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Sample records for abell richness class

  1. The nearby Abell clusters. III. Luminosity functions for eight rich clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Oegerle, W.R.; Hoessel, J.G. Washburn Observatory, Madison, WI )

    1989-11-01

    Red photographic data on eight rich Abell clusters are combined with previous results on four other Abell clusters to study the luminosity functions of the clusters. The results produce a mean value of the characteristic galaxy magnitude (M asterisk) that is consistent with previous results. No relation is found between the magnitude of the first-ranked cluster galaxy and M asterisk, suggesting that the value of M asterisk is not changed by dynamical evolution. The faint ends of the luminosity functions for many of the clusters are quite flat, validating the nonuniversality in the parametrization of Schechter (1976) functions for rich clusters of galaxies. 40 refs.

  2. Abell 58 - a Planetary Nebula with an ONe-rich knot: a signature of binary interaction? .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, H. H. B.; De Marco, O.; Liu, X.-W.

    We have investigated the possibility that binary evolution is involved in the formation of the planetary nebula Abell 58. In particular, we assume a neon nova is responsible for the observed high oxygen and neon abundances of the central hydrogen-deficient knot of the H-deficient planetary nebula Abell 58 and the ejecta from the explosion are mixed with the planetary nebula. We have investigated different scenarios involving mergers and wind accretion and found that the most promising formation scenario involves a primary SAGB star that ends its evolution as an ONe white dwarf with an AGB companion at a moderately close separation. Mass is deposited on the white dwarf through wind accretion. So neon novae could occur just after the secondary AGB companion undergoes its final flash. However, the initial separation has to be fine-tuned. To estimate the frequency of such systems we evolve a population of binary systems and find that that Abell 58-like objects should indeed be rare and the fraction of Abell-58 planetary nebula is on the order of 10-4, or lower, among all planetary nebulae.

  3. Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katgert, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Abell clusters are the most conspicuous groupings of galaxies identified by George Abell on the plates of the first photographic survey made with the SCHMIDT TELESCOPE at Mount Palomar in the 1950s. Sometimes, the term Abell clusters is used as a synonym of nearby, optically selected galaxy clusters....

  4. A 1400-MHz survey of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. N.; White, R. A.; Hilldrup, K. C.; Hanisch, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of 1478 Abell clusters of galaxies with the NRAO 91-m telescope at 1400 MHz are reported. The measured beam shape was deconvolved from the measured source Gaussian fits in order to estimate the source size and position angle. All detected sources within 0.5 corrected Abell cluster radii are listed, including the cluster number, richness class, distance class, magnitude of the tenth brightest galaxy, redshift estimate, corrected cluster radius in arcmin, right ascension and error, declination and error, total flux density and error, and angular structure for each source.

  5. The kinematics and dynamics of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 539

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Huchra, John P.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A sample of 289 redshifts within 10 deg of the center of the cluster A539 have been obtained in order to investigate the cluster kinematics and dynamics. Within 1 Mpc of the center, the physical parameters of A539 are found to be typical of those of rich clusters. It is shown that early-type galaxies are more concentrated toward the cluster center and that the velocity distributions of early-type and late-type galaxies differ marginally.

  6. THE RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF ABELL 1689 AND THE RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Alamo-Martínez, K. A.; González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Jee, M. J.; Jordán, A.; Meurer, G. R.; Peng, E. W.; West, M. J.

    2013-09-20

    We study the rich globular cluster (GC) system in the center of the massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 (z = 0.18), one of the most powerful gravitational lenses known. With 28 Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys orbits in the F814W bandpass, we reach a magnitude I{sub 814} = 29 with ∼>90% completeness and sample the brightest ∼5% of the GC system. Assuming the well-known Gaussian form of the GC luminosity function (GCLF), we estimate a total population of N{sup total}{sub GC}= 162,850{sup +75,450}{sub -51,310} GCs within a projected radius of 400 kpc. As many as half of the GCs may comprise an intracluster component. Even with the sizable uncertainties, which mainly result from the uncertain GCLF parameters, this system is by far the largest GC population studied to date. The specific frequency S{sub N} is high, but not uncommon for central galaxies in massive clusters, rising from S{sub N} ≈ 5 near the center to ∼12 at large radii. Passive galaxy fading would increase S{sub N} by ∼20% at z = 0. We construct the radial mass profiles of the GCs, stars, intracluster gas, and lensing-derived total mass, and we compare the mass fractions as a function of radius. The estimated mass in GCs, M{sub GC}{sup total} = 3.9 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, is comparable to ∼80% of the total stellar mass of the Milky Way. The shape of the GC mass profile appears intermediate between those of the stellar light and total cluster mass. Despite the extreme nature of this system, the ratios of the GC mass to the baryonic and total masses, and thus the GC formation efficiency, are typical of those in other rich clusters when comparing at the same physical radii. The GC formation efficiency is not constant, but varies with radius, in a manner that appears similar for different clusters; we speculate on the reasons for this similarity in profile.

  7. The ESO nearby Abell cluster survey. VII. Galaxy density profiles of rich clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Mazure, A.; Katgert, P.; Biviano, A.

    1998-08-01

    We have analyzed the projected galaxy distributions in a subset of the ENACS cluster sample, viz. in those 77 clusters that have z < 0.1 and R_ACO >= 1 and for which ENACS and COSMOS data are available. For 20 % of these, the distribution of galaxies in the COSMOS catalogue does not allow a reliable centre position to be determined. For the other 62 clusters, we first determined the centre and elongation of the galaxy distribution. Subsequently, we made Maximum-Likelihood fits to the distribution of COSMOS galaxies for 4 theoretical profiles, two with `cores' (generalized King- and Hubble-profiles) and two with `cusps' (generalized Navarro, Frenk and White, or NFW, and de Vaucouleurs profiles). We obtain average core radii (or characteristic radii for the profiles without core) of 128, 189, 292 and 1582 kpc for fits with King, Hubble, NFW and de Vaucouleurs profiles respectively, with dispersions around these average values of 88, 116, 191 and 771 kpc. The surface density of background galaxies is about 4 10(-5) gals arcsec(-2) (with a spread of about 2 10(-5) ), and there is very good agreement between the values found for the 4 profiles. There is also very good agreement on the outer logarithmic slope of the projected galaxy distribution, which is that for the non-generalized King- and Hubble-profile (i.e. beta_ {King} = beta_ {Hubble} = 1, with the corresponding values for the two other model-profiles). We use the Likelihood ratio to investigate whether the observations are significantly better described by profiles with cusps or by profiles with cores. Taking the King and NFW profiles as `model' of either class, we find that about 75 % of the clusters are better fit by the King profile than by the NFW profile. However, for the individual clusters the preference for the King profile is rarely significant at a confidence level of more than 90 %. When we limit ourselves to the central regions it appears that the signifance increases drastically, with 65 % of the

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 1400-MHz Survey of 1478 Abell Clusters of Galaxies (Owen+ 1982)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, F. N.; White, R. A.; Hilldrup, K. C.; Hanisch, R. J.

    1994-03-01

    This catalog contains observations of Abell clusters of galaxies which were obtained with the Green Bank 91-m telescope at 1400 MHz with an angular resolution of 10'x11' (RAxDEC). This catalog extends the sample of clusters originally published in Owen (1974AJ.....79..427O). The primary goals of this survey were to observe all Abell (1958ApJS....3..211A, Cat. VII/4) clusters with m10 (magnitude of the tenth brightest galaxy in the cluster) less than or equal to 17.0 and declinations north of -19 degrees, to observe all clusters with richness>=3 regardless of m10, and to obtain observations of a representative sample of the rest of the catalog (m10>=17.0; richness<=2). The abelclus.dat file contains ALL 957 detected sources (also beyond 0.5 corrected Abell radii). It contains 525 sources within 0.5 corrected Abell radii, while the published table1.dat file contains 487 entries corresponding to 485 distinct sources (in 442 clusters). The catalog entries contains the flux density at 1400 MHz, the Abell cluster number, richness class, distance class, m10, redshift estimate (z), corrected Abell cluster radius, right ascension (B1950), declination (B1950), deconvolved major and minor source axis lengths, position angle, and distance of the source from the cluster center. (2 data files).

  9. The X-ray luminosity functions of Abell clusters from the Einstein Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived the present epoch X-ray luminosity function of northern Abell clusters using luminosities from the Einstein Cluster Survey. The sample is sufficiently large that we can determine the luminosity function for each richness class separately with sufficient precision to study and compare the different luminosity functions. We find that, within each richness class, the range of X-ray luminosity is quite large and spans nearly a factor of 25. Characterizing the luminosity function for each richness class with a Schechter function, we find that the characteristic X-ray luminosity, L(sub *), scales with richness class as (L(sub *) varies as N(sub*)(exp gamma), where N(sub *) is the corrected, mean number of galaxies in a richness class, and the best-fitting exponent is gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.4. Finally, our analysis suggests that there is a lower limit to the X-ray luminosity of clusters which is determined by the integrated emission of the cluster member galaxies, and this also scales with richness class. The present sample forms a baseline for testing cosmological evolution of Abell-like clusters when an appropriate high-redshift cluster sample becomes available.

  10. Surprising phenomena in a rich new class of inflationary models

    SciTech Connect

    Vaudrevange, Pascal M.; Podolsky, Dmitry I.; Starkman, Glenn D. E-mail: podolsky@phys.cwru.edu

    2010-04-01

    We report on a new class of fast-roll inflationary models. In a huge part of its parameter space, inflationary perturbations exhibit quite unusual phenomena such as scalar and tensor modes freezing out at widely different times, as well as scalar modes reentering the horizon during inflation. One specific point in parameter space is characterized by extraordinary behavior of the scalar perturbations. Freeze-out of scalar perturbations as well as particle production at horizon crossing are absent. Also the behavior of the perturbations around this quasi-de Sitter background is dual to a quantum field theory in flat space-time. Finally, the form of the primordial power spectrum is determined by the interaction between different modes of scalar perturbations.

  11. Spectral alteration effects in chondritic gas-rich breccias - Implications for S-Class and Q-Class asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey F.; Keil, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    Reflection spectra were obtained from sawed or freshly broken surfaces of gas-rich matrix regions in a number of ordinary chondrites (Dubrovnik, Cangas de Onis, Olivenza, and Dimmitt) which are believed to represent lithified portions of asteroid regoliths that were once directly exposed to space, with the purpose of relating these chondrites to Class S asteroids. However, the observations did not detect curved red continuum characteristic for Class S asteroid spectra, suggesting that it is unlikely for any well-observed Class S asteroid to be a source of ordinary chondrites. It is suggested that the newly discovered spectral class 'Q', of which asteroid 1982 Apollo is the prototype, provides a viable alternative of a parent body.

  12. From Rags to "Rich as Rockefeller": Portrayals of Class Mobility in Newbery Titles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest, Danielle E.

    2014-01-01

    Several scholars have noted the prevalence of the discourse of upward class mobility in the United States, particularly within K-12 education settings. "Rags-to-riches" stories, an extreme form of upward mobility discourse, have been embedded in American culture for generations. However, the prevalence of upward mobility discourse in…

  13. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootaninia, Zahra

    2015-05-01

    This thesis presents a study of the radio luminosity function and the evolution of galaxies in the Abell 2256 cluster (z=0.058, richness class 2). Using the NED database and VLA deep data with an rms sensitivity of 18 mu Jy.beam--1, we identified 257 optical galaxies as members of A2256, of which 83 are radio galaxies. Since A2256 is undergoing a cluster-cluster merger, it is a good candidate to study the radio activity of galaxies in the cluster. We calculated the Univariate and Bivariate radio luminosity functions for A2256, and compared the results to studies on other clusters. We also used the SDSS parameter fracDev to roughly classify galaxies as spirals and ellipticals, and investigated the distribution and structure of galaxies in the cluster. We found that most of the radio galaxies in A2256 are faint, and are distributed towards the outskirts of the cluster. On the other hand, almost all very bright radio galaxies are ellipticals which are located at the center of the cluster. We also found there is an excess in the number of radio spiral galaxies in A2256 compared to the number of radio ellipticals, counting down to a radio luminosity of log(luminosity)=20.135 W/Hz..

  14. A wide-field spectroscopic survey of Abell 1689 and Abell 1835 with VIMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czoske, Oliver

    2004-12-01

    Spectroscopic surveys can add a third dimension, velocity, to the galaxy distribution in and PoS(BDMH2004)099 around clusters. The largest wide-field spectroscopic samples at present exist for near-by clusters. Czoske et al. (2001: A&A 372, 391; 2002: A&A 386, 31) present a catalogue of redshifts for 300 cluster members with V < 22 in Cl0024+1654 at z = 0.395, the largest currently available cluster ˜ redshift catalogue at such a high redshift. In that case, it was only the redshift information ex- tending to large cluster-centric distances which revealed the complex structure of what appeared in other observations to be a relaxed rich cluster. The recent advent of high-multiplex spectrographs on 8 10 meter class telescopes has made it possible to obtain large numbers of high-quality spectra of galaxies and around clusters of galaxies in a short amount of time. The data described by Czoske et al. (2001) were obtained over the course of four years. Samples larger by a factor of 2 . . . 3 can now be obtained in ˜ 10 hours of observation time. Here I present the first results from a spectroscopic survey of the two X-ray luminous clusters Abell 1689 (z = 0.185) and Abell 1835 (z = 0.25). We use the VIsible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on VLT UT3/Melipal. The field of view of VIMOS available for spectroscopy consists of four quadrants of ˜ 7 × 7 , the separa- tion between the quadrants is ˜ 2 . Using the LR-Blue grism, one can place ˜ 100 . . . 150 slits per quadrant. The resulting spectra cover the wavelength range 3700 . . . 6700 Å with a resolution R 200. We use as the basis for object selection panoramic multi-colour images obtained with the CFH12k camera on CFHT (Czoske, 2002, PhD thesis), covering 40 × 30 in BRI for A1689 and VRI for A1835. The input catalogue has been cleaned of stars. We attempted to cover the entire CFH12k field of view by using 10 VIMOS pointings for each cluster. Due to technical problems with VIMOS only 8 and 9 masks

  15. Hierarchical socioeconomic fractality: The rich, the poor, and the middle-class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-05-01

    Since the seminal work of the Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, the study of wealth and income has been a topic of active scientific exploration engaging researches ranging from economics and political science to econophysics and complex systems. This paper investigates the intrinsic fractality of wealth and income. To that end we introduce and characterize three forms of socioeconomic scale-invariance-poor fractality, rich fractality, and middle-class fractality-and construct hierarchical fractal approximations of general wealth and income distributions, based on the stitching of these three forms of fractality. Intertwining the theoretical results with real-world empirical data we then establish that the three forms of socioeconomic fractality-amalgamated into a composite hierarchical structure-underlie the distributions of wealth and income in human societies. We further establish that the hierarchical socioeconomic fractality of wealth and income is also displayed by empirical rank distributions observed across the sciences.

  16. Stellar populations of BCGs, close companions and intracluster light in Abell 85, Abell 2457 and IIZw108

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. O. V.; Alpert, H. S.; Trierweiler, I. L.; Abraham, T.; Beizer, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first results from an integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey of a ˜75 kpc region around three brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), combining over 100 IFU fibres to study the intracluster light (ICL). We fit population synthesis models to estimate age and metallicity. For Abell 85 and Abell 2457, the ICL is best-fit with a fraction of old, metal-rich stars like in the BCG, but requires 30-50 per cent young and metal-poor stars, a component not found in the BCGs. This is consistent with the ICL having been formed by a combination of interactions with less massive, younger, more metal-poor cluster members in addition to stars that form the BCG. We find that the three galaxies are in different stages of evolution and may be the result of different formation mechanisms. The BCG in Abell 85 is near a relatively young, metal-poor galaxy, but the dynamical friction time-scale is long and the two are unlikely to be undergoing a merger. The outer regions of Abell 2457 show a higher relative fraction of metal-poor stars, and we find one companion, with a higher fraction of young, metal-poor stars than the BCG, which is likely to merge within a gigayear. Several luminous red galaxies are found at the centre of the cluster IIZw108, with short merger time-scales, suggesting that the system is about to embark on a series of major mergers to build up a dominant BCG. The young, metal-poor component found in the ICL is not found in the merging galaxies.

  17. MASS SUBSTRUCTURE IN ABELL 3128

    SciTech Connect

    McCleary, J.; Dell’Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-20

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  18. Mass Substructure in Abell 3128

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleary, J.; dell'Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  19. The Richness Dependence of Galaxy Cluster Correlations: Results From A Redshift Survey Of Rich APM Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, R. A. C.; Dalton, G. B.; Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the spatial clustering properties of a new catalog of very rich galaxy clusters selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. These clusters are of comparable richness and space density to Abell Richness Class greater than or equal to 1 clusters, but selected using an objective algorithm from a catalog demonstrably free of artificial inhomogeneities. Evaluation of the two-point correlation function xi(sub cc)(r) for the full sample and for richer subsamples reveals that the correlation amplitude is consistent with that measured for lower richness APM clusters and X-ray selected clusters. We apply a maximum likelihood estimator to find the best fitting slope and amplitude of a power law fit to x(sub cc)(r), and to estimate the correlation length r(sub 0) (the value of r at which xi(sub cc)(r) is equal to unity). For clusters with a mean space density of 1.6 x 10(exp -6) h(exp 3) MpC(exp -3) (equivalent to the space density of Abell Richness greater than or equal to 2 clusters), we find r(sub 0) = 21.3(+11.1/-9.3) h(exp -1) Mpc (95% confidence limits). This is consistent with the weak richness dependence of xi(sub cc)(r) expected in Gaussian models of structure formation. In particular, the amplitude of xi(sub cc)(r) at all richnesses matches that of xi(sub cc)(r) for clusters selected in N-Body simulations of a low density Cold Dark Matter model.

  20. Short interspersed elements (SINEs) from insectivores. Two classes of mammalian SINEs distinguished by A-rich tail structure.

    PubMed

    Borodulina, O R; Kramerov, D A

    2001-10-01

    Four tRNA-related SINE families were isolated from the genome of the shrew Sorex araneus (SOR element), mole Mogera robusta (TAL element), and hedgehog Mesechinus dauuricus (ERI-1 and ERI-2 elements). Each of these SINEs families is specific for a single Insectivora family: SOR, for Soricidae (shrews); TAL, for Talpidae (moles and desmans); ERI-1 and ERI-2, for Erinaceidae (hedgehogs). There is a long polypyrimidine region (TC-motif) in TAL, ERI-1, and ERI-2 elements located immediately upstream of an A-rich tail with polyadenylation signals (AATAAA) and an RNA polymerase III terminator (T(4-6)) or TCT(3-4)). Ten out of 14 analyzed mammalian tRNA-related SINE families have an A-rich tail similar to that of TAL, ERI-1, and ERI-2 elements. These elements were assigned to class T+. The other four SINEs including SOR element have no polyadenylation signal and transcription terminator in their A-rich tail and were assigned to class T-. Class T+ SINEs occur only in mammals, and most of them have a long polypyrimidine region. Possible models of retroposition of class T+ and T- SINEs are discussed.

  1. Social Class, Solipsism, and Contextualism: How the Rich Are Different from the Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Michael W.; Piff, Paul K.; Mendoza-Denton, Rodolfo; Rheinschmidt, Michelle L.; Keltner, Dacher

    2012-01-01

    Social class is shaped by an individual's material resources as well as perceptions of rank vis-a-vis others in society, and in this article, we examine how class influences behavior. Diminished resources and lower rank create contexts that constrain social outcomes for lower-class individuals and enhance contextualist tendencies--that is, a focus…

  2. An Analysis of Rich Cluster Redshift Survey Data for Large Scale Structure Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinglend, K.; Batuski, D.; Haase, S.; Hill, J.

    1994-12-01

    The results from the COBE satellite show the existence of structure on scales on the order of 10% or more of the horizon scale of the universe. Rich clusters of galaxies from Abell's catalog show evidence of structure on scales of 100 Mpc and may hold the promise of confirming structure on the scale of the COBE result. However, many Abell clusters have zero or only one measured redshift, so present knowledge of their three dimensional distribution has quite large uncertainties. The shortage of measured redshifts for these clusters may also mask a problem of projection effects corrupting the membership counts for the clusters. Our approach in this effort has been to use the MX multifiber spectrometer on the Steward 2.3m to measure redshifts of at least ten galaxies in each of 80 Abell cluster fields with richness class R>= 1 and mag10 <= 16.8 (estimated z<= 0.12) and zero or one measured redshifts. This work will result in a deeper, more complete (and reliable) sample of positions of rich clusters. Our primary intent for the sample is for two-point correlation and other studies of the large scale structure traced by these clusters in an effort to constrain theoretical models for structure formation. We are also obtaining enough redshifts per cluster so that a much better sample of reliable cluster velocity dispersions will be available for other studies of cluster properties. To date, we have collected such data for 64 clusters, and for most of them, we have seven or more cluster members with redshifts, allowing for reliable velocity dispersion calculations. Velocity histograms and stripe density plots for several interesting cluster fields are presented, along with summary tables of cluster redshift results. Also, with 10 or more redshifts in most of our cluster fields (30({') } square, just about an `Abell diameter' at z ~ 0.1) we have investigated the extent of projection effects within the Abell catalog in an effort to quantify and understand how this may effect

  3. Social class, solipsism, and contextualism: how the rich are different from the poor.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Michael W; Piff, Paul K; Mendoza-Denton, Rodolfo; Rheinschmidt, Michelle L; Keltner, Dacher

    2012-07-01

    Social class is shaped by an individual's material resources as well as perceptions of rank vis-à-vis others in society, and in this article, we examine how class influences behavior. Diminished resources and lower rank create contexts that constrain social outcomes for lower-class individuals and enhance contextualist tendencies--that is, a focus on external, uncontrollable social forces and other individuals who influence one's life outcomes. In contrast, abundant resources and elevated rank create contexts that enhance the personal freedoms of upper-class individuals and give rise to solipsistic social cognitive tendencies--that is, an individualistic focus on one's own internal states, goals, motivations, and emotions. Guided by this framework, we detail 9 hypotheses and relevant empirical evidence concerning how class-based contextualist and solipsistic tendencies shape the self, perceptions of the social environment, and relationships to other individuals. Novel predictions and implications for research in other socio-political contexts are considered. PMID:22775498

  4. An X-ray temperature map of Abell 754: A major merger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. Patrick; Briel, Ulrich G.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first two-dimensional X-ray temperature map of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 754. We also present an X-ray surface brightness map with improved spatial resolution and sensitivity compared with previous maps. Both the temperature map and the surface brightness map show that A754 is in the throes of a violent merger; it is probably far from hydrostatic equilibrium.

  5. Abel's Theorem Simplifies Reduction of Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We give an alternative to the standard method of reduction or order, in which one uses one solution of a homogeneous, linear, second order differential equation to find a second, linearly independent solution. Our method, based on Abel's Theorem, is shorter, less complex and extends to higher order equations.

  6. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts.

  7. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts. PMID:17082451

  8. Photometric Observations of the Binary Nuclei of Three Abell Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afşar, M.; Ibanoǧlu, C.

    2004-07-01

    CCD photometric observations of the three Abell planetary nebulae (Abell 63, Abell 46 and Abell 41) nuclei are presented. These systems are binary systems which allow us to derive model-independent parameters. Also the results of the light curve solution of UU Sge (binary nucleus of Abell 63) are discussed.

  9. Estimating the Richness of a Population When the Maximum Number of Classes Is Fixed: A Nonparametric Solution to an Archaeological Problem

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Metin I.; Chao, Anne; Hwang, Wen-Han; Colwell, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Estimating assemblage species or class richness from samples remains a challenging, but essential, goal. Though a variety of statistical tools for estimating species or class richness have been developed, they are all singly-bounded: assuming only a lower bound of species or classes. Nevertheless there are numerous situations, particularly in the cultural realm, where the maximum number of classes is fixed. For this reason, a new method is needed to estimate richness when both upper and lower bounds are known. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we introduce a new method for estimating class richness: doubly-bounded confidence intervals (both lower and upper bounds are known). We specifically illustrate our new method using the Chao1 estimator, rarefaction, and extrapolation, although any estimator of asymptotic richness can be used in our method. Using a case study of Clovis stone tools from the North American Lower Great Lakes region, we demonstrate that singly-bounded richness estimators can yield confidence intervals with upper bound estimates larger than the possible maximum number of classes, while our new method provides estimates that make empirical sense. Conclusions/Significance Application of the new method for constructing doubly-bound richness estimates of Clovis stone tools permitted conclusions to be drawn that were not otherwise possible with singly-bounded richness estimates, namely, that Lower Great Lakes Clovis Paleoindians utilized a settlement pattern that was probably more logistical in nature than residential. However, our new method is not limited to archaeological applications. It can be applied to any set of data for which there is a fixed maximum number of classes, whether that be site occupancy models, commercial products (e.g. athletic shoes), or census information (e.g. nationality, religion, age, race). PMID:22666316

  10. The X-ray cluster Abell 744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gioia, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray and optical observations of the cluster of galaxies Abell 744 are presented. The X-ray flux (assuming H(0) = 100 km/s per Mpc) is about 9 x 10 to the 42nd erg/s. The X-ray source is extended, but shows no other structure. Photographic photometry (in Kron-Cousins R), calibrated by deep CCD frames, is presented for all galaxies brighter than 19th magnitude within 0.75 Mpc of the cluster center. The luminosity function is normal, and the isopleths show little evidence of substructure near the cluster center. The cluster has a dominant central galaxy, which is classified as a normal brightest-cluster elliptical on the basis of its luminosity profile. New redshifts were obtained for 26 galaxies in the vicinity of the cluster center; 20 appear to be cluster members. The spatial distribution of redshifts is peculiar; the dispersion within the 150 kpc core radius is much greater than outside. Abell 744 is similar to the nearby cluster Abell 1060.

  11. Platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of Class II furcation defects: a histometrical study in dogs

    PubMed Central

    SUAID, Fabrícia Ferreira; CARVALHO, Marcelo Diniz; AMBROSANO, Gláucia Maria Bovi; NOCITI JUNIOR, Francisco Humberto; CASATI, Marcio Zaffalon; SALLUM, Enilson Antônio

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the potential adjunctive benefits of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) when used with guided-tissue regeneration (GTR) and bioactive glass (BG) in the treatment of Class II furcation lesions. Material and Methods Bilateral Class II furcation lesions were surgically created and allowed to become chronic in the mandibular third premolars of 9 dogs. The defects were randomly assigned to: A) GTR+BG and B) GTR+BG+PRP. Similar defects were created in the maxillary third premolars and received the same treatments after 45 days. Dogs were sacrificed 90 days after the first treatment. The histometric parameters evaluated were: connective tissue adaptation, new cementum, new bone, mineralized bone area, non-mineralized bone area, and residual BG particle area. Results Data analysis showed a superior length of new cementum and a greater mineralized bone area for group B in both periods (p<0.05). The non-mineralized bone area was greater in the control group (p<0.05) in both periods. Conclusion Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the use of PRP in the treatment of Class II furcation defects may enhance the amount of new cementum and provide a more mineralized bone in a shorter period of time. PMID:22666831

  12. Similar hormone-rich peptides from thyroglobulins of five vertebrate classes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, P.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Kaiser, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    Thyroglobulins (Tgs) were purified from five species (rat, chicken, turtle, frog, and goldfish), each representing a different vertebrate class. On reduction with mercaptoethanol, each Tg produced five major iodopeptides, designated A-E, with ranges of estimated molecular mass, in kilodaltons (K), as follows: A, more than 300K; B, 210-280K; C, 30-42K; D, 19-28K; and E, 10-23K. Of these, the two smallest, D and E, had 40-80% of their iodine as iodothyronine, compared with 15-20% for the parent Tgs. They contained 25-63% of Tg's total iodothyronines but only a few percent of its peptide material. Calculations from amino acid analyses and iodine contents showed approximately 1 mol each of D and E/mol 660,000 dalton Tg. In comparisons of amino acid compositions by cluster analysis, iodopeptides D and E resembled each other and their counterparts in other species more than they resembled their parent Tgs. Also, the Tgs from different species were more similar to each other and to iodopeptides D and E than to nonthyroidal proteins randomly selected from the literature. /sup 125/ was injected into rats and turtles, and compared its distribution among the iodopeptides to that of /sup 127/I. These dual isotope experiments showed that as Tg was iodinated in vivo, iodopeptide B decreased both in molecular size and in its share of Tg's iodine, while the sum of iodopeptides D and E increased, indicating that B may be the precursor of D and E. In vivo iodination of rat Tg with /sup 125/I for different periods of time suggested that iodopeptide E and its iodothyronines are derived from a larger portion of the Tg molecule, perhaps iodopeptide B. The amount of /sup 125/I in iodopeptide D also increased with time.

  13. Tauberian theorems for Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Enes; ćoşkun, Hüsamettin

    2015-09-01

    We give some conditions under which Abel summable sequences of fuzzy numbers are convergent. As corollaries we obtain the results given in [E. Yavuz, Ö. Talo, Abel summability of sequences of fuzzy numbers, Soft computing 2014, doi: 10.1007/s00500-014-1563-7].

  14. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s-1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX-TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  15. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s‑1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX–TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  16. Serre duality, Abel's theorem, and Jacobi inversion for supercurves over a thick superpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothstein, Mitchell J.; Rabin, Jeffrey M.

    2015-04-01

    The principal aim of this paper is to extend Abel's theorem to the setting of complex supermanifolds of dimension 1 | q over a finite-dimensional local supercommutative C-algebra. The theorem is proved by establishing a compatibility of Serre duality for the supercurve with Poincaré duality on the reduced curve. We include an elementary algebraic proof of the requisite form of Serre duality, closely based on the account of the reduced case given by Serre in Algebraic groups and class fields, combined with an invariance result for the topology on the dual of the space of répartitions. Our Abel map, taking Cartier divisors of degree zero to the dual of the space of sections of the Berezinian sheaf, modulo periods, is defined via Penkov's characterization of the Berezinian sheaf as the cohomology of the de Rham complex of the sheaf D of differential operators. We discuss the Jacobi inversion problem for the Abel map and give an example demonstrating that if n is an integer sufficiently large that the generic divisor of degree n is linearly equivalent to an effective divisor, this need not be the case for all divisors of degree n.

  17. Are Abell Clusters Correlated with Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Laros, J.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A recent study has presented marginal statistical evidence that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources are correlated with Abell clusters, based on analyses of bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog. Using precise localization information from the Third Interplanetary Network, we have reanalyzed this possible correlation. We find that most of the Abell clusters that are in the relatively large 3B error circles are not in the much smaller IPN/BATSE error regions. We believe that this argues strongly against an Abell cluster-GRB correlation.

  18. The planetary nebula Abell 48 and its [WN] nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, David J.; Bojičić, I. S.; Parker, Q. A.; Stupar, M.; Wachter, S.; DePew, K.; Danehkar, A.; Fitzgerald, M. T.; Douchin, D.

    2014-05-01

    We have conducted a detailed multi-wavelength study of the peculiar nebula Abell 48 and its central star. We classify the nucleus as a helium-rich, hydrogen-deficient star of type [WN4-5]. The evidence for either a massive WN or a low-mass [WN] interpretation is critically examined, and we firmly conclude that Abell 48 is a planetary nebula (PN) around an evolved low-mass star, rather than a Population I ejecta nebula. Importantly, the surrounding nebula has a morphology typical of PNe, and is not enriched in nitrogen, and thus not the `peeled atmosphere' of a massive star. We estimate a distance of 1.6 kpc and a reddening, E(B - V) = 1.90 mag, the latter value clearly showing the nebula lies on the near side of the Galactic bar, and cannot be a massive WN star. The ionized mass (˜0.3 M⊙) and electron density (700 cm-3) are typical of middle-aged PNe. The observed stellar spectrum was compared to a grid of models from the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) grid. The best-fitting temperature is 71 kK, and the atmospheric composition is dominated by helium with an upper limit on the hydrogen abundance of 10 per cent. Our results are in very good agreement with the recent study of Todt et al., who determined a hydrogen fraction of 10 per cent and an unusually large nitrogen fraction of ˜5 per cent. This fraction is higher than any other low-mass H-deficient star, and is not readily explained by current post-AGB models. We give a discussion of the implications of this discovery for the late-stage evolution of intermediate-mass stars. There is now tentative evidence for two distinct helium-dominated post-AGB lineages, separate to the helium- and carbon-dominated surface compositions produced by a late thermal pulse. Further theoretical work is needed to explain these recent discoveries.

  19. Probing single biomolecules in solution using the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Goldsmith, Randall H; Jiang, Yan; Bockenhauer, Samuel D; Moerner, W E

    2012-11-20

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements allow researchers to study asynchronous dynamics and expose molecule-to-molecule structural and behavioral diversity, which contributes to the understanding of biological macromolecules. To provide measurements that are most consistent with the native environment of biomolecules, researchers would like to conduct these measurements in the solution phase if possible. However, diffusion typically limits the observation time to approximately 1 ms in many solution-phase single-molecule assays. Although surface immobilization is widely used to address this problem, this process can perturb the system being studied and contribute to the observed heterogeneity. Combining the technical capabilities of high-sensitivity single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, real-time feedback control and electrokinetic flow in a microfluidic chamber, we have developed a device called the anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap to significantly prolong the observation time of single biomolecules in solution. We have applied the ABEL trap method to explore the photodynamics and enzymatic properties of a variety of biomolecules in aqueous solution and present four examples: the photosynthetic antenna allophycocyanin, the chaperonin enzyme TRiC, a G protein-coupled receptor protein, and the blue nitrite reductase redox enzyme. These examples illustrate the breadth and depth of information which we can extract in studies of single biomolecules with the ABEL trap. When confined in the ABEL trap, the photosynthetic antenna protein allophycocyanin exhibits rich dynamics both in its emission brightness and its excited state lifetime. As each molecule discontinuously converts from one emission/lifetime level to another in a primarily correlated way, it undergoes a series of state changes. We studied the ATP binding stoichiometry of the multi-subunit chaperonin enzyme TRiC in the ABEL trap by counting the number of hydrolyzed Cy3-ATP using stepwise

  20. The Abell 85 BCG: A Nucleated, Coreless Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Juan P.; Donzelli, Carlos J.

    2016-03-01

    New high-resolution r-band imaging of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 85 (Holm 15A) was obtained using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph. These data were taken with the aim of deriving an accurate surface brightness profile of the BCG of Abell 85, in particular, its central region. The new Gemini data show clear evidence of a previously unreported nuclear emission that is evident as a distinct light excess in the central kiloparsec of the surface brightness profile. We find that the light profile is never flat nor does it present a downward trend toward the center of the galaxy. That is, the new Gemini data show a different physical reality from the featureless, “evacuated core” recently claimed for the Abell 85 BCG. After trying different models, we find that the surface brightness profile of the BCG of Abell 85 is best fit by a double Sérsic model.

  1. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21(sub -0.47 sup +0.43) on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36(sub -0.17 sup +0.46).

  2. The magnitude-redshift relation for 561 Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.; Henry, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble diagram for the 561 Abell clusters with measured redshifts has been examined using Abell's (1958) corrected photo-red magnitudes for the tenth-ranked cluster member (m10). After correction for the Scott effect and K dimming, the data are in good agreement with a linear magnitude-redshift relation with a slope of 0.2 out to z = 0.1. New redshift data are also presented for 20 Abell clusters. Abell's m10 is suitable for redshift estimation for clusters with m10 of no more than 16.5. At fainter m10, the number of foreground galaxies expected within an Abell radius is large enough to make identification of the tenth-ranked galaxy difficult. Interlopers bias the estimated redshift toward low values at high redshift. Leir and van den Bergh's (1977) redshift estimates suffer from this same bias but to a smaller degree because of the use of multiple cluster parameters. Constraints on deviations of cluster velocities from the mean cosmological flow require greater photometric accuracy than is provided by Abell's m10 magnitudes.

  3. Large Scale Structure Studies: Final Results from a Rich Cluster Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinglend, K.; Batuski, D.; Haase, S.; Hill, J.

    1995-12-01

    The results from the COBE satellite show the existence of structure on scales on the order of 10% or more of the horizon scale of the universe. Rich clusters of galaxies from the Abell-ACO catalogs show evidence of structure on scales of 100 Mpc and hold the promise of confirming structure on the scale of the COBE result. Unfortunately, until now, redshift information has been unavailable for a large percentage of these clusters, so present knowledge of their three dimensional distribution has quite large uncertainties. Our approach in this effort has been to use the MX multifiber spectrometer on the Steward 2.3m to measure redshifts of at least ten galaxies in each of 88 Abell cluster fields with richness class R>= 1 and mag10 <= 16.8 (estimated z<= 0.12) and zero or one measured redshifts. This work has resulted in a deeper, 95% complete and more reliable sample of 3-D positions of rich clusters. The primary intent of this survey has been to constrain theoretical models for the formation of the structure we see in the universe today through 2-pt. spatial correlation function and other analyses of the large scale structures traced by these clusters. In addition, we have obtained enough redshifts per cluster to greatly improve the quality and size of the sample of reliable cluster velocity dispersions available for use in other studies of cluster properties. This new data has also allowed the construction of an updated and more reliable supercluster candidate catalog. Our efforts have resulted in effectively doubling the volume traced by these clusters. Presented here is the resulting 2-pt. spatial correlation function, as well as density plots and several other figures quantifying the large scale structure from this much deeper and complete sample. Also, with 10 or more redshifts in most of our cluster fields, we have investigated the extent of projection effects within the Abell catalog in an effort to quantify and understand how this may effect the Abell sample.

  4. THE GALAXY POPULATION OF LOW-REDSHIFT ABELL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Yee, H. K. C.; Lopez-Cruz, Omar E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.c

    2009-10-01

    We present a study of the luminosity and color properties of galaxies selected from a sample of 57 low-redshift Abell clusters. We utilize the non-parametric dwarf-to-giant ratio (DGR) and the blue galaxy fraction (f{sub b} ) to investigate the clustercentric radial-dependent changes in the cluster galaxy population. Composite cluster samples are combined by scaling the counting radius by r {sub 200} to minimize radius selection bias. The separation of galaxies into a red and blue population was achieved by selecting galaxies relative to the cluster color-magnitude relation. The DGR of the red and blue galaxies is found to be independent of cluster richness (B {sub gc}), although the DGR is larger for the blue population at all measured radii. A decrease in the DGR for the red and red+blue galaxies is detected in the cluster core region, while the blue galaxy DGR is nearly independent of radius. The f{sub b} is found not to correlate with B {sub gc}; however, a steady decline toward the inner-cluster region is observed for the giant galaxies. The dwarf galaxy f{sub b} is approximately constant with clustercentric radius except for the inner-cluster core region where f{sub b} decreases. The clustercentric radial dependence of the DGR and the galaxy blue fraction indicates that it is unlikely that a simple scenario based on either pure disruption or pure fading/reddening can describe the evolution of infalling dwarf galaxies; both outcomes are produced by the cluster environment.

  5. The Filtered Abel Transform and Its Application in Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    Many non-intrusive combustion diagnosis methods generate line-of-sight projections of a flame field. To reconstruct the spatial field of the measured properties, these projections need to be deconvoluted. When the spatial field is axisymmetric, commonly used deconvolution method include the Abel transforms, the onion peeling method and the two-dimensional Fourier transform method and its derivatives such as the filtered back projection methods. This paper proposes a new approach for performing the Abel transform method is developed, which possesses the exactness of the Abel transform and the flexibility of incorporating various filters in the reconstruction process. The Abel transform is an exact method and the simplest among these commonly used methods. It is evinced in this paper that all the exact reconstruction methods for axisymmetric distributions must be equivalent to the Abel transform because of its uniqueness and exactness. Detailed proof is presented to show that the two dimensional Fourier methods when applied to axisymmetric cases is identical to the Abel transform. Discrepancies among various reconstruction method stem from the different approximations made to perform numerical calculations. An equation relating the spectrum of a set of projection date to that of the corresponding spatial distribution is obtained, which shows that the spectrum of the projection is equal to the Abel transform of the spectrum of the corresponding spatial distribution. From the equation, if either the projection or the distribution is bandwidth limited, the other is also bandwidth limited, and both have the same bandwidth. If the two are not bandwidth limited, the Abel transform has a bias against low wave number components in most practical cases. This explains why the Abel transform and all exact deconvolution methods are sensitive to high wave number noises. The filtered Abel transform is based on the fact that the Abel transform of filtered projection data is equal

  6. Chandra View of Galaxy Cluster Abell 2554

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kıyami Erdim, Muhammed; Hudaverdi, Murat

    2016-07-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 2554 at z = 0.11, which is a member of Aquarius Super cluster using the Chandra archival data. The X-ray peak coincides with a bright elliptical cD galaxy. Slightly elongated X-ray plasma has an average temperature and metal abundance values of ˜6 keV and 0.28 solar, respectively. We observe small-scale temperature variations in the ICM. There is a significantly hot wall-like structure with 9 keV at the SE and also radio-lope locates at the tip of this hot region. A2554 is also part of a trio-cluster. Its close neighbors A2550 (at SW) and A2556 (at SE) have only 2 Mpc and 1.5 Mpc separations with A2554. Considering the temperature fluctuations and the dynamical environment of super cluster, we examine the possible ongoing merger scenarios within A2554.

  7. Ultraviolet Imaging of the cD Galaxy in Abell 1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Eric P.; Neff, Susan G.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stecher, Thedore P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Roberts, Morton S.

    1995-12-01

    We present an image of the Abell 1795 cD galaxy and its environment obtained with the Goddard Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT). Our ultraviolet (UV) image was obtained during the March 1995 Astro-2 Space Shuttle mission using a filter centered at ~ 1520 Angstroms/ (Delta lambda =354 Angstroms/). The ultraviolet image resulting from a 1310 second exposure has stellar images with ~ 5.0arcsec FWHM. We compare these data to published optical, radio (VLA) and archival HST observations. This richness class 2 cluster is known to contain a large cooling flow (dot {M} 300M_⊙ yr(-1) ) and its cD galaxy contains a relatively bright yet small radio source (4C26.42). Previous optical observations have shown the cD galaxy possesses a system of Hα filaments (van Breugel et al./ 1984, ApJ, 276, 79), whose surface brightness is consistent with models in which the emission--lines arise from radiatively regulated accretion (i.e. cooling X-ray gas). Broad-band optical investigations have revealed the presence of ``blue lobes'' near the cD galaxy center. These regions are posited to contain young stars formed via the interaction of a radio jet and the intercluster medium (McNamara & O'Connell 1993, AJ, 105, 417). The HST observations show the elliptical galaxy has an easily resolved dust lane structure near its center. The cD galaxy is very bright in the ultraviolet (m1520=15.1) and exhibits a strong radial color gradient with the center being bluer. Indeed, UV light is detected from the central 7.6arcsecx16 .1arcsec (8.4x17.7 kpc) which can be compared with the optical extents of 38arcsecx70 arcsec . We discuss the implications that our new UV data have for the high mass star formation rate, and examine how our photometry fits in with previous models for the unusual features present in the system. Most of the other cluster galaxies are not detected. We report photometry and predicted star formation rates for those that were seen along with upper limits for those galaxies not

  8. The SAMI Pilot Survey: stellar kinematics of galaxies in Abell 85, 168 and 2399

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, L. M. R.; Scott, N.; Owers, M. S.; Croom, S. M.; Bekki, K.; Houghton, R. C. W.; van de Sande, J.; D'Eugenio, F.; Cecil, G. N.; Colless, M. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cortese, L.; Davies, R. L.; Jones, D. H.; Pracy, M.; Allen, J. T.; Bryant, J. J.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Richards, S.; Sharp, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present the SAMI Pilot Survey, consisting of integral field spectroscopy of 106 galaxies across three galaxy clusters, Abell 85, Abell 168 and Abell 2399. The galaxies were selected by absolute magnitude to have Mr < -20.25 mag. The survey, using the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI), comprises observations of galaxies of all morphological types with 75 per cent of the sample being early-type galaxies (ETGs) and 25 per cent being late-type galaxies (LTGs). Stellar velocity and velocity dispersion maps are derived for all 106 galaxies in the sample. The λR parameter, a proxy for the specific stellar angular momentum, is calculated for each galaxy in the sample. We find a trend between λR and galaxy concentration such that LTGs are less concentrated higher angular momentum systems, with the fast-rotating ETGs (FRs) more concentrated and lower in angular momentum. This suggests that some dynamical processes are involved in transforming LTGs to FRs, though a significant overlap between the λR distributions of these classes of galaxies implies that this is just one piece of a more complicated picture. We measure the kinematic misalignment angle, Ψ, for the ETGs in the sample, to probe the intrinsic shapes of the galaxies. We find the majority of FRs (83 per cent) to be aligned, consistent with them being oblate spheroids (i.e. discs). The slow rotating ETGs (SRs), on the other hand, are significantly more likely to show kinematic misalignment (only 38 per cent are aligned). This confirms previous results that SRs are likely to be mildly triaxial systems.

  9. On sky characterization of the BAORadio wide band digital backend. Search for HI emission in Abell85, Abell1205 and Abell2440 galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Campagne, J. E.; Colom, P.; Ferrari, C.; Magneville, Ch.; Martin, J. M.; Moniez, M.; Torrentó, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    We have observed regions of three galaxy clusters at z˜[0.06÷0.09] (Abell85, Abell1205, Abell2440) with the Nançay radiotelescope (NRT) to search for 21 cm emission and to fully characterize the FPGA based BAORadio digital backend. We have tested the new BAORadio data acquisition system by observing sources in parallel with the NRT standard correlator (ACRT) back-end over several months. BAORadio enables wide band instantaneous observation of the [1250,1500] MHz frequency range, as well as the use of powerful RFI mitigation methods thanks to its fine time sampling. A number of questions related to instrument stability, data processing and calibration are discussed. We have obtained the radiometer curves over the integration time range [0.01,10 000] seconds and we show that sensitivities of few mJy over most of the wide frequency band can be reached with the NRT. It is clearly shown that in blind line search, which is the context of H I intensity mapping for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, the new acquisition system and processing pipeline outperforms the standard one. We report a positive detection of 21 cm emission at 3 σ-level from galaxies in the outer region of Abell85 at ≃1352 MHz (14400 km/s) corresponding to a line strength of ≃0.8 Jy km/s. We also observe an excess power around ≃1318 MHz (21600 km/s), although at lower statistical significance, compatible with emission from Abell1205 galaxies. Detected radio line emissions have been cross matched with optical catalogs and we have derived hydrogen mass estimates.

  10. The Dark Matter filament between Abell 222/223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Jörg P.; Werner, Norbert; Clowe, Douglas; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kitching, Tom; Miller, Lance; Simionescu, Aurora

    2016-10-01

    Weak lensing detections and measurements of filaments have been elusive for a long time. The reason is that the low density contrast of filaments generally pushes the weak lensing signal to unobservably low scales. To nevertheless map the dark matter in filaments exquisite data and unusual systems are necessary. SuprimeCam observations of the supercluster system Abell 222/223 provided the required combination of excellent seeing images and a fortuitous alignment of the filament with the line-of-sight. This boosted the lensing signal to a detectable level and led to the first weak lensing mass measurement of a large-scale structure filament. The filament connecting Abell 222 and Abell 223 is now the only one traced by the galaxy distribution, dark matter, and X-ray emission from the hottest phase of the warm-hot intergalactic medium. The combination of these data allows us to put the first constraints on the hot gas fraction in filaments.

  11. The Merger Dynamics of Abell 2061

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Avery; Sarazin, Craig L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Hogge, Taylor; Wik, Daniel R.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnsworth, Damon; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brown, Shea

    2016-04-01

    Abell 2061, a galaxy cluster at a redshift of z=.0784 in the Corona Borealis Supercluster, displays features in both the X-ray and radio indicative of merger activity. Observations by the GBT and the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) have indicated the presence of an extended, central radio halo/relic coincident with the cluster's main X-ray emission and a bright radio relic to the SW of the center of the cluster. Previous observations by ROSAT, Beppo-SAX, and Chandra show an elongated structure (referred to as the ‘Plume’), emitting in the soft X-ray and stretching to the NE of the cluster’s center. The Beppo-SAX and Chandra observations also suggest the presence of a hard X-ray shock slightly NE of the cluster’s center. Here we present the details of an August 2013 XMM-Newton observation of A2061 which has greater field of view and longer exposure (48.6 ks) than the previous Chandra observation. We present images displaying the cluster’s soft and hard X-ray emission and also a temperature map of the cluster. This temperature map highlights the presence of a previously unseen cool region of the cluster which we hypothesize to be the cool core of one of the subclusters involved in this merger. We also discuss the structural similarity of this cluster with a simulated high mass-ratio offset cluster merger taken from the Simulation Library of Astrophysical cluster Mergers (SLAM). This simulation would suggest that the Plume is gas from the cool core of a subcluster which is now falling back into the center of the cluster after initial core passage.

  12. LensPerfect Analysis of Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan A.

    2007-12-01

    I present the first massmap to perfectly reproduce the position of every gravitationally-lensed multiply-imaged galaxy detected to date in ACS images of Abell 1689. This massmap was obtained using a powerful new technique made possible by a recent advance in the field of Mathematics. It is the highest resolution assumption-free Dark Matter massmap to date, with the resolution being limited only by the number of multiple images detected. We detect 8 new multiple image systems and identify multiple knots in individual galaxies to constrain a grand total of 168 knots within 135 multiple images of 42 galaxies. No assumptions are made about mass tracing light, and yet the brightest visible structures in A1689 are reproduced in our massmap, a few with intriguing positional offsets. Our massmap probes radii smaller than that resolvable in current Dark Matter simulations of galaxy clusters. And at these radii, we observe slight deviations from the NFW and Sersic profiles which describe simulated Dark Matter halos so well. While we have demonstrated that our method is able to recover a known input massmap (to limited resolution), further tests are necessary to determine the uncertainties of our mass profile and positions of massive subclumps. I compile the latest weak lensing data from ACS, Subaru, and CFHT, and attempt to fit a single profile, either NFW or Sersic, to both the observed weak and strong lensing. I confirm the finding of most previous authors, that no single profile fits extremely well to both simultaneously. Slight deviations are revealed, with the best fits slightly over-predicting the mass profile at both large and small radius. Our easy-to-use software, called LensPerfect, will be made available soon. This research was supported by the European Commission Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant 017288-BPZ and the PNAYA grant AYA2005-09413-C02.

  13. Mass Profile of Abell 2204 An X-Ray Analysis of Abell 2204 using XMM-Newton Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Travis

    2003-09-05

    The vast majority of the matter in the universe is of an unknown type. This matter is called dark matter by astronomers. The dark matter manifests itself only through gravitational interaction and is otherwise undetectable. The distribution of this matter in can be better understood by studying the mass profile of galaxy clusters. The X-ray emissions of the galaxy cluster Abell 2204 were analyzed using archived data from the XMM-Newton space telescope. We analyze a 40ks observation of Abell 2204 and present a radial temperature and radial mass profile based on hydrostatic equilibrium calculations.

  14. A One-year Case Study: Understanding the Rich Potential of Project-based Learning in a Virtual Reality Class for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Teresa M.; Bang, EunJin; Andre, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a qualitative case analysis of a new and unique, high school, student-directed, project-based learning (PBL), virtual reality (VR) class. In order to create projects, students learned, on an independent basis, how to program an industrial-level VR machine. A constraint was that students were required to produce at least one educational application of VR. This study incorporated in-depth classroom observations, interviews with students, analyses of student projects, and surveys of parents and teachers to examine the social and learning processes in the class, and the nature of content learning represented in student projects. The results demonstrated that PBL can be effective even with minimal teacher guidance. The findings substantiate an educational approach rich with promise, for at least some students, that deserves considerable additional study to maximize its powerful potentials for independent and peer-mentored learning.

  15. Ethical Intervention versus Capital Imaginaries: A Class Analysis of the Overseas Schooling Choice of the Chinese "New Rich"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yujia

    2012-01-01

    The overseas schooling choice as a spatial strategy of capital accumulation has recently attracted scholarly attention (Findlay et al 2012; Ong 1999; Waters 2005, 2006; Brooks and Waters 2011). This paper follows an exploration of the links between geographical mobilities incurred by educational choices, capital accumulation, and class identities…

  16. Retrieval Performance and Indexing Differences in ABELL and MLAIB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Vince

    2012-01-01

    Searches for 117 British authors are compared in the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (ABELL) and the Modern Language Association International Bibliography (MLAIB). Authors are organized by period and genre within the early modern era. The number of records for each author was subdivided by format, language of publication,…

  17. The photometric properties of brightest cluster galaxies. I - Absolute magnitudes in 116 nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, J. G.; Gunn, J. E.; Thuan, T. X.

    1980-01-01

    Two-color aperture photometry of the brightest galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters is presented. The results are used to anchor the bright end of the Hubble diagram; essentially the entire formal error for this method is then due to the sample of distant clusters used. New determinations of the systematic trend of galaxy absolute magnitude with the cluster properties of richness and Bautz-Morgan type are derived. When these new results are combined with the Gunn and Oke (1975) data on high-redshift clusters, a formal value (without accounting for any evolution) of q sub 0 = -0.55 + or - 0.45 (1 standard deviations) is found.

  18. Mass dependent galaxy transformation mechanisms in the complex environment of SuperGroup Abell 1882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Aparajita

    We present our data and results from panchromatic photometry and optical spectrometry of the nearest (extremely rich) filamentary large scale structure, SuperGroup Abell 1882. It is a precursor of a cluster and is an inevitable part of the narrative in the study of galaxy transformations. There has been strong empirical evidence over the past three decades that galaxy environment affects galaxy properties. Blue disky galaxies transform into red bulge-like galaxies as they traverse into the deeper recesses of a cluster. However, we have little insight into the story of galaxy evolution in the early stages of cluster formation. Besides, in relaxed clusters that have been studied extensively, several evolutionary mechanisms take effect on similar spatial and temporal scales, making it almost impossible to disentangle different local and global mechanisms. A SuperGroup on the other hand, has a shallower dark-matter potential. Here, the accreting galaxies are subjected to evolutionary mechanisms over larger time and spatial scales. This separates processes that are otherwise superimposed in rich cluster-filament interfaces. As has been found from cluster studies, galaxy color and morphology tie very strongly with local galaxy density even in a complex and nascent structure like Abell 1882. Our major results indicate that there is a strong dependence of galaxy transformations on the galaxy masses themselves. Mass- dependent evolutionary mechanisms affect galaxies at different spatial scales. The galaxy color also varies with radial projected distance from the assumed center of the structure for a constant local galaxy density, indicating the underlying large scale structure as a second order evolutionary driver. We have looked for clues to the types of mechanisms that might cause the transformations at various mass regimes. We have found the thoroughly quenched low mass galaxies confined to the groups, whereas there are evidences of intermediate-mass quenched galaxies

  19. Kinematics and stellar populations of low-luminosity early-type galaxies in the Abell 496 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, I. V.; Cayatte, V.; Durret, F.; Adami, C.; Balkowski, C.; Chemin, L.; Laganá, T. F.; Prugniel, P.

    2008-07-01

    Context: The morphology and stellar populations of low-luminosity early-type galaxies in clusters have until now been limited to a few relatively nearby clusters such as Virgo or Fornax. Scenarii for the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in clusters are therefore not well constrained. Aims: We investigate here the morphology and stellar populations of low-luminosity galaxies in the relaxed richness class 1 cluster Abell 496 (z = 0.0330). Methods: Deep multiband imaging obtained with the CFHT Megacam allowed us to select a sample of faint galaxies, defined here as objects with magnitudes 18 < r' < 22 mag within a 1.2 arcsec fibre (-18.8 < MB < -15.1 mag). We observed 118 galaxies spectroscopically with the ESO VLT FLAMES/Giraffe spectrograph with a resolving power R = 6300. We present structural analysis and colour maps for the 48 galaxies belonging to the cluster. We fit the spectra of 46 objects with PEGASE.HR synthetic spectra to estimate the ages, metallicities, and velocity dispersions. We estimated possible biases by similarly analysing spectra of ~1200 early-type galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6). We computed values of α/Fe abundance ratios from the measurements of Lick indices. We briefly discuss effects of the fixed aperture size on the measurements. Results: For the first time, high-precision estimates of stellar population properties have been obtained for a large sample of faint galaxies in a cluster, allowing for the extension of relations between stellar populations and internal kinematics to the low-velocity dispersion regime. We have revealed a peculiar population of elliptical galaxies in the core of the cluster, resembling massive early-type galaxies by their stellar population properties and velocity dispersions, but having luminosities of about 2 mag fainter. Conclusions: External mechanisms of gas removal (ram pressure stripping and gravitational harassment) are more likely to have occurred than

  20. X-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Abell 1835

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Kaastra, J. S.; Arnaud, M.; Reiprich T. H.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Jernigan, J. G.; Sakelliou, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopy results of the observation of Abell 1835 using the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton observatory. Abell 1835 is a luminous (10(exp 46)ergs/s), medium redshift (z = 0.2523), X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. The observations support the interpretation that large amounts of cool gas are present in a multi-phase medium surrounded by a hot (kT(sub e) = 8.2 keV) outer envelope. We detect O VIII Ly(alpha) and two Fe XXIV complexes in the RGS spectrum. The emission measure of the cool gas below kT(sub e) = 2.7 keV is much lower than expected from standard cooling-flow models, suggesting either a more complicated cooling process than simple isobaric radiative cooling or differential cold absorption of the cooler gas.

  1. A plethora of diffuse steep spectrum radio sources in Abell 2034 revealed by LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimwell, T. W.; Luckin, J.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Intema, H. T.; Owers, M. S.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Stroe, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; Cassano, R.; de Gasperin, F.; Heald, G. H.; Hoang, D. N.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Sridhar, S. S.; Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Bonafede, A.; Chyży, K. T.; Enßlin, T. A.; Ferrari, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; McKean, J. P.; Morabito, L. K.; Orrù, E.; Pizzo, R.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; White, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations, we have discovered a diverse assembly of steep spectrum emission that is apparently associated with the intracluster medium (ICM) of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2034. Such a rich variety of complex emission associated with the ICM has been observed in few other clusters. This not only indicates that Abell 2034 is a more interesting and complex system than previously thought but it also demonstrates the importance of sensitive and high-resolution, low-frequency observations. These observations can reveal emission from relativistic particles which have been accelerated to sufficient energy to produce observable emission or have had their high energy maintained by mechanisms in the ICM. The most prominent feature in our maps is a bright bulb of emission connected to two steep spectrum filamentary structures, the longest of which extends perpendicular to the merger axis for 0.5 Mpc across the south of the cluster. The origin of these objects is unclear, with no shock detected in the X-ray images and no obvious connection with cluster galaxies or AGNs. We also find that the X-ray bright region of the cluster coincides with a giant radio halo with an irregular morphology and a very steep spectrum. In addition, the cluster hosts up to three possible radio relics, which are misaligned with the cluster X-ray emission. Finally, we have identified multiple regions of emission with a very steep spectral index that seem to be associated with either tailed radio galaxies or a shock.

  2. The galaxy population of Abell 1367: the stellar mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhcine, M.; Kriwattanawong, W.; James, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    Using wide baseline broad-band photometry, we analyse the stellar population properties of a sample of 72 galaxies, spanning a wide range of stellar masses and morphological types, in the nearby spiral-rich and dynamically young galaxy cluster Abell 1367. The sample galaxies are distributed from the cluster centre out to approximately half the cluster Abell radius. The optical/near-infrared colours are compared with simple stellar population synthesis models from which the luminosity-weighted stellar population ages and metallicities are determined. The locus of the colours of elliptical galaxies traces a sequence of varying metallicity at a narrow range of luminosity-weighted stellar ages. Lenticular galaxies in the red sequence, however, exhibit a substantial spread of luminosity-weighted stellar metallicities and ages. For red-sequence lenticular galaxies and blue cloud galaxies, low-mass galaxies tend to be on average dominated by stellar populations of younger luminosity-weighted ages. Sample galaxies exhibit a strong correlation between integrated stellar mass and luminosity-weighted stellar metallicity. Galaxies with signs of morphological disturbance and ongoing star formation activity, tend to be underabundant with respect to passive galaxies in the red sequence of comparable stellar masses. We argue that this could be due to tidally driven gas flows towards the star-forming regions, carrying less enriched gas and diluting the pre-existing gas to produce younger stellar populations with lower metallicities than would be obtained prior to the interaction. Finally, we find no statistically significant evidence for changes in the luminosity-weighted ages and metallicities for either red-sequence or blue-cloud galaxies, at fixed stellar mass, with location within the cluster. We dedicate this work to the memory of our friend and colleague C. Moss who died suddenly recently.

  3. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics

    PubMed Central

    Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the “core team”, facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  4. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    PubMed

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination.

  5. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    PubMed

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  6. Globular Clusters, Ultracompact Dwarfs, and Dwarf Galaxies in Abell 2744 at a Redshift of 0.308

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung

    2016-11-01

    We report a photometric study of globular clusters (GCs), ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs), and dwarf galaxies in the giant merging galaxy cluster Abell 2744 at z = 0.308. Color–magnitude diagrams of the point sources derived from deep F814W (rest frame r‧) and F105W (rest frame I) images of Abell 2744 in the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field show a rich population of point sources, which have colors that are similar to those of typical GCs. These sources are as bright as -14.9\\lt {M}r\\prime ≤slant -11.4 (26.0 < F814W(Vega) ≤ 29.5) mag, being mostly UCDs and bright GCs in Abell 2744. The luminosity function (LF) of these sources shows a break at {M}r\\prime ≈ -12.9 (F814W ≈ 28.0) mag, indicating a boundary between UCDs and bright GCs. The numbers of GCs and UCDs are estimated to be 1,711,640+589,760 ‑430,500 and 147 ± 26, respectively. The clustercentric radial number density profiles of the UCDs and bright GCs show similar slopes, but these profiles are much steeper than those of the dwarf galaxies and the mass density profile based on gravitational lensing analysis. We derive an LF of the red sequence galaxies for -22.9\\lt {M}r\\prime ≤slant -13.9 mag. The faint end of this LF is fit well by a flat power law with α =-1.14+/- 0.08, showing no faint upturn. These results support the galaxy-origin scenario for bright UCDs: they are the nuclei of dwarf galaxies that are stripped when they pass close to the center of massive galaxies or a galaxy cluster, while some of the faint UCDs are at the bright end of the GCs.

  7. Treatment of Mandibular Molar Class II Furcation Defects in Humans With Bovine Porous Bone Mineral in Combination With Plasma Rich in Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, S. Sadat; Ghasemi, M.; Darmian, S. Saljughi; Pourseyediyan, T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present randomized clinical trial study was to compare the effectiveness of Bovine Porous Bone Mineral (BPBM) with and without Plasma Rich in Growth Factors (PRGF) in the treatment of mandibular Class II furcation defects. Materials and Methods: In seven patients, nine pairs of symmetric buccal or lingual mandibular class II furcation defects were treated. In each patient, one defect received BPBM (control) and the other received BPBM/PRGF (test) by random assignment. Clinical measurements were made both at baseline and 6-month evaluation. Results: Similar improvements were observed with both treatment modalities. Significant reductions were gained in the gingival index, probing depth and relative vertical clinical attachment level. Plaque index and gingival recession changes were not significant in both groups. The mean probing depth reductions were 2.67±0.87 mm for the control group and 3.22±1.56 mm for the test group (p<0.001). The mean relative vertical clinical attachment level gains were 1.57±0.96 mm (p<0.001) and 1.65±1.24 mm (p<0.004) in the control and test groups, respectively. In the test group, the relative horizontal clinical attachment level reduced from 5.87±0.96 mm to 4.58±1.02 mm (p<0.02). No significant differences were observed in all clinical parameters 6 months postoperatively between the two groups. Conclusion: The application of a combined technique using BPBM/PRGF, compared to the BPBM alone, resulted in greater healing, although not significant, in the treatment of mandibular class II furcation defects. PMID:22924101

  8. Internal dynamics of Abell 1240: a galaxy cluster with symmetric double radio relics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrena, R.; Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Dasí, M.

    2009-08-01

    Context: The mechanisms giving rise to diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters, and in particular their connection with cluster mergers, are still debated. Aims: We aim to obtain new insights into the internal dynamics of the cluster Abell 1240, which appears to contain two roughly symmetric radio relics, separated by ~2 h_70-1 Mpc. Methods: Our analysis is based mainly on redshift data for 145 galaxies mostly acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and on new photometric data acquired at the Isaac Newton Telescope. We also use X-ray data from the Chandra archive and photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data Release 7). We combine galaxy velocities and positions to select 89 cluster galaxies and analyze the internal dynamics of the Abell 1237 + Abell 1240 cluster complex, Abell 1237 being a close companion of Abell 1240 in its southern direction. Results: We estimate similar redshifts for Abell 1237 and Abell 1240, < z > = 0.1935 and < z > = 0.1948, respectively. For Abell 1237, we estimate a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion of σV ~ 740 km s-1and a mass of M ~ 6 × 1014 h_70-1 M⊙. For Abell 1240, we estimate a LOS σV ~ 870 km s-1and a mass in the range M ~ 0.9-1.9 × 1015 h_70-1 M⊙, which takes account of its complex dynamics. Abell 1240 is shown to have a bimodal structure with two galaxy clumps roughly aligned along its N-S direction, the same as defined by the elongation of its X-ray surface brightness and the axis of symmetry of the relics. The two brightest galaxies of Abell 1240, associated with the northern and southern clumps, are separated by a LOS rest-frame velocity difference Vrf ~ 400 km s-1and a projected distance D ~ 1.2 h_70-1 Mpc. The two-body model agrees with the hypothesis that we are looking at a cluster merger that occurred largely in the plane of the sky, the two galaxy clumps being separated by a rest-frame velocity difference Vrf ~ 2000 km s-1at a time of 0.3 Gyr after the crossing core, while Abell 1237

  9. Numerical Simulations Challenged on the Prediction of Massive Subhalo Abundance in Galaxy Clusters: The Case of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, E.; Grillo, C.; De Lucia, G.; Biviano, A.; Annunziatella, M.; Borgani, S.; Lombardi, M.; Mercurio, A.; Rosati, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter we compare the abundance of the member galaxies of a rich, nearby (z = 0.09) galaxy cluster, Abell 2142, with that of halos of comparable virial mass extracted from sets of state-of-the-art numerical simulations, both collisionless at different resolutions and with the inclusion of baryonic physics in the form of cooling, star formation, and feedback by active galactic nuclei. We also use two semi-analytical models to account for the presence of orphan galaxies. The photometric and spectroscopic information, taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 database, allows us to estimate the stellar velocity dispersion of member galaxies of Abell 2142. This quantity is used as proxy for the total mass of secure cluster members and is properly compared with that of subhalos in simulations. We find that simulated halos have a statistically significant (≳ 7 sigma confidence level) smaller amount of massive (circular velocity above 200 {km} {{{s}}}-1) subhalos, even before accounting for the possible incompleteness of observations. These results corroborate the findings from a recent strong lensing study of the Hubble Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416 and suggest that the observed difference is already present at the level of dark matter (DM) subhalos and is not solved by introducing baryonic physics. A deeper understanding of this discrepancy between observations and simulations will provide valuable insights into the impact of the physical properties of DM particles and the effect of baryons on the formation and evolution of cosmological structures.

  10. Bayesian Abel Inversion in Quantitative X-Ray Radiography

    DOE PAGES

    Howard, Marylesa; Fowler, Michael; Luttman, Aaron; Mitchell, Stephen E.; Hock, Margaret C.

    2016-05-19

    A common image formation process in high-energy X-ray radiography is to have a pulsed power source that emits X-rays through a scene, a scintillator that absorbs X-rays and uoresces in the visible spectrum in response to the absorbed photons, and a CCD camera that images the visible light emitted from the scintillator. The intensity image is related to areal density, and, for an object that is radially symmetric about a central axis, the Abel transform then gives the object's volumetric density. Two of the primary drawbacks to classical variational methods for Abel inversion are their sensitivity to the type andmore » scale of regularization chosen and the lack of natural methods for quantifying the uncertainties associated with the reconstructions. In this work we cast the Abel inversion problem within a statistical framework in order to compute volumetric object densities from X-ray radiographs and to quantify uncertainties in the reconstruction. A hierarchical Bayesian model is developed with a likelihood based on a Gaussian noise model and with priors placed on the unknown density pro le, the data precision matrix, and two scale parameters. This allows the data to drive the localization of features in the reconstruction and results in a joint posterior distribution for the unknown density pro le, the prior parameters, and the spatial structure of the precision matrix. Results of the density reconstructions and pointwise uncertainty estimates are presented for both synthetic signals and real data from a U.S. Department of Energy X-ray imaging facility.« less

  11. Guanidinium-Rich, Glycerol-Derived Oligocarbonates: A New Class of Cell-Penetrating Molecular Transporters That Complex, Deliver, and Release siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wender, Paul A.; Huttner, Melanie A.; Staveness, Daryl; Vargas, Jessica R.; Xu, Adele F.

    2015-01-01

    A highly versatile and step-economical route to a new class of guanidinium-rich molecular transporters and evaluation of their ability to complex, deliver, and release siRNA are described. These new drug/probe delivery systems are prepared in only two steps, irrespective of length or composition, using an organocatalytic ring-opening co-oligomerization of glycerol-derived cyclic carbonate monomers incorporating either protected guanidine or lipid side chains. The resultant amphipathic co-oligomers are highly effective vehicles for siRNA delivery, providing an excellent level of target protein suppression (>85%). These new oligocarbonates are nontoxic at levels required for cell penetration and can be tuned for particle size. Relative to the previously reported methyl(trimethylene)carbonate (MTC) scaffold, the ether linkage at C2 in the new transporters markedly enhances the stability of the siRNA/co-oligomer complexes. Both hybrid co-oligomers, containing a mixture of glycerol- and MTC-derived monomers, and co-oligomers containing only glycerol monomers are found to provide tunable control over siRNA complex stability. On the basis of a glycerol and CO2 backbone, these new co-oligomers represent a rapidly tunable and biocompatible siRNA delivery system that is highly effective in suppressing target protein synthesis. PMID:25588140

  12. The N-terminal cysteine-rich domain of tobacco class I chitinase is essential for chitin binding but not for catalytic or antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Iseli, B; Boller, T; Neuhaus, J M

    1993-09-01

    The vacuolar chitinases of class I possess an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain homologous to hevein and chitin-binding lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin and Urtica dioica lectin. To investigate the significance of this domain for the biochemical and functional characteristics of chitinase, chimeric genes encoding the basic chitinase A of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with and without this domain were constructed and constitutively expressed in transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris. The chitinases were subsequently isolated and purified to homogeneity from the transgenic plants. Chromatography on colloidal chitin revealed that only the form with the N-terminal domain, and not the one without it, had chitin-binding properties, demonstrating directly that the domain is a chitin-binding domain (CBD). Under standard assay conditions with radioactive colloidal chitin, both forms of chitinase had approximately the same catalytic activity. However, kinetic analysis demonstrated that the enzyme without CBD had a considerably lower apparent affinity for its substrate. The pH and temperature optima of the two chitinases were similar, but the form with the CBD had an approximately 3-fold higher activation energy and retained a higher activity at low pH values. Both chitinases were capable of inhibiting growth of Trichoderma viride, although the form with the CBD was about three times more effective than the one without it. Thus, the CBD is not necessary for catalytic or antifungal activity of chitinase. PMID:8208848

  13. Internal dynamics of Abell 2294: a massive, likely merging cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Barrena, R.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The mechanisms giving rise to diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters, and in particular their connection with cluster mergers, are still debated. Aims: We seek to explore the internal dynamics of the cluster Abell 2294, which has been shown to host a radio halo. Methods: Our analysis is mainly based on redshift data for 88 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. We combine galaxy velocities and positions to select 78 cluster galaxies and analyze its internal dynamics. We also use both photometric data acquired at the Isaac Newton Telescope and X-ray data from the Chandra archive. Results: We re-estimate the redshift of the large, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) obtaining < z > = 0.1690, which closely agrees with the mean cluster redshift. We estimate a quite large line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion σ_V ~ 1400 km s-1 and X-ray temperature TX ~ 10 keV. Our optical and X-ray analyses detect substructure. Our results imply that the cluster is composed of two massive subclusters separated by a LOS rest frame velocity difference Vrf ~ 2000 km s-1, very closely projected in the plane of sky along the SE-NW direction. This observational picture, interpreted in terms of the analytical two-body model, suggests that Abell 2294 is a cluster merger elongated mainly in the LOS direction and captured during the bound outgoing phase, a few fractions of Gyr after the core crossing. We find that Abell 2294 is a very massive cluster with a range of M = 2-4 × 1015 h70-1 M⊙, depending on the adopted model. In contrast to previous findings, we find no evidence of Hα emission in the spectrum of the BCG galaxy. Conclusions: The emerging picture of Abell 2294 is that of a massive, quite “normal” merging cluster, like many clusters hosting diffuse radio sources. However, perhaps because of its particular geometry, more data are needed for reach a definitive, more quantitative conclusion.

  14. Disentangling Structures in the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 133

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamical analysis of the structure of the cluster of galaxies Abell 133 will be presented using multi-wavelength data combined from multiple space and earth based observations. New and familiar statistical clustering techniques are used in combination in an attempt to gain a fully consistent picture of this interesting nearby cluster of galaxies. The type of analysis presented should be typical of cluster studies in the future, especially those to come from the surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2DF.

  15. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Métayer, Olivier; Saurel, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOS named "Noble Abel stiffened gas," this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular "Stiffened Gas (SG)" EOS. It is a combination of the so-called "Noble-Abel" and "stiffened gas" equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.

  16. Large-Scale Analyses of Angiosperm Nucleotide-Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Reveal Three Anciently Diverged Classes with Distinct Evolutionary Patterns.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhu-Qing; Xue, Jia-Yu; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Wu, Yue; Hang, Yue-Yu; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2016-04-01

    Nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes make up the largest plant disease resistance gene family (R genes), with hundreds of copies occurring in individual angiosperm genomes. However, the expansion history of NBS-LRR genes during angiosperm evolution is largely unknown. By identifying more than 6,000 NBS-LRR genes in 22 representative angiosperms and reconstructing their phylogenies, we present a potential framework of NBS-LRR gene evolution in the angiosperm. Three anciently diverged NBS-LRR classes (TNLs, CNLs, and RNLs) were distinguished with unique exon-intron structures and DNA motif sequences. A total of seven ancient TNL, 14 CNL, and two RNL lineages were discovered in the ancestral angiosperm, from which all current NBS-LRR gene repertoires were evolved. A pattern of gradual expansion during the first 100 million years of evolution of the angiosperm clade was observed for CNLs. TNL numbers remained stable during this period but were eventually deleted in three divergent angiosperm lineages. We inferred that an intense expansion of both TNL and CNL genes started from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. Because dramatic environmental changes and an explosion in fungal diversity occurred during this period, the observed expansions of R genes probably reflect convergent adaptive responses of various angiosperm families. An ancient whole-genome duplication event that occurred in an angiosperm ancestor resulted in two RNL lineages, which were conservatively evolved and acted as scaffold proteins for defense signal transduction. Overall, the reconstructed framework of angiosperm NBS-LRR gene evolution in this study may serve as a fundamental reference for better understanding angiosperm NBS-LRR genes.

  17. Large-Scale Analyses of Angiosperm Nucleotide-Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Reveal Three Anciently Diverged Classes with Distinct Evolutionary Patterns.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhu-Qing; Xue, Jia-Yu; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Wu, Yue; Hang, Yue-Yu; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2016-04-01

    Nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes make up the largest plant disease resistance gene family (R genes), with hundreds of copies occurring in individual angiosperm genomes. However, the expansion history of NBS-LRR genes during angiosperm evolution is largely unknown. By identifying more than 6,000 NBS-LRR genes in 22 representative angiosperms and reconstructing their phylogenies, we present a potential framework of NBS-LRR gene evolution in the angiosperm. Three anciently diverged NBS-LRR classes (TNLs, CNLs, and RNLs) were distinguished with unique exon-intron structures and DNA motif sequences. A total of seven ancient TNL, 14 CNL, and two RNL lineages were discovered in the ancestral angiosperm, from which all current NBS-LRR gene repertoires were evolved. A pattern of gradual expansion during the first 100 million years of evolution of the angiosperm clade was observed for CNLs. TNL numbers remained stable during this period but were eventually deleted in three divergent angiosperm lineages. We inferred that an intense expansion of both TNL and CNL genes started from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. Because dramatic environmental changes and an explosion in fungal diversity occurred during this period, the observed expansions of R genes probably reflect convergent adaptive responses of various angiosperm families. An ancient whole-genome duplication event that occurred in an angiosperm ancestor resulted in two RNL lineages, which were conservatively evolved and acted as scaffold proteins for defense signal transduction. Overall, the reconstructed framework of angiosperm NBS-LRR gene evolution in this study may serve as a fundamental reference for better understanding angiosperm NBS-LRR genes. PMID:26839128

  18. Order preserving contact transformations and dynamical symmetries of scalar and coupled Riccati and Abel chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin Pradeep, R.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Mohanasubha, R.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-07-01

    We identify contact transformations which linearize the given equations in the Riccati and Abel chains of nonlinear scalar and coupled ordinary differential equations to the same order. The identified contact transformations are not of Cole-Hopf type and are new to the literature. The linearization of Abel chain of equations is also demonstrated explicitly for the first time. The contact transformations can be utilized to derive dynamical symmetries of the associated nonlinear ODEs. The wider applicability of identifying this type of contact transformations and the method of deriving dynamical symmetries by using them is illustrated through two dimensional generalizations of the Riccati and Abel chains as well.

  19. A redshift survey of the strong-lensing cluster ABELL 383

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kurtz, Michael J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Coe, Dan; Rines, Kenneth J. E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu

    2014-03-01

    Abell 383 is a famous rich cluster (z = 0.1887) imaged extensively as a basis for intensive strong- and weak-lensing studies. Nonetheless, there are few spectroscopic observations. We enable dynamical analyses by measuring 2360 new redshifts for galaxies with r {sub Petro} ≤ 20.5 and within 50' of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG; R.A.{sub 2000} = 42.°014125, decl.{sub 2000} = –03.°529228). We apply the caustic technique to identify 275 cluster members within 7 h {sup –1} Mpc of the hierarchical cluster center. The BCG lies within –11 ± 110 km s{sup –1} and 21 ± 56 h {sup –1} kpc of the hierarchical cluster center; the velocity dispersion profile of the BCG appears to be an extension of the velocity dispersion profile based on cluster members. The distribution of cluster members on the sky corresponds impressively with the weak-lensing contours of Okabe et al. especially when the impact of foreground and background structure is included. The values of R {sub 200} = 1.22 ± 0.01 h {sup –1} Mpc and M {sub 200} = (5.07 ± 0.09) × 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} obtained by application of the caustic technique agree well with recent completely independent lensing measures. The caustic estimate extends direct measurement of the cluster mass profile to a radius of ∼5 h {sup –1} Mpc.

  20. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 1795 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamura, T.; Kaastra, J. S.; Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F.; Mittaz, J. P. D.; Trudolyubov, S. P.; Stewart, G.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Lumb, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    The initial results from XMM-Newton observations of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 1795 are presented. The spatially-resolved X-ray spectra taken by the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) show a temperature drop at a radius of - 200 kpc from the cluster center, indicating that the ICM is cooling. Both the EPIC and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) spectra extracted from the cluster center can be described by an isothermal model with a temperature of approx. 4 keV. The volume emission measure of any cool component (less than 1 keV) is less than a few % of the hot component at the cluster center. A strong O VIII Lyman alpha line was detected with the RGS from the cluster core. The O abundance of the ICM is 0.2-0.5 times the solar value. The O to Fe ratio at the cluster center is 0.5 - 1.5 times the solar ratio.

  1. Peculiar radio structures in the central regions of galaxy cluster Abell 585

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamrozy, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Marchenko, V.; Kuźmicz, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Sikora, M.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyse the peculiar radio structure observed across the central region of the galaxy cluster Abell 585 (z = 0.12). In the low-resolution radio maps, this structure appears uniform and diffuse on angular scales of ˜3 arcmin, and is seemingly related to the distant (z = 2.5) radio quasar B3 0727+409 rather than to the cluster itself. However, after a careful investigation of the unpublished archival radio data with better angular resolution, we resolve the structure into two distinct arcmin-scale features, which resemble typical lobes of cluster radio galaxies with no obvious connection to the background quasar. We support this conclusion by examining the spectral and polarization properties of the features, demonstrating in addition that the analysed structure can hardly be associated with any sort of a radio mini-halo or relics of the cluster. Yet at the same time we are not able to identify host galaxies of the radio lobes in the available optical and infrared surveys. We consider some speculative explanations for our findings, including gravitational wave recoil kicks of supermassive black holes responsible for the lobes' formation in the process of merging massive ellipticals within the central parts of a rich cluster environment, but we do not reach any robust conclusions regarding the origin of the detected radio features.

  2. SPECTRAL INDEX STUDIES OF THE DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN ABELL 2256: IMPLICATIONS FOR MERGER ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S. E-mail: dwaraka@rri.res.i

    2010-08-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the merging rich cluster of galaxies, Abell 2256 (A2256). We have observed A2256 at 150 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and successfully detected the diffuse radio halo and the relic emission over a {approx}1.2 Mpc{sup 2} extent. Using this 150 MHz image and the images made using archival observations from the Very Large Array (VLA; 1369 MHz) and the Westerbrok Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT; 330 MHz), we have produced spectral index images of the diffuse radio emission in A2256. These spectral index images show a distribution of flat spectral index (S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup {alpha}}, {alpha} in the range -0.7 to -0.9) plasma in the region NW of the cluster center. Regions showing steep spectral indices ({alpha} in the range -1.0 to -2.3) are toward the SE of the cluster center. These spectral indices indicate synchrotron lifetimes for the relativistic plasmas in the range 0.08-0.4 Gyr. We interpret this spectral behavior as resulting from a merger event along the direction SE to NW within the last 0.5 Gyr or so. A shock may be responsible for the NW relic in A2256 and the megaparsec scale radio halo toward the SE is likely to be generated by the turbulence injected by mergers. Furthermore, the diffuse radio emission shows spectral steepening toward lower frequencies. This low-frequency spectral steepening is consistent with a combination of spectra from two populations of relativistic electrons created at two epochs (two mergers) within the last {approx}0.5 Gyr. Earlier interpretations of the X-ray and the optical data also suggested that there were two mergers in Abell 2256 in the last 0.5 Gyr, consistent with the current findings. Also highlighted in this study is the futility of correlating the average temperatures of thermal gas and the average spectral indices of diffuse radio emission in the respective clusters.

  3. Combining Strong and Weak Gravitational Lensing in Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limousin, Marceau; Richard, Johan; Jullo, Eric; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Fort, Bernard; Soucail, Geneviève; Elíasdóttir, Árdís; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Ellis, Richard S.; Smail, Ian; Czoske, Oliver; Smith, Graham P.; Hudelot, Patrick; Bardeau, Sébastien; Ebeling, Harald; Egami, Eiichi; Knudsen, Kirsten K.

    2007-10-01

    We present a reconstruction of the mass distribution of galaxy cluster Abell 1689 at z=0.18 using detected strong lensing features from deep ACS observations and extensive ground based spectroscopy. Earlier analyses have reported up to 32 multiply imaged systems in this cluster, of which only 3 were spectroscopically confirmed. In this work, we present a parametric strong lensing mass reconstruction using 34 multiply imaged systems of which 24 have newly determined spectroscopic redshifts, which is a major step forward in building a robust mass model. In turn, the new spectroscopic data allows a more secure identification of multiply imaged systems. The resultant mass model enables us to reliably predict the redshifts of additional multiply imaged systems for which no spectra are currently available, and to use the location of these systems to further constrain the mass model. Using our strong lensing mass model, we predict on larger scale a shear signal which is consistent with that inferred from our large scale weak lensing analysis derived using CFH12K wide field images. Thanks to a new method for reliably selecting a well defined background lensed galaxy population, we resolve the discrepancy found between the NFW concentration parameters derived from earlier strong and weak lensing analysis. The derived parameters for the best fit NFW profile is found to be c200=7.6+/-1.6 and r200=2.16+/-0.10 h-170 Mpc (corresponding to a 3D mass equal to M200=[1.32+/-0.2]×1015 h70 Msolar). The large number of new constraints incorporated in this work makes Abell 1689 the most reliably reconstructed cluster to date. This well calibrated mass model, which we here make publicly available, will enable us to exploit Abell 1689 efficiently as a gravitational telescope, as well as to potentially constrain cosmology. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des

  4. A new Abel inversion by means of the integrals of an input function with noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian-Fang; Huang, Li; Huang, Yong

    2007-01-01

    Abel's integral equations arise in many areas of natural science and engineering, particularly in plasma diagnostics. This paper proposes a new and effective approximation of the inversion of Abel transform. This algorithm can be simply implemented by symbolic computation, and moreover an nth-order approximation reduces to the exact solution when it is a polynomial in r2 of degree less than or equal to n. Approximate Abel inversion is expressed in terms of integrals of input measurement data; so the suggested approach is stable for experimental data with random noise. An error analysis of the approximation of Abel inversion is given. Finally, several test examples used frequently in plasma diagnostics are given to illustrate the effectiveness and stability of this method.

  5. SHOCKING TAILS IN THE MAJOR MERGER ABELL 2744

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare 'jellyfish' galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging 'Bullet-like' subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  6. The central star of the planetary nebula Abell 78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaler, J. B.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The ultraviolet spectrum of the nucleus of Abell 78, one of the two planetaries known to contain zones of nearly pure helium, is studied. The line spectrum and wind velocities are examined, the determination of interstellar extinction for assessing circumstellar dust is improved, and the temperature, luminosity, and core mass are derived. The results for A78 are compared with results for A30, and it is concluded that the dust distributions around the two central stars are quite different. The temperature of the A78 core is not as high as previously believed, and almost certainly lies between 67,000 K and 130,000 K. The most likely temperature range is 77,000-84,000 K. The core mass lies between 0.56 and 0.70 solar mass, with the most likely values between 0.56 and 0.58 solar mass.

  7. Shocking Tails in the Major Merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare "jellyfish" galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging "Bullet-like" subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  8. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Spectrum of Abell 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaRoque, S.; Reese, E. D.; Holder, G. P.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Joy, M. K.; Grego, L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a measurement of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) at 30 GHz for the galaxy cluster Abell 2163. Combining this data point with previous measurements at 140, 220, and 270 GHz from the SuZIE and Daibolo experiments, we construct them most complete SZE spectrum to date. The spectrum is fitted to determine the compton y parameter and the peculiar velocity for this cluster; our results are y_0=3.6 x 10(circumflex)4 and v_p=360 km s(circumflex)-1. These results include corrections for contamination by Galactic dust emission; we find the contamination level to be much less than previously reported. The dust emission, while strong, is distributed over much larger angular scales than the cluster signal and contributes little to the measured signal when the proper SZE observing strategy is taken into account.

  9. Black holes a-wandering in Abell 2261

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spolaor, Sarah; Ford, Holland; Gultekin, Kayhan; Lauer, Tod R.; Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Loeb, Abraham; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Postman, Marc; Taylor, Joanna M.

    2016-01-01

    The brightest cluster galaxy in Abell 2261 (BCG2261) has an exceptionally large, flat, and asymmetric core, thought to have been shaped by a binary supermassive black hole inspiral and subsequent gravitational recoil. BCG2261 should contain a 10^10 Msun black hole, but it lacks the central cusp that should mark such a massive black hole. Based on the presence of central radio emission, we have explored the core of this galaxy with HST and the VLA to identify the presence and location of the active nucleus in this galaxy's core. We present our exploration of whether this system in fact contains direct evidence of a recoiling binary supermassive black hole. A recoiling core in this system would represent a pointed observational test of three preeminent theoretical predictions: that scouring forms cores, that SMBHs may recoil after coalescence, and that recoil can strongly influence core formation and morphology.

  10. A shock front at the radio relic of Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.; Jauzac, M.; Vazza, F.; Owers, M. S.; Kneib, J.-P.; Tchernin, C.; Intema, H.; Knowles, K.

    2016-09-01

    Radio relics are Mpc-scale diffuse radio sources at the peripheries of galaxy clusters which are thought to trace outgoing merger shocks. We present XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.306), which reveal the presence of a shock front 1.5 Mpc east of the cluster core. The surface-brightness jump coincides with the position of a known radio relic. Although the surface-brightness jump indicates a weak shock with a Mach number M=1.7_{-0.3}^{+0.5}, the plasma in the post-shock region has been heated to a very high temperature (˜13 keV) by the passage of the shock wave. The low-acceleration efficiency expected from such a weak shock suggests that mildly relativistic electrons have been re-accelerated by the passage of the shock front.

  11. ABEL description and implementation of cyber net system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiyuan; Jing, Liang

    2013-03-01

    Cyber net system is a subclass of Petri Nets. It has more powerful description capability and more complex properties compared with P/T system. Due to its nonlinear relation, it can't use analysis techniques of other net systems directly. This influences the research on cyber net system. In this paper, the author uses hardware description language to describe cyber net system. Simulation analysis is carried out through EDA software tools to disclose properties of the system. This method is introduced in detail through cyber net system model of computing Fibonacci series. ABEL source codes and simulation wave are also presented. The source codes are compiled, optimized, fit design and downloaded to the Programmable Logic Device. Thus ASIC of computing Fibonacci series is obtained. It will break a new path for the analysis and application study of cyber net system.

  12. Origin of galactic bulges, the evolution of groups, and the distribution of Abell clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Various dynamical topics connected with the origins of galaxies and large scale structure were studied. In Chapter 1 the hypothesis that galactic bulges are simply ellipticals modified by the gravitational field of exponential disks is tested with N-body experiments and an analysis of S. Kent's data-set. The author concludes that, unless disks have improbably low M/L ratios, bulges were not ellipticals; disk fields should produce significant effects, but generally in the wrong direction to explain the differences between bulges and ellipticals. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 explore the evolution of groups of galaxies under the general assumption that galaxies possess massive halos. A sequence of increasingly realistic techniques are employed, culminating in an extensive series of large direct-summation N-body simulations. It is shown that groups of halo-galaxies evolve rapidly, the galaxies becoming segregated at the center of the system. This induces a systematic bias in the observed virial parameters, underestimating the total mass of the system, which may account for the relative M/L ratios of groups and rich clusters, and for the general trend of M/L with scale size between approx.0.1 and approx.1.0 Mpc. Groups with apparent crossing times of approx.0.1 H/sub 0//sup -1/ have probably only just collapsed and are rapidly evolving toward multiple-merger systems. Chapter 5 compares the clustering statistics of rich clusters in N-body simulations with recent observations for Abell clusters. It was found that models with significant power on large scales, such as the cold particle models have the best chance of accounting for the observations.

  13. Red population of Abell 1314 : A rest-frame narrowband photometric evolutionary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, Yuvraj Harsha

    2014-06-01

    Red sequence galaxies form with an intense burst of star formation in the early universe to evolve passively into massive, metal rich, old galaxies at z ˜ 0. But Abell 1314 (z=0.034) is found to host almost all red sequence galaxy members - identified using the mz index, classified using the Principle Component Analysis technique and SDSS colour correlations - some of which show properties of low-mass, star forming, and metal rich galaxies. The variably spread Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) near the core forms a vital part in influencing the evolution of these members. To study their evolution, I correlated different parameters of the rest-frame narrowband photometry and the derived luminosity-weighted mean Single Stellar Population model ages and metallicities. The study finds the member galaxies evolve differently in three different sections of the cluster: 1. the region of ≤ 200 kpc hosts passively evolving old, massive systems which accumulate mass by dry, minor mergers, 2. the zone between 200-500 kpc shows stripped systems (or in the process of being gas stripped) by ram pressure with moderate star formation history, 3. the outer regions (≥ 500 kpc) show low-mass red objects with blue, star forming Butcher-Oemler galaxy like colours. This sort of environmental condition is known to harbour hybrid systems, like, the pseudo bulges, blue sequence E/S0 and Butcher-Oemler like satellite cluster galaxies. Overall, the cluster is found to be poor, quiescent with galaxies to have formed by the monolithic structure formation in the early universe and are now evolving with mergers and gas stripping processes by ram pressure.

  14. The distribution of dark and luminous matter in the unique galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lindsay J.; Clowe, Douglas I.; Coleman, Joseph E.; Russell, Helen R.; Santana, Rebecca; White, Jacob A.; Canning, Rebecca E. A.; Deering, Nicole J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Lee, Brandyn E.; Li, Baojiu; McNamara, Brian R.

    2016-06-01

    Abell 2146 (z = 0.232) consists of two galaxy clusters undergoing a major merger. The system was discovered in previous work, where two large shock fronts were detected using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, consistent with a merger close to the plane of the sky, caught soon after first core passage. A weak gravitational lensing analysis of the total gravitating mass in the system, using the distorted shapes of distant galaxies seen with Advanced Camera for Surveys - Wide Field Channel on Hubble Space Telescope, is presented. The highest peak in the reconstruction of the projected mass is centred on the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 2146-A. The mass associated with Abell 2146-B is more extended. Bootstrapped noise mass reconstructions show the mass peak in Abell 2146-A to be consistently centred on the BCG. Previous work showed that BCG-A appears to lag behind an X-ray cool core; although the peak of the mass reconstruction is centred on the BCG, it is also consistent with the X-ray peak given the resolution of the weak lensing mass map. The best-fitting mass model with two components centred on the BCGs yields M200 = 1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.4} × 1015 and 3^{+1}_{-2} × 1014 M⊙ for Abell 2146-A and Abell 2146-B, respectively, assuming a mass concentration parameter of c = 3.5 for each cluster. From the weak lensing analysis, Abell 2146-A is the primary halo component, and the origin of the apparent discrepancy with the X-ray analysis where Abell 2146-B is the primary halo is being assessed using simulations of the merger.

  15. The wonderful apparatus of John Jacob Abel called the "artificial kidney".

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2009-01-01

    Hemodialysis, which now provides life-saving therapy to millions of individuals, began as an exploratory attempt to sustain the lives of selected patients in the 1950s. That was a century after the formulation of the concept and determination of the laws governing dialysis. The first step in the translation of the laboratory principles of dialysis to living animals was the "vividiffusion" apparatus developed by John Jacob Abel (1859-1938), dubbed the "artificial kidney" in the August 11, 1913 issue of The Times of London reporting the demonstration of vividiffusion by Abel at University College. The detailed article in the January 18, 1914 of the New York Times, reproduced here, is based on the subsequent medical reports published by Abel et al. Tentative attempts of human dialysis in the decade that followed based on the vividiffusion apparatus of Abel and his materials (collodion, hirudin, and glass) met with failure and had to be abandoned. Practical dialysis became possible in the 1940s and thereafter after cellophane, heparin, and teflon became available. Abel worked in an age of great progress and experimental work in the basic sciences that laid the foundations of science-driven medicine. It was a "Heroic Age of Medicine," when medical discoveries and communicating them to the public were assuming increasing importance. This article provides the cultural, social, scientific, and medical background in which Abel worked, developed and reported his wonderful apparatus called the "artificial kidney."

  16. An Hα survey of eight Abell clusters: the dependence of tidally induced star formation on cluster density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, C.; Whittle, M.

    2000-09-01

    We have undertaken a survey of Hα emission in a substantially complete sample of CGCG galaxies of types Sa and later within 1.5 Abell radii of the centres of eight low-redshift Abell clusters (Abell 262, 347, 400, 426, 569, 779, 1367 and 1656). Some 320 galaxies were surveyed, of which 116 were detected in emission (39 per cent of spirals, 75 per cent of peculiars). Here we present previously unpublished data for 243 galaxies in seven clusters. Detected emission is classified as `compact' or `diffuse'. From an analysis of the full survey sample, we confirm our previous identification of compact and diffuse emission with circumnuclear starburst and disc emission respectively. The circumnuclear emission is associated either with the presence of a bar, or with a disturbed galaxy morphology indicative of ongoing tidal interactions (whether galaxy-galaxy, galaxy-group, or galaxy-cluster). The frequency of such tidally induced (circumnuclear) starburst emission in spirals increases from regions of lower to higher local galaxy surface density, and from clusters with lower to higher central galaxy space density. The percentages of spirals classed as disturbed and of galaxies classified as peculiar show a similar trend. These results suggest that tidal interactions for spirals are more frequent in regions of higher local density and for clusters with higher central galaxy density. The prevalence of such tidal interactions in clusters is expected from recent theoretical modelling of clusters with a non-static potential undergoing collapse and infall. Furthermore, in accord with this picture, we suggest that peculiar galaxies are predominantly ongoing mergers. We conclude that tidal interactions are likely to be the main mechanism for the transformation of spirals to S0s in clusters. This mechanism operates more efficiently in higher density environments, as is required by the morphological type-local surface density (T-Σ) relation for galaxies in clusters. For regions of

  17. The galaxy population of Abell 1367: photometric and spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriwattanawong, W.; Moss, C.; James, P. A.; Carter, D.

    2011-03-01

    Aims: Photometric and spectroscopic observations of the galaxy population of the galaxy cluster Abell 1367 have been obtained, over a field of 34' × 90', covering the cluster centre out to a radius of ~2.2 Mpc. Optical broad- and narrow-band imaging was used to determine galaxy luminosities, diameters and morphologies, and to study current star formation activity of a sample of cluster galaxies. Near-infrared imaging was obtained to estimate integrated stellar masses, and to aid the determination of mean stellar ages and metallicities for the future investigation of the star formation history of those galaxies. Optical spectroscopic observations were also taken, to confirm cluster membership of galaxies in the sample through their recession velocities. Methods.U, B and R broad-band and Hα narrow-band imaging observations were carried out using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, covering the field described above. J and K near-infrared imaging was obtained using the Wide Field Camera (WFCAM) on the 3.8 m UK Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea, covering a somewhat smaller field of 0.75 square degrees on the cluster centre. The spectroscopic observations were carried out using a multifibre spectrograph (WYFFOS) on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telecope on La Palma, over the same field as the optical imaging observations. Results: Our photometric data give optical and near-infrared isophotal magnitudes for 303 galaxies in our survey regions, down to stated diameter and B-band magnitude limits, determined within R24 isophotal diameters. Our spectroscopic data of 328 objects provide 84 galaxies with detections of emission and/or absorption lines. Combining these with published spectroscopic data gives 126 galaxies within our sample for which recession velocities are known. Of these, 72 galaxies are confirmed as cluster members of Abell 1367, 11 of which are identified in this study and 61 are reported in the literature. Hα equivalent

  18. The merging cluster Abell 1758: an optical and dynamical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro-Oliveira, Rogerio; Serra Cypriano, Eduardo; Machado, Rubens; Lima Neto, Gastao B.

    2015-08-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 1758-North (z=0.28) is a binary system composed by the sub-structures NW and NE. This is supposed to be a post-merging cluster due to observed detachment between the NE BCG and the respective X-ray emitting hot gas clump in a scenario very close to the famous Bullet Cluster. On the other hand, the projected position of the NW BCG coincides with the local hot gas peak. This system was been targeted previously by several studies, using multiple wavelengths and techniques, but there is still no clear picture of the scenario that could have caused this unusual configuration. To help solving this complex puzzle we added some pieces: firstly, we have used deep B, RC and z' Subaru images to perform both weak lensing shear and magnification analysis of A1758 (including here the South component that is not in interaction with A1758-North) modeling each sub-clump as an NFW profile in order to constrain masses and its center positions through MCMC methods; the second piece is the dynamical analysis using radial velocities available in the literature (143) plus new Gemini-GMOS/N measurements (68 new redshifts).From weak lensing we found that independent shear and magnification mass determinations are in excellent agreement between them and combining both we could reduce mass error bar by ~30% compared to shear alone. By combining this two weak-lensing probes we found that the position of both Northern BCGs are consistent with the masses centers within 2σ and and the NE hot gas peak to be offseted of the respective mass peak (M200=5.5 X 1014 M⊙) with very high significance. The most massive structure is NW (M200=7.95 X 1014 M⊙ ) where we observed no detachment between gas, DM and BCG.We have calculated a low line-of-sight velocity difference (<300 km/s) between A1758 NW and NE. We have combined it with the projected velocity of 1600 km/s which was estimated by previous X-ray analysis (David & Kempner 2004) and we have obtained a small angle between

  19. A shock at the radio relic position in Abell 115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botteon, A.; Gastaldello, F.; Brunetti, G.; Dallacasa, D.

    2016-07-01

    We analysed a deep Chandra observation (334 ks) of the galaxy cluster Abell 115 and detected a shock cospatial with the radio relic. The X-ray surface brightness profile across the shock region presents a discontinuity, corresponding to a density compression factor {C}=2.0± 0.1, leading to a Mach number {M}=1.7± 0.1 ({M}=1.4-2 including systematics). Temperatures measured in the upstream and downstream regions are consistent with what expected for such a shock: T_u=4.3^{+1.0}_{-0.6}{keV} and T_d=7.9^{+1.4}_{-1.1}{keV}, respectively, implying a Mach number {M}=1.8^{+0.5}_{-0.4}. So far, only few other shocks discovered in galaxy clusters are consistently detected from both density and temperature jumps. The spatial coincidence between this discontinuity and the radio relic edge strongly supports the view that shocks play a crucial role in powering these synchrotron sources. We suggest that the relic is originated by shock re-acceleration of relativistic electrons rather than acceleration from the thermal pool. The position and curvature of the shock and the associated relic are consistent with an off-axis merger with unequal mass ratio where the shock is expected to bend around the core of the less massive cluster.

  20. Abell 1201: A Minor Merger at Second Core Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Owers, Matt; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-06-01

    We present an analysis of the structures and dynamics of the merging cluster Abell 1201, which has two sloshing cold fronts around a cooling core, and an offset gas core approximately 500 kpc northwest of the center. New Chandra and XMM-Newton data reveal a region of enhanced brightness east of the offset core, with breaks in surface brightness along its boundary to the north and east. This is interpreted as a tail of gas stripped from the offset core. Gas in the offset core and the tail is distinguished from other gas at the same distance from the cluster center chiefly by having higher density, hence lower entropy. In addition, the offset core shows marginally lower temperature and metallicity than the surrounding area. The metallicity in the cool core is high and there is an abrupt drop in metallicity across the southern cold front. We interpret the observed properties of the system, including the placement of the cold fronts, the offset core, and its tail in terms of a simple merger scenario. The offset core is the remnant of a merging subcluster, which first passed pericenter southeast of the center of the primary cluster and is now close to its second pericenter passage, moving at ~= 1000 km s-1. Sloshing excited by the merger gave rise to the two cold fronts and the disposition of the cold fronts reveals that we view the merger from close to the plane of the orbit of the offset core.

  1. Chandra Observations of Point Sources in Abell 2255

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David S.; Miller, Neal A.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    In our search for "hidden" AGN we present results from a Chandra observation of the nearby cluster Abell 2255. Eight cluster galaxies are associated with point-like X-ray emission, and we classify these galaxies based on their X-ray, radio, and optical properties. At least three are associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN) with no optical signatures of nuclear activity, with a further two being potential AGN. Of the potential AGN, one corresponds to a galaxy with a post-starburst optical spectrum. The remaining three X-ray detected cluster galaxies consist of two starbursts and an elliptical with luminous hot gas. Of the eight cluster galaxies five are associated with luminous (massive) galaxies and the remaining three lie in much lower luminosity systems. We note that the use of X-ray to optical flux ratios for classification of X-ray sources is often misleading, and strengthen the claim that the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting an AGN based on optical data is significantly lower than the fraction based on X-ray and radio data.

  2. ABELL 1201: A MINOR MERGER AT SECOND CORE PASSAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Chengjiun; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Owers, Matt; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-06-20

    We present an analysis of the structures and dynamics of the merging cluster Abell 1201, which has two sloshing cold fronts around a cooling core, and an offset gas core approximately 500 kpc northwest of the center. New Chandra and XMM-Newton data reveal a region of enhanced brightness east of the offset core, with breaks in surface brightness along its boundary to the north and east. This is interpreted as a tail of gas stripped from the offset core. Gas in the offset core and the tail is distinguished from other gas at the same distance from the cluster center chiefly by having higher density, hence lower entropy. In addition, the offset core shows marginally lower temperature and metallicity than the surrounding area. The metallicity in the cool core is high and there is an abrupt drop in metallicity across the southern cold front. We interpret the observed properties of the system, including the placement of the cold fronts, the offset core, and its tail in terms of a simple merger scenario. The offset core is the remnant of a merging subcluster, which first passed pericenter southeast of the center of the primary cluster and is now close to its second pericenter passage, moving at {approx_equal} 1000 km s{sup -1}. Sloshing excited by the merger gave rise to the two cold fronts and the disposition of the cold fronts reveals that we view the merger from close to the plane of the orbit of the offset core.

  3. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Cooray, Asantha R.; Holzappel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect toward the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas distribution to be strongly aspherical, as do the X-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction in two ways. We first compare the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deprojecting the three-dimensional gas density distribution and deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods and find that they agree within the errors of the measurement. We discuss the possible system- atic errors in the gas mass fraction measurement and the constraints it places on the matter density parameter, Omega(sub M).

  4. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Spectrum of Abell 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaRoque, S. J.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Reese, E. D.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Joy, M.; Grego, L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present an interferometric measurement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) at 1 cm for the galaxy cluster Abell 2163. We combine this data point with previous measurements at 1.1, 1.4, and 2.1 mm from the SuZIE experiment to construct the most complete SZE spectrum to date. The intensity in four wavelength bands is fit to determine the Compton y-parameter (y(sub 0)) and the peculiar velocity (v(sub p)) for this cluster. Our results are y(sub 0) = 3.56((sup +0.41+0.27)(sub -0.41-0.19)) X 10(exp -4) and v(sub p) = 410((sup +1030+460) (sub -850-440)) km s(exp -1) where we list statistical and systematic uncertainties, respectively, at 68% confidence. These results include corrections for contamination by Galactic dust emission. We find less contamination by dust emission than previously reported. The dust emission is distributed over much larger angular scales than the cluster signal and contributes little to the measured signal when the details of the SZE observing strategy are taken into account.

  5. One-dimensional tomography - A comparison of Abel, onion-peeling, and filtered backprojection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasch, Cameron J.

    1992-03-01

    It is shown that the Abel inversion, onion-peeling, and filtered backprojection methods can be intercompared without assumptions about the object being deconvolved. If the projection data are taken at equally spaced radial positions, the deconvolved field is given by weighted sums of the projections divided by the data spacing. The weighting factors are independent of the data spacing. All the methods are remarkably similar and have Abelian behavior: the field at a radial location is primarily determined by the weighted differences of a few projections around the radial position. Onion-peeling and an Abel inversion using two-point interpolation are similar. When the Shepp-Logan filtered backprojection method is reduced to one dimension, it is essentially identical to an Abel inversion using three-point interpolation. The weighting factors directly determine the relative noise performance: the three-point Abel inversion is the best, while onion peeling is the worst with approximately twice the noise. Based on ease of calculation, robustness, and noise, the three-point Abel inversion is recommended.

  6. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and the distribution of galaxy orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Owen, Frazer N.

    1987-01-01

    The present data on the orientations of the tails with respect to the cluster centers of a sample of 70 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters show the distribution of tail angles to be inconsistent with purely radial or circular orbits in all the samples, while being consistent with isotropic orbits in (1) the whole sample, (2) the sample of NATs far from the cluster center, and (3) the samples of morphologically regular Abell clusters. Evidence for very radial orbits is found, however, in the sample of NATs near the cluster center. If these results can be generalized to all cluster galaxies, then the presence of radial orbits near the center of Abell clusters suggests that violent relaxation may not have been fully effective even within the cores of the regular clusters.

  7. Nonlocal symmetries of Riccati and Abel chains and their similarity reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzon, M. S.; Gandarias, M. L.; Senthilvelan, M.

    2012-02-01

    We study nonlocal symmetries and their similarity reductions of Riccati and Abel chains. Our results show that all the equations in Riccati chain share the same form of nonlocal symmetry. The similarity reduced Nth order ordinary differential equation (ODE), N = 2, 3, 4, …, in this chain yields (N - 1)th order ODE in the same chain. All the equations in the Abel chain also share the same form of nonlocal symmetry (which is different from the one that exist in Riccati chain) but the similarity reduced Nth order ODE, N = 2, 3, 4, …, in the Abel chain always ends at the (N - 1)th order ODE in the Riccati chain. We describe the method of finding general solution of all the equations that appear in these chains from the nonlocal symmetry.

  8. A One-Year Case Study: Understanding the Rich Potential of Project-Based Learning in a Virtual Reality Class for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Teresa M.; Bang, EunJin; Andre, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative case analysis of a new and unique, high school, student-directed, project-based learning (PBL), virtual reality (VR) class. In order to create projects, students learned, on an independent basis, how to program an industrial-level VR machine. A constraint was that students were required to produce at least one…

  9. U(1)-invariant membranes: The geometric formulation, Abel, and pendulum differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltukhin, A. A.; Trzetrzelewski, M.

    2010-06-15

    The geometric approach to study the dynamics of U(1)-invariant membranes is developed. The approach reveals an important role of the Abel nonlinear differential equation of the first type with variable coefficients depending on time and one of the membrane extendedness parameters. The general solution of the Abel equation is constructed. Exact solutions of the whole system of membrane equations in the D=5 Minkowski space-time are found and classified. It is shown that if the radial component of the membrane world vector is only time dependent, then the dynamics is described by the pendulum equation.

  10. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Joy, Marshall K.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Patel, Sandeep; Holzapfel, William L.; Cooray, Asantha K.

    1999-01-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect towards the galaxy cluster Abell 370. These measurements, which directly probe the pressure of the cluster's gas, show the gas is strongly aspherical, on agreement with the morphology revealed by x-ray and gravitational lensing observations. We calculate the cluster's gas mass fraction by comparing the gas mass derived from the SZ measurements to the lensing-derived gravitational mass near the critical lensing radius. We also calculate the gas mass fraction from the SZ data by deriving the total mass under the assumption that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE). We test the assumptions in the HSE method by comparing the total cluster mass implied by the two methods. The Hubble constant derived for this cluster, when the known systematic uncertainties are included, has a very wide range of values and therefore does not provide additional constraints on the validity of the assumptions. We examine carefully the possible systematic errors in the gas fraction measurement. The gas fraction is a lower limit to the cluster's baryon fraction and so we compare the gas mass fraction, calibrated by numerical simulations to approximately the virial radius, to measurements of the global mass fraction of baryonic matter, OMEGA(sub B)/OMEGA(sub matter). Our lower limit to the cluster baryon fraction is f(sub B) = (0.043 +/- 0.014)/h (sub 100). From this, we derive an upper limit to the universal matter density, OMEGA(sub matter) <= 0.72/h(sub 100), and a likely value of OMEGA(sub matter) <= (0.44(sup 0.15, sub -0.12)/h(sub 100).

  11. Generalization of Abel's mechanical problem: The extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle

    SciTech Connect

    Kinugawa, Tohru

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents a simple but nontrivial generalization of Abel's mechanical problem, based on the extended isochronicity condition and the superposition principle. There are two primary aims. The first one is to reveal the linear relation between the transit-time T and the travel-length X hidden behind the isochronicity problem that is usually discussed in terms of the nonlinear equation of motion (d{sup 2}X)/(dt{sup 2}) +(dU)/(dX) =0 with U(X) being an unknown potential. Second, the isochronicity condition is extended for the possible Abel-transform approach to designing the isochronous trajectories of charged particles in spectrometers and/or accelerators for time-resolving experiments. Our approach is based on the integral formula for the oscillatory motion by Landau and Lifshitz [Mechanics (Pergamon, Oxford, 1976), pp. 27–29]. The same formula is used to treat the non-periodic motion that is driven by U(X). Specifically, this unknown potential is determined by the (linear) Abel transform X(U) ∝ A[T(E)], where X(U) is the inverse function of U(X), A=(1/√(π))∫{sub 0}{sup E}dU/√(E−U) is the so-called Abel operator, and T(E) is the prescribed transit-time for a particle with energy E to spend in the region of interest. Based on this Abel-transform approach, we have introduced the extended isochronicity condition: typically, τ = T{sub A}(E) + T{sub N}(E) where τ is a constant period, T{sub A}(E) is the transit-time in the Abel type [A-type] region spanning X > 0 and T{sub N}(E) is that in the Non-Abel type [N-type] region covering X < 0. As for the A-type region in X > 0, the unknown inverse function X{sub A}(U) is determined from T{sub A}(E) via the Abel-transform relation X{sub A}(U) ∝ A[T{sub A}(E)]. In contrast, the N-type region in X < 0 does not ensure this linear relation: the region is covered with a predetermined potential U{sub N}(X) of some arbitrary choice, not necessarily obeying the Abel-transform relation. In discussing

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Deep spectroscopy of Abell 85 (Agulli+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sanchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Palmero, L. D.; Yu, H.

    2016-07-01

    File a85_memb.dat contains 5 columns with the sky coordinates (RA;DE), the r and g band magnitudes and the recessional velocities for each 460 confirmed members of Abell 85 cluster. Details on the data set can be found in the paper. (1 data file).

  13. Crazy heart: kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, R.; Richtler, T.; West, M. J.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Lloyd-Davies, E.; Schuberth, Y.

    2011-04-01

    We study the structure and internal kinematics of the "star pile" in Abell 545 - a low surface brightness structure lying in the center of the cluster. We have obtained deep long-slit spectroscopy of the star pile using VLT/FORS2 and Gemini/GMOS, which is analyzed in conjunction with deep multiband CFHT/MEGACAM imaging. As presented in a previous study the star pile has a flat luminosity profile and its color is consistent with the outer parts of elliptical galaxies. Its velocity map is irregular, with parts being seemingly associated with an embedded nucleus, and others which have significant velocity offsets to the cluster systemic velocity with no clear kinematical connection to any of the surrounding galaxies. This would make the star pile a dynamically defined stellar intra-cluster component. The complicated pattern in velocity and velocity dispersions casts doubts on the adequacy of using the whole star pile as a dynamical test for the innermost dark matter profile of the cluster. This status is fulfilled only by the nucleus and its nearest surroundings which lie at the center of the cluster velocity distribution. Based on observations taken at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, under programme ID 080.B-0529. Also based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and SECYT (Argentina); and on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National

  14. MUSE observations of the lensing cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, D.; Pelló, R.; Richard, J.; Lewis, J.; Patrício, V.; Cantalupo, S.; Herenz, E. C.; Soto, K.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Bacon, R.; Vernet, J. D. R.; Wisotzki, L.; Clément, B.; Cuby, J. G.; Lagattuta, D. J.; Soucail, G.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-05-01

    Context. This paper presents the results obtained with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) for the core of the lensing cluster Abell 1689, as part of MUSE's commissioning at the ESO Very Large Telescope. Aims: Integral-field observations with MUSE provide a unique view of the central 1 × 1 arcmin2 region at intermediate spectral resolution in the visible domain, allowing us to conduct a complete census of both cluster galaxies and lensed background sources. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of all sources found in the MUSE data cube. Two hundred and eighty-two objects were systematically extracted from the cube based on a guided-and-manual approach. We also tested three different tools for the automated detection and extraction of line emitters. Cluster galaxies and lensed sources were identified based on their spectral features. We investigated the multiple-image configuration for all known sources in the field. Results: Previous to our survey, 28 different lensed galaxies displaying 46 multiple images were known in the MUSE field of view, most of them were detected through photometric redshifts and lensing considerations. Of these, we spectroscopically confirm 12 images based on their emission lines, corresponding to 7 different lensed galaxies between z = 0.95 and 5.0. In addition, 14 new galaxies have been spectroscopically identified in this area thanks to MUSE data, with redshifts ranging between 0.8 and 6.2. All background sources detected within the MUSE field of view correspond to multiple-imaged systems lensed by A1689. Seventeen sources in total are found at z ≥ 3 based on their Lyman-α emission, with Lyman-α luminosities ranging between 40.5 ≲ log (Lyα) ≲ 42.5 after correction for magnification. This sample is particularly sensitive to the slope of the luminosity function toward the faintest end. The density of sources obtained in this survey is consistent with a steep value of α ≤ -1.5, although this result still

  15. Abell 41: shaping of a planetary nebula by a binary central star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Lloyd, M.; Santander-García, M.; López, J. A.; Meaburn, J.; Mitchell, D. L.; O'Brien, T. J.; Pollacco, D.; Rubio-Díez, M. M.; Vaytet, N. M. H.

    2010-11-01

    We present the first detailed spatiokinematical analysis and modelling of the planetary nebula Abell 41, which is known to contain the well-studied close-binary system MT Ser. This object represents an important test case in the study of the evolution of planetary nebulae with binary central stars as current evolutionary theories predict that the binary plane should be aligned perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the nebula. Deep narrow-band imaging in the light of [NII]6584Å, [OIII]5007 Å and [SII]6717+6731Å, obtained using ACAM on the William Herschel Telescope, has been used to investigate the ionization structure of Abell 41. Long-slit observations of the Hα and [NII]6584Å emission were obtained using the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer on the 2.1-m San Pedro Mártir Telescope. These spectra, combined with the narrow-band imagery, were used to develop a spatiokinematical model of [NII]6584Å emission from Abell 41. The best-fitting model reveals Abell 41 to have a waisted, bipolar structure with an expansion velocity of ~40 km s-1 at the waist. The symmetry axis of the model nebula is within 5° of perpendicular to the orbital plane of the central binary system. This provides strong evidence that the close-binary system, MT Ser, has directly affected the shaping of its nebula, Abell 41. Although the theoretical link between bipolar planetary nebulae and binary central stars is long established, this nebula is only the second to have this link, between nebular symmetry axis and binary plane, proved observationally. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. E-mail: david.jones-3@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk

  16. Richness-based masses of rich and famous galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreon, S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a catalog of galaxy cluster masses derived by exploiting the tight correlation between mass and richness, i.e., a properly computed number of bright cluster galaxies. The richness definition adopted in this work is properly calibrated, shows a small scatter with mass, and has a known evolution, which means that we can estimate accurate (0.16 dex) masses more precisely than by adopting any other richness estimates or X-ray or SZ-based proxies based on survey data. We measured a few hundred galaxy clusters at 0.05 < z < 0.22 in the low-extinction part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint that are in the 2015 catalog of Planck-detected clusters, that have a known X-ray emission, that are in the Abell catalog, or that are among the most most cited in the literature. Diagnostic plots and direct images of clusters are individually inspected and we improved cluster centers and, when needed, we revised redshifts. Whenever possible, we also checked for indications of contamination from other clusters on the line of sight, and found ten such cases. All this information, with the derived cluster mass values, are included in the distributed value-added cluster catalog of the 275 clusters with a derived mass larger than 1014M⊙. Finally, in a technical appendix we illustrate with Planck clusters how to minimize the sensitivity of comparisons between masses listed in different catalogs to the specific overlapping of the considerd subsamples, a problem recognized but not solved in the literature. Full Table 1 is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A158A web front-end is available at the URL http://www.brera.mi.astro.it/~andreon/famous.html

  17. Internal dynamics of the galaxy cluster Abell 545. The ideal case where to study the simultaneous formation of a galaxy system and its brightest galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrena, R.; Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; de Grandi, S.; Eckert, D.; Rossetti, M.

    2011-05-01

    Context. The mechanisms giving rise to diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters, and in particular their connection with cluster mergers, are still debated. Aims: We seek to explore the internal dynamics of the cluster Abell 545, which has been shown to host a radio halo. Abell 545 is also peculiar for hosting in its center a very bright, red, diffuse intracluster light due to an old, presumably metal-rich stellar population, so bright to be named as "star pile". Methods: Our analysis is mainly based on redshift data for 110 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. We identify 95 cluster members and analyze the cluster internal dynamics by combining galaxy velocities and positions. We also use both multiband photometric data acquired at the Isaac Newton Telescope and X-ray data from the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Results: We estimate the cluster redshift, ⟨ z ⟩ = 0.1580, a large line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion σV ~ 1200 km s-1, and ICM temperature kTX ~ 8 keV. Our optical and X-ray analyses detect substructures. Optical data reveal three main galaxy clumps (one at the center hosting the peak of X-ray emission; one at NNW, and one at NE); and possibly a fourth clump at South. There is not a dominant galaxy and the four brightest galaxies avoid the cluster core - ≳ 0.4 h70-1 Mpcdistant from the cluster center - and are ≳ 1500 km s-1far from the mean cluster velocity. Two of these brightest galaxies are located in the NNW and NE clumps. The analysis of the X-ray surface brightness distribution provides us evidence of a disturbed dynamical phase: the strong NNW-SSE elongation, a western excess, and a sharp discontinuity in the northern region which is the likely signature of a shock. Located in the star pile region there is the brightest galaxy of the cluster core (CBCG) and a very compact elliptical galaxy, likely a M32-like dwarf. We show that the star pile, which has a previously determined redshift, has a similar redshift to that of

  18. Improved Abel transform inversion: First application to COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon-Angel, A.; Hernandez-Pajares, M.; Juan, J.; Sanz, J.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the first results of Ionospheric Tomographic inversion are presented, using the Improved Abel Transform on the COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 constellation of 6 LEO satellites, carrying on-board GPS receivers.[- 4mm] The Abel transform inversion is a wide used technique which in the ionospheric context makes it possible to retrieve electron densities as a function of height based of STEC (Slant Total Electron Content) data gathered from GPS receivers on board of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellites. Within this precise use, the classical approach of the Abel inversion is based on the assumption of spherical symmetry of the electron density in the vicinity of an occultation, meaning that the electron content varies in height but not horizontally. In particular, one implication of this assumption is that the VTEC (Vertical Total Electron Content) is a constant value for the occultation region. This assumption may not always be valid since horizontal ionospheric gradients (a very frequent feature in some ionosphere problematic areas such as the Equatorial region) could significantly affect the electron profiles. [- 4mm] In order to overcome this limitation/problem of the classical Abel inversion, a studied improvement of this technique can be obtained by assuming separability in the electron density (see Hernández-Pajares et al. 2000). This means that the electron density can be expressed by the multiplication of VTEC data and a shape function which assumes all the height dependency in it while the VTEC data keeps the horizontal dependency. Actually, it is more realistic to assume that this shape fuction depends only on the height and to use VTEC information to take into account the horizontal variation rather than considering spherical symmetry in the electron density function as it has been carried out in the classical approach of the Abel inversion.[-4mm] Since the above mentioned improved Abel inversion technique has already been tested and proven to be a useful

  19. UV Observations of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1795 with the Optical Monitor on XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittaz, J. P. D.; Kaastra, J. S.; Tamura, T.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, F.; Peterson, J. R.; Ikebe, Y.; Lumb, D. H.; Paerels, F.; Stewart, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of broad band UV observations of the central regions of Abell 1795 observed with the optical monitor on XMM-Newton. As have been found with other UV observations of the central regions of clusters of galaxies, we find evidence for star formation. However, we also find evidence for absorption in the cD galaxy on a more extended scale than has been seen with optical imaging. We also report the first UV observation of part of the filamentary structure seen in H-alpha, X-rays and very deep U band imaging. The part of the filament we see is very blue with UV colours consistent with a very early (O/B) stellar population. This is the first direct evidence of a dominant population of early type stars at the centre of Abell 1795 and implies very recent star formation. The relationship of this emission to emission at other wavebands is discussed.

  20. A combined optical/X-ray study of the Galaxy cluster Abell 2256

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabricant, Daniel G.; Kent, Stephen M.; Kurtz, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of Abell 2256 is investigated by combining X-ray observations of the intracluster gas with optical observations of the galaxy distribution and kinematics. Magnitudes and positions are presented for 172 galaxies and new redshifts for 75. Abell 2256 is similar to the Coma Cluster in its X-ray luminosity, mass, and galaxy density. Both the X-ray surface brightness and the galaxy surface density distributions exhibit an elliptical morphology. The radial galaxy distribution is steeper than the density profile of the X-ray-emitting gas, yet the galaxy velocity dispersion is higher than the equivalent value for the gas. Under the simplest assumptions that the galaxy velocity distribution is isotropic and the gas is isothermal, the galaxies and gas cannot be in hydrostatic equilibrium in a common gravitational potential. Models consistent with available data have mass-to-light ratios which increase with radius and galaxy orbits that are anisotropic with a radial bias.

  1. Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic (ABEL) Trapping of Single High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockenhauer, Samuel; Furstenberg, Alexandre; Wang, Quan; Devree, Brian; Jie Yao, Xiao; Bokoch, Michael; Kobilka, Brian; Sunahara, Roger; Moerner, W. E.

    2010-03-01

    The ABEL trap is a novel device for trapping single biomolecules in solution for extended observation. The trap estimates the position of a fluorescently-labeled object as small as ˜10 nm in solution and then applies a feedback electrokinetic drift every 20 us to trap the object by canceling its Brownian motion. We use the ABEL trap to study HDL particles at the single-copy level. HDL particles, essential in regulation of ``good'' cholesterol in humans, comprise a small (˜10 nm) lipid bilayer disc bounded by a belt of apolipoproteins. By engineering HDL particles with single fluorescent donor/acceptor probes and varying lipid compositions, we are working to study lipid diffusion on small length scales. We also use HDL particles as hosts for single transmembrane receptors, which should enable study of receptor conformational dynamics on long timescales.

  2. RELICS Discovery of a Probable Lens-magnified SN behind Galaxy Cluster Abell 1763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, S.; Coe, D.; Bradley, L.; Strolger, L.; Brammer, G.; Avila, R.; Ryan, R.; Ogaz, S.; Riess, A.; Sharon, K.; Johnson, T.; Paterno-Mahler, R.; Molino, A.; Graham, M.; Kelly, P.; Filippenko, A.; Frye, B.; Foley, R.; Schmidt, K.; Umetsu, K.; Czakon, N.; Weiner, B.; Stark, D.; Mainali, R.; Zitrin, A.; Sendra, I.; Graur, O.; Grillo, C.; Hjorth, J.; Selsing, J.; Christensen, L.; Rosati, P.; Nonino, M.; Balestra, I.; Vulcani, B.; McCully, C.; Dawson, W.; Bouwens, R.; Lam, D.; Trenti, M.; Nunez, D. Carrasco; Matheson, T.; Merten, J.; Jha, S.; Jones, C.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Salmon, B.; Bradac, M.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.; Wang, X.; Oesch, P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of a likely supernova (SN) in the background field of the galaxy cluster Abell 1763 (a.k.a. RXC J1335.3+4059, ZwCl 1333.7+4117). The SN candidate was detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations collected on June 17, 2016 as part of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS, HST program ID: 14096, PI: D.Coe).

  3. Fast algorithm for computing the Abel inversion integral in broadband reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, F.D.

    1995-10-01

    The application of the Hansen--Jablokow recursive technique is proposed for the numerical computation of the Abel inversion integral which is used in ({ital O}-mode) frequency-modulated broadband reflectometry to evaluate plasma density profiles. Compared to the usual numerical methods the recursive algorithm allows substantial time savings that can be important when processing massive amounts of data aiming to control the plasma in real time. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. The Extraordinary Amount of Substructure in the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauzac, M.; Eckert, D.; Schwinn, J.; Harvey, D.; Baugh, C. M.; Robertson, A.; Bose, S.; Massey, R.; Owers, M.; