low-energy X-ray emission of the coronae of 5 x 10 to the 16th stars with very high M/L(v), but in the 2-10 keV range the data are consistent with current theoretical predictions for hot intracluster gas.

  4. Deciphering the bipolar planetary nebula Abell 14 with 3D ionization and morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akras, S.; Clyne, N.; Boumis, P.; Monteiro, H.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Redman, M. P.; Williams, S.

    2016-04-01

    Abell 14 is a poorly studied object despite being considered a born-again planetary nebula. We performed a detailed study of its 3D morphology and ionization structure using the SHAPE and MOCASSIN codes. We found that Abell 14 is a highly evolved, bipolar nebula with a kinematical age of ˜19 400 yr for a distance of 4 kpc. The high He abundance, and N/O ratio indicate a progenitor of 5 M⊙ that has experienced the third dredge-up and hot bottom burning phases. The stellar parameters of the central source reveal a star at a highly evolved stage near to the white dwarf cooling track, being inconsistent with the born-again scenario. The nebula shows unexpectedly strong [N I] λ5200 and [O I] λ6300 emission lines indicating possible shock interactions. Abell 14 appears to be a member of a small group of highly evolved, extreme type-I planetary nebulae (PNe). The members of this group lie at the lower-left corner of the PNe regime on the [N II]/Hα versus [S II]/Hα diagnostic diagram, where shock-excited regions/objects are also placed. The low luminosity of their central stars, in conjunction with the large physical size of the nebulae, result in a very low photoionization rate, which can make any contribution of shock interaction easily perceptible, even for small velocities.

  5. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software.

    PubMed

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the 'omics' context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  6. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software

    PubMed Central

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the ’omics’ context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  7. Serre duality, Abel's theorem, and Jacobi inversion for supercurves over a thick superpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothstein, Mitchell J.; Rabin, Jeffrey M.

    2015-04-01

    The principal aim of this paper is to extend Abel's theorem to the setting of complex supermanifolds of dimension 1 | q over a finite-dimensional local supercommutative C-algebra. The theorem is proved by establishing a compatibility of Serre duality for the supercurve with Poincaré duality on the reduced curve. We include an elementary algebraic proof of the requisite form of Serre duality, closely based on the account of the reduced case given by Serre in Algebraic groups and class fields, combined with an invariance result for the topology on the dual of the space of répartitions. Our Abel map, taking Cartier divisors of degree zero to the dual of the space of sections of the Berezinian sheaf, modulo periods, is defined via Penkov's characterization of the Berezinian sheaf as the cohomology of the de Rham complex of the sheaf D of differential operators. We discuss the Jacobi inversion problem for the Abel map and give an example demonstrating that if n is an integer sufficiently large that the generic divisor of degree n is linearly equivalent to an effective divisor, this need not be the case for all divisors of degree n.

  8. The environments of poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliton, Mark Alan

    Poor clusters of galaxies are fundamental cosmological structures, but have received relatively little attention compared to rich, Abell clusters. In order to fully understand galaxy clustering, we must examine galaxy associations of all masses and richness levels. We have therefore undertaken an X-ray, optical, and radio investigation of the environments of poor clusters, in order to understand how their galaxies, radio sources, and intracluster media influence and interact with one another. To examine the global properties of poor clusters as observed in these three wavelength regimes, we have utilized three major sky surveys: the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, the Digitized Sky Survey, and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. For the purposes of this study, we construct a complete, volume-limited sample of 306 poor clusters in the redshift range 0.01--0.03. We compute the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of poor clusters and compare to XLFs of nearby, rich, Abell clusters. We also compute the bivariate radio luminosity function (BRLF), which is the fraction of radio-loud galaxies of a given optical magnitude. Higher richness clusters produce increased AGN activity in M* galaxies. We find that only clusters with an elliptical as their dominant galaxy possess an ICM. This implies that the presence of a dominant elliptical at the center of a poor cluster is more closely linked to the presence of an ICM than the overall morphological mix of the cluster galaxies. We also find a strong anti-correlation between richness and the fraction of starburst radio galaxies in poor clusters. There may be two factors which contribute to this anti-correlation. For richer clusters, the ICM density may be sufficiently strong that it can strip gas from starforming galaxies, thereby reducing the level of star formation in richer systems. Conversely, the poorest clusters contain higher galaxy compactness, which results in smaller nearest-neighbor distances between galaxies. These smaller galaxy separations

  9. Tidally-Induced Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Rosswog, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than 2x105M{circle_dot} swallow a typical 0.6M{circle_dot} white dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's selfgravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an Xray flare close to the Eddington limit of L{sub Edd} {approx} 10{sup 41}erg/s (Mbh/1000M{circle_dot}), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  10. Probing single biomolecules in solution using the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Goldsmith, Randall H; Jiang, Yan; Bockenhauer, Samuel D; Moerner, W E

    2012-11-20

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements allow researchers to study asynchronous dynamics and expose molecule-to-molecule structural and behavioral diversity, which contributes to the understanding of biological macromolecules. To provide measurements that are most consistent with the native environment of biomolecules, researchers would like to conduct these measurements in the solution phase if possible. However, diffusion typically limits the observation time to approximately 1 ms in many solution-phase single-molecule assays. Although surface immobilization is widely used to address this problem, this process can perturb the system being studied and contribute to the observed heterogeneity. Combining the technical capabilities of high-sensitivity single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, real-time feedback control and electrokinetic flow in a microfluidic chamber, we have developed a device called the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap to significantly prolong the observation time of single biomolecules in solution. We have applied the ABEL trap method to explore the photodynamics and enzymatic properties of a variety of biomolecules in aqueous solution and present four examples: the photosynthetic antenna allophycocyanin, the chaperonin enzyme TRiC, a G protein-coupled receptor protein, and the blue nitrite reductase redox enzyme. These examples illustrate the breadth and depth of information which we can extract in studies of single biomolecules with the ABEL trap. When confined in the ABEL trap, the photosynthetic antenna protein allophycocyanin exhibits rich dynamics both in its emission brightness and its excited state lifetime. As each molecule discontinuously converts from one emission/lifetime level to another in a primarily correlated way, it undergoes a series of state changes. We studied the ATP binding stoichiometry of the multi-subunit chaperonin enzyme TRiC in the ABEL trap by counting the number of hydrolyzed Cy3-ATP using stepwise

  11. The self-enrichment of globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, S.; Lake, G.

    1989-04-01

    It is shown that protoglobular clusters of primordial gas can confine the supernovae needed to enrich themselves. The required protocluster cloud masses and structural parameters are the same as those currently observed for the clusters. Two causal scenarios for star formation are examined to calculate the initial enrichment of primordial clouds. In the 'Christmas tree' scheme, the maximum final (Fe/H) is about 0.1. Since the time scale for formation and evolution of massive stars at the center of a cluster is nearly an order of magnitude less than the collapse time of the cluster, every globular cluster may have to survive a supernova detonation. If this is the case, the minimum mass of a globular cluster is about 10 to the 4.6th solar mass. 24 refs.

  12. The Richness Dependence of Galaxy Cluster Correlations: Results From A Redshift Survey Of Rich APM Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, R. A. C.; Dalton, G. B.; Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the spatial clustering properties of a new catalog of very rich galaxy clusters selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. These clusters are of comparable richness and space density to Abell Richness Class greater than or equal to 1 clusters, but selected using an objective algorithm from a catalog demonstrably free of artificial inhomogeneities. Evaluation of the two-point correlation function xi(sub cc)(r) for the full sample and for richer subsamples reveals that the correlation amplitude is consistent with that measured for lower richness APM clusters and X-ray selected clusters. We apply a maximum likelihood estimator to find the best fitting slope and amplitude of a power law fit to x(sub cc)(r), and to estimate the correlation length r(sub 0) (the value of r at which xi(sub cc)(r) is equal to unity). For clusters with a mean space density of 1.6 x 10(exp -6) h(exp 3) MpC(exp -3) (equivalent to the space density of Abell Richness greater than or equal to 2 clusters), we find r(sub 0) = 21.3(+11.1/-9.3) h(exp -1) Mpc (95% confidence limits). This is consistent with the weak richness dependence of xi(sub cc)(r) expected in Gaussian models of structure formation. In particular, the amplitude of xi(sub cc)(r) at all richnesses matches that of xi(sub cc)(r) for clusters selected in N-Body simulations of a low density Cold Dark Matter model.

  13. Intense Magnetism in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C.

    2002-05-01

    Observations of the Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars have provided strong evidence for a class of neutron stars with magnetic fields exceeding 1015 G. This talk will overview the excellent prospects for generating such intense fields in a core-collapse supernova, with a focus on the violent convective motions believed to occur both inside and outside the neutrinosphere of the forming neutron star. I will also examine the effects of late fallback, and the role of (electron-type) neutrinos in aiding buoyant motions of the magnetic field. The case will be made that the SGRs and AXPs are distinguished from classical radio pulsars by a very rapid initial rotation of the neutron star.

  14. Supernova olivine from cometary dust.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P; Lauretta, Dante S

    2005-07-29

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (<0.8 times solar), indicative of formation from a type II supernova. The aggregate contains olivine (forsterite 83) grains <100 nanometers in size, with microstructures that are consistent with minimal thermal alteration. This unusually iron-rich olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  15. Supernova olivine from cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2005-01-01

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (<0.8 times solar), indicative of formation from a type II supernova. The aggregate contains olivine (forsterite 83) grains <100 nanometers in size, with microstructures that are consistent with minimal thermal alteration. This unusually iron-rich olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  16. Spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, S. T.; Hall, A.; Fraser, M.; Campbell, H.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Pietro, N.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of four supernovae at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and the R300V grating (3500-8000 Ang; ~6 Ang resolution).

  17. Simulation of Kepler Supernova Explosion

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a simulation of the Kepler supernova as it interacts with material expelled by the giant star companion to the white dwarf before the latter exploded. It was assumed that the bulk ...

  18. [Reducing the searching range of supernova candidates automatically in a flood of spectra of galaxies].

    PubMed

    Tu, Liang-Ping; Luo, A-Li; Wu, Fu-Chao; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2009-12-01

    Supernova (SN) is one of the most intense astronomical phenomena among the known stellar activities, but compared with several billion astronomical objects which people have probed, the number of supernova the authors have observed is very small. Therefore, the authors need to find faster and higher-efficiency approaches to searching supernova. In the present paper, we present a novel automated method, which can be successfully used to reduce the range of searching for 1a supernova candidates in a huge number of galaxy spectra. The theoretical basis of the method is clustering and outlier picking, by introducing and measuring local outlier factors of data samples, description of statistic characters of SN emerges in low dimension space. Firstly, eigenvectors of Peter's 1a supernova templates are acquired through PCA projection, and the description of la supernova's statistic characters is calculated. Secondly, in all data set, the local outlier factor (LOF) of each galaxy is calculated including those SN and their host galaxy spectra, and all LOFs are arranged in descending order. Finally, spectra with the largest first one percent of all LOFs should be the reduced 1a SN candidates. Experiments show that this method is a robust and correct range reducing method, which can get rid of the galaxy spectra without supernova component automatically in a flood of galaxy spectra. It is a highly efficient approach to getting the reliable candidates in a spectroscopy survey for follow-up photometric observation.

  19. Photometric Properties of Galaxies in Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T.

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using optical photometry. We select these poor clusters as luminous, extended X-ray sources identified with poor galaxy systems in the EMSS catalogue of clusters of galaxies. The clusters are at moderate redshifts (0.08Abell richness 0 or less. The early-type galaxy populations are clearly evolved, as traced by the tightness of their color--magnitude relations and accordance of the latter with those of the Virgo Cluster. The fraction of blue galaxies is similar to those of low-redshift richness 0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The luminosity functions (LFs) of the individual clusters are not significantly different from each other. Using these, we construct composite LFs in B, V , and R bands (to MV=-18). The faint-end of these LFs are flat, like the V-band LF of other (e.g., MKW/AWM) poor clusters, but steeper than the field LF in the R-band. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts.

  20. Distant Supernovae Indicate Ever-Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    parameters, the age of the Universe and the geometry of space can be derived. They have been the focus of a large number of astronomical programmes over the past decades. Many aspects of the currently preferred cosmological model, the Hot Big Bang , have been impressively confirmed by observations of the expansion of the Universe, the cosmic background radiation, and also the explanation of the synthesis of light elements. Still, our knowledge about the dynamical state of the Universe, as well as the early formation of structures, i.e., of galaxies and stars, is far from complete - this remains a field of active research. Possibly, the simplest way to test our present assumptions in this direction is to measure accurate distances and compare them with the expected cosmic scale. This is where the recent results contribute to our understanding of the Universe. The key role of supernovae The two research teams, both with participation from ESO [1], have concentrated on the study of rare stellar explosions, during which certain old stars undergo internal incineration. In this process, explosive nuclear fusion burns matter into the most stable atomic nucleus, iron, and releases a gigantic amount of energy. ESO PR Photo 50a/98 ESO PR Photo 50a/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 648 pix - 768k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 2431 pix - 8.5Mb] ESO PR Photo 50b/98 ESO PR Photo 50b/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 649 pix - 784k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 2432 pix - 8.4Mb] These photos illustrate the follow-up observations on which the new results described in this Press Release are based. Sky fields with clusters of galaxies are monitored with the 4-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory (CTIO) in Chile and spectra are obtained of suddenly appearing star-like objects that may be supernovae. Confirmed Type Ia supernovae are then monitored by ESO telescopes at La Silla and at other observatories. In PR Photo 50a/98 , a supernova at redshift z = 0.51 [2] (corresponding to a distance of about 10

  1. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  2. The distribution of nearby rich clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Huchra, John P.; Geller, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    Redshifts are acquired for a complete sample of 351 Abell clusters with tenth-ranked galaxy magnitudes (m10) less than or equal to 16.5, including 115 entirely new cluster redshifts. Analysis of the spatial distribution of these clusters reveals no clustering on scales larger than 75/h Mpc. The correlation length is 20.0 (+/-4.3)/h Mpc, consistent with the results from other surveys. The frequency of voids with radii of order 60/h Mpc or less is consistent with the form and amplitude of the observed two-point correlation function. There is no significant difference between the clustering properties of clusters with RC = 0 and RC not less than 1. A percolation analysis yields 23 superclusters, 17 of which are new. The superclusters are not significantly elongated in the radial direction; large-scale peculiar motions are of order 1000 km/s or less.

  3. First supernova companion star found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Supernova 1993J exploding hi-res Size hi-res: 222 kb Credits: ESA and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge) Supernova 1993J exploding (artist’s impression) New observations with the Hubble Space Telescope allow a look into a supernova explosion under development. In this artist’s view the red supergiant supernova progenitor star (left) is exploding after having transferred about 10 solar masses of hydrogen gas to the blue companion star (right). This interaction process happened over about 250 years and affected the supernova explosion to such an extent that SN 1993J was later known as one of the most peculiar supernovae ever seen. Supernova 1993J exploding hi-res Size hi-res: 4200 kb Credits: ESA and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge) The site of the Supernova 1993J explosion A virtual journey into one of the spiral arms of the grand spiral Messier 81 (imaged with the Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, left) reveals the superb razor-sharp imaging power of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (Hubble’s WFPC2 instrument, below). The close-up (with Hubble’s ACS, to the right) is centred on the newly discovered companion star to Supernova 1993J that itself is no longer visible. The quarter-circle around the supernova companion is a so-called light echo originating from sheets of dust in the galaxy reflecting light from the original supernova explosion. Supernova 1993J explosing site hi-res Size hi-res: 1502 kb Credits: ESA and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge) Close-up of the Supernova 1993J explosion site (ACS/HRC image) This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the area in Messier 81 where Supernova 1993J exploded. The companion to the supernova ‘mother star’ that remains after the explosion is seen in the centre of the image. The image is taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and is a combination of four exposures taken with ACS’ High Resolution Camera. The exposures were taken through two near-UV filters (250W

  4. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. II. Photometric redshifts and rest frame properties in Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Amorín, R.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; McLure, R. J.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Mortlock, A.; Parsa, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Balestra, I.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Rosati, P.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present the first public release of photometric redshifts, galaxy rest frame properties and associated magnification values in the cluster and parallel pointings of the first two Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416. The released catalogues aim to provide a reference for future investigations of extragalactic populations in these legacy fields: from lensed high-redshift galaxies to cluster members themselves. Methods: We exploit a multiwavelength catalogue, ranging from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to ground-based K and Spitzer IRAC, which is specifically designed to enable detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. The multiband information is used to derive photometric redshifts and physical properties of sources detected either in the H-band image alone, or from a stack of four WFC3 bands. To minimize systematics, median photometric redshifts are assembled from six different approaches to photo-z estimates. Their reliability is assessed through a comparison with available spectroscopic samples. State-of-the-art lensing models are used to derive magnification values on an object-by-object basis by taking into account sources positions and redshifts. Results: We show that photometric redshifts reach a remarkable ~3-5% accuracy. After accounting for magnification, the H-band number counts are found to be in agreement at bright magnitudes with number counts from the CANDELS fields, while extending the presently available samples to galaxies that, intrinsically, are as faint as H ~ 32-33, thanks to strong gravitational lensing. The Frontier Fields allow the galaxy stellar mass distribution to be probed, depending on magnification, at 0.5-1.5 dex lower masses with respect to extragalactic wide fields, including sources at Mstar ~ 107-108 M⊙ at z > 5. Similarly, they allow the detection of objects with intrinsic star formation rates (SFRs) >1 dex lower than in the CANDELS fields reaching 0.1-1 M⊙/yr at z ~ 6-10. The

  5. Spectropolarimetric diagnostics of thermonuclear supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifan; Baade, Dietrich; Patat, Ferdinando

    2007-01-12

    Even at extragalactic distances, the shape of supernova ejecta can be effectively diagnosed by spectropolarimetry. We present results for 17 type Ia supernovae that allow a statistical study of the correlation among the geometric structures and other observable parameters of type Ia supernovae. These observations suggest that type Ia supernova ejecta typically consist of a smooth, central, iron-rich core and an outer layer with chemical asymmetries. The degree of this peripheral asphericity is correlated with the light-curve decline rate of type Ia supernovae. These results lend strong support to delayed-detonation models of type Ia supernovae.

  6. How multiple supernovae overlap to form superbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Naveen; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Sharma, Prateek; Nath, Biman B.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the formation of superbubbles through energy deposition by multiple supernovae (SNe) in a uniform medium. We use total energy conserving, 3-D hydrodynamic simulations to study how SNe correlated in space and time create superbubbles. While isolated SNe fizzle out completely by ˜1 Myr due to radiative losses, for a realistic cluster size it is likely that subsequent SNe go off within the hot/dilute bubble and sustain the shock till the cluster lifetime. For realistic cluster sizes, we find that the bubble remains overpressured only if, for a given ng0, NOB is sufficiently large. While most of the input energy is still lost radiatively, superbubbles can retain up to ˜5 - 10% of the input energy in form of kinetic+thermal energy till 10 Myr for ISM density ng0 ≈ 1 cm-3. We find that the mechanical efficiency decreases for higher densities (η _mech ∝ n_{g0}^{-2/3}). We compare the radii and velocities of simulated supershells with observations and the classical adiabatic model. Our simulations show that the superbubbles retain only ≲ 10% of the injected energy, thereby explaining the observed smaller size and slower expansion of supershells. We also confirm that a sufficiently large (≳ 104) number of SNe is required to go off in order to create a steady wind with a stable termination shock within the superbubble. We show that the mechanical efficiency increases with increasing resolution, and that explicit diffusion is required to obtain converged results.

  7. The Cluster of Galaxies Surrounding Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Frazer N.; Ledlow, Michael J.; Morrison, Glenn E.; Hill, John M.

    1997-10-01

    We report optical imaging and spectroscopy of 41 galaxies in a 22' square region surrounding Cygnus A. The results show that there is an extensive rich cluster associated with Cyg A of Abell richness of at least 1 and possibly as high as 4. The velocity histogram has two peaks, one centered on Cyg A and a more significant peak redshifted by about 2060 km s-1 from the velocity of Cyg A. The dynamical centroid of the spatial distribution is also shifted somewhat to the northwest. However, statistical tests show only weak evidence that there are two distinct clusters. The entire system has a velocity dispersion of 1581 km s-1, which is slightly larger than other, well-studied examples of rich clusters.

  8. Constraining the power spectrum using clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgani, S.; Moscardini, L.; Plionis, M.; Górski, K. M.; Holtzman, J.; Klypin, A.; Primack, J. R.; Smith, C. C.; Stompor, R.

    1997-03-01

    We analyze an extended redshift sample of Abell/ACO clusters and compare the results with those coming from numerical simulations of the cluster distribution, based on the truncated Zel'dovich approximation (TZA), for a list of eleven dark matter (DM) models. For each model we run several realizations, so that we generate a set of 48 independent mock Abell/ACO cluster samples per model, on which we estimate cosmic variance effects. Other than the standard CDM model, we consider (a) Ω0 = 1 CDM models based on lowering the Hubble parameter and/or on tilting the primordial spectrum; (b) Ω0 = 1 Cold + Hot DM models with 0.1 ≤ Ων ≤0.5; (c) low-density flat ΛCDM models with 0.3 ≤ Ω0 ≤0.5. We compare real and simulated cluster distributions by analysing correlation statistics, the probability density function, and supercluster properties from percolation analysis. We introduce a generalized definition of the spectrum shape parameter Γ in terms of σ25/ σ8, where σ ris the rms fluctuation amplitude within a sphere of radius r. As a general result, we find that the distribution of galaxy clusters provides a constraint only on the shape of the power spectrum, but not on its amplitude: a shape parameter 0.18 ≲ Γ ≲ 0.25 and an effective spectral index at the 20 h-1 Mpc scale -1.1 ≲ neff ≲ -0.9 are required by the Abell/ACO data. In order to obtain complementary constraints on the spectrum amplitude, we consider the cluster abundance as estimated using the Press-Schechter approach, whose reliability is explicitly tested against N-body simulations. By combining results from the analysis of the distribution and the abundance of clusters we conclude that, of the cosmological models considered here, the only viable models are either Cold + Hot DM ones with 0.2 ≲ Ων ≲ 0.3, better if shared between two massive ν species, and ΛCDM ones with 0.3 ≲ Ω0≲0.5.

  9. Kinematics of cD Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. M.; Oegerle, W. R.

    1992-12-01

    In order to determine the distribution and frequency of peculiar velocities of cD galaxies and the nature of their parent clusters, we have begun a survey of a statistically complete sample of cD clusters with the MX multifiber spectrometer at Steward Observatory. If ``speeding'' cDs are common, then their existence must be taken into account by formation models, which usually assume that cDs lie at rest in the bottom of the cluster potential well (ie. the cannibalism model). Our sample is the subset of the Hoessel, Gunn & Thuan (1980) Abell cluster sample satisfying the following constraints: (1) the cluster must be of Rood-Sastry type cD, (2) have redshift <0.08, and (3) have declination >-10(deg) . This provides a statistically complete, unbiased sample of cD clusters. There are 24 Abell clusters in this sample, and we present data for 10 clusters. The goal of the survey is to collect ~ 60 redshifts per cluster, in order that peculiar velocities of 250\\ km\\ s(-1) or higher can be verified at a >2.5sigma level of significance. In the current sample of clusters, 7 cD galaxies have no statistically significant peculiar velocities (A399, 401, 1749, 1809, 2063, 2124, 2589). Three other clusters (A1795, 2107, and 2634) have peculiar or marginally peculiar velocities, but show evidence for subclustering or non-Gaussian velocity distributions. Based on the data taken so far, ~ 25% of all cD galaxies appear to have statistically significant peculiar velocities with respect to their parent clusters. Evidence is now beginning to mount that these peculiar velocities are due to subclustering, as first suggested by Sharples etal (1988) & Hill etal (1988).

  10. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  11. Photometric Properties of Poor Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using multi-color optical photometry obtained at the Vainu Bappu Telescope, India. The clusters, selected from the EMSS Catalog, are at moderate redshifts (0.08 < z < 0.25), of equivalent Abell richness R=0, and appear to be dynamically young. The early-type galaxy populations are clearly evolved, as traced by the tightness of the color-magnitude relations and the accordance of the latter with those of the Virgo cluster. The blue galaxy fractions are similar to those of R=0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The composite luminosity functions (LFs) in B, V, and R bands are flat at the faint end, similar to the V-band LF derived by Yamagata & Maehara for other (MKW/AWM) poor clusters but steeper than the R-band field LF derived by Lin et al. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts. The brightest galaxies of three of these poor clusters appear to be luminous ellipticals with no incontrovertible signatures of a halo. It is likely that they were formed from multiple mergers early in the history of the clusters.

  12. The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /NOAO, Tucson /Inst. Astron., Honolulu /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Bohr Inst. /Notre Dame U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Stockholm U.

    2007-01-08

    We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

  13. Light-echo spectroscopy of historic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Oliver

    Young Galactic supernova remnants are unique laboratories for supernova physics. Due to their proximity they provide us with the most detailed view of the outcome of a supernova. However, the exact spectroscopic types of their original explosions have been undetermined so far -hindering to link the wealth of multi-wavelength knowledge about their remnants with the diverse population of supernovae. Light echoes, reflektions of the brilliant supernova burst of light by interstellar dust, provide a unique opportunity to reobserve today -with powerful scientific instruments of the 21st century -historic supernova exlosions even after hundreds of years and to conclude on their nature. We report on optical light-echo spectroscopy of two famous Galactic supernovae: Tycho Brahe's SN 1572 and the supernova that created the Cassiopeia A remnant around the year 1680. These observations finally recovered the missing spectroscopic classifications and provide new constraints on explosion models for future studies.

  14. Core Collapse Supernova Models and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-01-01

    After the Big Bang, production of heavy elements in the early Universe takes place in the first stars and their supernova explosions. The nature of the first supernovae, however, has not been well understood. The signature of nucleosynthesis yields of the first supernovae can be seen in the elemental abundance patterns observed in extremely metal-poor stars. Interestingly, those abundance patterns show some peculiarities relative to the solar abundance pattern, which should provide important clues to understanding the nature of early generations of supernovae. We review the recent results of the nucleosynthesis yields of massive stars. We examine how those yields are affected by some hydrodynamical effects during the supernova explosions, namely, explosion energies from those of hypernovae to faint supernovae, mixing and fallback of processed materials, asphericity, etc. Those parameters in the supernova nucleosynthesis models are constrained from observational data of supernovae and metal-poor stars.

  15. VLA Discovers Giant Rings Around Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have discovered giant, ring-like structures around a cluster of galaxies. The discovery provides tantalizing new information about how such galaxy clusters are assembled, about magnetic fields in the vast spaces between galaxy clusters, and possibly about the origin of cosmic rays. Radio-Optical Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (Radio/Optical) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Above, a combined radio/optical image shows the galaxy cluster Abell 3376 in visible light (blue) and radio (red) images. The giant radio arcs surrounding the cluster were discovered using the Very Large Array. The visible-light image is from the Digitized Sky survey. Below, an X-ray image of Abell 3376 made using the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton telescope shows a spectacular, bullet-shaped region of X-rays coming from gas heated to 60 million degrees Kelvin. The bullet shape results from the supersonic collision of a smaller smaller galaxy subcluster with the main body of the larger cluster. Click on images for larger version. X-Ray Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (X-Ray) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, ESA "These giant, radio-emitting rings probably are the result of shock waves caused by violent collisions of smaller groups of galaxies within the cluster," said Joydeep Bagchi, of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, who led an international research team. The scientists reported their findings in the November 3 edition of the journal Science. The newly-discovered ring segments, some 6 million light-years across, surround a galaxy cluster called Abell 3376, more than 600 million light-years from Earth. They were revealed because fast-moving electrons emitted radio waves as they spiraled around magnetic field lines in intergalactic space. "Even from this large distance, the feeble radio waves were easily picked up by the VLA

  16. INFRARED OBSERVATIONAL MANIFESTATIONS OF YOUNG DUSTY SUPER STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-González, Sergio; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    The growing evidence pointing at core-collapse supernovae as large dust producers makes young massive stellar clusters ideal laboratories to study the evolution of dust immersed in a hot plasma. Here we address the stochastic injection of dust by supernovae, and follow its evolution due to thermal sputtering within the hot and dense plasma generated by young stellar clusters. Under these considerations, dust grains are heated by means of random collisions with gas particles which result in the appearance of  infrared spectral signatures. We present time-dependent infrared spectral energy distributions that are to be expected from young stellar clusters. Our results are based on hydrodynamic calculations that account for the stochastic injection of dust by supernovae. These also consider gas and dust radiative cooling, stochastic dust temperature fluctuations, the exit of dust grains out of the cluster volume due to the cluster wind, and a time-dependent grain size distribution.

  17. Supernovae. Old supernova dust factory revealed at the Galactic center.

    PubMed

    Lau, R M; Herter, T L; Morris, M R; Li, Z; Adams, J D

    2015-04-24

    Dust formation in supernova ejecta is currently the leading candidate to explain the large quantities of dust observed in the distant, early universe. However, it is unclear whether the ejecta-formed dust can survive the hot interior of the supernova remnant (SNR). We present infrared observations of ~0.02 solar masses of warm (~100 kelvin) dust seen near the center of the ~10,000-year-old Sagittarius A East SNR at the Galactic center. Our findings indicate the detection of dust within an older SNR that is expanding into a relatively dense surrounding medium (electron density ~10(3) centimeters(-3)) and has survived the passage of the reverse shock. The results suggest that supernovae may be the dominant dust-production mechanism in the dense environment of galaxies of the early universe.

  18. Supernovae. Old supernova dust factory revealed at the Galactic center.

    PubMed

    Lau, R M; Herter, T L; Morris, M R; Li, Z; Adams, J D

    2015-04-24

    Dust formation in supernova ejecta is currently the leading candidate to explain the large quantities of dust observed in the distant, early universe. However, it is unclear whether the ejecta-formed dust can survive the hot interior of the supernova remnant (SNR). We present infrared observations of ~0.02 solar masses of warm (~100 kelvin) dust seen near the center of the ~10,000-year-old Sagittarius A East SNR at the Galactic center. Our findings indicate the detection of dust within an older SNR that is expanding into a relatively dense surrounding medium (electron density ~10(3) centimeters(-3)) and has survived the passage of the reverse shock. The results suggest that supernovae may be the dominant dust-production mechanism in the dense environment of galaxies of the early universe. PMID:25791082

  19. The Shape of Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What causes the tremendous explosions of superluminous supernovae? New observations reveal the geometry of one such explosion, SN 2015bn, providing clues as to its source.A New Class of ExplosionsImage of a type Ia supernova in the galaxy NGC 4526. [NASA/ESA]Supernovae are powerful explosions that can briefly outshine the galaxies that host them. There are several different classifications of supernovae, each with a different physical source such as thermonuclear instability in a white dwarf, caused by accretion of too much mass, or the exhaustion of fuel in the core of a massive star, leading to the cores collapse and expulsion of its outer layers.In recent years, however, weve detected another type of supernovae, referred to as superluminous supernovae. These particularly energetic explosions last longer months instead of weeks and are brighter at their peaks than normal supernovae by factors of tens to hundreds.The physical cause of these unusual explosions is still a topic of debate. Recently, however, a team of scientists led by Cosimo Inserra (Queens University Belfast) has obtained new observations of a superluminous supernova that might help address this question.The flux and the polarization level (black lines) along the dominant axis of SN 2015bn, 24 days before peak flux (left) and 28 days after peak flux (right). Blue lines show the authors best-fitting model. [Inserra et al. 2016]Probing GeometryInserra and collaborators obtained two sets of observations of SN 2015bn one roughly a month before and one a month after the superluminous supernovas peak brightness using a spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope in Chile. These observations mark the first spectropolarimetric data for a superluminous supernova.Spectropolarimetry is the practice of obtaining information about the polarization of radiation from an objects spectrum. Polarization carries information about broken spatial symmetries in the object: only if the object is perfectly symmetric can it

  20. The Supernova Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethe, Hans A.

    1995-08-01

    Vigorous convection is the key to the supernova mechanism. An analytic theory is presented which parallels the computations of Herant et al. Energy is delivered by neutrinos to the convecting medium. The most important quantity is p1r3, where P1 is the density outside the shock. This can be obtained from the computations of Wilson et al., since it is not affected by the convection behind the shock. It is closely related to Mdot, the rate at which matter falls in toward the center. The outgoing shock is dominated by the Hugoniot equation; the shock cannot move out until its energy is of the order of 1 foe (= 1051 ergs). Once it moves, its velocity and energy are calculated as functions of its radius. Nucleosynthesis gives an appreciable contribution to the energy. A substantial fraction of the energy is initially stored as nuclear dissociation energy, and then released as the shock moves out. This energy cannot at present be calculated from first principles, but it can be deduced from the observed energy of SN 1987A of 1.4±0.4 foe. From the result it is shown that about one-half of the infalling material goes into the shock and one-half accretes to the neutron star.

  1. Supernova Remnants And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-11-29

    It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

  2. A Supernova's Shockwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Supernovae are the explosive deaths of the universe's most massive stars. In death, these volatile creatures blast tons of energetic waves into the cosmos, destroying much of the dust surrounding them.

    This false-color composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of one such explosion. The remnant, called N132D, is the wispy pink shell of gas at the center of this image. The pinkish color reveals a clash between the explosion's high-energy shockwaves and surrounding dust grains.

    In the background, small organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are shown as tints of green. The blue spots represent stars in our galaxy along this line of sight.

    N132D is located 163,000 light-years away in a neighboring galaxy called, the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    In this image, infrared light at 4.5 microns is mapped to blue, 8.0 microns to green and 24 microns to red. Broadband X-ray light is mapped purple. The infrared data were taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer, while the X-ray data were captured by Chandra.

  3. Supernova explosions in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Burrows, A

    2000-02-17

    During the lifetime of our Milky Way galaxy, there have been something like 100 million supernova explosions, which have enriched the Galaxy with the oxygen we breathe, the iron in our cars, the calcium in our bones and the silicon in the rocks beneath our feet. These exploding stars also influence the birth of new stars and are the source of the energetic cosmic rays that irradiate us on the Earth. The prodigious amount of energy (approximately 10(51), or approximately 2.5 x 10(28) megatonnes of TNT equivalent) and momentum associated with each supernova may even have helped to shape galaxies as they formed in the early Universe. Supernovae are now being used to measure the geometry of the Universe, and have recently been implicated in the decades-old mystery of the origin of the gamma-ray bursts. Together with major conceptual advances in our theoretical understanding of supernovae, these developments have made supernovae the centre of attention in astrophysics.

  4. Is the Eagle Nebula powered by a hidden supernova remnant ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, Francois

    2008-10-01

    Spitzer observations of the Eagle nebula (M16) reveal the presence of a large (8 pc diameter) shell of dust heated to anomalously high temperatures. Modeling of dust excitation shows that the shell emission cannot be powered by the cluster UV radiation but that it can be accounted for by collisionally heated dust in a young (a few 1000 yrs) supernova remnant. We have re-analyzed deep Chandra observations that show diffuse emission consistent with this hypothesis, but also with galactic ridge emission. We propose a 50 ksec XMM observation to probe the spatial extent of the diffuse X-ray emission beyond the Spitzer shell. Absence of emission outside of this shell will strongly support the supernova remnant interpretation

  5. Learning from the scatter in type ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Vallinotto, Alberto; /Fermilab /Chicago U.

    2005-11-01

    Type Ia Supernovae are standard candles so their mean apparent magnitude has been exploited to learn about the redshift-distance relationship. Besides intrinsic scatter in this standard candle, additional scatter is caused by gravitational magnification by large scale structure. Here they probe the dependence of this dispersion on cosmological parameters and show that information about the amplitude of clustering, {sigma}{sub s}, is contained in the scatter. In principle, it will be possible to constrain {sigma}{sub s} to within 5% with observations of 2000 Type Ia Supernovae. They identify three sources of systematic error--evolution of intrinsic scatter, baryon contributions to lensing, and non-Gaussianity of lensing--which will make this measurement difficult.

  6. Theory and phenomenology of supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2015-07-15

    The theory and phenomenology of supernova neutrinos is reviewed, with focus on the most recent advancements on the neutrino flux predicted by supernova numerical models, on neutrino oscillations inside the star and in the Earth, and on the physics of the diffuse supernova neutrino background. Future directions of research are briefly summarized.

  7. Evidence for Tides and Interactions in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conselice, C. J.; Gallagher, J. S.

    1997-12-01

    We present preliminary results of a search for tidally distorted, or interacting galaxies in the galaxy clusters: Abell 2199, AWM 5, AWM 3, the Coma and Perseus clusters. This is part of a large study to determine the nature of small-scale structure in galaxy clusters of various morphologies. Our B and R band observations were made with the CCD imager on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope, and typically have an angular resolution of 1 arcsec or better. We are able to classify all of the observed structures into seven different types. These include: Galaxy Interactions, Multiple Galaxies, Tailed Galaxies, Dwarf Galaxy Groups, Galaxy Aggregates, Distorted Galaxies, and Line Galaxies. We present examples of objects in these categories and conclude that interactions that perturb individual galaxies are common in clusters of galaxies, despite the high relative random velocities between cluster members.

  8. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  9. Standardization of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Rodrigo C. V.; Calvão, Maurício O.; Reis, Ribamar R. R.; Siffert, Beatriz B.

    2015-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been intensively investigated due to their great homogeneity and high luminosity, which make it possible to use them as standardizable candles for the determination of cosmological parameters. In 2011, the physics Nobel prize was awarded ‘for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.’ This is a pedagogical article, aimed at those starting their study of that subject, in which we dwell on some topics related to the analysis of SNe Ia and their use in luminosity distance estimators. Here, we investigate their spectral properties and light curve standardization, paying careful attention to the fundamental quantities directly related to the SNe Ia observables. Finally, we describe our own step-by-step implementation of a classical light curve fitter, the stretch, applying it to real data from the Carnegie Supernova Project.

  10. Supernovae, young remnants, and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshner, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical abundance data from extragalactic supernovae and from supernova remnants (SNR) less than 1000 yrs old are employed to show that nuclear burning beyond helium synthesis actually occurs. Supernova (SN) are classified into types I or II, having no hydrogen lines or featuring hydrogen lines, respectively. The SN I's have been observed as having a preponderance of Fe lines, and emitting from a source at around 12,000 K with a center continuum of approximately 10 AU. Decay chains which could account for detected luminosities and spectra are presented, noting a good fit of Fe II spectrum with observed SN spectra. SNR pass through younger and older stages, going from the outpouring of material to diffusion in the interstellar medium. Expanding flocculi from young SNR show oxygen abundances as well as lines from sulfur, calcium, and argon, with a corresponding necessity of an explosive source of 15 solar masses.

  11. Dynamics of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's SNR have revealed a strong interaction with the ambient medium, far in excess of that expected at a distance of about 600 pc away from the Galactic plane where Kepler's SNR is located. This has been interpreted as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the dense circumstellar medium (CSM). Based on the bow-shock model of Bandiera (1985), we study the dynamics of this interaction. The CSM distribution consists of an undisturbed stellar wind of a moving supernova progenitor and a dense shell formed in its interaction with a tenuous interstellar medium. Supernova ejecta drive a blast wave through the stellar wind which splits into the transmitted and reflected shocks upon hitting this bow-shock shell. We identify the transmitted shock with the nonradiative, Balmer-dominated shocks found recently in Kepler's SNR. The transmitted shock most probably penetrated the shell in the vicinity of the stagnation point.

  12. Nature of type 1 Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shklovskiy, I. S.

    1980-01-01

    The nature of type 1 supernovae (SN 1) is discussed through a comparison of observational evidence and theoretical perspectives relating to both type 1 and 2 supernovae. In particular two hypotheses relating to SN 1 phenomenon are examined: the first proposing that SN 1 are components of binary systems in which, at a comparatively late stage of evolution, overflow of the mass occurs; the second considers pre-SN 1 to be recently evolved stars with a mass greater than 1.4 solar mass (white dwarfs). In addition, an explanation of the reduced frequency of flares of SN 1 in spiral galaxies as related to that in elliptical galaxies is presented.

  13. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-10-20

    An explanation is given of the low value of R lambda triple bond A lambda/E(B - V), the ratio of absolute to selective extinction deduced from Type Ia supernova observations. The idea involves scattering by dust clouds located in the circumstellar environment, or at the highest velocity shells of the supernova ejecta. The scattered light tends to reduce the effective R lambda in the optical, but has an opposite effect in the ultraviolet. The presence of circumstellar dust can be tested by ultraviolet to near infrared observations and by multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SNe Ia.

  14. Educational Resources on Supernovae for Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, James T.

    The National Science Education Standards (1996, National Academy Press) suggest mention of objects like the ``sun, moon, stars" in grades K-4 and element formation in grades 9-12. Children's librarians and some astronomy librarians should know about some of the resources for children on supernovae not only because supernovae are critical to higher element formation, but also to educate others about the universe's expansion and stars. In addition, basic bibliometrics on these resources yields lessons on the importance of using many indexes, the pattern of literature for children on supernovae, the types of resources on supernovae, and the scattering of resources/information for children on supernovae.

  15. Inverting ion images without Abel inversion: maximum entropy reconstruction of velocity maps.

    PubMed

    Dick, Bernhard

    2014-01-14

    A new method for the reconstruction of velocity maps from ion images is presented, which is based on the maximum entropy concept. In contrast to other methods used for Abel inversion the new method never applies an inversion or smoothing to the data. Instead, it iteratively finds the map which is the most likely cause for the observed data, using the correct likelihood criterion for data sampled from a Poissonian distribution. The entropy criterion minimizes the information content in this map, which hence contains no information for which there is no evidence in the data. Two implementations are proposed, and their performance is demonstrated with simulated and experimental data: Maximum Entropy Velocity Image Reconstruction (MEVIR) obtains a two-dimensional slice through the velocity distribution and can be compared directly to Abel inversion. Maximum Entropy Velocity Legendre Reconstruction (MEVELER) finds one-dimensional distribution functions Q(l)(v) in an expansion of the velocity distribution in Legendre polynomials P((cos θ) for the angular dependence. Both MEVIR and MEVELER can be used for the analysis of ion images with intensities as low as 0.01 counts per pixel, with MEVELER performing significantly better than MEVIR for images with low intensity. Both methods perform better than pBASEX, in particular for images with less than one average count per pixel.

  16. A New Empirical Model for Type Ia Supernovae Using Spectrophotometry from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Clare; Nearby Supernova Factory

    2016-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae are currently limited in their use for cosmology by dispersion in standardized magnitudes. A large part of this dispersion is due to the fact that the current lightcurve fitters do not describe the full range of Type Ia supernova diversity. I will present an empirical model of Type Ia supernovae that captures a wider range of supernova behavior and can improve magnitude standardization. This model is constructed using over 2000 spectrophotometric observations of Type Ia supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory. The true spectral time series for each supernova is modeled using Gaussian Processes. The supernova model predictions are used to calculate the principal components of the full set of supernova spectral time series. K-fold cross-validation is used to determine how many components correlate to absolute magnitude. Future work will test this method on independent photometric data sets.

