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Sample records for abell richness class

  1. A WEAK-LENSING AND NEAR-INFRARED STUDY OF A3192: DISASSEMBLING A RICHNESS CLASS 3 ABELL CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton-Morris, Victoria; Smith, Graham P.; Haines, C. P.; Sanderson, A. J. R.; Edge, A. C.; Egami, E.; Marshall, P. J.; Targett, T. A. E-mail: gps@star.sr.bham.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    We present a joint gravitational lensing and near-infrared study of the galaxy cluster Abell 3192 (A3192) that has been associated both with galaxies at z = 0.168 and with the X-ray luminous cluster RXC J0358.8-2955 (RXC J0358) at z = 0.425. Weak-lensing analysis of our Hubble Space Telescope snapshot observation with the Advanced Camera for Surveys detects two mass over-densities separated by {approx}2 arcmin, one adjacent to the optical position of A3192 (4.4{sigma} significance) and the other adjacent to the X-ray position of RXC J0358 (6.2{sigma} significance). These mass peaks coincide with peaks in the K-band luminosity density of galaxies with near-infrared colors consistent with the red sequence at z = 0.168 and z 0.425, respectively. Moreover, the Bayesian evidence of parameterized mass models that include two cluster/group-scale halos centered on the respective mass peaks exceeds that of single-halo models by a factor of {>=}10. The total projected mass of each galaxy system within 250 kpc of the respective peaks is M{sub WL}(z = 0.168) {approx_equal} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} M{sub Sun} and M{sub WL}(z = 0.425) {approx_equal} 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }, both with total mass-to-light ratios of M{sub WL}/L{sub K} {approx_equal} 20 M{sub Sun }/L{sub Sun }. The original Abell cluster therefore comprises two independent galaxy systems-a foreground group at z = 0.168 and RXC J0358 at z = 0.425. Our results demonstrate the power of combining X-ray, near-infrared, and weak-lensing observations to select massive clusters, place those clusters and interloper galaxy systems along the line of sight, and measure their masses. This combination will be invaluable to robust interpretation of future high-redshift cluster surveys, including eROSITA.

  2. Radio Galaxies in Abell Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, M. J.

    1994-05-01

    We have defined a complete sample of radio galaxies chosen from Abell's northern catalog consisting of all clusters with measured redshifts < 0.09. This sample consists of nearly 300 clusters. A multiwavelength survey including optical CCD R-Band imaging, optical spectroscopy, and VLA 20 cm radio maps has been compiled. I have used this database to study the optical/radio properties of radio galaxies in the cluster environment. In particular, optical properties have been compared to a radio-quiet selected sample to look for optical signatures which may distinguish radio galaxies from normal radio-quiet ellipticals. The correlations between radio morphology and galaxy type, the optical dependence of the FR I/II break, and the univariate and bivariate luminosity functions have been examined for this sample. This study is aimed at understanding radio galaxies as a population and examining their status in the AGN heirarchy. The results of this work will be applied to models of radio source evolution. The results from the optical data analysis suggest that radio galaxies, as a class, cannot be distinguished from non-radio selected elliptical galaxies. The magnitude/size relationship, the surface-brightness profiles, the fundamental plane, and the intrinsic shape of the radio galaxies are consistent between our radio galaxy and control sample. The radio galaxies also trace the elliptical galaxy optical luminosity function in clusters very well; with many more L(*) galaxies than brightest cluster members. Combined with the results of the spectroscopy, the data are consistent with the idea that all elliptical galaxies may at some point in their lifetimes become radio sources. In conclusion, I present a new observational picture for radio galaxies and discuss the important properties which may determine the evolution of individual sources.

  3. The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey. II. The distribution of velocity dispersions of rich galaxy clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazure, A.; Katgert, P.; den Hartog, R.; Biviano, A.; Dubath, P.; Escalera, E.; Focardi, P.; Gerbal, D.; Giuricin, G.; Jones, B.; Le Fevre, O.; Moles, M.; Perea, J.; Rhee, G.

    1996-06-01

    The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (the ENACS) has yielded 5634 redshifts for galaxies in the directions of 107 rich, Southern clusters selected from the ACO catalogue (Abell et al. 1989). By combining these data with another 1000 redshifts from the literature, of galaxies in 37 clusters, we construct a volume-limited sample of 128 R_ACO_>=1 clusters in a solid angle of 2.55sr centered on the South Galactic Pole, out to a redshift z=0.1. For a subset of 80 of these clusters we can calculate a reliable velocity dispersion, based on at least 10 (but very often between 30 and 150) redshifts. We deal with the main observational problem that hampers an unambiguous interpretation of the distribution of cluster velocity dispersions, namely the contamination by fore- and background galaxies. We also discuss in detail the completeness of the cluster samples for which we derive the distribution of cluster velocity dispersions. We find that a cluster sample which is complete in terms of the field-corrected richness count given in the ACO catalogue gives a result that is essentially identical to that based on a smaller and more conservative sample which is complete in terms of an intrinsic richness count that has been corrected for superposition effects. We find that the large apparent spread in the relation between velocity dispersion and richness count (based either on visual inspection or on machine counts) must be largely intrinsic; i.e. this spread is not primarily due to measurement uncertainties. One of the consequences of the (very) broad relation between cluster richness and velocity dispersion is that all samples of clusters that are defined complete with respect to richness count are unavoidably biased against low-σ_V_ clusters. For the richness limit of our sample this bias operates only for velocity dispersions less than =~800km/sec. We obtain a statistically reliable distribution of global velocity dispersions which, for velocity dispersions σ_V_>800km/s, is

  4. Abell 58 - a Planetary Nebula with an ONe-rich knot: a signature of binary interaction? .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, H. H. B.; De Marco, O.; Liu, X.-W.

    We have investigated the possibility that binary evolution is involved in the formation of the planetary nebula Abell 58. In particular, we assume a neon nova is responsible for the observed high oxygen and neon abundances of the central hydrogen-deficient knot of the H-deficient planetary nebula Abell 58 and the ejecta from the explosion are mixed with the planetary nebula. We have investigated different scenarios involving mergers and wind accretion and found that the most promising formation scenario involves a primary SAGB star that ends its evolution as an ONe white dwarf with an AGB companion at a moderately close separation. Mass is deposited on the white dwarf through wind accretion. So neon novae could occur just after the secondary AGB companion undergoes its final flash. However, the initial separation has to be fine-tuned. To estimate the frequency of such systems we evolve a population of binary systems and find that that Abell 58-like objects should indeed be rare and the fraction of Abell-58 planetary nebula is on the order of 10-4, or lower, among all planetary nebulae.

  5. Statistical analysis of catalogs of extragalactic objects. II - The Abell catalog of rich clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, M. G.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a power-spectrum analysis are presented for the distribution of clusters in the Abell catalog. Clear and direct evidence is found for superclusters with small angular scale, in agreement with the recent study of Bogart and Wagoner (1973). It is also found that the degree and angular scale of the apparent superclustering varies with distance in the manner expected if the clustering is intrinsic to the spatial distribution rather than a consequence of patchy local obscuration.

  6. A 1400-MHz survey of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. N.; White, R. A.; Hilldrup, K. C.; Hanisch, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies with the NRAO 91-m telescope at 1400 MHz are reported. The measured beam shape was deconvolved from the measured source Gaussian fits in order to estimate the source size and position angle. All detected sources within 0.5 corrected Abell cluster radii are listed, including the cluster number, richness class, distance class, magnitude of the tenth brightest galaxy, redshift estimate, corrected cluster radius in arcmin, right ascension and error, declination and error, total flux density and error, and angular structure for each source.

  7. The Rich Globular Cluster System of Abell 1689 and the Radial Dependence of the Globular Cluster Formation Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Jee, M. J.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Jordán, A.; Meurer, G. R.; Peng, E. W.; West, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z = 0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach a magnitude I 814 = 29 with gsim90% completeness and sample the brightest ~5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N^total_GC = 162{,}850^{+75,450}_{-51,310} GCs within a projected radius of 400 kpc. As many as half of the GCs may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this system is by far the largest GC population studied to date. The specific frequency SN is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from SN ≈ 5 near the center to ~12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase SN by ~20% at z = 0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the mass fractions as a function of radius. The estimated mass in GCs, {M}_GC^total = 3.9 × 1010 M ⊙, is comparable to ~80% of the total stellar mass of the Milky Way. The shape of the GC mass profile appears intermediate between those of the stellar light and total cluster mass. Despite the extreme nature of this system, the ratios of the GC mass to the baryonic and total masses, and thus the GC formation efficiency, are typical of those in other rich clusters when comparing at the same physical radii. The GC formation efficiency is not constant, but varies with radius, in a manner that appears similar for different clusters; we speculate on the reasons for this similarity in profile.

  8. The kinematics and dynamics of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 539

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Huchra, John P.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A sample of 289 redshifts within 10 deg of the center of the cluster A539 have been obtained in order to investigate the cluster kinematics and dynamics. Within 1 Mpc of the center, the physical parameters of A539 are found to be typical of those of rich clusters. It is shown that early-type galaxies are more concentrated toward the cluster center and that the velocity distributions of early-type and late-type galaxies differ marginally.

  9. THE RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF ABELL 1689 AND THE RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Jee, M. J.; Jordán, A.; Meurer, G. R.; Peng, E. W.; West, M. J.

    2013-09-20

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z = 0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach a magnitude I{sub 814} = 29 with ∼>90% completeness and sample the brightest ∼5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N{sup total}{sub GC}= 162,850{sup +75,450}{sub -51,310} GCs within a projected radius of 400 kpc. As many as half of the GCs may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this system is by far the largest GC population studied to date. The specific frequency S{sub N} is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from S{sub N} ≈ 5 near the center to ∼12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase S{sub N} by ∼20% at z = 0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the mass fractions as a function of radius. The estimated mass in GCs, M{sub GC}{sup total} = 3.9 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, is comparable to ∼80% of the total stellar mass of the Milky Way. The shape of the GC mass profile appears intermediate between those of the stellar light and total cluster mass. Despite the extreme nature of this system, the ratios of the GC mass to the baryonic and total masses, and thus the GC formation efficiency, are typical of those in other rich clusters when comparing at the same physical radii. The GC formation efficiency is not constant, but varies with radius, in a manner that appears similar for different clusters; we speculate on the reasons for this similarity in profile.

  10. Spatial Analyses of a Complete Sample of Rich Abell/ACO Clusters to z=0.14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    1999-12-01

    Galaxy clusters act as excellent mass tracers in our local Universe. They are bright, contain hundreds of galaxies, and are easy to observe. The most recognized galaxy cluster catalogs are those of Abell (1958) and Abell, Corwin and Olowin (1989-ACO). I will present the results of a new survey of Abell/ACO cluster redshifts that extends our knowledge of the large-scale mass distribution to a redshift of z = 0.14. The volume of the Universe traced by this survey is four times larger than any of its predecessors. The large number of clusters within the survey boundaries ( 560) as well as the large volume traced, allow for statistical analyses on scales never before probed. I will present the cluster power spectrum to scales approaching 1000h-1Mpc. I will also demonstrate the high-level of completeness for this survey, which allows one to study the effects of large-scale structure on internal cluster properties. I will then summarize some recent collaborative efforts which show that (1) Wide-Angle Tail radio jets are ``blown'' in the direction of the local large-scale axis; (2) High dM/dt cooling flow clusters reside in crowded environments; (3) Clusters with close near-neighbors are also close to the fundamental plane created from Lo, Lx and Ro. CM was funded in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Maine Science and Technology Foundation.

  11. Deep CCD Photometry of the Rich Galaxy Cluster Abell 1656: Characteristics of the Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy Population in the Cluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secker, Jeff

    1996-06-01

    I have developed a statistically rigorous and automated program code (DYNAMO) to implement the detection, photometry and classification of faint objects on digital images. Detected objects correspond to local maxima of the intensity distribution, whose peak-flux pixel intensity exceeds a user-defined threshold. For all detected objects, several intensity-weighted quantities are computed: average and centers, the radial moments r_1 and r_-2, the ellipticity epsilon and the concentration index c_in. Then, Kron's 2r_1 total magnitude, integrated colors derived from standard fixed aperture magnitudes, and measures of surface brightness (central and average) are then calculated for each object. The process of discrimination between galaxy and starlike objects is performed interactively, through parameter-space culling and color-magnitude discrimination. Statistical number correction with remote background fields can then be used to further reduce contamination in the resulting distributions. This program code was tested and characterized using artificial CCD images of star and galaxy fields: it is accurate, robust and versatile. I have analyzed deep R- and B-band KPNO 4-m CCD images of the central ~700 arcmin^2 of the Coma cluster (Abell 1656, v ~= 7000 km/s, richness-class 2), using the new photometry software described above. I detected and measured total R magnitudes and (B-R) colors for a sample of 3741 objects in Coma cluster core and 1164 objects on a remote control field, complete to a limiting magnitude of R = 22.5 mag. The typical uncertainties are +-0.06 and +-0.12 mag in total magnitude and color respectively. The dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies are confined to a tight sequence in the color range given by 0.7 <= (B-R) <= 1.9 mag; within this interval there are 2535 dE candidates in the cluster core, and 694 objects on the control field (2.57 X less area). Scaling the number of objects on the control field to the area of the program fields leaves a sample of

  12. Quantification of Substructure in Nearby Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriessler, J. R.; Beers, T. C.; Odewahn, S. C.

    1995-05-01

    Theory, as well as numerical simulations, suggests that Omega_o may be observationally constrained by the amount of substructure observed in present-day clusters of galaxies. We have therefore begun a study of the 116 Abell clusters with richness class greater than or equal to 1 and distance class less than or equal to 4, the so-called ``volume-limited'' sample of Hoessel, Gunn, & Thuan 1980 (ApJ 241, 486) to determine the prevalence of substructure in the clusters' projected galaxy positions. We use positions of galaxies identified by the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner to obtain contour plots of the available clusters using an adaptive kernel routine. Significance of substructure is evaluated using the 2-D Lee test as well as a likelihood-ratio test on fits made with mixtures of two-dimensional gaussians. We also present nonparametric density profile estimates obtained with the program MAPEL (Merritt and Tremblay 1994, AJ 108, 514).

  13. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  14. A survey by HEAO 1 of clusters of galaxies. III - The complete Abell catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. W.; Cruddace, R. G.; Wood, K. S.; Ulmer, M. P.; Kowalski, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    A catalog of 128 X-ray emitting clusters, including the Virgo Cluster, is presented. Ninety-one of these are new identifications. The catalog was obtained by searching the HEAO 1 survey observations for coincidences of X-ray sources with Abell clusters. The distribution of these sources in the sky has been examined in search of associations with other Abell clusters, with a null result. The X-ray luminosity has been correlated with cluster richness, but no association with Bautz-Morgan class has been found. The cluster luminosity function has been evaluated, and using this function the contribution of clusters to the diffuse X-ray background radiation has been estimated. It amounts to less than 15% at 2 keV and 3% at 6 keV.

  15. A survey of rich clusters of galaxies with HEAO 1. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Meekins, J.; Smathers, H.; Yentis, D.; Wood, K.; Mcnutt, D.; Chubb, T.; Johnson, M.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of an X-ray survey of approximately 1900 Abell clusters of galaxies performed with the NRL large-area X-ray detectors on HEAO 1. The cluster luminosity function derived from the observations made at ecliptic longitudes between 80 and 180 deg and 260 and 360 deg is fit with both power law and exponential relations, and used to estimate a total contribution of Abell clusters to the volume emissivity of the diffuse X-ray background of between 3 and 10%. No strong correlation is found between X-ray luminosity and Bautz-Morgan class, richness class or 26-MHz radio power, although B-M type I and Abell richness class 3 appear more likely to be strong X-ray sources. A correlation is suggested between optical radius and X-ray luminosity.

  16. Surprising phenomena in a rich new class of inflationary models

    SciTech Connect

    Vaudrevange, Pascal M.; Podolsky, Dmitry I.; Starkman, Glenn D. E-mail: podolsky@phys.cwru.edu

    2010-04-01

    We report on a new class of fast-roll inflationary models. In a huge part of its parameter space, inflationary perturbations exhibit quite unusual phenomena such as scalar and tensor modes freezing out at widely different times, as well as scalar modes reentering the horizon during inflation. One specific point in parameter space is characterized by extraordinary behavior of the scalar perturbations. Freeze-out of scalar perturbations as well as particle production at horizon crossing are absent. Also the behavior of the perturbations around this quasi-de Sitter background is dual to a quantum field theory in flat space-time. Finally, the form of the primordial power spectrum is determined by the interaction between different modes of scalar perturbations.

  17. The cluster of galaxies Abell 2670

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shambrook, Anouk Aimee

    2001-10-01

    The rich cluster of galaxies Abell 2670 provides a laboratory in which to observe how galaxy properties change as a function of environment. Though initially considered a relaxed cluster, Abell 2670 exhibits substructure in optical, x-ray, and radio 21 cm H I line data. The cluster hosts a plethora of elliptical galaxies as well as spiral galaxies including galaxies rich in cold gas (some with more than 1010 Msolar in H I), and K+A galaxies. A group of galaxies rich in cold gas may be entering the cluster environment for the first time, making Abell 2670 a valuable case study. This thesis presents a catalog of UBV RI colors for objects located in an area 1° x 1° centered on Abell 2670, based on observations using the CTIO 0.9-m Schmidt telescope. Follow up observations using the Keck II 10-m and the CTIO 4-m telescopes will enable the classification of galaxy morphology. Using evolutionary synthesis models by Poggianti and Barbaro, a photometric redshift analysis yields a best- fit redshift and spectral energy distribution for each galaxy. The results are checked with galaxies observed by Sharples, Ellis, and Gray, which are known cluster members. Radial density profiles of cluster and field galaxies are modeled by King and uniform distributions respectively. A set of simulated galaxies, drawn from a combination of the two models, is compared to the data; for each redshift classification (based on the photometric redshift analysis), Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests characterize the probable fraction of cluster galaxies relative to the total. For the galaxies classified by the photometric redshift analysis as E, Sa, and Sc, an overdensity value is calculated, quantifying the density-morphology relation for this sample. A detailed study of this low redshift (z = 0.076) cluster may inform future studies of high redshift clusters. The optical UBV RI catalog is an important part of a multiwavelength set of data on Abell 2670 which in the future will probably lend itself well

  18. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasadia, S.; Sun, M.; Sarazin, C.; Morandi, A.; Markevitch, M.; Wik, D.; Feretti, L.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    Deep (103 ks) Chandra observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of M = 3.0 ± 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell 665 the second cluster, after the Bullet cluster, where a strong merger shock of M ≈ 3 has been detected. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 ± 0.7) × 103 km s-1. The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the re-acceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  19. Spectral alteration effects in chondritic gas-rich breccias - Implications for S-Class and Q-Class asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey F.; Keil, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    Reflection spectra were obtained from sawed or freshly broken surfaces of gas-rich matrix regions in a number of ordinary chondrites (Dubrovnik, Cangas de Onis, Olivenza, and Dimmitt) which are believed to represent lithified portions of asteroid regoliths that were once directly exposed to space, with the purpose of relating these chondrites to Class S asteroids. However, the observations did not detect curved red continuum characteristic for Class S asteroid spectra, suggesting that it is unlikely for any well-observed Class S asteroid to be a source of ordinary chondrites. It is suggested that the newly discovered spectral class 'Q', of which asteroid 1982 Apollo is the prototype, provides a viable alternative of a parent body.

  20. Dwarf busting in Abell 868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon

    1999-07-01

    We request 24 orbits to obtain a deep mosaic {6 * 4-orbit pointings} of the central region of A868, a rich Abell cluster which we have imaged comprehensively from the ground. The objective is to identify and characterise the morphological nature of the dwarf galaxy population{s} responsible for the steep upturn seen in this cluster's luminosity function. While similar upturns have been reported in many clusters, the specifics of the dwarf population remain unknown as these objects cannot be resolved from the ground. What type of dwarf galaxies are they ? Is there more than one population contributing ? How are they clustered ? By obtaining deep high-resolution HST WFPC2 imaging over a central field roughly 7.5' * 3.75' we will be able to measure morphologies, light- profiles and the clustering properties of the dwarf population{s} down to M_I = -16 mags {H_o=75kms^-1Mpc^-1}. Although we shall primarily concentrate on the dwarf galaxies, we will also recover the cluster's morphological luminosity distributions for elliptical, spirals and irregulars over a broad absolute magnitude range {-24 < M_I < -16 mags} as well as the more quantitative bivariate brightness distribution {- 24 < M_I < -16 mags, 17.0 < mu_e^I < 25 mags per sq arcsec}. Comparing these results to those recently derived for the general field will provide an insight into the environmental influences on morphology and surface brightness.

  1. From Rags to "Rich as Rockefeller": Portrayals of Class Mobility in Newbery Titles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest, Danielle E.

    2014-01-01

    Several scholars have noted the prevalence of the discourse of upward class mobility in the United States, particularly within K-12 education settings. "Rags-to-riches" stories, an extreme form of upward mobility discourse, have been embedded in American culture for generations. However, the prevalence of upward mobility discourse in…

  2. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootaninia, Zahra

    2015-05-01

    This thesis presents a study of the radio luminosity function and the evolution of galaxies in the Abell 2256 cluster (z=0.058, richness class 2). Using the NED database and VLA deep data with an rms sensitivity of 18 mu Jy.beam--1, we identified 257 optical galaxies as members of A2256, of which 83 are radio galaxies. Since A2256 is undergoing a cluster-cluster merger, it is a good candidate to study the radio activity of galaxies in the cluster. We calculated the Univariate and Bivariate radio luminosity functions for A2256, and compared the results to studies on other clusters. We also used the SDSS parameter fracDev to roughly classify galaxies as spirals and ellipticals, and investigated the distribution and structure of galaxies in the cluster. We found that most of the radio galaxies in A2256 are faint, and are distributed towards the outskirts of the cluster. On the other hand, almost all very bright radio galaxies are ellipticals which are located at the center of the cluster. We also found there is an excess in the number of radio spiral galaxies in A2256 compared to the number of radio ellipticals, counting down to a radio luminosity of log(luminosity)=20.135 W/Hz..

  3. Technology-Rich Ethnography for Examining the Transition to Authentic Problem-Solving in a High School Computer Programming Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Xun; Thomas, Michael K.; Greene, Barbara A.

    2006-01-01

    This study utilized elements of technology-rich ethnography to create a rich description of a multi-user virtual environment in a high school computer programming class. Of particular interest was the transition that took place in classroom culture from one characterized by a well-defined problem solving approach to one more indicative of open…

  4. Discovery of an overlapping cluster in the Abell 1674 field with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tawa, Noriaki; Koyama, Katsuji

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a Suzaku observation of Abell 1674, an optically very rich (richness class 3) cluster cataloged as z = 0.1066. We discover the He-like Fe K-shell line from the central region for the first time, and find that the X-ray spectrum yields a high redshift of 0.215^{+0.007}_{-0.006}. On the other hand, the spectrum of the south-western region is fitted with a redshift of 0.11 ± 0.02 by the He-like Fe L-shell lines, consistent with the optically determined value. The gas temperature, metal abundance, and core radius of the X-ray emission in the central region are 3.8 ± 0.2 keV, 0.20 ± 0.05 Z⊙, and 450 ± 40 kpc, respectively, while those in the south-western region are 2.0 ± 0.2 keV, 0.41^{+0.17}_{-0.13} Z⊙, and 220^{+90}_{-70} kpc, respectively. These parameters are typical for clusters. We thus conclude that Abell 1674 consists of two independent clusters, A 1674-C at z ˜ 0.22 and A 1674-SW at z ˜ 0.11, overlapping along the line of sight. The X-ray luminosity of A 1674-C within r = 2 Mpc is (15.9 ± 0.6) × 1043 erg s-1 in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band, while that for A 1674-SW is (1.25 ± 0.07) × 1043 erg s-1. Both are consistent with those expected from the L-T relation of clusters within a factor of 2. This is another supporting factor for our conclusion.

  5. Hierarchical socioeconomic fractality: The rich, the poor, and the middle-class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-05-01

    Since the seminal work of the Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, the study of wealth and income has been a topic of active scientific exploration engaging researches ranging from economics and political science to econophysics and complex systems. This paper investigates the intrinsic fractality of wealth and income. To that end we introduce and characterize three forms of socioeconomic scale-invariance-poor fractality, rich fractality, and middle-class fractality-and construct hierarchical fractal approximations of general wealth and income distributions, based on the stitching of these three forms of fractality. Intertwining the theoretical results with real-world empirical data we then establish that the three forms of socioeconomic fractality-amalgamated into a composite hierarchical structure-underlie the distributions of wealth and income in human societies. We further establish that the hierarchical socioeconomic fractality of wealth and income is also displayed by empirical rank distributions observed across the sciences.

  6. The dynamics of Abell 2634

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkney, J.; Rhee, George F.; Burns, Jack O.; Batuski, D.; Hill, J. M.; Hintzen, P.; Oegerle, W.

    1993-01-01

    We have amassed a large sample of velocity data for the cluster of galaxies Abell 2634 which contains the wide-angle tail (WAT) radio source 3C 465. Robust indicators of location and scale and their confidence intervals are used to determine if the cD galaxy, containing the WAT, has a significant peculiar motion. We find a cD peculiar radial velocity of 219 plus or minus 98 km s(exp -1). Further dynamical analyses, including substructure and normality tests, suggest that A 2634 is an unrelaxed cluster whose radio source structure may be bent by the turbulent gas of a recent cluster-subcluster merger.

  7. Stellar populations of BCGs, close companions and intracluster light in Abell 85, Abell 2457 and IIZw108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. O. V.; Alpert, H. S.; Trierweiler, I. L.; Abraham, T.; Beizer, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first results from an integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey of a ˜75 kpc region around three brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), combining over 100 IFU fibres to study the intracluster light (ICL). We fit population synthesis models to estimate age and metallicity. For Abell 85 and Abell 2457, the ICL is best-fit with a fraction of old, metal-rich stars like in the BCG, but requires 30-50 per cent young and metal-poor stars, a component not found in the BCGs. This is consistent with the ICL having been formed by a combination of interactions with less massive, younger, more metal-poor cluster members in addition to stars that form the BCG. We find that the three galaxies are in different stages of evolution and may be the result of different formation mechanisms. The BCG in Abell 85 is near a relatively young, metal-poor galaxy, but the dynamical friction time-scale is long and the two are unlikely to be undergoing a merger. The outer regions of Abell 2457 show a higher relative fraction of metal-poor stars, and we find one companion, with a higher fraction of young, metal-poor stars than the BCG, which is likely to merge within a gigayear. Several luminous red galaxies are found at the centre of the cluster IIZw108, with short merger time-scales, suggesting that the system is about to embark on a series of major mergers to build up a dominant BCG. The young, metal-poor component found in the ICL is not found in the merging galaxies.

  8. Stellar Populations of BCGs, Close Companions and Intracluster Light in Abell 85, Abell 2457 and IIZw108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. O. V.; Alpert, H. S.; Trierweiler, I. L.; Abraham, T.; Beizer, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first results from an integral field (IFU) spectroscopic survey of a ˜75 kpc region around three Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs), combining over 100 IFU fibres to study the intracluster light (ICL). We fit population synthesis models to estimate age and metallicity. For Abell 85 and Abell 2457, the ICL is best-fit with a fraction of old, metal-rich stars like in the BCG, but requires 30-50% young and metal-poor stars, a component not found in the BCGs. This is consistent with the ICL having been formed by a combination of interactions with less massive, younger, more metal-poor cluster members in addition to stars that form the BCG. We find that the three galaxies are in different stages of evolution and may be the result of different formation mechanisms. The BCG in Abell 85 is near a relatively young, metal-poor galaxy, but the dynamical friction timescale is long and the two are unlikely to be undergoing a merger. The outer regions of Abell 2457 show a higher relative fraction of metal-poor stars, and we find one companion, with a higher fraction of young, metal-poor stars than the BCG, which is likely to merge within a gigayear. Several luminous red galaxies are found at the centre of the cluster IIZw108, with short merger timescales, suggesting the system is about to embark on a series of major mergers to build up a dominant BCG. The young, metal-poor component found in the ICL is not found in the merging galaxies.

  9. Mass Substructure in Abell 3128

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleary, J.; dell'Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  10. The Richness Dependence of Galaxy Cluster Correlations: Results From A Redshift Survey Of Rich APM Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, R. A. C.; Dalton, G. B.; Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the spatial clustering properties of a new catalog of very rich galaxy clusters selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. These clusters are of comparable richness and space density to Abell Richness Class greater than or equal to 1 clusters, but selected using an objective algorithm from a catalog demonstrably free of artificial inhomogeneities. Evaluation of the two-point correlation function xi(sub cc)(r) for the full sample and for richer subsamples reveals that the correlation amplitude is consistent with that measured for lower richness APM clusters and X-ray selected clusters. We apply a maximum likelihood estimator to find the best fitting slope and amplitude of a power law fit to x(sub cc)(r), and to estimate the correlation length r(sub 0) (the value of r at which xi(sub cc)(r) is equal to unity). For clusters with a mean space density of 1.6 x 10(exp -6) h(exp 3) MpC(exp -3) (equivalent to the space density of Abell Richness greater than or equal to 2 clusters), we find r(sub 0) = 21.3(+11.1/-9.3) h(exp -1) Mpc (95% confidence limits). This is consistent with the weak richness dependence of xi(sub cc)(r) expected in Gaussian models of structure formation. In particular, the amplitude of xi(sub cc)(r) at all richnesses matches that of xi(sub cc)(r) for clusters selected in N-Body simulations of a low density Cold Dark Matter model.

  11. Social Class, Solipsism, and Contextualism: How the Rich Are Different from the Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Michael W.; Piff, Paul K.; Mendoza-Denton, Rodolfo; Rheinschmidt, Michelle L.; Keltner, Dacher

    2012-01-01

    Social class is shaped by an individual's material resources as well as perceptions of rank vis-a-vis others in society, and in this article, we examine how class influences behavior. Diminished resources and lower rank create contexts that constrain social outcomes for lower-class individuals and enhance contextualist tendencies--that is, a focus…

  12. The Evolution of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain of the Class A Scavenger Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Nicholas V. L.; Whelan, Fiona J.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.; Golding, G. Brian

    2015-01-01

    The class A scavenger receptor (cA-SR) family is a group of five evolutionarily related innate immune receptors. The cA-SRs are known for their promiscuous ligand binding; as they have been shown to bind bacteria, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, as well as different modified forms of low-density lipoprotein. Three of the five family members possess a scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain while the remaining two receptors lack the domain. Previous work has suggested that the macrophage-associated receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) shares a recent common ancestor with the non-SRCR-containing receptors; however, the origin of the SRCR domain within the cA-SRs remains unknown. We hypothesize that the SRCR domains of the cA-SRs have a common origin that predates teleost fish. Using the newly available sequence data from sea lamprey and ghost shark genome projects, we have shown that MARCO shares a common ancestor with the SRCR-containing proteins. In addition, we explored the evolutionary relationships within the SRCR domain by reconstructing the ancestral SRCR domains of the cA-SRs. We identified a motif that is highly conserved between the cA-SR SRCR domains and the ancestral SRCR domain that consist of WGTVCDD. We also show that the GRAEVYY motif, a functionally important motif within MARCO, is poorly conserved in the other cA-SRs and in the reconstructed ancestral domain. Further, we identified three sites within MARCO’s SRCR domain, which are under positive selection. Two of these sites lie adjacent to the conserved WGTVCDD motif, and may indicate a potential biological function for these sites. Together, these findings indicate a common origin of the SRCR domain within the cA-SRs; however, different selective pressures between the proteins may have caused MARCOs SRCR domain to evolve to contain different functional motifs when compared to the other SRCR-containing cA-SRs. PMID:26217337

  13. An X-ray survey of clusters of galaxies. IV - A survey of southern clusters and a compilation of upper limits for both Abell and southern clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Wood, K. S.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the HEAO 1 A-1 X-ray survey of galaxy clusters are reported. X-ray error boxes and intensities are presented for all clusters in the Abell catalog and for the catalog of southern clusters and groups compiled by Duus and Newell (1977). A correlation is derived on the basis of the X-ray luminosity function for 2-6 keV which may be used to calculate the contribution of clusters to the diffuse X-ray background at different energies. The cluster X-ray is estimated to be 9.3 percent (+ 1.9 or - 1.5 percent). Correlations between X-ray luminosity and other cluster properties are exmained, and it is found that the distribution of upper limits may be applied to obtaining a more precise estimate of the average X-ray luminosity of clusters. The Abell richness class and southern cluster concentrations were strongly correlated with X-ray luminosity. Correlations between optical x-ray luminosity and optical radius velocity dispersion, spiral fraction, and radio power are analyzed. The evidence for all these correlations was considered to be weak because of poor scatter in the data.

  14. Enhancing Large-Class Teaching: A Systematic Comparison of Rich-Media Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, F. C.; Hutt, I.

    2015-01-01

    Large cohorts (>200 students) are an ever-increasing presence in the UK higher education (HE) sector. Providing excellent teaching and learning to these large classes is an ongoing challenge for teaching faculty, a challenge intensified when the cohort comprises 85% non-native English speakers. This paper presents the findings of a project to…

  15. An X-ray temperature map of Abell 754: A major merger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. Patrick; Briel, Ulrich G.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first two-dimensional X-ray temperature map of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 754. We also present an X-ray surface brightness map with improved spatial resolution and sensitivity compared with previous maps. Both the temperature map and the surface brightness map show that A754 is in the throes of a violent merger; it is probably far from hydrostatic equilibrium.

  16. The cD galaxy in Abell cluster 1775

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. J. E.; Bhattacharya, B.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, a number of workers have studied the multiple nuclei cD galaxy in the rich Abell cluster 1775, trying to discover its nature. In all the cases though, very little has been published concerning its morphology. The majority of arguments about the nature of this object have been based on the relative radial velocities of the 2 components with each other and with the other galaxies in the cluster, or its radio morphology. Very little work has been done on the optical morphology. To rectify that lack of data, the authors have obtained charge coupled device (CCD) images of the cD. The authors find from the CCD data that the cD is unlikely to be a bound object and that there is strong evidence for a collision.

  17. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts. PMID:17082451

  18. Abel's Theorem Simplifies Reduction of Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We give an alternative to the standard method of reduction or order, in which one uses one solution of a homogeneous, linear, second order differential equation to find a second, linearly independent solution. Our method, based on Abel's Theorem, is shorter, less complex and extends to higher order equations.

  19. The Morphological Decomposition of Abell 868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, S. P.; Odewahn, S. C.; Echevarria, L.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Phillipps, S.; Couch, W. J.

    2003-12-01

    We report on the morphological luminosity functions (LFs) and radial profiles derived for the galaxy population within the rich cluster Abell 868 (z=0.153) based purely on Hubble Space Telescope imaging in F606W. We recover Schechter functions (-24.0

  20. Serine/arginine-rich splicing factors belong to a class of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Chad; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.

    2006-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) splicing factors play an important role in constitutive and alternative splicing as well as during several steps of RNA metabolism. Despite the wealth of functional information about SR proteins accumulated to-date, structural knowledge about the members of this family is very limited. To gain a better insight into structure-function relationships of SR proteins, we performed extensive sequence analysis of SR protein family members and combined it with ordered/disordered structure predictions. We found that SR proteins have properties characteristic of intrinsically disordered (ID) proteins. The amino acid composition and sequence complexity of SR proteins were very similar to those of the disordered protein regions. More detailed analysis showed that the SR proteins, and their RS domains in particular, are enriched in the disorder-promoting residues and are depleted in the order-promoting residues as compared to the entire human proteome. Moreover, disorder predictions indicated that RS domains of SR proteins were completely unstructured. Two different classification methods, the charge-hydropathy measure and the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the disorder scores, were in agreement with each other, and they both strongly predicted members of the SR protein family to be disordered. This study emphasizes the importance of the disordered structure for several functions of SR proteins, such as for spliceosome assembly and for interaction with multiple partners. In addition, it demonstrates the usefulness of order/disorder predictions for inferring protein structure from sequence. PMID:16407336

  1. The Two-Point Spatial Correlation Function for the MX Northern Abell Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.; Slinglend, K. A.; Batuski, D. J.; Hill, J.

    1997-12-01

    The results from the COBE satellite show the existence of structure in the cosmic microwave background radiation on scales ~ 10% or more of the horizon scale of the Universe. Rich clusters of galaxies from the Abell/ACO catalogs show evidence of structure on scales of 100h(-1) Mpc and hold the promise of confirming structure on the scale of the COBE results. However, previous analyses for large-scale structure based on the clusters in these catalogs suffer from small sample sizes, imcomplete samples, and large uncertainties in the measured data. Our efforts with the MX Cluster Redshift Survey have resulted in galaxy redshifts for 95 rich Abell clusters returning 88 positive cluster identifications. Five cluster fields did not supply enough data for cluster positions and two clusters were found to be simply projections of galaxies strung out along the line of sight. By obtaining an average of 9 member galaxy redshifts per cluster, we have greatly reduced uncertainty in cluster locations. The Abell catalog is now 98% complete out to m10 <= 16.8. This complete sample has provided us with the necessary data to calculate the two-point spatial correlation function, xi (r), characterized by the slope of its power-law fit gamma and a scale length r_o. Preliminary results give gamma = -2.26+/-0.14 and r_o = 21.9+/- 1.5 h(-1) Mpc. These results are then compared with other spatial analyses based on different samples.

  2. The clusters Abell 222 and Abell 223: a multi-wavelength view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Laganá, T. F.; Adami, C.; Bertin, E.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The Abell 222 and 223 clusters are located at an average redshift z ~ 0.21 and are separated by 0.26 deg. Signatures of mergers have been previously found in these clusters, both in X-rays and at optical wavelengths, thus motivating our study. In X-rays, they are relatively bright, and Abell 223 shows a double structure. A filament has also been detected between the clusters both at optical and X-ray wavelengths. Aims: We analyse the optical properties of these two clusters based on deep imaging in two bands, derive their galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs) and correlate these properties with X-ray characteristics derived from XMM-Newton data. Methods: The optical part of our study is based on archive images obtained with the CFHT Megaprime/Megacam camera, covering a total region of about 1 deg2, or 12.3 × 12.3 Mpc2 at a redshift of 0.21. The X-ray analysis is based on archive XMM-Newton images. Results: The GLFs of Abell 222 in the g' and r' bands are well fit by a Schechter function; the GLF is steeper in r' than in g'. For Abell 223, the GLFs in both bands require a second component at bright magnitudes, added to a Schechter function; they are similar in both bands. The Serna & Gerbal method allows to separate well the two clusters. No obvious filamentary structures are detected at very large scales around the clusters, but a third cluster at the same redshift, Abell 209, is located at a projected distance of 19.2 Mpc. X-ray temperature and metallicity maps reveal that the temperature and metallicity of the X-ray gas are quite homogeneous in Abell 222, while they are very perturbed in Abell 223. Conclusions: The Abell 222/Abell 223 system is complex. The two clusters that form this structure present very different dynamical states. Abell 222 is a smaller, less massive and almost isothermal cluster. On the other hand, Abell 223 is more massive and has most probably been crossed by a subcluster on its way to the northeast. As a consequence, the

  3. Similar hormone-rich peptides from thyroglobulins of five vertebrate classes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, P.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Kaiser, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    Thyroglobulins (Tgs) were purified from five species (rat, chicken, turtle, frog, and goldfish), each representing a different vertebrate class. On reduction with mercaptoethanol, each Tg produced five major iodopeptides, designated A-E, with ranges of estimated molecular mass, in kilodaltons (K), as follows: A, more than 300K; B, 210-280K; C, 30-42K; D, 19-28K; and E, 10-23K. Of these, the two smallest, D and E, had 40-80% of their iodine as iodothyronine, compared with 15-20% for the parent Tgs. They contained 25-63% of Tg's total iodothyronines but only a few percent of its peptide material. Calculations from amino acid analyses and iodine contents showed approximately 1 mol each of D and E/mol 660,000 dalton Tg. In comparisons of amino acid compositions by cluster analysis, iodopeptides D and E resembled each other and their counterparts in other species more than they resembled their parent Tgs. Also, the Tgs from different species were more similar to each other and to iodopeptides D and E than to nonthyroidal proteins randomly selected from the literature. /sup 125/ was injected into rats and turtles, and compared its distribution among the iodopeptides to that of /sup 127/I. These dual isotope experiments showed that as Tg was iodinated in vivo, iodopeptide B decreased both in molecular size and in its share of Tg's iodine, while the sum of iodopeptides D and E increased, indicating that B may be the precursor of D and E. In vivo iodination of rat Tg with /sup 125/I for different periods of time suggested that iodopeptide E and its iodothyronines are derived from a larger portion of the Tg molecule, perhaps iodopeptide B. The amount of /sup 125/I in iodopeptide D also increased with time.

  4. The nature of the driving mechanism in the pulsating hybrid PG 1159 star Abell 43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, P.-O.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2005-10-01

    We extend our previous pulsational stability analyses of PG 1159 stars by modeling the hybrid PG 1159 type star Abell 43. We show that the standard κ-mechanism due to the ionization of C and O in the envelope of this H-rich PG 1159 star is perfectly able to drive g-mode pulsations. Thus, contrary to a recent suggestion, there is no need to invoke any new or exotic mechanism to explain the pulsational instabilities observed in this particular star. Our expected instability band for l=1 modes extends in period from ~2604 s to ~5529 s, which is consistent with the available photometric observations of Abell 43. We also suggest that efforts to detect luminosity variations in its sibling NGC 7094 be pursued.

  5. The hydrogen-deficient knot of the `born-again' planetary nebula Abell 58 (V605 Aql)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, R.; Barlow, M. J.; Liu, X.-W.; Storey, P. J.; Ercolano, B.; De Marco, O.

    2008-02-01

    We have analysed deep optical spectra of the `born-again' planetary nebula Abell 58 and its hydrogen-deficient knot, surrounding V605 Aql, which underwent a nova-like eruption in 1919. Our analysis shows that the extinction towards the central knot is much higher than previously thought, with c(Hβ) = 2.0. The outer nebula is less reddened, with c(Hβ) = 1.04. We find that the outer nebula has a Ne/O ratio higher than the average PN value. The electron temperature we derive for the central knot varies widely depending on the diagnostic used. The [OIII] nebular-to-auroral transition ratio gives a temperature of 20800K, while the ratio of the [NII] nebular and auroral lines gives Te = 15200K. The helium line ratios λ5876/λ4471 and λ6678/λ4471 imply temperatures of 350 and 550K, respectively. Weakly temperature-sensitive OII recombination line ratios imply similarly low electron temperatures. Abundances derived from recombination lines are vastly higher than those found from collisionally excited lines, with the abundance discrepancy factor (ADF) for O2+ reaching 89 - the second highest known value after that found for the hydrogen-deficient knots in Abell 30. The observed temperature diagnostics and abundances support the idea that, like Abell 30, the knot of Abell 58 contains some very cold ionized material. Although the central star is carbon-rich (C/O > 1), the knot is found to be oxygen-rich, a situation not predicted by the single-star `born-again' theory of its formation. We compare the known properties of Abell 58 to those of Abell 30, Sakurai's Object and several novae and nova remnants. We argue that the abundances in the ejecta observed in A30 and A58 have more in common with neon novae than with Sakurai's Object, which is believed to have undergone a final helium flash. In particular, the C/O ratio of less than unity and the presence of substantial quantities of neon in the ejecta of both Abell 30 and Abell 58 are not predicted by very late thermal

  6. The X-ray cluster Abell 744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gioia, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray and optical observations of the cluster of galaxies Abell 744 are presented. The X-ray flux (assuming H(0) = 100 km/s per Mpc) is about 9 x 10 to the 42nd erg/s. The X-ray source is extended, but shows no other structure. Photographic photometry (in Kron-Cousins R), calibrated by deep CCD frames, is presented for all galaxies brighter than 19th magnitude within 0.75 Mpc of the cluster center. The luminosity function is normal, and the isopleths show little evidence of substructure near the cluster center. The cluster has a dominant central galaxy, which is classified as a normal brightest-cluster elliptical on the basis of its luminosity profile. New redshifts were obtained for 26 galaxies in the vicinity of the cluster center; 20 appear to be cluster members. The spatial distribution of redshifts is peculiar; the dispersion within the 150 kpc core radius is much greater than outside. Abell 744 is similar to the nearby cluster Abell 1060.

  7. ROSAT HRI images of Abell 85 and Abell 496: Evidence for inhomogeneities in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Guimond, Stephen J.; Luginbuhl, Christian; Joy, Marshall

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT HRI images of two clusters of galaxies with cooling flows, Abell 496 and Abell 85. In these clusters, x-ray emission on small scales above the general cluster emission is significant at the 3 sigma level. There is no evidence for optical counterparts. The enhancements may be associated with lumps of gas at a lower temperature and higher density than the ambient medium, or hotter, denser gas perhaps compressed by magnetic fields. These observations can be used to test models of how thermal instabilities form and evolve in cooling flows.

  8. Tauberian theorems for Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Enes; ćoşkun, Hüsamettin

    2015-09-01

    We give some conditions under which Abel summable sequences of fuzzy numbers are convergent. As corollaries we obtain the results given in [E. Yavuz, Ö. Talo, Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers, Soft computing 2014, doi: 10.1007/s00500-014-1563-7].

  9. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s‑1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX–TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  10. X-ray morphologies of Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. L. W.; Kowalski, M. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented for X-ray measurements made with the Einstein Observatory's IPC for a sample of 49 Abell clusters, which were used to determine quantitative measures of two morphological parameters of these clusters, the orientation and ellipticity. Consideration is given to the techniques used for estimating and removing background noise in the images and for determining the variation of these parameters with the flux level of a cluster. It was found that most clusters are clearly flattened; for 20 of these clusters, the orientation was unambiguously determined. A catalog of cluster properties is presented.

  11. Mapping the intracluster medium of Abell 3627

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, Julie; Koribalski, Baerbel; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Wong, O. Ivy; Serra, Paolo; Schnitzeler, Dominic; Dehghan, Siamak

    2013-10-01

    Galaxy clusters are among the largest structures in the Universe. They provide a high density environment where galaxies undergo high-speed collisions, ram pressure stripping, and tidal interactions. The resulting debris can sometimes be detected in the form of neutral or ionised intergalactic filaments. Abell 3627 lies at a distance of ~66kpc right in the heart of the Great Attractor and is one of the most massive clusters known. We propose to map an area of 1 sq. deg. around Abell 3627 at 1 - 3 GHz to study the polarised emission in and between cluster members and search for HI absorption of neutral intracluster gas. We will be able to: (1) test cluster magnetic field turbulence on very small scales; (2) examine rotation measure (RM) spectra to understand the effect of radio sources in cluster environments; (3) detect the intracluster medium (ICM) magnetic field; (4) determine the magnetic field strength of the cluster and place upper limits on the age; and (5) constrain the HI column density in the ICM. All of these goals together will provide information to understand how the large-scale structure of the Universe evolves.

  12. Are Abell Clusters Correlated with Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Laros, J.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A recent study has presented marginal statistical evidence that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources are correlated with Abell clusters, based on analyses of bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog. Using precise localization information from the Third Interplanetary Network, we have reanalyzed this possible correlation. We find that most of the Abell clusters that are in the relatively large 3B error circles are not in the much smaller IPN/BATSE error regions. We believe that this argues strongly against an Abell cluster-GRB correlation.

  13. Probing single biomolecules in solution using the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Goldsmith, Randall H; Jiang, Yan; Bockenhauer, Samuel D; Moerner, W E

    2012-11-20

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements allow researchers to study asynchronous dynamics and expose molecule-to-molecule structural and behavioral diversity, which contributes to the understanding of biological macromolecules. To provide measurements that are most consistent with the native environment of biomolecules, researchers would like to conduct these measurements in the solution phase if possible. However, diffusion typically limits the observation time to approximately 1 ms in many solution-phase single-molecule assays. Although surface immobilization is widely used to address this problem, this process can perturb the system being studied and contribute to the observed heterogeneity. Combining the technical capabilities of high-sensitivity single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, real-time feedback control and electrokinetic flow in a microfluidic chamber, we have developed a device called the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap to significantly prolong the observation time of single biomolecules in solution. We have applied the ABEL trap method to explore the photodynamics and enzymatic properties of a variety of biomolecules in aqueous solution and present four examples: the photosynthetic antenna allophycocyanin, the chaperonin enzyme TRiC, a G protein-coupled receptor protein, and the blue nitrite reductase redox enzyme. These examples illustrate the breadth and depth of information which we can extract in studies of single biomolecules with the ABEL trap. When confined in the ABEL trap, the photosynthetic antenna protein allophycocyanin exhibits rich dynamics both in its emission brightness and its excited state lifetime. As each molecule discontinuously converts from one emission/lifetime level to another in a primarily correlated way, it undergoes a series of state changes. We studied the ATP binding stoichiometry of the multi-subunit chaperonin enzyme TRiC in the ABEL trap by counting the number of hydrolyzed Cy3-ATP using stepwise

  14. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, C

    2004-02-05

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060.

  15. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21(sub -0.47 sup +0.43) on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36(sub -0.17 sup +0.46).

  16. The magnitude-redshift relation for 561 Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.; Henry, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble diagram for the 561 Abell clusters with measured redshifts has been examined using Abell's (1958) corrected photo-red magnitudes for the tenth-ranked cluster member (m10). After correction for the Scott effect and K dimming, the data are in good agreement with a linear magnitude-redshift relation with a slope of 0.2 out to z = 0.1. New redshift data are also presented for 20 Abell clusters. Abell's m10 is suitable for redshift estimation for clusters with m10 of no more than 16.5. At fainter m10, the number of foreground galaxies expected within an Abell radius is large enough to make identification of the tenth-ranked galaxy difficult. Interlopers bias the estimated redshift toward low values at high redshift. Leir and van den Bergh's (1977) redshift estimates suffer from this same bias but to a smaller degree because of the use of multiple cluster parameters. Constraints on deviations of cluster velocities from the mean cosmological flow require greater photometric accuracy than is provided by Abell's m10 magnitudes.

  17. Abel inversion method for cometary atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Benoit; Opitom, Cyrielle; Hutsemekers, Damien; Jehin, Emmanuel; Munhoven, Guy; Manfroid, Jean; Bisikalo, Dmitry V.; Shematovich, Valery I.

    2016-04-01

    Remote observation of cometary atmospheres produces a measurement of the cometary emissions integrated along the line of sight joining the observing instrument and the gas of the coma. This integration is the so-called Abel transform of the local emission rate. We develop a method specifically adapted to the inversion of the Abel transform of cometary emissions, that retrieves the radial profile of the emission rate of any unabsorbed emission, under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry of the coma. The method uses weighted least squares fitting and analytical results. A Tikhonov regularization technique is applied to reduce the possible effects of noise and ill-conditioning, and standard error propagation techniques are implemented. Several theoretical tests of the inversion techniques are carried out to show its validity and robustness, and show that the method is only weakly dependent on any constant offset added to the data, which reduces the dependence of the retrieved emission rate on the background subtraction. We apply the method to observations of three different comets observed using the TRAPPIST instrument: 103P/ Hartley 2, F6/ Lemmon and A1/ Siding spring. We show that the method retrieves realistic emission rates, and that characteristic lengths and production rates can be derived from the emission rate for both CN and C2 molecules. We show that the emission rate derived from the observed flux of CN emission at 387 nm and from the C2 emission at 514.1 nm of comet Siding Spring both present an easily-identifiable shoulder that corresponds to the separation between pre- and post-outburst gas. As a general result, we show that diagnosing properties and features of the coma using the emission rate is easier than directly using the observed flux. We also determine the parameters of a Haser model fitting the inverted data and fitting the line-of-sight integrated observation, for which we provide the exact analytical expression of the line-of-sight integration

  18. The Filtered Abel Transform and Its Application in Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    Many non-intrusive combustion diagnosis methods generate line-of-sight projections of a flame field. To reconstruct the spatial field of the measured properties, these projections need to be deconvoluted. When the spatial field is axisymmetric, commonly used deconvolution method include the Abel transforms, the onion peeling method and the two-dimensional Fourier transform method and its derivatives such as the filtered back projection methods. This paper proposes a new approach for performing the Abel transform method is developed, which possesses the exactness of the Abel transform and the flexibility of incorporating various filters in the reconstruction process. The Abel transform is an exact method and the simplest among these commonly used methods. It is evinced in this paper that all the exact reconstruction methods for axisymmetric distributions must be equivalent to the Abel transform because of its uniqueness and exactness. Detailed proof is presented to show that the two dimensional Fourier methods when applied to axisymmetric cases is identical to the Abel transform. Discrepancies among various reconstruction method stem from the different approximations made to perform numerical calculations. An equation relating the spectrum of a set of projection date to that of the corresponding spatial distribution is obtained, which shows that the spectrum of the projection is equal to the Abel transform of the spectrum of the corresponding spatial distribution. From the equation, if either the projection or the distribution is bandwidth limited, the other is also bandwidth limited, and both have the same bandwidth. If the two are not bandwidth limited, the Abel transform has a bias against low wave number components in most practical cases. This explains why the Abel transform and all exact deconvolution methods are sensitive to high wave number noises. The filtered Abel transform is based on the fact that the Abel transform of filtered projection data is equal

  19. Chandra View of Galaxy Cluster Abell 2554

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kıyami Erdim, Muhammed; Hudaverdi, Murat

    2016-07-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 2554 at z = 0.11, which is a member of Aquarius Super cluster using the Chandra archival data. The X-ray peak coincides with a bright elliptical cD galaxy. Slightly elongated X-ray plasma has an average temperature and metal abundance values of ˜6 keV and 0.28 solar, respectively. We observe small-scale temperature variations in the ICM. There is a significantly hot wall-like structure with 9 keV at the SE and also radio-lope locates at the tip of this hot region. A2554 is also part of a trio-cluster. Its close neighbors A2550 (at SW) and A2556 (at SE) have only 2 Mpc and 1.5 Mpc separations with A2554. Considering the temperature fluctuations and the dynamical environment of super cluster, we examine the possible ongoing merger scenarios within A2554.

  20. Abell 1033: birth of a radio phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperin, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Dawson, W. A.; Brüggen, M.; Bonafede, A.; Simionescu, A.

    2015-04-01

    Extended steep-spectrum radio emission in a galaxy cluster is usually associated with a recent merger. However, given the complex scenario of galaxy cluster mergers, many of the discovered sources hardly fit into the strict boundaries of a precise taxonomy. This is especially true for radio phoenixes that do not have very well defined observational criteria. Radio phoenixes are aged radio galaxy lobes whose emission is reactivated by compression or other mechanisms. Here, we present the detection of a radio phoenix close to the moment of its formation. The source is located in Abell 1033, a peculiar galaxy cluster which underwent a recent merger. To support our claim, we present unpublished Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Chandra observations together with archival data from the Very Large Array and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We discover the presence of two subclusters displaced along the N-S direction. The two subclusters probably underwent a recent merger which is the cause of a moderately perturbed X-ray brightness distribution. A steep-spectrum extended radio source very close to an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is proposed to be a newly born radio phoenix: the AGN lobes have been displaced/compressed by shocks formed during the merger event. This scenario explains the source location, morphology, spectral index, and brightness. Finally, we show evidence of a density discontinuity close to the radio phoenix and discuss the consequences of its presence.

  1. The SAMI Pilot Survey: stellar kinematics of galaxies in Abell 85, 168 and 2399

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, L. M. R.; Scott, N.; Owers, M. S.; Croom, S. M.; Bekki, K.; Houghton, R. C. W.; van de Sande, J.; D'Eugenio, F.; Cecil, G. N.; Colless, M. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cortese, L.; Davies, R. L.; Jones, D. H.; Pracy, M.; Allen, J. T.; Bryant, J. J.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Richards, S.; Sharp, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present the SAMI Pilot Survey, consisting of integral field spectroscopy of 106 galaxies across three galaxy clusters, Abell 85, Abell 168 and Abell 2399. The galaxies were selected by absolute magnitude to have Mr < -20.25 mag. The survey, using the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI), comprises observations of galaxies of all morphological types with 75 per cent of the sample being early-type galaxies (ETGs) and 25 per cent being late-type galaxies (LTGs). Stellar velocity and velocity dispersion maps are derived for all 106 galaxies in the sample. The λR parameter, a proxy for the specific stellar angular momentum, is calculated for each galaxy in the sample. We find a trend between λR and galaxy concentration such that LTGs are less concentrated higher angular momentum systems, with the fast-rotating ETGs (FRs) more concentrated and lower in angular momentum. This suggests that some dynamical processes are involved in transforming LTGs to FRs, though a significant overlap between the λR distributions of these classes of galaxies implies that this is just one piece of a more complicated picture. We measure the kinematic misalignment angle, Ψ, for the ETGs in the sample, to probe the intrinsic shapes of the galaxies. We find the majority of FRs (83 per cent) to be aligned, consistent with them being oblate spheroids (i.e. discs). The slow rotating ETGs (SRs), on the other hand, are significantly more likely to show kinematic misalignment (only 38 per cent are aligned). This confirms previous results that SRs are likely to be mildly triaxial systems.

  2. Ethical Intervention versus Capital Imaginaries: A Class Analysis of the Overseas Schooling Choice of the Chinese "New Rich"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yujia

    2012-01-01

    The overseas schooling choice as a spatial strategy of capital accumulation has recently attracted scholarly attention (Findlay et al 2012; Ong 1999; Waters 2005, 2006; Brooks and Waters 2011). This paper follows an exploration of the links between geographical mobilities incurred by educational choices, capital accumulation, and class identities…

  3. On sky characterization of the BAORadio wide band digital backend. Search for HI emission in Abell85, Abell1205 and Abell2440 galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Campagne, J. E.; Colom, P.; Ferrari, C.; Magneville, Ch.; Martin, J. M.; Moniez, M.; Torrentó, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    We have observed regions of three galaxy clusters at z˜[0.06÷0.09] (Abell85, Abell1205, Abell2440) with the Nançay radiotelescope (NRT) to search for 21 cm emission and to fully characterize the FPGA based BAORadio digital backend. We have tested the new BAORadio data acquisition system by observing sources in parallel with the NRT standard correlator (ACRT) back-end over several months. BAORadio enables wide band instantaneous observation of the [1250,1500] MHz frequency range, as well as the use of powerful RFI mitigation methods thanks to its fine time sampling. A number of questions related to instrument stability, data processing and calibration are discussed. We have obtained the radiometer curves over the integration time range [0.01,10 000] seconds and we show that sensitivities of few mJy over most of the wide frequency band can be reached with the NRT. It is clearly shown that in blind line search, which is the context of H I intensity mapping for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, the new acquisition system and processing pipeline outperforms the standard one. We report a positive detection of 21 cm emission at 3 σ-level from galaxies in the outer region of Abell85 at ≃1352 MHz (14400 km/s) corresponding to a line strength of ≃0.8 Jy km/s. We also observe an excess power around ≃1318 MHz (21600 km/s), although at lower statistical significance, compatible with emission from Abell1205 galaxies. Detected radio line emissions have been cross matched with optical catalogs and we have derived hydrogen mass estimates.

  4. The merging cluster Abell 1758 revisited: multi-wavelength observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Laganá, T. F.; Haider, M.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Cluster properties can be more distinctly studied in pairs of clusters, where we expect the effects of interactions to be strong. Aims: We here discuss the properties of the double cluster Abell 1758 at a redshift z ~ 0.279. These clusters show strong evidence for merging. Methods: We analyse the optical properties of the North and South cluster of Abell 1758 based on deep imaging obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) archive Megaprime/Megacam camera in the g' and r' bands, covering a total region of about 1.05 × 1.16 deg2, or 16.1 × 17.6 Mpc2. Our X-ray analysis is based on archive XMM-Newton images. Numerical simulations were performed using an N-body algorithm to treat the dark-matter component, a semi-analytical galaxy-formation model for the evolution of the galaxies and a grid-based hydrodynamic code with a parts per million (PPM) scheme for the dynamics of the intra-cluster medium. We computed galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs) and 2D temperature and metallicity maps of the X-ray gas, which we then compared to the results of our numerical simulations. Results: The GLFs of Abell 1758 North are well fit by Schechter functions in the g' and r' bands, but with a small excess of bright galaxies, particularly in the r' band; their faint-end slopes are similar in both bands. In contrast, the GLFs of Abell 1758 South are not well fit by Schechter functions: excesses of bright galaxies are seen in both bands; the faint-end of the GLF is not very well defined in g'. The GLF computed from our numerical simulations assuming a halo mass-luminosity relation agrees with those derived from the observations. From the X-ray analysis, the most striking features are structures in the metal distribution. We found two elongated regions of high metallicity in Abell 1758 North with two peaks towards the centre. In contrast, Abell 1758 South shows a deficit of metals in its central regions. Comparing observational results to those derived from numerical

  5. Mechanisms for Galaxy Transformation in the Complex Environment of SuperGroup Abell 1882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Aparajita; Keel, W. C.; Morrison, G. E.; Windhorst, R. A.; Smith, B.

    2013-01-01

    We present our results from a multi-wavelength study of galaxy transformations in the outskirts of SuperGroup Abell 1882, a highly filamentary and clumpy structure caught in the early stages of coalescing into a Coma-like cluster. Our data have been drawn from MMT, GMOS, WIYN, SDSS, SARA, CFHT, GALEX, Spitzer and Chandra. Clusters grow by accretion through filaments, and these accreted galaxies undergo transformations due to environmental effects. Radial locations of these transformations in cluster outskirts can be mapped to a time sequence. In relaxed clusters, several evolutionary mechanisms take effect on similar spatial and temporal scales, thus making it almost impossible to disentangle different local and global mechanisms. A SuperGroup, on the other hand, has shallower Dark Matter potential. Here, the accreting galaxies are subjected to evolutionary mechanisms over larger time and spatial scales. This separates processes that are otherwise superimposed in rich cluster-filament interfaces. We have studied transformations in Specific Star Formation Rate, birth rate parameter, color and morphological properties of 342 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies of Abell 1882, as they make their journey through the feeding filaments into the high density core of the structure, as a function of their local galaxy density and structure-centric distance. Our results show that significant transformations in galaxies begin to occur much before the galaxies reach the X-ray gas environments of the dense groups. This indicates that ram pressure stripping is unlikely driver of early galaxy transformations in proto-clusters.

  6. MHC class II variation in a rare and ecological specialist mouse lemur reveals lower allelic richness and contrasting selection patterns compared to a generalist and widespread sympatric congener.

    PubMed

    Pechouskova, Eva; Dammhahn, Melanie; Brameier, Markus; Fichtel, Claudia; Kappeler, Peter M; Huchard, Elise

    2015-04-01

    The polymorphism of immunogenes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is thought to influence the functional plasticity of immune responses and, consequently, the fitness of populations facing heterogeneous pathogenic pressures. Here, we evaluated MHC variation (allelic richness and divergence) and patterns of selection acting on the two highly polymorphic MHC class II loci (DRB and DQB) in the endangered primate Madame Berthe's mouse lemur (Microcebus berthae). Using 454 pyrosequencing, we examined MHC variation in a total of 100 individuals sampled over 9 years in Kirindy Forest, Western Madagascar, and compared our findings with data obtained previously for its sympatric congener, the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). These species exhibit a contrasting ecology and demography that were expected to affect MHC variation and molecular signatures of selection. We found a lower allelic richness concordant with its low population density, but a similar level of allelic divergence and signals of historical selection in the rare feeding specialist M. berthae compared to the widespread generalist M. murinus. These findings suggest that demographic factors may exert a stronger influence than pathogen-driven selection on current levels of allelic richness in M. berthae. Despite a high sequence similarity between the two congeners, contrasting selection patterns detected at DQB suggest its potential functional divergence. This study represents a first step toward unravelling factors influencing the adaptive divergence of MHC genes between closely related but ecologically differentiated sympatric lemurs and opens new questions regarding potential functional discrepancy that would explain contrasting selection patterns detected at DQB. PMID:25687337

  7. LensPerfect Analysis of Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan A.

    2007-12-01

    I present the first massmap to perfectly reproduce the position of every gravitationally-lensed multiply-imaged galaxy detected to date in ACS images of Abell 1689. This massmap was obtained using a powerful new technique made possible by a recent advance in the field of Mathematics. It is the highest resolution assumption-free Dark Matter massmap to date, with the resolution being limited only by the number of multiple images detected. We detect 8 new multiple image systems and identify multiple knots in individual galaxies to constrain a grand total of 168 knots within 135 multiple images of 42 galaxies. No assumptions are made about mass tracing light, and yet the brightest visible structures in A1689 are reproduced in our massmap, a few with intriguing positional offsets. Our massmap probes radii smaller than that resolvable in current Dark Matter simulations of galaxy clusters. And at these radii, we observe slight deviations from the NFW and Sersic profiles which describe simulated Dark Matter halos so well. While we have demonstrated that our method is able to recover a known input massmap (to limited resolution), further tests are necessary to determine the uncertainties of our mass profile and positions of massive subclumps. I compile the latest weak lensing data from ACS, Subaru, and CFHT, and attempt to fit a single profile, either NFW or Sersic, to both the observed weak and strong lensing. I confirm the finding of most previous authors, that no single profile fits extremely well to both simultaneously. Slight deviations are revealed, with the best fits slightly over-predicting the mass profile at both large and small radius. Our easy-to-use software, called LensPerfect, will be made available soon. This research was supported by the European Commission Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant 017288-BPZ and the PNAYA grant AYA2005-09413-C02.

  8. The Merger Dynamics of Abell 2061

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Avery; Sarazin, Craig L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Hogge, Taylor; Wik, Daniel R.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnsworth, Damon; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brown, Shea

    2016-04-01

    Abell 2061, a galaxy cluster at a redshift of z=.0784 in the Corona Borealis Supercluster, displays features in both the X-ray and radio indicative of merger activity. Observations by the GBT and the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) have indicated the presence of an extended, central radio halo/relic coincident with the cluster's main X-ray emission and a bright radio relic to the SW of the center of the cluster. Previous observations by ROSAT, Beppo-SAX, and Chandra show an elongated structure (referred to as the ‘Plume’), emitting in the soft X-ray and stretching to the NE of the cluster’s center. The Beppo-SAX and Chandra observations also suggest the presence of a hard X-ray shock slightly NE of the cluster’s center. Here we present the details of an August 2013 XMM-Newton observation of A2061 which has greater field of view and longer exposure (48.6 ks) than the previous Chandra observation. We present images displaying the cluster’s soft and hard X-ray emission and also a temperature map of the cluster. This temperature map highlights the presence of a previously unseen cool region of the cluster which we hypothesize to be the cool core of one of the subclusters involved in this merger. We also discuss the structural similarity of this cluster with a simulated high mass-ratio offset cluster merger taken from the Simulation Library of Astrophysical cluster Mergers (SLAM). This simulation would suggest that the Plume is gas from the cool core of a subcluster which is now falling back into the center of the cluster after initial core passage.

  9. Mass Profile of Abell 2204 An X-Ray Analysis of Abell 2204 using XMM-Newton Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Travis

    2003-09-05

    The vast majority of the matter in the universe is of an unknown type. This matter is called dark matter by astronomers. The dark matter manifests itself only through gravitational interaction and is otherwise undetectable. The distribution of this matter in can be better understood by studying the mass profile of galaxy clusters. The X-ray emissions of the galaxy cluster Abell 2204 were analyzed using archived data from the XMM-Newton space telescope. We analyze a 40ks observation of Abell 2204 and present a radial temperature and radial mass profile based on hydrostatic equilibrium calculations.

  10. The photometric properties of brightest cluster galaxies. I - Absolute magnitudes in 116 nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, J. G.; Gunn, J. E.; Thuan, T. X.

    1980-01-01

    Two-color aperture photometry of the brightest galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters is presented. The results are used to anchor the bright end of the Hubble diagram; essentially the entire formal error for this method is then due to the sample of distant clusters used. New determinations of the systematic trend of galaxy absolute magnitude with the cluster properties of richness and Bautz-Morgan type are derived. When these new results are combined with the Gunn and Oke (1975) data on high-redshift clusters, a formal value (without accounting for any evolution) of q sub 0 = -0.55 + or - 0.45 (1 standard deviations) is found.

  11. AGES Observations of Abell1367 and its Outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Minchin, R. F.; Auld, R. R.; Davies, J. I.; Catinella, B.; Momjian, E.; Rosenberg, J. L.; O'Neil, K.

    2007-05-01

    The Arecibo Galactic Environment Survey (AGES) will map over the next years ˜200 square degrees using the ALFA feed array at the 305-m Arecibo Telescope. AGES is specifically designed to investigate various galactic environments from local voids to interacting groups and cluster of galaxies. AGES will map 20 square degrees in the Coma-Abell1367 supercluster covering all the Abell cluster 1367 and its outskirts (˜2 virial radii). In Spring 2006 we nearly completed the observations of 5 square degrees in the range (11:34Abell1367 (˜92 Mpc). An HI selected sample has been extracted from the datacube obtaining a complete catalogue of fluxes, recessional velocities, positions and velocity widths. We will present a preliminary analysis of the properties of the HI sources and report the discovery of HI diffuse features within interacting groups at the periphery of Abell1367.

  12. Retrieval Performance and Indexing Differences in ABELL and MLAIB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Vince

    2012-01-01

    Searches for 117 British authors are compared in the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (ABELL) and the Modern Language Association International Bibliography (MLAIB). Authors are organized by period and genre within the early modern era. The number of records for each author was subdivided by format, language of publication,…

  13. Mass dependent galaxy transformation mechanisms in the complex environment of SuperGroup Abell 1882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Aparajita

    We present our data and results from panchromatic photometry and optical spectrometry of the nearest (extremely rich) filamentary large scale structure, SuperGroup Abell 1882. It is a precursor of a cluster and is an inevitable part of the narrative in the study of galaxy transformations. There has been strong empirical evidence over the past three decades that galaxy environment affects galaxy properties. Blue disky galaxies transform into red bulge-like galaxies as they traverse into the deeper recesses of a cluster. However, we have little insight into the story of galaxy evolution in the early stages of cluster formation. Besides, in relaxed clusters that have been studied extensively, several evolutionary mechanisms take effect on similar spatial and temporal scales, making it almost impossible to disentangle different local and global mechanisms. A SuperGroup on the other hand, has a shallower dark-matter potential. Here, the accreting galaxies are subjected to evolutionary mechanisms over larger time and spatial scales. This separates processes that are otherwise superimposed in rich cluster-filament interfaces. As has been found from cluster studies, galaxy color and morphology tie very strongly with local galaxy density even in a complex and nascent structure like Abell 1882. Our major results indicate that there is a strong dependence of galaxy transformations on the galaxy masses themselves. Mass- dependent evolutionary mechanisms affect galaxies at different spatial scales. The galaxy color also varies with radial projected distance from the assumed center of the structure for a constant local galaxy density, indicating the underlying large scale structure as a second order evolutionary driver. We have looked for clues to the types of mechanisms that might cause the transformations at various mass regimes. We have found the thoroughly quenched low mass galaxies confined to the groups, whereas there are evidences of intermediate-mass quenched galaxies

  14. Kinematics and stellar populations of low-luminosity early-type galaxies in the Abell 496 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, I. V.; Cayatte, V.; Durret, F.; Adami, C.; Balkowski, C.; Chemin, L.; Laganá, T. F.; Prugniel, P.

    2008-07-01

    Context: The morphology and stellar populations of low-luminosity early-type galaxies in clusters have until now been limited to a few relatively nearby clusters such as Virgo or Fornax. Scenarii for the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in clusters are therefore not well constrained. Aims: We investigate here the morphology and stellar populations of low-luminosity galaxies in the relaxed richness class 1 cluster Abell 496 (z = 0.0330). Methods: Deep multiband imaging obtained with the CFHT Megacam allowed us to select a sample of faint galaxies, defined here as objects with magnitudes 18 < r' < 22 mag within a 1.2 arcsec fibre (-18.8 < MB < -15.1 mag). We observed 118 galaxies spectroscopically with the ESO VLT FLAMES/Giraffe spectrograph with a resolving power R = 6300. We present structural analysis and colour maps for the 48 galaxies belonging to the cluster. We fit the spectra of 46 objects with PEGASE.HR synthetic spectra to estimate the ages, metallicities, and velocity dispersions. We estimated possible biases by similarly analysing spectra of ~1200 early-type galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6). We computed values of α/Fe abundance ratios from the measurements of Lick indices. We briefly discuss effects of the fixed aperture size on the measurements. Results: For the first time, high-precision estimates of stellar population properties have been obtained for a large sample of faint galaxies in a cluster, allowing for the extension of relations between stellar populations and internal kinematics to the low-velocity dispersion regime. We have revealed a peculiar population of elliptical galaxies in the core of the cluster, resembling massive early-type galaxies by their stellar population properties and velocity dispersions, but having luminosities of about 2 mag fainter. Conclusions: External mechanisms of gas removal (ram pressure stripping and gravitational harassment) are more likely to have occurred than

  15. X-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Abell 1835

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Kaastra, J. S.; Arnaud, M.; Reiprich T. H.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Jernigan, J. G.; Sakelliou, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopy results of the observation of Abell 1835 using the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton observatory. Abell 1835 is a luminous (10(exp 46)ergs/s), medium redshift (z = 0.2523), X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. The observations support the interpretation that large amounts of cool gas are present in a multi-phase medium surrounded by a hot (kT(sub e) = 8.2 keV) outer envelope. We detect O VIII Ly(alpha) and two Fe XXIV complexes in the RGS spectrum. The emission measure of the cool gas below kT(sub e) = 2.7 keV is much lower than expected from standard cooling-flow models, suggesting either a more complicated cooling process than simple isobaric radiative cooling or differential cold absorption of the cooler gas.

  16. The galaxy population of Abell 1367: the stellar mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhcine, M.; Kriwattanawong, W.; James, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    Using wide baseline broad-band photometry, we analyse the stellar population properties of a sample of 72 galaxies, spanning a wide range of stellar masses and morphological types, in the nearby spiral-rich and dynamically young galaxy cluster Abell 1367. The sample galaxies are distributed from the cluster centre out to approximately half the cluster Abell radius. The optical/near-infrared colours are compared with simple stellar population synthesis models from which the luminosity-weighted stellar population ages and metallicities are determined. The locus of the colours of elliptical galaxies traces a sequence of varying metallicity at a narrow range of luminosity-weighted stellar ages. Lenticular galaxies in the red sequence, however, exhibit a substantial spread of luminosity-weighted stellar metallicities and ages. For red-sequence lenticular galaxies and blue cloud galaxies, low-mass galaxies tend to be on average dominated by stellar populations of younger luminosity-weighted ages. Sample galaxies exhibit a strong correlation between integrated stellar mass and luminosity-weighted stellar metallicity. Galaxies with signs of morphological disturbance and ongoing star formation activity, tend to be underabundant with respect to passive galaxies in the red sequence of comparable stellar masses. We argue that this could be due to tidally driven gas flows towards the star-forming regions, carrying less enriched gas and diluting the pre-existing gas to produce younger stellar populations with lower metallicities than would be obtained prior to the interaction. Finally, we find no statistically significant evidence for changes in the luminosity-weighted ages and metallicities for either red-sequence or blue-cloud galaxies, at fixed stellar mass, with location within the cluster. We dedicate this work to the memory of our friend and colleague C. Moss who died suddenly recently.

  17. A plethora of diffuse steep spectrum radio sources in Abell 2034 revealed by LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimwell, T. W.; Luckin, J.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Intema, H. T.; Owers, M. S.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Stroe, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; Cassano, R.; de Gasperin, F.; Heald, G. H.; Hoang, D. N.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Sridhar, S. S.; Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Bonafede, A.; Chyży, K. T.; Enßlin, T. A.; Ferrari, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; McKean, J. P.; Morabito, L. K.; Orrù, E.; Pizzo, R.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; White, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations, we have discovered a diverse assembly of steep spectrum emission that is apparently associated with the intracluster medium (ICM) of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2034. Such a rich variety of complex emission associated with the ICM has been observed in few other clusters. This not only indicates that Abell 2034 is a more interesting and complex system than previously thought but it also demonstrates the importance of sensitive and high-resolution, low-frequency observations. These observations can reveal emission from relativistic particles which have been accelerated to sufficient energy to produce observable emission or have had their high energy maintained by mechanisms in the ICM. The most prominent feature in our maps is a bright bulb of emission connected to two steep spectrum filamentary structures, the longest of which extends perpendicular to the merger axis for 0.5 Mpc across the south of the cluster. The origin of these objects is unclear, with no shock detected in the X-ray images and no obvious connection with cluster galaxies or AGNs. We also find that the X-ray bright region of the cluster coincides with a giant radio halo with an irregular morphology and a very steep spectrum. In addition, the cluster hosts up to three possible radio relics, which are misaligned with the cluster X-ray emission. Finally, we have identified multiple regions of emission with a very steep spectral index that seem to be associated with either tailed radio galaxies or a shock.

  18. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    PubMed

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  19. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics

    PubMed Central

    Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the “core team”, facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  20. Guanidinium-Rich, Glycerol-Derived Oligocarbonates: A New Class of Cell-Penetrating Molecular Transporters That Complex, Deliver, and Release siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wender, Paul A.; Huttner, Melanie A.; Staveness, Daryl; Vargas, Jessica R.; Xu, Adele F.

    2015-01-01

    A highly versatile and step-economical route to a new class of guanidinium-rich molecular transporters and evaluation of their ability to complex, deliver, and release siRNA are described. These new drug/probe delivery systems are prepared in only two steps, irrespective of length or composition, using an organocatalytic ring-opening co-oligomerization of glycerol-derived cyclic carbonate monomers incorporating either protected guanidine or lipid side chains. The resultant amphipathic co-oligomers are highly effective vehicles for siRNA delivery, providing an excellent level of target protein suppression (>85%). These new oligocarbonates are nontoxic at levels required for cell penetration and can be tuned for particle size. Relative to the previously reported methyl(trimethylene)carbonate (MTC) scaffold, the ether linkage at C2 in the new transporters markedly enhances the stability of the siRNA/co-oligomer complexes. Both hybrid co-oligomers, containing a mixture of glycerol- and MTC-derived monomers, and co-oligomers containing only glycerol monomers are found to provide tunable control over siRNA complex stability. On the basis of a glycerol and CO2 backbone, these new co-oligomers represent a rapidly tunable and biocompatible siRNA delivery system that is highly effective in suppressing target protein synthesis. PMID:25588140

  1. Guanidinium-rich, glycerol-derived oligocarbonates: a new class of cell-penetrating molecular transporters that complex, deliver, and release siRNA.

    PubMed

    Wender, Paul A; Huttner, Melanie A; Staveness, Daryl; Vargas, Jessica R; Xu, Adele F

    2015-03-01

    A highly versatile and step-economical route to a new class of guanidinium-rich molecular transporters and evaluation of their ability to complex, deliver, and release siRNA are described. These new drug/probe delivery systems are prepared in only two steps, irrespective of length or composition, using an organocatalytic ring-opening co-oligomerization of glycerol-derived cyclic carbonate monomers incorporating either protected guanidine or lipid side chains. The resultant amphipathic co-oligomers are highly effective vehicles for siRNA delivery, providing an excellent level of target protein suppression (>85%). These new oligocarbonates are nontoxic at levels required for cell penetration and can be tuned for particle size. Relative to the previously reported methyl(trimethylene)carbonate (MTC) scaffold, the ether linkage at C2 in the new transporters markedly enhances the stability of the siRNA/co-oligomer complexes. Both hybrid co-oligomers, containing a mixture of glycerol- and MTC-derived monomers, and co-oligomers containing only glycerol monomers are found to provide tunable control over siRNA complex stability. On the basis of a glycerol and CO2 backbone, these new co-oligomers represent a rapidly tunable and biocompatible siRNA delivery system that is highly effective in suppressing target protein synthesis. PMID:25588140

  2. Exact travelling wave solutions of non-linear reaction-convection-diffusion equations—An Abel equation based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, T.; Mak, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    We consider quasi-stationary (travelling wave type) solutions to a general nonlinear reaction-convection-diffusion equation with arbitrary, autonomous coefficients. The second order nonlinear equation describing one dimensional travelling waves can be reduced to a first kind first order Abel equation. By using two integrability conditions for the Abel equation (the Chiellini lemma and the Lemke transformation), several classes of exact travelling wave solutions of the general reaction-convection-diffusion equation are obtained, corresponding to different functional relations imposed between the diffusion, convection and reaction functions. In particular, we obtain travelling wave solutions for two non-linear second order partial differential equations, representing generalizations of the standard diffusion equation and of the classical Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, to which they reduce for some limiting values of the model parameters. The models correspond to some specific, power law type choices of the reaction and convection functions, respectively. The travelling wave solutions of these two classes of differential equation are investigated in detail by using both numerical and semi-analytical methods.

  3. Numerical Simulations Challenged on the Prediction of Massive Subhalo Abundance in Galaxy Clusters: The Case of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, E.; Grillo, C.; De Lucia, G.; Biviano, A.; Annunziatella, M.; Borgani, S.; Lombardi, M.; Mercurio, A.; Rosati, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter we compare the abundance of the member galaxies of a rich, nearby (z = 0.09) galaxy cluster, Abell 2142, with that of halos of comparable virial mass extracted from sets of state-of-the-art numerical simulations, both collisionless at different resolutions and with the inclusion of baryonic physics in the form of cooling, star formation, and feedback by active galactic nuclei. We also use two semi-analytical models to account for the presence of orphan galaxies. The photometric and spectroscopic information, taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 database, allows us to estimate the stellar velocity dispersion of member galaxies of Abell 2142. This quantity is used as proxy for the total mass of secure cluster members and is properly compared with that of subhalos in simulations. We find that simulated halos have a statistically significant (≳ 7 sigma confidence level) smaller amount of massive (circular velocity above 200 {km} {{{s}}}-1) subhalos, even before accounting for the possible incompleteness of observations. These results corroborate the findings from a recent strong lensing study of the Hubble Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416 and suggest that the observed difference is already present at the level of dark matter (DM) subhalos and is not solved by introducing baryonic physics. A deeper understanding of this discrepancy between observations and simulations will provide valuable insights into the impact of the physical properties of DM particles and the effect of baryons on the formation and evolution of cosmological structures.

  4. Large-Scale Analyses of Angiosperm Nucleotide-Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Reveal Three Anciently Diverged Classes with Distinct Evolutionary Patterns.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhu-Qing; Xue, Jia-Yu; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Wu, Yue; Hang, Yue-Yu; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2016-04-01

    Nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes make up the largest plant disease resistance gene family (R genes), with hundreds of copies occurring in individual angiosperm genomes. However, the expansion history of NBS-LRR genes during angiosperm evolution is largely unknown. By identifying more than 6,000 NBS-LRR genes in 22 representative angiosperms and reconstructing their phylogenies, we present a potential framework of NBS-LRR gene evolution in the angiosperm. Three anciently diverged NBS-LRR classes (TNLs, CNLs, and RNLs) were distinguished with unique exon-intron structures and DNA motif sequences. A total of seven ancient TNL, 14 CNL, and two RNL lineages were discovered in the ancestral angiosperm, from which all current NBS-LRR gene repertoires were evolved. A pattern of gradual expansion during the first 100 million years of evolution of the angiosperm clade was observed for CNLs. TNL numbers remained stable during this period but were eventually deleted in three divergent angiosperm lineages. We inferred that an intense expansion of both TNL and CNL genes started from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. Because dramatic environmental changes and an explosion in fungal diversity occurred during this period, the observed expansions of R genes probably reflect convergent adaptive responses of various angiosperm families. An ancient whole-genome duplication event that occurred in an angiosperm ancestor resulted in two RNL lineages, which were conservatively evolved and acted as scaffold proteins for defense signal transduction. Overall, the reconstructed framework of angiosperm NBS-LRR gene evolution in this study may serve as a fundamental reference for better understanding angiosperm NBS-LRR genes. PMID:26839128

  5. Disentangling Structures in the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 133

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamical analysis of the structure of the cluster of galaxies Abell 133 will be presented using multi-wavelength data combined from multiple space and earth based observations. New and familiar statistical clustering techniques are used in combination in an attempt to gain a fully consistent picture of this interesting nearby cluster of galaxies. The type of analysis presented should be typical of cluster studies in the future, especially those to come from the surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2DF.

  6. Buoyant Bubbles and the Disturbed Cool Core of Abell 133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, T.; Nulsen, P.; Owers, M.; Sarazin, C.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    2010-03-01

    X-ray cavities, often filled with radio-emitting plasma, are routinely observed in the intracluster medium of clusters of galaxies. These cavities, or "bubbles", are evacuated by jets from central AGN and subsequently rise buoyantly, playing a vital role in the "AGN feedback" model now commonly evoked to explain the balance between heating and radiative cooling in cluster cores. As the bubbles rise, they can displace cool central gas, promoting mixing and the redistribution of metals. I will show a few examples of buoyant bubbles, then argue that the peculiar morphology of the Abell 133 is due to buoyant lifting of cool central gas by a radio-filled bubble.

  7. The discovery of diffuse steep spectrum sources in Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Intema, H. T.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Clarke, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Hierarchical galaxy formation models indicate that during their lifetime galaxy clusters undergo several mergers. An example of such a merging cluster is Abell 2256. Here we report on the discovery of three diffuse radio sources in the periphery of Abell 2256, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Aims: The aim of the observations was to search for diffuse ultra-steep spectrum radio sources within the galaxy cluster Abell 2256. Methods: We have carried out GMRT 325 MHz radio continuum observations of Abell 2256. V, R and I band images of the cluster were taken with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). Results: We have discovered three diffuse elongated radio sources located about 1 Mpc from the cluster center. Two are located to the west of the cluster center, and one to the southeast. The sources have a measured physical extent of 170, 140 and 240 kpc, respectively. The two western sources are also visible in deep low-resolution 115-165 MHz Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) images, although they are blended into a single source. For the combined emission of the blended source we find an extreme spectral index (α) of -2.05 ± 0.14 between 140 and 351 MHz. The extremely steep spectral index suggests these two sources are most likely the result of adiabatic compression of fossil radio plasma due to merger shocks. For the source to the southeast, we find that {α < -1.45} between 1369 and 325 MHz. We did not find any clear optical counterparts to the radio sources in the WHT images. Conclusions: The discovery of the steep spectrum sources implies the existence of a population of faint diffuse radio sources in (merging) clusters with such steep spectra that they have gone unnoticed in higher frequency (⪆1 GHz) observations. Simply considering the timescales related to the AGN activity, synchrotron losses, and the presence of shocks, we find that most massive clusters should possess similar sources. An exciting possibility

  8. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Métayer, Olivier; Saurel, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOS named "Noble Abel stiffened gas," this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular "Stiffened Gas (SG)" EOS. It is a combination of the so-called "Noble-Abel" and "stiffened gas" equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.

  9. Hierarchical Velocity Structure in the Core of Abell 2597

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, Martin; Mushotzky, Richard

    2004-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton RGS and EPIC data of the putative cooling flow cluster Abell 2597. Velocities of the low-ionization emission lines in the spectrum are blue shifted with respect to the high-ionization lines by 1320 (sup +660) (sub -210) kilometers per second, which is consistent with the difference in the two peaks of the galaxy velocity distribution and may be the signature of bulk turbulence, infall, rotation or damped oscillation in the cluster. A hierarchical velocity structure such as this could be the direct result of galaxy mergers in the cluster core, or the injection of power into the cluster gas from a central engine. The uniform X-ray morphology of the cluster, the absence of fine scale temperature structure and the random distribution of the the galaxy positions, independent of velocity, suggests that our line of sight is close to the direction of motion. These results have strong implications for cooling flow models of the cluster Abell 2597. They give impetus to those models which account for the observed temperature structure of some clusters using mergers instead of cooling flows.

  10. A redshift survey of the strong-lensing cluster ABELL 383

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kurtz, Michael J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Coe, Dan; Rines, Kenneth J. E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu

    2014-03-01

    Abell 383 is a famous rich cluster (z = 0.1887) imaged extensively as a basis for intensive strong- and weak-lensing studies. Nonetheless, there are few spectroscopic observations. We enable dynamical analyses by measuring 2360 new redshifts for galaxies with r {sub Petro} ≤ 20.5 and within 50' of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG; R.A.{sub 2000} = 42.°014125, decl.{sub 2000} = –03.°529228). We apply the caustic technique to identify 275 cluster members within 7 h {sup –1} Mpc of the hierarchical cluster center. The BCG lies within –11 ± 110 km s{sup –1} and 21 ± 56 h {sup –1} kpc of the hierarchical cluster center; the velocity dispersion profile of the BCG appears to be an extension of the velocity dispersion profile based on cluster members. The distribution of cluster members on the sky corresponds impressively with the weak-lensing contours of Okabe et al. especially when the impact of foreground and background structure is included. The values of R {sub 200} = 1.22 ± 0.01 h {sup –1} Mpc and M {sub 200} = (5.07 ± 0.09) × 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} obtained by application of the caustic technique agree well with recent completely independent lensing measures. The caustic estimate extends direct measurement of the cluster mass profile to a radius of ∼5 h {sup –1} Mpc.

  11. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 1795 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamura, T.; Kaastra, J. S.; Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F.; Mittaz, J. P. D.; Trudolyubov, S. P.; Stewart, G.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Lumb, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    The initial results from XMM-Newton observations of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 1795 are presented. The spatially-resolved X-ray spectra taken by the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) show a temperature drop at a radius of - 200 kpc from the cluster center, indicating that the ICM is cooling. Both the EPIC and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) spectra extracted from the cluster center can be described by an isothermal model with a temperature of approx. 4 keV. The volume emission measure of any cool component (less than 1 keV) is less than a few % of the hot component at the cluster center. A strong O VIII Lyman alpha line was detected with the RGS from the cluster core. The O abundance of the ICM is 0.2-0.5 times the solar value. The O to Fe ratio at the cluster center is 0.5 - 1.5 times the solar ratio.

  12. Order preserving contact transformations and dynamical symmetries of scalar and coupled Riccati and Abel chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin Pradeep, R.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Mohanasubha, R.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-07-01

    We identify contact transformations which linearize the given equations in the Riccati and Abel chains of nonlinear scalar and coupled ordinary differential equations to the same order. The identified contact transformations are not of Cole-Hopf type and are new to the literature. The linearization of Abel chain of equations is also demonstrated explicitly for the first time. The contact transformations can be utilized to derive dynamical symmetries of the associated nonlinear ODEs. The wider applicability of identifying this type of contact transformations and the method of deriving dynamical symmetries by using them is illustrated through two dimensional generalizations of the Riccati and Abel chains as well.

  13. SPECTRAL INDEX STUDIES OF THE DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN ABELL 2256: IMPLICATIONS FOR MERGER ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S. E-mail: dwaraka@rri.res.i

    2010-08-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the merging rich cluster of galaxies, Abell 2256 (A2256). We have observed A2256 at 150 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and successfully detected the diffuse radio halo and the relic emission over a {approx}1.2 Mpc{sup 2} extent. Using this 150 MHz image and the images made using archival observations from the Very Large Array (VLA; 1369 MHz) and the Westerbrok Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT; 330 MHz), we have produced spectral index images of the diffuse radio emission in A2256. These spectral index images show a distribution of flat spectral index (S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup {alpha}}, {alpha} in the range -0.7 to -0.9) plasma in the region NW of the cluster center. Regions showing steep spectral indices ({alpha} in the range -1.0 to -2.3) are toward the SE of the cluster center. These spectral indices indicate synchrotron lifetimes for the relativistic plasmas in the range 0.08-0.4 Gyr. We interpret this spectral behavior as resulting from a merger event along the direction SE to NW within the last 0.5 Gyr or so. A shock may be responsible for the NW relic in A2256 and the megaparsec scale radio halo toward the SE is likely to be generated by the turbulence injected by mergers. Furthermore, the diffuse radio emission shows spectral steepening toward lower frequencies. This low-frequency spectral steepening is consistent with a combination of spectra from two populations of relativistic electrons created at two epochs (two mergers) within the last {approx}0.5 Gyr. Earlier interpretations of the X-ray and the optical data also suggested that there were two mergers in Abell 2256 in the last 0.5 Gyr, consistent with the current findings. Also highlighted in this study is the futility of correlating the average temperatures of thermal gas and the average spectral indices of diffuse radio emission in the respective clusters.

  14. Red population of Abell 1314 : A rest-frame narrowband photometric evolutionary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, Yuvraj Harsha

    2014-06-01

    Red sequence galaxies form with an intense burst of star formation in the early universe to evolve passively into massive, metal rich, old galaxies at z ˜ 0. But Abell 1314 (z=0.034) is found to host almost all red sequence galaxy members - identified using the mz index, classified using the Principle Component Analysis technique and SDSS colour correlations - some of which show properties of low-mass, star forming, and metal rich galaxies. The variably spread Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) near the core forms a vital part in influencing the evolution of these members. To study their evolution, I correlated different parameters of the rest-frame narrowband photometry and the derived luminosity-weighted mean Single Stellar Population model ages and metallicities. The study finds the member galaxies evolve differently in three different sections of the cluster: 1. the region of ≤ 200 kpc hosts passively evolving old, massive systems which accumulate mass by dry, minor mergers, 2. the zone between 200-500 kpc shows stripped systems (or in the process of being gas stripped) by ram pressure with moderate star formation history, 3. the outer regions (≥ 500 kpc) show low-mass red objects with blue, star forming Butcher-Oemler galaxy like colours. This sort of environmental condition is known to harbour hybrid systems, like, the pseudo bulges, blue sequence E/S0 and Butcher-Oemler like satellite cluster galaxies. Overall, the cluster is found to be poor, quiescent with galaxies to have formed by the monolithic structure formation in the early universe and are now evolving with mergers and gas stripping processes by ram pressure.

  15. Brig. Gen. Richard F. Abel and Col. Natan J. Lindsay answering questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Brigadier General Richard F. Abel, right, director of public affairs for the Air Force, and Colonel Nathan J. Lindsay of the USAF's space division, answer questions concerning STS-4 during a press conference at JSC on May 20, 1982.

  16. SHOCKING TAILS IN THE MAJOR MERGER ABELL 2744

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare 'jellyfish' galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging 'Bullet-like' subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  17. Large Scale Diffuse X-ray Emission from Abell 3571

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the Luman alpha forest suggest that there are many more baryons at high redshift than we can find in the Universe nearby. The largest known concentration of baryons in the nearby Universe is the Shapley supercluster. We scanned the Shapley supercluster to search for large scale diffuse emission with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and found some evidence for such emission. Large scale diffuse emission may be associated to the supercluster, or the clusters of galaxies within the supercluster. In this paper we present results of scans near Abell 3571. We found that the sum of a cooling flow and an isothermal beta model adequately describes the X-ray emission from the cluster. Our results suggest that diffuse emission from A3571 extends out to about two virial radii. We briefly discuss the importance of the determination of the cut off radius of the beta model.

  18. Shocking Tails in the Major Merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare "jellyfish" galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging "Bullet-like" subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  19. Comparison of four stable numerical methods for Abel's integral equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murio, Diego A.; Mejia, Carlos E.

    1991-01-01

    The 3-D image reconstruction from cone-beam projections in computerized tomography leads naturally, in the case of radial symmetry, to the study of Abel-type integral equations. If the experimental information is obtained from measured data, on a discrete set of points, special methods are needed in order to restore continuity with respect to the data. A new combined Regularized-Adjoint-Conjugate Gradient algorithm, together with two different implementations of the Mollification Method (one based on a data filtering technique and the other on the mollification of the kernal function) and a regularization by truncation method (initially proposed for 2-D ray sample schemes and more recently extended to 3-D cone-beam image reconstruction) are extensively tested and compared for accuracy and numerical stability as functions of the level of noise in the data.

  20. Diffuse Radio Emission in the Galaxy Cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a low frequency (<1.4GHz) study of the diffuse radio halo and relic emission in the galaxy cluster Abell 0754. Images at 150 MHz made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) revealed 4 diffuse features; 3 of which are new. Images at 330 and 1363 MHz were created using archival data from the GMRT and the VLA respectively. These yield synchrotron spectral indices, α (S ∝ν-α), steeper than 2 for the new features. Adiabatic compression of fossil radio galaxy cocoon by shocks can lead to the formation of radio relics (Ensslin & Gopal-Krishna, 2001). In the framework of this model we find that the relic in A754 can be explained as a lurking cocoon of a radio galaxy; no shock compression is required to produce this emission. The implications of this result to the merger scenario in A754 are discussed.

  1. A shock front at the radio relic of Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.; Jauzac, M.; Vazza, F.; Owers, M. S.; Kneib, J.-P.; Tchernin, C.; Intema, H.; Knowles, K.

    2016-09-01

    Radio relics are Mpc-scale diffuse radio sources at the peripheries of galaxy clusters which are thought to trace outgoing merger shocks. We present XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.306), which reveal the presence of a shock front 1.5 Mpc east of the cluster core. The surface-brightness jump coincides with the position of a known radio relic. Although the surface-brightness jump indicates a weak shock with a Mach number M=1.7_{-0.3}^{+0.5}, the plasma in the post-shock region has been heated to a very high temperature (˜13 keV) by the passage of the shock wave. The low-acceleration efficiency expected from such a weak shock suggests that mildly relativistic electrons have been re-accelerated by the passage of the shock front.

  2. Single florescent nanodiamond in a three dimensional ABEL trap

    PubMed Central

    Kayci, Metin; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional single particle trapping and manipulation is an outstanding challenge in various fields ranging from basic physics to life sciences. By monitoring the response of a trapped particle to a designed environment one can extract its characteristics. In addition, quantum dynamics of a spatially scanned well-known particle can provide environmental information. Precise tracking and positioning of such a particle in aqueous environment is crucial task for achieving nano-scale resolution. Here we experimentally demonstrate three dimensional ABEL trap operating at high frequency by employing a hybrid approach in particle tracking. The particle location in the transverse plane is detected via a scanning laser beam while the axial position is determined by defocused imaging. The scanning of the trapped particle is accomplished through a nano positioning stage integrated to the trap platform. PMID:26559890

  3. The central star of the planetary nebula Abell 78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaler, J. B.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The ultraviolet spectrum of the nucleus of Abell 78, one of the two planetaries known to contain zones of nearly pure helium, is studied. The line spectrum and wind velocities are examined, the determination of interstellar extinction for assessing circumstellar dust is improved, and the temperature, luminosity, and core mass are derived. The results for A78 are compared with results for A30, and it is concluded that the dust distributions around the two central stars are quite different. The temperature of the A78 core is not as high as previously believed, and almost certainly lies between 67,000 K and 130,000 K. The most likely temperature range is 77,000-84,000 K. The core mass lies between 0.56 and 0.70 solar mass, with the most likely values between 0.56 and 0.58 solar mass.

  4. Properties of the Blue Galaxy Population in Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rix, H.-W.; Caldwell, N.

    2000-12-01

    Do star-forming spirals accreted recently by massive clusters evolve in a few Gyrs. into smooth disk galaxies with little or no current star formation? Hierarchical models of large-scale structure and the observed effect of the cluster environment on galaxy morphologies and star formation rates have given rise to many theories predicting such cluster galaxy evolution. Depending on the star formation truncation mechanism timescale, the more recent cluster arrivals should still have relatively young stellar populations and thus bluer colors (esp. in U-V) than the older, red early-types (E/S0) that define the cluster color-magnitude relation. Yet to date no significant population of bluer S0's has been found in local clusters, though we note previous studies have concentrated on the inner regions (R<0.5Mpc) of nearby clusters, which are expected to be dominated by older members. Therefore, we have obtained wide-field (R>0.6/h Mpc) UVI imaging for 10 local (z<0.06) Abell clusters, with 100's of spectroscopically confirmed members, to search the cluster outskirts for bluer S0's which may be recently accreted spirals. From our detailed photometry, we have measured structural parameters for a sample of over 300 U-band selected, spectroscopically confirmed members, by fitting each galaxy surface brightness profile with a PSF-convolved, de Vaucouleur's bulge plus exponential disk model. We have found a population of blue, disk-dominated galaxies, that are predominately in the outskirts (>0.75/h Mpc projected radius) of our first analyzed cluster, Abell 754 at z=0.053. We present the photometric and structural properties of this blue population.

  5. The distribution of dark and luminous matter in the unique galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lindsay J.; Clowe, Douglas I.; Coleman, Joseph E.; Russell, Helen R.; Santana, Rebecca; White, Jacob A.; Canning, Rebecca E. A.; Deering, Nicole J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Lee, Brandyn E.; Li, Baojiu; McNamara, Brian R.

    2016-06-01

    Abell 2146 (z = 0.232) consists of two galaxy clusters undergoing a major merger. The system was discovered in previous work, where two large shock fronts were detected using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, consistent with a merger close to the plane of the sky, caught soon after first core passage. A weak gravitational lensing analysis of the total gravitating mass in the system, using the distorted shapes of distant galaxies seen with Advanced Camera for Surveys - Wide Field Channel on Hubble Space Telescope, is presented. The highest peak in the reconstruction of the projected mass is centred on the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 2146-A. The mass associated with Abell 2146-B is more extended. Bootstrapped noise mass reconstructions show the mass peak in Abell 2146-A to be consistently centred on the BCG. Previous work showed that BCG-A appears to lag behind an X-ray cool core; although the peak of the mass reconstruction is centred on the BCG, it is also consistent with the X-ray peak given the resolution of the weak lensing mass map. The best-fitting mass model with two components centred on the BCGs yields M200 = 1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.4} × 1015 and 3^{+1}_{-2} × 1014 M⊙ for Abell 2146-A and Abell 2146-B, respectively, assuming a mass concentration parameter of c = 3.5 for each cluster. From the weak lensing analysis, Abell 2146-A is the primary halo component, and the origin of the apparent discrepancy with the X-ray analysis where Abell 2146-B is the primary halo is being assessed using simulations of the merger.

  6. A One-Year Case Study: Understanding the Rich Potential of Project-Based Learning in a Virtual Reality Class for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Teresa M.; Bang, EunJin; Andre, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative case analysis of a new and unique, high school, student-directed, project-based learning (PBL), virtual reality (VR) class. In order to create projects, students learned, on an independent basis, how to program an industrial-level VR machine. A constraint was that students were required to produce at least one…

  7. The merging cluster Abell 1758: an optical and dynamical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro-Oliveira, Rogerio; Serra Cypriano, Eduardo; Machado, Rubens; Lima Neto, Gastao B.

    2015-08-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 1758-North (z=0.28) is a binary system composed by the sub-structures NW and NE. This is supposed to be a post-merging cluster due to observed detachment between the NE BCG and the respective X-ray emitting hot gas clump in a scenario very close to the famous Bullet Cluster. On the other hand, the projected position of the NW BCG coincides with the local hot gas peak. This system was been targeted previously by several studies, using multiple wavelengths and techniques, but there is still no clear picture of the scenario that could have caused this unusual configuration. To help solving this complex puzzle we added some pieces: firstly, we have used deep B, RC and z' Subaru images to perform both weak lensing shear and magnification analysis of A1758 (including here the South component that is not in interaction with A1758-North) modeling each sub-clump as an NFW profile in order to constrain masses and its center positions through MCMC methods; the second piece is the dynamical analysis using radial velocities available in the literature (143) plus new Gemini-GMOS/N measurements (68 new redshifts).From weak lensing we found that independent shear and magnification mass determinations are in excellent agreement between them and combining both we could reduce mass error bar by ~30% compared to shear alone. By combining this two weak-lensing probes we found that the position of both Northern BCGs are consistent with the masses centers within 2σ and and the NE hot gas peak to be offseted of the respective mass peak (M200=5.5 X 1014 M⊙) with very high significance. The most massive structure is NW (M200=7.95 X 1014 M⊙ ) where we observed no detachment between gas, DM and BCG.We have calculated a low line-of-sight velocity difference (<300 km/s) between A1758 NW and NE. We have combined it with the projected velocity of 1600 km/s which was estimated by previous X-ray analysis (David & Kempner 2004) and we have obtained a small angle between

  8. Searching for Young S0 Galaxies in Abell 2052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rix, H.-W.; Caldwell, N.

    1999-12-01

    Numerous studies have established strong observational evidence for evolution in cluster member color and morphology. Such evolution is predicted by hierarchical structure formation scenarios where galaxy clusters evolve via accretion of mass from the field. It has been hypothesized that recently accreted large surface brightness spirals will rapidly evolve via some star formation (SF) truncation mechanism into smooth disk galaxies with little or no current SF, but relatively young stellar populations. These younger S0's (hereafter bluer S0's = BS0's) would have bluer colors than the older early-types (E/S0) that define the mean cluster color-magnitude relation (CMR). The existence of such galaxies provides explanations for the disappearance of the blue, star-forming disk galaxies that were common in clusters at z 0.5 (the Butcher-Oemler effect), and the increased fraction of S0's in present-day clusters. To date a significant population of BS0's in nearby clusters has not been found. Therefore, we have obtained wide field (R > 0.6 Mpc), high precision UVI photometry for a sample of 14 local (z < 0.06) Abell clusters, most with over <100 spectroscopically confirmed members. We present photometric results for our first completely reduced cluster, Abell 2052. We have selected candidate BS0's as those early-type members that deviate blueward from the CMR by more than the intrinsic CMR scatter. We used 2-D bulge/disk (B/D) decomposition as an indicator of morphology to refine our sample. This spring, we will obtain spectroscopy of this sample to confirm the relative youth of the stellar populations. In addition, we will use the B/D decompositions of these candidate BS0's to address the following questions: (1) do BS0's make up a significant fraction of the early-type members that deviated from the cluster mean CMR; (2) do BS0's avoid the inner cluster; (3) are BS0's bluer in their disks or bulges; (4) do BS0's exhibit a range of B/D ratios similar to that found in

  9. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Cooray, Asantha R.; Holzappel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect toward the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas distribution to be strongly aspherical, as do the X-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction in two ways. We first compare the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deprojecting the three-dimensional gas density distribution and deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods and find that they agree within the errors of the measurement. We discuss the possible system- atic errors in the gas mass fraction measurement and the constraints it places on the matter density parameter, Omega(sub M).

  10. A shock at the radio relic position in Abell 115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botteon, A.; Gastaldello, F.; Brunetti, G.; Dallacasa, D.

    2016-07-01

    We analysed a deep Chandra observation (334 ks) of the galaxy cluster Abell 115 and detected a shock cospatial with the radio relic. The X-ray surface brightness profile across the shock region presents a discontinuity, corresponding to a density compression factor {C}=2.0± 0.1, leading to a Mach number {M}=1.7± 0.1 ({M}=1.4-2 including systematics). Temperatures measured in the upstream and downstream regions are consistent with what expected for such a shock: T_u=4.3^{+1.0}_{-0.6}{keV} and T_d=7.9^{+1.4}_{-1.1}{keV}, respectively, implying a Mach number {M}=1.8^{+0.5}_{-0.4}. So far, only few other shocks discovered in galaxy clusters are consistently detected from both density and temperature jumps. The spatial coincidence between this discontinuity and the radio relic edge strongly supports the view that shocks play a crucial role in powering these synchrotron sources. We suggest that the relic is originated by shock re-acceleration of relativistic electrons rather than acceleration from the thermal pool. The position and curvature of the shock and the associated relic are consistent with an off-axis merger with unequal mass ratio where the shock is expected to bend around the core of the less massive cluster.

  11. ABELL 1201: A MINOR MERGER AT SECOND CORE PASSAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Chengjiun; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Owers, Matt; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-06-20

    We present an analysis of the structures and dynamics of the merging cluster Abell 1201, which has two sloshing cold fronts around a cooling core, and an offset gas core approximately 500 kpc northwest of the center. New Chandra and XMM-Newton data reveal a region of enhanced brightness east of the offset core, with breaks in surface brightness along its boundary to the north and east. This is interpreted as a tail of gas stripped from the offset core. Gas in the offset core and the tail is distinguished from other gas at the same distance from the cluster center chiefly by having higher density, hence lower entropy. In addition, the offset core shows marginally lower temperature and metallicity than the surrounding area. The metallicity in the cool core is high and there is an abrupt drop in metallicity across the southern cold front. We interpret the observed properties of the system, including the placement of the cold fronts, the offset core, and its tail in terms of a simple merger scenario. The offset core is the remnant of a merging subcluster, which first passed pericenter southeast of the center of the primary cluster and is now close to its second pericenter passage, moving at {approx_equal} 1000 km s{sup -1}. Sloshing excited by the merger gave rise to the two cold fronts and the disposition of the cold fronts reveals that we view the merger from close to the plane of the orbit of the offset core.

  12. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Spectrum of Abell 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaRoque, S. J.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Reese, E. D.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Joy, M.; Grego, L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present an interferometric measurement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) at 1 cm for the galaxy cluster Abell 2163. We combine this data point with previous measurements at 1.1, 1.4, and 2.1 mm from the SuZIE experiment to construct the most complete SZE spectrum to date. The intensity in four wavelength bands is fit to determine the Compton y-parameter (y(sub 0)) and the peculiar velocity (v(sub p)) for this cluster. Our results are y(sub 0) = 3.56((sup +0.41+0.27)(sub -0.41-0.19)) X 10(exp -4) and v(sub p) = 410((sup +1030+460) (sub -850-440)) km s(exp -1) where we list statistical and systematic uncertainties, respectively, at 68% confidence. These results include corrections for contamination by Galactic dust emission. We find less contamination by dust emission than previously reported. The dust emission is distributed over much larger angular scales than the cluster signal and contributes little to the measured signal when the details of the SZE observing strategy are taken into account.

  13. Dynamical analysis of galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.; Canning, R. E. A.; King, L. J.; Lee, B. E.; Russell, H. R.; Baum, S. A.; Clowe, D. I.; Coleman, J. E.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; McNamara, B. R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Sanders, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the merging galaxy cluster system Abell 2146 using spectroscopy obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini North telescope. As revealed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the system is undergoing a major merger and has a gas structure indicative of a recent first core passage. The system presents two large shock fronts, making it unique amongst these rare systems. The hot gas structure indicates that the merger axis must be close to the plane of the sky and that the two merging clusters are relatively close in mass, from the observation of two shock fronts. Using 63 spectroscopically determined cluster members, we apply various statistical tests to establish the presence of two distinct massive structures. With the caveat that the system has recently undergone a major merger, the virial mass estimate is M_vir= 8.5^{+4.3}_{-4.7} × 10^{14} M_{⊙} for the whole system, consistent with the mass determination in a previous study using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal. The newly calculated redshift for the system is z = 0.2323. A two-body dynamical model gives an angle of 13°-19° between the merger axis and the plane of the sky, and a time-scale after first core passage of ≈0.24-0.28 Gyr.

  14. An optical analysis of the merging cluster Abell 3888

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakouri, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Dehghan, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present new AAOmega spectroscopy of 254 galaxies within a 30 arcmin radius around Abell 3888. We combine these data with the existing redshifts measured in a one degree radius around the cluster and performed a substructure analysis. We confirm 71 member galaxies within the core of A3888 and determine a new average redshift and velocity dispersion for the cluster of 0.1535 ± 0.0009 and 1181 ± 197 km s-1, respectively. The cluster is elongated along an East-West axis and we find the core is bimodal along this axis with two subgroups of 26 and 41 members detected. Our results suggest that A3888 is a merging system putting to rest the previous conjecture about the morphological status of the cluster derived from X-ray observations. In addition to the results on A3888 we also present six newly detected galaxy overdensities in the field, three of which we classify as new galaxy clusters.

  15. Measuring Galaxy Properties in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2007-10-01

    We develop a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties, as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and we have already obtained spectroscopic redshifts for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. We fit a world coordinate system to the images using the software ``WCStools.'' We use ``SExtractor'' to extract sources from the images. We create software for merging catalogs in such a way as to avoid double counting, to reject cosmic rays, and to combine redundant measurements. The measured properties include magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We investigate the efficacy of our separation of galaxies and stars and find that it begins breaking down around R=19.0. We attempt to separate cluster members from foreground and background galaxies using the color-magnitude relation. In future work, we will investigate substructure (clumping) within clusters and its correlation with galaxy properties (especially color, size and morphology).

  16. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2009-04-01

    We have developed a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and redshifts exist for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. We fitted a world coordinate system to the images using the software ``WCStools,'' then used ``Source Extractor'' to extract sources from the images. We have created software for merging catalogs in such a way as to avoid double counting, to reject cosmic rays, and to combine redundant measurements. The software also corrects magnitude differences by comparing the mean difference and adding this to each individual catalog before merging it to a master catalog. The measured properties included in this study were magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We investigate the efficacy of our separation of galaxies and stars and find that it begins breaking down around R=19.0. We divide our master catalog into several subsamples for substructure analysis. For one subsample, we attempt to separate cluster members from foreground and background galaxies using the color-magnitude relation. We compare the results of substructure diagnostics for the subsamples. In future work, we will examine correlation of substructure with galaxy properties (especially color, size and morphology).

  17. Shedding light on the matter of Abell 781

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, D.; Dawson, William; Benson, Bryant

    2014-02-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 781 West has been viewed as a challenge to weak gravitational lensing mass calibration, as Cook & dell'Antonio found that the weak lensing signal-to-noise ratio in three independent sets of observations was consistently lower than expected from mass models based on X-ray and dynamical measurements. We correct some errors in statistical inference in Cook & dell'Antonio and show that their own results agree well with the dynamical mass and exhibit at most 2.2-2.9σ low compared to the X-ray mass, similar to the tension between the dynamical and X-ray masses. Replacing their simple magnitude cut with weights based on source photometric redshifts eliminates the tension between lensing and X-ray masses; in this case the weak lensing mass estimate is actually higher than, but still in agreement with, the dynamical estimate. A comparison of lensing analyses with and without photometric redshifts shows that a 1-2σ chance alignment of low-redshift sources lowers the signal-to-noise ratio observed by all previous studies which used magnitude cuts rather than photometric redshifts. The fluctuation is unexceptional, but appeared to be highly significant in Cook & dell'Antonio due to the errors in statistical interpretation.

  18. Infrared observations of gravitational lensing in Abell 2219 with CIRSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Meghan E.; Ellis, Richard S.; Refregier, Alexandre; Bézecourt, Jocelyn; McMahon, Richard G.; Beckett, Martin G.; Mackay, Craig D.; Hoenig, Michael D.

    2000-10-01

    We present the first detection of a gravitational depletion signal at near-infrared wavelengths, based on deep panoramic images of the cluster Abell 2219 (z=0.22) taken with the Cambridge Infrared Survey Instrument (CIRSI) at the prime focus of the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. Infrared studies of gravitational depletion offer a number of advantages over similar techniques applied at optical wavelengths, and can provide reliable total masses for intermediate-redshift clusters. Using the maximum-likelihood technique developed by Schneider, King & Erben, we detect the gravitational depletion at the 3σ confidence level. By modelling the mass distribution as a singular isothermal sphere and ignoring the uncertainty in the unlensed number counts, we find an Einstein radius of θE ~= 13.7+3.9-4.2 arcsec (66per cent confidence limit). This corresponds to a projected velocity dispersion of σv~800kms-1, in agreement with constraints from strongly lensed features. For a Navarro, Frenk & White mass model, the radial dependence observed indicates a best-fitting halo scalelength of 125h-1kpc. We investigate the uncertainties arising from the observed fluctuations in the unlensed number counts, and show that clustering is the dominant source of error. We extend the maximum-likelihood method to include the effect of incompleteness, and discuss the prospects of further systematic studies of lensing in the near-infrared band.

  19. Chandra Observations of Point Sources in Abell 2255

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David S.; Miller, Neal A.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    In our search for "hidden" AGN we present results from a Chandra observation of the nearby cluster Abell 2255. Eight cluster galaxies are associated with point-like X-ray emission, and we classify these galaxies based on their X-ray, radio, and optical properties. At least three are associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN) with no optical signatures of nuclear activity, with a further two being potential AGN. Of the potential AGN, one corresponds to a galaxy with a post-starburst optical spectrum. The remaining three X-ray detected cluster galaxies consist of two starbursts and an elliptical with luminous hot gas. Of the eight cluster galaxies five are associated with luminous (massive) galaxies and the remaining three lie in much lower luminosity systems. We note that the use of X-ray to optical flux ratios for classification of X-ray sources is often misleading, and strengthen the claim that the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting an AGN based on optical data is significantly lower than the fraction based on X-ray and radio data.

  20. Abel reconstruction of piecewise constant radial density profiles from x-ray radiographs.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, M; Notea, A; Pal, D

    1989-08-01

    We present a method for reconstructing the radial density profile of a cylindrically symmetric object from a single x-ray projection, when the profile consists of a number of different constant sections. A forward Abel transform based algorithm is employed whereby the profile is recovered recursively, onion peelinglike, starting from the outside diameter of the object and moving in. Distortions originating in the Gibbs phenomenon, unavoidable in most available Abel inversion methods, are completely eliminated. The method is simple enough to be carried out on a handheld calculator or a spreadsheet program on a personal computer, and no elaborate computer fits or application programming are required. The method is demonstrated by inverting a simulated three-section noisy set of data and is shown to yield results of a quality equal to that of a recent powerful Abel inversion method, based on full nonlinear least-squares computer fits. PMID:20555668

  1. Clinical evaluation and comparison of the efficacy of coronally advanced flap alone and in combination with platelet rich fibrin membrane in the treatment of Miller Class I and II gingival recessions

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Santosh; Banthia, Ruchi; Singh, Pallavi; Banthia, Priyank; Raje, Sapna; Aggarwal, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of coronally advanced flap (CAF) alone and in combination with autologous platelet rich fibrin membrane (PRF) in Miller's class I and II gingival recessions. Materials and Method: Thirty isolated Miller class I or II sites in 26 subjects were randomly divided into test (15 sites- CAF+PRF) and control (15 sites- CAF alone). Parameters probing pocket depth (PPD), Recession depth (RD), Clinical attachment loss (CAL), Keratinised tissue width (KTW) and Gingival tissue thickness (GTH) were evaluated at baseline, 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. Data was subjected to statistical analysis. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Mean percentage root coverage was 91.00±19.98% and 86.60±23.83% for test and control group respectively. Difference between the groups in all parameters at baseline, 3 months and 6 months was non significant. Complete root coverage was obtained in 12 (80%) and 11 (73.3%) subjects in test and control group respectively. The difference was found to be non-significant. Both groups showed significant differences in all parameters at 3 and 6 months respectively except difference in gingival tissue thickness which was non-significant in control group at 3 months. Conclusion: Combination of PRF to CAF procedure did not provide any added advantage in term of recession coverage in Miller class I and II recessions. Long term trials with more sample size are needed to validate these findings. PMID:26097347

  2. U(1)-invariant membranes: The geometric formulation, Abel, and pendulum differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltukhin, A. A.; Trzetrzelewski, M.

    2010-06-15

    The geometric approach to study the dynamics of U(1)-invariant membranes is developed. The approach reveals an important role of the Abel nonlinear differential equation of the first type with variable coefficients depending on time and one of the membrane extendedness parameters. The general solution of the Abel equation is constructed. Exact solutions of the whole system of membrane equations in the D=5 Minkowski space-time are found and classified. It is shown that if the radial component of the membrane world vector is only time dependent, then the dynamics is described by the pendulum equation.

  3. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Holzapfel, William L.; Cooray, Asantha K.

    1999-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect towards the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas is strongly aspherical, on agreement with the morphology revealed by x-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction by comparing the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods. The Hubble constant derived for this cluster, when the known systematic uncertainties are included, has a very wide range of values and therefore does not provide additional constraints on the validity of the assumptions. We examine carefully the possible systematic errors in the gas fraction measurement. The gas fraction is a lower limit to the cluster's baryon fraction and so we compare the gas mass fraction, calibrated by numerical simulations to approximately the virial radius, to measurements of the global mass fraction of baryonic matter, OMEGA(sub B)/OMEGA(sub matter). Our lower limit to the cluster baryon fraction is f(sub B) = (0.043 +/- 0.014)/h (sub 100). From this, we derive an upper limit to the universal matter density, OMEGA(sub matter) <= 0.72/h(sub 100), and a likely value of OMEGA(sub matter) <= (0.44(sup 0.15, sub -0.12)/h(sub 100).

  4. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2008-10-01

    We continue development of a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties, as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and we have already obtained spectroscopic redshifts for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. For each CCD frame we fit a WCS (world coordinate system), remove bright cosmic rays, and extract sources using ``SExtractor.'' We create software for merging source catalogs in such a way as to reject residual cosmic rays and other invalid sources, and to combine redundant measurements without double counting. The measured properties include magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We compare our data to those of the HST (Hubble Space Telescope) and SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) archives to examine the accuracy of our star/galaxy separation and our color measurements. For our substructure investigation, we draw several subsamples of galaxies based on stellarity index, color (the color-magnitude relation), magnitude and velocity. The smallest subsample of spectroscopically confirmed members produces significant substructure signals from 1D (velocity) and 3D (x,y,velocity) diagnostics - a small, offset group may be the culprit. The 2D (x,y) diagnostics applied to the larger samples produce some significant statistics, the cause does not seem to be a large-scale merger, but perhaps several small groups. This is consistent with previous X-ray data showing X-ray emitting gas clumped around small groupings of galaxies.

  5. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    SciTech Connect

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion (d{sup 2}X)/(dt{sup 2}) +(dU)/(dX) =0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27–29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A=(1/√(π))∫{sub 0}{sup E}dU/√(E−U) is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = T{sub A}(E) + T{sub N}(E) where τ is a constant period, T{sub A}(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and T{sub N}(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function X{sub A}(U) is determined from T{sub A}(E) via the Abel-transform relation X{sub A}(U) ∝ A[T{sub A}(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential U{sub N}(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing

  6. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion {d^2X}/{dt^2} + {dU}/{dX} = 0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27-29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A = (1/sqrt{π })int 0E {dU}/sqrt{E-U} is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = TA(E) + TN(E) where τ is a constant period, TA(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and TN(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function XA(U) is determined from TA(E) via the Abel-transform relation XA(U) ∝ A[TA(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential UN(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing the isochronicity problem, there has been no attempt of N-type regions that are

  7. Richness-based masses of rich and famous galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreon, S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a catalog of galaxy cluster masses derived by exploiting the tight correlation between mass and richness, i.e., a properly computed number of bright cluster galaxies. The richness definition adopted in this work is properly calibrated, shows a small scatter with mass, and has a known evolution, which means that we can estimate accurate (0.16 dex) masses more precisely than by adopting any other richness estimates or X-ray or SZ-based proxies based on survey data. We measured a few hundred galaxy clusters at 0.05 < z < 0.22 in the low-extinction part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint that are in the 2015 catalog of Planck-detected clusters, that have a known X-ray emission, that are in the Abell catalog, or that are among the most most cited in the literature. Diagnostic plots and direct images of clusters are individually inspected and we improved cluster centers and, when needed, we revised redshifts. Whenever possible, we also checked for indications of contamination from other clusters on the line of sight, and found ten such cases. All this information, with the derived cluster mass values, are included in the distributed value-added cluster catalog of the 275 clusters with a derived mass larger than 1014M⊙. Finally, in a technical appendix we illustrate with Planck clusters how to minimize the sensitivity of comparisons between masses listed in different catalogs to the specific overlapping of the considerd subsamples, a problem recognized but not solved in the literature. Full Table 1 is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A158A web front-end is available at the URL http://www.brera.mi.astro.it/~andreon/famous.html

  8. IRAS sources in the direction of rich clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unewisse, A. M.

    1992-06-01

    Results of a search for possible associations between point sources in the IRAS catalog and rich clusters of galaxies in the recently published Abell, Corwin and Olowin (ACO; (1989)) catalog are presented. It is found that the surface density of IRAS sources rises progressively above the background as the projected distance from the cluster center decreases below about 1 Mpc. The increase is most pronounced for the poorest clusters in the ACO catalog. At low redshift (z less than 0.03) the spatial distribution of ACO-IRAS associations is markedly anisotropic with a 3-sigma enhancement in the direction of the Great Attractor.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Deep spectroscopy of Abell 85 (Agulli+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sanchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Palmero, L. D.; Yu, H.

    2016-07-01

    File a85_memb.dat contains 5 columns with the sky coordinates (RA;DE), the r and g band magnitudes and the recessional velocities for each 460 confirmed members of Abell 85 cluster. Details on the data set can be found in the paper. (1 data file).

  10. Dark matter distribution in the merging cluster Abell 2163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucail, G.

    2012-04-01

    Context. The cluster Abell 2163 is a merging system of several subclusters with complex dynamics. It presents exceptional X-rays properties (high temperature and luminosity), suggesting that it is a very massive cluster. Recent 2D analysis of the gas distribution has revealed a complex and multiphase structure. Aims: This paper presents a wide-field weak lensing study of the dark matter distribution in the cluster in order to provide an alternative vision of the merging status of the cluster. The 2D mass distribution was built and compared to the galaxies and gas distributions. Methods: A Bayesian method, implemented in the Im2shape software, was used to fit the shape parameters of the faint background galaxies and to correct for PSF smearing. A careful color selection on the background galaxies was applied to retrieve the weak lensing signal. Shear signal was measured out to more than 2 Mpc (≃12' from the center). The radial shear profile was fit with different parametric mass profiles. The 2D mass map was built from the shear distribution and used to identify the different mass components. Results: The 2D mass map agrees with the galaxy distribution, while the total mass inferred from weak lensing shows a strong discrepancy to the X-ray deduced mass. Regardless of the method used, the virial mass M200 falls in the range 8 to 14 × 1014 h70-1 M⊙, a value that is two times less than the mass deduced from X-rays. The central mass clump appears bimodal in the dark matter distribution, with a mass ratio ~3:1 between the two components. The infalling clump A2163-B is detected in weak lensing as an independent entity. All these results are interpreted in the context of a multiple merger seen less than 1 Gyr after the main crossover. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of

  11. MUSE observations of the lensing cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, D.; Pelló, R.; Richard, J.; Lewis, J.; Patrício, V.; Cantalupo, S.; Herenz, E. C.; Soto, K.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Bacon, R.; Vernet, J. D. R.; Wisotzki, L.; Clément, B.; Cuby, J. G.; Lagattuta, D. J.; Soucail, G.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-05-01

    Context. This paper presents the results obtained with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) for the core of the lensing cluster Abell 1689, as part of MUSE's commissioning at the ESO Very Large Telescope. Aims: Integral-field observations with MUSE provide a unique view of the central 1 × 1 arcmin2 region at intermediate spectral resolution in the visible domain, allowing us to conduct a complete census of both cluster galaxies and lensed background sources. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of all sources found in the MUSE data cube. Two hundred and eighty-two objects were systematically extracted from the cube based on a guided-and-manual approach. We also tested three different tools for the automated detection and extraction of line emitters. Cluster galaxies and lensed sources were identified based on their spectral features. We investigated the multiple-image configuration for all known sources in the field. Results: Previous to our survey, 28 different lensed galaxies displaying 46 multiple images were known in the MUSE field of view, most of them were detected through photometric redshifts and lensing considerations. Of these, we spectroscopically confirm 12 images based on their emission lines, corresponding to 7 different lensed galaxies between z = 0.95 and 5.0. In addition, 14 new galaxies have been spectroscopically identified in this area thanks to MUSE data, with redshifts ranging between 0.8 and 6.2. All background sources detected within the MUSE field of view correspond to multiple-imaged systems lensed by A1689. Seventeen sources in total are found at z ≥ 3 based on their Lyman-α emission, with Lyman-α luminosities ranging between 40.5 ≲ log (Lyα) ≲ 42.5 after correction for magnification. This sample is particularly sensitive to the slope of the luminosity function toward the faintest end. The density of sources obtained in this survey is consistent with a steep value of α ≤ -1.5, although this result still

  12. A weak-lensing analysis of the Abell 383 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Radovich, M.; Grado, A.; Puddu, E.; Romano, A.; Limatola, L.; Fu, L.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We use deep CFHT and SUBARU uBVRIz archival images of the Abell 383 cluster (z = 0.187) to estimate its mass by weak-lensing. Methods: To this end, we first use simulated images to check the accuracy provided by our Kaiser-Squires-Broadhurst (KSB) pipeline. These simulations include shear testing programme (STEP) 1 and 2 simulations, as well as more realistic simulations of the distortion of galaxy shapes by a cluster with a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. From these simulations we estimate the effect of noise on shear measurement and derive the correction terms. The R-band image is used to derive the mass by fitting the observed tangential shear profile with an NFW mass profile. Photometric redshifts are computed from the uBVRIz catalogs. Different methods for the foreground/background galaxy selection are implemented, namely selection by magnitude, color, and photometric redshifts, and the results are compared. In particular, we developed a semi-automatic algorithm to select the foreground galaxies in the color-color diagram, based on the observed colors. Results: Using color selection or photometric redshifts improves the correction of dilution from foreground galaxies: this leads to higher signals in the inner parts of the cluster. We obtain a cluster mass Mvir = 7.5+2.7_{-1.9 × 1014} M⊙: this value is 20% higher than previous estimates and is more consistent the mass expected from X-ray data. The R-band luminosity function of the cluster is computed and gives a total luminosity Ltot = (2.14 ± 0.5) × 1012 L⊙ and a mass-to-luminosity ratio M/L 300 M⊙/L⊙. Based on: data collected with the Subaru Telescope (University of Tokyo) and obtained from the SMOKA, which is operated by the Astronomy Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada

  13. Crazy heart: kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, R.; Richtler, T.; West, M. J.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Lloyd-Davies, E.; Schuberth, Y.

    2011-04-01

    We study the structure and internal kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545 - a low surface brightness structure lying in the center of the cluster. We have obtained deep long-slit spectroscopy of the star pile using VLT/FORS2 and Gemini/GMOS, which is analyzed in conjunction with deep multiband CFHT/MEGACAM imaging. As presented in a previous study the star pile has a flat luminosity profile and its color is consistent with the outer parts of elliptical galaxies. Its velocity map is irregular, with parts being seemingly associated with an embedded nucleus, and others which have significant velocity offsets to the cluster systemic velocity with no clear kinematical connection to any of the surrounding galaxies. This would make the star pile a dynamically defined stellar intra-cluster component. The complicated pattern in velocity and velocity dispersions casts doubts on the adequacy of using the whole star pile as a dynamical test for the innermost dark matter profile of the cluster. This status is fulfilled only by the nucleus and its nearest surroundings which lie at the center of the cluster velocity distribution. Based on observations taken at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, under programme ID 080.B-0529. Also based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and SECYT (Argentina); and on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National

  14. Improved Abel transform inversion: First application to COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon-Angel, A.; Hernandez-Pajares, M.; Juan, J.; Sanz, J.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the first results of Ionospheric Tomographic inversion are presented, using the Improved Abel Transform on the COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 constellation of 6 LEO satellites, carrying on-board GPS receivers.[- 4mm] The Abel transform inversion is a wide used technique which in the ionospheric context makes it possible to retrieve electron densities as a function of height based of STEC (Slant Total Electron Content) data gathered from GPS receivers on board of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellites. Within this precise use, the classical approach of the Abel inversion is based on the assumption of spherical symmetry of the electron density in the vicinity of an occultation, meaning that the electron content varies in height but not horizontally. In particular, one implication of this assumption is that the VTEC (Vertical Total Electron Content) is a constant value for the occultation region. This assumption may not always be valid since horizontal ionospheric gradients (a very frequent feature in some ionosphere problematic areas such as the Equatorial region) could significantly affect the electron profiles. [- 4mm] In order to overcome this limitation/problem of the classical Abel inversion, a studied improvement of this technique can be obtained by assuming separability in the electron density (see Hernández-Pajares et al. 2000). This means that the electron density can be expressed by the multiplication of VTEC data and a shape function which assumes all the height dependency in it while the VTEC data keeps the horizontal dependency. Actually, it is more realistic to assume that this shape fuction depends only on the height and to use VTEC information to take into account the horizontal variation rather than considering spherical symmetry in the electron density function as it has been carried out in the classical approach of the Abel inversion.[-4mm] Since the above mentioned improved Abel inversion technique has already been tested and proven to be a useful

  15. The X-ray luminosity function of very rich clusters and the luminosity-richness relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltan, A.; Henry, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    For a sample of galactic clusters that includes richness class three, four, and five clusters, the significance of the luminosity-richness relation is estimated using nonparametric methods which are valid for any luminosity function. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to determine the significance at which the X-ray luminosities of clusters in one richness class are statistically equal to those in another. The a priori expectation that the high richness clusters are more luminous on average than lower richness objects is confirmed, but it is found that the luminosity function for clusters of richness class three or higher turns over for luminosities less than about 3 x 10 to the 44th ergs/s, while that for lower richness classes extends to at least an order of magnitude lower luminosity.

  16. UV Observations of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1795 with the Optical Monitor on XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittaz, J. P. D.; Kaastra, J. S.; Tamura, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, F.; Peterson, J. R.; Ikebe, Y.; Lumb, D. H.; Paerels, F.; Stewart, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of broad band UV observations of the central regions of Abell 1795 observed with the optical monitor on XMM-Newton. As have been found with other UV observations of the central regions of clusters of galaxies, we find evidence for star formation. However, we also find evidence for absorption in the cD galaxy on a more extended scale than has been seen with optical imaging. We also report the first UV observation of part of the filamentary structure seen in H-alpha, X-rays and very deep U band imaging. The part of the filament we see is very blue with UV colours consistent with a very early (O/B) stellar population. This is the first direct evidence of a dominant population of early type stars at the centre of Abell 1795 and implies very recent star formation. The relationship of this emission to emission at other wavebands is discussed.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Halpha measurements in Abell 2465 (Wegner+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, G. A.; Chu, D. S.; Hwang, H. S.

    2015-07-01

    The wavelength of the Hα line at the redshift of Abell 2465 is near 817nm in a clear spectral region between the many telluric emission lines. A custom narrow-band filter for observing Hα was obtained from the Andover Corp. It has a peak transmission at 817.7nm (m817) and a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 8.77nm. The wide filter was a Gunn i (ig) filter with nearly the same central wavelength of 820nm and a FWHM of 185nm, and was manufactured by Custom Scientific. Hα observations of Abell 2465 were obtained 2012 September 19-23 using the 2.4m Hiltner telescope at the MDM Observatory on Kitt Peak. The 'Nellie' CCD was used. (1 data file).

  18. A combined optical/X-ray study of the Galaxy cluster Abell 2256

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabricant, Daniel G.; Kent, Stephen M.; Kurtz, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of Abell 2256 is investigated by combining X-ray observations of the intracluster gas with optical observations of the galaxy distribution and kinematics. Magnitudes and positions are presented for 172 galaxies and new redshifts for 75. Abell 2256 is similar to the Coma Cluster in its X-ray luminosity, mass, and galaxy density. Both the X-ray surface brightness and the galaxy surface density distributions exhibit an elliptical morphology. The radial galaxy distribution is steeper than the density profile of the X-ray-emitting gas, yet the galaxy velocity dispersion is higher than the equivalent value for the gas. Under the simplest assumptions that the galaxy velocity distribution is isotropic and the gas is isothermal, the galaxies and gas cannot be in hydrostatic equilibrium in a common gravitational potential. Models consistent with available data have mass-to-light ratios which increase with radius and galaxy orbits that are anisotropic with a radial bias.

  19. RELICS Discovery of a Probable Lens-magnified SN behind Galaxy Cluster Abell 1763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, S.; Coe, D.; Bradley, L.; Strolger, L.; Brammer, G.; Avila, R.; Ryan, R.; Ogaz, S.; Riess, A.; Sharon, K.; Johnson, T.; Paterno-Mahler, R.; Molino, A.; Graham, M.; Kelly, P.; Filippenko, A.; Frye, B.; Foley, R.; Schmidt, K.; Umetsu, K.; Czakon, N.; Weiner, B.; Stark, D.; Mainali, R.; Zitrin, A.; Sendra, I.; Graur, O.; Grillo, C.; Hjorth, J.; Selsing, J.; Christensen, L.; Rosati, P.; Nonino, M.; Balestra, I.; Vulcani, B.; McCully, C.; Dawson, W.; Bouwens, R.; Lam, D.; Trenti, M.; Nunez, D. Carrasco; Matheson, T.; Merten, J.; Jha, S.; Jones, C.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Salmon, B.; Bradac, M.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.; Wang, X.; Oesch, P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of a likely supernova (SN) in the background field of the galaxy cluster Abell 1763 (a.k.a. RXC J1335.3+4059, ZwCl 1333.7+4117). The SN candidate was detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations collected on June 17, 2016 as part of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS, HST program ID: 14096, PI: D.Coe).

  20. The Extraordinary Amount of Substructure in the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauzac, M.; Eckert, D.; Schwinn, J.; Harvey, D.; Baugh, C. M.; Robertson, A.; Bose, S.; Massey, R.; Owers, M.; Ebeling, H.; Shan, H. Y.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Richard, J.; Atek, H.; Clément, B.; Egami, E.; Israel, H.; Knowles, K.; Limousin, M.; Natarajan, P.; Rexroth, M.; Taylor, P.; Tchernin, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a joint optical/X-ray analysis of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z=0.308). Our strong- and weak-lensing analysis within the central region of the cluster, i.e., at R < 1 Mpc from the brightest cluster galaxy, reveals eight substructures, including the main core. All of these dark-matter halos are detected with a significance of at least 5σ and feature masses ranging from 0.5 to 1.4× 1014M⊙ within R < 150 kpc. Merten et al. (2011) and Medezinski et al. (2016) substructures are also detected by us. We measure a slightly higher mass for the main core component than reported previously and attribute the discrepancy to the inclusion of our tightly constrained strong-lensing mass model built on Hubble Frontier Fields data. X-ray data obtained by XMM-Newton reveal four remnant cores, one of them a new detection, and three shocks. Unlike Merten et al. (2011), we find all cores to have both dark and luminous counterparts. A comparison with clusters of similar mass in the MXXL simulations yields no objects with as many massive substructures as observed in Abell 2744, confirming that Abell 2744 is an extreme system. We stress that these properties still do not constitute a challenge to ΛCDM, as caveats apply to both the simulation and the observations: for instance, the projected mass measurements from gravitational lensing and the limited resolution of the sub-haloes finders. We discuss implications of Abell 2744 for the plausibility of different dark-matter candidates and, finally, measure a new upper limit on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter of σDM < 1.28 cm2g-1(68% CL), in good agreement with previous results from Harvey et al. (2015).

  1. Fast algorithm for computing the Abel inversion integral in broadband reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, F.D.

    1995-10-01

    The application of the Hansen--Jablokow recursive technique is proposed for the numerical computation of the Abel inversion integral which is used in ({ital O}-mode) frequency-modulated broadband reflectometry to evaluate plasma density profiles. Compared to the usual numerical methods the recursive algorithm allows substantial time savings that can be important when processing massive amounts of data aiming to control the plasma in real time. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software

    PubMed Central

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the ’omics’ context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  3. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software.

    PubMed

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the 'omics' context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  4. Deciphering the bipolar planetary nebula Abell 14 with 3D ionization and morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akras, S.; Clyne, N.; Boumis, P.; Monteiro, H.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Redman, M. P.; Williams, S.

    2016-04-01

    Abell 14 is a poorly studied object despite being considered a born-again planetary nebula. We performed a detailed study of its 3D morphology and ionization structure using the SHAPE and MOCASSIN codes. We found that Abell 14 is a highly evolved, bipolar nebula with a kinematical age of ˜19 400 yr for a distance of 4 kpc. The high He abundance, and N/O ratio indicate a progenitor of 5 M⊙ that has experienced the third dredge-up and hot bottom burning phases. The stellar parameters of the central source reveal a star at a highly evolved stage near to the white dwarf cooling track, being inconsistent with the born-again scenario. The nebula shows unexpectedly strong [N I] λ5200 and [O I] λ6300 emission lines indicating possible shock interactions. Abell 14 appears to be a member of a small group of highly evolved, extreme type-I planetary nebulae (PNe). The members of this group lie at the lower-left corner of the PNe regime on the [N II]/Hα versus [S II]/Hα diagnostic diagram, where shock-excited regions/objects are also placed. The low luminosity of their central stars, in conjunction with the large physical size of the nebulae, result in a very low photoionization rate, which can make any contribution of shock interaction easily perceptible, even for small velocities.

  5. ASCA Temperature Maps of Three Clusters of Galaxies: Abell 1060, AWM 7, and the Centaurus Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusho, Tae; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ohashi, Takaya; Shibata, Ryo; Kagei, Tomohiro; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Ezawa, Hajime; Ikebe, Yasushi

    2001-06-01

    We present two-dimensional temperature maps of three bright clusters of galaxies (Abell 1060, AWM 7, and the Centaurus cluster), based on multi-pointing observations with the ASCA GIS. The temperatures were derived from hardness ratios by taking into account the XRT response. For the Centaurus cluster, we subtracted the central cool component using the previous ASCA and ROSAT results, and the metallicity gradients observed in AWM 7 and the Centaurus cluster were included in deriving the temperatures. The intracluster medium in Abell 1060 and AWM 7 is almost isothermal from the center to the outer regions with temperatures of 3.3 and 3.9 keV, respectively. The Centaurus cluster exhibits remarkable hot regions within about 30' from the cluster center, showing a temperature increase of ×0.8 keV from the surrounding level of 3.5keV, and the outer cool regions with lower temperatures by -1.3 keV. These results imply that a strong merger has occurred in the Centaurus in the recent 2-3Gyr, and that the central cool component has survived it. In contrast, the gas in Abell 1060 was well-mixed in an early period, which probably has prevented the development of a central cool component. In AWM 7, mixing of the gas should have occurred in a period earlier than the epoch of metal enrichment.

  6. Rich Imaginations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The story of Bernard Madoff rivals outrageous fiction. It was astonishing that this seemingly kindly, respectable financier, a pioneer in electronic trading, a founding partner in the Nasdaq exchange, turned out to have been running a $65-billion Ponzi scheme that victimized country-club elites, middle-class retirees, foundations, universities,…

  7. Reevaluating Active Galactic Nuclei in Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, M. J.; Flores, R.; Quintana, H.

    1999-06-01

    We have selected 42 candidate Active Galactic Nuclei in 19 Rich Abell Clusters. The candidates were selected using the criteria of Dressler, Thompson & Shectman (1985; DTS) in their analysis of the statistics of 22 AGN in 14 rich cluster fields, which are based on the equivalent width of [OII]3727Å, H β, and [OIII]5007Å emission. These AGN are then separated from HII galaxies in the manner developed by Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987; VO) using the additional information provided by Hα and [NII]6583Å or Hα and [SII]6716 + 6731Å emission, in order to test the reliability of the selection criteria used by DTS. Our sample is very comparable to that of DTS before we discriminate AGN from HII galaxies, and would lead to similar conclusions. However, we find that their method inevitably mixes HII galaxies with AGN. Over the years many authors have attempted to quantify the relative fraction of cluster to field AGN since the study of DTS (Hill & Oegerle 1993; Biviano et al. 1997) and have reached similar conclusions, but using criteria similar to that of DTS to select AGN (or using the [OIII]5007Å/H β flux ratio test that also mixes HII galaxies with AGN).

  8. Separating the BL Lac and cluster X-ray emissions in Abell 689 with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, P. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Lancaster, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a Chandra observation of the galaxy cluster Abell 689 (z = 0.279). Abell 689 is one of the most luminous clusters detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS), but was flagged as possibly including significant point source contamination. The small point spread function of the Chandra telescope allows us to confirm this and separate the point source from the extended cluster X-ray emission. For the cluster, we determine a bolometric luminosity of Lbol= (3.3 ± 0.3) × 1044 erg s-1 and a temperature of kT = 5.1+2.2- 1.3 keV when including a physically motivated background model. We compare our measured luminosity for A689 to that quoted in the RASS, and find L0.1-2.4 keV= 2.8 × 1044 erg s-1, a value ˜10 times lower than the ROSAT measurement. Our analysis of the point source shows evidence for significant pile-up, with a pile-up fraction of ≃60 per cent. Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images lead us to the conclusion that the point source within Abell 689 is a BL Lac object. Using radio and optical observations from the Very Large Array and HST archives, we determine αro= 0.50, αox= 0.77 and αrx= 0.58 for the BL Lac, which would classify it as being of 'high-energy peak BL Lac' type. Spectra extracted of A689 show a hard X-ray excess at energies above 6 keV that we interpret as inverse-Compton emission from aged electrons that may have been transported into the cluster from the BL Lac.

  9. Two long H I tails in the outskirts of Abell 1367

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, T. C.; Cortese, L.; Brinks, E.; Bravo-Alfaro, H.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R.

    2012-01-01

    We present VLA D-array H I observations of the RSCG 42 and FGC 1287 galaxy groups, in the outskirts of the Abell 1367 cluster. These groups are projected ˜1.8 and 2.7 Mpc west from the cluster centre. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey provided evidence for H I extending over as much as 200 kpc in both groups. Our new, higher resolution observations reveal that the complex H I features detected by Arecibo are in reality two extraordinary long H I tails extending for ˜160 and 250 kpc, respectively, i.e. among the longest H I structures ever observed in groups of galaxies. Although in the case of RSCG 42 the morphology and dynamics of the H I tail, as well as the optical properties of the group members, support a low-velocity tidal interaction scenario, less clear is the origin of the unique features associated with FGC 1287. This galaxy displays an exceptionally long 'dog leg' H I tail, and the large distance from the X-ray-emitting region of Abell 1367 makes a ram-pressure stripping scenario highly unlikely. At the same time, a low-velocity tidal interaction seems unable to explain the extraordinary length of the tail and the lack of any sign of disturbance in the optical properties of FGC 1287. An intriguing possibility could be that this galaxy might have recently experienced a high-speed interaction with another member of the Coma-Abell 1367 Great Wall. We searched for the interloper responsible for this feature and, although we find a possible candidate, we show that without additional observations it is impossible to settle this issue. While the mechanism responsible for this extraordinary H I tail remains to be determined, our discovery highlights how little we know about environmental effects in galaxy groups.

  10. Temperature and elemental abundances in the Abell cluster A 576 derived from X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenflug, R.; Vigroux, L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of Einstein solid state spectrometer observations of the central region of Abell 576 combined with HEAO 1 spectra of the total cluster are given. Line emission was detected due to Fe, Si, and S from a hot plasma in the central region. The temperature of the total cluster spectrum may be in conflict with the central temperature. This difference can be explained either if cooling takes place in the center, or if part of the measured emission is due to individual galaxies. If the X-ray emission comes from the intergalactic gas only, there is some difficulty in producing all the silicon observed in the galaxies of A 576.

  11. Morphological study of three Abell's planetary nebulae - A33, A36, and A79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, C. T.; Nguyen-Trong, T.

    1983-01-01

    The Abell list discovered in the Palomar Sky Survey includes the three objects A33, A36 and A79, which have been classified as old planetary nebulae. The monochromatic images of these three objects in H-alpha, H-beta, and the forbidden lines N II 6584 A and S II 6717 A, are presented and discussed. The forbidden line N II/H-alpha intensity ratio is found to be useful because of its implications in the evolutionary behavior of planetary nebulae.

  12. Uniform upper bounds for the cyclicity of the zero solution of the Abel differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenkov, Dmitry; Binyamini, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Given two polynomials P, q we consider the following question: "how large can the index of the first non-zero moment m˜k = ∫ab Pk q be, assuming the sequence is not identically zero?" The answer K to this question is known as the moment Bautin index, and we provide the first general upper bound: K ⩽ 2 + deg ⁡ q + 3(deg ⁡ P - 1) 2. The proof is based on qualitative analysis of linear ODEs, applied to Cauchy-type integrals of certain algebraic functions. The moment Bautin index plays an important role in the study of bifurcations of periodic solution in the polynomial Abel equation y‧ = py2 + εqy3 for p, q polynomials and ε ≪ 1. In particular, our result implies that for p satisfying a well-known generic condition, the number of periodic solutions near the zero solution does not exceed 5 + deg ⁡ q + 3deg2 ⁡ p. This is the first such bound depending solely on the degrees of the Abel equation.

  13. The double galaxy cluster Abell 2465 - II. Star formation in the cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Gary A.; Chu, Devin S.; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the star formation rate and its location in the major merger cluster Abell 2465 at z = 0.245. Optical properties of the cluster are described in Paper I. Measurements of the Hα and infrared dust emission of galaxies in the cluster were made with an interference filter centred on the redshifted line at a wavelength of 817 nm and utilized data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer satellite 12 μm band. Imaging in the Johnson U and B bands was obtained, and along with Sloan Digital Sky Survey u and r was used to study the blue fraction, which appears enhanced, as a further signature of star formation in the cluster. Star formation rates were calculated using standard calibrations. The total star formation rate normalized by the cluster mass, ΣSFR/Mcl compared to compilations for other clusters indicate that the components of Abell 2465 lie above the mean z and Mcl relations, suggestive that interacting galaxy clusters have enhanced star formation. The projected radial distribution of the star-forming galaxies does not follow an NFW profile and is relatively flat indicating that fewer star-forming galaxies are in the cluster centre. The morphologies of the Hα sources within R200 for the cluster as a whole indicate that many are disturbed or merging, suggesting that a combination of merging or harassment is working.

  14. The Utility and Psychometric Properties of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasingame, Gerry D.; Abel, Gene G.; Jordan, Alan; Wiegel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and utility of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "individuals with intellectual disabilities" (ABID) for assessment of sexual interest and problematic sexual behaviors. The study examined the preliminary psychometric properties and evaluated the clinical utility of the ABID based on a sample of 495…

  15. Spatio-kinematic modelling of Abell 65, a double-shelled planetary nebula with a binary central star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckvale, L.; Prouse, B.; Jones, D.; Lloyd, M.; Pollacco, D.; López, J. A.; O'Brien, T. J.; Sabin, L.; Vaytet, N. M. H.

    2013-09-01

    We present the first detailed spatio-kinematical analysis and modelling of the planetary nebula Abell 65, which is known to host a post-common envelope, binary, central star system. As such, this object is of great interest in studying the link between nebular morphology and central star binarity. [O III]5007 Å and Hα+[N II]6584 Å longslit spectra and imagery of Abell 65 were obtained with the Manchester Échelle Spectrometer on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Martír Observatory (MES-SPM). Further [O III]5007 Å longslit spectra were obtained with the Ultraviolet and Visual Échelle Spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT-UVES). These data were used to develop a spatio-kinematical model for the [O III]5007 Å emission from Abell 65. A `best-fitting' model was found by comparing synthetic spectra and images rendered from the model to the data. The model comprises an outer shell and an inner shell, with kinematical ages of 15000 ± 5000 yr kpc-1 and 8000 ± 3000 yr kpc-1, respectively. Both shells have peanut-shaped bipolar structures with symmetry axes at inclinations of (55 ± 10)° (to the line of sight) for the outer shell and (68 ± 10)° for the inner shell. The near alignment between the nebular shells and the binary orbital inclination [of (68 ± 2)°] is strongly indicative that the binary is responsible for shaping the nebula. Abell 65 is one of a growing number of planetary nebulae (seven to date, including Abell 65 itself) for which observations and modelling support the shaping influence of a central binary.

  16. Class Counts: Education, Inequality, and the Shrinking Middle Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Allan

    2007-01-01

    Class differences and class warfare have existed since the beginning of western civilization, but the gap in income and wealth between the rich (top 10 percent) and the rest has increased steadily in the last twenty-five years. The U.S. is heading for a financial oligarchy much worse than the aristocratic old world that our Founding Fathers feared…

  17. "Racializing" Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  18. A Statistical Study of Multiply Imaged Systems in the Lensing Cluster Abell 68

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jullo, Eric; Covone, Giovanni; Limousin, Marceau; Ellis, Richard; Stark, Daniel; Bundy, Kevin; Czoske, Oliver; Ebeling, Harald; Soucail, Geneviève

    2007-06-01

    We have carried out an extensive spectroscopic survey with the Keck and VLT telescopes, targeting lensed galaxies in the background of the massive cluster Abell 68. Spectroscopic measurements are obtained for 26 lensed images, including a distant galaxy at z=5.4. Redshifts have been determined for 5 out of 7 multiple-image systems. Through a careful modeling of the mass distribution in the strongly lensed regime, we derive a mass estimate of 5.3×1014 Msolar within 500 kpc. Our mass model is then used to constrain the redshift distribution of the remaining multiply imaged and singly imaged sources. This enables us to examine the physical properties for a subsample of 7 Lyα emitters at 1.7<~z<~5.5, whose unlensed luminosities of ~=1041 ergs s-1 are fainter than similar objects found in blank fields. Of particular interest is an extended Lyα emission region surrounding a highly magnified source at z=2.6, detected in VIMOS integral field spectroscopy data. The physical scale of the most distant lensed source at z=5.4 is very small (<300 pc), similar to the lensed z~5.6 emitter reported by Ellis et al. in Abell 2218. New photometric data available for Abell 2218 allow for a direct comparison between these two unique objects. Our survey illustrates the practicality of using lensing clusters to probe the faint end of the z~2-5 Lyα luminosity function in a manner that is complementary to blank-field narrowband surveys. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Also based on observations collected at the Very Large Telescope (Antu/UT1 and Melipal/UT3), European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programs 070.A-0643 and 073.A-0774), the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

  19. Dirac neutrino mass from a neutrino dark matter model for the galaxy cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus Maria

    2016-03-01

    The dark matter in the galaxy cluster Abell 1689 is modelled as an isothermal sphere of neutrinos. New data on the 2d mass density allow an accurate description of its core and halo. The model has no “missing baryon problem” and beyond 2.1 Mpc the baryons have the cosmic mass abundance. Combination of cluster data with the cosmic dark matter fraction - here supposed to stem from the neutrinos - leads to a solution of the dark matter riddle by left and right handed neutrinos with mass (1.861 ± 0.016)h 70 -2eV/c 2. The thus far observed absence of neutrinoless double beta decay points to (quasi-) Dirac neutrinos: uncharged electrons with different flavour and mass eigenbasis, as for quarks. Though the cosmic microwave background spectrum is matched up to some 10% accuracy only, the case is not ruled out because the plasma phase of the early Universe may be turbulent.

  20. An Approximation to the Periodic Solution of a Differential Equation of Abel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    2011-10-01

    The Abel equation, in canonical form, is y^' = sint- y^3 (*) and corresponds to the singular (ɛ --> 0) limit of the nonlinear, forced oscillator ɛy^'' + y^' + y^3 = sint, ɛ-> 0. (**) Equation (*) has the property that it has a unique periodic solution defined on (-∞,∞). Further, as t increases, all solutions are attracted into the strip |y| < 1 and any two different solutions y1(t) and y2(t) satisfy the condition Lim [y1(t) - y2(t)] = 0, (***) t --> ∞ and for t negatively decreasing, each solution, except for the periodic solution, becomes unbounded.ootnotetextU. Elias, American Mathematical Monthly, vol.115, (Feb. 2008), pps. 147-149. Our purpose is to calculate an approximation to the unique periodic solution of Eq. (*) using the method of harmonic balance. We also determine an estimation for the blow-up time of the non-periodic solutions.

  1. New bibenzyl glycosides from leaves of Camellia oleifera Abel. with cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuelong; Tang, Ling; Feng, Baomin; Shi, Liying; Wang, Huiguo; Wang, Yongqi

    2011-04-01

    Studies on the chemical constituents of leaves of Camellia oleifera Abel. led to the isolation of 3 new bibenzyl glycosides. Their structures have been elucidated as 1-(3',5'-dihydroxy)phenyl-2-(4″-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)phenylethane (1), 1-(3',5'-dimethoxy)phenyl-2-(4″-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)phenylethane (2) and 1-(3',5'-dimethoxy)phenyl-2-[4″-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(6→1)-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl]phenylethane (3) through spectral studies including HR-ESI-MS, ((1))H NMR, ((13))C NMR and 2D NMR experiments. All the above 3 bibenzyl glycosides showed cytotoxic activities to Hela and hep2 cell lines. PMID:21219989

  2. X-ray constraints on the shape of the dark matter in five Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buote, David A.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray observations obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to constrain the shape of the dark matter in the inner regions of Abell clusters A401, A426, A1656, A2029, and A2199, each of which exhibits highly flattened optical isopleths. The dark matter is modeled as an ellipsoid with a mass density of about r exp -2. The possible shapes of the dark matter is constrained by comparing these model isophotes to the image isophotes. The X-ray isophotes, and therefore the gravitational potentials, have ellipticities of about 0.1-0.2. The dark matter within the central 1 Mpc is found to be substantially rounder for all the clusters. It is concluded that the shape of the galaxy distributions in these clusters traces neither the gravitational potential nor the gravitating matter.

  3. Temperature and elemental abundances in the Abell cluster A576 derived from X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenflug, R.; Vigroux, L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the Einstein Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) observations of the central region of Abell 576 combined with HEAO 1 spectra of the total cluster are reported. Line emission due to Fe, Si, and S from a hot plasma in the central region of the object are detected. Abundances roughly one-half of the solar value are derived for these elements. The total cluster spectrum is well fitted by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with a temperature of 4 +3.5 or -1.4 x 10 to the 7th K. This temperature is in conflict with the SSS temperature determination for the center of the cluster. This difference can be explained if cooling takes place in the central part of the cluster, or if the X-ray emission in the center is dominated by the emission of a single galaxy.

  4. A Chandra Study of the Large-Scale Shock Front in Abell 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Steven

    2011-09-01

    Abell 2219 (z=0.225) is the third galaxy cluster in which a clear, large-scale shock front, viewed approximately edge-on and generated by ongoing merging activity, has been discovered. It is highly X-ray luminous and 2.5 times brighter in X-rays than either 1E0657-56 or A520. We propose a 150ks ACIS-I observation to obtain the first precise measurements of the pre- and post-shock gas temperature, enabling improved estimates of the Mach number and shock velocity. The observed gradient of the temperature jump across the shock will constrain the process of post-shock electron-ion equilibration. We will probe the origin of very hot (kT>20 keV) gas observed in the cluster center. High quality radio, optical-dynamical, and ground- and space-based gravitational lensing data are in hand.

  5. RADIO AND DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISTURBED COOL CORE CLUSTER ABELL 133

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, S. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Owers, M. S.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2010-10-10

    We present results based on new Chandra and multi-frequency radio observations of the disturbed cool core cluster Abell 133. The diffuse gas has a complex bird-like morphology, with a plume of emission extending from two symmetric wing-like features. The plume is capped with a filamentary radio structure that has been previously classified as a radio relic. X-ray spectral fits in the region of the relic indicate the presence of either high-temperature gas or non-thermal emission, although the measured photon index is flatter than would be expected if the non-thermal emission is from inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background by the radio-emitting particles. We find evidence for a weak elliptical X-ray surface brightness edge surrounding the core, which we show is consistent with a sloshing cold front. The plume is consistent with having formed due to uplift by a buoyantly rising radio bubble, now seen as the radio relic, and has properties consistent with buoyantly lifted plumes seen in other systems (e.g., M87). Alternatively, the plume may be a gas sloshing spiral viewed edge-on. Results from spectral analysis of the wing-like features are inconsistent with the previous suggestion that the wings formed due to the passage of a weak shock through the cool core. We instead conclude that the wings are due to X-ray cavities formed by displacement of X-ray gas by the radio relic. The central cD galaxy contains two small-scale cold gas clumps that are slightly offset from their optical and UV counterparts, suggestive of a galaxy-galaxy merger event. On larger scales, there is evidence for cluster substructure in both optical observations and the X-ray temperature map. We suggest that the Abell 133 cluster has recently undergone a merger event with an interloping subgroup, initialing gas sloshing in the core. The torus of sloshed gas is seen close to edge-on, leading to the somewhat ragged appearance of the elliptical surface brightness edge. We show

  6. Beneficial Effects of Camellia Oil (Camellia oleifera Abel.) on Hepatoprotective and Gastroprotective Activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that increased dietary intake of natural antioxidants is beneficial for health because of their bioactivities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammation actions. Camellia oil made from tea seed (Camellia oleifera Abel.) is commonly used as an edible oil and a traditional medicine in Taiwan and China. Until now, the camellia oil has been widely considered as a dietary oil for heath. In this review, we summarize the protective effects of camellia oil with antioxidant activity against oxidative stress leading to hepatic damage and gastrointestinal ulcers. The information in this review leads to the conclusion that camellia oil is not only an edible oil but also a vegetable oil with a potential function for human health. PMID:26598814

  7. Sloshing, Shocks, and Bubbles in the Cool Core Cluster Abell 2052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, S. W.; Clarke, T. E.; Sarazin, C. L.; McNamara, B. R.; Douglass, E. M.; McDonald, M.

    2011-05-01

    We present results from a very deep (650 ksec) Chandra X-ray observation of Abell 2052, as well as archival VLA radio observations. The data reveal exquisite detail in the inner parts of the cluster, including bubbles evacuated by the AGN's radio lobes, compressed bubble rims, filaments, and loops. Two concentric shocks are seen, and a temperature rise is measured for the innermost one. On larger scales, an excess surface brightness spiral feature is detected. The spiral has cooler temperatures and higher abundances than its surroundings, and is likely the result of sloshing gas initiated by a previous cluster-cluster or sub-cluster merger. Initial evidence for previously unseen bubbles at larger radii related to earlier outbursts from the AGN is presented. Support for this work was provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, through Chandra Award Number GO9-0147X.

  8. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and evidence for radial orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Owen, Frazer N.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1986-01-01

    Published observational data on the tail orientations (TOs) of 60 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters of galaxies are analyzed statistically using a maximum-likelihood approach. The results are presented in a table, and it is found that the observed TO distributions in the whole sample and in subsamples of morphologically regular NATs and NATs with pericentric distances d greater than 500 kpc are consistent with isotropic orbits, whereas the TOs for NATs with d less than 500 kpc are consistent with highly radial orbits. If radial orbits were observed near the centers of other types of cluster galaxies as well, it could be inferred that violent relaxation during cluster formation was incomplete, and that clusters form by spherical collapse and secondary infall, as proposed by Gunn (1977).

  9. The Mass of Abell 1060 and AWM 7 from Spatially Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenstein, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1996-11-01

    Using X-ray temperature and surface brightness profiles of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) derived from ASCA (Astro-D) and ROSAT observations, we place constraints on the dark matter (DM) and baryon fraction distributions in the poor clusters Abell 1060 (A1060) and AWM 7. Although their total mass distributions are similar, AWM 7 has twice the baryon fraction of A1060 in the best-fit models. The functional form of the DM distribution is ill determined; however, mass models where the baryon fractions in A1060 and AWM 7 significantly overlap are excluded. Such variations in baryon fraction are not predicted by standard models and imply that some mechanism in addition to gravity plays a major role in organizing matter on cluster scales.

  10. A new asymmetric Abel-inversion method for plasma interferometry in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1989-02-01

    In order to get precise local electron density information from chordal interferometric measurement of a tokamak plasma, a self- consistent and reliable inversion method is necessary. In this paper, a new asymmetric Abel-inversion method is introduced. This method includes flexible boundary conditions, application to a non-circular geometry, and estimation of the plasma in the scrape-off layer. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by comparison with other methods. This new inversion method is applied to a parametric study which includes dependence on the Shafranov shift and elongation of the profile. The inverted results are integrated along different views and compared with other density measurements. This new method can also be applied to plasma spectroscopy. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Television documentary, history and memory. An analysis of Sergio Zavoli's The Gardens of Abel

    PubMed Central

    Foot, John

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a celebrated documentary made for Italian state TV in 1968 and transmitted in 1969 to an audience of millions. The programme – The Gardens of Abel – looked at changes introduced by the radical psychiatrist Franco Basaglia in an asylum in the north-east of Italy (Gorizia). The article examines the content of this programme for the first time, questions some of the claims that have been made for it, and outlines the sources used by the director, Sergio Zavoli. The article argues that the film was as much an expression of Zavoli's vision and ideas as it was linked to those of Franco Basaglia himself. Finally, the article highlights the way that this programme has become part of historical discourse and popular memory. PMID:25937804

  12. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  13. Revisiting Abell 2744: a powerful synergy of the GLASS spectroscopy and the HFF photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Borello Schmidt, Kasper; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-08-01

    We present new emission line identifications and improve the strong lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744 using the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) observations and the full depth of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging. We performed a blind and targeted search for emission lines in objects within the full field of view (FoV) of the GLASS prime pointings, including all the previously known multiple arc images. We report over 50 high quality spectroscopic redshifts, 4 of which are for the arc images. We also present an extensive analysis based on the HFF photometry, measuring the colors and photometric redshifts of all objects within the FoV, and comparing the spectroscopic and photometric results of the same ensemble of sources. In order to improve the lens model of Abell 2744, we develop a rigorous alogorithm to screen arc images, based on their colors and morphology, and selecting the most reliable ones to use. As a result, 21 systems (corresponding to 59 images) pass the screening process and are used to reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive mesh. The resulting total mass distribution is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data in a fashion very similar to the reduction of the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP) clusters, in order to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made publicly available in the standard HFF format.

  14. Deep spectroscopy of nearby galaxy clusters - I. Spectroscopic luminosity function of Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Dominguez Palmero, L.; Yu, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new deep spectroscopic catalogue for Abell 85, within 3.0 × 2.6 Mpc2 and down to Mr ˜ Mr^{ast } +6. Using the Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope and the AutoFiber 2 at the William Herschel Telescope, we obtained almost 1430 new redshifts for galaxies with mr ≤ 21 mag and <μe,r> ≤ 24 mag arcsec-2. These redshifts, together with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and NASA/IPAC Extragaalctic Database spectroscopic information, result in 460 confirmed cluster members. This data set allows the study of the luminosity function (LF) of the cluster galaxies covering three orders of magnitudes in luminosities. The total and radial LFs are best modelled by a double Schechter function. The normalized LFs show that their bright (Mr ≤ -21.5) and faint (Mr ≥ -18.0) ends are independent of clustercentric distance and similar to the field LFs unlike the intermediate luminosity range (-21.5 ≤ Mr ≤ -18.0). Similar results are found for the LFs of the dominant types of galaxies: red, passive, virialized and early-infall members. On the contrary, the LFs of blue, star forming, non-virialized and recent-infall galaxies are well described by a single Schechter function. These populations contribute to a small fraction of the galaxy density in the innermost cluster region. However, in the outskirts of the cluster, they have similar densities to red, passive, virialized and early-infall members at the LF faint end. These results confirm a clear dependence of the colour and star formation of Abell 85 members in the cluster centric distance.

  15. Suzaku observation of a high-entropy cluster Abell 548W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Kato, Yuichi; Gu, Liyi; Kawaharada, Madoka; Takizawa, Motokazu; Fujita, Yutaka; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    Abell 548W, one of the galaxy clusters located in the Abell 548 region, has about an order of magnitude lower X-ray luminosity compared to ordinal clusters in view of the well-known intracluster medium (ICM) temperature vs. X-ray luminosity (kT-LX) relation. The cluster hosts a pair of diffuse radio sources to the northwest and north, both about 10' apart from the cluster center. They are candidate radio relics, frequently associated with merging clusters. A Suzaku deep observation with exposure of 84.4 ks was performed to search for signatures of merging in this cluster. The XIS detectors successfully detected the ICM emission out to 16' from the cluster center. The temperature is ˜ 3.6 keV around its center, and ˜ 2 keV at the outermost regions. The hot region (˜ 6 keV) beside the relic candidates shifted to the cluster center reported by XMM-Newton was not seen in the Suzaku data, although its temperature of 3.6 keV itself is higher than the average temperature of 2.5 keV around the radio sources. In addition, the signature of a cool (kT ˜ 0.9 keV) component was found around the northwest source. A marginal temperature jump at its outer edge was also found, consistent with the canonical idea of the shock acceleration origin of the radio relics. The cluster has among the highest central entropy of ˜ 400 keV cm2 and is one of the so-called low surface brightness clusters. Taking into account the fact that its shape itself is relatively circular and smooth and also that its temperature structure is nearly flat, possible scenarios for merging are discussed.

  16. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-04-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  17. Galaxy Luminosity Function of the Dynamically Young Abell 119 Cluster: Probing the Cluster Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngdae; Rey, Soo-Chang; Hilker, Michael; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the galaxy luminosity function (LF) of the Abell 119 cluster down to {M}r∼ -14 mag based on deep images in the u, g, and r bands taken by using MOSAIC II CCD mounted on the Blanco 4 m telescope at the CTIO. The cluster membership was accurately determined based on the radial velocity information and on the color–magnitude relation for bright galaxies and the scaling relation for faint galaxies. The overall LF exhibits a bimodal behavior with a distinct dip at r∼ 18.5 mag ({M}r∼ -17.8 mag), which is more appropriately described by a two-component function. The shape of the LF strongly depends on the clustercentric distance and on the local galaxy density. The LF of galaxies in the outer, low-density region exhibits a steeper slope and more prominent dip compared with that of counterparts in the inner, high-density region. We found evidence for a substructure in the projected galaxy distribution in which several overdense regions in the Abell 119 cluster appear to be closely associated with the surrounding, possible filamentary structure. The combined LF of the overdense regions exhibits a two-component function with a distinct dip, while the LF of the central region is well described by a single Schechter function. We suggest that, in the context of the hierarchical cluster formation scenario, the observed overdense regions are the relics of galaxy groups, retaining their two-component LFs with a dip, which acquired their shapes through a galaxy merging process in group environments, before they fall into a cluster.

  18. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived From Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From analysis of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging data we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the SZE toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster.

  19. The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey. VI. Spatial distribution and kinematics of early- and late-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Theije, P. A. M.; Katgert, P.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the data obtained in the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (ENACS) has shown that the space distribution and kinematics of galaxies with detectable emission lines in their spectra differ significantly from those of galaxies without emission lines. This result, and details of the kinematics, were considered as support for the idea that at least the spirals with emission lines are on orbits that are not isotropic. This might indicate that this subset of late-type galaxies either has `first approach'-orbits towards the dense core of their respective clusters, or has orbits that `avoid' the core. The galaxies with emission lines are essentially all late-type galaxies. On the other hand, the emission-line galaxies represent only about a third of the late-type galaxies, the majority of which do not show detectable emission lines. The galaxies without emission lines are therefore a mix of early- and late-type galaxies. In this paper we attempt to separate early- and late-type galaxies, and we study possible differences in distribution and kinematics of the two galaxy classes. For only about 10% of the galaxies in the ENACS, the morphology is known from imaging. Here, we describe our classification on the basis of the ENACS spectrum. The significant information in each spectrum is compressed into 15 Principal Components, which are used as input for an Artificial Neural Network. The latter is `trained' with 150 of the 270 galaxies for which a morphological type is available from Dressler, and subsequently used to classify each galaxy. This yields a classification for two-thirds of the ENACS galaxies. The Artificial Neural Network has two output classes: early-type (E+S0) and late-type (S+I) galaxies. We do not distinguish E and S0 galaxies, because these cannot be separated very robustly on the basis of the spectrum. The success rate of the classification is estimated from the sample of 120 galaxies with Dressler morphologies which were not used to train the ANN

  20. A Census of Star Formation and Active Galactic Nuclei Populations in Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Logan H.; Atlee, David Wesley

    2016-01-01

    A recent survey of low-z galaxy clusters observed a disjunction between X-ray and mid-infrared selected populations of active galactic nuclei (X-ray and IR AGNs) (Atlee+ 2011, ApJ 729, 22.). Here we present an analysis of near-infrared spectroscopic data of star-forming galaxies in cluster Abell 1689 in order to confirm the identity of some of their IR AGN and to provide a check on their reported star formation rates. Our sample consists of 24 objects in Abell 1689. H and K band spectroscopic observations of target objects and standard stars were obtained by David Atlee between 2010 May 17 and 2011 June 6 using the Large Binocular Telescope's LUCI instrument. After undergoing initial reductions, standard stars were corrected for telluric absorption using TelFit (Gullikson+ 2014, AJ, 158, 53). Raw detector counts were converted to physical units using the wavelength-dependent response of the grating and the star's reported H and K band magnitudes to produce conversion factors that fully correct for instrumental effects. Target spectra were flux-calibrated using the airmass-corrected transmission profiles produced by TelFit and the associated H band conversion factor (or the average of the two factors, for nights with two standard stars). Star formation rates were calculated using the SFR-L(Ha) relation reported in Kennicutt (1998), with the measured luminosity of the Pa-a emission line at the luminosity distance of the cluster used as a proxy for L(Ha) (Kennicutt 1998, ARA&A 36, 189; Hummer & Stoney 1987, MNRAS 346, 1055). The line ratios H2 2.121 mm/Brg and [FeII]/Pab were used to classify targets as starburst galaxies, AGNs, or LINERs (Rodriguez-Ardila+ 2005, MNRAS, 364, 1041). Jones was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  1. On the Merging Cluster Abell 578 and Its Central Radio Galaxy 4C+67.13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, K.; Stawarz, Ł.; Siemiginowska, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Szostek, A.; Madejski, G.; Harris, D. E.; Simionescu, A.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-06-01

    Here we analyze radio, optical, and X-ray data for the peculiar cluster Abell 578. This cluster is not fully relaxed and consists of two merging sub-systems. The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), CGPG 0719.8+6704, is a pair of interacting ellipticals with projected separation ˜10 kpc, the brighter of which hosts the radio source 4C+67.13. The Fanaroff-Riley type-II radio morphology of 4C+67.13 is unusual for central radio galaxies in local Abell clusters. Our new optical spectroscopy revealed that both nuclei of the CGPG 0719.8+6704 pair are active, albeit at low accretion rates corresponding to the Eddington ratio ˜ {{10}-4} (for the estimated black hole masses of ˜ 3× {{10}8} {{M}⊙ } and ˜ {{10}9} {{M}⊙ }). The gathered X-ray (Chandra) data allowed us to confirm and to quantify robustly the previously noted elongation of the gaseous atmosphere in the dominant sub-cluster, as well as a large spatial offset (˜60 kpc projected) between the position of the BCG and the cluster center inferred from the modeling of the X-ray surface brightness distribution. Detailed analysis of the brightness profiles and temperature revealed also that the cluster gas in the vicinity of 4C+67.13 is compressed (by a factor of about ˜1.4) and heated (from ≃ 2.0 keV up to 2.7 keV), consistent with the presence of a weak shock (Mach number ˜1.3) driven by the expanding jet cocoon. This would then require the jet kinetic power of the order of ˜ {{10}45} erg s-1, implying either a very high efficiency of the jet production for the current accretion rate, or a highly modulated jet/accretion activity in the system. Based on service observations made with the WHT operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  2. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Siobhan; Lumsden, Linda S.

    1994-01-01

    The items featured in this annotated bibliography touch on several aspects of the multifaceted class-size debate. Allen Odden reviews the literature and contends that class-size reduction should be used "sparingly and strategically." C. M. Achilles and colleagues examines two different class-size situations and find student test performance in the…

  3. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Holly R.

    Exploring the class-size issue, this paper focuses on the primary grades and asks questions such as "does a reduction in class size promote an increase in academic achievement?" and "how substantial does the reduction in numbers have to be in order for a significant increase to occur?" The paper surveys debates on class size and the social factors…

  4. Class Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdata, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Ever since George Washington opted for the title of president rather than king, Americans have been uncomfortable with the idea of class distinctions. This article presents an interview with Dr. Janet Galligani Casey regarding the idea of class distinctions. Galligani Casey, who grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Somerville, Massachusetts,…

  5. X-ray Emission from the Born-Again Planetary Nebula Abell 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    The planetary nebula (PN) Abell 30 underwent a very late thermal pulse that resulted in the ejection of knots of hydrogen-poor material. ROSAT detected soft X-ray emission from these knots. We present deep Chandra and XMM-Newton observations that show this X-ray emission to consist of two components: a point-source at the central star and diffuse emission associated with the hydrogen-poor knots and the cloverleaf structure inside the nebular shell. The spatial distribution and spectral properties of the diffuse X-ray emission suggest that it is generated by the shock-heated plasma produced by the interaction of the present stellar wind with the hydrogen-poor ejecta of the born-again event. Charge-exchange reactions between the ions of the stellar winds and the born-again ejecta may also contribute to this emission. The origin of the X-ray emission from the central star of A 30 is puzzling: shocks in the present fast stellar wind and photospheric emission can be ruled out, while the development of a new, compact hot bubble confining the fast stellar wind seems implausible.

  6. Peculiar velocities of cD galaxies - MX spectroscopy of Abell 1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Hintzen, Paul; Oegerle, W. R.; Romanishin, W.; Lesser, M. P.; Eisenhamer, J. D.; Batuski, D. J.

    1988-09-01

    Spectroscopic observations of galaxies in the Abell 1795 field have been obtained using the MX multiple-object spectrograph on the Steward Observatory 2.3 m telescope. Redshifts are presented for 46 galaxies, including 41 cluster members. It is found that the A1795 cD galaxy is not at rest in the cluster gravitational potential well; it has a peculiar radial velocity, cz, of 365 km/s, and the hypothesis that the mean cluster velocity is as large as the cD's velocity can be rejected at the 99.5 percent confidence level. This conclusion is supported by spectroscopic data for the 'cooling flow' gas found in the central region of the cluster; this gas, except for the portion coincident with the cD nucleus, lies at the velocity derived for the cluster mean. It is suggested that current models of the formation of cD galaxies are unlikely to account for the large peculiar velocities of the cD galaxies in A1795 and A2670 unless substantial subclustering is still present. However, the available data show no evidence for velocity subclustering in either A1795 or A2670.

  7. On the X-ray spectrum of the volume emissivity arising from Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stottlemyer, A. R.; Boldt, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    HEAO 1 A-2 X-ray spectra (2-15 keV) for an optically selected sample of Abell clusters of galaxies with z less than 0.1 have been analyzed to determine the energy dependence of the cosmological X-ray volume emissivity arising from such clusters. This spectrum is well fitted by an isothermal-bremsstrahlung model with kT = 7.4 + or - 1.5 KeV. This result is a test of the isothermal-volume-emissivity spectrum to be inferred from the conjecture that all contributing clusters may be characterized by kT = 7 keV, as assumed by McKee et al. (1980) in estimating the underlying luminosity function for the same sample. Although satisfied at the statistical level indicated, the analysis of a low-luminosity subsample suggests that this assumption of identical isothermal spectra would lead to a systematic error for a more statistically precise determination of the luminosity function's form.

  8. Population Analysis of Seyfert Galaxies in the Coma Abell-1367 Supercluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Megan; Wilcots, E. M.; Hess, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    In the hopes of finding a possible source of intergalactic heating, we are studying the population of active galaxies residing in and out of groups along the Coma-Abell 1367 supercluster to look at the occurrence of Seyfert galaxies. We report on the distribution of Seyfert galaxies as a function of environment across the supercluster and probe the characteristics of the population of groups that currently host at least one Seyfert. Of the 66 groups sampled, there are 11 groups containing one Seyfert and 6 groups containing multiple Seyferts, which leaves 49 groups without any activity. We have yet to determine whether the occurrence of Seyferts is dependent on environmental factors. So far, we have not identified a correlation between environment and AGN activity; activity occurs pretty evenly both within and outside of galaxy groups. However, there does seem to be some correlation between the size of the group and the the percentage of Seyfert activity; one group with over 250 members has a much smaller amount of Seyferts by percentage (9 Seyferts) than other groups with 10 or less members. We explore the effect of Seyfert activity on the intergalactic medium in galaxy groups.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abell 496 gri photometry (Moretti+, 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Molinari, E.; Chincarini, G.; de Grandi, S.

    2000-04-01

    We initiated a large project aimed to estimate the Luminosity Function of galaxies in clusters and to evaluate its relation to cluster morphology. With this paper we deem necessary to outline the general procedures of the data reduction and details of the data analysis. The cluster sample includes the brightest southern ROSAT all-sky survey clusters with z<0.1 . These have been observed in three colours g, r, i, and mapped up to a few core radii using a mosaic of CCD frames. E/S0 galaxies in the cluster core are singled out both by morphology (for the brightest galaxies), and by colour. The details of the data reduction procedure are illustrated via the analysis of the cluster Abell 496, which has been used as a pilot cluster for the whole program. The related photometric catalogue consists of 2355 objects. The limiting magnitudes (the reference Surface Brightness is given in parenthesis) in the various colours are respectively g(25.5)=24.14, r(25.5)=24.46, i(25.0)=23.75. These correspond to the limiting absolute magnitudes -12.28, -11.96 and -12.67 (H0=50km/s/Mpc). (1 data file).

  10. A Cosmic Train Wreck: JVLA Radio Observations of the HST Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Connor; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Kraft, Ralph P.; Dawson, William; Brüggen, Marcus; Roediger, Elke; Bulbul, Esra; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The galaxy cluster mergers observed in the HST Frontier Fields represent some of the most energetic events in the Universe. Major cluster mergers leave distinct signatures in the ICM in the form of shocks, turbulence, and diffuse cluster radio sources. These diffuse radio sources, so-called radio relics and halos, provide evidence for the acceleration of relativistic particles and the presence of large scale magnetic fields in the ICM. Observations of these halos and relics allow us to (i) study the physics of particle acceleration and its relation with shocks and turbulence in the ICM and (ii) constrain the dynamical evolution of the merger eventsWe present Jansky Very Large Array 1-4 GHz observations of the Frontier cluster Abell 2744. We confirm the presence of the known giant radio halo and radio relic via our deep radio images. Owing to the much greater sensitivity of the JVLA compared to previous observations, we are able to detect a previously unobserved long Mpc-size filament of synchrotron emission to the south west of the cluster core. We also present a radio spectral index image of the diffuse cluster emission to test the origin of the radio relic and halo, related to the underlying particle acceleration mechanism. Finally, we carry out a search for radio emission from the 'jellyfish' galaxies in A2744 to estimate their star formation rate. These highly disturbed galaxies are likely influenced by the cluster merger event, although the precise origin of these galaxies is still being debated.

  11. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING BY THE SUPER-MASSIVE cD GALAXY IN ABELL 3827

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, E. R.; Gomez, P. L.; Lee, H.; Diaz, R.; Bergmann, M.; Turner, J. E. H.; Miller, B. W.; West, M. J.; Verdugo, T.

    2010-06-01

    We have discovered strong gravitational lensing features in the core of the nearby cluster Abell 3827 by analyzing Gemini South GMOS images. The most prominent strong lensing feature is a highly magnified, ring-shaped configuration of four images around the central cD galaxy. GMOS spectroscopic analysis puts this source at z {approx} 0.2. Located {approx}20'' away from the central galaxy is a secondary tangential arc feature which has been identified as a background galaxy with z {approx} 0.4. We have modeled the gravitational potential of the cluster core, taking into account the mass from the cluster, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and other galaxies. We derive a total mass of (2.7 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 13} M {sub sun} within 37 h {sup -1} kpc. This mass is an order of magnitude larger than that derived from X-ray observations. The total mass derived from lensing data suggests that the BCG in this cluster is perhaps the most massive galaxy in the nearby universe.

  12. An efficient and flexible Abel-inversion method for noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhin, Igor I.

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient and flexible method for solving Abel integral equation of the first kind, frequently appearing in many fields of astrophysics, physics, chemistry, and applied sciences. This equation represents an ill-posed problem, thus solving it requires some kind of regularization. Our method is based on solving the equation on a so-called compact set of functions and/or using Tikhonov's regularization. A priori constraints on the unknown function, defining a compact set, are very loose and can be set using simple physical considerations. Tikhonov's regularization on itself does not require any explicit a priori constraints on the unknown function and can be used independently of such constraints or in combination with them. Various target degrees of smoothness of the unknown function may be set, as required by the problem at hand. The advantage of the method, apart from its flexibility, is that it gives uniform convergence of the approximate solution to the exact solution, as the errors of input data tend to zero. The method is illustrated on several simulated models with known solutions. An example of astrophysical application of the method is also given.

  13. Systematic Uncertainties in Characterizing Cluster Outskirts: The Case of Abell 133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, Jennie; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Nulsen, Paul; Farrah, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    The outskirts of galaxy clusters have low surface brightness compared to the X-ray background, making accurate background subtraction particularly important for analyzing cluster spectra out to and beyond the virial radius. We analyze the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) of Abell 133 and assess the extent to which uncertainties on background subtraction affect measured quantities. We implement two methods of analyzing the ICM spectra: one in which the blank-sky background is subtracted, and another in which the sky background is modeled. We find that the two methods are consistent within the 90% confidence ranges. We were able to measure the thermodynamic properties of the cluster up to R500. Even at R500, the systematic uncertainties associated with the sky background in the direction of A133 are small, despite the ICM signal constituting only ~25% of the total signal. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution. GAO acknowledges support by NASA through a Hubble Fellowship grant HST-HF2-51345.001-A awarded by the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  14. MMTF-Halpha AND HST-FUV IMAGING OF THE FILAMENTARY COMPLEX IN ABELL 1795

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2009-10-01

    We have obtained deep, high spatial resolution images of the central region of Abell 1795 at Halpha and [N II] lambda6583 with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter (MMTF), and in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys solar blind channel on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The superb image quality of the MMTF data has made it possible to resolve the known SE filament into a pair of thin, intertwined filaments extending for {approx}50 kpc, with a width <1 kpc. The presence of these thin, tangled strands is suggestive of a cooling wake where runaway cooling is taking place, perhaps aided by an enhanced magnetic field in this region. The HST data further resolve these strands into chains of FUV-bright stellar clusters, indicating that these filaments are indeed sites of ongoing star formation, but at a rate {approx}2 orders of magnitude smaller than the mass-deposition rates predicted from the X-ray data. The elevated [N II]/Halpha ratio and large spatial variations of the FUV/Halpha flux ratio across the filaments indicate that O-star photoionization is not solely responsible for the ionization. The data favor collisional heating by cosmic rays either produced in situ by magnetohydrodynamical processes or conducted from the surrounding intracluster medium.

  15. Diffuse radio emission in the complex merging galaxy cluster Abell2069

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabent, A.; Hoeft, M.; Pizzo, R. F.; Bonafede, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Klein, U.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters with signs of a recent merger in many cases show extended diffuse radio features. This emission originates from relativistic electrons that suffer synchrotron losses due to the intracluster magnetic field. The mechanisms of particle acceleration and the properties of the magnetic field are still poorly understood. Aims: We search for diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters. Here, we study the complex galaxy cluster Abell 2069, for which X-ray observations indicate a recent merger. Methods: We investigate the cluster's radio continuum emission by deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations at 346 MHz and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations at 322 MHz. Results: We find an extended diffuse radio feature roughly coinciding with the main component of the cluster. We classify this emission as a radio halo and estimate its lower limit flux density at 25 ± 9 mJy. Moreover, we find a second extended diffuse source located at the cluster's companion and estimate its flux density at 15 ± 2 mJy. We speculate that this is a small halo or a mini-halo. If true, this cluster is the first example of a double-halo in a single galaxy cluster.

  16. A generalized Abel inversion method for gamma-ray imaging of thermonuclear plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.; Pavone, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Schoepf, K.; Yavorskij, V.

    2016-03-01

    A method to determine the gamma-ray emissivity profile from measurements along a few multiple collimated lines of sight in thermonuclear plasmas is presented. The algorithm is based on a generalisation of the known Abel inversion and takes into account the non circular shape of the plasma flux surfaces and the limited number of data points available. The method is applied to synthetic experimental measurements originating from parabolic and non parabolic JET gamma-ray emissivity profiles, where the aim is to compare the results of the inversion with the original, known input parameters. We find that profile parameters, such as the peak value, width and centre of the emissivity, are determined with an accuracy between 1 and 20% for parabolic and 2 to 25% for non parabolic profiles, respectively, which compare to an error at the 10% level for the input data. The results presented in this paper are primarily of relevance for the reconstruction of emissivity profiles from radiation measurements in tokamaks, but the method can also be applied to measurements along a sparse set of collimated lines of sight in general applications, provided that the surfaces at constant emissivity are known to have rotational simmetry.

  17. Two new triterpenoid glycosides from the stems of Camellia oleifera Abel.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing-Wei; Fu, Hui-Zheng; Luo, Yue-Hua; Zhou, Guo-Ping; Wan, Kai-Hua; Zhong, Rui-Jian

    2016-07-01

    Two new oleanane-type triterpenoid glycosides, 3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)-[β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-22α-angeloyloxyolean-12-ene-15α,16α,28-triol(1) and 3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)-[β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21β-acetyl-22α-angeloyloxyolean-12-ene-16α,28-diol (2) were isolated from the stems of Camellia oleifera Abel. Their structures were elucidated by means of spectroscopic methods and chemical evidence. The cytotoxic activities of compounds 1-2 were evaluated against five human tumour cell lines (HCT-8, BGC-823, A5049, and A2780). Compounds 1-2 showed cytotoxic activity against five human cancer cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 3.15 to 7.32 μM. PMID:26610161

  18. The role of stellar mass and environment for cluster blue fraction, AGN fraction and star formation indicators from a targeted analysis of Abell 1691

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Jensen, Peter C.

    2012-10-01

    We present an analysis of the galaxy population of the intermediate X-ray luminosity galaxy cluster, Abell 1691, from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galaxy Zoo data to elucidate the relationships between environment and galaxy stellar mass for a variety of observationally important cluster populations that include the Butcher-Oemler blue fraction, the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction and other spectroscopic classifications of galaxies. From 342 cluster members, we determine a cluster recession velocity of 21257 ± 54 km s-1 and velocity dispersion of 1009-36+40 km s-1 and show that although the cluster is fed by multiple filaments of galaxies it does not possess significant sub-structure in its core. We identify the AGN population of the cluster from a Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich diagram and show that there is a mild increase in the AGN fraction with radius from the cluster centre that appears mainly driven by high-mass galaxies [log(stellar mass) > 10.8]. Although the cluster blue fraction follows the same radial trend, it is caused primarily by lower mass galaxies [log(stellar mass) < 10.8]. Significantly, the galaxies that have undergone recent starbursts or are presently starbursting but dust-shrouded [spectroscopic e(a) class galaxies] are also nearly exclusively driven by low-mass galaxies. We therefore suggest that the Butcher-Oemler effect may be a mass-dependent effect. We also examine red and passive spiral galaxies and show that the majority are massive galaxies, much like the rest of the red and spectroscopically passive cluster population. We further demonstrate that the velocity dispersion profiles of low- and high-mass cluster galaxies are different. Taken together, we infer that the duty cycle of high- and low-mass cluster galaxies is markedly different, with a significant departure in star formation and specific star formation rates observed beyond r200 and we discuss these findings.

  19. Structure and Formation of cD Galaxies: NGC 6166 in ABELL 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Ralf; Kormendy, John; Cornell, Mark E.; Fisher, David B.

    2015-07-01

     Hobby–Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy is used to measure the velocity dispersion profile of the nearest prototypical cD galaxy, NGC 6166 in the cluster Abell 2199. We also present composite surface photometry from many telescopes. We confirm the defining feature of a cD galaxy; i.e., (we suggest), a halo of stars that fills the cluster center and that is controlled dynamically by cluster gravity, not by the central galaxy. Our HET spectroscopy shows that the velocity dispersion of NGC 6166 rises from σ ≃ 300 km s‑1 in the inner r∼ 10\\prime\\prime to σ =865+/- 58 km s‑1 at r ∼ 100″ in the cD halo. This extends published observations of an outward σ increase and shows for the first time that σ rises all the way to the cluster velocity dispersion of 819 ± 32 km s‑1. We also observe that the main body of NGC 6166 moves at +206 ± 39 km s‑1 with respect to the cluster mean velocity, but the velocity of the inner cD halo is ∼70 km s‑1 closer to the cluster velocity. These results support our picture that cD halos consist of stars that were stripped from individual cluster galaxies by fast tidal encounters.  However, our photometry does not confirm the widespread view that cD halos are identifiable as an extra, low-surface-brightness component that is photometrically distinct from the inner, steep-Sérsic-function main body of an otherwise-normal giant elliptical galaxy. Instead, all of the brightness profile of NGC 6166 outside its core is described to ±0.037 V mag arcsec‑2 by a single Sérsic function with index n≃ 8.3. The cD halo is not recognizable from photometry alone. This blurs the distinction between cluster-dominated cD halos and the similarly-large-Sérsic-index halos of giant, core-boxy-nonrotating ellipticals. These halos are believed to be accreted onto compact, high-redshift progenitors (“red nuggets”) by large numbers of minor mergers. They belong dynamically to their central galaxies. Still, cDs and core

  20. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  1. THE DISTRIBUTION OF DARK MATTER OVER THREE DECADES IN RADIUS IN THE LENSING CLUSTER ABELL 611

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S.; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Sand, David J.; Richard, Johan; Capak, Peter; Miyazaki, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the baryonic and dark matter distribution in the lensing cluster Abell 611 (z = 0.288), with the goal of determining the dark matter profile over an unprecedented range of cluster-centric distance. By combining three complementary probes of the mass distribution, weak lensing from multi-color Subaru imaging, strong lensing constraints based on the identification of multiply imaged sources in Hubble Space Telescope images, and resolved stellar velocity dispersion measures for the brightest cluster galaxy secured using the Keck telescope, we extend the methodology for separating the dark and baryonic mass components introduced by Sand et al. Our resulting dark matter profile samples the cluster from approx3 kpc to 3.25 Mpc, thereby providing an excellent basis for comparisons with recent numerical models. We demonstrate that only by combining our three observational techniques can degeneracies in constraining the form of the dark matter profile be broken on scales crucial for detailed comparisons with numerical simulations. Our analysis reveals that a simple Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile is an unacceptable fit to our data. We confirm earlier claims based on less extensive analyses of other clusters that the inner profile of the dark matter profile deviates significantly from the NFW form and find a inner logarithmic slope beta flatter than 0.3 (68%; where rho{sub DM} propor to r{sup -b}eta at small radii). In order to reconcile our data with cluster formation in a LAMBDACDM cosmology, we speculate that it may be necessary to revise our understanding of the nature of baryon-dark matter interactions in cluster cores. Comprehensive weak and strong lensing data, when coupled with kinematic information on the brightest cluster galaxy, can readily be applied to a larger sample of clusters to test the universality of these results.

  2. Exploring the origin of a large cavity in Abell 1795 using deep Chandra observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Kosec, P.

    2014-12-01

    We examine deep stacked Chandra observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 1795 (over 700 ks) to study in depth a large (34 kpc radius) cavity in the X-ray emission. Curiously, despite the large energy required to form this cavity (4PV = 4 × 1060 erg), there is no obvious counterpart to the cavity on the opposite side of the cluster, which would be expected if it has formed due to jets from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) inflating bubbles. There is also no radio emission associated with the cavity, and no metal enhancement or filaments between it and the brightest cluster galaxy, which are normally found for bubbles inflated by AGN which have risen from the core. One possibility is that this is an old ghost cavity, and that gas sloshing has dominated the distribution of metals around the core. Projection effects, particularly the long X-ray bright filament to the south-east, may prevent us from seeing the companion bubble on the opposite side of the cluster core. We calculate that such a companion bubble would easily have been able to uplift the gas in the southern filament from the core. Interestingly, it has recently been found that inside the cavity is a highly variable X-ray point source coincident with a small dwarf galaxy. Given the remarkable spatial correlation of this point source and the X-ray cavity, we explore the possibility that an outburst from this dwarf galaxy in the past could have led to the formation of the cavity, but find this to be an unlikely scenario.

  3. Dynamics of cD clusters of galaxies. II: Analysis of seven Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Hill, John M.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of the seven Abell clusters A193, A399, A401, A1795, A1809, A2063, and A2124, based on redshift data reported previously by us (Hill & Oegerle, (1993)). These papers present the initial results of a survey of cD cluster kinematics, with an emphasis on studying the nature of peculiar velocity cD galaxies and their parent clusters. In the current sample, we find no evidence for significant peculiar cD velocities, with respect to the global velocity distribution. However, the cD in A2063 has a significant (3 sigma) peculiar velocity with respect to galaxies in the inner 1.5 Mpc/h, which is likely due to the merger of a subcluster with A2063. We also find significant evidence for subclustering in A1795, and a marginally peculiar cD velocity with respect to galaxies within approximately 200 kpc/h of the cD. The available x-ray, optical, and galaxy redshift data strongly suggest that a subcluster has merged with A1795. We propose that the subclusters which merged with A1795 and A2063 were relatively small, with shallow potential wells, so that the cooling flows in these clusters were not disrupted. Two-body gravitational models of the A399/401 and A2063/MKW3S systems indicate that A399/401 is a bound pair with a total virial mass of approximately 4 x 10(exp 15) solar mass/h, while A2063 and MKW3S are very unlikely to be bound.

  4. Reconstructing the projected gravitational potential of Abell 1689 from X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernin, Céline; Majer, Charles L.; Meyer, Sven; Sarli, Eleonora; Eckert, Dominique; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters can be used as cosmological probes, but to this end, they need to be thoroughly understood. Combining all cluster observables in a consistent way will help us to understand their global properties and their internal structure. Aims: We provide proof of the concept that the projected gravitational potential of galaxy clusters can directly be reconstructed from X-ray observations. We also show that this joint analysis can be used to locally test the validity of the equilibrium assumptions in galaxy clusters. Methods: We used a newly developed reconstruction method, based on Richardson-Lucy deprojection, that allows reconstructing projected gravitational potentials of galaxy clusters directly from X-ray observations. We applied this algorithm to the well-studied cluster Abell 1689 and compared the gravitational potential reconstructed from X-ray observables to the potential obtained from gravitational lensing measurements. We also compared the X-ray deprojected profiles obtained by the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm with the findings from the more conventional onion-peeling technique. Results: Assuming spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium, the potentials recovered from gravitational lensing and from X-ray emission agree very well beyond 500 kpc. Owing to the fact that the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm allows deprojecting each line of sight independently, this result may indicate that non-gravitational effects and/or asphericity are strong in the central regions of the clusters. Conclusions: We demonstrate the robustness of the potential reconstruction method based on the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm and show that gravitational lensing and X-ray emission lead to consistent gravitational potentials. Our results illustrate the power of combining galaxy-cluster observables in a single, non-parametric, joint reconstruction of consistent cluster potentials that can be used to locally constrain the physical state

  5. The growth of the galaxy cluster Abell 85: mergers, shocks, stripping and seeding of clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinohe, Y.; Werner, N.; Simionescu, A.; Allen, S. W.; Canning, R. E. A.; Ehlert, S.; Mernier, F.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of deep Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 85, which is currently undergoing at least two mergers, and in addition shows evidence for gas sloshing which extends out to r ≈ 600 kpc. One of the two infalling subclusters, to the south of the main cluster centre, has a dense, X-ray bright cool core and a tail extending to the south-east. The northern edge of this tail is strikingly smooth and sharp (narrower than the Coulomb mean free path of the ambient gas) over a length of 200 kpc, while towards the south-west the boundary of the tail is blurred and bent, indicating a difference in the plasma transport properties between these two edges. The thermodynamic structure of the tail strongly supports an overall north-westward motion. We propose, that a sloshing-induced tangential, ambient, coherent gas flow is bending the tail eastwards. The brightest galaxy of this subcluster is at the leading edge of the dense core, and is trailed by the tail of stripped gas, suggesting that the cool core of the subcluster has been almost completely destroyed by the time it reached its current radius of r ≈ 500 kpc. The surface-brightness excess, likely associated with gas stripped from the infalling southern subcluster, extends towards the south-east out to at least r500 of the main cluster, indicating that the stripping of infalling subclusters may seed gas inhomogeneities. The second merging subcluster appears to be a diffuse non-cool-core system. Its merger is likely supersonic with a Mach number of ≈1.4.

  6. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  7. Abell 262 and RXJ0341: Two Brightest Cluster Galaxies with Line Emission Blanketing a Cool Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Heng, Renita

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, integral field (IFU) analysis of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in several cool core clusters has revealed the central regions of these massive old red galaxies to be far from dead. Bright line emission alongside extended X-ray emission links nearby galaxies, is superposed upon vast dust lanes and extends out in long thin filaments from the galaxy core. Yet, to date no unifying picture has come into focus, and the activity across systems is currently seen as a grab-bag of possibile emission line mechanisms. Our primary goal is to work toward a consistent picture for why the BCGs seem are undergoing a renewed level of activity. One problem is most of the current data remains focused on mapping the very core of the BCG, but neglects surrounding galaxies. We propose to discover the full extent of line emission in a complementary pair of BCGs. In Abell 262, an extensive dust patch screens large portions of an otherwise smooth central galaxy, whereas RXJ0341 appears to be a double-core dust free BCG. We will map the full extent of the line emission in order to deduce whether the line emission is a product of local interactions, or the large-scale cluster X-ray gas. The narrow band filter set and large FOV afforded by the the Mayall MOSAIC-1 (MOSA) imager allows us to concurrently conduct an emission line survey of both clusters, locating all line emitting members and beginning a search for the effect of the environment of the different regions (outskirts vs. cluster core) out to the virial radius. We will combine our results with publically available data from 2MASS to determine the upper limits on specific star formation in the BCG and other cluster galaxies within the cluster virial radius.

  8. Can standard cosmological models explain the observed Abell cluster bulk flow?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Michael A.; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Laure, Tod R.; Postman, Marc

    1995-01-01

    Lauer and Postman (LP) observed that all Abell clusters with redshifts less than 15,000 km/s appear to be participating in a bulk flow of 689 km/s with respect to the cosmic microwave background. We find this result difficult to reconcile with all popular models for large-scale structure formation that assume Gaussian initial conditions. This conclusion is based on Monte Carlo realizations of the LP data, drawn from large particle-mesh N-body simulations for six different models of the initial power spectrum (standard, tilted, and Omega(sub 0) = 0.3 cold dark matter, and two variants of the primordial baryon isocurvature model). We have taken special care to treat properly the longest-wavelength components of the power spectra. The simulations are sampled, 'observed,' and analyzed as identically as possible to the LP cluster sample. Large-scale bulk flows as measured from clusters in the simulations are in excellent agreement with those measured from the grid: the clusters do not exhibit any strong velocity bias on large scales. Bulk flows with amplitude as large as that reported by LP are not uncommon in the Monte Carlo data stes; the distribution of measured bulk flows before error bias subtraction is rougly Maxwellian, with a peak around 400 km/s. However the chi squared of the observed bulk flow, taking into account the anisotropy of the error ellipsoid, is much more difficult to match in the simulations. The models examined are ruled out at confidence levels between 94% and 98%.

  9. Creation of cosmic structure in the complex galaxy cluster merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, J.; Coe, D.; Dupke, R.; Massey, R.; Zitrin, A.; Cypriano, E. S.; Okabe, N.; Frye, B.; Braglia, F. G.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Rhodes, J.; Meneghetti, M.; Moustakas, L. A.; Sodré, L., Jr.; Krick, J.; Bregman, J. N.

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed strong-lensing, weak-lensing and X-ray analysis of Abell 2744 (z= 0.308), one of the most actively merging galaxy clusters known. It appears to have unleashed 'dark', 'ghost', 'bullet' and 'stripped' substructures, each ˜1014 M⊙. The phenomenology is complex and will present a challenge for numerical simulations to reproduce. With new, multiband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, we identify 34 strongly lensed images of 11 galaxies around the massive Southern 'core'. Combining this with weak-lensing data from HST, VLT and Subaru, we produce the most detailed mass map of this cluster to date. We also perform an independent analysis of archival Chandra X-ray imaging. Our analyses support a recent claim that the Southern core and Northwestern substructure are post-merger and exhibit morphology similar to the Bullet Cluster viewed from an angle. From the separation between X-ray emitting gas and lensing mass in the Southern core, we derive a new and independent constraint on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter particles σ/m < 3 ± 1 cm2 g-1. In the Northwestern substructure, the gas, dark matter and galaxy components have become separated by much larger distances. Most curiously, the 'ghost' clump (primarily gas) leads the 'dark' clump (primarily dark matter) by more than 150 kpc. We propose an enhanced 'ram-pressure slingshot' scenario which may have yielded this reversal of components with such a large separation, but needs further confirmation by follow-up observations and numerical simulations. A secondary merger involves a second 'bullet' clump in the North and an extremely 'stripped' clump to the West. The latter appears to exhibit the largest separation between dark matter and X-ray emitting baryons detected to date in our sky.

  10. Suzaku Constraints on Soft and Hard Excess Emissions from Abell 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaharada, Madoka; Makishima, Kazuo; Kitaguchi, Takao; Okuyama, Sho; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi

    2010-02-01

    The nearby (z = 0.03015) cluster of galaxies Abell 2199 was observed by Suzaku in X-rays, with five pointings for ˜20ks each. From the XIS data, the temperature and metal abundance profiles were derived out to ˜700 kpc (0.4 times the virial radius). Both of these quantities decrease gradually from the center to peripheries by a factor of ˜2, while the oxygen abundance tends to be flat. The temperature within 12' (˜430 kpc) is ˜4 keV, and the 0.5-10 keV X-ray luminosity integrated up to 30' is (2.9±0.1) × 1044 erg s-1, in agreement with previous XMM-Newton measurements. Above this thermal emission, no significant excess was found either in the XIS range below ˜1 keV, or in the HXD-PIN range above ˜15 keV. The 90%-confidence upper limit on the emission measure of an assumed 0.2 keV warm gas is (3.7-7.5) × 1062 cm-3 arcmin-2, which is 3.7-7.6 times tighter than the detection reported with XMM-Newton. The 90%-confidence upper limit on the 20-80 keV luminosity of any power-law component is 1.8 × 1043 erg s-1, assuming a photon index of 2.0. Although this upper limit does not reject the possible 2.1σ detection by the BeppoSAX PDS, it is a factor of 2.1 tighter than that of the PDS if both are considered upper limits. The non-detection of the hard excess can be reconciled with the upper limit on diffuse radio emission, without invoking very low magnetic fields (<0.073μG) which were suggested previously.

  11. Research: Rags to Rags? Riches to Riches?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2004-01-01

    Everyone has read about what might be called the "gold gap"--how the rich in this country are getting richer and controlling an ever-larger share of the nation's wealth. The Century Foundation has started publishing "Reality Check", a series of guides to campaign issues that sometimes finds gaps in these types of cherished delusions. The guides…

  12. Illuminating a Dark Lens : A Type Ia Supernova Magnified by the Frontier Fields Galaxy Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Patel, Brandon; Scolnic, Daniel; Foley, Ryan J.; Molino, Alberto; Brammer, Gabriel; Jauzac, Mathilde; Bradač, Maruša; Broadhurst, Tom; Coe, Dan; Diego, Jose M.; Graur, Or; Hjorth, Jens; Hoag, Austin; Jha, Saurabh W.; Johnson, Traci L.; Kelly, Patrick; Lam, Daniel; McCully, Curtis; Medezinski, Elinor; Meneghetti, Massimo; Merten, Julian; Richard, Johan; Riess, Adam; Sharon, Keren; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Treu, Tommaso; Wang, Xin; Williams, Liliya L. R.; Zitrin, Adi

    2015-09-01

    SN HFF14Tom is a Type Ia SN discovered at z=1.3457+/- 0.0001 behind the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). In a cosmology-independent analysis, we find that HFF14Tom is 0.77 ± 0.15 mag brighter than unlensed Type Ia SNe at similar redshift, implying a lensing magnification of {μ }{obs}=2.03+/- 0.29. This observed magnification provides a rare opportunity for a direct empirical test of galaxy cluster lens models. Here we test 17 lens models, 13 of which were generated before the SN magnification was known, qualifying as pure “blind tests.” The models are collectively fairly accurate: 8 of the models deliver median magnifications that are consistent with the measured μ to within 1σ. However, there is a subtle systematic bias: the significant disagreements all involve models overpredicting the magnification. We evaluate possible causes for this mild bias, and find no single physical or methodological explanation to account for it. We do find that model accuracy can be improved to some extent with stringent quality cuts on multiply imaged systems, such as requiring that a large fraction have spectroscopic redshifts. In addition to testing model accuracies as we have done here, Type Ia SN magnifications could also be used as inputs for future lens models of Abell 2744 and other clusters, providing valuable constraints in regions where traditional strong- and weak-lensing information is unavailable.

  13. Application of Abel-Plana Formula for Collapse and Revival of Rabi Oscillations in Jaynes-Cummings Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Hiroo

    In this paper, we give an analytical treatment to study the behavior of the collapse and the revival of the Rabi oscillations in the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM). The JCM is an exactly soluble quantum mechanical model, which describes the interaction between a two-level atom and a single cavity mode of the electromagnetic field. If we prepare the atom in the ground state and the cavity mode in a coherent state initially, the JCM causes the collapse and the revival of the Rabi oscillations many times in a complicated pattern in its time-evolution. In this phenomenon, the atomic population inversion is described with an intractable infinite series. (When the electromagnetic field is resonant with the atom, the nth term of this infinite series is given by a trigonometric function for √ {n} t, where t is a variable of the time.) According to Klimov and Chumakov's method, using the Abel-Plana formula, we rewrite this infinite series as a sum of two integrals. We examine the physical meanings of these two integrals and find that the first one represents the initial collapse (the semi-classical limit) and the second one represents the revival (the quantum correction) in the JCM. Furthermore, we evaluate the first- and second-order perturbations for the time-evolution of the JCM with an initial thermal coherent state for the cavity mode at low temperature, and write down their correction terms as sums of integrals by making use of the Abel-Plana formula.

  14. Vitamins and Violence: Can Micronutrients Make Students Behave, Schools Safer and Test Scores Better? The Abell Report. Volume 23, No.6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joann Ellison

    2010-01-01

    The notion that vitamins, minerals, and other "supplemental" nutrients profoundly change behavior, mood, and intellect has origins as old as recorded history. Research has indeed suggested connections between nutrient deficiencies and behavior problems, but correlations are not the same as causality. This "Abell Report" is an…

  15. Diffuse light and building history of the galaxy cluster Abell 2667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covone, G.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Kneib, J.-P.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Slezak, E.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.We searched for diffuse intracluster light in the galaxy cluster Abell 2667 (z=0.233) from HST images in three broad band-filters. Methods: .We applied an iterative multi-scale wavelet analysis and reconstruction technique to these images, which allows to subtract stars and galaxies from the original images. Results: .We detect a zone of diffuse emission southwest of the cluster center (DS1) and a second faint object (ComDif) within DS1. Another diffuse source (DS2) may be detected at lower confidence level northeast of the center. These sources of diffuse light contribute to 10-15% of the total visible light in the cluster. Whether they are independent entities or part of the very elliptical external envelope of the central galaxy remains unclear. Deep VLT VIMOS integral field spectroscopy reveals a faint continuum at the positions of DS1 and ComDif but do not allow a redshift to be computed, so we conclude if these sources are part of the central galaxy or not. A hierarchical substructure detection method reveals the presence of several galaxy pairs and groups defining a similar direction to the one drawn by the DS1 - central galaxy - DS2 axis. The analysis of archive XMM-Newton and Chandra observations shows X-ray emission elongated in the same direction. The X-ray temperature map shows the presence of a cool core, a broad cool zone stretching from north to south, and hotter regions towards the northeast, southwest, and northwest. This might suggest shock fronts along these directions produced by infalling material, even if uncertainties remain quite large on the temperature determination far from the center. Conclusions: .These various data are consistent with a picture in which diffuse sources are concentrations of tidal debris and harassed matter expelled from infalling galaxies by tidal stripping and undergoing an accretion process onto the central cluster galaxy; as such, they are expected to be found along the main infall directions. Note, however

  16. Abundances in the atmosphere of the metal-rich planet-host star HD 77338

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushniruk, I. O.; Pavlenko, Ya. V.; Jenkins, J. S.; Jones, H. R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Abundances of Fe, Si, Ni, Ti, Na, Mg, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr and Ca in the atmosphere of the K-dwarf HD 77338 are determined and discussed. HD 77338 hosts a hot Uranus-like planet and is currently the most metal-rich single star to host any planet. Determination of abundances was carried out in the framework of a self-consistent approach developed by Pavlenko et al. (2012). Abundances were computed iteratively by the ABEL8 code, and the process converged after 4 iterations. We find that most elements follow the iron abundance, however some of the iron peak elements are found to be over-abundant in this star.

  17. Do the major axes of rich clusters of galaxies point toward their neighbors?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Mcmillan, S. L. W.; Kowalski, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    The major axis orientation of rich clusters of galaxies, determined from an analysis of X-ray images, is used to investigate whether these clusters point toward their nearest neighbors. No statistical significance is found for a pointing effect between clusters and their nearest neighbors in either X-ray, optical, or combined X-ray and optical samples. Using updated redshifts and permitting nonstatistical sample Abell clusters as nearest neighbors does not affect this conclusion. The lack of statistical significance for a pointing effect favors hierarchical models in which galaxies form first, followed by clusters and then superclusters. For clusters with well-defined X-ray orientations, it is found that cluster position angles determined from X-ray and optical data are in general agreement.

  18. Project CLASS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Susan L.; And Others

    Project CLASS (Competency-Based Live-Ability Skills) uses a series of 60 modules to teach life survival skills to adults with low-level reading ability--especially Adult Basic Education/English as a Second Language students. Two versions of the modules have been developed: one for use with teacher-directed instruction and another for independent…

  19. Class Trash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students calculate the amount and types of trash thrown out by their class at school to investigate how much trash is generated, where it goes, and speculate about alternatives. Students need to be familiar with the concepts of weight, volume, and numbers. (MCO)

  20. OSO-7 observations of a high-latitude X-ray source associated with Abell cluster A2052

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinz, C. J.; Clark, G. W.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Schnopper, H. W.; Sprott, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    An X-ray source with a flux of 1.6 times 10 to the -10th power ergs per sec/sq cm (2-10 keV) has been observed at high galactic latitude by the MIT X-ray detectors on the OSO-7 satellite. Designated GX 8+50, its position is 15 hr 14.2 min right ascension, 6 deg 51 min declination, with a 90 percent confidence error circle of area 0.5 sq deg. The data are consistent with a power-law spectrum with an exponent 1.2 (plus or minus 0.2) or a thermal-bremsstrahlung spectrum with kT = 4 plus or minus 1 keV. A likely identification is the Abell cluster A2052, whose center coincides with the radio source 3C 317.

  1. Summability of trigonometric Fourier series at d-points and a generalization of the Abel-Poisson method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigub, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    We study the convergence of linear means of the Fourier series \\sumk=-∞+∞λk,\\varepsilon\\hat{f}_keikx of a function f\\in L1 \\lbrack -π,π \\rbrack to f(x) as \\varepsilon\\searrow0 at all points at which the derivative \\bigl(\\int_0^xf(t) dt\\bigr)' exists (i.e. at the d-points). Sufficient conditions for the convergence are stated in terms of the factors \\{λk,\\varepsilon\\} and, in the case of λk,\\varepsilon=\\varphi(\\varepsilon k), in terms of the condition that the functions \\varphi and x\\varphi'(x) belong to the Wiener algebra A( R). We also study a new problem concerning the convergence of means of the Abel-Poisson type, \\sumk=-∞^∞r\\psi(\\vert k\\vert)\\hat{f}_keikx, as r\

  2. A 2163: Merger events in the hottest Abell galaxy cluster. I. Dynamical analysis from optical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurogordato, S.; Cappi, A.; Ferrari, C.; Benoist, C.; Mars, G.; Soucail, G.; Arnaud, M.; Pratt, G. W.; Bourdin, H.; Sauvageot, J.-L.

    2008-04-01

    Context: A 2163 is among the richest and most distant Abell clusters, presenting outstanding properties in different wavelength domains. X-ray observations have revealed a distorted gas morphology and strong features have been detected in the temperature map, suggesting that merging processes are important in this cluster. However, the merging scenario is not yet well-defined. Aims: We have undertaken a complementary optical analysis, aiming to understand the dynamics of the system, to constrain the merging scenario and to test its effect on the properties of galaxies. Methods: We present a detailed optical analysis of A 2163 based on new multicolor wide-field imaging and medium-to-high resolution spectroscopy of several hundred galaxies. Results: The projected galaxy density distribution shows strong subclustering with two dominant structures: a main central component (A), and a northern component (B), visible both in optical and in X-ray, with two other substructures detected at high significance in the optical. At magnitudes fainter than R=19, the galaxy distribution shows a clear elongation approximately with the east-west axis extending over 4~h70-1 Mpc, while a nearly perpendicular bridge of galaxies along the north-south axis appears to connect (B) to (A). The (A) component shows a bimodal morphology, and the positions of its two density peaks depend on galaxy luminosity: at magnitudes fainter than R = 19, the axis joining the peaks shows a counterclockwise rotation (from NE/SW to E-W) centered on the position of the X-ray maximum. Our final spectroscopic catalog of 512 objects includes 476 new galaxy redshifts. We have identified 361 galaxies as cluster members; among them, 326 have high precision redshift measurements, which allow us to perform a detailed dynamical analysis of unprecedented accuracy. The cluster mean redshift and velocity dispersion are respectively z= 0.2005 ± 0.0003 and 1434 ± 60 km s-1. We spectroscopically confirm that the northern

  3. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. I. Multiwavelength photometry of Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Buitrago, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Lotz, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Frontier Fields survey is a pioneering observational program aimed at collecting photometric data, both from space (Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope) and from ground-based facilities (VLT Hawk-I), for six deep fields pointing at clusters of galaxies and six nearby deep parallel fields, in a wide range of passbands. The analysis of these data is a natural outcome of the Astrodeep project, an EU collaboration aimed at developing methods and tools for extragalactic photometry and creating valuable public photometric catalogues. Aims: We produce multiwavelength photometric catalogues (from B to 4.5 μm) for the first two of the Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416 (plus their parallel fields). Methods: To detect faint sources even in the central regions of the clusters, we develop a robust and repeatable procedure that uses the public codes Galapagos and Galfit to model and remove most of the light contribution from both the brightest cluster members, and the intra-cluster light. We perform the detection on the processed HST H160 image to obtain a pure H-selected sample, which is the primary catalogue that we publish. We also add a sample of sources which are undetected in the H160 image but appear on a stacked infrared image. Photometry on the other HST bands is obtained using SExtractor, again on processed images after the procedure for foreground light removal. Photometry on the Hawk-I and IRAC bands is obtained using our PSF-matching deconfusion code t-phot. A similar procedure, but without the need for the foreground light removal, is adopted for the Parallel fields. Results: The procedure of foreground light subtraction allows for the detection and the photometric measurements of ~2500 sources per field. We deliver and release complete photometric H-detected catalogues, with the addition of the complementary sample of infrared-detected sources. All objects have multiwavelength coverage including B to H HST bands, plus K

  4. The CBM RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Chernogorov, A.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höohne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2016-05-01

    The CBM RICH detector will use CO2 as radiator gas, focussing glass mirrors with Al+MgF2 reflective and protective coating and Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs as photon detectors. The detector will serve for electron to pion separation up to momenta of 8 GeV/c and thus enable in CBM the measurement of electromagnetic radiation from the early and dense fireball in A+A collisions at SIS 100. In this article, the current status of the CBM RICH development will be presented including new measurements of the radiation hardness of the H12700 MAPMT and WLS coatings with p-terphenyl, the new concept for the readout electronics, and optimizations ongoing with respect to the mirror mount structure and overall geometry. Prior to the usage in CBM, part of the already ordered MAPMTs will be used to upgrade the HADES RICH detector for a new measurement campaign at SIS 18 from 2018-2020.

  5. The near-infrared Tully-Fisher relation - A preliminary study of the Coma and Abell 400 clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Bernstein, Gary; Raychaudhury, Somak; Haynes, Martha; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Herter, Terry; Vogt, Nicole

    1993-01-01

    We have started a large project to study the NIR Tully-Fisher (TF) relation using H- and I-band surface photometry of spiral galaxies. A preliminary study of 20 spirals in the Coma and Abell 400 clusters is presented. The NIR images have been used to derive accurate inclinations and total magnitudes, and rotational linewidths are measured from high-quality 21-cm Arecibo data. The scatter in the Coma TF plot is found to be 0.19 mag in the H band and 0.20 mag in the I band for a set of 13 galaxies, if we assume that they are all at the same distance. The deviation of the Coma galaxies from the best-fit Tully-Fisher relation is correlated with their redshift, indicating that some of the galaxies are not bound to the cluster. Indeed, if we treat all the galaxies in the Coma sample as undergoing free Hubble expansion, the TF scatter drops to 0.12 and 0.13 mag for the H- and I-band datasets, respectively. The Abell 400 sample is best fit by a common distance model, yielding a scatter of 0.12 mag for seven galaxies in H using a fixed TF slope. We are in the process of studying cluster and field spirals out to about 10,000 km/s in order to calibrate the NIR TF relation and will apply it to more nearby galaxies to measure the peculiar velocity field in the local universe.

  6. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Rupe, J. H.; Kushida, R. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by injecting air and hydrocarbon fuel at one end of a cylindrically shaped chamber to form a mixture and igniting the mixture to provide hot combustion gases by partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon fuel. The combustion gases move away from the ignition region to another region where water is injected to be turned into steam by the hot combustion gases. The steam which is formed mixes with the hot gases to yield a uniform hot gas whereby a steam reforming reaction with the hydrocarbon fuel takes place to produce a hydrogen rich gas.

  7. Chiefs' Pocket Guide to Class Size: A Research Synthesis to Inform State Class Size Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Few questions in public education discourse benefit as much from research-based evidence as the question of class size--the pursuit of the ideal number of students that should be co-located for any particular period of instruction. But for policymakers, research on class size can be an embarrassment of riches, and much of the research appears to…

  8. From Rags to Riches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the "Rags to Riches" design project she introduced to her students. She assigned each of her students one item from an array to thrift store goods which included old scarves, sweaters, jackets, and even evening gowns. The design problem was to imagine what a clothing tag might look like if the assigned item…

  9. Thinking about "Rich" Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Box, Lorna; Watson, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an e-mail conversation between two teachers discussing how to have a "rich task" lesson in which they get to the heart of mathematical modeling and in which students are motivated into working on mathematics. One teacher emphasizes that the power of maths is in developing mathematical descriptions of situations by looking at…

  10. Class distinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. Catherine

    Typical 101 courses discourage many students from pursuing higher level science and math courses. Introductory classes in science and math serve largely as a filter, screening out all but the most promising students, and leaving the majority of college graduates—including most prospective teachers—with little understanding of how science works, according to a study conducted for the National Science Foundation. Because few teachers, particularly at the elementary level, experience any collegiate science teaching that stresses skills of inquiry and investigation, they simply never learn to use those methods in their teaching, the report states.

  11. Practical considerations for Abel inverting of photographic data with application to the analysis of a 15-kW wall-stabilized arc-light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Temperature profiles were measured for agron atmospheric pressure by using absolute line and continuum intensity and were compared with stark width and shift measurements. A detailed analysis of the engineering aspects of setting up for Abel inverting deta photographically is presented. The merits of using photographic detection and of using continuum radiation for temperature profile analysis are discussed. The importance of empirically determining the optical depth is emphasized by discrepancies between measured (two-path) and calculated estimates.

  12. X-ray cavities and temperature jumps in the environment of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkamble, S. S.; Vagshette, N. D.; Pawar, P. K.; Patil, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present results based on the systematic analysis of high resolution 95 ks Chandra observations of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390 at the redshift of z = 0.228 that hosts an energetic radio AGN. This analysis has enabled us to investigate five X-ray deficient cavities in the atmosphere of Abell 2390 within central 30''. Presence of these cavities have been confirmed through a variety of image processing techniques like, the surface brightness profiles, unsharp masked image, as well as 2D elliptical model subtracted residual map. Temperature profile as well as 2D temperature map revealed structures in the distribution of ICM, in the sense that ICM in the NW direction is cooler than that on the SE direction. Temperature jump in all directions is evident near 25'' (90.5 kpc) corresponding to the average Mach number 1.44± 0.05, while another jump from 7.47 keV to 9.10 keV at 68'' (246 kpc) in the north-west direction, corresponding to Mach number 1.22± 0.06 and these jumps are associated with the cold fronts. Tricolour map as well as hardness ratio map detects cool gas clumps in the central 30 kpc region of temperature 4.45_{-0.10}^{+0.16} keV. The entropy profile derived from the X-ray analysis is found to fall systematically inward in a power-law fashion and exhibits a floor near 12.20± 2.54 keV cm2 in the central region. This flattening of the entropy profile in the core region confirms the intermittent heating at the centre by AGN. The diffuse radio emission map at 1.4 GHz using VLA L-band data exhibits highly asymmetric morphology with an edge in the north-west direction coinciding with the X-ray edge seen in the unsharp mask image. The mechanical power injected by the AGN in the form of X-ray cavities is found to be 5.94× 10^{45} erg s^{-1} and is roughly an order of magnitude higher than the energy lost by the ICM in the form of X-ray emission, confirming that AGN feedback is capable enough to quench the cooling flow in this cluster.

  13. Data and two-dimensional scaling relations for galaxies in Abell 1689: a hint of size evolution at z˜ 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, R. C. W.; Davies, Roger L.; Dalla Bontà, E.; Masters, R.

    2012-06-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of Abell 1689 (z= 0.183) from the Gemini multi-object spectrograph (GMOS) on the Gemini North telescope and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We measure integrated photometry from the GMOS g' and r' images (for 531 galaxies) and surface photometry from the HSTF625W image (for 43 galaxies) as well as velocities and velocity dispersions from the GMOS spectra (for 71 galaxies). We construct the Kormendy, Faber-Jackson and colour-magnitude relations for early-type galaxies in Abell 1689 using these data and compare them to those of the Coma cluster. We measure the intrinsic scatter of the colour-magnitude relation in Abell 1689 to be σCMR= 0.054 ± 0.004 mag, which places degenerate constraints on the ratio of the assembly time-scale to the time available (β) and the age of the population. Making the assumption that galaxies in Abell 1689 will evolve into those of Coma over an interval of 2.26 Gyr breaks this degeneracy and limits β to be >0.6 and the age of the red sequence to be >5.5 Gyr (formed at z > 0.55). Without corrections for size evolution but accounting for magnitude cuts and selection effects, the Kormendy and Faber-Jackson relations are inconsistent and disagree at the 2σ level regarding the amount of luminosity evolution in the last 2.26 Gyr. However, after correcting for size evolution the Kormendy and Faber-Jackson relations show similar changes in luminosity (0.22 ± 0.11 mag) that are consistent with the passive evolution of the stellar populations from a single burst of star formation 10.2 ± 3.3 Gyr ago (?). Thus, the changes in the Kormendy, Faber-Jackson and colour-magnitude relations of Abell 1689 relative to Coma all agree and suggest old galaxy populations with little or no synchronization in the star formation histories. Furthermore, the weak evidence for size evolution in the cluster environment in the last 2.26 Gyr places interesting constraints on the possible

  14. Statistics of Active Galactic Nuclei in Rich Clusters Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, M. J.; Flores, R. A.; Quintana, H.

    1998-07-01

    Using the spectrophotometry of a large sample of galaxies in 19 Abell clusters, we have selected 42 candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the criteria used by Dressler and coworkers in their analysis of the statistics of 22 AGNs in 14 rich cluster fields, which are based on the equivalent width of [O II] 3727 Å, Hβ, and [O III] 5007 Å emission. We have then discriminated AGNs from H II region-like galaxies (hereafter H II galaxies) in the manner developed by Veilleux & Osterbrock using the additional information provided by Hα and [N II] 6583 Å or Hα and [S II] 6716 + 6731 Å emission, in order to test the reliability of the selection criteria used by Dressler and coworkers. We find that before we discriminate AGNs from H II galaxies, our sample is very similar to that of Dressler and coworkers and it leads to similar conclusions. However, we find that their method inevitably mixes H II galaxies with AGNs, even for the most luminous objects in our sample. We estimate a contamination of at least 38% at a formal 90% confidence level. Since the study of Dressler and coworkers, other authors have attempted to quantify the relative fraction of cluster-to-field AGNs and have reached similar conclusions, but they have used criteria similar to Dressler and coworkers to select AGNs (or have used the [O III] 5007 Å/Hβ flux ratio test that also mixes H II galaxies with AGNs). Our sample of true AGNs remains too small to reach statistically meaningful conclusions, therefore a new study with a more time-consuming method that includes the other lines will be required to quantify the true relative fraction of cluster-to-field AGNs.

  15. Chandra mapping of the cosmic web converging on the virialization region of Abell 1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2014-09-01

    Detailed observations of the "cosmic melting pot" in the virialization zone of rich galaxy clusters are a fairly new territory for the physics of clusters and the intergalactic medium. The first step has been taken with a deep Chandra study of A133, which has provided a uniquely detailed picture of the Cosmic Web converging onto the cluster virial radius and demonstrated that Chandra can probe to fainter surface brightness levels than any other X-ray observatory now operating. Many of the results from the A133 observation are potentially game-changers for our understanding of the virialization region and its proper modeling. We now need to follow this up with a similarly deep observation of at least one more cluster.

  16. An X-ray and optical study of the cluster of galaxies Abell 754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabricant, D.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gorenstein, P.; Huchra, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray and optical data for A754 are used to study the relative distribution of the luminous and dark matter in this dense, rich cluster of galaxies with X-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Coma Cluster. A quantitative statistical comparison is made of the galaxy positions with the total mass responsible for maintaining the X-ray emitting gas in hydrostatic equilibrium. A simple bimodal model which fits both the X-ray and optical data suggests that the galaxies are distributed consistently with the projected matter distribution within the region covered by the X-ray map (0.5-1 Mpc). The X-ray and optical estimates of the mass in the central region of the cluster are 2.9 x 10 to the 14th and 3.6 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the 14th solar masses, respectively.

  17. Two New Oleanane-Type Saponins with Anti-Proliferative Activity from Camellia oleifera Abel. Seed Cake.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Fa; Peng, Yun-Ru; Bao, Guan-Hu; Hou, Ru-Yan; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Two new oleanane-type saponins, named oleiferasaponins C₄ (1) and C₅ (2), were isolated from Camellia oleifera Abel. seed cake residue. Their respective structures were identified as 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxymethylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galacto-pyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-galactopyranosy-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosid-uronic acid methyl ester (1) and 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxy-methylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (2) through 1D- and 2D-NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and GC-MS spectroscopic methods. The two compounds exhibited potent cytotoxic activities against five human tumor cell lines (BEL-7402, BGC-823, MCF-7, HL-60 and KB). PMID:26861265

  18. Near-infrared photometry and stellar populations of first-ranked galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinx X.; Puschell, Jeffery J.

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-four brightest cluster members (BCMs) in the complete sample of high Galactic latitude nearby Abell clusters of Hoessel, Gunn, and Thuan (HGT) are investigated. The stellar populations in BCMs using near-infrared and optical-near-infrared colors are studied. Brighter BCMs have redder (J-K) and (V-K) colors, suggesting a metallicity increase in brighter galaxies. The larger dispersion of their colors implies that BCMs possess more heterogeneous stellar populations than their lower luminosity counterparts, the normal elliptical galaxies. Special attention is paid to BCMs associated with cooling flows. BCMs with larger accretion rates have bluer (V-K) colors due to ultraviolet excesses and are brighter in the visual wavelength region, but not in the infrared. It is suggested that part of the X-ray emitting cooling gas is converted into high- and intermediate-mass stars emitting in the blue and visible, but not in the infrared. The properties of BCMs as standard candles in the near-infrared are examined and compared with those in the optical.

  19. Discovery of Ultra-steep Spectrum Giant Radio Galaxy with Recurrent Radio Jet Activity in Abell 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunik, Dominika; Jamrozy, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We report a discovery of a 1.3 Mpc diffuse radio source with extremely steep spectrum fading radio structures in the vicinity of the Abell 449 cluster of galaxies. Its extended diffuse lobes are bright only at low radio frequencies and their synchrotron age is about 160 Myr. The parent galaxy of the extended relic structure, which is the dominant galaxy within the cluster, is starting a new jet activity. There are three weak X-rays sources in the vicinity of the cluster as found in the ROSAT survey, however it is not known if they are connected with this cluster of galaxies. Just a few radio galaxy relics are currently known in the literature, as finding them requires sensitive and high angular resolution low-frequency radio observations. Objects of this kind, which also are starting a new jet activity, are important for understanding the life cycle and evolution of active galactic nuclei. A new 613 MHz map as well as the archival radio data pertaining to this object are presented and analyzed.

  20. The behaviour of dark matter associated with four bright cluster galaxies in the 10 kpc core of Abell 3827

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Williams, Liliya; Smit, Renske; Swinbank, Mark; Kitching, Thomas D.; Harvey, David; Jauzac, Mathilde; Israel, Holger; Clowe, Douglas; Edge, Alastair; Hilton, Matt; Jullo, Eric; Leonard, Adrienne; Liesenborgs, Jori; Merten, Julian; Mohammed, Irshad; Nagai, Daisuke; Richard, Johan; Robertson, Andrew; Saha, Prasenjit; Santana, Rebecca; Stott, John; Tittley, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Galaxy cluster Abell 3827 hosts the stellar remnants of four almost equally bright elliptical galaxies within a core of radius 10 kpc. Such corrugation of the stellar distribution is very rare, and suggests recent formation by several simultaneous mergers. We map the distribution of associated dark matter, using new Hubble Space Telescope imaging and Very Large Telescope/Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer integral field spectroscopy of a gravitationally lensed system threaded through the cluster core. We find that each of the central galaxies retains a dark matter halo, but that (at least) one of these is spatially offset from its stars. The best-constrained offset is 1.62^{+0.47}_{-0.49} kpc, where the 68 per cent confidence limit includes both statistical error and systematic biases in mass modelling. Such offsets are not seen in field galaxies, but are predicted during the long infall to a cluster, if dark matter self-interactions generate an extra drag force. With such a small physical separation, it is difficult to definitively rule out astrophysical effects operating exclusively in dense cluster core environments - but if interpreted solely as evidence for self-interacting dark matter, this offset implies a cross-section σDM/m ˜ (1.7 ± 0.7) × 10-4 cm2 g-1 × (tinfall/109 yr)-2, where tinfall is the infall duration.

  1. An Abel transform for deriving line-of-sight wind profiles from LEO-LEO infrared laser occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syndergaard, S.; Kirchengast, G.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a formula for the retrieval of the line-of-sight (l.o.s.) wind speed from future low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite-to-satellite infrared laser occultation measurements. The formula involves an Abelian integral transform akin to the Abel transform widely used for deriving refractive index from bending angle in Global Navigation Satellite System radio occultation measurements. Besides the Abelian integral transform, the formula is derived from a truncated series expansion of the volume absorption coefficient as a function of frequency and includes a simple absorption-line-asymmetry correction term. A first-order formulation (referred to as the standard formula) is complemented by higher-order terms that can be used for high-accuracy computations. Under the assumptions of spherical symmetry and perfect knowledge of spectroscopy, the residual l.o.s. wind error from using the standard formula rather than the high-accuracy formula is assessed to be small compared to that anticipated from measurement errors in a real experiment. Applying the new formula just in standard form to future infrared laser transmission profiles would therefore enable the retrieval of l.o.s. stratospheric wind profiles with an accuracy limited mainly by measurement errors, residual spectroscopic errors, and deviations from spherical symmetry.

  2. 3C28 in Abell 115- A Radio Source With a Twist: Tracing Gas Vortices in a Merging Subcluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Churazov, Eugene

    2014-08-01

    Abell 115 is one of the “bimodal” clusters, first identified from Einstein Observatory X-ray images. The X-ray image is dominated by emission from two subclusters, separated by about 900 kpc, that are in the process of merging. The northern subcluster (A115-N) contains a bright central galaxy that hosts the radio source 3C28. 3C28 has a remarkable morphology. Although there is no evidence of a presently active nucleus, there are two prominent jets connected to a pair of radio lobes, each of which exhibits a radio tail. A115-N shows a classic cold front, the remarkable phenomenon first studied from Chandra cluster observations. We describe the overall structure of the cluster from detailed Chandra observations. We review the gravitational lensing observations and radio observations of the relic and discuss the overall state of the cluster merger. In addition, we exploit the Chandra data and the cold front phenomenon to study the gas motions in and around A115-N that hosts 3C28. The subcluster motion of A115-N through the cluster induces counter-rotating vortices in the subcluster gas that give rise to the unique radio morphology of 3C28 with its two radio tails pointing in the direction of motion of A115-N. Thus, the radio emitting plasma acts as a dye in a fluid tracing the vortices in the X-ray emitting gas, resembling text book pictures of fluid motions.

  3. 3C28 in Abell 115- A Radio Source With a Twist: Tracing Gas Vortices in a Merging Subcluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, William R.; Churazov, Eugene; Heinz, Sebastian; Giacintucci, Simona; Jones, Christine; Bogdan, Akos; David, Laurence P; Kraft, Ralph P.; Murgia, Matteo; Markevitch, Maxim L.; Randall, Scott W.; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2014-06-01

    Abell 115 is one of the “bimodal” clusters, first identified from Einstein Observatory X-ray images. The X-ray image is dominated by emission from two subclusters, separated by about 900 kpc, that are in the process of merging. The northern subcluster (A115-N) contains a bright central galaxy that hosts the radio source 3C28. 3C28 has a remarkable morphology. Although there is no evidence of a presently active nucleus, there are two prominent jets connected to a pair of radio lobes, each of which exhibits a radio tail. A115-N shows a classic cold front, the remarkable phenomenon first studied from Chandra cluster observations. We describe the overall structure of the cluster from detailed Chandra obserations. In addition, we exploit the Chandra data and the cold front phenomenon to study the gas motions in and around A115-N that hosts 3C28. The subcluster motion of A115-N through the cluster induces counter-rotating vortices in the subcluster gas that give rise to the unique radio morphology of 3C28 with its two radio tails pointing in the direction of motion of A115-N. Thus, the radio emitting plasma acts as a dye in a fluid tracing the vortices in the X-ray emitting gas, resembling text book pictures of fluid motions.

  4. Novel triterpenoid saponins from residual seed cake of Camellia oleifera Abel. show anti-proliferative activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jianfa; Wang, Ruilong; Bao, Guanhu; Ling, Tiejun; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Xinfu; Hou, Ruyan

    2015-07-01

    Four oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins were isolated from the seed cake of Camellia oleifera Abel.: camelliasaponin B1 and three new saponins, oleiferasaponin C1-C3 (1-3). Their structures were identified as 22-O-angeloyl-camelliagenin B 3-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-l-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (1); 22-O-angeloyl-camelliagenin A 3-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (2); and 28-O-cinnamoyl-camelliagenin B 3-O-[β-d-galactopyranosylz-(1→2)] [β-d-galactopyranosyl(1→2)-α-l-arabinopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (3) through 1D and 2D NMR, HR-ESI-MS, as well as GC-MS spectroscopic methods. The anti-proliferative activities of these four compounds were investigated on five human tumor cell lines (BEL-7402, BGC-823, MCF-7, HL-60 and KB). Compounds 1 and 2 and camelliasaponin B1 showed significant cytotoxic activities. PMID:25958771

  5. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  6. Comparing the nutrient rich foods index with "Go," "Slow," and "Whoa," foods.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, Adam; Fulgoni, Victor

    2011-02-01

    The US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has grouped foods and beverages into three classes: "Go," "Slow," and "Whoa," as part of a children's guide to eating right. Using nutrient composition data in the 2004 Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies, this descriptive study compared the Go, Slow, and Whoa food classes to tertiles of food rankings generated by the Nutrient Rich Foods Index. A total of 1,045 foods and beverages were first assigned into Go, Slow, and Whoa classes and then ranked by the Nutrient Rich Foods Index nutrient profile model. The Nutrient Rich Foods Index model was based on nine nutrients to encourage: protein, fiber, vitamins A, C, and E, calcium, iron, magnesium, and potassium; and on three nutrients to limit: saturated fat, added sugar, and sodium, all calculated per 100 calories. Both the Go, Slow, and Whoa and the Nutrient Rich Foods Index models readily distinguished between energy-dense and nutrient-rich beverages and foods, and the three Go, Slow, and Whoa classes closely corresponded to tertiles of Nutrient Rich Foods Index scores. There were some disagreements in the class assignment of fortified cereals, some dairy products, and diet beverages. Unlike the Go, Slow, and Whoa model, the Nutrient Rich Foods Index model produced continuous scores that could be used to rank foods within a given class. The study provides an illustration of how diverse nutrient profiling systems can be used to identify healthful foods and beverages. PMID:21272703

  7. Genetic relationship between Na-rich chondrules and Ca,Al-rich inclusions? - Formation of Na-rich chondrules by melting of refractory and volatile precursors in the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Samuel; Bischoff, Addi

    2016-03-01

    Al-rich objects (Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs), Al-rich chondrules, Al-rich fragments) occur in all chondrite classes. These objects can be centimeter-sized in CV3 carbonaceous chondrites, but they are generally much smaller in other chondrite groups and classes. Within the ordinary chondrites, most Al-rich objects are chondrules that vary from Ca- to Na-rich. Here, we have investigated the mineralogy and major element chemistry of 32 Na-rich chondrules and 3 Na-rich fragments from 15 different chondrites. Most objects (chondrules and chondrule fragments) are from ordinary chondrites (petrologic types 3.2-3.8), but two of the chondrules are from two CO3 chondrites, and three of the chondrules are from one Rumuruti (R)-chondrite. We found that these Na-rich objects have bulk Na2O-concentrations between 4.3 and 15.2 wt%. Texturally, they typically consist of euhedral to subhedral (often skeletal) mafic minerals (olivine and pyroxenes) embedded within a nepheline-normative, glassy mesostasis, which is brownish in transmitted light. In addition, some chondrules contain euhedral to subhedral spinel. Bulk chondrule compositions show group II, group III, and ultrarefractory rare earth element (REE) patterns similar to those found in CAIs. These results clearly demonstrate that the Na-rich chondrules must have been formed by melting of precursors containing an (ultra-)refractory element-rich component and Na-rich constituents. The Na-rich chondrules showed Sm and Eu anomalies, indicating that they must have formed at low oxygen fugacities. Based on the chemical composition of the Na-rich objects, we can rule out that they were formed as a result of planetary formation due to metasomatic processes or processes related to collisions between molten planetesimals.

  8. On the Origin of Temperature Substructure within Merging Clusters of Galaxies: Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack O.; Pinkney, Jason

    1995-11-01

    Recent ROSA T PSPC and ASCA observations of several rich clusters of galaxies have revealed complex temperature substructure within the X-ray emitting gas. One of the best and most detailed examples is A2256. Briel & Henry (1994) show four distinct temperature components within the central (<12') of A2256. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a plausible model, within reasonable parameter space, that explains the origin of the hottest (>8 keV) gas near the core of A2256. We find the temperature substructure in A2256 to be consistent with a model in which A2256 is currently in the early stages of a merger. We attempt to quantify this model by comparison with results from our parameter study of merging clusters of galaxies conducted with a numerical Hydro/N-body code. From this, we estimate that A2256 is actually two systems with a 2:1 mass ratio, whose cores are separated by ˜0.5 Mpc with a relative velocity of nearly 3000 km s-1. The proposed merger axis is projected into the plane of the sky by 45°-50° such that the less massive of the two clusters is approaching the observer. Within the frame work of this model, we find the hot gas (>8 keV) to be the result of shock heating during the merger event. We also use this model to explain the discrepancy between X-ray and galaxy-based mass estimates for A2256.

  9. Clumped X-ray emission around radio galaxies in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Rhee, George; Owen, Frazer N.; Pinkney, Jason

    1994-01-01

    We have made a comparison of the X-ray and radio morphologies for a sample of 41 rich cluster fields using Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) and Very Large Array (VLA) 20 cm images. Surprisingly, we find that 75% of the radio galaxies have a statistically significant X-ray peak or subclump within 5 min of the radio galaxy position. The X-ray luminosity and the generally extended nature of the X-ray subclumps suggest that these subclumps are overdense regions emitting free-free radiation, although there is also evidence for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) X-ray emission coming from some of the more compact, high surface brightness X-ray peaks. Some interesting correlations with radio morphology were also discovered. For clusters which contain wide-angle-tailed radio sources associated with centrally dominant galaxies, there are significant elongations or clumps in the central X-ray emission which are unusual for this type of cluster. We suggest that cluster radio galaxies are pointers to particular clusters or regions within clusters that have recently undergone mergers between cluster subsystems.

  10. Type Ibn Supernovae: Not a Single Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Arcavi, Iair; Howell, Dale Andrew; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Type Ibn supernovae are a small yet diverse class of explosions whose spectra are characterized by low-velocity helium emission lines. The prevailing theory has been that these are the core-collapse explosions of very massive stars embedded in helium-rich circumstellar material. However, unlike the more common Type IIn supernovae, whose interaction with hydrogen-rich circumstellar material has been shown to generate a wide variety of light curve shapes, we find that light curves of Type Ibn supernovae are more homogeneous and faster evolving. Spectroscopically, we find that Type Ibn supernovae divide cleanly into two classes, only one of which resembles the archetypal Type Ibn SN 2006jc. We explore various photometric and spectroscopic parameter spaces in order to characterize these two classes. We consider the possibility that not all objects classified as Type Ibn have the same physical origin.

  11. Teachers in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I argue for a closer read of the daily "class work" of teachers, as posited by Reay, 1998. In developing exploratory class portraits of four teachers who occupy distinctive social positions (two from working-class homes now teaching upper-middle-class children and two from upper-middle-class homes now teaching poor children), I…

  12. Evolution of dwarfs in the filament-cluster system Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, Dario; Biviano, Andrea; Durret, Florence; Marleau, Francine

    2013-10-01

    While we have a basic understanding of how bright and normal galaxies evolve in clusters, the evolutionary scenario of the faintest population of dwarf galaxies remains essentially unexplored. Observations show a sharp decrease of blue dwarfs and an increase of red dwarfs in the central region of clusters during the last 4 billion years. Current models, still controversial, try to link this change in population to the infall of small groups into clusters. To verify this scenario, we propose to obtain deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron images of the rich nearby cluster A85 (z=0.055) which has a feeding filament, discovered by our team in the X-rays, with two infalling groups. Based on our recent follow-up with ultra-deep GALEX and Herschel observations, we see a clear enhancement of specific star formation along the direction of the filament. IRAC images will allow us to extend our study to a sample of approximately 700 new faint dwarfs (down to a stellar mass of dex(7.5) solar masses) which are not detected with WISE or have confused counterparts. Comparing spectral energy distributions to stellar population models, we will be able to estimate accurate stellar masses, ages, and metallicities as well as to unveil dust-enshrouded active galactic nuclei. IRAC observations will be fundamental to define a controlled sample of dwarf galaxies to explore their number densities and properties in the different environments of the A85 system, shedding new light on the evolution of dwarfs in galaxy clusters.

  13. Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Brian J.; Seroyer, Shane T.; Filardo, Giuseppe; Bajaj, Sarvottam; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may affect soft tissue healing via growth factors released after platelet degranulation. Because of this potential benefit, clinicians have begun to inject PRP for the treatment of tendon, ligament, muscle, and cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was performed for studies relating to PRP, growth factors, and soft tissue injuries from 1990 to 2010. Relevant references from these studies were also retrieved. Results: Soft tissue injury is a major source of disability that may often be complicated by prolonged and incomplete recovery. Numerous growth factors may potentiate the healing and regeneration of tendons and ligaments. The potential benefits of biologically enhanced healing processes have led to a recent interest in the use of PRP in orthopaedic sports medicine. There has been widespread anecdotal use of PRP for muscle strains, tendinopathy, and ligament injuries and as a surgical adjuvant to rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and meniscal or labral repairs. Although the fascination with this emerging technology has led to a dramatic increase in its use, scientific data supporting this use are still in their infancy. Conclusions: The literature is replete with studies on the basic science of growth factors and their relation to the maintenance, proliferation, and regeneration of various tissues and tissue-derived cells. Despite the promising results of several animal studies, well-controlled human studies are lacking. PMID:23015939

  14. Direct measurement of lensing amplification in Abell S1063 using a strongly lensed high redshift HII galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlevich, Roberto; Melnick, Jorge; Terlevich, Elena; Chávez, Ricardo; Telles, Eduardo; Bresolin, Fabio; Plionis, Manolis; Basilakos, Spyros; Fernández Arenas, David; González Morán, Ana Luisa; Díaz, Ángeles I.; Aretxaga, Itziar

    2016-08-01

    ID11 is an actively star-forming, extremely compact galaxy and Lyα emitter at z = 3.117 that is gravitationally magnified by a factor of ~17 by the cluster of galaxies Hubble Frontier Fields AS1063. The observed properties of this galaxy resemble those of low luminosity HII galaxies or giant HII regions such as 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Using the tight correlation correlation between the Balmer-line luminosities and the width of the emission lines (typically L(Hβ) - σ(Hβ)), which are valid for HII galaxies and giant HII regions to estimate their total luminosity, we are able to measure the lensing amplification of ID11. We obtain an amplification of 23 ± 11 that is similar within errors to the value of ~17 estimated or predicted by the best lensing models of the massive cluster Abell S1063. We also compiled, from the literature, luminosities and velocity dispersions for a set of lensed compact star-forming regions. There is more scatter in the L-σ correlation for these lensed systems, but on the whole the results tend to support the lensing model estimates of the magnification. Our result indicates that the amplification can be independently measured using the L - σ relation in lensed giant HII regions or HII galaxies. It also supports the suggestion, even if lensing is model dependent, that the L - σ relation is valid for low luminosity high-z objects. Ad hoc observations of lensed star-forming systems are required to determine the lensing amplification accurately.

  15. Does Class Size Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Brewer, Dominic J.; Gamoran, Adam; Willms, J. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the significance of class size to student learning. Includes an overview of class size in various countries, the importance of teacher adaptability, and the Asian paradox of large classes allied to high test scores. (MM)

  16. Application of a XMM-Newton EPIC Monte Carlo to Analysis And Interpretation of Data for Abell 1689, RXJ0658-55 And the Centaurus Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Karl E.; Peterson, J.R.; Madejski, G.M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-17

    We propose a new Monte Carlo method to study extended X-ray sources with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard XMM Newton. The Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI) technique, described in a companion paper, is applied here to the EPIC data for the clusters of galaxies Abell 1689, Centaurus and RXJ 0658-55 (the ''bullet cluster''). We aim to show the advantages of this method of simultaneous spectral-spatial modeling over traditional X-ray spectral analysis. In Abell 1689 we confirm our earlier findings about structure in temperature distribution and produce a high resolution temperature map. We also confirm our findings about velocity structure within the gas. In the bullet cluster, RXJ 0658-55, we produce the highest resolution temperature map ever to be published of this cluster allowing us to trace what looks like the motion of the bullet in the cluster. We even detect a south to north temperature gradient within the bullet itself. In the Centaurus cluster we detect, by dividing up the luminosity of the cluster in bands of gas temperatures, a striking feature to the north-east of the cluster core. We hypothesize that this feature is caused by a subcluster left over from a substantial merger that slightly displaced the core. We conclude that our method is very powerful in determining the spatial distributions of plasma temperatures and very useful for systematic studies in cluster structure.

  17. A Jacobi-Legendre polynomial-based method for the stable solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammari, Amara; Karoui, Abderrazek

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we build a stable scheme for the solution of a deconvolution problem of the Abel integral equation type. This scheme is obtained by further developing the orthogonal polynomial-based techniques for solving the Abel integral equation of Ammari and Karoui (2010 Inverse Problems 26 105005). More precisely, this method is based on the simultaneous use of the two families of orthogonal polynomials of the Legendre and Jacobi types. In particular, we provide an explicit formula for the computation of the Legendre expansion coefficients of the solution. This explicit formula is based on some known formulae for the exact computation of the integrals of the product of some Jacobi polynomials with the derivatives of the Legendre polynomials. Besides the explicit and the exact computation of the expansion coefficients of the solution, our proposed method has the advantage of ensuring the stability of the solution under a fairly weak condition on the functional space to which the data function belongs. Finally, we provide the reader with some numerical examples that illustrate the results of this work.

  18. Shock fronts, electron-ion equilibration and intracluster medium transport processes in the merging cluster Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. R.; McNamara, B. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Canning, R. E. A.; Baum, S. A.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; King, L. J.; O'Dea, C. P.

    2012-06-01

    We present a new 400-ks Chandra X-ray observation of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2146. This deep observation reveals detailed structure associated with the major merger event including the Mach number M= 2.3 ± 0.2 bow shock ahead of the dense, ram pressure stripped subcluster core and the first known example of an upstream shock in the intracluster medium (ICM) (M= 1.6 ± 0.1). By measuring the electron temperature profile behind each shock front, we determine the time-scale for the electron population to thermally equilibrate with the shock-heated ions. We find that the temperature profile behind the bow shock is consistent with the time-scale for Coulomb collisional equilibration and the post-shock temperature is lower than expected for instant shock heating of the electrons. Although like the Bullet cluster the electron temperatures behind the upstream shock front are hotter than expected, favouring the instant heating model, the uncertainty on the temperature values is greater here and there is significant substructure complicating the interpretation. We also measured the width of each shock front and the contact discontinuity on the leading edge of the subcluster core to investigate the suppression of transport processes in the ICM. The upstream shock is ˜440 kpc in length but appears remarkably narrow over this distance with a best-fitting width of only 6+5-3 kpc compared with the mean free path of 23 ± 5 kpc. The leading edge of the subcluster core is also narrow with an upper limit on the width of only 2 kpc separating the cool, multiphase gas at 0.5-2 keV from the shock-heated surrounding ICM at ˜6 keV. The strong suppression of diffusion and conduction across this edge suggests a magnetic draping layer may have formed around the subcluster core. The deep Chandra observation has also revealed a cool, dense plume of material extending ˜170 kpc perpendicular to the merger axis, which is likely to be the disrupted remnant of the primary cluster core

  19. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. II. Photometric redshifts and rest frame properties in Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Amorín, R.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; McLure, R. J.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Mortlock, A.; Parsa, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Balestra, I.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Rosati, P.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present the first public release of photometric redshifts, galaxy rest frame properties and associated magnification values in the cluster and parallel pointings of the first two Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416. The released catalogues aim to provide a reference for future investigations of extragalactic populations in these legacy fields: from lensed high-redshift galaxies to cluster members themselves. Methods: We exploit a multiwavelength catalogue, ranging from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to ground-based K and Spitzer IRAC, which is specifically designed to enable detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. The multiband information is used to derive photometric redshifts and physical properties of sources detected either in the H-band image alone, or from a stack of four WFC3 bands. To minimize systematics, median photometric redshifts are assembled from six different approaches to photo-z estimates. Their reliability is assessed through a comparison with available spectroscopic samples. State-of-the-art lensing models are used to derive magnification values on an object-by-object basis by taking into account sources positions and redshifts. Results: We show that photometric redshifts reach a remarkable ~3-5% accuracy. After accounting for magnification, the H-band number counts are found to be in agreement at bright magnitudes with number counts from the CANDELS fields, while extending the presently available samples to galaxies that, intrinsically, are as faint as H ~ 32-33, thanks to strong gravitational lensing. The Frontier Fields allow the galaxy stellar mass distribution to be probed, depending on magnification, at 0.5-1.5 dex lower masses with respect to extragalactic wide fields, including sources at Mstar ~ 107-108 M⊙ at z > 5. Similarly, they allow the detection of objects with intrinsic star formation rates (SFRs) >1 dex lower than in the CANDELS fields reaching 0.1-1 M⊙/yr at z ~ 6-10. The

  20. SMALL CYSTEINE-RICH PEPTIDES RESEMBLING ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES HAVE BEEN UNDER-PREDICTED IN PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multicellular organisms produce small cysteine-rich anti-microbial peptides as an innate defense against pathogens. While defensins, a well-known class of such peptides, are common among eukaryotes, there are classes restricted to the plant kingdom. These include thionins, lipid transfer proteins,...

  1. The SuperCLASS Weak Lensing Deep Field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Ian; Superclass Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    SuperCLASS is a survey of 1.75 square degrees of the Northern sky using the e-MERLIN telescope array at a frequency of 1.4GHz, aiming to reach an image noise RMS level of 4 micro-Jy/beam. The primary goal is to use the expected source density of ~1 per square arcminute (giving a total of ~10,000), ~150 milli-arcsecond resolution and presence in the survey region of 5 massive Abell clusters to measure a significant weak lensing effect in the radio band for only the second time, proving the potential of radio weak lensing as a powerful tool for mapping dark matter and constraining cosmological models. In doing this we will also learn a significant amount about the source population (star forming galaxies and radio AGN) themselves and their polarisation properties. SuperCLASS will not only require development of a pipeline for making the highly accurate determination of shapes of a large number of sources for performing standard weak lensing measurements, but will also form a test bed for new methods, such as the use of polarisation information to mitigate the biasing effect of intrinsic alignments between galaxies, which will be a key systematic for future weak lensing surveys. Whilst the challenges of the necessary shape measurement in image plane optical data are relatively well-explored, there is little experience in meeting those involved in the use of data from radio interferometers. The knowledge gained about efficient and accurate techniques for large scale radio astronomy from SuperCLASS will be invaluable in the build up to the next generation of experiments.

  2. Perceptual presence without counterfactual richness.

    PubMed

    Madary, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, I suggest that non-visual perceptual modalities provide counterexamples to Seth's claim that perceptual presence depends on counterfactual richness. Then I suggest a modification to Seth's view that is not vulnerable to these counterexamples. PMID:24739124

  3. VOSGES, a long and rich geologic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominique, Carteaux; Cyrille, Delangle; Sophie, Demangel

    2015-04-01

    The study of geology in scientific classes is often too theoretical and abstract for the pupils. How can teachers make the link between some samples of rocks observed in a practical class and the geologic story of the region? There's nothing better than outdoor education to establish a relationship between the rock observed in macroscopic and microscopic scale in the classroom,with the outcrop scale and the landscape scale in the field: all of them are the result of a fascinating geologic history.Our pupils are lucky enough to live at the heart of a modest mountain massif that has a very rich geologic story: the massif from Vosges situated in the east of France. During two expeditions we show the students all the following tectonic processes: Accretion at the scale of the landscape with the Rhenish Ditch (tectonic and volcanic markers) Obductionis observed due to ophiolites found in the massive of Thalhorn (peridotite, gabbro and sedimentary marine rocks of great depth). Collisionis illuminated with numerous sites like the schists of Steige, the phyllite of Villé, the gneisses of Climont. Subductionis captured bystudying the outcrops of magmatic rocks within the continental crust (andesite, diorite, granodiorite). At each of the stops we have the students, from a hand sample, to findits story in a more global context. So the theory becomes reality. A study of thin slides of rocks observed on the ground finishes these exits and so various scales of understanding are approached. The long and rich geologic history of Vosges maybe reconstituted on hundreds of million years, allowing certainly giving another aspect to the living environment of our pupils.

  4. An Improved Cluster Richness Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy; Hao, Jiangang; Evrard, August; Wechsler, Risa H.; Hansen, Sarah; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Becker, Matthew R.; Annis, James T.; Bleem, Lindsey; Scranton, Ryan; /Pittsburgh U.

    2009-08-03

    Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L{sub X}-richness relation, from {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.86 {+-} 0.02){sup 2} to {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.69 {+-} 0.02){sup 2}. Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to our more sophisticated treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L{sub X}-richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can be easily generalized to other mass tracers.

  5. An ISOCAM survey through gravitationally lensing galaxy clusters. III. New results from mid-infrared observations of the cluster Abell 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coia, D.; Metcalfe, L.; McBreen, B.; Biviano, A.; Smail, I.; Altieri, B.; Kneib, J.-P.; McBreen, S.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; O'Halloran, B.

    2005-01-01

    The massive cluster of galaxies Abell 2219 (z = 0.228) with two spectacular gravitational lensing arcs was observed at 14.3 μm (hereafter 15 μm) with the Infrared Space Observatory and results were published by Barvainis et al. (\\cite{1999AJ....118..645B}). These observations have been reanalyzed using a method specifically designed for the detection of faint sources that had been applied to other clusters. Five new sources were detected and the resulting cumulative total of ten sources all have optical counterparts. The mid-infrared sources are identified with three cluster members, three foreground galaxies, an Extremely Red Object, a star and two galaxies of unknown redshift. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the galaxies are fit with models from a selection, using the program GRASIL. Best-fits are obtained, in general, with models of galaxies with ongoing star formation. Infrared luminosities and star formation rates are obtained for six sources: the cluster members and the foreground galaxies. For the three cluster members the infrared luminosities derived from the model SEDs are between ˜5.7 × 1010 L⊙ and 1.4 × 1011 L⊙, corresponding to infrared star formation rates between 10 and 24 M⊙ yr-1. The two cluster galaxies that have optical classifications are in the Butcher-Oemler region of the color-magnitude diagramme. The three foreground galaxies have infrared luminosities between 1.5 × 1010 L⊙ and 9.4 × 1010 L⊙ yielding infrared star formation rates between 3 and 16 M⊙ yr-1. Two of the foreground galaxies are located in two foreground galaxy enhancements (Boschin et al. \\cite{2004A&A...416..839B}). Including Abell 2219, six distant clusters of galaxies have been mapped with ISOCAM and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) have been found in three of them. The presence of LIRGs in Abell 2219 strengthens the association between luminous infrared galaxies in clusters and recent or ongoing cluster merger activity. Based on observations

  6. Partitioning sources of variation in vertebrate species richness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, R.B.; Krohn, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To explore biogeographic patterns of terrestrial vertebrates in Maine, USA using techniques that would describe local and spatial correlations with the environment. Location: Maine, USA. Methods: We delineated the ranges within Maine (86,156 km2) of 275 species using literature and expert review. Ranges were combined into species richness maps, and compared to geomorphology, climate, and woody plant distributions. Methods were adapted that compared richness of all vertebrate classes to each environmental correlate, rather than assessing a single explanatory theory. We partitioned variation in species richness into components using tree and multiple linear regression. Methods were used that allowed for useful comparisons between tree and linear regression results. For both methods we partitioned variation into broad-scale (spatially autocorrelated) and fine-scale (spatially uncorrelated) explained and unexplained components. By partitioning variance, and using both tree and linear regression in analyses, we explored the degree of variation in species richness for each vertebrate group that Could be explained by the relative contribution of each environmental variable. Results: In tree regression, climate variation explained richness better (92% of mean deviance explained for all species) than woody plant variation (87%) and geomorphology (86%). Reptiles were highly correlated with environmental variation (93%), followed by mammals, amphibians, and birds (each with 84-82% deviance explained). In multiple linear regression, climate was most closely associated with total vertebrate richness (78%), followed by woody plants (67%) and geomorphology (56%). Again, reptiles were closely correlated with the environment (95%), followed by mammals (73%), amphibians (63%) and birds (57%). Main conclusions: Comparing variation explained using tree and multiple linear regression quantified the importance of nonlinear relationships and local interactions between species

  7. Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Kay-Uwe; Stühmer, Roland; Dörflinger, Jörg; Rahmani, Tirdad; Thomas, Susan; Stojanovic, Ljiljana

    Rich Internet Applications significantly raise the user experience compared with legacy page-based Web applications because of their highly responsive user interfaces. Although this is a tremendous advance, it does not solve the problem of the one-size-fits-all approach1 of current Web applications. So although Rich Internet Applications put the user in a position to interact seamlessly with the Web application, they do not adapt to the context in which the user is currently working. In this paper we address the on-the-fly personalization of Rich Internet Applications. We introduce the concept of ARRIAs: Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications and elaborate on how they are able to adapt to the current working context the user is engaged in. An architecture for the ad hoc adaptation of Rich Internet Applications is presented as well as a holistic framework and tools for the realization of our on-the-fly personalization approach. We divided both the architecture and the framework into two levels: offline/design-time and online/run-time. For design-time we explain how to use ontologies in order to annotate Rich Internet Applications and how to use these annotations for conceptual Web usage mining. Furthermore, we describe how to create client-side executable rules from the semantic data mining results. We present our declarative lightweight rule language tailored to the needs of being executed directly on the client. Because of the event-driven nature of the user interfaces of Rich Internet Applications, we designed a lightweight rule language based on the event-condition-action paradigm.2 At run-time the interactions of a user are tracked directly on the client and in real-time a user model is built up. The user model then acts as input to and is evaluated by our client-side complex event processing and rule engine.

  8. Cosmo Girls: Configurations of Class and Femininity in Elite Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Alexandra; Charles, Claire

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we offer a unique contribution to understandings of schooling as a site for the production of social class difference. We bring together the rich body of work that has been conducted on middle-class educational identities, with explorations of the centrality of the feminine in representations of class difference from the field of…

  9. Class Notes for "Class-Y-News."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Judy L.

    1991-01-01

    A self-contained class of students with mild to moderate disabilities published a monthly newsletter which was distributed to students' families. Students became involved in writing, typing, drawing, folding, basic editing, and disseminating. (JDD)

  10. Girls' Class, Infinite Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ost, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    The co-director of a small independent school describes Girls' Class, which she created in order to have a special time together with the girls in grades 6 through 8. The class provides guidance and celebrates spirituality and the beginning of menses for the young women. To end the class, each person says a positive self-affirmation and gives…

  11. First-Class Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesser, Kathi; Buck, Gayle; Dopp, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    In the activity described in this article, students will explore how variables in a first-class lever, specifically arm length, position of the fulcrum, and placement of the load, affect the effort needed to lift the load. To begin the lesson, demonstrate to the class how a first-class lever works and review what is meant by the terms fulcrum,…

  12. Forests, Trees, and Micronutrient-Rich Food Consumption in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ickowitz, Amy; Rowland, Dominic; Powell, Bronwen; Salim, Mohammad Agus; Sunderland, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiency remains a serious problem in Indonesia with approximately 100 million people, or 40% of the population, suffering from one or more micronutrient deficiencies. In rural areas with poor market access, forests and trees may provide an essential source of nutritious food. This is especially important to understand at a time when forests and other tree-based systems in Indonesia are being lost at unprecedented rates. We use food consumption data from the 2003 Indonesia Demographic Health Survey for children between the ages of one and five years and data on vegetation cover from the Indonesian Ministry of Forestry to examine whether there is a relationship between different tree-dominated land classes and consumption of micronutrient-rich foods across the archipelago. We run our models on the aggregate sample which includes over 3000 observations from 25 provinces across Indonesia as well as on sub-samples from different provinces chosen to represent the different land classes. The results show that different tree-dominated land classes were associated with the dietary quality of people living within them in the provinces where they were dominant. Areas of swidden/agroforestry, natural forest, timber and agricultural tree crop plantations were all associated with more frequent consumption of food groups rich in micronutrients in the areas where these were important land classes. The swidden/agroforestry land class was the landscape associated with more frequent consumption of the largest number of micronutrient rich food groups. Further research needs to be done to establish what the mechanisms are that underlie these associations. Swidden cultivation in is often viewed as a backward practice that is an impediment to food security in Indonesia and destructive of the environment. If further research corroborates that swidden farming actually results in better nutrition than the practices that replace it, Indonesian policy makers may need to

  13. Forests, Trees, and Micronutrient-Rich Food Consumption in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Ickowitz, Amy; Rowland, Dominic; Powell, Bronwen; Salim, Mohammad Agus; Sunderland, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiency remains a serious problem in Indonesia with approximately 100 million people, or 40% of the population, suffering from one or more micronutrient deficiencies. In rural areas with poor market access, forests and trees may provide an essential source of nutritious food. This is especially important to understand at a time when forests and other tree-based systems in Indonesia are being lost at unprecedented rates. We use food consumption data from the 2003 Indonesia Demographic Health Survey for children between the ages of one and five years and data on vegetation cover from the Indonesian Ministry of Forestry to examine whether there is a relationship between different tree-dominated land classes and consumption of micronutrient-rich foods across the archipelago. We run our models on the aggregate sample which includes over 3000 observations from 25 provinces across Indonesia as well as on sub-samples from different provinces chosen to represent the different land classes. The results show that different tree-dominated land classes were associated with the dietary quality of people living within them in the provinces where they were dominant. Areas of swidden/agroforestry, natural forest, timber and agricultural tree crop plantations were all associated with more frequent consumption of food groups rich in micronutrients in the areas where these were important land classes. The swidden/agroforestry land class was the landscape associated with more frequent consumption of the largest number of micronutrient rich food groups. Further research needs to be done to establish what the mechanisms are that underlie these associations. Swidden cultivation in is often viewed as a backward practice that is an impediment to food security in Indonesia and destructive of the environment. If further research corroborates that swidden farming actually results in better nutrition than the practices that replace it, Indonesian policy makers may need to

  14. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of triterpene saponins from tea seed pomace (Camellia oleifera Abel) and their activities against bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Fu; Yang, Shao-Lan; Han, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Lei; Lu, Gui-Long; Xia, Tao; Gao, Li-Ping

    2014-01-01

    A method using LC-ESI-IT-TOF/MS and LC/UV-ELSD was established to qualitatively analyze triterpene saponins obtained from the tea seed pomace (Camellia oleifera Abel). In addition, the quantitative analysis of oleiferasaponin A1 using LC/UV was developed. The purified total saponins did not exhibit any inhibitory effects at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 mg/mL against the tested bacteria, except for Staphyloccocus aureus and Escherichia coli. By contrast, higher inhibitory activity was seen against the tested fungi, especially against Bipolaris maydis. Following treatment with an MIC value of 250 μg/mL for 24 h, the mycelial morphology was markedly shriveled in appearance or showed flattened and empty hyphae, with fractured cell walls, ruptured plasmalemma and cytoplasmic coagulation or leakage. These structural changes hindered the growth of mycelia. PMID:24914901

  15. Wavelet transform analysis of the small-scale X-ray structure of the cluster Abell 1367

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebeney, S. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a new technique based on a wavelet transform analysis to quantify the small-scale (less than a few arcminutes) X-ray structure of clusters of galaxies. We apply this technique to the ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) and Einstein high-resolution imager (HRI) images of the central region of the cluster Abell 1367 to detect sources embedded within the diffuse intracluster medium. In addition to detecting sources and determining their fluxes and positions, we show that the wavelet analysis allows a characterization of the sources extents. In particular, the wavelet scale at which a given source achieves a maximum signal-to-noise ratio in the wavelet images provides an estimate of the angular extent of the source. To account for the widely varying point response of the ROSAT PSPC as a function of off-axis angle requires a quantitative measurement of the source size and a comparison to a calibration derived from the analysis of a Deep Survey image. Therefore, we assume that each source could be described as an isotropic two-dimensional Gaussian and used the wavelet amplitudes, at different scales, to determine the equivalent Gaussian Full Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) (and its uncertainty) appropriate for each source. In our analysis of the ROSAT PSPC image, we detect 31 X-ray sources above the diffuse cluster emission (within a radius of 24 min), 16 of which are apparently associated with cluster galaxies and two with serendipitous, background quasars. We find that the angular extents of 11 sources exceed the nominal width of the PSPC point-spread function. Four of these extended sources were previously detected by Bechtold et al. (1983) as 1 sec scale features using the Einstein HRI. The same wavelet analysis technique was applied to the Einstein HRI image. We detect 28 sources in the HRI image, of which nine are extended. Eight of the extended sources correspond to sources previously detected by Bechtold et al. Overall, using both the

  16. Frontier Field Abell 370

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Tom; Capak, Peter

    2014-08-01

    After considering valuable advice from the astronomical community and broad range of open questions in galaxy evolution an advisory committee unanimously recommended HST undertake a program of six deep fields centered on strong lensing galaxy clusters in p arallel with six deep blank fields". The key science goals of these twelve new frontier fields are: 1) to reveal hitherto inaccessible populations of z = 5 - 10 galaxies thatare 10 - 50 times fainter intrinsically than any presently known. 2) to solidify our understanding of the stellar masses and star formation histories of sub-L* galaxies at the earliest times 3) to provide the first statistically meaningful morphological characterization of star forming galaxies at z > 5 4) to find z > 8 galaxies stretched out enough by cluster lensing to discern internal structure and/or magnified enough by cluster lensing for spectroscopic follow-up. Spitzer data are essential to meeting these goals because it enables mass and physical parameter estimates for the high redshift sources and differentiates between low and high redshift galaxies. As a result Spitzer has committed to observing these fields as a major DDT program. The first 4 galaxies clusters and the first 4 deep "blank fields" will be observed by Spitzer over cycles 9 and 10.

  17. Gemini Frontier Fields: Wide-field Adaptive Optics Ks-band Imaging of the Galaxy Clusters MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; Pessev, P.; Garrel, V.; Winge, C.; Neichel, B.; Vidal, F.

    2015-04-01

    We have observed two of the six Frontier Fields galaxy clusters, MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744, using the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) and the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI). With 0.″ 08-0.″ 10 FWHM our data are nearly diffraction-limited over a 100\\prime\\prime × 100\\prime\\prime wide area. GeMS/GSAOI complements the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) redwards of 1.6 μm with twice the angular resolution. We reach a 5σ depth of {{K}s}˜ 25.6 mag (AB) for compact sources. In this paper, we describe the observations, data processing, and initial public data release. We provide fully calibrated, co-added images matching the native GSAOI pixel scale as well as the larger plate scales of the HST release, adding to the legacy value of the Frontier Fields. Our work demonstrates that even for fields at high galactic latitude where natural guide stars are rare, current multi-conjugated adaptive optics technology at 8 m telescopes has opened a new window on the distant universe. Observations of a third Frontier Field, Abell 370, are planned. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal Observatories, Chile.

  18. Hydrogen-rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for producing hydrogen-rich product gases. A spray of liquid hydrocarbon is mixed with a stream of air in a startup procedure and the mixture is ignited for partial oxidation. The stream of air is then heated by the resulting combustion to reach a temperature such that a signal is produced. The signal triggers a two way valve which directs liquid hydrocarbon from a spraying mechanism to a vaporizing mechanism with which a vaporized hydrocarbon is formed. The vaporized hydrocarbon is subsequently mixed with the heated air in the combustion chamber where partial oxidation takes place and hydrogen-rich product gases are produced.

  19. AU-rich RNA binding proteins in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baou, Maria; Norton, John D; Murphy, John J

    2011-11-24

    Posttranscriptional mechanisms are now widely acknowledged to play a central role in orchestrating gene-regulatory networks in hematopoietic cell growth, differentiation, and tumorigenesis. Although much attention has focused on microRNAs as regulators of mRNA stability/translation, recent data have highlighted the role of several diverse classes of AU-rich RNA-binding protein in the regulation of mRNA decay/stabilization. AU-rich elements are found in the 3'-untranslated region of many mRNAs that encode regulators of cell growth and survival, such as cytokines and onco/tumor-suppressor proteins. These are targeted by a burgeoning number of different RNA-binding proteins. Three distinct types of AU-rich RNA binding protein (ARE poly-U-binding degradation factor-1/AUF1, Hu antigen/HuR/HuA/ELAVL1, and the tristetraprolin/ZFP36 family of proteins) are essential for normal hematopoiesis. Together with 2 further AU-rich RNA-binding proteins, nucleolin and KHSRP/KSRP, the functions of these proteins are intimately associated with pathways that are dysregulated in various hematopoietic malignancies. Significantly, all of these AU-rich RNA-binding proteins function via an interconnected network that is integrated with microRNA functions. Studies of these diverse types of RNA binding protein are providing novel insight into gene-regulatory mechanisms in hematopoiesis in addition to offering new opportunities for developing mechanism-based targeted therapeutics in leukemia and lymphoma. PMID:21917750

  20. Be Bold ... Be Enrollment Rich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, marketing specialist Mark Perna offers advice on how career and technical schools can market themselves and their programs. To become "enrollment rich," he suggests the following: (1) develop a brand plan--something that separates your organization from competitors in the mind of the community; (2) deliver the message--the community…

  1. Rich-Cores in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Athen; Mondragón, Raúl J.

    2015-01-01

    A core comprises of a group of central and densely connected nodes which governs the overall behaviour of a network. It is recognised as one of the key meso-scale structures in complex networks. Profiling this meso-scale structure currently relies on a limited number of methods which are often complex and parameter dependent or require a null model. As a result, scalability issues are likely to arise when dealing with very large networks together with the need for subjective adjustment of parameters. The notion of a rich-club describes nodes which are essentially the hub of a network, as they play a dominating role in structural and functional properties. The definition of a rich-club naturally emphasises high degree nodes and divides a network into two subgroups. Here, we develop a method to characterise a rich-core in networks by theoretically coupling the underlying principle of a rich-club with the escape time of a random walker. The method is fast, scalable to large networks and completely parameter free. In particular, we show that the evolution of the core in World Trade and C. elegans networks correspond to responses to historical events and key stages in their physical development, respectively. PMID:25799585

  2. Technology-Rich Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thach, Kim J.; Norman, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses one of the authors' classroom experiences to explore how teachers can create technology-rich learning environments that support upper elementary students' mathematical understanding of algebra and number and operations. They describe a unit that presents a common financial problem (the use of credit cards) to engage sixth graders…

  3. Class network routing

    DOEpatents

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  4. Class and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Mechthild

    2005-01-01

    Everyone is dependent on caring labor. Because women's labor is financially beneficial to global capitalism, gender is inseparable from class, regardless of the specific national or cultural contexts.

  5. Online, Bigger Classes May Be Better Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Marc

    2010-01-01

    In his work as a professor, Stephen Downes used to feel that he was helping those who least needed it. His students at places like the University of Alberta already had a leg up in life and could afford the tuition. When a colleague suggested they co-teach an online class in learning theory at the University of Manitoba, in 2008, Downes welcomed…

  6. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the limits to open class performance. The contents include: 1) Standard Class; 2) 15m/Racing Class; 3) Open Class; and 4) Design Solutions associated with assumptions, limiting parameters, airfoil performance, current trends, and analysis.

  7. Cluster redshifts in five suspected superclusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardullo, R.; Ford, H.; Harms, R.

    1985-01-01

    Redshift surveys for rich superclusters were carried out in five regions of the sky containing surface-density enhancements of Abell clusters. While several superclusters are identified, projection effects dominate each field, and no system contains more than five rich clusters. Two systems are found to be especially interesting. The first, field 0136 10, is shown to contain a superposition of at least four distinct superclusters, with the richest system possessing a small velocity dispersion. The second system, 2206 - 22, though a region of exceedingly high Abell cluster surface density, appears to be a remarkable superposition of 23 rich clusters almost uniformly distributed in redshift space between 0.08 and 0.24. The new redshifts significantly increase the three-dimensional information available for the distance class 5 and 6 Abell clusters and allow the spatial correlation function around rich superclusters to be estimated.

  8. Methane rich models of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolak, M.

    1976-01-01

    A series of models of Uranus is computed assuming that Uranus consists of a core of rocky material surrounded by a convecting envelope rich in H2O, NH3, and CH4. It is found that good fits are obtained to the observed parameters when the CH4:H2 ratio is of the order of 0.1. It is suggested that the rotational period of Uranus is roughly 18 h.

  9. Class Scheduling Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Irving E.; And Others

    In order to ascertain students' preferences for the number of times a class should meet each week, 375 questionnaires administered to students during the 1989 summer session at Cuyahoga Community College, Western Campus (Ohio) were evaluated. Results indicated that 49% of respondents preferred classes meeting twice each week, and 29% preferred…

  10. Bayesian Hierarchical Classes Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenen, Iwin; Van Mechelen, Iven; Gelman, Andrew; De Knop, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    Hierarchical classes models are models for "N"-way "N"-mode data that represent the association among the "N" modes and simultaneously yield, for each mode, a hierarchical classification of its elements. In this paper we present a stochastic extension of the hierarchical classes model for two-way two-mode binary data. In line with the original…

  11. The Question of Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorski, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    For too long, educators' approach to understanding the relationships between poverty, class and education has been framed by studying the behaviors and cultures of poor students and their families. If only we--in the middle and upper-middle classes--can understand "their" culture, why "those people" don't value education, why "those parents" don't…

  12. The Question of Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorski, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    For too long, educators' approach to understanding the relationships between poverty, class and education has been framed by studying the behaviors and cultures of poor students and their families. If only people--in the middle and upper-middle classes--can understand "their" culture, why "those people" do not value education, why "those parents"…

  13. The Last Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhl, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    The last class of the semester is like a goodbye. It can be cold and perfunctory or warm and heartfelt. For many years, I erred on the side of "cold and perfunctory." No more. Now my last classes are a time of celebration and ritual as I invite students to focus on qualities such as acceptance and gratitude.

  14. The Class Size Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.; Rothstein, Richard, Ed.

    This collection of papers debates the merits of smaller class sizes and research methods used to evaluate the efficacy of this education reform measure. Four chapters focus on (1) "Understanding the Magnitude and Effect of Class Size on Student Achievement" (Alan B. Krueger), which discusses expenditures per student and economic criterion; (2)…

  15. Teaching Large Evening Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wambuguh, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    High enrollments, conflicting student work schedules, and the sheer convenience of once-a-week classes are pushing many colleges to schedule evening courses. Held from 6 to 9 pm or 7 to 10 pm, these classes are typically packed, sometimes with more than 150 students in a large lecture theater. How can faculty effectively teach, control, or even…

  16. Cutting Class Harms Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lewis A., III

    2012-01-01

    An accessible business school population of undergraduate students was investigated in three independent, but related studies to determine effects on grades due to cutting class and failing to take advantage of optional reviews and study quizzes. It was hypothesized that cutting classes harms exam scores, attending preexam reviews helps exam…

  17. Teaching Social Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tablante, Courtney B.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Discussing socioeconomic status in college classes can be challenging. Both teachers and students feel uncomfortable, yet social class matters more than ever. This is especially true, given increased income inequality in the United States and indications that higher education does not reduce this inequality as much as many people hope. Resources…

  18. Oxygen-rich semiregular and irregular variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Kleinmann, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    All the known oxygen-rich semiregulars and irregulars of spectral classes K and M with the absolute value of B not greater than 30 deg, Delta(m) not less than 0.5 mag, and, for the semiregulars, periods in the range of 50 to 400 d are compiled. On the basis of their distributions on the sky and their brightnesses in the K band at 2.2 microns, it is argued that the semiregulars with a period of 300-400 d appear to belong to the same population as the 'thin disk' Miras in the same period range and have an exponential scale height from the Galactic plane of about 250 pc. The semiregulars with a period range of 200 to 300 d belong to the population of the 'thick disk' Miras with an exponential scale height from the Galactic plane of about 500 pc. On the basis of the similarities of their space distributions and the presence of Tc in their atmospheres, and using the pulsational mode calculations by Ostlie and Cox (1986), it is suggested that the semiregulars with a period range of 100-150 d are first and second overtone pulsations of the same population of AGB stars as the Miras in their fundamental pulsational mode with periods longer than 300 d.

  19. A Metadata-Rich File System

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, S; Gokhale, M B; Maltzahn, C

    2009-01-07

    Despite continual improvements in the performance and reliability of large scale file systems, the management of file system metadata has changed little in the past decade. The mismatch between the size and complexity of large scale data stores and their ability to organize and query their metadata has led to a de facto standard in which raw data is stored in traditional file systems, while related, application-specific metadata is stored in relational databases. This separation of data and metadata requires considerable effort to maintain consistency and can result in complex, slow, and inflexible system operation. To address these problems, we have developed the Quasar File System (QFS), a metadata-rich file system in which files, metadata, and file relationships are all first class objects. In contrast to hierarchical file systems and relational databases, QFS defines a graph data model composed of files and their relationships. QFS includes Quasar, an XPATH-extended query language for searching the file system. Results from our QFS prototype show the effectiveness of this approach. Compared to the defacto standard, the QFS prototype shows superior ingest performance and comparable query performance on user metadata-intensive operations and superior performance on normal file metadata operations.

  20. Physical properties of CAI-rich asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanga, P.; Devogele, M.; Cellino, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Campins, H.; Bus, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Some L-type asteroids (collectively called "Barbarians") are known to exhibit an anomalous polarimetric behavior, whose origin - still to be elucidated - can be related to compositional and/or scattering effects. The fact that these asteroids belong to the same taxonomic class (following the De Meo 2009 classification, including NIR) implies that composition must play a role. Sunshine et al. 2008 showed that these asteroids contain high amounts of CAIs, possibly hinting to a formation in an early proto-planetary environment, very rich in refractory material. On the base of this evidence, we started an observational campaign to increase the data coverage of these objects, by obtaining new NIR spectra, photometric and polarimetric measurements. Our first results show that the peculiar features are not restricted to polarimetry. In particular we show the existence of an anomalous distribution of the rotation periods, and a possible relation between CAI abundance and albedos determined by WISE. We tentatively discuss a possible scenario justifying the different observed features.

  1. The development, characterization and testing of magnesium-rich primers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchi, Dante

    Aluminum alloys are widely used in aircraft industry for their strength and light weight. Those alloys that are hardened by precipitation, especially the Copper-rich of the 2000 series, are prone to corrosion and are protected against it using chromate containing coatings. The primary component of these coating systems is Chromium 6+ (CrVI) that has been found to be very toxic in the environment and carcinogenic, toxic and mutagenic in humans. The Mg-rich primer development is the result of a successful multi-year project funded by the US Air-force with its objective the replacement of coatings based on CrVI with a class of coatings less toxic and with comparable protective performances. The Mg rich primer fulfilled the USAF requirements and it is currently undergoing commercial and military qualifications testing. The use of Mg as one of the active pigments in coatings allows the primer to protect the underlying Al sacrificially, not considered possible for this substrate until now. Mg is anodic to most of the other structural metals and when particulate Mg became available commercially, the concept of the primer was first developed by analogy to Zn-rich coatings for steel. When Mg and Al are in contact and immersed in a corrosive environment, magnesium corrodes preferentially and protects the aluminum.

  2. 47 CFR 73.25 - Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. 73.25 Section 73.25 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.25 Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. The frequencies in...

  3. 47 CFR 73.25 - Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. 73.25 Section 73.25 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.25 Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. The frequencies in...

  4. 47 CFR 73.25 - Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. 73.25 Section 73.25 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.25 Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. The frequencies in...

  5. 47 CFR 73.25 - Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. 73.25 Section 73.25 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.25 Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. The frequencies in...

  6. 47 CFR 73.25 - Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. 73.25 Section 73.25 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.25 Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. The frequencies in...

  7. Poetry: It's Not Just for English Class Anymore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor-Greene, Patricia A.; Young, Art; Paul, Catherine; Murdoch, Janice W.

    2005-01-01

    Higher level thought involves both critical and creative thinking skills. Although the psychological literature is rich with research on teaching critical thinking, relatively little published work addresses ways of promoting creative thinking. In this article we describe the use of poetry writing in an abnormal psychology class to encourage…

  8. 'Die Zeit' im Konversationsunterricht ('Die Zeit' in a Conversation Class)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker-Cantarino, Barbel

    1975-01-01

    The German weekly newspaper "Die Zeit" contains a very rich variety of topics and is therefore an inexhaustable source for an exciting conversation class. This article outlines and lists the advantages of a German conversation course organized around this newspaper. (Text is in German.) (TL)

  9. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived from Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From an analysis of X-ray spectroscopy and imaging data, we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster. The X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect observations are combined to determine the angular diameter distance to the cluster of D(sub A) = 1294(sup +294 +438, sub -283 -458) Mpc (Statistical followed by systematic uncertainty), implying a Hubble constant of H(sub 0) = 52.2(sup +11.4 +18.5, sub -11.9 -17.7) km/s.Mpc for Omega(sub M) = 0.3 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0.7. We find a best-fit H(sub 0) of 46 km/s.Mpc for the Omega(sub M) = 1 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0 cosmology, and 48 km/s.Mpc for Omega(sub M) = 0.3 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0.0. The X-ray data are also used to derive a total cluster mass of M(sup HSE, sub tot)(r(sub 500)) = 5.18(sup +0.62, sub -0.48) x 10(exp 14)/h solar mass; the optical velocity dispersion yields an independent and consistent estimate of M(sup virial, sub tot)(r(sub 500)) = 6.35(sup +1.51, sub -1.19) X 10(exp 14) /h solar mass. Both of the total mass estimates are evaluated at a fiducial radius, r(sub 500) = 830 /h kpc, where the overdensity is 500 times the critical density. The total cluster mass is then combined with gas mass measurements to determine a cluster gas mass fraction of F(sub g) = 0.056(sup +0.010, sub -0.013) /h(sup 3/2) in combination with recent baryon density constraints, the measured gas mass fraction yields an upper limit on the mass density parameter of Omega(sub M) h(sup 1/2) <= 0.34(sup +/0.06, sub 0.05.

  10. Astrometry With the Hubble Space Telescope: Trigonometric Parallaxes of Planetary Nebula Nuclei NGC 6853, NGC 7293, ABELL 31, and DeHt 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, G. F.; McArthur, Barbara E.; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Harrison, Thomas E.; Harris, Hugh C.; Nelan, Edmund; Bond, Howard E; Patterson, Richard J.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2009-01-01

    We present absolute parallaxes and relative proper motions for the central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 6853 (The Dumbbell), NGC 7293 (The Helix), Abell 31, and DeHt 5. This paper details our reduction and analysis using DeHt 5 as an example. We obtain these planetary nebula nuclei (PNNi) parallaxes with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors FGS 1r and FGS 3, white-light interferometers on the Hubble Space Telescope. Proper motions, spectral classifications and VJHKT2M and DDO51 photometry of the stars comprising the astrometric reference frames provide spectrophotometric estimates of reference star absolute parallaxes. Introducing these into our model as observations with error, we determine absolute parallaxes for each PNN. Weighted averaging with previous independent parallax measurements yields an average parallax precision, sigma (sub pi)/ pi = 5%. Derived distances are: d(sub NGC6853) = 405(exp +28 sub -25) pc, d(sub NGC7293) = 216(exp +14 sub -12) pc, d(sub Abell31) = 621(exp +91 sub -70) pc, and d(sub DeHt5) = 345(exp +19 sub -17) pc. These PNNi distances are all smaller than previously derived from spectroscopic analyses of the central stars. To obtain absolute magnitudes from these distances requires estimates of interstellar extinction. We average extinction measurements culled from the literature, from reddening based on PNNi intrinsic colors derived from model SEDs, and an assumption that each PNN experiences the same rate of extinction as a function of distance as do the reference stars nearest (in angular separation) to each central star. We also apply Lutz-Kelker bias corrections. The absolute magnitudes and effective temperatures permit estimates of PNNi radii through both the Stefan-Boltzmann relation and Eddington fluxes. Comparing absolute magnitudes with post-AGB models provides mass estimates. Masses cluster around 0.57 solar Mass, close to the peak of the white dwarf mass distribution. Adding a few more PNNi with well

  11. ASTROMETRY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE: TRIGONOMETRIC PARALLAXES OF PLANETARY NEBULA NUCLEI NGC 6853, NGC 7293, ABELL 31, AND DeHt 5

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Harrison, Thomas E.; Harris, Hugh C.; Nelan, Edmund; Bond, Howard E.; Patterson, Richard J.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2009-12-15

    We present absolute parallaxes and relative proper motions for the central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 6853 (The Dumbbell), NGC 7293 (The Helix), Abell 31, and DeHt 5. This paper details our reduction and analysis using DeHt 5 as an example. We obtain these planetary nebula nuclei (PNNi) parallaxes with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors FGS 1r and FGS 3, white-light interferometers on the Hubble Space Telescope. Proper motions, spectral classifications and VJHKT{sub 2}M and DDO51 photometry of the stars comprising the astrometric reference frames provide spectrophotometric estimates of reference star absolute parallaxes. Introducing these into our model as observations with error, we determine absolute parallaxes for each PNN. Weighted averaging with previous independent parallax measurements yields an average parallax precision, {sigma}{sub {pi}}/{pi} = 5%. Derived distances are: d {sub NGC6853} = 405{sup +28} {sub -25} pc, d {sub NGC7293} = 216{sup +14} {sub -12} pc, d {sub Abell31} = 621{sup +91} {sub -70} pc, and d {sub DeHt5} = 345{sup +19}{sub -17} pc. These PNNi distances are all smaller than previously derived from spectroscopic analyses of the central stars. To obtain absolute magnitudes from these distances requires estimates of interstellar extinction. We average extinction measurements culled from the literature, from reddening based on PNNi intrinsic colors derived from model SEDs, and an assumption that each PNN experiences the same rate of extinction as a function of distance as do the reference stars nearest (in angular separation) to each central star. We also apply Lutz-Kelker bias corrections. The absolute magnitudes and effective temperatures permit estimates of PNNi radii through both the Stefan-Boltzmann relation and Eddington fluxes. Comparing absolute magnitudes with post-AGB models provides mass estimates. Masses cluster around 0.57 M{sub odot}, close to the peak of the white dwarf mass distribution. Adding a few more PNNi

  12. Vascular plant and vertebrate species richness in national parks of the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatfield, Jeffrey S.; Myrick, Kaci E.; Huston, Michael A.; Weckerly, Floyd W.; Green, M. Clay

    2013-01-01

    Given the estimates that species diversity is diminishing at 50-100 times the normal rate, it is critical that we be able to evaluate changes in species richness in order to make informed decisions for conserving species diversity. In this study, we examined the potential of vascular plant species richness to be used as a surrogate for vertebrate species richness in the classes of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Vascular plants, as primary producers, represent the biotic starting point for ecological community structure and are the logical place to start for understanding vertebrate species associations. We used data collected by the United States (US) National Park Service (NPS) on species presence within parks in the eastern US to estimate simple linear regressions between plant species richness and vertebrate richness. Because environmental factors may also influence species diversity, we performed simple linear regressions of species richness versus natural logarithm of park area, park latitude, mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature, and human population density surrounding the parks. We then combined plant species richness and environmental variables in multiple regressions to determine the variables that remained as significant predictors of vertebrate species richness. As expected, we detected significant relationships between plant species richness and amphibian, bird, and mammal species richness. In some cases, plant species richness was predicted by park area alone. Species richness of mammals was only related to plant species richness. Reptile species richness, on the other hand, was related to plant species richness, park latitude and annual precipitation, while amphibian species richness was related to park latitude, park area, and plant species richness. Thus, plant species richness predicted species richness of different vertebrate groups to varying degrees and should not be used exclusively as a surrogate for vertebrate

  13. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  14. Gas Sloshing in the Rich Cluster A2204: Putting Constraints on the Properties of the Magnetized Hot Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Chen, Huanqing; Li, Zhiyuan; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Zuhone, John

    2016-01-01

    We present results from our detailed analysis of the gas sloshing structures in the rich galaxy cluster Abell 2204, based on deep Chandra observations. We investigate the spiral structure in the X-ray surface brightness, which is a common signature of gas sloshing caused by an interaction with another nearby cluster. We identify discontinuities (edges) in the cluster surface brightness profiles in different directions from the cluster center. We measure the gas temperature, pressure and entropy across these surface brightness edges and find that the prominant surface brightness edges in the east and west are both typical "cold fronts", likely produced by gas sloshing. We use the results of our analysis to constrain the strength of the magnetic field in the cluster. We also use our measurements to provide an upper limit on the velocity of the cold gas beneath the front surface of the cold front. Finally we identify two subcluster candidates in the cluster outskirts, which may have been responsible for the gas sloshing.This research was supported by the Smithsonian Institution, Chandra Prime Contract NAS8-03060, Nanjing University, and the Massachusetts Institute for Technology.

  15. An appropriate plot area for analyzing canopy cover and tree species richness in Zagros forests.

    PubMed

    Adeli, Kamran; Fallah, Asghar; Kooch, Yahya

    2008-01-01

    In order to make the sampling procedure more efficient and more accurate to study the tree species richness and canopy cover, the appropriate plot size was calculated in the this study. The sampling was carried out using 48 four-hectare plots, each with 13 sub-plots of different plot sizes and 7 one-hectare plots, each with 7 sub-plots. The result of this study showed that 300 ARE plot size was determined as the best area for 1-5% density class, 125 ARE plots for 5-10% class, 150 ARE for 10-25% class, 100 ARE for 25-50% class and 75 ARE plot size to sample >50% density class, in 95% confidence level. Consequently, using 100 ARE sampling plots is suggested for all density classes in central Zagros forests. PMID:18819601

  16. Teaching Heterogeneous Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millrood, Radislav

    2002-01-01

    Discusses an approach to teaching heterogeneous English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classes. Draws on classroom research data to describe the features of a success-building lesson context. (Author/VWL)

  17. Universality classes of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Roest, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We investigate all single-field, slow-roll inflationary models whose slow-roll parameters scale as 1/N in the limit of a large number of e-folds N. We proof that all such models belong to two universality classes, characterised by a single parameter. One class contains small field models like hilltop inflation, while the other class consists of large field models like chaotic inflation. We give the leading expressions for the spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio r, which are universal for each class, plus subleading corrections for a number of models. This predicts r either to be unobservably small, r < 0.01, or close to the present observational limit, r ≈ 0.07.

  18. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  19. Star formation and black hole accretion activity in rich local clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Matteo; Marleau, Francine R.; Fadda, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Context. We present a study of star formation and central black hole accretion activity of galaxies that are hosted in the two nearby (z ~ 0.2) rich galaxy clusters Abell 983 and 1731. Aims: We aim to quantify both the obscured and unobscured star formation rates, as well as the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of the environment in which the galaxy is located. Methods: We targeted the clusters with unprecedented deep infrared Spitzer observations (0.2 mJy at 24 micron), near-IR Palomar imaging and optical WIYN spectroscopy. The extent of our observations (~3 virial radii) covers the vast range of possible environments, from the very dense cluster centre to the very rarefied cluster outskirts and accretion regions. Results: The star-forming members of the two clusters present star formation rates that are comparable with those measured in coeval field galaxies. Analysis of the spatial arrangement of the spectroscopically confirmed members reveals an elongated distribution for A1731 with respect to the more uniform distribution of A983. The emerging picture is compatible with A983 being a fully evolved cluster, in contrast with the still actively accreting A1731. Conclusions: Analysis of the specific star formation rate reveals evidence of ongoing galaxy pre-processing along A1731's filament-like structure. Furthermore, the decrease in the number of star-forming galaxies and AGN towards the cluster cores suggests that the cluster environment is accelerating the ageing process of the galaxies and blocking further accretion of the cold gas that fuels both star formation and black hole accretion activity. The catalogue and the reduced images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A105

  20. Species richness of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: associations with grassland plant richness and biomass.

    PubMed

    Hiiesalu, Inga; Pärtel, Meelis; Davison, John; Gerhold, Pille; Metsis, Madis; Moora, Mari; Öpik, Maarja; Vasar, Martti; Zobel, Martin; Wilson, Scott D

    2014-07-01

    Although experiments show a positive association between vascular plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) species richness, evidence from natural ecosystems is scarce. Furthermore, there is little knowledge about how AMF richness varies with belowground plant richness and biomass. We examined relationships among AMF richness, above- and belowground plant richness, and plant root and shoot biomass in a native North American grassland. Root-colonizing AMF richness and belowground plant richness were detected from the same bulk root samples by 454-sequencing of the AMF SSU rRNA and plant trnL genes. In total we detected 63 AMF taxa. Plant richness was 1.5 times greater belowground than aboveground. AMF richness was significantly positively correlated with plant species richness, and more strongly with below- than aboveground plant richness. Belowground plant richness was positively correlated with belowground plant biomass and total plant biomass, whereas aboveground plant richness was positively correlated only with belowground plant biomass. By contrast, AMF richness was negatively correlated with belowground and total plant biomass. Our results indicate that AMF richness and plant belowground richness are more strongly related with each other and with plant community biomass than with the plant aboveground richness measures that have been almost exclusively considered to date. PMID:24641509

  1. Mass reconstruction of galaxies clusters: Abell 2219, RXC J2248.7-4431, and SDSS J1004+4112 using strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaelani, Anton T.; Premadi, Premana W.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents mass reconstruction of galaxies cluster from strong lens analysis for Abell 2219 (z = 0.225), RXC J2248,7-4431 (z = 0.348), and SDSS J1004+4112 (z = 0.68) using parametric model sofware for strong gravitational lensing, glafic (Oguri 2010). We use assumptions of point source and source-plane approximation for minimization. We find that our parametric model well reproduces the positions of multiply imaged galaxies and quasars and time delays between quasar images. We find that the best-fit centroid of the dark halo (NFW) is quite consistent with the distribution of gas from observed X-ray. Radius enclosed mass profile and mass profile from hidrostatic assumption on distribution of gas from X-ray agree quite well with each other, including the radial slopes of the profiles with average discrepancies, Mlens/MX = 1.52 on the outer radius of images. Existence of dominant galaxy associate with compactness of cluster as lens. We find increasing of fraction of galaxies morphology from distribution of cluster members increase with redshift.

  2. Am I Missing Something? The Effects of Absence from Class on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arulampalam, Wiji; Naylor, Robin A.; Smith, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    We analyse a rich dataset of Economics students at a UK university to identify causal effects of class absence on student performance, exploiting the random assignment of students and information on students' class timetables to avoid selection problems. We use panel properties of the data to control for unobserved student factors such as ability…

  3. Students' Perceived Sense of Campus Community: The Influence of Out-of-Class Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Daniel J.; Forrester, Scott A.; Noel-Elkins, Amelia V.

    2011-01-01

    Out-of-class involvement provides students with opportunities for rich social lives which, according to Cheng (2004), are closely associated with sense of campus community. Based on Astin's (1984) Theory of Involvement, and Boyer's (1990) principles of community, the purpose of this study was to examine how involvement in out-of-class activities…

  4. Elementary School Children's Reasoning about Social Class: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mistry, Rashmita S.; Brown, Christia S.; White, Elizabeth S.; Chow, Kirby A.; Gillen-O'Neel, Cari

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined children's identification and reasoning about their subjective social status (SSS), their beliefs about social class groups (i.e., the poor, middle class, and rich), and the associations between the two. Study participants were 117 10- to 12-year-old children of diverse racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds…

  5. Documenting Reproduction and Inequality: Revisiting Jean Anyon's "Social Class and School Knowledge"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Jean Anyon's (1981) "Social Class and School Knowledge" was a landmark work in North American educational research. It provided a richly detailed qualitative description of differential, social class-based constructions of knowledge and epistemological stance. This essay situates Anyon's work in two parallel traditions of critical educational…

  6. Teachers and the Emotional Dimensions of Class in Resource-Affected Rural Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pini, Barbara; Price, Robin; McDonald, Paula

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, a "cultural turn" in the study of class has resulted in a rich body of work detailing the ways in which class advantage and disadvantage are emotionally inscribed and embodied in educational settings. To date, however, much of this literature has focused on the urban sphere. In order to address this gap in the literature, this…

  7. Rich Language Analysis for Counterterrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidère, Mathieu; Howard, Newton; Argamon, Shlomo

    Accurate and relevant intelligence is critical for effective counterterrorism. Too much irrelevant information is as bad or worse than not enough information. Modern computational tools promise to provide better search and summarization capabilities to help analysts filter and select relevant and key information. However, to do this task effectively, such tools must have access to levels of meaning beyond the literal. Terrorists operating in context-rich cultures like fundamentalist Islam use messages with multiple levels of interpretation, which are easily misunderstood by non-insiders. This chapter discusses several kinds of such “encryption” used by terrorists and insurgents in the Arabic language, and how knowledge of such methods can be used to enhance computational text analysis techniques for use in counterterrorism.

  8. Team Conflict in ICT-Rich Environments: Roles of Technologies in Conflict Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Ana-Paula

    2008-01-01

    This study looks at how an information and communication technologies (ICT)-rich environment impacts team conflict and conflict management strategies. A case study research method was used. Three teams, part of a graduate class in instructional design, participated in the study. Data were collected through observations of team meetings, interviews…

  9. theories of class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiotto, Davide; Razamat, Shlomo S.

    2015-07-01

    We construct classes of superconformal theories elements of which are labeled by punctured Riemann surfaces. Degenerations of the surfaces correspond, in some cases, to weak coupling limits. Different classes are labeled by two integers ( N, k). The k = 1 case coincides with A N - 1 theories of class and simple examples of theories with k > 1 are orbifolds of some of the A N - 1 class theories. For the space of theories to be complete in an appropriate sense we find it necessary to conjecture existence of new strongly coupled SCFTs. These SCFTs when coupled to additional matter can be related by dualities to gauge theories. We discuss in detail the A 1 case with k = 2 using the supersymmetric index as our analysis tool. The index of theories in classes with k > 1 can be constructed using eigenfunctions of elliptic quantum mechanical models generalizing the Ruijsenaars-Schneider integrable model. When the elliptic curve of the model degenerates these eigenfunctions become polynomials with coefficients being algebraic expressions in fugacities, generalizing the Macdonald polynomials with rational coefficients appearing when k = 1.

  10. Robust Optical Richness Estimation with Reduced Scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Rykoff, E.S.; Koester, B.P.; Rozo, E.; Annis, J.; Evrard, A.E.; Hansen, S.M.; Hao, J.; Johnston, D.E.; McKay, T.A.; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-07

    Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. (2009b), and evaluate their impact on the scatter in X-ray luminosity at fixed richness. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that {sigma}{sub ln L{sub X}|{lambda}} = 0.63 {+-} 0.02 for clusters with M{sub 500c} {approx}> 1.6 x 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is {sigma}{sub ln M|{lambda}} {approx} 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a-priori calibrations of the red-sequence. We also demonstrate that the recovered richness is robust to up to 50% uncertainties in the galaxy background, as well as to the choice of photometric filter employed, so long as the filters span the 4000 {angstrom} break of red-sequence galaxies. Consequently, our richness estimator can be used to compare richness estimates of different clusters, even if they do not share the same photometric data. Appendix A includes 'easy-bake' instructions for implementing our optimal richness estimator, and we are releasing an implementation of the code that works with SDSS data, as well as an augmented maxBCG catalog with the {lambda} richness measured for each cluster.

  11. Richness of lichen species, especially of threatened ones, is promoted by management methods furthering stand continuity.

    PubMed

    Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Hessenmöller, Dominik; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Fischer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Lichens are a key component of forest biodiversity. However, a comprehensive study analyzing lichen species richness in relation to several management types, extending over different regions and forest stages and including information on site conditions is missing for temperate European forests. In three German regions (Schwäbische Alb, Hainich-Dün, Schorfheide-Chorin), the so-called Biodiversity Exploratories, we studied lichen species richness in 631 forest plots of 400 m(2) comprising different management types (unmanaged, selection cutting, deciduous and coniferous age-class forests resulting from clear cutting or shelterwood logging), various stand ages, and site conditions, typical for large parts of temperate Europe. We analyzed how lichen species richness responds to management and habitat variables (standing biomass, cover of deadwood, cover of rocks). We found strong regional differences with highest lichen species richness in the Schwäbische Alb, probably driven by regional differences in former air pollution, and in precipitation and habitat variables. Overall, unmanaged forests harbored 22% more threatened lichen species than managed age-class forests. In general, total, corticolous, and threatened lichen species richness did not differ among management types of deciduous forests. However, in the Schwäbische-Alb region, deciduous forests had 61% more lichen species than coniferous forests and they had 279% more threatened and 76% more corticolous lichen species. Old deciduous age classes were richer in corticolous lichen species than young ones, while old coniferous age-classes were poorer than young ones. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of stand continuity for conservation. To increase total and threatened lichen species richness we suggest (1) conserving unmanaged forests, (2) promoting silvicultural methods assuring stand continuity, (3) conserving old trees in managed forests, (4) promoting stands of native deciduous tree species

  12. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  13. IQ and Social Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbein, Siv

    1980-01-01

    Swedish longitudinal studies of twins support Scarr-Salapatek's explanation of nature-nurture influences on intelligence. This model predicts more genetic variance in test results for advantaged than disadvantaged groups. Jensen's work, however, suggests equal amounts of variance among different social classes. (Author/CP)

  14. Teaching Very Large Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRogatis, Amy; Honerkamp, Kenneth; McDaniel, Justin; Medine, Carolyn; Nyitray, Vivian-Lee; Pearson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The editor of "Teaching Theology and Religion" facilitated this reflective conversation with five teachers who have extensive experience and success teaching extremely large classes (150 students or more). In the course of the conversation these professors exchange and analyze the effectiveness of several active learning strategies they…

  15. Vendler Classes and Reinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawamura, Michihiko

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the theoretical status of Vendler classes in grammar and utterance interpretation. In the 1950s Zeno Vendler outlined a taxonomy of verb classification which grouped verbs into four equal categories: (1) activity terms; (2) accomplishment terms; (3) achievement terms; and (4) state terms. Although Vendler's taxonomy still has…

  16. Coming out in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnon, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This article shares how the author explained her trans status to her students. Everyone has been extremely supportive of her decision to come out in class and to completely mask the male secondary-sex characteristics, especially in the workplace. The department chair and the faculty in general have been willing to do whatever they can to assist…

  17. Openers for Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, C. Robert R.

    This teaching guide contains 200 activities that are suitable for openers and demonstrations in biology classes. Details are provided regarding the use of these activities. Some of the broad topics under which the activities are organized include algae, amphibians, bacteria, biologists, crustaceans, dinosaurs, ecology, evolution, flowering plants,…

  18. Virtual Classes, Real Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Kate

    2010-01-01

    As Internet technology encroached on the public school classroom about a decade ago, Kim Ross, superintendent of the Houston School District in Houston, Minnesota, saw an opportunity. At first, he and his administrative team simply wanted to offer students in the district of 1,300 access to more classes via the web than what a district that size…

  19. Financing Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Class size reduction has been shown to, among other things, improve academic achievement for all students and particularly for low-income and minority students. With the No Child Left Behind Act's heavy emphasis on scientifically based research, adequate yearly progress, and disaggregated results, one wonders why all children aren't enrolled in…

  20. The CLASS Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    The CLASS project is a series of investigations and projects designed by the National Wildlife Federation as supplementary materials for existing junior high school environmental curricula. This notebook contains nine different sections: an introduction, six content areas, a series of case studies, and a resource bibliography. The six content…

  1. The Grism Lens-amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). IV. Mass Reconstruction of the Lensing Cluster Abell 2744 from Frontier Field Imaging and GLASS Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.-H.; Treu, T.; Bradač, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Brammer, G. B.; Vulcani, B.; Jones, T. A.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Trenti, M.

    2015-09-01

    We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain five high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and two tentative ones. We confirm one strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all three multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometric redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.

  2. A Pilot Survey for C III] Emission in the Reionization Era: Gravitationally Lensed z ˜ 7-8 Galaxies in the Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitrin, Adi; Ellis, Richard S.; Belli, Sirio; Stark, Daniel P.

    2015-05-01

    We report results of a search for C iii] λ λ 1907, 1909 Å emission using Keck’s MOSFIRE spectrograph in a sample of 7 {{z}phot}˜ 7-8 candidates (H˜ 27) lensed by the Hubble Frontier Field cluster Abell 2744. Earlier work has suggested the promise of using the C iii] doublet for redshift confirmation of galaxies in the reionization era given that Lyα (λ1216 Å) is likely attenuated by the neutral intergalactic medium. The primary challenge of this approach is the feasibility of locating C iii] emission without advanced knowledge of the spectroscopic redshift. With an integration time of 5 hr in the H band, we reach a 5σ median flux limit (in between the skylines) of 1.5× {{10}-18} ergs cm-2 s-1 but no convincing C iii] emission was found. We also incorporate preliminary measurements from two other CLASH/HFF clusters in which, similarly, no line was detected, but these were observed to lesser depth. Using the known distribution of OH emission and the photometric redshift likelihood distribution of each lensed candidate, we present statistical upper limits on the mean total C iii] rest-frame equivalent width (EW) for our z≃ 7-8 sample. For a signal-to-noise ratio of 5, we estimate that the typical C iii] doublet rest-frame EW is, with 95% confidence, \\lt 26+/- 5 Å. Although consistent with the strength of earlier detections in brighter objects at z≃ 6-7, our study illustrates the necessity of studying more luminous or strongly lensed examples prior to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  3. Substructure lensing in galaxy clusters as a constraint on low-mass sterile neutrinos in tensor-vector-scalar theory: The straight arc of Abell 2390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feix, Martin; Zhao, Hongsheng; Fedeli, Cosimo; Pestaña, José Luis Garrido; Hoekstra, Henk

    2010-12-01

    Certain covariant theories of the modified Newtonian dynamics paradigm seem to require an additional hot dark matter (HDM) component—in the form of either heavy ordinary neutrinos or more recently light sterile neutrinos (SNs) with a mass around 11 eV—to be relieved of problems ranging from cosmological scales down to intermediate ones relevant for galaxy clusters. Here we suggest using gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters to test such a marriage of neutrino HDM and modified gravity, adopting the framework of tensor-vector-scalar theory (TeVeS). Unlike conventional cold dark matter (CDM), such HDM is subject to strong phase-space constraints, which allows one to check cluster lens models inferred within the modified framework for consistency. Since the considered HDM particles cannot collapse into arbitrarily dense clumps and only form structures well above the galactic scale, systems which indicate the need for dark substructure are of particular interest. As a first example, we study the cluster lens Abell 2390 and its impressive straight arc with the help of numerical simulations. Based on our results, we outline a general and systematic approach to model cluster lenses in TeVeS which significantly reduces the calculation complexity. We further consider a simple bimodal lens configuration, capable of producing the straight arc, to demonstrate our approach. We find that such a model is marginally consistent with the hypothesis of 11 eV SNs. Future work including more detailed and realistic lens models may further constrain the necessary SN distribution and help to conclusively assess this point. Cluster lenses could therefore provide an interesting discriminator between CDM and such modified gravity scenarios supplemented by SNs or other choices of HDM.

  4. Substructure lensing in galaxy clusters as a constraint on low-mass sterile neutrinos in tensor-vector-scalar theory: The straight arc of Abell 2390

    SciTech Connect

    Feix, Martin; Zhao Hongsheng; Fedeli, Cosimo; Hoekstra, Henk

    2010-12-15

    Certain covariant theories of the modified Newtonian dynamics paradigm seem to require an additional hot dark matter (HDM) component--in the form of either heavy ordinary neutrinos or more recently light sterile neutrinos (SNs) with a mass around 11 eV--to be relieved of problems ranging from cosmological scales down to intermediate ones relevant for galaxy clusters. Here we suggest using gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters to test such a marriage of neutrino HDM and modified gravity, adopting the framework of tensor-vector-scalar theory (TeVeS). Unlike conventional cold dark matter (CDM), such HDM is subject to strong phase-space constraints, which allows one to check cluster lens models inferred within the modified framework for consistency. Since the considered HDM particles cannot collapse into arbitrarily dense clumps and only form structures well above the galactic scale, systems which indicate the need for dark substructure are of particular interest. As a first example, we study the cluster lens Abell 2390 and its impressive straight arc with the help of numerical simulations. Based on our results, we outline a general and systematic approach to model cluster lenses in TeVeS which significantly reduces the calculation complexity. We further consider a simple bimodal lens configuration, capable of producing the straight arc, to demonstrate our approach. We find that such a model is marginally consistent with the hypothesis of 11 eV SNs. Future work including more detailed and realistic lens models may further constrain the necessary SN distribution and help to conclusively assess this point. Cluster lenses could therefore provide an interesting discriminator between CDM and such modified gravity scenarios supplemented by SNs or other choices of HDM.

  5. Distinct kimberlite pipe classes with contrasting eruption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, E. M. W.; Marsh, J. S.

    2004-09-01

    Field and Scott Smith [Field, M., Scott Smith, B.H., 1999. Contrasting geology and near-surface emplacement of kimberlite pipes in southern Africa and Canada. Proc. 7th Int. Kimb. Conf. (Eds. Gurney et al.) 1, 214-237.] propose that kimberlite pipes can be grouped into three types or classes. Classical or Class 1 pipes are the only class with characteristic low temperature, diatreme-facies kimberlite in addition to hypabyssal- and crater-facies kimberlite. Class 2 and 3 pipes are characterized only by hypabyssal-and crater-facies kimberlite. In an increasing number of Class 1 pipes a new kimberlite facies, transitional-facies kimberlite, is being found. In most cases this facies forms a zone several metres wide at the interface between the hypabyssal- and diatreme-facies. The transitional-facies exhibits textural and mineralogical features, which are continuously gradational between the hypabyssal and the diatreme types. The textural gradations are from a coherent magmatic texture to one where the rock becomes increasingly magmaclastic and this is accompanied by concomitant mineralogical gradations involving the decline and eventual elimination of primary calcite at the expense of microlitic diopside. Both transitional- and diatreme-facies kimberlites are considered to have formed in situ from intruding hypabyssal kimberlite magma as a consequence of exsolution of initially CO 2-rich volatiles from the volatile-rich kimberlite magma. The transitional-facies is initiated by volatile exsolution at depths of about 3 km below the original surface. With subsequent cracking through to the surface and resultant rapid decompression, the further catastrophic exsolution of volatiles and their expansion leads to the formation of the diatreme facies. Thus diatreme-facies kimberlite and Class 1 pipes are emplaced by essentially magmatic processes rather than by phreatomagmatism. Distinctly different petrographic features characterize crater-facies kimberlite in each of the

  6. Diet Evolution and Clade Richness in Hexapoda: A Phylogenetic Study of Higher Taxa.

    PubMed

    Rainford, James L; Mayhew, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Hexapoda, the insects and their relatives, includes over half of all described species. Because large proportions of this diversity cluster within a small set of phytophagous groups, dietary substrates have been proposed to shape patterns of richness within the clade through antagonistic coevolution and zones of ecological opportunity. Here we explore these processes in the context of a recent dated phylogeny of Hexapod families. Our results indicate phylogenetic clustering of specialized ecologies, such as phytophagy and parasitism, but reveal no consistent associations between the use of particular dietary substrates and clade richness. We also find no evidence that diets expected to promote antagonistic coevolution are consistently associated with elevated species richness or that sister clades differing in dietary state are associated with greater-than-expected differences in richness. We do, however, identify variation in the age of, and transition rates among, dietary states that are likely to play a role in the observed heterogeneity in richness among dietary classes. Based on these findings, we suggest remaining circumspect about the generality of adaptive zones based on broad dietary groupings as an explanation for hexapod richness and suggest that richness heterogeneity may be better explained by origination and transition rates as well as variation within dietary categories. PMID:26655984

  7. Student Engagement in a Computer Rich Science Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Jeffrey C.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the student lived experience when using computers in a rural science classroom. The overarching question the project sought to examine was: How do rural students relate to computers as a learning tool in comparison to a traditional science classroom? Participant data were collected using a pre-study survey, Experience Sampling during class and post-study interviews. Students want to use computers in their classrooms. Students shared that they overwhelmingly (75%) preferred a computer rich classroom to a traditional classroom (25%). Students reported a higher level of engagement in classes that use technology/computers (83%) versus those that do not use computers (17%). A computer rich classroom increased student control and motivation as reflected by a participant who shared; "by using computers I was more motivated to get the work done" (Maggie, April 25, 2014, survey). The researcher explored a rural school environment. Rural populations represent a large number of students and appear to be underrepresented in current research. The participants, tenth grade Biology students, were sampled in a traditional teacher led class without computers for one week followed by a week using computers daily. Data supported that there is a new gap that separates students, a device divide. This divide separates those who have access to devices that are robust enough to do high level class work from those who do not. Although cellular phones have reduced the number of students who cannot access the Internet, they may have created a false feeling that access to a computer is no longer necessary at home. As this study shows, although most students have Internet access, fewer have access to a device that enables them to complete rigorous class work at home. Participants received little or no training at school in proper, safe use of a computer and the Internet. It is clear that the majorities of students are self-taught or receive guidance

  8. New classes of Wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Manchanda, P.; Meenakshi

    2009-07-02

    Recently Manchanda, Meenakshi and Siddiqi have studied Haar-Vilenkin wavelet and a special type of non-uniform multiresolution analysis. Haar-Vilenkin wavelet is a generalization of Haar wavelet. Motivated by the paper of Gabardo and Nashed we have introduced a class of multiresolution analysis extending the concept of classical multiresolution analysis. We present here a resume of these results. We hope that applications of these concepts to some significant real world problems could be found.

  9. PID techniques: Alternatives to RICH methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Va'vra, J.

    2011-05-01

    In this review article we discuss the recent progress in PID techniques other than the RICH methods. In particular we mention the recent progress in the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), d E/d x cluster counting, and Time of Flight (TOF) techniques. Invited talk at RICH 2010, May 5, Cassis, France

  10. Statistically Recapturing the Richness Within the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Ellis Batten

    1975-01-01

    Classroom research is caught between lack of rigor and lack of richness. When multiple classrooms are used, and when the performance of different groups or levels of students is regarded as "repeated measures" (or split plots) and analyzed accordingly, much of the descriptive richness of the interactions may be regained. (Author)

  11. Ceres' hydrogen-rich regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; McSween, Harry Y.; Schorghofer, Norbert; Toplis, Michael J.; Forni, Olivier; Joy, Steven P.; Marchi, Simone; Platz, Thomas; Polanskey, Carol A.; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Rayman, Marc D.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    Low-altitude mapping of Ceres by Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) began in December of 2015. GRaND will continue to acquire data for at least six months in a circular-polar orbit, at an altitude of about 0.8 body radii. Close-proximity enables global mapping of the elemental composition of Ceres' regolith, with regional-scale spatial resolution, similar to that achieved at Vesta. An initial analysis of the data shows that Ceres' regolith is rich in H, consistent with the detection of ammoniated phyllosilicates by Dawn's Visible to InfraRed (VIR) spectrometer. Global maps of neutron and gamma ray counting data reveal a strong latitude variation, with suppressed counts at the poles. Lower bound estimates of the concentration of polar H exceed that found in carbonaceous chondrites, which are the best meteorite analogs for Ceres. Thermal modeling predicts that water ice is stable near the surface at high latitudes, and, given Ceres' low obliquity, water ice and other volatile species may be concentrated in permanently shadowed regions near the poles. Excess hydrogen at high latitudes is likely in the form of water ice within the decimeter depths sensed by GRaND. Changes in the hydration state of phyllosilicates and hydrated salt minerals with temperature could also contribute to observed spatial variations. Some GRaND signatures show evidence for layering of hydrogen, consistent with ice stability models. Differences in the gamma ray spectra of Ceres and Vesta indicate that Ceres' surface is primitive (closely related to carbonaceous chondrite-like compositions), in contrast to Vesta's fractionated igneous composition. Strong gamma rays are observed at 7.6 MeV (Fe), 6.1 MeV (O), and 2.2 MeV (H). With additional accumulation time, it may be possible to quantify or bound the concentration of other elements, such as Mg, Ni, and C. Elements diagnostic of hydrothermal activity (K, Cl, and S) may be detectable if they are present in high concentrations over

  12. ROBUST OPTICAL RICHNESS ESTIMATION WITH REDUCED SCATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Rykoff, E. S.; Koester, B. P.; Rozo, E.; Annis, J.; Hao, J.; Johnston, D. E.; Evrard, A. E.; McKay, T. A.; Hansen, S. M.

    2012-02-20

    Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence-matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. implemented on the maxBCG cluster catalog and evaluate the impact of these changes on the scatter in X-ray luminosity (L{sub X} ) at fixed richness, using L{sub X} from the ROSAT All-Sky Catalog as the best mass proxy available for the large area required. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that {sigma}{sub ln{sub L{sub x|{lambda}}}}=0.63{+-}0.02 for clusters with M{sub 500c} {approx}> 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h{sup -1}{sub 70} M{sub Sun }. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is {sigma}{sub lnM|{lambda}} Almost-Equal-To 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a priori calibrations of the red sequence. We also demonstrate that the recovered richness is robust to up to 50% uncertainties in the galaxy background, as well as to the choice of photometric filter employed, so long as the filters span the 4000 A break of red-sequence galaxies. Consequently, our richness estimator can be used to compare richness estimates of different clusters, even if they do not share the same photometric data. Appendix A includes 'easy-bake' instructions for implementing our optimal richness estimator, and we are releasing an implementation of the code that works with Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, as well as an augmented maxBCG catalog with the {lambda} richness measured for each cluster.

  13. The "Why's" of Class Size: Student Behavior in Small Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Jeremy D.; Pannozzo, Gina M.; Achilles, Charles M.

    2003-01-01

    Small classes in the elementary grades have been shown to boost students' academic performance. However, researchers continue to seek a consistent, integrated explanation of "why" small classes have positive effects. This article forwards the hypothesis that when class sizes are reduced, major changes occur in students' engagement in the…

  14. Climate and landscape explain richness patterns depending on the type of species' distribution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsianou, Mariana A.; Koutsias, Nikolaos; Mazaris, Antonios D.; Kallimanis, Athanasios S.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the patterns of species richness and their environmental drivers, remains a central theme in ecological research and especially in the continental scales where many conservation decisions are made. Here, we analyzed the patterns of species richness from amphibians, reptiles and mammals at the EU level. We used two different data sources for each taxon: expert-drawn species range maps, and presence/absence atlases. As environmental drivers, we considered climate and land cover. Land cover is increasingly the focus of research, but there still is no consensus on how to classify land cover to distinct habitat classes, so we analyzed the CORINE land cover data with three different levels of thematic resolution (resolution of classification scheme ˗ less to more detailed). We found that the two types of species richness data explored in this study yielded different richness maps. Although, we expected expert-drawn range based estimates of species richness to exceed those from atlas data (due to the assumption that species are present in all locations throughout their region), we found that in many cases the opposite is true (the extreme case is the reptiles where more than half of the atlas based estimates were greater than the expert-drawn range based estimates). Also, we detected contrasting information on the richness drivers of biodiversity patterns depending on the dataset used. For atlas based richness estimates, landscape attributes played more important role than climate while for expert-drawn range based richness estimates climatic variables were more important (for the ectothermic amphibians and reptiles). Finally we found that the thematic resolution of the land cover classification scheme, also played a role in quantifying the effect of land cover diversity, with more detailed thematic resolution increasing the relative contribution of landscape attributes in predicting species richness.

  15. The Class of '34

    PubMed Central

    Cairney, Richard

    1995-01-01

    The Great Depression raged, governments were beleaguered, the unemployment rate stood at 30%, scurvy stalked the poor and no one was immune to contagious diseases such as scarlet fever, polio and measles when the University of Alberta School of Medicine's Class of '34 graduated. For four alumni who recently gathered in Edmonton—Drs. Morley Hodgson, Melvin Gaudin, John McLurg and Edmund Cairns—their 60th-anniversary reunion was a time to recall the changes they have witnessed in medicine, including the arrival of antibiotic drugs and the medicare system. Imagesp558-a

  16. Kinematics and host-galaxy properties suggest a nuclear origin for calcium-rich supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Ryan J.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium-rich supernovae (Ca-rich SNe) are peculiar low-luminosity SNe Ib with relatively strong Ca spectral lines at ˜2 months after peak brightness. This class also has an extended projected offset distribution, with several members of the class offset from their host galaxies by 30-150 kpc. There is no indication of any stellar population at the SN positions. Using a sample of 13 Ca-rich SNe, we present kinematic evidence that the progenitors of Ca-rich SNe originate near the centres of their host galaxies and are kicked to the locations of the SN explosions. Specifically, SNe with small projected offsets have large line-of-sight velocity shifts as determined by nebular lines, while those with large projected offsets have no significant velocity shifts. Therefore, the velocity shifts must not be primarily the result of the SN explosion. Additionally, nearly every Ca-rich SN is hosted by a galaxy with indications of a recent merger and/or is in a dense environment. We propose a progenitor model which fits all current data: the progenitor system for a Ca-rich SN is a double white dwarf (WD) system where at least one WD has a significant He abundance. This system, through an interaction with a super-massive black hole (SMBH) is ejected from its host galaxy and the binary is hardened, significantly reducing the merger time. After 10-100 Myr (on average), the system explodes with a large physical offset. The rate for such events is significantly enhanced for galaxies which have undergone recent mergers, potentially making Ca-rich SNe new probes of both the galaxy merger rate and (binary) SMBH population.

  17. A Touch of...Class!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Francois

    1990-01-01

    Class activities for French native and second-language immersion classes using the souvenir program of a 1988 Manitoba travel festival are outlined. Activities involve global manipulation of the document and specific uses for information seeking and information manipulation. (MSE)

  18. Radial tail resolution in the SELEX RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Morelos, A.; Mata, J.; Cooper, P.S.; Engelfried, J.; Aguilera-Servin, J.L.; /San Luis Potosi U. /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The authors use a 7 Million event data sample of 600 GeV/c single track pion events, where the pion track is reconstructed upstream and downstream of the SELEX RICH. They build the RICH ring radius histogram distribution and count the tail events that fall outside 5{sigma}, giving a fraction of 4 x 10{sup -5} events outside the Gaussian tails. This control of events establishes the ability of using the RICH as velocity spectrometer for high precision searches of the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay like it is planned in the CKM experiment.

  19. Firm size diversity, functional richness, and resilience

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garmestani, A.S.; Allen, C.R.; Mittelstaedt, J.D.; Stow, C.A.; Ward, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper applies recent advances in ecology to our understanding of firm development, sustainability, and economic development. The ecological literature indicates that the greater the functional richness of species in a system, the greater its resilience - that is, its ability to persist in the face of substantial changes in the environment. This paper focuses on the effects of functional richness across firm size on the ability of industries to survive in the face of economic change. Our results indicate that industries with a richness of industrial functions are more resilient to employment volatility. ?? 2006 Cambridge University Press.

  20. Mass, shape and thermal properties of Abell 1689 using a multiwavelength X-ray, lensing and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, Mauro; Ettori, Stefano; Umetsu, Keiichi; Baldi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the mass and concentration of galaxy clusters is crucial for an understanding of their formation and evolution. Unbiased estimates require an understanding of the shape and orientation of the halo as well as its equilibrium status. We propose a novel method to determine the intrinsic properties of galaxy clusters from a multiwavelength data set, spanning from X-ray spectroscopic and photometric data to gravitational lensing to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The method relies on two non-informative geometrical assumptions: the distributions of total matter or gas are approximately ellipsoidal and co-aligned; they have different, constant axial ratios but share the same degree of triaxiality. Weak and strong lensing probe the features of the total mass distribution in the plane of the sky. X-ray data measure the size and orientation of the gas in the plane of the sky. Comparison with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich amplitude fixes the elongation of the gas along the line of sight. These constraints are deprojected as a result of Bayesian inference. The mass distribution is described as a Navarro-Frenk-White halo with arbitrary orientation, and the gas density and temperature are modelled with parametric profiles. We have applied the method to Abell 1689. Independently of the priors, the cluster is massive, M200 = (1.3 ± 0.2) × 1015 M⊙, and overconcentrated, c200 = 8 ± 1, but it is still consistent with theoretical predictions. The total matter is triaxial (minor to major axial ratio ˜0.5 ± 0.1, exploiting priors from N-body simulations) with the major axis nearly orientated along the line of sight. The gas is rounder (minor to major axial ratio ˜0.6 ± 0.1) and deviates from hydrostatic equilibrium. The contribution of non-thermal pressure is ˜20-50 per cent in the inner regions, ≲ 300 kpc, and ˜25 ± 5 per cent at ˜1.5 Mpc. This picture of A1689 was obtained with a small number of assumptions and in a single framework, suitable for application to a

  1. Multimethod latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nussbeck, Fridtjof W.; Eid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Correct and, hence, valid classifications of individuals are of high importance in the social sciences as these classifications are the basis for diagnoses and/or the assignment to a treatment. The via regia to inspect the validity of psychological ratings is the multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) approach. First, a latent variable model for the analysis of rater agreement (latent rater agreement model) will be presented that allows for the analysis of convergent validity between different measurement approaches (e.g., raters). Models of rater agreement are transferred to the level of latent variables. Second, the latent rater agreement model will be extended to a more informative MTMM latent class model. This model allows for estimating (i) the convergence of ratings, (ii) method biases in terms of differential latent distributions of raters and differential associations of categorizations within raters (specific rater bias), and (iii) the distinguishability of categories indicating if categories are satisfyingly distinct from each other. Finally, an empirical application is presented to exemplify the interpretation of the MTMM latent class model. PMID:26441714

  2. Team Learning in Large Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Information and suggestions are provided on the use of team learning in large college classes. Introductory material discusses the negative cycle of student-teacher interaction that may be provoked by large classes, and the use of permanent, heterogeneous, six- or seven-member student learning groups as the central focus of class activity as a…

  3. Teachers, Social Class and Underachievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Mairead; Gazeley, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Addressing the "the social class attainment gap" in education has become a government priority in England. Despite multiple initiatives, however, little has effectively addressed the underachievement of working-class pupils within the classroom. In order to develop clearer understandings of working-class underachievement at this level, this small…

  4. Contrasting structure and composition of the understory in species-rich tropical rain forests.

    PubMed

    LaFrankie, James V; Ashton, Peter S; Chuyong, George B; Co, Leonardo; Condit, Richard; Davies, Stuart J; Foster, Robin; Hubbell, Stephen P; Kenfack, David; Lagunzad, Daniel; Losos, Elizabeth C; Nor, Noor Supardi Md; Tan, Sylvester; Thomas, Duncan W; Valencia, Renato; Villa, Gorky

    2006-09-01

    In large samples of trees > or = 1 cm dbh (more than 1 million trees and 3000 species), in six lowland tropical forests on three continents, we assigned species with >30 individuals to one of six classes of stature at maturity (SAM). We then compared the proportional representation of understory trees (1-2 cm dbh) among these classes. The understory of the three Asian sites was predominantly composed of the saplings of large-canopy trees whereas the African and American sites were more richly stocked with trees of the smaller SAM classes. Differences in class representation were related to taxonomic families that were present exclusively in one continent or another. Families found in the Asian plots but not in the American plot (e.g., Dipterocarpaceae, Fagaceae) were predominantly species of the largest SAM classes, whereas families exclusive to the American plots (e.g., Melastomataceae sensu stricto, Piperaceae, and Malvaceae [Bombacacoidea]) were predominantly species of small classes. The African plot was similar to Asia in the absence of those American families rich in understory species, while similar to America in lacking the Asian families rich in canopy species. The numerous understory species of Africa were chiefly derived from families shared with Asia and/or America. The ratio of saplings (1-2 cm dbh) to conspecific canopy trees (>40 cm dbh) was lower in American plots than in the Asian plots. Possible explanations for these differences include phenology, moisture and soil fertility regimes, phyletic constraints, and the role of early successional plants in forest development. These results demonstrate that tropical forests that appear similar in tree number, basal area, and the family taxonomy of canopy trees nonetheless differ in ecological structure in ways that may impact the ecology of pollinators, dispersers, and herbivores and might reflect fundamental differences in canopy tree regeneration. PMID:16995630

  5. Thermodynamics of neutron-rich nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Jorge A.; Porras, Sergio Terrazas; Gutiérrez, Araceli Rodríguez

    2016-07-01

    This manuscript presents methods to obtain properties of neutron-rich nuclear matter from classical molecular dynamics. Some of these are bulk properties of infinite nuclear matter, phase information, the Maxwell construction, spinodal lines and symmetry energy.

  6. Tannin rich peanut skins lack anthelmintic properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) resistance to synthetic anthelmintics in small ruminants has led to the evaluation of feed sources containing naturally occurring bioactive secondary metabolites that lessen parasite activity. Plants rich in condensed tannins (CT) can have beneficial anthelmintic pro...

  7. Revisiting spatial scale in the productivity-species richness relationship: fundamental issues and global change implications.

    PubMed

    McBride, Paul D; Cusens, Jarrod; Gillman, Len N

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between net primary productivity (NPP) and species richness has been the subject of long-running debate. A changing climate gives added impetus to resolving this debate, as it becomes increasingly necessary to predict biodiversity responses that might arise from shifts in productivity or its climatic correlates. It has become increasingly clear that at small scales productivity-species richness relationships (PSRs) are variable, while at macro scales relationships are typically positive. We demonstrate the importance of explicitly considering scale in discussions on PSRs even at large scales by showing that distinct patterns emerge in a global dataset of terrestrial ecoregions when ecoregions are binned into size classes. At all sizes, PSRs in ecoregions are positive, but the strength of the PSR scales positively with ecoregion size. In small ecoregions (10(3)-10(4) km(2)), factors correlating with productivity play only a minor role in species richness patterns, while in large ecoregions (>10(5) km(2)), NPP modelled from remotely sensed data is able to explain most of the variation in species richness. Better understanding the effects of scale on PSRs contributes to the debate on the relationship between species richness and productivity, which in turn allows us to better predict how both long- and short-term biodiversity patterns and ecosystem functioning might be altered under global change scenarios. This gives focus on future research to clarify causal pathways between species richness and productivity with appropriate attention to scale as an important focusing element. PMID:25249265

  8. Tests of Zinc Rich Anticorrosion Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. D.; Paton, W. J.; Rowe, A.

    1986-01-01

    Condition of zinc-rich anticorrosion coatings after 10 years of exposure discussed in status report, which follows up on 18-month study of anticorrosion coatings on steel started in 1971. Test panels with various coatings mounted on racks on beach and checked periodically. Of panels with inorganic zinc-rich coatings, only one slightly rusted. Panels were in such good condition they were returned to beach for more exposure.

  9. Toxicological evaluation of arachidonic acid (ARA)-rich oil and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich oil.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kara D; Huang, Weifeng; Zheng, Xiaohui; Jiang, Yue; Feldman, Robin S; Falk, Michael C

    2016-10-01

    The safety of DHA-rich oil from Schizochytrium sp. and ARA-rich oil from Mortierella alpina was separately evaluated by testing for gene mutations, clastogenicity, and aneugenicity, and by conducting 28-day and 90-day dietary studies in Wistar rats. The results of all genotoxicity tests were negative. The 28-day and 90-day studies involved dietary exposure to 1000, 2500, and 5000 mg per kg bw of the DHA-rich and ARA-rich oils and two control diets: water and corn oil (vehicle control). There were no treatment-related effects of either the DHA-rich or ARA-rich oils on clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, behavior, hematology, clinical chemistry, coagulation, urinalysis parameters, or necropsy findings. Increases in cholesterol and triglyceride levels were considered related to a high oil diet and non-adverse. The no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) for both the DHA-rich and ARA-rich oils was 5000 mg per kg bw, the highest dose tested. The results confirm that these oils possess toxicity profiles similar to those of other currently marketed oils and support the safety of DHA-rich oil from Schizochytrium sp. and ARA-rich oil from Mortierella alpina for their proposed uses in food. PMID:27470615

  10. Calcium-rich gap transients: tidal detonations of white dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, P. H.; Maccarone, T. J.; Kotak, R.; Knigge, C.; Sand, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    We hypothesize that at least some of the recently discovered class of calcium-rich gap transients are tidal detonation events of white dwarfs (WDs) by black holes (BHs) or possibly neutron stars. We show that the properties of the calcium-rich gap transients agree well with the predictions of the tidal detonation model. Under the predictions of this model, we use a follow-up X-ray observation of one of these transients, SN 2012hn, to place weak upper limits on the detonator mass of this system that include all intermediate-mass BHs (IMBHs). As these transients are preferentially in the stellar haloes of galaxies, we discuss the possibility that these transients are tidal detonations of WDs caused by random flyby encounters with IMBHs in dwarf galaxies or globular clusters. This possibility has been already suggested in the literature but without connection to the calcium-rich gap transients. In order for the random flyby cross-section to be high enough, these events would have to be occurring inside these dense stellar associations. However, there is a lack of evidence for IMBHs in these systems, and recent observations have ruled out all but the very faintest dwarf galaxies and globular clusters for a few of these transients. Another possibility is that these are tidal detonations caused by three-body interactions, where a WD is perturbed towards the detonator in isolated multiple star systems. We highlight a number of ways this could occur, even in lower mass systems with stellar-mass BHs or neutron stars. Finally, we outline several new observational tests of this scenario, which are feasible with current instrumentation.

  11. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions from enstatite chondrites: indigenous or foreign?

    PubMed

    Guan; Huss; MacPherson; Wasserburg

    2000-08-25

    The primary mineral assemblages and initial (26)Al/(27)Al ratios of rare calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from enstatite (E) chondrites are similar to those of CAIs from other chondrite classes. CAIs from all chondrite classes formed under oxidizing conditions that are much different from the reducing conditions under which the E chondrites formed. Either CAIs formed at an earlier, more oxidizing epoch in the region where E chondrites ultimately formed, or they formed at a different place in the solar nebula and were transported into the E chondrite formation region. PMID:10958775

  12. Predicting spatial variations of tree species richness in tropical forests from high-resolution remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Fricker, Geoffrey A; Wolf, Jeffrey A; Saatchi, Sassan S; Gillespie, Thomas W

    2015-10-01

    There is an increasing interest in identifying theories, empirical data sets, and remote-sensing metrics that can quantify tropical forest alpha diversity at a landscape scale. Quantifying patterns of tree species richness in the field is time consuming, especially in regions with over 100 tree species/ha. We examine species richness in a 50-ha plot in Barro Colorado Island in Panama and test if biophysical measurements of canopy reflectance from high-resolution satellite imagery and detailed vertical forest structure and topography from light detection and ranging (lidar) are associated with species richness across four tree size classes (>1, 1-10, >10, and >20 cm dbh) and three spatial scales (1, 0.25, and 0.04 ha). We use the 2010 tree inventory, including 204,757 individuals belonging to 301 species of freestanding woody plants or 166 ± 1.5 species/ha (mean ± SE), to compare with remote-sensing data. All remote-sensing metrics became less correlated with species richness as spatial resolution decreased from 1.0 ha to 0.04 ha and tree size increased from 1 cm to 20 cm dbh. When all stems with dbh > 1 cm in 1-ha plots were compared to remote-sensing metrics, standard deviation in canopy reflectance explained 13% of the variance in species richness. The standard deviations of canopy height and the topographic wetness index (TWI) derived from lidar were the best metrics to explain the spatial variance in species richness (15% and 24%, respectively). Using multiple regression models, we made predictions of species richness across Barro Colorado Island (BCI) at the 1-ha spatial scale for different tree size classes. We predicted variation in tree species richness among all plants (adjusted r² = 0.35) and trees with dbh > 10 cm (adjusted r² = 0.25). However, the best model results were for understory trees and shrubs (dbh 1-10 cm) (adjusted r² = 0.52) that comprise the majority of species richness in tropical forests. Our results indicate that high

  13. Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sassler, Sharon; Miller, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning cohabitation literature, research has failed to examine social class variation in processes of forming and advancing such unions. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 122 working- and middle-class cohabitors, we examine the duration between dating and moving in together, reasons for cohabiting, and subsequent plans. Transitions to cohabitation are more rapid among the working class. Respondents often cohabited for practical reasons—out of financial necessity, because it was convenient, or to meet a housing need. Regardless of social class status, few couples move in together as a “trial marriage.” Nonetheless, middle-class cohabitors were more likely to have become engaged than their working-class counterparts. Our findings indicate the need to reassess common beliefs regarding the role served by cohabitation and suggest that cohabitation has become another location where family outcomes are diverging by social class. PMID:23504506

  14. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  15. Network Class Superposition Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carl A. B.; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., for the yeast cell cycle process [1]), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix , which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for derived from Boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with . We show how to generate Derrida plots based on . We show that -based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on . We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology Boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for , for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses. PMID:23565141

  16. A Casualty in the Class War: Canada's Medicare

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    “There's class warfare, all right, but it's my class, the rich class, that's making war, and we're winning.” (Warren Buffett, five years ago.) Last year's Occupy Wall Street movement suggested that people are finally catching on. Note, making war: Buffett meant that there was deliberate intent and agency behind the huge transfer of wealth, since 1980, from the 99% to the 1%. Nor is the war metaphorical. There are real casualties, even if no body bags. Sadly, much Canadian commentary on inequality is pitiably naïve or deliberately obfuscatory. The 1% have captured national governments. The astronomical cost of American elections excludes the 99%. In Canada, parliamentary government permits one man to rule as a de facto dictator. The 1% don't like medicare. PMID:23372577

  17. A Casualty in the Class War: Canada's Medicare.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert G

    2012-02-01

    "There's class warfare, all right, but it's my class, the rich class, that's making war, and we're winning." (Warren Buffett, five years ago.) Last year's Occupy Wall Street movement suggested that people are finally catching on. Note, making war: Buffett meant that there was deliberate intent and agency behind the huge transfer of wealth, since 1980, from the 99% to the 1%. Nor is the war metaphorical. There are real casualties, even if no body bags. Sadly, much Canadian commentary on inequality is pitiably naïve or deliberately obfuscatory. The 1% have captured national governments. The astronomical cost of American elections excludes the 99%. In Canada, parliamentary government permits one man to rule as a de facto dictator. The 1% don't like medicare. PMID:23372577

  18. Abundances in red giant stars - Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Sahai, R.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter-wave observations have been made of isotopically substituted CO toward the envelopes of 11 carbon-rich stars. In every case, C-13O was detected and model calculations were used to estimate the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio. C-17O was detected toward three, and possibly four, envelopes, with sensitive upper limits for two others. The CO-18 variant was detected in two envelopes. New results include determinations of oxygen isotopic ratios in the two carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae CRL 26688 and CRL 618. As with other classes of red giant stars, the carbon-rich giants seem to be significantly, though variably, enriched in O-17. These results, in combination with observations in interstellar molecular clouds, indicate that current knowledge of stellar production of the CNO nuclides is far from satisfactory.

  19. Lithium-rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhang, Andrew J.; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G.; Cunha, Katia

    2016-03-01

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. Archaebacterial class I and class II aldolases from extreme halophiles.

    PubMed

    Altekar, W; Dhar, N M

    1988-01-01

    Both, class I (Schiff-base forming) and class II (metal requiring) fructose biphosphate aldolases were found to be distributed among halophilic archaebacteria. The aldolase activity from Halobacteriium halobium, H. salinarium, H. cutirubrum, H. mediterranei and H. volcanii exhibited properties of a bacterial class II aldolase as it was metal-dependent for activity and therefore inhibited by EDTA. In contrast, aldolase from H. saccharovorum, Halobacterium R-113, H. vallismortis and Halobacterium CH-1 formed a Schiff-base intermediate with the substrate and therefore resembled to eukaryotic class I type. The type of aldolase did not vary by changes in the growth medium. PMID:11536602

  1. Archaebacterial class I and class II aldolases from extreme halophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterkar, Wijaya; Dhar, Nenoo M.

    1988-03-01

    Both, class I (Schiff-base forming) and class II (metal requiring) fructose biphosphate aldolases were found to be distributed among halophilic archaebacteria. The aldolase activity fromHalobacterium halobium, H. salinarium, H. cutirubrum, H. mediterranei andH. volcanii exhibited properties of a bacterial class II aldolase as it was metal-dependent for activity and therefore inhibited by EDTA. In contrast, aldolase fromH. saccharovorum, Halobacterium R-113, H. vallismortis andHalobacterium CH-1 formed a Schiff-base intermediate with the substrate and therefore resembled to eukaryotic class I type. The type of aldolase did not vary by changes in the growth medium.

  2. TRIGLYCERIDE-RICH LIPOPROTEIN LIPOLYSIS RELEASES NEUTRAL AND OXIDIZED FREE FATTY ACIDS THAT INDUCE ENDOTHELIAL CELL INFLAMMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective–Increased products of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TGRL) lipolysis provide a pro-inflammatory stimulus that may alter endothelial barrier function. To probe the mechanism of this lipolysis-induced dysfunction, we evaluated the pro-inflammatory potential of lipid classes derived from huma...

  3. Organizing MHC Class II Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Fooksman, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are ligands for CD4+ T cells and are critical for initiating the adaptive immune response. This review is focused on what is currently known about MHC class II organization at the plasma membrane of antigen presenting cells and how this affects antigen presentation to T cells. The organization and diffusion of class II molecules have been measured by a variety of biochemical and microscopic techniques. Membrane lipids and other proteins have been implicated in MHC class II organization and function. However, when compared with the organization of MHC class I or TCR complexes, much less is known about MHC class II. Since clustering of T cell receptors occurs during activation, the organization of MHC molecules prior to recognition and during synapse formation may be critical for antigen presentation. PMID:24782863

  4. The Malaysian Class Reader Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raj, Devinder; Hunt, Brain

    1990-01-01

    Briefly describes reading standards in Malaysian schools, outlines a class reader program, and provides samples of teaching files designed to help teachers implement the program. (one reference. (GLR)

  5. Species richness changes lag behind climate change.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Rosa; Megías, Adela González; Hill, Jane K; Braschler, Brigitte; Willis, Stephen G; Collingham, Yvonne; Fox, Richard; Roy, David B; Thomas, Chris D

    2006-06-22

    Species-energy theory indicates that recent climate warming should have driven increases in species richness in cool and species-poor parts of the Northern Hemisphere. We confirm that the average species richness of British butterflies has increased since 1970-82, but much more slowly than predicted from changes of climate: on average, only one-third of the predicted increase has taken place. The resultant species assemblages are increasingly dominated by generalist species that were able to respond quickly. The time lag is confirmed by the successful introduction of many species to climatically suitable areas beyond their ranges. Our results imply that it may be decades or centuries before the species richness and composition of biological communities adjusts to the current climate. PMID:16777739

  6. Patterns of fine-scale plant species richness in dry grasslands across the eastern Balkan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palpurina, Salza; Chytrý, Milan; Tzonev, Rossen; Danihelka, Jiří; Axmanová, Irena; Merunková, Kristina; Duchoň, Mário; Karakiev, Todor

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale plant species richness varies across habitats, climatic and biogeographic regions, but the large-scale context of this variation is insufficiently explored. The patterns at the borders between biomes harbouring rich but different floras are of special interest. Dry grasslands of the eastern Balkan Peninsula, situated in the Eurasian forest-steppe zone and developed under Mediterranean influence, are a specific case of such biome transition. However, there are no studies assessing the patterns of fine-scale species richness and their underlying factors across the eastern Balkans. To explore these patterns, we sampled dry and semi-dry grasslands (phytosociological class Festuco-Brometea) across Bulgaria and SE Romania. In total, 172 vegetation plots of 10 × 10 m2 were sampled, in which all vascular plant species were recorded, soil depth was measured, and soil samples were collected and analysed in a laboratory for pH and plant-available nutrients. Geographic coordinates were used to extract selected climatic variables. Regression trees and linear regressions were used to quantify the relationships between species richness and environmental variables. Climatic factors were identified as the main drivers of species richness: (1) Species richness was strongly positively correlated with the mean temperature of the coldest month: sub-Mediterranean areas of S and E Bulgaria, characterized by warmer winters, were more species-rich. (2) Outside the sub-Mediterranean areas, species richness strongly increased with annual precipitation, which was primarily controlled by altitude. (3) Bedrock type and soil pH also significantly affected dry grassland richness outside the sub-Mediterranean areas. These results suggest that fine-scale species richness of dry grasslands over large areas is driven by processes at the regional level, especially by the difference in the species pools of large regions, in our case the Continental and Mediterranean biogeographic regions

  7. Spectroscopic Studies of Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Michael Joseph

    The objectives of this work are to use spectroscopic techniques to accurately categorize galaxies as either HII region star forming galaxies or as Active Galactic Nuclei powered via a black hole, and to use radial velocities and projected positions of galaxies in clusters to obtain the total cluster mass and its distribution. The masses and distributions compare well to X-ray mass measurements. The commonly used Dressler, A., Thompson, I. & Shectman, S. 1985, ApJ, 288, 481 technique for discriminating between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies uses the measurement of the equivalent width of the emission lines (OII) 3727 A, H/beta, and (OIII) 5007 A. High quality spectra from 42 galaxies were taken and it is shown that their method is not capable of distinguishing between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. The emission line flux from H/beta, (OIII) 5007 A, (OI) 6300 A, Hα, (NII) 6583 A, and (SII) 6716+6731 A in combination with the method of Veilleux, S. & Osterbrock, D. E. 1987, ApJS, 63, 295 must be used to accurately distinguish between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. Galaxy radial velocities from spectroscopic data and their projected 2-D positions in clusters are used to obtain robust estimates of the total mass and mass distribution in two clusters. The total mass is calculated using the Virial theorem after removing substructure. The mass distribution is estimated via several robust statistical tests for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structure. It is shown that the derived mass estimates agree well with those found independently from hot X-ray gas emission in clusters.

  8. First class models from linear and nonlinear second class constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Mehdi; Mardaani, Maryam; Monemzadeh, Majid; Nejad, Salman Abarghouei

    2015-10-01

    Two models with linear and nonlinear second class constraints are considered and gauged by embedding in an extended phase space. These models are studied by considering a free non-relativistic particle on the hyperplane and hypersphere in the configuration space. The gauged theory of the first model is obtained by converting the very second class system to the first class one directly. In contrast, the first class system related to the free particle on the hypersphere is derived with the help of the infinite Batalin-Fradkin-Tyutin (BFT) embedding procedure. We propose a practical formula, based on the simplified BFT method, which is practical in gauging linear and some nonlinear second class systems. As a result of gauging these two models, we show that in the conversion of second class constraints to the first class ones, the minimum number of phase space degrees of freedom for both systems is a pair of phase space coordinates. This pair is made up of a coordinate and its conjugate momentum for the first model, but the corresponding Poisson structure of the embedded non-relativistic particle on hypersphere is a nontrivial one. We derive infinite correction terms for the Hamiltonian of the nonlinear constraints and an interacting gauged Hamiltonian is constructed by summing over them. At the end, we find an open algebra for three first class objects of the embedded nonlinear system.

  9. 47 CFR 80.1053 - Prohibition on certification, manufacture, importation, sale or use of Class A, Class B, Class S...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prohibition on certification, manufacture... certification, manufacture, importation, sale or use of Class A, Class B, Class S, and INMARSAT-E EPIRBs. The manufacture, importation, or sale in the United States of Class A, Class B, Class S, or INMARSAT-E EPIRBs...

  10. Probing neutron rich matter with parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Many compact and energetic astrophysical systems are made of neutron rich matter. In contrast, most terrestrial nuclei involve approximately symmetric nuclear matter with more equal numbers of neutrons and protons. However, heavy nuclei have a surface region that contains many extra neutrons. Precision measurements of this neutron rich skin can determine properties of neutron rich matter. Parity violating electron scattering provides a uniquely clean probe of neutrons, because the weak charge of a neutron is much larger than that of a proton. We describe first results and future plans for the Jefferson Laboratory experiment PREX that measures the thickness of the neutron skin in 208Pb. Another JLAB experiment CREX will measure the neutron radius of 48Ca and test recent microscopic calculations of this neutron rich 48 nucleon system. Finally, we show how measuring parity violation at multiple momentum transfers can determine not just the neutron radius but the full radial structure of the neutron density in 48Ca. A neutron star is eighteen orders of magnitude larger than a nucleus (km vs fm) but both the star and the neutron rich nuclear skin are made of the same neutrons, with the same strong interactions, and the same equation of state. A large pressure pushes neutrons out against surface tension and gives a thick neutron skin. Therefore, PREX will constrain the equation of state of neutron rich matter and improve predictions for the structure of neutron stars. Supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  11. Infall patterns around rich clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regos, Eniko; Geller, Margaret J.

    1989-01-01

    The pattern of infall velocities induced by a rich cluster of galaxies is considered, using an infall model based on the Friedmann solution to determine the exact implicit dependence of the peculiar velocity on the density enhancment and the mean cosmological mass density, Omega(0). An analytic model for the distribution of galaxies around a cluster core in redshift space is developed. The high-density caustics in redshift space are shown to appear as envelopes around rich clusters. Assuming that the galaxies trace the matter distribution, low Omega(0) models can explain observational data obtained for four clusters. The present results support the prediction that light traces mass in the infall region.

  12. He-3-rich flares - A possible explanation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A plasma mechanism is proposed to explain the dramatic enhancements in He-3 observed in He-3-rich flares. It is shown that a common current instability in the corona may heat ambient He-3(2+) over any other ion and thus may preferentially inject He-3 into the flare acceleration process. This mechanism operates when the abundance of He-4 and heavier elements is larger than normal in the coronal plasma. It may also preferentially heat and thus inject certain ions of iron. The mechanism thus provides a possible explanation for the observed correlation between He-3 and heavy enhancements in He-3-rich flares.

  13. Prototype studies for the CLEO III RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, S.; Artuso, M.; Efimov, A.; Gao, M.; Playfer, S.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Stone, S.

    1996-06-01

    The authors describe a prototype RICH detector that has been built as part of design work for the CLEO III RICH. Cherenkov photons are produced in a LiF radiator, and are detected in a multiwire chamber with a CaF{sub 2} entrance window containing a gas mixture of methane and TEA. Signals are read out from 2016 cathode pads using low noise Viking chips. First results from this prototype show a yield of 13 photoelectrons per image in agreement with the design studies.

  14. Is Montgomery County's Housing Policy One Answer to Baltimore's Education Achievement Gap? The Abell Report. Volume 24, No.3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    In 1966, the Coleman Report firmly established the link between a family's socioeconomic status and a child's educational outcomes. Known as the "income achievement gap," the disparity between the achievement of poor and rich children has become entrenched in our nation's educational landscape: with few exceptions, schools…

  15. Grain size effects on 230Th xs inventories in opal-rich and carbonate-rich marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretschmer, Sven; Geibert, Walter; Rutgers van der Loeff, Michiel M.; Mollenhauer, Gesine

    2010-05-01

    Excess Thorium-230 ( 230Th xs) as a constant flux tracer is an essential tool for paleoceanographic studies, but its limitations for flux normalization are still a matter of debate. In regions of rapid sediment accumulation, it has been an open question if 230Th xs-normalized fluxes are biased by particle sorting effects during sediment redistribution. In order to study the sorting effect of sediment transport on 230Th xs, we analyzed the specific activity of 230Th xs in different particle size classes of carbonate-rich sediments from the South East Atlantic, and of opal-rich sediments from the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. At both sites, we compare the 230Th xs distribution in neighboring high vs. low accumulation settings. Two grain-size fractionation methods are explored. We find that the 230Th xs distribution is strongly grain size dependent, and 50-90% of the total 230Th xs inventory is concentrated in fine material smaller than 10 µm, which is preferentially deposited at the high accumulation sites. This leads to an overestimation of the focusing factor Ψ, and consequently to an underestimation of the vertical flux rate at such sites. The distribution of authigenic uranium indicates that fine organic-rich material has also been re-deposited from lateral sources. If the particle sorting effect is considered in the flux calculations, it reduces the estimated extent of sediment focusing. In order to assess the maximum effect of particle sorting on Ψ, we present an extreme scenario, in which we assume a lateral sediment supply of only fine material (< 10 µm). In this case, the focusing factor of the opal-rich core would be reduced from Ψ = 5.9 to Ψ = 3.2. In a more likely scenario, allowing silt-sized material to be transported, Ψ is reduced from 5.9 to 5.0 if particle sorting is taken into consideration. The bias introduced by particle sorting is most important for strongly focused sediments. Comparing 230Th xs-normalized mass fluxes biased by

  16. [Modified Class II tunnel preparation].

    PubMed

    Rimondini, L; Baroni, C

    1991-05-15

    Tunnel preparations for restoration of Class II carious lesions in primary molars preserve the marginal ridge and minimize sacrifice of healthy tooth substructure. Materials with improved bonding to tooth structure and increase potential for fluoride release allow Class II restorations without "extension for prevention". PMID:1864420

  17. Ideas for Managing Large Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabel, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes management strategies used in a large kinetics/industrial chemistry course. Strategies are designed to make instruction in such classes more efficient and effective. Areas addressed include homework assignment, quizzes, final examination, grading and feedback, and rewards for conducting the class in the manner described. (JN)

  18. Automatic discovery of optimal classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John; Freeman, Don; Self, Matthew

    1986-01-01

    A criterion, based on Bayes' theorem, is described that defines the optimal set of classes (a classification) for a given set of examples. This criterion is transformed into an equivalent minimum message length criterion with an intuitive information interpretation. This criterion does not require that the number of classes be specified in advance, this is determined by the data. The minimum message length criterion includes the message length required to describe the classes, so there is a built in bias against adding new classes unless they lead to a reduction in the message length required to describe the data. Unfortunately, the search space of possible classifications is too large to search exhaustively, so heuristic search methods, such as simulated annealing, are applied. Tutored learning and probabilistic prediction in particular cases are an important indirect result of optimal class discovery. Extensions to the basic class induction program include the ability to combine category and real value data, hierarchical classes, independent classifications and deciding for each class which attributes are relevant.

  19. The Paradox of Paperless Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackie, Paula

    1998-01-01

    Describes paperless classes developed at Carleton College that augment traditional classes by giving students and faculty the ability to share digital course-related materials via the campus computer network. Presents a case study of a managerial economics course, and includes problems with various aspects of the course and solutions. (LRW)

  20. The Generalizability of Class Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael T.; Brennan, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    Dependability of class means is analyzed by applying generalizability to a split-plot design with students nested within classes. Basic generalizability concepts are reviewed, and the derivation and interpretation of distinct generalizability concepts are discussed. Four generalizability coefficients are compared with each other and with the three…

  1. Translanguaging in a Reading Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaish, Viniti; Subhan, Aidil

    2015-01-01

    Using translanguaging as a theoretical foundation, this paper analyses findings from a Grade 2 reading class for low achieving students, where Malay was used as a scaffold to teach English. Data come from one class in one school in Singapore and its Learning Support Programme (LSP), which is part of a larger research project on biliteracy. The LSP…

  2. Social Class and the Extracurriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barratt, Will

    2012-01-01

    Social class is a powerful and often unrecognized influence on student participation in the extracurriculum. Spontaneous student-created extracurricular experiences depend on students affiliating and interacting with each other; student social class is a powerful influence on student affiliations. Students tend to exercise consciousness of kind-…

  3. Student Engagement and Marketing Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven A.; Hunter, Gary L.; Melton, Horace; Goodwin, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    A study is reported that investigates the goals underlying undergraduate students' engagement in their major classes, nonmajor classes, and in extracurricular activities. The qualitative study employs both focus groups and goal-mapping exercises. The results suggest that students tend to focus on utilitarian, attribute-level considerations mainly…

  4. Class and SLA: Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how class might be brought to the fore as an identity inscription in studies of second language learning, alongside other identity inscriptions such as gender, ethnicity and national identity, which have been the focus of rather more research. It begins by clarifying what is meant by class through a brief discussion of the…

  5. CAPEOPEN.NET CLASS LIBRARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cape-Open for .Net class library is a collection of classes that implement the Cape-Open v.1.0 interfaces in the .Net framework. This is a tool to aid process modeling component (PMC) developers in producing CAPE-OPEN compliant objects using the latest version of the Visual S...

  6. Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassler, Sharon; Miller, Amanda J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning cohabitation literature, research has failed to examine social class variation in processes of forming and advancing such unions. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 122 working- and middle-class cohabitors, we examine the duration between dating and moving in together, reasons for cohabiting, and subsequent plans.…

  7. A Touch of...Class!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netten, Joan W., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    A collection of ideas for class activities in elementary and secondary language classes includes a vocabulary review exercise and games of memory, counting, vocabulary, flashcard tic-tac-toe, dice, trashcans, questioning, and spelling. Some are designed specifically for French. (MSE)

  8. Eustace Tilley Comes to Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arin, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Of all the reasons to use "The New Yorker" in a college writing class, the most compelling may be that its articles go beyond--well beyond--the five-paragraph model. Why, oh why, did that paradigm become such a fixture in composition courses? Students in the author's writing classes invariably suppose they can compose a quick introduction, add…

  9. Class, Identity, and Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities of working with White, working-class teacher education students to explore the "complex social trajectory" (Reay in Women's Stud Int Forum 20(2):225-233, 1997a, p. 19) of class border crossing as they progress through college. Through analysis of a course that I have developed, "Education and the American…

  10. Control Class Summaries and Control Class IV from April 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-02-22

    The D0 cryogenic control system is a complicated system with many facets. Because of the large number and variety of features in the system, a series of ongoing control system training seminars, or control classes, were created in order to keep people up to date on the operation of the system. As of the writing of this engineering note, there have been four classes. The original lecture notes from each class can be found in the cryogenic control room at the D0 Assembly Building, or in the Co-op office. This note provides a summary of the first three control classes, and it includes the entire set of notes from the fourth class, which was held in April of 1990. This class was taught by Jeff Wendlandt and Dan Markley. Dan should be consulted for more complete explanations than those given in the notes. The notes are, in fact, more of a reference for someone who has some experience with the system, than they are a training manual. Most of the pages include pictures and printouts of different menus and functions, useful for finding details without searching through the actual program. In general, this note serves as a pointer to the existence of the control class lecture notes, and as an explanation of their overall contents and purpose.

  11. Dynamics of very rich open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.

    The oldest open clusters in our Galaxy set the lower limit to the age of the Galactic Disk (9-10 Gyr). Although they appear to be very rich now, it is clear that their primordial populations were much larger. Often considered as transitional objects, these populous open clusters show structural differences with respect to globular clusters so their dynamics and characteristic evolutionary time scales can also be different. On the other hand, their large membership lead to different dynamical evolution as compared with average open clusters. In this paper, the differential features of the evolution of rich open clusters are studied using N-body simulations, including several of the largest (10^4 stars) published direct collisional N-body calculations so far, which were performed on a CRAY YMP. The disruption rate of rich open clusters is analysed in detail and the effect of the initial spatial distribution of the stars in the cluster on its dynamics is studied. The results show that cluster life-time depends on this initial distribution, decreasing when it is more concentrated. The effect of stellar evolution on the dynamical evolution of rich clusters is an important subject that also has been considered here. We demonstrate that the cluster's life-expectancy against evaporation increases because of mass loss by evolving high-mass stars.

  12. Power Divider for Waveforms Rich in Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III

    2005-01-01

    A method for dividing the power of an electronic signal rich in harmonics involves the use of an improved divider topology. A divider designed with this topology could be used, for example, to propagate a square-wave signal in an amplifier designed with a push-pull configuration to enable the generation of more power than could be generated in another configuration.

  13. A Rich Metadata Filesystem for Scientific Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Hoang

    2012-01-01

    As scientific research becomes more data intensive, there is an increasing need for scalable, reliable, and high performance storage systems. Such data repositories must provide both data archival services and rich metadata, and cleanly integrate with large scale computing resources. ROARS is a hybrid approach to distributed storage that provides…

  14. Technology-Rich Schools Up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Barbara B.; Schrum, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    This article observes that schools that use technology well have key commonalities, including a project-based curriculum and supportive, distributed leadership. The authors' research into tech-rich schools revealed that schools used three strategies to integrate technology successfully. They did so by establishing the vision and culture,…

  15. Mathematically Rich, Investigative Tasks for Teaching Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    A challenge for teachers is to incorporate the Standards for Mathematical Practice (CCSSI 2010) throughout their teaching of mathematics so that the Common Core Standards do not revert back to a purely content-driven curriculum. One way to achieve this is through the use of mathematically rich, investigative tasks. These tasks encourage students…

  16. RICH Theory: The Promotion of Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.

    2004-01-01

    The acronym RICH stands for resources, intimacy, competence, and health. These characteristics are purported to define psychological health, which is assumed to be synonymous with happiness. The four characteristics encompass all possible reinforcers, are relatively obtainable by all individuals, are interrelated to the extent they incorporate…

  17. Elite International Schools in the Global South: Transnational Space, Class Relationalities and the "Middling" International Schoolteacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarc, Paul; Mishra Tarc, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    The elite international school is a rich site for sociological inquiry in global times. In this paper, we conceptualize the international school as a transnational space of agonist social class-making given the dynamic positioning of the complement of international school actors. We position international schoolteachers in the middle of these…

  18. Determining pathogen and indicator levels in Class B municipal organic residuals used for land application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are nutrient rich organic residuals that are currently in use to amend soils for food production. Treatment requirements to inactivate pathogens for production of Class A biosolids are energy intensive. One less energy intensive alternative is to treat biosolids to Cl...

  19. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI). Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI) were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p < 0.05); significantly lower condylar volume was observed in class II subjects, respect to class I and class III (p < 0.05). In the whole sample condylar volume (699.8 ± 63.07 mm3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p < 0.01) as well as condylar surface (423.24 ± 63.03 mm2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p < 0.01) were significantly higher in males than in females. Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population. PMID:23241136

  20. Simplified Design Equations for Class-E Neural Prosthesis Transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Troyk, Philip; Hu, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Extreme miniaturization of implantable electronic devices is recognized as essential for the next generation of neural prostheses, owing to the need for minimizing the damage and disruption of the surrounding neural tissue. Transcutaneous power and data transmission via a magnetic link remains the most effective means of powering and controlling implanted neural prostheses. Reduction in the size of the coil, within the neural prosthesis, demands the generation of a high-intensity radio frequency magnetic field from the extracoporeal transmitter. The Class-E power amplifier circuit topology has been recognized as a highly effective means of producing large radio frequency currents within the transmitter coil. Unfortunately, design of a Class-E circuit is most often fraught by the need to solve a complex set of equations so as to implement both the zero-voltage-switching and zero-voltage-derivative-switching conditions that are required for efficient operation. This paper presents simple explicit design equations for designing the Class-E circuit topology. Numerical design examples are presented to illustrate the design procedure. PMID:23292784

  1. Dust from oxygen-rich stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, L.; Alexander, C.; Gao, X.; Walker, R.; Zinner, E.

    1994-07-01

    We have previously reported the identification of 8 presolar Al-rich oxide grains out of 2000 measured in an acid residue of the Tieschitz ordinary chondrite. Continued ion imaging searches for particles with unusual O-16/O-18 ratios have located 13 more isotopically anomalous oxide grains out of an additional 4000 Tieschitz grains. This brings the number of interstellar oxide grains isolated from meteorites to date to 24 (21 from Tieschitz and 1 each from Murchison, Orgueil, and Bishunpur) and extends the study of presolar grains to samples from a range of O-rich stars. We have divided the grains into three groups on the basis of their O-isotopic ratios. Group 1 grains are characterized by large enrichments in O-17 and modest O-18 depletions, similar to spectroscopic observations of O-rich red giant stars. Group 2 grains have O-18 depletions orders of magnitude larger than those that have been observed in stellar atmospheres, as well as large enrichments in Al-26 and O-17. The stellar source(s) for the (17)O-depleted group 3 grains is difficult to ascertain. Estimates of dust production in the galaxy indicate that O-rich phases should be as abundant as C-rich phases. The abundance of demonstrably interstellar aluminum oxide grains found to date in meteorites is far less than the abundance of isotopically anomalous SiC grains or even the abundance of the less common interstellar graphite component. This is especially surprising since reduced phases should be less stable than O-rich ones in the oxidizing conditions of the solar nebula. One possible explanation for the apparent paucity of interstellar oxides is that they have a finer grain-size distribution than the reduced phases and thus may have largely escaped detection. Measurements in progress on aggregates of fine-grained Tieschitz oxides may settle this issue. Ion imaging searches of physically separated 1-2 microns Tieschitz silicate grains are currently underway.

  2. Two decades of Neo-Marxist class analysis and health inequalities: A critical reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Muntaner, Carles; Ng, Edwin; Chung, Haejoo; Prins, Seth J

    2015-01-01

    Most population health researchers conceptualize social class as a set of attributes and material conditions of life of individuals. The empiricist tradition of ‘class as an individual attribute' equates class to an ‘observation', precluding the investigation of unobservable social mechanisms. Another consequence of this view of social class is that it cannot be conceptualized, measured, or intervened upon at the meso- or macro levels, being reduced to a personal attribute. Thus, population health disciplines marginalize rich traditions in Marxist theory whereby ‘class' is understood as a ‘hidden' social mechanism such as exploitation. Yet Neo-Marxist social class has been used over the last two decades in population health research as a way of understanding how health inequalities are produced. The Neo-Marxist approach views social class in terms of class relations that give persons control over productive assets and the labour power of others (property and managerial relations). We critically appraise the contribution of the Neo-Marxist approach during the last two decades and suggest realist amendments to understand class effects on the social determinants of health and health outcomes. We argue that when social class is viewed as a social causal mechanism it can inform social change to reduce health inequalities. PMID:26345311

  3. Class Size, Class Composition, and the Distribution of Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosworth, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Using richly detailed data on fourth- and fifth-grade students in the North Carolina public school system, I find evidence that students are assigned to classrooms in a non-random manner based on observable characteristics for a substantial portion of classrooms. Moreover, I find that this non-random assignment is statistically related to class…

  4. 7 CFR 1006.51 - Class I differential, adjustments to Class I prices, and Class I price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Class Prices § 1006.51 Class I... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class I differential, adjustments to Class I prices, and Class I price. 1006.51 Section 1006.51 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  5. 7 CFR 1006.51 - Class I differential, adjustments to Class I prices, and Class I price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Class Prices § 1006.51 Class I... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class I differential, adjustments to Class I prices, and Class I price. 1006.51 Section 1006.51 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  6. Race and Class Consciousness among Lower- and Middle-Class Blacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Thomas J., Jr.; Sparrow, Kathleen H.

    1997-01-01

    Studied differences in attitudinal patterns of race consciousness and class consciousness among lower-class and middle-class blacks in a large southern city. Interview results for 205 adults show similarities in race consciousness but differences in class consciousness. Lower-class blacks express more class consciousness than middle-class blacks.…

  7. Universality classes of the generalized epidemic process on random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kihong; Baek, Yongjoo; Ha, Meesoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2016-05-01

    We present a self-contained discussion of the universality classes of the generalized epidemic process (GEP) on Poisson random networks, which is a simple model of social contagions with cooperative effects. These effects lead to rich phase transitional behaviors that include continuous and discontinuous transitions with tricriticality in between. With the help of a comprehensive finite-size scaling theory, we numerically confirm static and dynamic scaling behaviors of the GEP near continuous phase transitions and at tricriticality, which verifies the field-theoretical results of previous studies. We also propose a proper criterion for the discontinuous transition line, which is shown to coincide with the bond percolation threshold.

  8. Weighted species richness outperforms species richness as predictor of biotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Anna; Yu, Jun; Wardle, David A; Trygg, Johan; Englund, Göran

    2016-01-01

    The species richness hypothesis, which predicts that species-rich communities should be better at resisting invasions than species-poor communities, has been empirically tested many times and is often poorly supported. In this study, we contrast the species richness hypothesis with four alternative hypotheses with the aim of finding better descriptors of invasion resistance. These alternative hypotheses state that resistance to invasions is determined by abiotic conditions, community saturation (i.e., the number of resident species relative to the maximum number of species that can be supported), presence/absence of key species, or weighted species richness. Weighted species richness is a weighted sum of the number of species, where each species' weight describes its contribution to resistance. We tested these hypotheses using data on the success of 571 introductions of four freshwater fish species into lakes throughout Sweden, i.e., Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), tench (Tinca tinca), zander (Sander lucioperca), and whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus). We found that weighted species richness best predicted invasion success. The weights describing the contribution of each resident species to community resistance varied considerably in both strength and sign. Positive resistance weights, which indicate that species repel invaders, were as common as negative resistance weights, which indicate facilitative interactions. This result can be contrasted with the implicit assumption of the original species richness hypothesis, that all resident species have negative effects on invader success. We argue that this assumption is unlikely to be true in natural communities, and thus that we expect that weighted species richness is a better predictor of invader success than the actual number of resident species. PMID:27008794

  9. Transitory O-rich chemistry in heavily obscured C-rich post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; García-Lario, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Engels, D.; Perea-Calderón, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    Spitzer/IRS spectra of eleven heavily obscured C-rich sources rapidly evolving from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to Planetary Nebulae are presented. IRAM 30m observations for three of these post-AGBs are also reported. A few (3) of these sources are known to exhibit strongly variable maser emission of O-bearing molecules such as OH and H2 O, suggesting a transitory O-rich chemistry because of the quickly changing physical and chemical conditions in this short evolutionary phase. Interestingly, the Spitzer/IRS spectra show a rich circumstellar carbon chemistry, as revealed by the detection of small hydrocarbon molecules such as C2H2, C4H2, C6H2, C6H6, and HCN. Benzene is detected towards two sources, bringing up to three the total number of Galactic post-AGBs where this molecule has been detected. In addition, we report evidence for the possible detection of other hydrocarbon molecules like HC3N, CH3C2H, and CH3 in several of these sources. The available IRAM 30m data confirm that the central stars are C-rich - in despite of the presence of O-rich masers - and the presence of high velocity molecular outflows together with extreme AGB mass-loss rates (∼⃒10-4 Mʘ /yr). Our observations confirm the polymerization model of Cernicharo [1] that predicts a rich photochemistry in the neutral regions of these objects on timescales shorter than the dynamical evolution of the central HII region, leading to the formation of small C-rich molecules and a transitory O-rich chemistry.

  10. The rich club phenomenon in the classroom

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, Luis M.; Cebrian, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of the online interactions held by college students and report on novel relationships between social structure and performance. Our results indicate that more frequent and intense social interactions generally imply better score for students engaging in them. We find that these interactions are hosted within a “rich-club”, mediated by persistent interactions among high performing students, which is created during the first weeks of the course. Low performing students try to engage in the club after it has been initially formed, and fail to produce reciprocity in their interactions, displaying more transient interactions and higher social diversity. Furthermore, high performance students exchange information by means of complex information cascades, from which low performing students are selectively excluded. Failure to engage in the rich club eventually decreases these students' communication activity towards the end of the course. PMID:23378908

  11. Pair correlations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    We started a program to study the ground-state properties of heavy, neutron-rich nuclei using the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) approximation. This appears at present to be the most realistic approach for heavy nuclei that contain many loosely bound valence neutrons. The two-neutron density obtained in this approach can be decomposed into two components, one associated with the mean field and one associated with the pairing field. The latter has a structure that is quite similar to the pair-density obtained by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian for a two-neutron halo, which was studied earlier. This allows comparison of the HFB solutions against numerically exact solutions for two-neutron halos. This work is in progress. We intend to apply the HFB method to predict the ground-state properties of heavier, more neutron-rich nuclei that may be produced at future radioactive beam facilities.

  12. Proton-Rich Nuclei in Nuclear Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K. E.

    2007-11-30

    The stable isotopes which we observe on Earth are to a large extent, produced in nature via a 'detour' through unstable nuclei. The reaction path leading through proton-rich nuclei is the so-called rapid proton capture process, where, starting from carbon, nitrogen and oxygen through successive capture or protons and alphas, followed by beta decays, nuclei up to the mass 100 region can be produced. In order to understand the reaction paths and the conditions at various astrophysical sites (e.g. Novae and X-ray bursts) cross sections, masses and half-lives of unstable nuclei have to be measured. In this contribution recent results involving proton-rich nuclei are discussed.

  13. Proton-rich nuclei in nuclear astrophysics.

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K. E.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The stable isotopes which we observe on Earth are to a large extent, produced in nature via a 'detour' through unstable nuclei. The reaction path leading through proton-rich nuclei is the so-called rapid proton capture process, where, starting from carbon, nitrogen and oxygen through successive capture or protons and alphas, followed by beta decays, nuclei up to the mass 100 region can be produced. In order to understand the reaction paths and the conditions at various astrophysical sites (e.g. Novae and X-ray bursts) cross sections, masses and half-lives of unstable nuclei have to be measured. In this contribution recent results involving proton-rich nuclei are discussed.

  14. The CLAS12 large area RICH detector

    SciTech Connect

    M. Contalbrigo, E. Cisbani, P. Rossi

    2011-05-01

    A large area RICH detector is being designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer as part of the 12 GeV upgrade program of the Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall-B. This detector is intended to provide excellent hadron identification from 3 GeV/c up to momenta exceeding 8 GeV/c and to be able to work at the very high design luminosity-up to 1035 cm2 s-1. Detailed feasibility studies are presented for two types of radiators, aerogel and liquid C6F14 freon, in conjunction with a highly segmented light detector in the visible wavelength range. The basic parameters of the RICH are outlined and the resulting performances, as defined by preliminary simulation studies, are reported.

  15. Rubidium-rich asymptotic giant branch stars.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, D A; García-Lario, P; Plez, B; D'Antona, F; Manchado, A; Trigo-Rodríguez, J M

    2006-12-15

    A long-debated issue concerning the nucleosynthesis of neutron-rich elements in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is the identification of the neutron source. We report intermediate-mass (4 to 8 solar masses) AGB stars in our Galaxy that are rubidium-rich as a result of overproduction of the long-lived radioactive isotope (87)Rb, as predicted theoretically 40 years ago. This finding represents direct observational evidence that the (22)Ne(alpha,n)(25)Mg reaction must be the dominant neutron source in these stars. These stars challenge our understanding of the late stages of the evolution of intermediate-mass stars and would have promoted a highly variable Rb/Sr environment in the early solar nebula. PMID:17095658

  16. RICH Detector for Jefferson Labs CLAS12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotta, Richard; Torisky, Ben; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-10-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to its Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beams. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new hybrid Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 8 GeV/c momentum range. This detector will be used for a variety of Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments. Cherenkov light can be accurately detected by a large array of sophisticated Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT) and heavier particles, like kaons, will span the inner radii. We are presenting our work on the creation of the RICH's geometry within the CLAS12 java framework. This development is crucial for future calibration, reconstructions and analysis of the detector.

  17. FIRE_MS_CEILOM_CLASS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-25

    ... Parameters:  Clouds Humidity Pressure Temperature Wind Speed Order Data:  Search and ... Additional Info:  Ceilometer and Cross-chain Loran Atmospheric Sounding System (CLASS) SCAR-B Block:  ...

  18. Brainwriting in the Theory Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wunsch, Ilse Gerda

    1973-01-01

    Considers the problem of taking dictation in a music class and recognizes the importance of perception for understanding musical structure. Author demonstrates his point with an analysis of a German folksong. (RK)

  19. Class Sizes and Dissadvantaged Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, David

    1978-01-01

    Describes a program in which smaller class groups for socially and culturally deprived children resulted in enhanced social attitudes and more responsive, mature behavior in interaction with both adults and peers. (Author/IRT)

  20. An English Class with Emily.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassett, Lawrence F.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a high school student's description in class of her deep connection to Hester Prynne in Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter," and how it offers a glimpse of the vast interior lives of women. (SR)

  1. Integrals of the Ising Class

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.

    2006-06-01

    From an experimental-mathematical perspective we analyze"Ising-class" integrals. Our experimental results involvedextreme-precision, multidimensional quadrature on intricate integrands;thus, highly parallel computation was required.

  2. Statistical Descriptors of School Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohnes, Paul R.

    1972-01-01

    It may be useful in evaluation research to employ the class as the unit of analysis, assessing its syntality by a vector of distribution cumulants or indices for each of several input tests administered. (Author)

  3. Wildflower Collecting: A Class Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Sheila V.

    1976-01-01

    Advocates wildflower collecting as a class project, citing instances of interest in studies of soil composition, growing wildflowers, and increased student motivation toward the subject of botany as basis for the activity. (CP)

  4. The E781 (SELEX) RICH detector

    SciTech Connect

    Engelfried, J.

    1997-06-01

    First results from a new RICH detector, operating in an experiment currently taking data - Fermilab E781 (SELEX), are presented. The detector utilizes a matrix of 2848 phototubes for the photocathode. In a 650 GeV/c ?r- beam the number of photons detected is 14 per ring, giving a Figure of Merit No of 106 cm-`. The ring radius resolution obtained is 1.2 %. Results showing the particle identification ability of the detector are discussed.

  5. Going Global, for Rich and Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Jay; Mathews, Linda

    2012-01-01

    International Baccalaureate (IB) programs are turning up in a diverse mix of school districts, an attempt to add rigor and depth. For rich and for poor, for big schools and small ones, IB has become a way to add rigor and depth to public school curricula. But each school district has adapted IB for its own needs. Some use it in all schools for all…

  6. Effective Interactions in Neutron-Rich Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sammarruca, F.; Krastev, P.; Barredo, W.

    2005-10-14

    We are generally concerned with probing the behavior of the isospin-asymmetric equation of state. In particular, we will discuss the one-body potentials for protons and neutrons obtained from our Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations of neutron-rich matter properties. We will also present predictions of proton-proton and neutron-neutron cross sections in the isospin-asymmetric nuclear medium.

  7. Protective Coats For Zinc-Rich Primers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis G, III

    1993-01-01

    Report describes tests of topcoats for inorganic zinc-rich primers on carbon steel. Topcoats intended to provide additional protection against corrosion in acidic, salty seacoast-air/rocket-engine-exhaust environment of Space Shuttle launch site. Tests focused on polyurethane topcoats on epoxy tie coats on primers. Part of study involved comparison between "high-build" coating materials and thin-film coating materials.

  8. Automation of Presentation Record Production Based on Rich-Media Technology Using SNT Petri Nets Theory

    PubMed Central

    Martiník, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Rich-media describes a broad range of digital interactive media that is increasingly used in the Internet and also in the support of education. Last year, a special pilot audiovisual lecture room was built as a part of the MERLINGO (MEdia-rich Repository of LearnING Objects) project solution. It contains all the elements of the modern lecture room determined for the implementation of presentation recordings based on the rich-media technologies and their publication online or on-demand featuring the access of all its elements in the automated mode including automatic editing. Property-preserving Petri net process algebras (PPPA) were designed for the specification and verification of the Petri net processes. PPPA does not need to verify the composition of the Petri net processes because all their algebraic operators preserve the specified set of the properties. These original PPPA are significantly generalized for the newly introduced class of the SNT Petri process and agent nets in this paper. The PLACE-SUBST and ASYNC-PROC algebraic operators are defined for this class of Petri nets and their chosen properties are proved. The SNT Petri process and agent nets theory were significantly applied at the design, verification, and implementation of the programming system ensuring the pilot audiovisual lecture room functionality. PMID:26258164

  9. Less than a Class Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kristin Redington

    2012-01-01

    The iPad holds amazing potential for classroom use. Just a few--or even only one--is enough to get results. Having a class set promotes traditional, whole-class instruction, but fewer iPads facilitate individualized and tailored instruction. In this article, the author discusses the potential of the iPad and suggests ways to put the iPad to use in…

  10. Whole Class Laboratories: More Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon

    2016-03-01

    Typically, introductory physics courses are taught with a combination of lectures and laboratories in which students have opportunities to discover the natural laws through hands-on activities in small groups. This article reports the use of Google Drive, a free online document-sharing tool, in physics laboratories for pooling experimental data from the whole class. This pedagogical method was reported earlier, and the present article offers a few more examples of such "whole class" laboratories.

  11. HOW TO FIND METAL-RICH ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Alan W.; Drube, Line

    2014-04-10

    The metal content of asteroids is of great interest, not only for theories of their origins and the evolution of the solar system but, in the case of near-Earth objects (NEOs), also for impact mitigation planning and endeavors in the field of planetary resources. However, since the reflection spectra of metallic asteroids are largely featureless, it is difficult to identify them and relatively few are known. We show how data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)/NEOWISE thermal-infrared survey and similar surveys, fitted with a simple thermal model, can reveal objects likely to be metal rich. We provide a list of candidate metal-rich NEOs. Our results imply that future infrared surveys with the appropriate instrumentation could discover many more metal-rich asteroids, providing valuable data for assessment of the impact hazard and the potential of NEOs as reservoirs of vital materials for future interplanetary space activities and, eventually perhaps, for use on Earth.

  12. Photographs and Classroom Response Systems in Middle School Astronomy Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunju; Feldman, Allan

    2015-08-01

    In spite of being readily available, photographs have played a minor and passive role in science classes. In our study, we present an active way of using photographs in classroom discussions with the use of a classroom response system (CRS) in middle school astronomy classes to teach the concepts of day-night and seasonal change. In this new pedagogical method, students observe objects or phenomena in photographs and use the information to develop understanding of the scientific concepts. They share their ideas in classroom discussion with the assistance of the CRS. Pre- and posttest results showed that the new pedagogy helped students overcome primitive conceptions and enhanced their understanding of the concepts. The observation of the rich details of photographs played three pedagogical roles in classroom discussion: easing students' anxiety about learning a new scientific concept; continuous stimulus of learning; and as evidence or data.

  13. Elementary School Children's Reasoning About Social Class: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rashmita S; Brown, Christia S; White, Elizabeth S; Chow, Kirby A; Gillen-O'Neel, Cari

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined children's identification and reasoning about their subjective social status (SSS), their beliefs about social class groups (i.e., the poor, middle class, and rich), and the associations between the two. Study participants were 117 10- to 12-year-old children of diverse racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds attending a laboratory elementary school in Southern California. Results indicated that children's SSS ratings correlated with indicators of family socioeconomic status and were informed by material possessions, lifestyle characteristics, and social and societal comparisons. Children rated the poor as having fewer positive attributes and more negative attributes than the middle class, and fewer positive attributes than the rich. Lower SSS children held less positive attitudes toward the poor than children with middle SSS ratings. PMID:26300338

  14. Two classes of speculative peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2001-10-01

    Speculation not only occurs in financial markets but also in numerous other markets, e.g. commodities, real estate, collectibles, and so on. Such speculative movements result in price peaks which share many common characteristics: same order of magnitude of duration with respect to amplitude, same shape (the so-called sharp-peak pattern). Such similarities suggest (at least as a first approximation) a common speculative behavior. However, a closer examination shows that in fact there are (at least) two distinct classes of speculative peaks. For the first, referred to as class U, (i) the amplitude of the peak is negatively correlated with the price at the start of the peak (ii) the ensemble coefficient of variation exhibits a trough. Opposite results are observed for the second class that we refer to as class S. Once these empirical observations have been made we try to understand how they should be interpreted. First, we show that the two properties are in fact related in the sense that the second is a consequence of the first. Secondly, by listing a number of cases belonging to each class we observe that the markets in the S-class offer collection of items from which investors can select those they prefer. On the contrary, U-markets consist of undifferentiated products for which a selection cannot be made in the same way. All prices considered in the paper are real (i.e., deflated) prices.

  15. Imbalanced Class Learning in Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Haque, M. Muksitul; Holder, Lawrence B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In machine learning, one of the important criteria for higher classification accuracy is a balanced dataset. Datasets with a large ratio between minority and majority classes face hindrance in learning using any classifier. Datasets having a magnitude difference in number of instances between the target concept result in an imbalanced class distribution. Such datasets can range from biological data, sensor data, medical diagnostics, or any other domain where labeling any instances of the minority class can be time-consuming or costly or the data may not be easily available. The current study investigates a number of imbalanced class algorithms for solving the imbalanced class distribution present in epigenetic datasets. Epigenetic (DNA methylation) datasets inherently come with few differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) and with a higher number of non-DMR sites. For this class imbalance problem, a number of algorithms are compared, including the TAN+AdaBoost algorithm. Experiments performed on four epigenetic datasets and several known datasets show that an imbalanced dataset can have similar accuracy as a regular learner on a balanced dataset. PMID:24798423

  16. School Class Size: Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.; And Others

    This book synthesizes research evidence to demonstrate that 1) class size is strongly related to pupil achievement; 2) smaller classes are more conducive to improved pupil performance than larger classes; 3) smaller classes provide more opportunities to adapt learning programs to individual needs; 4) pupils in smaller classes have more interest in…

  17. Mechanical Behaviour of Phyllosilicate-Rich Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Niemeijer, André; Viti, Cecilia; Marone, Chris

    2010-05-01

    A number of observations indicate that phyllosilicate-rich faults are widespread within the brittle crust. Here, we report on laboratory experiments designed to investigate the frictional behavior of 1) intact foliated solid rocks sheared in their in-situ geometry and 2) powders obtained from crushing and sieving the samples used in the solid experiments; 3) powders obtained from non foliated samples. The samples were collected from the Zuccale low-angle normal fault (Italy) and are characterised by different amounts of phyllosilicates (from 60 to 10 % of talc, smectite biotite and chlorite) plus calcite, hornblende and tremolite. Friction of powders, at room humidity and temperature, is in the range 0.27-0.62 and it is controlled by the abundance of weak phyllosilicates (talc and smectite). Over a range of normal stresses from 10 to 150 MPa and sliding velocities from 1 to 300 μm/s, the powdered material with a) 60% of phyllosilicates exhibits velocity strengthening behaviour associated to calcite grain rotation and translation in a phyllosilicate-rich groundmass; b) < 40% of phyllosilicates exhibits an evolution, with increasing sliding velocity, from velocity strengthening to velocity weakening associated to grain size reduction and localization along B and Y shear planes. Friction of solid samples (20-35% of phyllosilicates) is in the range 0.35-0.25 and for each normal stress solid rocks have a friction coefficient 0.2-0.3 lower than powders with identical mineralogical composition. In addition, the solid samples become more and more velocity strengthening with increasing sliding velocity. Field observations along exhumed and phyllosilicate-rich faults worldwide suggest that phyllosilicates-rich strands bound lenses of stronger and non foliated lithologies. Within this fault structure fault creep and aseismic slip along weak and phyllosilicate-rich foliated surfaces (velocity strengthening behaviour) might increase stress on lenses of stronger materials

  18. New ligand platforms featuring boron-rich clusters as organomimetic substituents*,**

    PubMed Central

    Spokoyny, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    200 years of research with carbon-rich molecules have shaped the development of modern chemistry. Research pertaining to the chemistry of boron-rich species has historically trailed behind its more distinguished neighbor (carbon) in the periodic table. Notably, a potentially rich and, in many cases, unmatched field of coordination chemistry using boronrich clusters remains fundamentally underdeveloped. Our work has been devoted to examining several basic concepts related to the functionalization of icosahedral boron-rich clusters and their use as ligands, aimed at designing fundamentally new hybrid molecular motifs and materials. Particularly interesting are icosahedral carboranes, which can be regarded as 3D analogs of benzene. These species comprise a class of boron-rich clusters that were discovered in the 1950s during the “space race” while researchers were developing energetic materials for rocket fuels. Ultimately, the unique chemical and physical properties of carborane species, such as rigidity, indefinite stability to air and moisture, and 3D aromaticity, may allow one to access a set of properties not normally available in carbon-based chemistry. While technically these species are considered as inorganic clusters, the chemical properties they possess make these boron-rich species suitable for replacing and/or altering structural and functional features of the organic and organometallic molecules—a phenomenon best described as “organomimetic”. Aside from purely fundamental features associated with the organomimetic chemistry of icosahedral carboranes, their use can also provide new avenues in the development of systems relevant to solving current problems associated with energy production, storage, and conversion. PMID:24311823

  19. New ligand platforms featuring boron-rich clusters as organomimetic substituents(.)

    PubMed

    Spokoyny, Alexander M

    2013-05-01

    200 years of research with carbon-rich molecules have shaped the development of modern chemistry. Research pertaining to the chemistry of boron-rich species has historically trailed behind its more distinguished neighbor (carbon) in the periodic table. Notably, a potentially rich and, in many cases, unmatched field of coordination chemistry using boronrich clusters remains fundamentally underdeveloped. Our work has been devoted to examining several basic concepts related to the functionalization of icosahedral boron-rich clusters and their use as ligands, aimed at designing fundamentally new hybrid molecular motifs and materials. Particularly interesting are icosahedral carboranes, which can be regarded as 3D analogs of benzene. These species comprise a class of boron-rich clusters that were discovered in the 1950s during the "space race" while researchers were developing energetic materials for rocket fuels. Ultimately, the unique chemical and physical properties of carborane species, such as rigidity, indefinite stability to air and moisture, and 3D aromaticity, may allow one to access a set of properties not normally available in carbon-based chemistry. While technically these species are considered as inorganic clusters, the chemical properties they possess make these boron-rich species suitable for replacing and/or altering structural and functional features of the organic and organometallic molecules-a phenomenon best described as "organomimetic". Aside from purely fundamental features associated with the organomimetic chemistry of icosahedral carboranes, their use can also provide new avenues in the development of systems relevant to solving current problems associated with energy production, storage, and conversion. PMID:24311823

  20. Innate signals in mucosal immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Puga, Irene; Cols, Montserrat; Cerutti, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The intestinal mucosa contains large communities of commensal bacteria that process otherwise indigestible food components, synthesize essential vitamins, stimulate the maturation of the immune system, and form an ecologic niche that prevents the growth of pathogenic species. Conversely, the intestine provides the commensals with a stable habitat rich in energy derived from the ingested food. A delicate homeostatic balance maintains this mutualistic relationship without triggering a destructive inflammatory response. Commensals orchestrate intestinal homeostasis by entertaining an intimate dialogue with epithelial cells and immune cells lodged in the mucosa. Such a dialogue generates finely tuned signaling programs that ensure a state of hyporesponsiveness against noninvasive commensals and a state of active readiness against invasive pathogens. In this dialogue epithelial cells function as "interpreters" that continuously translate microbial messages to "instruct" immune cells as to the antigenic composition of the intestinal lumen. This education process initiates sophisticated defensive strategies that comprise massive production of IgA, a noninflammatory mucosal antibody class that generates immunity while preserving homeostasis. PMID:21050939

  1. Ca-Al-rich chondrules and inclusions in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bischoff, A.; Keil, K.

    1983-01-01

    Ca-Al-rich objects, hitherto mostly found in carbonaceous chondrites, are shown to be widespread, albeit rare, constituents of type 3 ordinary chondrites. Widespread occurrence and textural similarities of Ca-Al-rich chondrules to common, Mg-Fe-rich chondrules suggest that they formed by related processes. It is suggested in this article that Ca-Al-rich chondrules were formed by total melting and crystallization of heterogeneous, submillimeter- to submillimeter-sized dustballs made up of mixtures of high-temperature, Ca-Al-rich and lower-temperature, Na-K-rich components.

  2. Hydrodynamic models for novae with ejecta rich in oxygen, neon and magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Sparks, W. M.; Truran, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of a new class of novae are identified and explained. This class consists of those objects that have been observed to eject material rich in oxygen, neon, magnesium, and aluminum at high velocities. We propose that for this class of novae the outburst is occurring not on a carbon-oxygen white dwarf but on an oxygen-neon-magnesium white dwarf which has evolved from a star which had a main sequence mass of approx. 8 solar masses to approx. 12 solar masses. An outburst was simulated by evolving 1.25 solar mass white dwarfs accreting hydrogen rich material at various rates. The effective enrichment of the envelope by ONeMg material from the core is simulated by enhancing oxygen in the accreted layers. The resulting evolutionary sequences can eject the entire accreted envelope plus core material at high velocities. They can also become super-Eddington at maximum bolometric luminosity. The expected frequency of such events (approx. 1/4) is in good agreement with the observed numbers of these novae.

  3. Design and Implementation of a Metadata-rich File System

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, S; Gokhale, M B; Maltzahn, C

    2010-01-19

    Despite continual improvements in the performance and reliability of large scale file systems, the management of user-defined file system metadata has changed little in the past decade. The mismatch between the size and complexity of large scale data stores and their ability to organize and query their metadata has led to a de facto standard in which raw data is stored in traditional file systems, while related, application-specific metadata is stored in relational databases. This separation of data and semantic metadata requires considerable effort to maintain consistency and can result in complex, slow, and inflexible system operation. To address these problems, we have developed the Quasar File System (QFS), a metadata-rich file system in which files, user-defined attributes, and file relationships are all first class objects. In contrast to hierarchical file systems and relational databases, QFS defines a graph data model composed of files and their relationships. QFS incorporates Quasar, an XPATH-extended query language for searching the file system. Results from our QFS prototype show the effectiveness of this approach. Compared to the de facto standard, the QFS prototype shows superior ingest performance and comparable query performance on user metadata-intensive operations and superior performance on normal file metadata operations.

  4. Star forming regions in gas-rich SO galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogge, Richard W.; Eskridge, Paul B.

    1987-01-01

    The first results of an H alpha imaging survey of HI rich SO galaxies, which were searched for HII regions and other sources of emission, are presented. The charge coupled device H alpha interference filter images were made of 16 galaxies. Eight of these galaxies show evidence for on-going star formation, one has nuclear emission but no HII regions, and the remaining seven have no emissions detected within well defined upper limits. With the exception of one notably peculiar galaxy in which the emission from HII regions appears pervasive, the HII regions are either organized into inner-disk rings or randomly distributed throughout the disk. A few of these galaxies are found to be clearly not SO's; or peculiar objects atypical of the SO class. Using simple models star formation rates (SFRs) and gas depletion times from the observed H alpha fluxes were estimated. In general, the derived SFRs are much lower than those found in isolated field spiral galaxies and the corresponding gas depletion time scales are also longer.

  5. Group Work Tests for Context-Rich Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The group work test is an assessment strategy that promotes higher-order thinking skills for solving context-rich problems. With this format, teachers are able to pose challenging, nuanced questions on a test, while providing the support weaker students need to get started and show their understanding. The test begins with a group discussion phase, when students are given a "number-free" version of the problem. This phase allows students to digest the story-like problem, explore solution ideas, and alleviate some test anxiety. After 10-15 minutes of discussion, students inform the instructor of their readiness for the individual part of the test. What follows next is a pedagogical phase change from lively group discussion to quiet individual work. The group work test is a natural continuation of the group work in our daily physics classes and helps reinforce the importance of collaboration. This method has met with success at York Mills Collegiate Institute, in Toronto, Ontario, where it has been used consistently for unit tests and the final exam of the grade 12 university preparation physics course.

  6. Carbon-rich planet formation in a solar composition disk

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Mousis, Olivier; Petit, Jean-Marc

    2014-04-20

    The C to O ratio is a crucial determinant of the chemical properties of planets. The recent observation of WASP 12b, a giant planet with a C/O value larger than that estimated for its host star, poses a conundrum for understanding the origin of this elemental ratio in any given planetary system. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for enhancing the value of C/O in the disk through the transport and distribution of volatiles. We construct a model that computes the abundances of major C- and O-bearing volatiles under the influence of gas drag, sublimation, vapor diffusion, condensation, and coagulation in a multi-iceline 1+1D protoplanetary disk. We find a gradual depletion in water and carbon monoxide vapors inside the water's iceline, with carbon monoxide depleting slower than water. This effect increases the gaseous C/O and decreases the C/H ratio in this region to values similar to those found in WASP 12b's day side atmosphere. Giant planets whose envelopes were accreted inside the water's iceline should then display C/O values larger than those of their parent stars, making them members of the class of so-called carbon-rich planets.

  7. Carbon-rich Planet Formation in a Solar Composition Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Mousis, Olivier; Petit, Jean-Marc; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2014-04-01

    The C to O ratio is a crucial determinant of the chemical properties of planets. The recent observation of WASP 12b, a giant planet with a C/O value larger than that estimated for its host star, poses a conundrum for understanding the origin of this elemental ratio in any given planetary system. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for enhancing the value of C/O in the disk through the transport and distribution of volatiles. We construct a model that computes the abundances of major C- and O-bearing volatiles under the influence of gas drag, sublimation, vapor diffusion, condensation, and coagulation in a multi-iceline 1+1D protoplanetary disk. We find a gradual depletion in water and carbon monoxide vapors inside the water's iceline, with carbon monoxide depleting slower than water. This effect increases the gaseous C/O and decreases the C/H ratio in this region to values similar to those found in WASP 12b's day side atmosphere. Giant planets whose envelopes were accreted inside the water's iceline should then display C/O values larger than those of their parent stars, making them members of the class of so-called carbon-rich planets.

  8. Optimization of DNA Extractions from Iron-rich Microbial Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, H.; Hilton, T. S.; Moyer, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is potentially one of the most abundant energy sources on the earth as an electron donor for chemolithoautotrophicgrowth coupled to Fe(II) oxidation. Many microbes have adapted to this energy source. One such bacterial class are the Zetaproteobacteria, which dominate Iron-rich microbial mats at Loihi seamount. Although cell counts are very high (up to 5.3x108 cells/ml), efficient DNA yields are low in comparison. In this study we compared extraction efficiency across different methods and with the addition of various buffers. Regardless of protocol (i.e., kit), the addition of sodium citrate drastically increased the DNA yield. The addition of sodium citrate did not alter community structure as determined by T-RFLP and qPCR. Citrate is a well-known ferric iron chelator and will bind ferrous as well. The chelated iron is then unable to participate in the Fenton reaction and this stops the generation of hydroxyl radicals which in turn can react and degrade the extracted DNA. We have utilized this relationship to allow us to obtain nearly an order of magnitude more microbial community DNA per sample, which should also have implications when processing low biomass samples, e.g., from the deep subsurface.

  9. Union Presence, Class, and Individual Earnings Inequality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leicht, Kevin T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Data from the Survey of Class Structure and Class Consciousness showed that union membership positively affects earnings of all workers, but union density affects only the working class. Interindustry union threats affect the wages of only nonunionized workers. (SK)

  10. Testing of fuel/oxidizer-rich, high-pressure preburners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawver, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    Results of an evaluation of high pressure combustion of fuel rich and oxidizer rich LOX/RP-1 propellants using 4.0 inch diameter prototype preburner injectors and chambers are presented. Testing covered a pressure range from 8.9 to 17.5 MN/square meters (1292 to 2540 psia). Fuel rich mixture ratios ranged from 0.238 to 0.367; oxidizer rich mixture ratios ranged from 27.2 to 47.5. Performance, gas temperature uniformity, and stability data for two fuel rich and two ozidizer rich preburner injectors are presented for a conventional like-on-like (LOL) design and a platelet design injector. Kinetically limited combustion is shown by the excellent agreement of measured fuel rich gas composition and C performance data with kinetic model predictions. The oxidizer rich test results support previous equilibrium combustion predictions.

  11. Elastic moduli of pyrope rich garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. K.; Pandey, A. K.; Singh, C. K.

    2013-06-01

    The elastic properties of minerals depend on its composition, crystal structure, temperature and level of defects. The elastic parameters are important for the interpretation of the structure and composition of the garnet rich family. In present work we have calculated the elastic moduli such as isothermal bulk modulus, Young's modulus and Shear modulus over a wide range of temperature from 300 K to 1000 K by using Birch EOS and Poirrier Tarantola equation of state. The obtained results are compared with the experimental results obtained by measuring the elastic moduli of single crystal. The calculated results show that the logarithmic isothermal EOS does not cooperate well with experimental results.

  12. Mars: A water-rich planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    Good geomorphic evidence is presented for a planet that was once water rich, and that a lower limit on the amount of water available for a given Martian watershed may be estimated by assuming that the volume of material eroded was equal to the volume of water available. This estimate, coupled with high latitude water estimates of 50 to 100 m gives a global inventory of about 500 m total water in the subsurface. It was emphasized that this is a lower limit as considerable water may be bound in weathered debris and in primary minerals.

  13. Mass Evaluation for Proton Rich Nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-11-30

    The Atomic mass evaluation (AME) provides the reliable resource for the values related to atomic masses. Since the publication of the latest version of AME in 2003, many developments for atomic mass determination have been done and important results changed significantly our knowledge. A preliminary version of AME was released in April 2011, and an official version is foreseen to be published in early 2013. The general status of AME is presented and some specific features of AME for proton-rich nuclides are discussed.

  14. New process hydrotreats metal-rich feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Langhout, W.C.V.Z.; Ouwerkerk, C.; Pronk, K.M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Shell Internationale Petroleum Maatschappij B.V. has developed a hydroprocessing procedure suitable for heavy residual feeds with metal contents of up to about 100 ppm, and Shell plans to introduce soon a process which will enable the catalytic hydrotreating of even the heaviest metal-rich feedstocks. This new process will be studied in an experimental unit expected to be on stream by the end of 1981 at a Venezuelan refinery. Also discussed are the catalytic hydroprocessing of residual material, including the roles of hydrodemetallization, h

  15. Zinc-rich coatings: A market survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizak, R.

    1975-01-01

    Zinc-rich coatings with both organic and inorganic binders were considered for coastal bridges which require more corrosion protection than inland bridges because of exposure to salt spray and fog. Inorganics give longer protection and may be applied without a finish coat; those currently available are harder to apply than organics. The NASA potassium silicate/zinc - dust coating appears to provide longer protection, resist thermal shock, and overcome the application problem. Panels coated with the formulation withstood 5308 hours in a salt spray chamber with no rusting or blistering.

  16. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, W. ||

    1997-11-01

    One of the frontiers of today`s nuclear science is the ``journey to the limits``: of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The new data on exotic nuclei are expected to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure of neutron-rich nuclei are discussed from a theoretical perspective.

  17. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discusses open or unlimited class aircraft performance limitations and design solutions. Limitations in this class of aircraft include slow climbing flight which requires low wing loading, high cruise speed which requires high wing loading, gains in induced or viscous drag alone which result in only half the gain overall and other structural problems (yaw inertia and spins, flutter and static loads integrity). Design solutions include introducing minimum induced drag for a given span (elliptical span load or winglets) and introducing minimum induced drag for a bell shaped span load. It is concluded that open class performance limits (under current rules and technologies) is very close to absolute limits, though some gains remain to be made from unexplored areas and new technologies.

  18. Evidence for an unusual transmembrane configuration of AGG3, a Class C Gγ Subunit, of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wolfenstetter, Susanne; Chakravorty, David; Kula, Ryan; Urano, Daisuke; Trusov, Yuri; McCurdy, David W.; Assmann, Sarah M.; Jones, Alan M.; Botella, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Heterotrimeric G proteins are crucial for the perception of external signals and subsequent signal transduction in animal and plant cells. In both model systems, the complex is comprised of one Gα, one Gβ and one Gγ subunit. However, in addition to the canonical Gγ subunits (Class A), plants also possess two unusual, plant-specific classes of Gγ subunits (Classes B and C) not yet found in animals. These include Gγ subunits lacking the C-terminal CaaX motif (Class B) which is important for membrane anchoring of the protein, and thus give rise to a flexible subpopulation of Gβ/γ heterodimers that is not necessarily restricted to the plasma membrane. Even more interesting, plants also contain Class C Gγ subunits which are twice the size of canonical Gγs, with a predicted transmembrane domain, and a large cysteine-rich, extracellular C-terminus. However, neither the presence of the transmembrane domain nor the membrane topology has been unequivocally demonstrated. Here, we provide compelling evidence that AGG3, a Class C Ggamma subunit of Arabidopsis, contains a functional transmembrane domain, which is sufficient but not essential for plasma membrane localization, and that the cysteine-rich C-terminus is extracellular. PMID:25430066

  19. Cd-rich and Te-rich low-temperature photoluminescence in cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D. S. Kuciauskas, D.; Ma, J.; Metzger, W. K.; Burst, J. M.; Moutinho, H. R.; Dippo, P. C.

    2014-03-03

    Low-temperature photoluminescence emission spectra were measured in cadmium telluride (CdTe) samples in which composition was varied to promote either Cd or Te-rich stoichiometry. The ability to monitor stoichiometry is important, since it has been shown to impact carrier recombination. Te-rich samples show transitions corresponding to acceptor-bound excitons (∼1.58 eV) and free-electron to acceptor transitions (∼1.547 eV). In addition to acceptor-bound excitons, Cd-rich samples show transitions assigned to donor-bound excitons (1.591 eV) and Te vacancies at 1.552 eV. Photoluminescence is a noninvasive way to monitor stoichiometric shifts induced by post-deposition anneals in polycrystalline CdTe thin films deposited by close-spaced sublimation.

  20. Class Cuisine: Food in the Foreign Language Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauschenberg, Gretchen S.

    1984-01-01

    Food can both interest students in a foreign culture and motivate them to broaden their interests. Cooking with students can take many forms. The students can cook in class if adequate preparations are made and permission is granted. Students can contribute toward the purchase of food for snacks and meals, and the cost can be kept to the price of…

  1. Class Extraction and Classification Accuracy in Latent Class Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Qiong

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of latent class models (LCM) in educational research, methodological studies have not yet accumulated much information on the appropriate application of this modeling technique, especially with regard to requirement on sample size and number of indicators. This dissertation study represented an initial attempt to…

  2. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  3. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  4. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  5. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  6. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  7. Promoting Wellness in Lamaze Classes

    PubMed Central

    Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Lamaze childbirth educators are responsible for teaching wellness-based classes that do not add to the anxiety of the current, fear-based culture of maternity health care. Expectant parents' vulnerable months of pregnancy offer “teachable moments” for the childbirth educator, during which parents can be encouraged to alter their lifestyles and adopt the concept of wellness to their principles of living. In this article, concepts of wellness are examined, drawing from the writings of wellness advocates, midwifery researchers, and an anthropologist. Nutrition, physical exercise, breathing, and awareness of the five senses are components of potential class content explored in this article. PMID:17273442

  8. Alloys For Corrosive, Hydrogen-Rich Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, William B.; Bhat, Biliyar N.; Chen, Po-Shou; Kuruvilla, A. K.; Panda, Binayak

    1993-01-01

    "NASA-23" denotes class of alloys resisting both embrittlement by hydrogen and corrosion. Weldable and castable and formed by such standard processes as rolling, forging, and wire drawing. Heat-treated to obtain desired combinations of strength and ductility in ranges of 100 to 180 kpsi yield strength, 120 to 200 kpsi ultimate tensile strength, and 10 to 30 percent elongation at break. Used in place of most common aerospace structural alloy, Inconel(R) 718.

  9. Productivity is a poor predictor of plant species richness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For 30 years, the relationship between net primary productivity and species richness has generated intense debate in ecology about the processes regulating fine-scale species richness. The true relationship was thought to be hump-shaped, with richness peaking at intermediate levels of productivity, ...

  10. Constancy in Functional Space across a Species Richness Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Nathan G; Weiser, Michael D; Mao, Lingfeng; Normand, Signe; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Lin, Luxiang; Cao, Min; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between large-scale gradients in species richness and functional diversity provides important information regarding the mechanisms driving patterns of biodiversity. A classic hypothesis in ecology is that strong interspecific interactions should result in an increase in the functional volume of assemblages as the species richness increases, whereas climatic constraints may result in no change in functional volume. Most research of this kind examines latitudinal gradients in species richness, but the results are likely confounded by underlying gradients in climate and phylogenetic composition. We take an alternative approach that examines functional richness across a tree species richness anomaly where species richness doubles from Europe to eastern North America. The results demonstrate that the functional richness on both continents saturates at a similar point as species richness increases and that the packing of functional space becomes tighter. Further, the species richness anomaly is driven primarily by genera unique to North America, but those genera contribute less than expected functional richness to the region, indicating a high level of redundancy with genera shared between the continents. Taken together, the results indicate that the species richness anomaly is associated with diversification within a climatically constrained trait space. More generally, the work demonstrates the power of utilizing species richness anomalies in biodiversity research, particularly when they are coupled with information regarding organismal function. PMID:27028083

  11. Hydrogen as a New Class of Radioprotective Agent

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Liren; Shen, Jianliang; Chuai, Yunhai; Cai, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that most of the ionizing radiation-induced damage is caused by hydroxyl radicals (·OH) follows radiolysis of H2O. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has antioxidant activities by selectively reducing ·OH and peroxynitrite(ONOO-). We firstly hypothesized and demonstrated the radioprotective effect of H2 in vitro and in vivo, which was also repeated on different experimental animal models by different departments. A randomized, placebo-controlled study showed that consumption of hydrogen-rich water reduces the biological reaction to radiation-induced oxidative stress without compromising anti-tumor effects. These encouraging results suggested that H2 represents a potentially novel preventative strategy for radiation-induced oxidative injuries. H2 is explosive. Therefore, administration of hydrogen-rich solution (physiological saline/pure water/other solutions saturated with H2) may be more practical in daily life and more suitable for daily consumption. This review focuses on major scientific and clinical advances of hydrogen-rich solution/H2 as a new class of radioprotective agent. PMID:24155664

  12. Metal-rich or misclassified? The case of four RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L.; Juhasz, A. L.; Plachy, E.; Szabo, R.

    2016-06-01

    We analysed the light curve of four, apparently extremely metal-rich fundamenta-mode RR Lyrae stars. We identified two stars, MT Tel and ASAS J091803-3022.6 as RRc (first-overtone) pulsators that were misclassified as RRab ones in the ASAS survey. In the case of the other two stars, V397 Gem and ASAS J075127-4136.3, we could not decide conclusively, as they are outliers in the period-Fourier-coefficient space from the loci of both classes, but their photometric metallicities also favour the RRc classification.

  13. Oxygen-rich Mira variables: Near-infrared luminosity calibrations. Populations and period-luminosity relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, R.; Mennessier, M.-O.; Barthes, D.; Luri, X.; Mattei, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Hipparcos astrometric and kinematical data of oxygen-rich Mira variables are used to calibrate absolute near-infrared magnitudes and kinematic parameters. Three distinct classes of stars with different kinematics and scale heights were identified. The two most significant groups present characteristics close to those usually assigned to extended/thick disk-halo populations and old disk populations, respectively, and thus they may differ by their metallicity abundance. Two parallel period-luminosity relations are found, one for each population. The shift between these relations is interpreted as the consequence of the effects of metallicity abundance on the luminosity.

  14. Extremely Electron-Rich, Boron-Functionalized, Icosahedral Carborane-Based Phosphinoboranes

    PubMed Central

    Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Lewis, Calvin D.; Teverovskiy, Georgiy; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    We have prepared the first examples of B9-connected trivalent aryl and alkyl phosphinoborane species via Pd-catalyzed phosphination of 9-iodo-meta-carborane. Our studies highlight the unique electronic features of the B9-connected meta-carboranyl moiety as compared to its C1-based analogue. This work suggests that the B9-functionalized meta-carboranyl substituent in these ligands exhibits more electron-releasing character than any other known carbon-based substituent, ultimately laying the foundation for a new class of phosphine ligands with extremely electron-rich character. PMID:23667288

  15. Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richard S. Tuthill

    2004-06-10

    The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

  16. Conversion of glycerol to hydrogen rich gas.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen H; Kannangara, G S Kamali

    2013-12-21

    Presently there is a glut of glycerol as the by-product of biofuel production and it will grow as production increases. The conundrum is how we can consume this material and convert it into a more useful product. One potential route is to reform glycerol to hydrogen rich gas including synthesis gas (CO + H2) and hydrogen. However, there is recent literature on various reforming techniques which may have a bearing on the efficiency of such a process. Hence in this review reforming of glycerol at room temperature (normally photo-catalytic), catalysis at moderate and high temperature and a non-catalytic pyrolysis process are presented. The high temperature processes allow the generation of synthesis gas with the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratios being suitable for synthesis of dimethyl ether, methanol and for the Fischer-Tropsch process using established catalysts. Efficient conversion of synthesis gas to hydrogen involves additional catalysts that assist the water gas shift reaction, or involves in situ capture of carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Reforming at reduced temperatures including photo-reforming offers the opportunity of producing synthesis gas or hydrogen using single catalysts. Together, these processes will assist in overcoming the worldwide glut of glycerol, increasing the competitiveness of the biofuel production and reducing our dependency on the fossil based, hydrogen rich gas. PMID:24043264

  17. Sports medicine applications of platelet rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Allan; Harmon, Kimberly; Woodall, James; Vieira, Amy

    2012-06-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is a powerful new biologic tool in sports medicine. PRP is a fraction of autologous whole blood containing and increased number of platelets and a wide variety of cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-B1), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) among many others. Worldwide interest in this biologic technology has recently risen sharply. Basic science and preclinical data support the use of PRP for a variety of sports related injuries and disorders. The published, peer reviewed, human data on PRP is limited. Although the scientific evaluation of clinical efficacy is in the early stages, elite and recreational athletes already use PRP in the treatment of sports related injuries. Many questions remain to be answered regarding the use of PRP including optimal formulation, including of leukocytes, dosage and rehabilitation protocols. In this review, a classification for platelet rich plasma is proposed and the in-vitro, preclinical and human investigations of PRP applications in sports medicine will be reviewed as well as a discussion of rehabilitation after a PRP procedure. The regulation of PRP by the World Anti-Doping Agency will also be discussed. PRP is a promising technology in sports medicine; however, it will require more vigorous study in order to better understand how to apply it most effectively. PMID:21740373

  18. Magnesium-rich Basalts on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2013-05-01

    X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers on NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft are making key measurements regarding the composition and properties of the surface of Mercury, allowing researchers to more clearly decipher the planet's formation and geologic history. The origin of the igneous rocks in the crust of Mercury is the focus of recent research by Karen Stockstill-Cahill and Tim McCoy (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution), along with Larry Nittler and Shoshana Weider (Carnegie Institution of Washington) and Steven Hauck II (Case Western Reserve University). Using the well-known MELTS computer code Stockstill-Cahill and coauthors worked with MESSENGER-derived and rock-analog compositions to constrain petrologic models of the lavas that erupted on the surface of Mercury. Rock analogs included a partial melt of the Indarch meteorite and a range of Mg-rich terrestrial rocks. Their work shows the lavas on Mercury are most similar to terrestrial magnesian basalt (with lowered FeO content). The implications of the modeling are that Mg-rich lavas came from high-temperature sources in Mercury's mantle and erupted at high temperature with exceptionally low viscosity into thinly bedded and laterally extensive flows, concepts open to further evaluation by laboratory experiments and by geologic mapping of Mercury's surface using MESSENGER's imaging system and laser altimeter to document flow features and dimensions.

  19. Catalytic oxidation of very fuel rich mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a catalytic reactor as a tool to study soot formation from the fuel rich side of the soot limit (null set = 3 - 6). The experimental approach to be taken in the first phase of the research is to document that a hydrocarbon fuel can be burnt at very rich equivalence ratios without forming soot. A simple mono-component fuel, iso-octane, will be used as the test fuel. To insure that combustion is uniform across the catalyst bed, measurements will be made of the fuel-air equivalence ratio profile across the inlet and the temperature and product distribution across the outlet. Phase Two will be to use this environment as a testing ground for determining the effect the structure of a hydrocarbon fuel has on its tendency to form soot. Various amounts of organic compounds such as benzene will be added to the iso-octane and the reaction products studied. Other compounds to be tested will xylene, toluene, and naphthalene.

  20. Sustainable Lighting and Sense-Rich Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, Hayden

    Sustainable lighting, considered in the broader context of sustainable design, suggests a return to more natural interior environments with their greater sensory stimulation and experiential richness. Research over the last 50 years has been claimed to provide little evidence of the interaction between the visual, thermal, acoustic, tactile and olfactory senses which might be expected to be essential to sensory richness. A critical evaluation of such research, in the context of understanding gained from recent research in cognitive science and neuroscience, reveals serious flaws in this research into sensory interaction. The nature of these flaws is discussed with examples. Insight gained from studies of visual perception suggests significant changes need to be made to experimental procedures to avoid the problem of “inattentional blindness” and to overcome the lack of reality in the rooms and equipment used in laboratory-based studies. In particular, it is argued that the lack of a sense of “place” and of a realistic activity means that the experimental setting will fail to trigger any significant activity in the neural pathway in the visual cortex which has been found to enable interaction with non-visual sensory modalities.