  17. Are supernovae recorded in indigenous astronomical traditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    2014-07-01

    Novae and supernovae are rare astronomical events that would have had an influence on the skywatching peoples who witnessed them. Although several bright novae/supernovae have been visible during recorded human history, there are many proposed but no confirmed accounts of supernovae in indigenous oral traditions or material culture. Criteria are established for confirming novae/supernovae in oral traditions and material culture, and claims from around the world are discussed to determine if they meet these criteria. Aboriginal Australian traditions are explored for possible descriptions of novae/supernovae. Although representations of supernovae may exist in Aboriginal traditions, there are currently no confirmed accounts of supernovae in Indigenous Australian oral or material traditions.

  18. Compton Observatory observations of clusters of galaxies and extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This task involved the investigation of the emission of clusters of galaxies, particularly those which contain extended radio emission, in the gamma-ray region of the spectrum. Observations were made of several clusters using the Compton Observatory EGRET instrument. For each cluster a measured flux or upper limit on the gamma-ray flux was obtained. In only one case, Abell 2199, was there a significant measured flux. This source is spatially confused with a know blazar in the field of view. The observation is consistent with all emissions being from the blazar.

  19. The Utility and Psychometric Properties of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasingame, Gerry D.; Abel, Gene G.; Jordan, Alan; Wiegel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and utility of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "individuals with intellectual disabilities" (ABID) for assessment of sexual interest and problematic sexual behaviors. The study examined the preliminary psychometric properties and evaluated the clinical utility of the ABID based on a sample of 495…

  20. The Supernova - A Stellar Spectacle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, W. C.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics concerning supernovae are included: the outburst as observed and according to theory, the stellar remnant, the nebular remnant, and a summary…

  1. Radio studies of extragalactic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Weiler, K W; Sramek, R A; Panagia, N

    1986-03-14

    Some exploding stars (supernovae) are powerful emitters of centimeter radio radiation. Detailed observations have shown that these supernovae quickly become detectable in the radio range, first at shorter wavelengths (higher frequencies) and later at progressively longer and longer wavelengths (lower frequencies). This part of the phenomenon appears to be well explained by a monotonic decrease in the amount of ionized material surrounding the radio-emitting regions as the shock from the explosion travels outward. The radio emission itself is of a nonthermal, synchrotron origin, as is the case in most bright cosmic radio sources. Once the absorption effects become negligible, the radio intensity declines with time until reaching the detection limit of the telescope. Models suggest that the absorbing material originates in a dense wind of matter lost by the supernova progenitor star, or by its companion if it is in a binary system, in the last stages of evolution before the explosion. The synchrotron radio emission can be generated either externally by the shock wave from the explosion propagating through this same high density stellar wind or internally by a rapidly rotating neutron star, which is the collapsed core of the exploded star. Present results appear to favor the former model for at least the first several years after the supernova explosion, although the latter model remains viable.

  2. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-05-09

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  3. The supernova: A stellar spectacle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    The life of a star, the supernova, related objects and their importance in astronomy and science in general are discussed. Written primarily for science teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth sciences, the booklet contains a glossary, reference sources, suggested topics for discussion, and projects for individual or group assignment.

  4. A Cluster and a Sea of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    A new wide-field image released today by ESO displays many thousands of distant galaxies, and more particularly a large group belonging to the massive galaxy cluster known as Abell 315. As crowded as it may appear, this assembly of galaxies is only the proverbial "tip of the iceberg", as Abell 315 - like most galaxy clusters - is dominated by dark matter. The huge mass of this cluster deflects light from background galaxies, distorting their observed shapes slightly. When looking at the sky with the unaided eye, we mostly only see stars within our Milky Way galaxy and some of its closest neighbours. More distant galaxies are just too faint to be perceived by the human eye, but if we could see them, they would literally cover the sky. This new image released by ESO is both a wide-field and long-exposure one, and reveals thousands of galaxies crowding an area on the sky roughly as large as the full Moon. These galaxies span a vast range of distances from us. Some are relatively close, as it is possible to distinguish their spiral arms or elliptical halos, especially in the upper part of the image. The more distant appear just like the faintest of blobs - their light has travelled through the Universe for eight billion years or more before reaching Earth. Beginning in the centre of the image and extending below and to the left, a concentration of about a hundred yellowish galaxies identifies a massive galaxy cluster, designated with the number 315 in the catalogue compiled by the American astronomer George Abell in 1958 [1]. The cluster is located between the faint, red and blue galaxies and the Earth, about two billion light-years away from us. It lies in the constellation of Cetus (the Whale). Galaxy clusters are some of the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity. But there is more in these structures than the many galaxies we can see. Galaxies in these giants contribute to only ten percent of the mass, with hot gas in between galaxies

  5. Pasta phases in core-collapse supernova matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Helena; Chiacchiera, Silvia; Providência, Constança

    2016-04-01

    The pasta phase in core-collapse supernova matter (finite temperatures and fixed proton fractions) is studied within relativistic mean field models. Three different calculations are used for comparison, the Thomas-Fermi (TF), the Coexisting Phases (CP) and the Compressible Liquid Drop (CLD) approximations. The effects of including light clusters in nuclear matter and the densities at which the transitions between pasta configurations and to uniform matter occur are also investigated. The free energy and pressure, in the space of particle number densities and temperatures expected to cover the pasta region, are calculated. Finally, a comparison with a finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculation is drawn.

  6. Cosmological constraints from strong gravitational lensing in clusters of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Jullo, Eric; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Kneib, Jean-Paul; D'Aloisio, Anson; Limousin, Marceau; Richard, Johan; Schimd, Carlo

    2010-08-20

    Current efforts in observational cosmology are focused on characterizing the mass-energy content of the universe. We present results from a geometric test based on strong lensing in galaxy clusters. Based on Hubble Space Telescope images and extensive ground-based spectroscopic follow-up of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1689, we used a parametric model to simultaneously constrain the cluster mass distribution and dark energy equation of state. Combining our cosmological constraints with those from x-ray clusters and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year data gives Omega(m) = 0.25 +/- 0.05 and w(x) = -0.97 +/- 0.07, which are consistent with results from other methods. Inclusion of our method with all other available techniques brings down the current 2sigma contours on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w(x) by approximately 30%.

  7. Cosmological constraints from strong gravitational lensing in clusters of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Jullo, Eric; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Kneib, Jean-Paul; D'Aloisio, Anson; Limousin, Marceau; Richard, Johan; Schimd, Carlo

    2010-08-20

    Current efforts in observational cosmology are focused on characterizing the mass-energy content of the universe. We present results from a geometric test based on strong lensing in galaxy clusters. Based on Hubble Space Telescope images and extensive ground-based spectroscopic follow-up of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1689, we used a parametric model to simultaneously constrain the cluster mass distribution and dark energy equation of state. Combining our cosmological constraints with those from x-ray clusters and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year data gives Omega(m) = 0.25 +/- 0.05 and w(x) = -0.97 +/- 0.07, which are consistent with results from other methods. Inclusion of our method with all other available techniques brings down the current 2sigma contours on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w(x) by approximately 30%. PMID:20724628

  8. Requirements on the Redshift Accuracy for future Supernova andNumber Count Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Huterer, Dragan; Kim, Alex; Broderick, Tamara

    2004-08-09

    We investigate the required redshift accuracy of type Ia supernova and cluster number-count surveys in order for the redshift uncertainties not to contribute appreciably to the dark energy parameter error budget. For the SNAP supernova experiment, we find that, without the assistance of ground-based measurements, individual supernova redshifts would need to be determined to about 0.002 or better, which is a challenging but feasible requirement for a low-resolution spectrograph. However, we find that accurate redshifts for z < 0.1 supernovae, obtained with ground-based experiments, are sufficient to immunize the results against even relatively large redshift errors at high z. For the future cluster number-count surveys such as the South Pole Telescope, Planck or DUET, we find that the purely statistical error in photometric redshift is less important, and that the irreducible, systematic bias in redshift drives the requirements. The redshift bias will have to be kept below 0.001-0.005 per redshift bin (which is determined by the filter set), depending on the sky coverage and details of the definition of the minimal mass of the survey. Furthermore, we find that X-ray surveys have a more stringent required redshift accuracy than Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect surveys since they use a shorter lever arm in redshift; conversely, SZ surveys benefit from their high redshift reach only so long as some redshift information is available for distant (zgtrsim1) clusters.

  9. Astrometry With the Hubble Space Telescope: Trigonometric Parallaxes of Planetary Nebula Nuclei NGC 6853, NGC 7293, ABELL 31, and DeHt 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, G. F.; McArthur, Barbara E.; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Harrison, Thomas E.; Harris, Hugh C.; Nelan, Edmund; Bond, Howard E; Patterson, Richard J.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2009-01-01

    We present absolute parallaxes and relative proper motions for the central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 6853 (The Dumbbell), NGC 7293 (The Helix), Abell 31, and DeHt 5. This paper details our reduction and analysis using DeHt 5 as an example. We obtain these planetary nebula nuclei (PNNi) parallaxes with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors FGS 1r and FGS 3, white-light interferometers on the Hubble Space Telescope. Proper motions, spectral classifications and VJHKT2M and DDO51 photometry of the stars comprising the astrometric reference frames provide spectrophotometric estimates of reference star absolute parallaxes. Introducing these into our model as observations with error, we determine absolute parallaxes for each PNN. Weighted averaging with previous independent parallax measurements yields an average parallax precision, sigma (sub pi)/ pi = 5%. Derived distances are: d(sub NGC6853) = 405(exp +28 sub -25) pc, d(sub NGC7293) = 216(exp +14 sub -12) pc, d(sub Abell31) = 621(exp +91 sub -70) pc, and d(sub DeHt5) = 345(exp +19 sub -17) pc. These PNNi distances are all smaller than previously derived from spectroscopic analyses of the central stars. To obtain absolute magnitudes from these distances requires estimates of interstellar extinction. We average extinction measurements culled from the literature, from reddening based on PNNi intrinsic colors derived from model SEDs, and an assumption that each PNN experiences the same rate of extinction as a function of distance as do the reference stars nearest (in angular separation) to each central star. We also apply Lutz-Kelker bias corrections. The absolute magnitudes and effective temperatures permit estimates of PNNi radii through both the Stefan-Boltzmann relation and Eddington fluxes. Comparing absolute magnitudes with post-AGB models provides mass estimates. Masses cluster around 0.57 solar Mass, close to the peak of the white dwarf mass distribution. Adding a few more PNNi with well

  10. Astrometry with the Hubble Space Telescope: Trigonometric Parallaxes of Planetary Nebula Nuclei NGC 6853, NGC 7293, Abell 31, and DeHt 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Harrison, Thomas E.; Harris, Hugh C.; Nelan, Edmund; Bond, Howard E.; Patterson, Richard J.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2009-12-01

    We present absolute parallaxes and relative proper motions for the central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 6853 (The Dumbbell), NGC 7293 (The Helix), Abell 31, and DeHt 5. This paper details our reduction and analysis using DeHt 5 as an example. We obtain these planetary nebula nuclei (PNNi) parallaxes with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors FGS 1r and FGS 3, white-light interferometers on the Hubble Space Telescope. Proper motions, spectral classifications and VJHKT2M and DDO51 photometry of the stars comprising the astrometric reference frames provide spectrophotometric estimates of reference star absolute parallaxes. Introducing these into our model as observations with error, we determine absolute parallaxes for each PNN. Weighted averaging with previous independent parallax measurements yields an average parallax precision, σπ/π = 5%. Derived distances are: d NGC 6853 = 405+28 -25 pc, d NGC 7293 = 216+14 -12 pc, d Abell 31 = 621+91 -70 pc, and d DeHt 5 = 345+19 -17 pc. These PNNi distances are all smaller than previously derived from spectroscopic analyses of the central stars. To obtain absolute magnitudes from these distances requires estimates of interstellar extinction. We average extinction measurements culled from the literature, from reddening based on PNNi intrinsic colors derived from model SEDs, and an assumption that each PNN experiences the same rate of extinction as a function of distance as do the reference stars nearest (in angular separation) to each central star. We also apply Lutz-Kelker bias corrections. The absolute magnitudes and effective temperatures permit estimates of PNNi radii through both the Stefan-Boltzmann relation and Eddington fluxes. Comparing absolute magnitudes with post-AGB models provides mass estimates. Masses cluster around 0.57 M_{⊙}, close to the peak of the white dwarf mass distribution. Adding a few more PNNi with well-determined distances and masses, we compare all the PNNi with cooler white dwarfs

  11. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND MORPHOLOGY OF A NEWLY IDENTIFIED COMPACT z = 4.04 LENSED SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY IN ABELL 2218

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Kirsten K.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Richard, Johan; Petitpas, Glen; Egami, Eiichi

    2010-01-20

    We present the identification of a bright submillimeter (submm) source, SMM J163555.5+661300, detected in the lensing cluster Abell 2218, for which we have accurately determined the position using observations from the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The identified optical counterpart has a spectroscopic redshift of z = 4.044 +- 0.001 if we attribute the single emission line detected at lambda = 6140 A to Lyalpha. This redshift identification is in good agreement with the optical/near-infrared photometric redshift as well as the submm flux ratio S{sub 450}/S{sub 850}approx 1.6, the radio-submm flux ratio S{sub 1.4}/S{sub 850} < 0.004, and the 24 mum to 850 mum flux ratio S{sub 24}/S{sub 850} < 0.005. Correcting for the gravitational lensing amplification of approx5.5, we find that the source has a far-infrared luminosity of 1.3 x 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}, which implies a star formation rate (SFR) of 230 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. This makes it the lowest-luminosity submillimeter galaxy (SMG) known at z>4 to date. Previous CO(4-3) emission line observations yielded a non-detection, for which we derived an upper limit of the CO line luminosity of L{sub CO}{sup '}= 0.3x10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup -2}, which is not inconsistent with the L{sup '}{sub CO}-L{sub FIR} relation for starburst galaxies. The best-fit model to the optical and near-infrared photometry give a stellar population with an age of 1.4 Gyr and a stellar mass of 1.6 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}. The optical morphology is compact and in the source plane the galaxy has an extent of approx6 x 3 kpc with individual star-forming knots of <500 pc in size. J163556 is not resolved in the SMA data, and we place a strict upper limit on the size of the starburst region of 8 kpc x 3 kpc, which implies a lower limit on the SFR surface density of 12 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup 2}. The redshift of J163556 extends the redshift distribution of faint, lensed SMGs, and we find no evidence that these have a different redshift

  12. An H-alpha survey of cluster spirals - Comparison of star formation in clusters and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C.; Whittle, M.

    1993-01-01

    In an objective prism survey of eight nearby Abell clusters, we have detected H-alpha emission from 77 out of a total of 201 CGCG spiral galaxies. We find that detection of H alpha emission is approximately independent of galaxy absolute magnitude, distance to the cluster center, and the presence of a bar. However, tidally distorted spirals are much more likely to be detected than undistorted spirals. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency for tidally distorted spirals to have compact nuclear emission rather than more extended disk-wide emission. When compared to field spirals, we find that late-type (Sc and Sc-Irr) cluster spirals have less H alpha emission, while early-type (Sa and Sab) cluster spirals can have significantly enhanced emission. The enhanced emission is most likely to be due to tidally induced star formation from galaxy-galaxy interactions.

  13. Applications for edge detection techniques using Chandra and XMM-Newton data: galaxy clusters and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. A.; Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-09-01

    The unrivalled spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray observatory has allowed many breakthroughs to be made in high-energy astrophysics. Here we explore applications of Gaussian gradient magnitude (GGM) filtering to X-ray data, which dramatically improves the clarity of surface brightness edges in X-ray observations, and maps gradients in X-ray surface brightness over a range of spatial scales. In galaxy clusters, we find that this method is able to reveal remarkable substructure behind the cold fronts in Abell 2142 and Abell 496, possibly the result of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. In Abell 2319 and Abell 3667, we demonstrate that the GGM filter can provide a straightforward way of mapping variations in the widths and jump ratios along the lengths of cold fronts. We present results from our ongoing programme of analysing the Chandra and XMM-Newton archives with the GGM filter. In the Perseus cluster, we identify a previously unseen edge around 850 kpc from the core to the east, lying outside a known large-scale cold front, which is possibly a bow shock. In MKW 3s we find an unusual `V' shape surface brightness enhancement starting at the cluster core, which may be linked to the AGN jet. In the Crab nebula a new, moving feature in the outer part of the torus is identified which moves across the plane of the sky at a speed of ˜0.1c, and lies much further from the central pulsar than the previous motions seen by Chandra.

  14. Progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, Cody

    Type Ia supernovae are important, but mysterious cosmological tools. Their standard brightnesses have enabled cosmologists to measure extreme distances and to discover dark energy. However, the nature of their progenitor mechanisms remains elusive, with many competing models offering only partial clues to their origins. Here, type Ia supernova delay times are explored using analytical models. Combined with a new observation technique, this model places new constraints on the characteristic time delay between the formation of stars and the first type Ia supernovae. This derived delay time (500 million years) implies low-mass companions for single degenerate progenitor scenarios. In the latter portions of this dissertation, two progenitor mechanisms are simulated in detail; white dwarf collisions and mergers. From the first of these simulations, it is evident that white dwarf collisions offer a viable and unique pathway to producing type Ia supernovae. Many of the combinations of masses simulated produce sufficient quantities of 56 Ni (up to 0.51 solar masses) to masquerade as normal type Ia supernovae. Other combinations of masses produce 56 Ni yields that span the entire range of supernova brightnesses, from the very dim and underluminous, with 0.14 solar masses, to the over-bright and superluminous, with up to 1.71 solar masses. The 56 Ni yield in the collision simulations depends non-linearly on total system mass, mass ratio, and impact parameter. Using the same numerical tools as in the collisions examination, white dwarf mergers are studied in detail. Nearly all of the simulations produce merger remnants consisting of a cold, degenerate core surrounded by a hot accretion disk. The properties of these disks have strong implications for various viscosity treatments that have attempted to pin down the accretion times. Some mass combinations produce super-Chandrasekhar cores on shorter time scales than viscosity driven accretion. A handful of simulations also

  15. Large Scale Structure Studies: Final Results from a Rich Cluster Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinglend, K.; Batuski, D.; Haase, S.; Hill, J.

    1995-12-01

    The results from the COBE satellite show the existence of structure on scales on the order of 10% or more of the horizon scale of the universe. Rich clusters of galaxies from the Abell-ACO catalogs show evidence of structure on scales of 100 Mpc and hold the promise of confirming structure on the scale of the COBE result. Unfortunately, until now, redshift information has been unavailable for a large percentage of these clusters, so present knowledge of their three dimensional distribution has quite large uncertainties. Our approach in this effort has been to use the MX multifiber spectrometer on the Steward 2.3m to measure redshifts of at least ten galaxies in each of 88 Abell cluster fields with richness class R>= 1 and mag10 <= 16.8 (estimated z<= 0.12) and zero or one measured redshifts. This work has resulted in a deeper, 95% complete and more reliable sample of 3-D positions of rich clusters. The primary intent of this survey has been to constrain theoretical models for the formation of the structure we see in the universe today through 2-pt. spatial correlation function and other analyses of the large scale structures traced by these clusters. In addition, we have obtained enough redshifts per cluster to greatly improve the quality and size of the sample of reliable cluster velocity dispersions available for use in other studies of cluster properties. This new data has also allowed the construction of an updated and more reliable supercluster candidate catalog. Our efforts have resulted in effectively doubling the volume traced by these clusters. Presented here is the resulting 2-pt. spatial correlation function, as well as density plots and several other figures quantifying the large scale structure from this much deeper and complete sample. Also, with 10 or more redshifts in most of our cluster fields, we have investigated the extent of projection effects within the Abell catalog in an effort to quantify and understand how this may effect the Abell sample.

  16. Television documentary, history and memory. An analysis of Sergio Zavoli's The Gardens of Abel

    PubMed Central

    Foot, John

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a celebrated documentary made for Italian state TV in 1968 and transmitted in 1969 to an audience of millions. The programme – The Gardens of Abel – looked at changes introduced by the radical psychiatrist Franco Basaglia in an asylum in the north-east of Italy (Gorizia). The article examines the content of this programme for the first time, questions some of the claims that have been made for it, and outlines the sources used by the director, Sergio Zavoli. The article argues that the film was as much an expression of Zavoli's vision and ideas as it was linked to those of Franco Basaglia himself. Finally, the article highlights the way that this programme has become part of historical discourse and popular memory. PMID:25937804

  17. An Approximation to the Periodic Solution of a Differential Equation of Abel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    2011-10-01

    The Abel equation, in canonical form, is y^' = sint- y^3 (*) and corresponds to the singular (ɛ --> 0) limit of the nonlinear, forced oscillator ɛy^'' + y^' + y^3 = sint, ɛ-> 0. (**) Equation (*) has the property that it has a unique periodic solution defined on (-∞,∞). Further, as t increases, all solutions are attracted into the strip |y| < 1 and any two different solutions y1(t) and y2(t) satisfy the condition Lim [y1(t) - y2(t)] = 0, (***) t --> ∞ and for t negatively decreasing, each solution, except for the periodic solution, becomes unbounded.ootnotetextU. Elias, American Mathematical Monthly, vol.115, (Feb. 2008), pps. 147-149. Our purpose is to calculate an approximation to the unique periodic solution of Eq. (*) using the method of harmonic balance. We also determine an estimation for the blow-up time of the non-periodic solutions.

  18. Beneficial Effects of Camellia Oil (Camellia oleifera Abel.) on Hepatoprotective and Gastroprotective Activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that increased dietary intake of natural antioxidants is beneficial for health because of their bioactivities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammation actions. Camellia oil made from tea seed (Camellia oleifera Abel.) is commonly used as an edible oil and a traditional medicine in Taiwan and China. Until now, the camellia oil has been widely considered as a dietary oil for heath. In this review, we summarize the protective effects of camellia oil with antioxidant activity against oxidative stress leading to hepatic damage and gastrointestinal ulcers. The information in this review leads to the conclusion that camellia oil is not only an edible oil but also a vegetable oil with a potential function for human health. PMID:26598814

  19. Finding Distances to Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are known as standard candles due to their consistency, allowing us to measure distances based on their brightness. But what if these explosions arent quite as consistent as we thought? Due scientific diligence requires careful checks, so a recent study investigates whether the metallicity of a supernovas environment affects the peak luminosity of the explosion.Metallicity Dependence?Type Ia supernovae are incredibly powerful tools for determining distances in our universe. Because these supernovae are formed by white dwarfs that explode when they reach a uniform accreted mass, the supernova peak luminosity is thought to be very consistent. This consistency allows these supernovae to be used as standard candles to measure distances to their host galaxies.But what if that peak luminosity is affected by a factor that we havent taken into account? Theorists have proposed that the luminosities of Type Ia supernovae might depend on the metallicity of their environments with high-metallicity environments suppressing supernova luminosities. If this is true, then we could be systematically mis-measuring cosmological distances using these supernovae.Testing AbundancesSupernova brightnesses vs. the metallicity of their environments. Low-metallicity supernovae (blue shading) and high-metallicity supernovae (red shading) have an average magnitude difference of ~0.14. [Adapted from Moreno-Raya et al. 2016]A team led by Manuel Moreno-Raya, of the Center for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain, has observed 28 Type Ia supernovae in an effort to test for such a metallicity dependence. These supernovae each have independent distance measurements (e.g., from Cepheids or the Tully-Fisher relation).Moreno-Raya and collaborators used spectra from the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope to estimate oxygen abundances in the region where each of these supernovae exploded. They then used these measurements to determine if metallicity of the local region

  20. Gravitational lensing statistics of amplified supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, Eric V.; Wagoner, Robert V.; Schneider, P.

    1988-01-01

    Amplification statistics of gravitationally lensed supernovae can provide a valuable probe of the lensing matter in the universe. A general probability distribution for amplification by compact objects is derived which allows calculation of the lensed fraction of supernovae at or greater than an amplification A and at or less than an apparent magnitude. Comparison of the computed fractions with future results from ongoing supernova searches can lead to determination of the mass density of compact dark matter components with masses greater than about 0.001 solar mass, while the time-dependent amplification (and polarization) of the expanding supernovae constrain the individual masses. Type II supernovae are found to give the largest fraction for deep surveys, and the optimum flux-limited search is found to be at approximately 23d magnitude, if evolution of the supernova rate is neglected.

  1. White dwarf models for type 1 supernovae and quiet supernovae, and presupernova evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.

    1980-01-01

    Supernova mechanisms in accreting white dwarfs are considered with emphasis on deflagration as a plausible mechanism for producing Type I supernovae and electron captures to form quiet supernovae leaving neutron stars. These outcomes depend on accretion rate of helium, initial mass and composition of the white dwarf. The various types of hydrogen shell burning in the presupernova stage are also discussed.

  2. Comment on the preprint Neutrino Flavor Evolution Near a Supernova`s Core

    SciTech Connect

    Pantaleone, J.; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Fuller, G.M.

    1994-08-01

    The revised version of the widely circulated preprint ``Neutrino Flavor Evolution Near A Supernova`s Core`` by J. Pantaleone (astro-ph 9405008 on the bulletin Board, Indiana University preprint IUHET-276) is wrong. It contains two errors which lead to incorrect conclusions regarding neutrino flavor transformation in the supernova environment. In this short note we discuss these errors.

  3. Magnetares como fuentes para potenciar supernovas superluminosas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersten, M. C.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetars have been proposed as one of the possible sources to power the light curve of super-luminous supernovae. We have included the energy deposited by a hypothetical magnetar in our one-dimensional hydrodynamical code, and analyzed the dynamical effect on the supernova ejecta. In particular, we present a model for SN 2011kl, the first object associated with a ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst. Finally, we show its effect on the light curves of hydrogen rich supernovae.

  4. La supernova galattica è in ritardo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2005-06-01

    After 400 years we are still waiting to see a galactic supernova. A simple galactic model based upon interstellar absorption is shown in order to explain the rate of observed galactic supernovae. The history of variable stars observations in modern epoch is sketched and the hypothesis for Bethlehem Star made by Kepler in occasion of the last galactic supernova, exploded in Ophiuchus on 9 October 1604, is also presented.

  5. Radio active galactic nuclei in galaxy clusters: Feedback, merger signatures, and cluster tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno-Mahler, Rachel Beth

    Galaxy clusters, the largest gravitationally-bound structures in the universe, are composed of 50-1000s of galaxies, hot X-ray emitting gas, and dark matter. They grow in size over time through cluster and group mergers. The merger history of a cluster can be imprinted on the hot gas, known as the intracluster medium (ICM). Merger signatures include shocks, cold fronts, and sloshing of the ICM, which can form spiral structures. Some clusters host double-lobed radio sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN). First, I will present a study of the galaxy cluster Abell 2029, which is very relaxed on large scales and has one of the largest continuous sloshing spirals yet observed in the X-ray, extending outward approximately 400 kpc. The sloshing gas interacts with the southern lobe of the radio galaxy, causing it to bend. Energy injection from the AGN is insufficient to offset cooling. The sloshing spiral may be an important additional mechanism in preventing large amounts of gas from cooling to very low temperatures. Next, I will present a study of Abell 98, a triple system currently undergoing a merger. I will discuss the merger history, and show that it is causing a shock. The central subcluster hosts a double-lobed AGN, which is evacuating a cavity in the ICM. Understanding the physical processes that affect the ICM is important for determining the mass of clusters, which in turn affects our calculations of cosmological parameters. To further constrain these parameters, as well as models of galaxy evolution, it is important to use a large sample of galaxy clusters over a range of masses and redshifts. Bent, double-lobed radio sources can potentially act as tracers of galaxy clusters over wide ranges of these parameters. I examine how efficient bent radio sources are at tracing high-redshift (z>0.7) clusters. Out of 646 sources in our high-redshift Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) sample, 282 are candidate new, distant clusters of galaxies based on

  6. An Update on Radio Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Sramek, Richard A.; Weiler, Kurt W.; Montes, Marcos J.; Panagia, Nino

    The radio emission from supernovae (SNe) is nonthermal synchrotron radiation of high brightness temperature, with a ``turn-on'' delay at longer wavelengths, power-law decline after maximum with index beta, and spectral index alpha asymptotically decreasing with time to a final, optically thin value. Radio supernovae (RSNe) are best described by the Chevalier (1982) ``mini-shell'' model, with modifications by Weiler \\etal\\ (1990). RSNe observations provide a valuable probe of the SN circumstellar environment and constraints on progenitor masses. We present a progress report on a number of recent RSNe, as well as on new behavior from RSNe 1979C and 1980K, and on RSNe as potential distance indicators. In particular, we present updated radio light curves for SN 1993J in M81.

  7. SUPERNOVA FALLBACK ONTO MAGNETARS AND PROPELLER-POWERED SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D. E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu

    2011-08-01

    We explore fallback accretion onto newly born magnetars during the supernova of massive stars. Strong magnetic fields ({approx}10{sup 15} G) and short spin periods ({approx}1-10 ms) have an important influence on how the magnetar interacts with the infalling material. At long spin periods, weak magnetic fields, and high accretion rates, sufficient material is accreted to form a black hole, as is commonly found for massive progenitor stars. When B {approx}< 5 x 10{sup 14} G, accretion causes the magnetar to spin sufficiently rapidly to deform triaxially and produces gravitational waves, but only for {approx}50-200 s until it collapses to a black hole. Conversely, at short spin periods, strong magnetic fields, and low accretion rates, the magnetar is in the 'propeller regime' and avoids becoming a black hole by expelling incoming material. This process spins down the magnetar, so that gravitational waves are only expected if the initial protoneutron star is spinning rapidly. Even when the magnetar survives, it accretes at least {approx}0.3 M{sub sun}, so we expect magnetars born within these types of environments to be more massive than the 1.4 M{sub sun} typically associated with neutron stars. The propeller mechanism converts the {approx}10{sup 52} erg of spin energy in the magnetar into the kinetic energy of an outflow, which shock heats the outgoing supernova ejecta during the first {approx}10-30 s. For a small {approx}5 M{sub sun} hydrogen-poor envelope, this energy creates a brighter, faster evolving supernova with high ejecta velocities {approx}(1-3) x 10{sup 4} km s{sup -1} and may appear as a broad-lined Type Ib/c supernova. For a large {approx}> 10 M{sub sun} hydrogen-rich envelope, the result is a bright Type IIP supernova with a plateau luminosity of {approx}> 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} lasting for a timescale of {approx}60-80 days.

  8. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.S.

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of {approximately} 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for {gamma}-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of {approximately} 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches {approximately} 60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  9. Object classification at the Nearby Supernova Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Aragon, C.; Romano, R.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.; Wong, D.

    2008-03-01

    We present the results of applying new object classification techniques to the supernova search of the Nearby Supernova Factory. In comparison to simple threshold cuts, more sophisticated methods such as boosted decision trees, random forests, and support vector machines provide dramatically better object discrimination: we reduced the number of non-supernova candidates by a factor of 10 while increasing our supernova identification efficiency. Methods such as these will be crucial for maintaining a reasonable false positive rate in the automated transient alert pipelines of upcoming large optical surveys.

  10. The first ten years of Swift supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Milne, Peter A.

    2015-09-01

    The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer has proven to be an incredible platform for studying the multiwavelength properties of supernova explosions. In its first ten years, Swift has observed over three hundred supernovae. The ultraviolet observations reveal a complex diversity of behavior across supernova types and classes. Even amongst the standard candle type Ia supernovae, ultraviolet observations reveal distinct groups. When the UVOT data is combined with higher redshift optical data, the relative populations of these groups appear to change with redshift. Among core-collapse supernovae, Swift discovered the shock breakout of two supernovae and the Swift data show a diversity in the cooling phase of the shock breakout of supernovae discovered from the ground and promptly followed up with Swift. Swift observations have resulted in an incredible dataset of UV and X-ray data for comparison with high-redshift supernova observations and theoretical models. Swift's supernova program has the potential to dramatically improve our understanding of stellar life and death as well as the history of our universe.

  11. Dust production in supernovae and AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Mikako

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, the role of supernovae on dust has changed; it has been long proposed that supernovae are dust destroyers, but now recent observations show that core-collapse supernovae can become dust factories. Theoretical models of dust evolution in galaxies have predicted that core-collapse supernovae can be an important source of dust in galaxies, if these supernovae can form a significant mass of dust (0.1-1 solar masses). The Herschel Space Observatory and ALMA detected dust in the ejecta of Supernova 1987A. They revealed an estimated 0.5 solar masses of dust. Herschel also found nearly 0.1 solar masses of dust in historical supernovae remnants, namely Cassiopeia A and the Crab Nebula. If dust grains can survive future interaction with the supernova winds and ambient interstellar medium, core-collapse supernovae can be an important source of dust in the interstellar media of galaxies. We further discuss the total dust mass injected by AGB stars and SNe into the interstellar medium of the Magellanic Clouds.

  12. Neutrino mechanism of supernova explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechetkin, V. M.

    In the last decades, scientifics have tried to understand the explosion mechanism of stars that is responsible for the simultaneous formation of neutron star and supernova outburst.The main problem is the determination of a source of energy in the ejection of a supernova envelope. The gravitation energy as a source of energy in supernova is placed first. However, subsequent studies led to certain problems in using gravitation energy if the assumption of neutrino difussion was adopted. Situation is changed if one take into consideration large scale convective instability owing to the neutronization of matter in a protoneutron star during the collapse of star with low initial entropy. The three-dimensional hydrodinamic calculation for 75*75*75 grid with step 0.015R(R = 2*10^7 cm) shows that large-scale bubbles with 10^6 cm emerge. When the bubble reaches low density, the neutrinos contained in matter freely escape from it in the regime of volume radiation. The characteristic time of this process is equaled 0.02 s. The shock from the initial bounce when the collapse in the stellar core stops will then be supported by the neutrino emission, resulting in the ejection of an envelope.

  13. Supernova 2009ig Has Brightened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2009-09-01

    The Type-Ia Supernova 2009ig in NGC 1015 has brightened from its discovery magnitude of 17.5 on Aug. 20.48 UT (I. Kleiser, S. B. Cenko, W. Li, and A. V. Filippenko, University of California; LOSS discovery on unfiltered KAIT images) to unfiltered CCD magnitude 14.0 on Sep. 20.646 UT (Yoshiteru Matsuura, Nada-ku, Kobe, Japan). H. Navasardyan, E. Cappellaro, and S. Benetti, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, report that a spectrogram obtained on Aug. 21.08 UT with the Asiago 1.82-m telescope indicates that the object is a type-Ia supernova caught soon after explosion. They note some similarity to early spectra of SN 2002bo (Benetti et al. 2004, MNRAS 348, 261), although Si II 597.2-nm and S II 564.0-nm are not yet present. Instructions for CCD observing are given in accordance with AAVSO policy on the observation of Type-Ia supernovae brighter than magnitude 15.0. Data should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database; FITS images should be uploaded to ftp.aavso.org.

  14. Dark Energy and Termonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domíngez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Straniero, O.; Höflich, P.

    2008-12-01

    Nowadays it is widely accepted that the current Universe is dominated by dark energy and exotic matter, the so called StandardModel of Cosmoloy or CDM model. All the available data (Thermonuclear Supernovae, Cosmic Microwave Background, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, Large Scale Structure, etc.) are compatible with a flat Universe made by ~70% of dark energy. Up to now observations agree that dark energy may be the vacuum energy (or cosmological constant) although improvements are needed to constrain further its equation of state. In this context, the cosmic destiny of the Universe is no longer linked to its geometry but to the nature of dark energy; it may be flat and expand forever or collapse. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today; it may open new roads of knowledge and led to unify gravity with the other fundamental interactions in nature. It is expected that astronomical data will continue to provide directions to theorists and experimental physicists. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have played a fundamental role, showing the acceleration of the expansion rate of the Universe a decade ago, and up to now they are the only astronomical observations that provide a direct evidence of the acceleration. However, in order to determine the source of the dark energy term it is mandatory to improve the precision of supernovae as distance indicators on cosmological scale.

  15. FUZZY SUPERNOVA TEMPLATES. I. CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney, Steven A.; Tonry, John L. E-mail: jt@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2009-12-20

    Modern supernova (SN) surveys are now uncovering stellar explosions at rates that far surpass what the world's spectroscopic resources can handle. In order to make full use of these SN data sets, it is necessary to use analysis methods that depend only on the survey photometry. This paper presents two methods for utilizing a set of SN light-curve templates to classify SN objects. In the first case, we present an updated version of the Bayesian Adaptive Template Matching program (BATM). To address some shortcomings of that strictly Bayesian approach, we introduce a method for Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT), which utilizes fuzzy set theory for the definition and combination of SN light-curve models. For well-sampled light curves with a modest signal-to-noise ratio (S/N >10), the SOFT method can correctly separate thermonuclear (Type Ia) SNe from core collapse SNe with >=98% accuracy. In addition, the SOFT method has the potential to classify SNe into sub-types, providing photometric identification of very rare or peculiar explosions. The accuracy and precision of the SOFT method are verified using Monte Carlo simulations as well as real SN light curves from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the SuperNova Legacy Survey. In a subsequent paper, the SOFT method is extended to address the problem of parameter estimation, providing estimates of redshift, distance, and host galaxy extinction without any spectroscopy.

  16. XMM Newton Observations of Toothbrush Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Sinancan; Nihal Ercan, Enise; De Plaa, Jelle; Mernier, Francois

    2016-07-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally-bound objects in the universe. The member galaxies are embedded in a hot X-ray emitting Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) that has been enriched over time with metals produced by supernovae. In this presentation we show new results from XMM-Newton regarding the merging cluster 1RXSJ0603.3+4213. This cluster, also known as the Toothbrush cluster, shows a large toothbrush-shaped radio relic associated with a merger shock North of the cluster core. We show the distribution and the abundances of the metals in this merging cluster in relation to the merger shock. The results are derived from spatially resolved X-ray spectra from the EPIC instrument aboard XMM-Newton.

  17. Constraining inverse curvature gravity with supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Santiago, Jose; Weller, Jochen; /University Coll., London /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    We show that the current accelerated expansion of the Universe can be explained without resorting to dark energy. Models of generalized modified gravity, with inverse powers of the curvature can have late time accelerating attractors without conflicting with solar system experiments. We have solved the Friedman equations for the full dynamical range of the evolution of the Universe. This allows us to perform a detailed analysis of Supernovae data in the context of such models that results in an excellent fit. Hence, inverse curvature gravity models represent an example of phenomenologically viable models in which the current acceleration of the Universe is driven by curvature instead of dark energy. If we further include constraints on the current expansion rate of the Universe from the Hubble Space Telescope and on the age of the Universe from globular clusters, we obtain that the matter content of the Universe is 0.07 {le} {omega}{sub m} {le} 0.21 (95% Confidence). Hence the inverse curvature gravity models considered can not explain the dynamics of the Universe just with a baryonic matter component.

  18. Constraining the Evolution of Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broming, Emma J.; Fuse, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    There currently exists no method by which to quantify the evolutionary state of poor clusters (PCs). Research by Broming & Fuse (2010) demonstrated that the evolution of Hickson compact groups (HCGs) are constrained by the correlation between the X-ray luminosities of point sources and diffuse gas. The current investigation adopts an analogous approach to understanding PCs. Plionis et al. (2009) proposed a theory to define the evolution of poor clusters. The theory asserts that cannibalism of galaxies causes a cluster to become more spherical, develop increased velocity dispersion and increased X-ray temperature and gas luminosity. Data used to quantify the evolution of the poor clusters were compiled across multiple wavelengths. The sample includes 162 objects from the WBL catalogue (White et al. 1999), 30 poor clusters in the Chandra X-ray Observatory archive, and 15 Abell poor clusters observed with BAX (Sadat et al. 2004). Preliminary results indicate that the cluster velocity dispersion and X-ray gas and point source luminosities can be used to highlight a weak correlation. An evolutionary trend was observed for multiple correlations detailed herein. The current study is a continuation of the work by Broming & Fuse examining point sources and their properties to determine the evolutionary stage of compact groups, poor clusters, and their proposed remnants, isolated ellipticals and fossil groups. Preliminary data suggests that compact groups and their high-mass counterpart, poor clusters, evolve along tracks identified in the X-ray gas - X-ray point source relation. While compact groups likely evolve into isolated elliptical galaxies, fossil groups display properties that suggest they are the remains of fully coalesced poor clusters.

  19. Spectroscopy for E and S0 galaxies in nine clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Inger; Franx, Marijn; Kjaergaard, Per

    1995-10-01

    Central velocity dispersions, Mg_2 line indices and radial velocities for 220 E and S0 galaxies are derived on the basis of intermediate resolution spectroscopy. Galaxies in the following clusters have been observed: Abell 194, Abell 539, Abell 3381, Abell 3574, S639, S753, Doradus, HydraI (Abell 1060) and Grm 15. For 151 of the galaxies, the velocity dispersion has not previously been measured. 134 of the Mg_2 determinations are for galaxies with no previous measurement. The spectra cover either 500 or 1000A, centred on the magnesium triplet at 5177A. The observations were obtained with the Boller & Chivens spectrograph at the ESO 1.5-m telescope and with the OPTOPUS, a multi-object fibre-fed B&C spectrograph, at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. The data are part of our ongoing study of the large-scale motions in the Universe and the physical background for the Fundamental Plane. The Fourier fitting method was used to derive the velocity dispersions and radial velocities. The velocity dispersions have been corrected for the effect of the size of the aperture. The correction was established on the basis of velocity dispersion profiles available in the literature. A comparison with results from Davies et al. shows that the derived central velocity dispersions have an rms error of 0.036 in logsigma. There is no offset relative to the velocity dispersions from Davies et al. The offset relative to data from Lucey & Carter is -0.017+/-0.011 in logsigma, with our velocity dispersions being the smallest. The velocity dispersions derived from the B&C and the OPTOPUS observations, as well as the velocity dispersions published by Davies et al., Dressler, Lucey & Carter and Lucey et al., can be brought on a system consistent within 3 per cent. The Mg_2 line indices have been corrected for the size of the apertures, transformed to the Lick system, and corrected for the effect of the velocity dispersion. From comparison with data from Davies et al. and from Faber, we find that the rms

  20. Cygnus Loop Supernova Blast Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This is an image of a small portion of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, which marks the edge of a bubble-like, expanding blast wave from a colossal stellar explosion, occurring about 15,000 years ago. The HST image shows the structure behind the shock waves, allowing astronomers for the first time to directly compare the actual structure of the shock with theoretical model calculations. Besides supernova remnants, these shock models are important in understanding a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, from winds in newly-formed stars to cataclysmic stellar outbursts. The supernova blast is slamming into tenuous clouds of insterstellar gas. This collision heats and compresses the gas, causing it to glow. The shock thus acts as a searchlight revealing the structure of the interstellar medium. The detailed HST image shows the blast wave overrunning dense clumps of gas, which despite HST's high resolution, cannot be resolved. This means that the clumps of gas must be small enough to fit inside our solar system, making them relatively small structures by interstellar standards. A bluish ribbon of light stretching left to right across the picture might be a knot of gas ejected by the supernova; this interstellar 'bullet' traveling over three million miles per hour (5 million kilometres) is just catching up with the shock front, which has slowed down by ploughing into interstellar material. The Cygnus Loop appears as a faint ring of glowing gases about three degrees across (six times the diameter of the full Moon), located in the northern constellation, Cygnus the Swan. The supernova remnant is within the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and is 2,600 light-years away. The photo is a combination of separate images taken in three colors, oxygen atoms (blue) emit light at temperatures of 30,000 to 60,000 degrees Celsius (50,000 to 100,000 degrees Farenheit). Hydrogen atoms (green) arise throughout the region of shocked gas. Sulfur atoms (red) form when the gas cools to

  1. Dynamics of supernova driven superbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Naveen; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Sharma, Prateek; Nath, Biman

    2015-08-01

    Energy injection by supernovae is believed to be one of the primary sources which powers the expansion of supershells. There is a qualitative difference between isolated supernovae (SNe) and overlapping SNe. For typical interstellar medium (ISM) conditions an isolated supernova loses most of the injected mechanical energy by 1 Myr. In contrast, for SNe going off in bubbles the radiative losses are much smaller. While the outer shock going off in the dense ISM (~1 cm-3) becomes radiative well before 1 Myr, there is a strong non-radiative termination shock that keeps the bubble over-pressured till the lifetime of the OB association (10s of Myr; Sharma et al. 2014). This has relevance for supernova feedback in galaxy formation simulations. In our previous 1-D treatment all the SNe were assumed to occur at the same location in space. It was found that a steady wind inside the bubble (Chevalier & Clegg 1985) can occur only if the number of SNe is large (>~104) and a supernova going off inside the bubble can thermalize within the termination shock. In the present work we study the effect of SNe separated in both space and time using 3-D hydrodynamic simulations with radiative cooling. If the separation between SNe is larger than the remnant’s radius at the time it becomes radiative, SNe are in the isolated regime. The explosion energy is deposited as thermal energy in a uniform, static interstellar medium (ISM) with temperature 104 K, corresponding to the warm neutral medium. The key parameters of our idealized setup are the ISM density (ngas), the number of SNe (N★) and the spatial separation between SNe (Rcl). The shock radius when it becomes radiative depends on the ISM density and number of SNe. We obtain the critical values of the key parameters (ngas, N★, Rcl) which lead to the formation of a superbubble. e.g., at least 103 SNe are required to maintain an over-pressured bubble at 20 Myr in an ISM with 1 cm-3 similarly 102 SNe going off within a region of 100

  2. A Cluster and a Sea of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    A new wide-field image released today by ESO displays many thousands of distant galaxies, and more particularly a large group belonging to the massive galaxy cluster known as Abell 315. As crowded as it may appear, this assembly of galaxies is only the proverbial "tip of the iceberg", as Abell 315 - like most galaxy clusters - is dominated by dark matter. The huge mass of this cluster deflects light from background galaxies, distorting their observed shapes slightly. When looking at the sky with the unaided eye, we mostly only see stars within our Milky Way galaxy and some of its closest neighbours. More distant galaxies are just too faint to be perceived by the human eye, but if we could see them, they would literally cover the sky. This new image released by ESO is both a wide-field and long-exposure one, and reveals thousands of galaxies crowding an area on the sky roughly as large as the full Moon. These galaxies span a vast range of distances from us. Some are relatively close, as it is possible to distinguish their spiral arms or elliptical halos, especially in the upper part of the image. The more distant appear just like the faintest of blobs - their light has travelled through the Universe for eight billion years or more before reaching Earth. Beginning in the centre of the image and extending below and to the left, a concentration of about a hundred yellowish galaxies identifies a massive galaxy cluster, designated with the number 315 in the catalogue compiled by the American astronomer George Abell in 1958 [1]. The cluster is located between the faint, red and blue galaxies and the Earth, about two billion light-years away from us. It lies in the constellation of Cetus (the Whale). Galaxy clusters are some of the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity. But there is more in these structures than the many galaxies we can see. Galaxies in these giants contribute to only ten percent of the mass, with hot gas in between galaxies

  3. Dumb-bell galaxies in southern clusters: Catalog and preliminary statistical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vettolani, G.; Gregorini, L.; Parma, P.; Deruiter, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant galaxy of a rich cluster is often an object whose formation and evolution is closely connected to the dynamics of the cluster itself. Hoessel (1980) and Schneider et al. (1983) estimate that 50 percent of the dominant galaxies are either of the dumb-bell type or have companions at projected distances less than 20 kpc, which is far in excess of the number expected from chance projection (see also Rood and Leir 1979). Presently there is no complete sample of these objects, with the exception of the listing of dumb-bell galaxies in BM type I and I-II clusters in the Abell statistical sample of Rood and Leir (1979). Recent dynamical studies of dumb-bell galaxies in clusters (Valentijn and Casertano, 1988) still suffer from inhomogeneity of the sample. The fact that it is a mixture of optically and radio selected objects may have introduced an unknown biases, for instance if the probability of radio emission is enhanced by the presence of close companions (Stocke, 1978, Heckman et al. 1985, Vettolani and Gregorini 1988) a bias could be present in their velocity distribution. However, this situation is bound to improve: a new sample of Abell clusters in the Southern Hemisphere has been constructed (Abell et al., 1988 hereafter ACO), which has several advantages over the original northern catalog. The plate material (IIIaJ plates) is of better quality and reaches fainter magnitudes. This makes it possible to classify the cluster types with a higher degree of accuracy, as well as to fainter magnitudes. The authors therefore decided to reconsider the whole problem constructing a new sample of dumb-bell galaxies homogeneously selected from the ACO survey. Details of the classification criteria are given.

  4. Gamma-ray constraints on supernova nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leising, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual supernova explosions via short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring current global Galactic supernova nucleosynthesis with longer-lived radioactivity. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both Co-56 and Co-57 were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions and nucleosynthesis. Live Al-26 in the Galaxy might come from Type II supernovae, and if it is eventually shown to be so, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, and the Galactic Type II supernova rate. Type Ia supernovae, thought to be thermonuclear explosions, have not yet been detected in gamma-rays. This is somewhat surprising given current models and recent Co-56 detection attempts. Ultimately, gamma-ray measurements can confirm their thermonuclear nature, probe the nuclear burning conditions, and help evaluate their contributions to Galactic nucleosynthesis. Type Ib/c supernovae are poorly understood. Whether they are core collapse or thermonuclear events might be ultimately settled by gamma-ray observations. Depending on details of the nuclear processing, any of these supernova types might contribute to a detectable diffuse glow of Fe-60 gamma-ray lines. Previous attempts at detection have come very close to expected emission levels. Remnants of any type of age less that a few centuries might be detectable as individual spots of Ti-44 gamma-ray line emission. It is in fact quite surprising that previous surveys have not discovered such spots, and the constraints on the combination of nucleosynthesis yields and supernova rates are very interesting. All of these interesting limits and possibilities mean that the next mission, International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), if it has sufficient sensitivity, is very likely to lead to the realization of much of the great potential

  5. The Carnegie Supernova Project: Intrinsic colors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, S. E.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, M. M.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Boldt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Morrell, Nidia; Salgado, Francisco; Folatelli, Gaston; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2014-07-01

    We present an updated analysis of the intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) using the latest data release of the Carnegie Supernova Project. We introduce a new light-curve parameter very similar to stretch that is better suited for fast-declining events, and find that these peculiar types can be seen as extensions to the population of 'normal' SNe Ia. With a larger number of objects, an updated fit to the Lira relation is presented along with evidence for a dependence on the late-time slope of the B – V light-curves with stretch and color. Using the full wavelength range from u to H band, we place constraints on the reddening law for the sample as a whole and also for individual events/hosts based solely on the observed colors. The photometric data continue to favor low values of R{sub V} , though with large variations from event to event, indicating an intrinsic distribution. We confirm the findings of other groups that there appears to be a correlation between the derived reddening law, R{sub V} , and the color excess, E(B – V), such that larger E(B – V) tends to favor lower R{sub V} . The intrinsic u-band colors show a relatively large scatter that cannot be explained by variations in R{sub V} or by the Goobar power-law for circumstellar dust, but rather is correlated with spectroscopic features of the supernova and is therefore likely due to metallicity effects.

  6. The Local Supernova Rate from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaman, Jesse F.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A.; LOSS

    2009-05-01

    The robotic Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS), conducted with the 0.76-m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT), has been the world's most successful nearby supernova search engine over the past decade. For the over 1,000 supernovae (SNe) discovered in the LOSS sample galaxies until the end of the year 2008, we used an optimal subsample of 728 SNe to derive the SN rate in the local universe. The LOSS galaxy sample consists of about 14,000 fields, imaged with temporal frequencies that typically range from 2 to 10 days. Detailed logs of the observations and search parameters have allowed us to determine the most accurate nearby SN rates since the study of Cappellaro, Evans, & Turatto (1999, A&A, 351, 459). We first selected 140 SNe, discovered in a distance-limited sample, to construct the observed luminosity functions for various types of SNe. Photometry for each of these 140 SNe was collected, their peak magnitudes were measured, and their completeness in the survey was calculated. The resulting luminosity functions are the first of their kind, and provide significant improvement to Zwicky's well-known control-time calculation for the SN rates. We derived SN rates for various types of SNe, in galaxies of different Hubble types and B-K colors. Our rates agree well with previous measurements, but provide significant improvement in precision, more morphological and color bins, and fewer observational biases. We found that the SN rates, after linear normalization by the size of the galaxies, still have a significant correlation with the galaxy size, in the sense that smaller galaxies have a higher SN rate per unit luminosity or mass. The volumetric SN rates are as follows (in units of 10^-4 SN Mpc^-3 yr^-1): 0.28 +/- 0.03 for SNe Ia, 0.20 +/- 0.03 for SNe Ibc, and 0.40 +/- 0.05 for SNe II.

  7. THE ORIENTATION OF GALAXIES IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Godlowski, Wlodzimierz; Piwowarska, Paulina; Panko, Elena; Flin, Piotr E-mail: paoletta@interia.p E-mail: sfflin@cyf-kr.edu.p

    2010-11-10

    We present an analysis of the spatial orientations of galaxies in 247 optically selected rich Abell clusters which have at least 100 members in the considered area. We investigated the relation between angles that give information about galaxy angular momenta and the number of members in each structure. The position angles of the galaxies' major axes, as well as two angles describing the spatial orientation of the galaxy plane, were tested for isotropy by applying three different statistical tests. It is found that the values of the statistics increase with the amount of the galaxies' members, which is equivalent to the existence of a relation between anisotropy and the number of galaxies in a cluster. The search for connection between the galaxies' alignments and Bautz-Morgan (BM) morphological types of examined clusters showed a weak dependence. A statistically marginal relation between velocity dispersion and cluster richness was observed. In addition, it was found that the velocity dispersion decreases with BM type at almost 3{sigma} level. These results show the dependence of alignments with respect to clusters' richness, which can be regarded as an environmental effect.

  8. Symbolic clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Reinke, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Clustering is the problem of finding a good organization for data. Because there are many kinds of clustering problems, and because there are many possible clusterings for any data set, clustering programs use knowledge and assumptions about individual problems to make clustering tractable. Cluster-analysis techniques allow knowledge to be expressed in the choice of a pairwise distance measure and in the choice of clustering algorithm. Conceptual clustering adds knowledge and preferences about cluster descriptions. In this study the author describes symbolic clustering, which adds representation choice to the set of ways a data analyst can use problem-specific knowledge. He develops an informal model for symbolic clustering, and uses it to suggest where and how knowledge can be expressed in clustering. A language for creating symbolic clusters, based on the model, was developed and tested on three real clustering problems. The study concludes with a discussion of the implications of the model and the results for clustering in general.

  9. Redshifts for a Sample of Radio-Selected Poor Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Neal A.; Ledlow, Michael J.; Owen, Frazer N.; Hill, John M.; Rabin, Douglas M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Multifiber optical spectroscopy has been performed on galaxies in the vicinity of strong, nearby radio galaxies. These radio galaxies were selected from the, 3CR and B2 catalogs based on their exclusion from the Abell catalog, which is puzzling given the hypothesis that an external medium is required to confine the radio plasma of such galaxies. Velocities derived from the spectra were used to confirm the existence of groups and poor clusters in the fields of most of the radio galaxies. We find that all radio galaxies with classical Fanaroff-Riley type I morphologies prove to reside in clusters, whereas the other radio galaxies often appear to be recent galaxy-galaxy mergers in regions of low galaxy density. These findings confirm the earlier result that the existence of extended X-ray emission combined with a statistical excess of neighboring galaxies can be used to identify poor clusters associated with radio galaxies.

  10. Two possible active supernovae in IC 2150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Stu; Bock, Greg; Marples, Peter; Drescher, Colin; Pearl, Patrick; BOSS Team; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, Mark; Morrell, Nidia; Hsiao, Eric; Carnegie Supernova Project

    2016-03-01

    Stu Parker and the BOSS team report the discovery of a rare event involving two possible active supernovae in IC 2150 (z=0.010404; NED) which were recorded in images obtained by Stu Parker during the ongoing program by the Backyard Observatory Supernova Search (BOSS) team.

  11. Gamma line radiation from supernovae. [nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Recent calculations of core collapse or massive stars result in explosive ejection of the mantle by a reflected shock. These hydrodynamic results are important for predictions of explosive nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray line emission from supernovae. Previous estimates, based on simple parameterized models or the nucleosynthesis in an average supernova, are compared with these latest results.

  12. The physical structure of planetary nebulae around sdO stars: Abell 36, DeHt 2, and RWT 152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, A.; Miranda, L. F.; Olguín, L.; Vázquez, R.; Guillén, P. F.; Oreiro, R.; Ulla, A.; Solano, E.

    2015-01-01

    We present narrow-band Hα and [O III] images, and high-resolution, long-slit spectra of the planetary nebulae (PNe) Abell 36, DeHt 2, and RWT 152 aimed at studying their morphology and internal kinematics. These data are complemented with intermediate-resolution, long-slit spectra to describe the spectral properties of the central stars and nebulae. The morphokinematical analysis shows that Abell 36 consists of an inner spheroid and two bright point-symmetric arcs; DeHt 2 is elliptical with protruding polar regions and a bright non-equatorial ring; and RWT 152 is bipolar. The formation of Abell 36 and DeHt 2 requires several ejection events including collimated bipolar outflows that probably are younger than and have disrupted the main shell. The nebular spectra of the three PNe show a high excitation and also suggest a possible deficiency in heavy elements in DeHt 2 and RWT 152. The spectra of the central stars strongly suggest an sdO nature and their association with PNe points out that they have most probably evolved through the asymptotic giant branch. We analyse general properties of the few known sdOs associated with PNe and find that most of them are relatively or very evolved PNe, show complex morphologies, host binary central stars, and are located at relatively high Galactic latitudes.

  13. Analysis of the optical emission of the young precataclysmic variables HS 1857+5144 and ABELL 65

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimansky, V. V.; Pozdnyakova, S. A.; Borisov, N. V.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Vlasyuk, V. V.; Spiridonova, O. I.; Galeev, A. I.; Mel'Nikov, S. S.

    2009-10-01

    We analyze the physical state and the properties of the close binary systems HS 1857+5144 and Abell 65. We took the spectra of both systems over a wide range of orbital phases with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SAO RAS) and obtained their multicolor light curves with the RTT150 and Zeiss-1000 telescopes of the SAO RAS. We demonstrate that both Abell 65 and HS 1857+5144 are young precataclysmic variables (PV) with orbital periods of P orb = 1. d 003729 and P orb = 0. d 26633331, respectively. The observed brightness and spectral variations during the orbital period are due to the radiation of the cold component, which absorbs the short-wave radiation of the hot component and reemits it in the visual part of the spectrum. A joint analysis of the brightness and radial velocity curves allowed us to find the possible and optimum sets of their fundamental parameters. We found the luminosity excesses of the secondary components of HS 1857+5144 and Abell 65 with respect to the corresponding Main Sequence stars to be typical for such objects. The excess luminosities of the secondary components of all young PVs are indicative of their faster relaxation rate towards the quiescent state compared to the rates estimated in earlier studies.

  14. Mass, shape and thermal properties of Abell 1689 using a multiwavelength X-ray, lensing and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, Mauro; Ettori, Stefano; Umetsu, Keiichi; Baldi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the mass and concentration of galaxy clusters is crucial for an understanding of their formation and evolution. Unbiased estimates require an understanding of the shape and orientation of the halo as well as its equilibrium status. We propose a novel method to determine the intrinsic properties of galaxy clusters from a multiwavelength data set, spanning from X-ray spectroscopic and photometric data to gravitational lensing to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The method relies on two non-informative geometrical assumptions: the distributions of total matter or gas are approximately ellipsoidal and co-aligned; they have different, constant axial ratios but share the same degree of triaxiality. Weak and strong lensing probe the features of the total mass distribution in the plane of the sky. X-ray data measure the size and orientation of the gas in the plane of the sky. Comparison with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich amplitude fixes the elongation of the gas along the line of sight. These constraints are deprojected as a result of Bayesian inference. The mass distribution is described as a Navarro-Frenk-White halo with arbitrary orientation, and the gas density and temperature are modelled with parametric profiles. We have applied the method to Abell 1689. Independently of the priors, the cluster is massive, M200 = (1.3 ± 0.2) × 1015 M⊙, and overconcentrated, c200 = 8 ± 1, but it is still consistent with theoretical predictions. The total matter is triaxial (minor to major axial ratio ˜0.5 ± 0.1, exploiting priors from N-body simulations) with the major axis nearly orientated along the line of sight. The gas is rounder (minor to major axial ratio ˜0.6 ± 0.1) and deviates from hydrostatic equilibrium. The contribution of non-thermal pressure is ˜20-50 per cent in the inner regions, ≲ 300 kpc, and ˜25 ± 5 per cent at ˜1.5 Mpc. This picture of A1689 was obtained with a small number of assumptions and in a single framework, suitable for application to a

  15. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, Type Ia supernovae exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. The brightness variations have been approximately corrected by various methods, but there remain intrinsic variations that limit the statistical power of current and future observations of distant supernovae for cosmological purposes. There may be systematic effects in this residual variation that evolve with redshift and thus limit the cosmological power of SN Ia luminosity-distance experiments. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in Type Ia supernovae. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory has been designed to discover hundreds of Type Ia supernovae in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. This project will observe these supernovae spectrophotometrically to provide the homogeneous high-quality data set necessary to improve the understanding and calibration of these vital cosmological yardsticks. From 1998 to 2003, in collaboration with the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a systematic and automated searching program was conceived and executed using the computing facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center. An automated search had never been attempted on this scale. A number of planned future large supernovae projects are predicated on the ability to find supernovae quickly, reliably, and efficiently in large datasets. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae. This thesis presents a new method for

  16. Supernova shock breakout from a red supergiant.

    PubMed

    Schawinski, Kevin; Justham, Stephen; Wolf, Christian; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Steenbrugge, Katrien C; Bell, Tony; Röser, Hermann-Josef; Walker, Emma S; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Hardin, Delphine; Hook, Isobel; Howell, D Andrew; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris; Regnault, Nicolas; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2008-07-11

    Massive stars undergo a violent death when the supply of nuclear fuel in their cores is exhausted, resulting in a catastrophic "core-collapse" supernova. Such events are usually only detected at least a few days after the star has exploded. Observations of the supernova SNLS-04D2dc with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope reveal a radiative precursor from the supernova shock before the shock reached the surface of the star and show the initial expansion of the star at the beginning of the explosion. Theoretical models of the ultraviolet light curve confirm that the progenitor was a red supergiant, as expected for this type of supernova. These observations provide a way to probe the physics of core-collapse supernovae and the internal structures of their progenitor stars.

  17. Supernovae and cosmology with future European facilities.

    PubMed

    Hook, I M

    2013-06-13

    Prospects for future supernova surveys are discussed, focusing on the European Space Agency's Euclid mission and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), both expected to be in operation around the turn of the decade. Euclid is a 1.2 m space survey telescope that will operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, and has the potential to find and obtain multi-band lightcurves for thousands of distant supernovae. The E-ELT is a planned, general-purpose ground-based, 40-m-class optical-infrared telescope with adaptive optics built in, which will be capable of obtaining spectra of type Ia supernovae to redshifts of at least four. The contribution to supernova cosmology with these facilities will be discussed in the context of other future supernova programmes such as those proposed for DES, JWST, LSST and WFIRST.

  18. Probing dark energy inhomogeneities with supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Blomqvist, Michael; Moertsell, Edvard; Nobili, Serena E-mail: edvard@physto.se

    2008-06-15

    We discuss the possibility of identifying anisotropic and/or inhomogeneous cosmological models using type Ia supernova data. A search for correlations in current type Ia peak magnitudes over a large range of angular scales yields a null result. However, the same analysis limited to supernovae at low redshift shows a feeble anticorrelation at the 2{sigma} level at angular scales {theta} Almost-Equal-To 40 Degree-Sign . Upcoming data from, e.g., the SNLS (Supernova Legacy Survey) and the SDSS-II (SDSS: Sloan Digital Sky Survey) supernova searches will improve our limits on the size of-or possibly detect-possible correlations also at high redshift at the per cent level in the near future. With data from the proposed SNAP (SuperNova Acceleration Probe) satellite, we will be able to detect the induced correlations from gravitational lensing on type Ia peak magnitudes on scales less than a degree.

  19. On relative supernova rates and nucleosynthesis roles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the Ni-56-Fe-56 observed in SN 1987A argues that core collapse supernovae may be responsible for more than 50 percent of the iron in the galaxy. Furthermore it is argued that the time averaged rate of thermonuclear driven Type I supernovae may be at least an order of magnitude lower than the average rate of core collapse supernovae. The present low rate of Type II supernovae (below their time averaged rate of approx. 1/10 yr) is either because the past rate was much higher because many core collapse supernovae are dim like SN 1987A. However, even in this latter case they are only an order of magnitude dimmer that normal Type II's due to the contribution of Ni-56 decay to the light curve.

  20. On relative supernova rates and nucleosynthesis roles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the Ni-56-Fe-56 observed in SN 1987A argues that core collapse supernovae may be responsible for more that 50 percent of the iron in the galaxy. Furthermore it is argued that the time averaged rate of thermonuclear driven Type I supernovae may be at least an order of magnitude lower than the average rate of core collapse supernovae. The present low rate of Type II supernovae (below their time averaged rate of approx. 1/10 yr) is either because the past rate was much higher because many core collapse supernovae are dim like SN 1987A. However, even in this latter case they are only an order of magnitude dimmer that normal Type II's due to the contribution of Ni-56 decay to the light curve.

  1. Supernovae and cosmology with future European facilities.

    PubMed

    Hook, I M

    2013-06-13

    Prospects for future supernova surveys are discussed, focusing on the European Space Agency's Euclid mission and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), both expected to be in operation around the turn of the decade. Euclid is a 1.2 m space survey telescope that will operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, and has the potential to find and obtain multi-band lightcurves for thousands of distant supernovae. The E-ELT is a planned, general-purpose ground-based, 40-m-class optical-infrared telescope with adaptive optics built in, which will be capable of obtaining spectra of type Ia supernovae to redshifts of at least four. The contribution to supernova cosmology with these facilities will be discussed in the context of other future supernova programmes such as those proposed for DES, JWST, LSST and WFIRST. PMID:23630381

  2. Four Papers by the Supernova Cosmology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, S.; et al.

    1995-06-01

    Our search for high-redshift Type Ia supernovae discovered, in its first years, a sample of seven supernovae. Using a 'batch' search strategy, almost all were discovered before maximum light and were observed over the peak of their light curves. The spectra and light curves indicate that almost all were Type Ia supernovae at redshifts z = 0.35 - 0.5. These high-redshift supernovae can provide a distance indicator and 'standard clock' to study the cosmological parameters q{sub 0}, {Lambda}, {Omega}{sub 0}, and H{sub 0}. This presentation and the following presentations of Kim et al. (1996), Goldhaber et al. (1996), and Pain et al. (1996) will discuss observation strategies and rates, analysis and calibration issues, the sources of measurement uncertainty, and the cosmological implications, including bounds on q{sub 0}, of these first high-redshift supernovae from our ongoing search.

  3. Supernova 1987A at 29 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, Richard

    2016-06-01

    In the 29 years since it was discovered, SN 1987A has evolved from supernova to supernova remnant, in the sense that its luminosity is now dominated by radiation from its shock interaction with circumstellar matter rather than radioactive decay of newly synthesized elements. The circumstellar matter has a complex structure and the impact of the supernova debris results in a complex distribution of shocks, with velocities ranging from a few hundred to several thousand km/s. The supernova blast wave is overtaking dense knots in the equatorial ring, resulting in rapidly brightening optical “hotspots”, while the interaction with less dense matter gives rise to X-rays. The X-rays illuminate the outer supernova debris, causing it to glow at optical wavelengths. The ALMA telescope provides a new window at mm/sub-mm wavelengths, enabling us to probe the structure of the cold inner debris through molecular emission lines.

  4. X-ray analysis of filaments in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. A.; Kosec, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    We perform a detailed X-ray study of the filaments surrounding the brightest cluster galaxies in a sample of nearby galaxy clusters using deep Chandra observations, namely the Perseus, Centaurus and Virgo clusters, and Abell 1795. We compare the X-ray properties and spectra of the filaments in all of these systems, and find that their Chandra X-ray spectra are all broadly consistent with an absorbed two-temperature thermal model, with temperature components at 0.75 and 1.7 keV. We find that it is also possible to model the Chandra ACIS filament spectra with a charge exchange model provided a thermal component is also present, and the abundance of oxygen is suppressed relative to the abundance of Fe. In this model, charge exchange provides the dominant contribution to the spectrum in the 0.5-1.0 keV band. However, when we study the high spectral resolution RGS spectrum of the filamentary plume seen in X-rays in Centaurus, the opposite appears to be the case. The properties of the filaments in our sample of clusters are also compared to the X-ray tails of galaxies in the Coma cluster and Abell 3627. In the Perseus cluster, we search for signs of absorption by a prominent region of molecular gas in the filamentary structure around NGC 1275. We do find a decrement in the X-ray spectrum below 2 keV, indicative of absorption. However, the spectral shape is inconsistent with this decrement being caused by simply adding an additional absorbing component. We find that the spectrum can be well fit (with physically sensible parameters) with a model that includes both absorption by molecular gas and X-ray emission from the filament, which partially counteracts the absorption.

  5. The LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano; LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    2016-06-01

    We highlight results from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Supernova Key Project -- a 3 year program to obtain lightcurves and spectra of approximately 500 low-redshift SNe. LCOGT is a robotic network of elevent one and two meter telescopes spaced around the globe. We are involved in a variety of surveys, including the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, LaSilla Quest, PESSTO, and KMTNet. Recent results include analysis of large samples of core-collaspe SNe, the largest sample of SNe Ibn, evidence of the progenitors of SNe Ia from companion shocking, and new findings about superluminious SNe.

  6. SkyMapper and Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalzo, R.

    The SkyMapper Southern Sky Survey will be a wide-area digital survey of the southern sky, run from the robotic 1.3-m SkyMapper telescope at Siding Spring Observatory near Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. The survey will include a supernova search run during poor seeing time, run as a rolling search to produce high-quality light curves for Hubble diagram cosmology. The search is currently taking data in science verification mode. I will briefly describe SkyMapper and then give an overview of su- pernova search activities, including pipeline design, operations, and interaction with the community.

  7. Petascale Supernova Simulation with CHIMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, Bronson; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, William Raphael; Dirk, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    CHIMERA is a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code designed to study core-collapse supernovae. The code is made up of three essentially independent parts: a hydrodynamics module, a nuclear burning module, and a neutrino transport solver combined within an operator-split approach. We describe some ma jor algorithmic facets of the code and briefly discuss some recent results. The multi-physics nature of the problem, and the specific implementation of that physics in CHIMERA, provide a rather straightforward path to effective use of multi-core platforms in the near future.

  8. Models for Type I supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.; Taam, R.E.

    1980-06-17

    Two rather disjoint scenarios for Type I supernovae are presented. One is based upon mass accretion by a white dwarf in a binary system. The second involves a star having some 8 to 10 times the mass of the sun which may or may not be a solitary star. Despite the apparent dissimilarities in the models it may be that each occurs to some extent in nature for they both share the possibility of producing substantial quantities of /sup 56/Ni and explosions in stars devoid of hydrogen envelopes. These are believed to be two properties that must be shared by any viable Type I model.

  9. The Progenitors of Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.; Tornambe, A.; Dominguez, I.

    2009-05-03

    In the framework of the rotating Double Degenerate Scenario for type Ia Supernovae progenitors, we show that the dichotomy between explosive events in early and late type galaxies can be easily explained. Assuming that more massive progenitors produce slow-decline (high-luminosity) light curve, it comes out that, at the current age of the Universe, in late type galaxies the continuous star formation provides very massive exploding objects (prompt component) corresponding to slow-decline (bright) SNe; on the other hand, in early type galaxies, where star formation ended many billions years ago, only low mass ''normal luminosity'' objects (delayed component) are present.

  10. Measuring q{sub 0} using supernovae at z {approx} 0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, H.J.M.

    1992-07-01

    The measurement of q{sub o} is extremely important for understanding the quantity of matter in our universe. The measurement of q{sub o} using supernovae of type Ia as standard candles is appealing because it requires less modeling than other methods using galaxies. The challenge with using supernovae to measure q{sub o} is in finding enough of them. In order to find supernovas, we have constructed a very popular f/1 camera for the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope. The camera uses reducing optics that put a 17 in. {times} 17 in. field on a 1024 {times} 1024 pixel Thomson CCD. Using this system, we image to 23rd magnitude in five minutes. We have developed a software package that uses image subtraction to find supernovae that are approximately magnitude 22.4 or brighter in these images. One field can be processed every 6.6 minutes on a relatively unloaded VAX 6000-6510. We estimate that this system should find one supernova in every 105--139 images (about two nights of observation on the AAT). Throughout the two years of operation, we observed the equivalent of about four nights with seeing better than two arc seconds. Although we found many candidates, we were unable to confirm any supemovae. The next generation of this search is currently using the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope in the Canary Islands. We have solved many problems encountered with the AAT search by targeting distant clusters of galaxies, by operating at a site that allows higher resolution imaging, and by scheduling follow-up observations. This system, although still in its infancy, has yielded one event that could be a high redshift supernova. We estimate that it will require 36 type Ia supernovae, discovered at or before maximum, to find q{sub o} to within 0.2, and 144 such supernovae to measure q{sub o} within 0.1. Clearly, the program will have to be expanded to find this quantity of supernovae.

  11. Measuring q sub 0 using supernovae at z approx 0. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, H.J.M.

    1992-07-01

    The measurement of q{sub o} is extremely important for understanding the quantity of matter in our universe. The measurement of q{sub o} using supernovae of type Ia as standard candles is appealing because it requires less modeling than other methods using galaxies. The challenge with using supernovae to measure q{sub o} is in finding enough of them. In order to find supernovas, we have constructed a very popular f/1 camera for the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope. The camera uses reducing optics that put a 17 in. {times} 17 in. field on a 1024 {times} 1024 pixel Thomson CCD. Using this system, we image to 23rd magnitude in five minutes. We have developed a software package that uses image subtraction to find supernovae that are approximately magnitude 22.4 or brighter in these images. One field can be processed every 6.6 minutes on a relatively unloaded VAX 6000-6510. We estimate that this system should find one supernova in every 105--139 images (about two nights of observation on the AAT). Throughout the two years of operation, we observed the equivalent of about four nights with seeing better than two arc seconds. Although we found many candidates, we were unable to confirm any supemovae. The next generation of this search is currently using the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope in the Canary Islands. We have solved many problems encountered with the AAT search by targeting distant clusters of galaxies, by operating at a site that allows higher resolution imaging, and by scheduling follow-up observations. This system, although still in its infancy, has yielded one event that could be a high redshift supernova. We estimate that it will require 36 type Ia supernovae, discovered at or before maximum, to find q{sub o} to within 0.2, and 144 such supernovae to measure q{sub o} within 0.1. Clearly, the program will have to be expanded to find this quantity of supernovae.

  12. The Supernova Remnant CTA 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1996-01-01

    The supernova remnants G327.1-1.1 and G327.4+0.4 (Kes 27) are located 1.5 deg apart in the constellation Norma. In 1980, Einstein IPC observations discovered that both were irregular filled-center X-ray sources with possible point sources superposed. This paper describes new ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations which both map the diffuse structure and clearly show several unresolved sources in each field. Both remnants have bright emitting regions inside the limb which might indicate the presence of high energy electrons accelerated by a pulsar. The interior region is more prominent in G327.1-1.1 than in Kes 27. The spectra are relatively strongly absorbed, as expected from distant remnants close to the galactic plane. Comparison of the X-ray and radio maps of each remnant allows us to attribute some emission to a shell and some to the interior. With this information, a blast-wave model is used to derive approximate ages and energy release. Indications are that the Kes 27 supernova deposited approximately 10(exp 51) ergs in the surrounding medium. The G327.1-1.1 event probably deposited a factor of 3-10 less.

  13. Supernova Remnants in High Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick; Badenes, Carles; Freyer, Chris; Hughes, Jack; Lee, Herman Shiu-Hang; Lopez, Laura; Patnaude, Daniel; Reynolds, Steve; Temim, Tea; Williams, Brian; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2015-10-01

    As the observable products of explosive stellar death, supernova remnants reveal some of the most direct information on the physics of the explosions, the properties of the progenitor systems, and the demographics of compact objects formed in the supernova events. High sensitivity X-ray observations have allowed us to probe the properties of the shocked plasma, providing constraints on abundances and ionization states that connect directly progenitor masses and metallicities, the nature of the explosions (core-collapse vs. thermonuclear), and the physics of shock heating and particle acceleration in fast shocks. Studies of SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds have provided information on source demographics in a low metallicity environment, and deep searches for point sources in Galactic SNRs imply that many remnants contain rapidly cooling neutron stars or black holes. Based on Chandra observations, we know that crucial measurements required to advance our knowledge in these areas are possible only with much more sensitive observations at high angular resolution. From identifying the effects of particle acceleration on the post-shock gas in young SNRs like Tycho to obtaining spatially resolved spectra - and identifying compact objects - for young SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, the capabilities of a facility like the X-ray Surveyor are required. Here I present a summary of recent advances brought about by spectral investigations of SNRs, and discuss particular examples of new advances that will be enabled by X-ray Surveyor capabilities.

  14. Runaway Stars in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannicke, Anna; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Dinçel, Baha

    2016-07-01

    Half of all stars and in particular 70 % of the massive stars are a part of a multiple system. A possible development for the system after the core collapse supernova (SN) of the more massive component is as follows: The binary is disrupted by the SN. The formed neutron star is ejected by the SN kick whereas the companion star either remains within the system and is gravitationally bounded to the neutron star, or is ejected with a spatial velocity comparable to its former orbital velocity (up to 500 km/s). Such stars with a large peculiar space velocity are called runaway stars. We present our observational results of the supernova remnants (SNRs) G184.6-5.8, G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2. The focus of this project lies on the detection of low mass runaway stars. We analyze the spectra of a number of candidates and discuss their possibility of being the former companions of the SN progenitor stars. The spectra were obtained with INT in Tenerife, Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory and the University Observatory Jena. Also we investigate the field stars in the neighborhood of the SNRs G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2 and calculate more precise distances for these SNRs.

  15. Gamma ray constraints on the Galactic supernova rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, Donald D.; Leising, M.; Mathews, G.; Woosley, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the expected gamma ray signatures of Galactic supernovae of all types to estimate the significance of the lack of a gamma ray signal due to supernovae occurring during the last millenium. Using recent estimates of the nuclear yields, we determine mean Galactic supernova rates consistent with the historic supernova record and the gamma ray limits. Another objective of these calculations of Galactic supernova histories is their application to surveys of diffuse Galactic gamma ray line emission.

  16. Supernovae: lights in the darkness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Every year, at the end of the summer, the Section of Physics and Technique of the "Institut Menorquí d'Estudis" and the "Societat Catalana de Física" organize the "Trobades Científiques de la Mediterrània" with the support of several academic institutions. The 2007 edition has been devoted to stellar explosions, the true evolutionary engines of galaxies. Whenever a star explodes, it injects into the interstellar medium a kinetic energy of 1051 erg and between one and several solar masses of newly synthesized elements as a result of the thermonuclear reactions that have taken place within the stellar interior. Two mechanisms are able to provide these enormous amounts of energy: one of them thermonuclear and the other, gravitational. Thermonuclear supernovae are the result of the incineration of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf that is the compact star of a binary stellar system. If the two stars are sufficiently close to each other, the white dwarf accretes matter from its companion, approaches the mass of Chandrasekhar, and ends up exploding. The processes previous to the explosion, the explosion itself, as well as the exact nature of the double stellar system that explodes, are still a matter of discussion. This point is particularly important because these explosions, known as Type Ia Supernovae, are very homogenous and can be used to measure cosmological distances. The most spectacular result obtained, is the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, but it still feels uncomfortable that such a fundamental result is based on a "measuring system" whose origin and behaviour in time is unknown. At the end of their lives, massive stars generate an iron nucleus that gets unstable when approaching the Chandrasekhar mass. Its collapse gives rise to the formation of a neutron star or a black hole, and the external manifestation of the energy that is released, about a 1053 erg, consists of a Type II or Ib/c supernova, of a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) or even of

  17. Energetic Supernovae from the Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung

    2013-04-01

    We present the results from our 3D supernova simulations by using CASTRO, a new radiation-hydrodynamics code. The first generation of stars in the universe ended the cosmic dark age by shining the first light. But what was the fate of these stars? Based on the stellar evolution models, the fate of stars depends on their masses. Modern cosmological simulations suggest that the first stars could be very massive, with a typical mass scale over 50 solar masses. We look for the possible supernovae from the death of the first stars with masses over 50 solar masses. Besides the iron-core collapse supernovae, we find energetic thermonuclear supernovae, including two types of pair-instability supernovae and one type of general-relativity instability supernovae. Our models capture all explosive burning and follow the explosion until the shock breaks out from the stellar surface. We will discuss the energetics, nucleosynthesis, and possible observational signatures for these primordial supernovae that will be the prime targets for future large telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

  18. An efficient and flexible Abel-inversion method for noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhin, Igor I.

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient and flexible method for solving Abel integral equation of the first kind, frequently appearing in many fields of astrophysics, physics, chemistry, and applied sciences. This equation represents an ill-posed problem, thus solving it requires some kind of regularization. Our method is based on solving the equation on a so-called compact set of functions and/or using Tikhonov's regularization. A priori constraints on the unknown function, defining a compact set, are very loose and can be set using simple physical considerations. Tikhonov's regularization on itself does not require any explicit a priori constraints on the unknown function and can be used independently of such constraints or in combination with them. Various target degrees of smoothness of the unknown function may be set, as required by the problem at hand. The advantage of the method, apart from its flexibility, is that it gives uniform convergence of the approximate solution to the exact solution, as the errors of input data tend to zero. The method is illustrated on several simulated models with known solutions. An example of astrophysical application of the method is also given.

  19. The C4 clustering algorithm: Clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert; Reichart, Dan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Annis, James; McKay, Timothy; Bahcall, Neta; Bernardi, Mariangela; Boehringer, Hans; Connolly, Andrew; Goto, Tomo; Kniazev, Alexie; Lamb, Donald; Postman, Marc; Schneider, Donald; Sheth, Ravi; Voges, Wolfgang; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Portsmouth U., ICG /North Carolina U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI /Michigan U. /Fermilab /Princeton U. Observ. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Pittsburgh U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Penn State U. /Chicago U. /Stavropol, Astrophys. Observ. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron. /INI, SAO

    2005-03-01

    We present the ''C4 Cluster Catalog'', a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster-finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects that have plagued previous optical cluster selection. The present C4 catalog covers {approx}2600 square degrees of sky and ranges in redshift from z = 0.02 to z = 0.17. The mean cluster membership is 36 galaxies (with redshifts) brighter than r = 17.7, but the catalog includes a range of systems, from groups containing 10 members to massive clusters with over 200 cluster members with redshifts. The catalog provides a large number of measured cluster properties including sky location, mean redshift, galaxy membership, summed r-band optical luminosity (L{sub r}), velocity dispersion, as well as quantitative measures of substructure and the surrounding large-scale environment. We use new, multi-color mock SDSS galaxy catalogs, empirically constructed from the {Lambda}CDM Hubble Volume (HV) Sky Survey output, to investigate the sensitivity of the C4 catalog to the various algorithm parameters (detection threshold, choice of passbands and search aperture), as well as to quantify the purity and completeness of the C4 cluster catalog. These mock catalogs indicate that the C4 catalog is {approx_equal}90% complete and 95% pure above M{sub 200} = 1 x 10{sup 14} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} and within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the SDSS DR2 data, we show that the C4 algorithm finds 98% of X-ray identified clusters and 90% of Abell clusters within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the mock galaxy catalogs and the full HV dark matter simulations, we show that the L{sub r} of a cluster is a more robust estimator of the halo mass (M{sub 200}) than the galaxy line-of-sight velocity dispersion or the richness of the cluster. However, if we

  20. The luminosity function of cluster galaxies: relations among M_1_, M^*^ and the morphological type.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevese, D.; Cirimele, G.; Appodia, B.

    1996-11-01

    A study of the luminosity function of 36 Abell clusters of galaxies has been carried out using photographic plates obtained with the Palomar 1.2 m Schmidt telescope. The relation between the magnitude M_1_ of the brightest cluster member and the Schechter function parameter M^*^ has been analyzed. A positive correlation between M^*^ and M_1_ is found. However clusters appear segregated in the M_1_-M^*^ plane according to their Rood & Sastry class in such a way that on average M_1_ becomes brighter while M^*^ becomes fainter going from late to early Rood & Sastry and also Bautz & Morgan classes. Also a partial correlation analysis involving the magnitude M_10_ of the 10th brightest galaxy, shows a negative intrinsic correlation between M_1_ and M^*^. These results agree with the cannibalism model for the formation of brightest cluster members, and provide new constraints for theories of cluster formation and evolution.

  1. Connecting the high- and low-energy Universe: dust processing inside Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    The recent detection of large amounts of dust (> 10(7) M_⊙) at very high redshift (z > 6) raises a fundamental question about the origin of such dust. The main dust producers, i. e., the stars populating the Red Giant Branch and the Asymptotic Giant Branch (RGB and AGB stars) did not have time to evolve. From an evolutionary point of view, young supernovae (SNe) could represent a viable source of dust in high-redshift galaxies, however, a critical issue still needs to be addressed. While recent observations have demonstrated that supernovae are indeed efficient dust factories, at the same time SNe represent the major agent responsible for dust destruction. Supernova blast waves propagating into the interstellar medium destroy the dust residing there, while the fresh dust produced by the supernova itself is threatened by the reverse shock which propagates through the expanding ejecta towards the center of the remnant. We focus here on this second destruction mechanism, with the aim of quantifying the amount of dust able to survive the heavy processing by the reverse shock and to reach the interstellar medium. We present our results for the textbook supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). Using recent X-ray and infrared observations, we have developed a model for the evolution of the remnant and the simultaneous processing of the dust by the reverse shock, and derived the expected amount of surviving dust. In addition, we will briefly illustrate the impact of the capabilities of the Athena mission on the variety of astrophysical problems involving the processing of dust particles in extreme environments characterized by the presence of shocked X-ray emitting gas. These range from individual supernova remnants, to starburst super winds up to AGN outflows and the hot intra-cluster medium. The study of dust processing by a shocked gas truly connects the high-energy Universe with the low-energy Universe, and Athena will play a major role in it.

  2. The Influence of Cluster Mergers on Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawle, T. D.; Altieri, B.; Bouy, H.; Egami, E.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Richard, J.; Valtchanov, I.; Walth, G.

    2016-06-01

    The rich environment of galaxy clusters is understood to have a profound effect on the evolution of constituent galaxies. However, even clusters of a similar mass and at fixed redshift are not homogeneous, displaying a range in structural complexity. Here we concentrate on the effect of cluster merging, the most massive dynamic process in the Universe. Two spectacular cluster mergers at z~0.3 are explored: the archetypal Bullet cluster (1E0657-558; Rawle et al. 2012), and the HST Frontier Field, Pandora's cluster (Abell 2744; Rawle et al. 2014, 2016). We present detailed analysis of their total star formation, derived from multi-wavelength observations of both dusty and unobscured activity from Herschel, Spitzer, WISE and GALEX. Examination of the morphologies of individual cluster galaxies reveals striking evidence for transformation and enhanced star formation, triggered by the merger-induced shock front. This includes several galaxies identified as having "jellyfish" morphologies caused by the passing shock. We discuss the implications, and preview future work exploring a large sample of clusters covering a range of dynamic states and redshifts.

  3. Studies of Substructure in Clusters of Galaxies: A Two-Dimensional Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriessler, J. R.

    1997-12-01

    I explore a procedure for the detection and quantification of substructure in the projected positions of galaxies in clusters. The method is first tested by application to the 56 well-studied galaxy clusters that make up the morphological sample of Dressler (1980). This method is then applied to a much larger sample of 119 Abell clusters which includes all Abell clusters with distance class <=4 and richness class >0 with | b | >30. Galaxy positions are obtained from digitized copies of the POSS I plates carried out by the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner project. Adaptive-kernel contour maps are constructed for each sample cluster and possible secondary peaks identified within one Abell radius (1.5h(-1) Mpc with H_0=100h km s(-1) Mpc(-1) ) of the cluster center. Two tests for substructure, one parametric and one nonparametric, are then applied to the galaxy positions and the results are compared. After removal of background/foreground groups determined by applying a K-S test to the distribution of apparent galaxy magnitudes, 64% +/- 15% of the large cluster sample is found to contain significant substructure. Radial number-density profiles are calculated for each of the sample clusters using a maximum penalized likelihood estimator. An average core radius of 112 +/- 75h(-1) kpc is obtained. Inside of 1 Mpc, the space density is found to vary as rho ~ r({-1.9) +/- 0.3}. The large fraction of clusters with presently-detectable substructure, as well as the shallow space-density profiles, are used to argue that rich clusters of galaxies are still in the process of formation during the present epoch through accretion of smaller groups of galaxies and are not in general well described by equilibrium models. With the assumption that substructure in the projected galaxy distribution is erased on a time scale of 4 cluster crossing times, then Omega gtrsim 0.4. On the other hand, if Omega_0 ~ 0.2, as currently predicted, then substructure in the projected galaxy positions

  4. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  5. A Comprehensive Investigation Into Modeling Supernovae Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Desmond

    Supernovae are a rich source of information. By studying their light curves and spectra we gain insights into stellar evolution, the nature of the progenitor star, surface abundances at the time of the explosion, whether previous mass-loss episodes have occurred, the physics of the explosion including the amount and type of elements synthesized, and whether the explosion has produced significant mixing between shells of different chemical composition. To maximize the information that can be gleaned from observations of supernovae it is essential that we have the necessary spectroscopic tools. To this end, we are developing a code, CMFGEN, capable of modeling supernova light curves and spectra. The code is currently being used, to study core-collapse supernovae as well as those arising from the nuclear detonation of a White Dwarf star. We wish to extend CMFGEN's capabilities by developing a procedure to handle non-monotonic velocity flows so that we can treat shock breakout and the interaction of supernova ejecta with circumstellar material. We will also investigate magnetar-powered SNe, and explore the connection between Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae and those supernovae associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursters. Through detailed studies of individual supernova, and through the construction of model grids, we are able to infer deficiencies in our modeling, in our atomic data, and in the progenitor models, and hence make refinements so that we can improve our understanding of all SNe classes. Previous (IUE), current (HST, Chandra, GALEX), and future NASA missions (James Webb Telescope) do/will provide a wealth of data on supernovae. The proposed research is related to strategic subgoal 3D: "Discover the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the universe, and search for Earth-like planets." Supernovae are inherently coupled to the evolution of the universe and life: They can trigger star formation and they provide the raw materials (e.g., oxygen

  6. Recent progress on young Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.

    2016-06-01

    I will review progress in the past few years on several young (less than a few thousand years old) supernova remnants within the Milky Way galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. I will focus on objects like Tycho, Kepler, 3C 397, W49B, and Cas A. I will discuss not only what has been learned about particular remnants, but also what these remnants can tell us about their pre-supernova progenitor systems. I will also show areas in which newly launched and upcoming observatories, such as Hitomi (Astro-H) and JWST can contribute to the study of supernova remnants.

  7. Object Classification at the Nearby Supernova Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Bailey, Stephen; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Romano, Raquel; Thomas, Rollin C.; Weaver, B. A.; Wong, D.

    2007-12-21

    We present the results of applying new object classification techniques to the supernova search of the Nearby Supernova Factory. In comparison to simple threshold cuts, more sophisticated methods such as boosted decision trees, random forests, and support vector machines provide dramatically better object discrimination: we reduced the number of nonsupernova candidates by a factor of 10 while increasing our supernova identification efficiency. Methods such as these will be crucial for maintaining a reasonable false positive rate in the automated transient alert pipelines of upcoming large optical surveys.

  8. Supernovae as sources of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Small hydrocarbon grains in the vicinity of a supernova could be annealed by the absorption of several far-ultraviolet photons to produce the tiny diamonds found in meteorites. These freshly-synthesized diamond grains would be bombarded by the heavy ions and neutrals in the supernovae outflow and would thereby acquire the distinctive noble-gas isotopic signature by which they were first isolated. Only diamonds formed relatively close to supernovae would acquire such a signature, since grains formed farther out would be subjected to a much diluted and less energetic plasma environment.

  9. A New Supernova Discovery/Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D. A.; Nugent, P. E.; Sullivan, M.; Gal-Yam, A.

    2010-10-01

    The Type Ia supernova science working group of the Palomar Transient Factory (ATEL#1964) reports the discovery of the Type Ia supernova PTF10ygu at RA=09:37:30.30, Dec=+23:09:33.6 (J2000) in the host galaxy NGC 2929 at z=0.025. The supernova was discovered on Oct. 12.5 UT when it was at magnitude 19.2 in R-band (calibrated wrt the USNO catalog). There was nothing at this location on Oct 8.5 UT to a limiting magnitude of 20.3, and a marginal detection (S/N=5) at R=19.6 on Oct.

  10. Supernova 1987 A - A cold, dusty and rusty supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyromilio, Jason; Graham, James R.

    1992-04-01

    The near-infrared emission from forbidden lines of singly ionized iron in the ejecta of supernova 1987 A has been modeled. It is found that as late as 1989 February, relatively high excitation transitions such as those arising from the a4F-a2G multiplet at 7150 A are surprisingly strong. The inferred temperature and electron density imply a mass of Fe(+) of order 10 exp -3 solar mass. No evidence is found for strong emission by neutral or doubly ionized iron. Given that 0.07 solar mass of iron is believed to be present in the ejecta of SN 1987 A, the results suggest that the bulk of the iron is unable to emit in the wavelength range investigated.

  11. SPECTROSCOPY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE BY THE CARNEGIE SUPERNOVA PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Folatelli, Gaston; Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Hsiao, Eric; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Castellon, Sergio; Roth, Miguel; Hamuy, Mario; Anderson, Joseph P.; Krzeminski, Wojtek; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Burns, Christopher R.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Murphy, David; Persson, S. E.; Prieto, Jose L.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Krisciunas, Kevin; and others

    2013-08-10

    This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature, we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely, SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2 (Si II 4130) and pW6 (Si II 5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of Almost-Equal-To 0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a Almost-Equal-To 2{sigma}-3{sigma} correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.

  12. Supernova relic neutrinos and the supernova rate problem: Analysis of uncertainties and detectability of ONeMg and failed supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Grant J.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Jyutaro

    2014-08-01

    Direct measurements of the core collapse supernova rate (R{sub SN}) in the redshift range 0 ≤ z ≤ 1 appear to be about a factor of two smaller than the rate inferred from the measured cosmic massive star formation rate (SFR). This discrepancy would imply that about one-half of the massive stars that have been born in the local observed comoving volume did not explode as luminous supernovae. In this work, we explore the possibility that one could clarify the source of this 'supernova rate problem' by detecting the energy spectrum of supernova relic neutrinos with a next generation 10{sup 6} ton water Čerenkov detector like Hyper-Kamiokande. First, we re-examine the supernova rate problem. We make a conservative alternative compilation of the measured SFR data over the redshift range 0 ≤z ≤ 7. We show that by only including published SFR data for which the dust obscuration has been directly determined, the ratio of the observed massive SFR to the observed supernova rate R{sub SN} has large uncertainties ∼1.8{sub −0.6}{sup +1.6} and is statistically consistent with no supernova rate problem. If we further consider that a significant fraction of massive stars will end their lives as faint ONeMg SNe or as failed SNe leading to a black hole remnant, then the ratio reduces to ∼1.1{sub −0.4}{sup +1.0} and the rate problem is essentially solved. We next examine the prospects for detecting this solution to the supernova rate problem. We first study the sources of uncertainty involved in the theoretical estimates of the neutrino detection rate and analyze whether the spectrum of relic neutrinos can be used to independently identify the existence of a supernova rate problem and its source. We consider an ensemble of published and unpublished core collapse supernova simulation models to estimate the uncertainties in the anticipated neutrino luminosities and temperatures. We illustrate how the spectrum of detector events might be used to establish the average

  13. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: a different view of supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-04-20

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research.

  14. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: A different view of supernova explosions

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research. PMID:20404206

  15. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  16. Pinwheels in the Quintuplet cluster.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, Peter; Monnier, John; Tanner, Angelle; Figer, Donald; Ghez, Andrea; Danchi, William

    2006-08-18

    The five enigmatic cocoon stars, after which the Quintuplet cluster was christened, have puzzled astronomers since their discovery. Their extraordinary cool, featureless thermal spectra have been attributed to various stellar types from young to highly evolved, whereas their absolute luminosities place them among the supergiants. We present diffraction-limited images from the Keck 1 telescope that resolve this debate with the identification of rotating spiral plumes characteristic of colliding-wind binary "pinwheel" nebulae. Such elegant spiral structures, found around high-luminosity Wolf-Rayet stars, have recently been implicated in the behavior of supernovae light curves in the radio and optical. PMID:16917053

  17. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z.; Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (≅ 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (≅ 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (∼3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub −2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub −0.8}{sup +1.4} per

  18. X-ray mapping the outer regions of galaxy clusters at z = 0.23 and 0.45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Walker, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    The thermal, chemical, and kinematic properties of the potentially multiphase circum/intergalactic medium at the virial radii of galaxy clusters remain largely uncertain. We present an X-ray study of Abell 2246 and GMBCG J255.34805+64.23661 (z = 0.23 and 0.45), two foreground clusters of the UV-bright QSO HS 1700+6416, based on 240 ks Chandra/Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations. We detect enhanced diffuse X-ray emission to the projected distances beyond r200 radii of these two clusters. The large-scale X-ray emission is consistent with being azimuthally symmetric at the projected radii of the QSO (0.36 and 0.8 times the radii of the two clusters). Assuming a spherical symmetry, we obtain the de-projected temperature and density profiles of the X-ray-emitting gas. Excluding the cool cores that are detected, we find that the mean temperature of the hot gas is ˜4.0 keV for Abell 2246 and 5.5 keV for GMBCG J255.34805+64.23661, although there are indications for temperature drop at large radii. From these results, we can estimate the density and pressure distributions of the hot gas along the QSO sightline. We further infer the radial entropy profile of Abell 2246 and compare it with the one expected from purely gravitational hierarchical structure formation. This comparison shows that the intracluster medium in the outer region of the clusters is likely in a clumpy and multiphased state. These results, together with the upcoming Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations of the QSO sightline, will enable a comprehensive investigation of the multiphase medium associated with the clusters.

  19. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  20. Supernova Optical Observations and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Keiichi; Bersten, Melina C.; Moriya, Takashi J.; Folatelli, Gaston; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-01-01

    We review emission processes within the supernova (SN) ejecta. Examples of the application of the theory to observational data are presented. The emission processes and thermal condition within the SN ejecta change as a function of time, and multi-epoch observations are important to obtain comprehensive views. Through the analyses, we can constrain the progenitor radius, compositions as a function of depth, ejecta properties, explosion asymmetry and so on. Multi-frequency follow-up is also important, including radio synchrotron emissions and the inverse Compton effect, γ-ray emissions from radioactive decay of newly synthesized materials. The optical data are essential to make the best use of the multi-frequency data.

  1. Supernovae and the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    2003-01-01

    Orbiting high above the turbulence of the earth's atmosphere, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided breathtaking views of astronomical objects never before seen in such detail. The steady diffraction-limited images allow this medium-size telescope to reach faint galaxies of 30th stellar magnitude. Some of these galaxies are seen as early as 2 billion years after the Big Bang in a 15 billion year old universe. Up until recently, astronomers assumed that all of the laws of physics and astronomy applied back then as they do today. Now, using the discovery that certain supernovae are standard candles, astronomers have found that the universe is expanding faster today than it was back then: the universe is accelerating in its expansion.

  2. Radio emision from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies have been discovered through radio observations, and only a very small number of the SNRs catalogued in the Milky Way have not been detected in the radio band, or are poorly defined by current radio observations. The study of the radio emission from SNRs is an excellent tool to investigate morphological characteristics, marking the location of shock fronts and contact discontinuities; the presence, orientation and intensity of the magnetic field; the energy spectrum of the emitting particles; and the dynamical consequences of the interaction with the circumstellar and interstellar medium. I will review the present knowledge of different important aspects of radio remnants and their impact on the interstellar gas. Also, new radio studies of the Crab Nebula carried out with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 3 GHz and with ALMA at 100 GHz, will be presented.

  3. Evidence for nearby supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Benítez, Narciso; Maíz-Apellániz, Jesús; Canelles, Matilde

    2002-02-25

    Supernova (SN) explosions are one of the most energetic---and potentially lethal---phenomena in the Universe. We show that the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, a group of young stars currently located at approximately 130 pc from the Sun, has generated 20 SN explosions during the last 11 Myr, some of them probably as close as 40 pc to our planet. The deposition on Earth of (60)Fe atoms produced by these explosions can explain the recent measurements of an excess of this isotope in deep ocean crust samples. We propose that approximately 2 Myr ago, one of the SNe exploded close enough to Earth to seriously damage the ozone layer, provoking or contributing to the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary marine extinction.

  4. Progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Keiichi; Terada, Yukikatsu

    2016-07-01

    Natures of progenitors of type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) have not yet been clarified. There has been long and intensive discussion on whether the so-called single degenerate (SD) scenario or the double degenerate (DD) scenario, or anything else, could explain a major population of SNe Ia, but the conclusion has not yet been reached. With rapidly increasing observational data and new theoretical ideas, the field of studying the SN Ia progenitors has been quickly developing, and various new insights have been obtained in recent years. This paper aims at providing a summary of the current situation regarding the SN Ia progenitors, both in theory and observations. It seems difficult to explain the emerging diversity seen in observations of SNe Ia by a single population, and we emphasize that it is important to clarify links between different progenitor scenarios and different sub-classes of SNe Ia.

  5. ANTIMATTER PRODUCTION IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kachelriess, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Tomas, R.

    2011-06-01

    We calculate the energy spectra of cosmic rays (CRs) and their secondaries produced in a supernova remnant (SNR) taking into account the time dependence of the SNR shock. We model the trajectories of charged particles as a random walk with a prescribed diffusion coefficient, accelerating the particles at each shock crossing. Secondary production by CRs colliding with gas is included as a Monte Carlo process. We find that SNRs produce less antimatter than suggested previously: the positron/electron ratio F{sub e}{sup +}/F{sub e}{sup +}{sub +e}{sup -} and the antiproton/proton ratio F{sub p-bar/}F{sub p-bar+p} are a few percent and few x 10{sup -5}, respectively. Moreover, the obtained positron/electron ratio decreases with energy, while the antiproton/proton ratio rises at most by a factor of two above 10 GeV.

  6. How to See a Recently Discovered Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientist Peter Nugent discusses a recently discovered supernova that is closer to Earth — approximately 21 million light-years away — than any other of its kind in a generation. Astronomers believe they caught the supernova within hours of its explosion, a rare feat made possible with a specialized survey telescope and state-of-the-art computational tools. The finding of such a supernova so early and so close has energized the astronomical community as they are scrambling to observe it with as many telescopes as possible, including the Hubble Space Telescope. More info on how to see it: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/31/glimpse-cosmic-explosion/ News release: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/25/supernova/

  7. Optical spectrosopy of HiTS supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Forster, F.; Smith, C.; Vivas, K.; Pignata, G.; Olivares, F.; Hamuy, M.; Martin, J. San; Maureira, J. C.; Cabrera, G.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Galbany, L.; Bufano, F.; de Jaeger, T.; Hsiao, E.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.

    2015-04-01

    We report optical wavelength spectroscopy obtained using the Goodman instrument mounted on the SOAR at CTIO on UT 2015-03-30, for two supernovae discovered by HiTS, the High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #7289, #7290).

  8. Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Make Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The husks of exploded stars produce some of the fastest particles in the cosmos. New findings by NASA's Fermi show that two supernova remnants accelerate protons to near the speed of light. The pro...

  9. Astrophysics: Echo from an ancient supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Andrea; Patat, Ferdinando

    2008-12-01

    Light reflected off a dust cloud in the vicinity of the relic of Tycho Brahe's supernova, whose light first swept past Earth more than four centuries ago, literally sheds light on the nature of this cosmic explosion.

  10. The Union3 Supernova Ia Compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, David; Aldering, Greg Scott; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle H.; Bruce, Adam; Chappell, Greta; Currie, Miles; Dawson, Kyle S.; Deustua, Susana E.; Doi, Mamoru; Fakhouri, Hannah; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Gibbons, Rachel A.; Goobar, Ariel; Hsiao, Eric; Huang, Xiaosheng; Ihara, Yutaka; Kim, Alex G.; Knop, Robert A.; Kowalski, Marek; Krechmer, Evan; Lidman, Chris; Linder, Eric; Meyers, Joshua; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nordin, Jakob; Perlmutter, Saul; Ripoche, Pascal; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Rykoff, Eli S.; Saunders, Clare; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Suzuki, Nao; Takanashi, Naohiro; Yasuda, Naoki; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift supernovae observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are crucial for constraining any time variation in dark energy. In a forthcoming paper (Rubin+, in prep), we will present a cosmological analysis incorporating existing supernovae with improved calibrations, and new HST-observed supernovae (six above z=1). We combine these data with current literature data, and fit them using SALT2-4 to create the Union3 Supernova compilation. We build on the Unified Inference for Type Ia cosmologY (UNITY) framework (Rubin+ 2015b), incorporating non-linear light-curve width and color relations, a model for unexplained dispersion, an outlier model, and a redshift-dependent host-mass correction.

  11. An ''archaeological'' quest for galactic supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Volpe, Cristina E-mail: Cecilia.Lunardini@asu.edu

    2009-04-15

    We explore the possibility to observe the effects of electron neutrinos from past galactic supernovae, through a geochemical measurement of the amount of Technetium 97 produced by neutrino-induced reactions in a Molybdenum ore. The calculations we present take into account the recent advances in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, of neutrino oscillations inside a supernova, of the solar neutrino flux at Earth and of possible failed supernovae. The predicted Technetium 97 abundance is of the order of 10{sup 7} atoms per 10 kilotons of ore, which is close to the current geochemical experimental sensitivity. Of this, {approx} 10-20% is from supernovae. Considering the comparable size of uncertainties, more precision in the modeling of neutrino fluxes as well as of neutrino cross sections is required for a meaningful measurement.

  12. Classification of 5 DES supernovae by Magellan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasker, J.; Kessler, R.; Scolnic, D.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Prajs, S.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2016-03-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of 5 supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectra (580-1050nm) were obtained using LDSS-3C on the 6.5m Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory.

  13. Classification of 14 DES supernovae by Magellan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbany, L.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Smith, M.; ForsterÂ, F.; Hamuy, M.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Sullivan, M.; NicholÂ, R.; Sako, M.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Wolf, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of 14 supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectra (425-1050nm) were obtained using LDSS3 on the 6.5m Clay telescope at the Las Campinas Observatory.

  14. Type Ibn Supernovae: Not a Single Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Arcavi, Iair; Howell, Dale Andrew; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Type Ibn supernovae are a small yet diverse class of explosions whose spectra are characterized by low-velocity helium emission lines. The prevailing theory has been that these are the core-collapse explosions of very massive stars embedded in helium-rich circumstellar material. However, unlike the more common Type IIn supernovae, whose interaction with hydrogen-rich circumstellar material has been shown to generate a wide variety of light curve shapes, we find that light curves of Type Ibn supernovae are more homogeneous and faster evolving. Spectroscopically, we find that Type Ibn supernovae divide cleanly into two classes, only one of which resembles the archetypal Type Ibn SN 2006jc. We explore various photometric and spectroscopic parameter spaces in order to characterize these two classes. We consider the possibility that not all objects classified as Type Ibn have the same physical origin.

  15. Supernova cooling in a dark matter smog

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yue

    2014-11-27

    A light hidden gauge boson with kinetic mixing with the usual photon is a popular setup in theories of dark matter. The supernova cooling via radiating the hidden boson is known to put an important constraint on the mixing. I consider the possible role dark matter, which under reasonable assumptions naturally exists inside supernova, can play in the cooling picture. Because the interaction between the hidden gauge boson and DM is likely unsuppressed, even a small number of dark matter compared to protons inside the supernova could dramatically shorten the free streaming length of the hidden boson. A picture of a dark matter “smog” inside the supernova, which substantially relaxes the cooling constraint, is discussed in detail.

  16. SN 1054: A pulsar-powered supernova?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Ze; Yu, Yun-Wei; Huang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    The famous ancient supernova SN 1054 could have been too bright to be explained in the “standard” radioactive-powered supernova scenario. As an alternative attempt, we demonstrate that the spin-down of the newly born Crab pulsar could provide a sufficient energy supply to make SN 1054 visible at daytime for 23 days and at night for 653 days, where a one-zone semi-analytical model is employed. Our results indicate that SN 1054 could be a “normal” cousin of magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae. Therefore, SN 1054-like supernovae could be a probe to uncover the properties of newly born neutron stars, which provide initial conditions for studies on neutron star evolutions.

  17. Physical processes in collapse driven supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Mayle, R.W.

    1985-11-01

    A model of the supernova explosion is discussed. The method of neutrino transport is discussed, since the explosive mechanism depends on neutrino heating of the material behind the accretion shock. The core region of these exploding stars becomes unstable to convective motions during the supernova evolution. Convective mixing allows more neutrinos to escape from under the neutrinosphere, and thus increases the amount of heating by neutrinos. An approximate method of incorporating convection is described, and some results of including convection in a computer model is presented. Another phenomena is seen in computer simulations of supernova, oscillations in the neutrino luminosity and mass accretion rate onto the protoneutron star. The last topic discussed in this thesis describes the attempt to understand this oscillation by perturbation of the steady state solution to equations approximating the complex physical processes occurring in the late time supernova. 42 refs., 31 figs.

  18. Supernova cooling in a dark matter smog

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yue

    2014-11-01

    A light hidden gauge boson with kinetic mixing with the usual photon is a popular setup in theories of dark matter. The supernova cooling via radiating the hidden boson is known to put an important constraint on the mixing. I consider the possible role dark matter, which under reasonable assumptions naturally exists inside supernova, can play in the cooling picture. Because the interaction between the hidden gauge boson and DM is likely unsuppressed, even a small number of dark matter compared to protons inside the supernova could dramatically shorten the free streaming length of the hidden boson. A picture of a dark matter ''smog'' inside the supernova, which substantially relaxes the cooling constraint, is discussed in detail.

  19. The Supernova Impostor SN 2010da

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Breanna A.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Supernova impostors are optical transients that, despite being assigned a supernova designation, do not signal the death of a massive star or accreting white dwarf. Instead, many impostors are thought to be major eruptions from luminous blue variables. Although the physical cause of these eruptions is still debated, tidal interactions from a binary companion has recently gained traction as a possible explanation for observations of some supernova impostors. In this talk, I will discuss the particularly interesting impostor SN 2010da, which exhibits high-luminosity, variable X-ray emission. The X-ray emission is consistent with accretion onto a neutron star, making SN 2010da a likely high mass X-ray binary in addition to a supernova impostor. SN 2010da is a unique laboratory for understanding both binary interactions as drivers of massive star eruptions and the evolutionary processes that create high mass X-ray binaries.

  20. Classification of 17 DES supernovae by SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, E.; Bassett, B.; Crawford, S.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.

    2016-02-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of 17 supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectra (380-820nm) were obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the South African Large Telescope (SALT).

  1. How to See a Recently Discovered Supernova

    ScienceCinema

    Nugent, Peter

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientist Peter Nugent discusses a recently discovered supernova that is closer to Earth — approximately 21 million light-years away — than any other of its kind in a generation. Astronomers believe they caught the supernova within hours of its explosion, a rare feat made possible with a specialized survey telescope and state-of-the-art computational tools. The finding of such a supernova so early and so close has energized the astronomical community as they are scrambling to observe it with as many telescopes as possible, including the Hubble Space Telescope. More info on how to see it: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/31/glimpse-cosmic-explosion/ News release: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/25/supernova/

  2. Multidimensional Simulations of Magnetar Powered Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung

    2016-03-01

    Magnetars are neutron stars with unusually strong magnetic fields, typically greater than 1E13 Gauss (G). Observational evidence suggests that magnetars form in a significant fraction of supernovae. Previous studies have shown that the radiation emitted by a rapidly rotating magnetar embedded in a young supernova can greatly amplify its luminosity. These one-dimensional studies also shown the existence of an instability arising from the piling up of radiatively accelerated matter in a dense, thin shell deep inside the supernova. Here, we examine the problem in two dimensions and find that this shell fragments into a filamenary structure that facilitates mixing. The degree of the mixing depends on the relative energy input by the magnetar and the kinetic energy of the inner ejecta. The light curve and spectrum of the resulting supernova will be appreciably altered. We acknowledge the support of EACOA Fellowship from the East Asian Core Observatories Association.

  3. A Probabilistic Approach to Classifying Supernovae UsingPhotometric Information

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Natalia V.; Connolly, Brian M.

    2006-12-14

    This paper presents a novel method for determining the probability that a supernova candidate belongs to a known supernova type (such as Ia, Ibc, IIL, etc.), using its photometric information alone. It is validated with Monte Carlo, and both space- and ground-based data. We examine the application of the method to well-sampled as well as poorly sampled supernova light curves and investigate to what extent the best currently available supernova models can be used for typing supernova candidates. Central to the method is the assumption that a supernova candidate belongs to a group of objects that can be modeled; we therefore discuss possible ways of removing anomalous or less well understood events from the sample. This method is particularly advantageous for analyses where the purity of the supernova sample is of the essence, or for those where it is important to know the number of the supernova candidates of a certain type (e.g., in supernova rate studies).

  4. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  5. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA CARBON FOOTPRINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R. C.; Nugent, P.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Loken, S.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Paech, K.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; and others

    2011-12-10

    We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of five Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 days relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II {lambda}6580 absorption 'notches' in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the five SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibit high-velocity (v > 20, 000 km s{sup -1}) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broadband light curve/color behavior: three of the five have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal to noise and phase, we estimate that 22{sup +10}{sub -6%} of SNe Ia exhibit spectroscopic C II signatures as late as -5 days with respect to maximum. We place these new objects in the context of previously recognized carbon-positive SNe Ia and consider reasonable scenarios seeking to explain a physical connection between light curve properties and the presence of photospheric carbon. We also examine the detailed evolution of the detected carbon signatures and the surrounding wavelength regions to shed light on the distribution of carbon in the ejecta. Our ability to reconstruct the C II {lambda}6580 feature in detail under the assumption of purely spherical symmetry casts doubt on a 'carbon blobs' hypothesis, but does not rule out all asymmetric models. A low volume filling factor for carbon, combined with line-of-sight effects, seems unlikely to explain the scarcity of detected carbon in SNe Ia by itself.

  6. Testing Cosmological Models with Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Schuecker, Peter

    2003-05-01

    Galaxy clusters are ideal probes for the large-scale structure of the Universe and for the tests of cosmological models. We use, REFLEX, the currently largest and best defined cluster X-ray survey to illustrate this application of galaxy cluster studies. Based on this survey of X-ray selected clusters of galaxies we determine statistical properties of the galaxy cluster population, their spatial correlation, and the density fluctuation power spectrum of the cosmic matter distribution on large scales up to about 1 Gpc. Comparing these results with predictions of cosmological models we obtain tight constrains for the matter density parameter of the Universe, consistent with the combined results from observations of the microwave background anisotropies and distant type Ia supernovae. The only difference between the present results and the ``concordance model'' is a low value for the σ8-normalization. Exploring the parameter space of the cosmic matter density and the equation of state parameter of dark energy most favoured by the combined observations of REFLEX clusters and distant type Ia supernovae we find that the conventional cosmological constant model is best consistent with the observational data.

  7. Condensation of dust in the ejecta of Type II-P supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2015-03-01

    Aims: We study the production of dust in Type II-P supernova ejecta by coupling the gas-phase chemistry to the dust nucleation and condensation phases. We consider two supernova progenitor masses with homogeneous and clumpy ejecta to assess the chemical type and quantity of dust that forms. Grain size distributions are derived for all dust components as a function of post-explosion time. Methods: The chemistry of the gas phase and the simultaneous formation of dust clusters are described by a chemical network that includes all possible processes that are efficient at high gas temperatures and densities. The formation of key bimolecular species (e.g., CO, SiO) and dust clusters of silicates, alumina, silica, metal carbides, metal sulphides, pure metals, and amorphous carbon is considered. A set of stiff, coupled, ordinary, differential equations is solved for the gas conditions pertaining to supernova explosions. These master equations are coupled to a dust condensation formalism based on Brownian coagulation. Results: We find that Type II-P supernovae produce dust grains of various chemical compositions and size distributions as a function of post-explosion time. The grain size distributions gain in complexity with time, are slewed towards large grains, and differ from the usual Mathis, Rumpl, & Nordsieck power-law distribution characterising interstellar dust. Gas density enhancements in the form of ejecta clumps strongly affect the chemical composition of dust and the grain size distributions. Some dust type, such as forsterite and pure metallic grains, are highly dependent on clumpiness. Specifically, a clumpy ejecta produces large grains over 0.1 μm, and the final dust mass for the 19 M⊙ progenitor reaches 0.14 M⊙. Clumps also favour the formation of specific molecules, such as CO2, in the oxygen-rich zones. Conversely, the carbon and alumina dust masses are primarily controlled by the mass yields of alumina and carbon in the ejecta zones where the dust is

  8. Overview of the nearby supernova factory

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, Greg; Adam, Gilles; Antilogus, Pierre; Astier, Pierre; Bacon, Roland; Bongard, S.; Bonnaud, C.; Copin, Yannick; Hardin, D.; Howell, D. Andy; Lemmonnier, Jean-Pierre; Levy, J.-M.; Loken, S.; Nugent, Peter; Pain, Reynald; Pecontal, Arlette; Pecontal, Emmanuel; Perlmutter, Saul; Quimby, Robert; Schahmaneche, Kyan; Smadja, Gerard; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael

    2002-07-29

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an international experiment designed to lay the foundation for the next generation of cosmology experiments (such as CFHTLS, wP, SNAP and LSST) which will measure the expansion history of the Universe using Type Ia supernovae. The SNfactory will discover and obtain frequent lightcurve spectrophotometry covering 3200-10000 {angstrom} for roughly 300 Type Ia supernovae at the low-redshift end of the smooth Hubble flow. The quantity, quality, breadth of galactic environments, and homogeneous nature of the SNfactory dataset will make it the premier source of calibration for the Type Ia supernova width-brightness relation and the intrinsic supernova colors used for K-correction and correction for extinction by host-galaxy dust. This dataset will also allow an extensive investigation of additional parameters which possibly influence the quality of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological probes. The SNfactory search capabilities and follow-up instrumentation include wide-field CCD imagers on two 1.2-m telescopes (via collaboration with the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking team at JPL and the QUEST team at Yale), and a two-channel integral-field-unit optical spectrograph/imager being fabricated for the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. In addition to ground-based follow-up, UV spectra for a subsample of these supernovae will be obtained with HST. The pipeline to obtain, transfer via wireless and standard internet, and automatically process the search images is in operation. Software and hardware development is now underway to enable the execution of follow-up spectroscopy of supernova candidates at the Hawaii 2.2-m telescope via automated remote control of the telescope and the IFU spectrograph/imager.

  9. Detection of Radio Transients from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Christian

    2011-05-01

    A core-collapse supernova (SN) would produce an expanding shell of charged particles which interact with the surrounding magnetic field of the progenitor star producing a transient radio pulse. Approximately one supernova event per century is expected in a galaxy. The radio waves emitted are detectable by a new generation of low-frequency radio telescope arrays. We present details of an ongoing search for such events by the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA).

  10. Are 44Ti-producing supernovae exceptional?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The, L.-S.; Clayton, D. D.; Diehl, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Iyudin, A. F.; Leising, M. D.; Meyer, B. S.; Motizuki, Y.; Schönfelder, V.

    2006-05-01

    According to standard models supernovae produce radioactive 44Ti, which should be visible in gamma-rays following decay to 44Ca for a few centuries. 44Ti production is believed to be the source of cosmic 44Ca, whose abundance is well established. Yet, gamma-ray telescopes have not seen the expected young remnants of core collapse events. The 44Ti mean life of τ ≃ 89 y and the Galactic supernova rate of ≃3/100 y imply ≃several detectable 44Ti gamma-ray sources, but only one is clearly seen, the 340-year-old Cas A SNR. Furthermore, supernovae which produce much 44Ti are expected to occur primarily in the inner part of the Galaxy, where young massive stars are most abundant. Because the Galaxy is transparent to gamma-rays, this should be the dominant location of expected gamma-ray sources. Yet the Cas A SNR as the only one source is located far from the inner Galaxy (at longitude 112°). We evaluate the surprising absence of detectable supernovae from the past three centuries. We discuss whether our understanding of SN explosions, their 44Ti yields, their spatial distributions, and statistical arguments can be stretched so that this apparent disagreement may be accommodated within reasonable expectations, or if we have to revise some or all of the above aspects to bring expectations in agreement with the observations. We conclude that either core collapse supernovae have been improbably rare in the Galaxy during the past few centuries, or 44Ti-producing supernovae are atypical supernovae. We also present a new argument based on 44Ca/40Ca ratios in mainstream SiC stardust grains that may cast doubt on massive-He-cap type I supernovae as the source of most galactic 44Ca.

  11. Core-collapse supernova explosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y

    2011-01-01

    Neutrinos play important roles in the pre-collapse evolution, explosion, and aftermath of core-collapse supernovae. Detected neutrino signals from core-collapse supernovae would provide insight into the explosion mechanism and unknown neutrino mixing parameters. Achieving these goals requires large-scale, multiphysics simulations. For many years, several groups have performed such simulations with increasing realism. Current simulations and plans for future work of the Oak Ridge group are described.

  12. Supernova 2010as: the lowest-velocity member of a family of flat-velocity type IIb supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Folatelli, Gastón; Bersten, Melina C.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Hamuy, Mario; Olivares Estay, Felipe; Pignata, Giuliano; Anderson, Joseph P.; Holmbo, Simon; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Maeda, Keiichi; Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, Mark M.; Förster, Francisco; Prieto, José Luis; Valenti, Stefano; Afonso, Paulo; Altenmüller, Konrad; Elliott, Jonny; and others

    2014-09-01

    We present extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the stripped-envelope supernova SN 2010as. Spectroscopic peculiarities such as initially weak helium features and low expansion velocities with a nearly flat evolution place this object in the small family of events previously identified as transitional Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). There is ubiquitous evidence of hydrogen, albeit weak, in this family of SNe, indicating that they are in fact a peculiar kind of Type IIb SNe that we name 'flat-velocity' Type IIb. The flat-velocity evolution—which occurs at different levels between 6000 and 8000 km s{sup –1} for different SNe—suggests the presence of a dense shell in the ejecta. Despite the spectroscopic similarities, these objects show surprisingly diverse luminosities. We discuss the possible physical or geometrical unification picture for such diversity. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope images, we associate SN 2010as with a massive cluster and derive a progenitor age of ≈6 Myr, assuming a single star-formation burst, which is compatible with a Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Our hydrodynamical modeling, on the contrary, indicates that the pre-explosion mass was relatively low, ≈4 M {sub ☉}. The seeming contradiction between a young age and low pre-SN mass may be solved by a massive interacting binary progenitor.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Redshifts of 65 CANDELS supernovae (Rodney+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, S. A.; Riess, A. G.; Strolger, L.-G.; Dahlen, T.; Graur, O.; Casertano, S.; Dickinson, M. E.; Ferguson, H. C.; Garnavich, P.; Hayden, B.; Jha, S. W.; Jones, D. O.; Kirshner, R. P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; McCully, C.; Mobasher, B.; Patel, B.; Weiner, B. J.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Cooper, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Frederiksen, T. F.; Hjorth, J.; Leibundgut, B.; Matheson, T.; Nayyeri, H.; Penner, K.; Trump, J.; Silverman, J. M.; U, V.; Azalee Bostroem, K.; Challis, P.; Rajan, A.; Wolff, S.; Faber, S. M.; Grogin, N. A.; Kocevski, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a measurement of the Type Ia supernova explosion rate as a function of redshift (SNR(z)) from a sample of 65 supernovae discovered in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) supernova program. This supernova survey is a joint operation of two Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Multi-Cycle Treasury (MCT) programs: CANDELS (PIs: Faber and Ferguson; Grogin et al., 2011ApJS..197...35G; Koekemoer et al., 2011ApJS..197...36K), and the Cluster Lensing and Supernovae search with Hubble (CLASH; PI: Postman; Postman et al. 2012, cat. J/ApJS/199/25). The supernova discovery and follow-up for both programs were allocated to the HST MCT supernova program (PI: Riess). The results presented here are based on the full five fields and ~0.25deg2 of the CANDELS program, observed from 2010 to 2013. A companion paper presents the SN Ia rates from the CLASH sample (Graur et al., 2014ApJ...783...28G). A composite analysis that combines the CANDELS+CLASH supernova sample and revisits past HST surveys will be presented in a future paper. The three-year CANDELS program was designed to probe galaxy evolution out to z~8 with deep infrared and optical imaging of five well-studied extragalactic fields: GOODS-S, GOODS-N (the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South and North; Giavalisco et al. 2004, cat. II/261), COSMOS (the Cosmic Evolution Survey, Scoville et al., 2007ApJS..172....1S; Koekemoer et al., 2007ApJS..172..196K), UDS (the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey; Lawrence et al. 2007, cat. II/314; Cirasuolo et al., 2007MNRAS.380..585C), EGS (the Extended Groth Strip; Davis et al. 2007, cat. III/248). As described fully in Grogin et al. (2011ApJS..197...35G), the CANDELS program includes both "wide" and "deep" fields. The wide component of CANDELS comprises the COSMOS, UDS, and EGS fields, plus one-third of the GOODS-S field and one half of the GOODS-N field--a total survey area of 730 arcmin2. The "deep" component of CANDELS came from the

  14. The distant type Ia supernova rate

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, R.; Fabbro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Ellis, R.S.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Deustua, S.E.; Fruchter, A.S.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Irwin, M.J.; Kim, A.G.; Kim, M.Y.; Knop, R.A.; Lee, J.C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N.A.

    2002-05-20

    We present a measurement of the rate of distant Type Ia supernovae derived using 4 large subsets of data from the Supernova Cosmology Project. Within this fiducial sample,which surveyed about 12 square degrees, thirty-eight supernovae were detected at redshifts 0.25--0.85. In a spatially flat cosmological model consistent with the results obtained by the Supernova Cosmology Project, we derive a rest-frame Type Ia supernova rate at a mean red shift z {approx_equal} 0.55 of 1.53 {sub -0.25}{sub -0.31}{sup 0.28}{sup 0.32} x 10{sup -4} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1} or 0.58{sub -0.09}{sub -0.09}{sup +0.10}{sup +0.10} h{sup 2} SNu(1 SNu = 1 supernova per century per 10{sup 10} L{sub B}sun), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second includes systematic effects. The dependence of the rate on the assumed cosmological parameters is studied and the redshift dependence of the rate per unit comoving volume is contrasted with local estimates in the context of possible cosmic star formation histories and progenitor models.

  15. Supernova Debris in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2000-03-01

    Meteorites contain clear evidence that isotopes with short half lives (as short as 100,000 years) were present in the cloud of gas and dust (the called solar nebula) from which the Sun and planets formed. Supernovae, the powerful explosions of spent stars, produce elements, including short-lived radioactive isotopes. Given the short lifetimes, these elements must have been added immediately before solids formed in the Solar System, and it is possible that a supernova triggered the collapse of the vast interstellar cloud in which the Solar System formed. However, there is some evidence that two isotopes, aluminum-26 and manganese-53, were not distributed uniformly in the solar nebula. If correct, does this mean that the supernova debris was not mixed thoroughly into the collapsing interstellar cloud? This possibility was tested by Robert H. Nichols, Frank Podosek, and Cristine Jennings (Washington University in St. Louis) and Brad Meyer (Clemson University). They evaluated how thoroughly supernova products were mixed into the solar nebula by searching for the effects on the isotopic make up of other elements. They conclude that the explosive products of a supernova would have been mixed uniformly into the nebula. Thus, either the evidence of heterogeneous distribution of short-lived isotopes is incorrect, or some isotopes were not formed in a supernova, but came from somewhere else. This research project is one of many that link studies of meteorites, astronomical observations, and astrophysical calculations.

  16. The Distant Type Ia Supernova Rate</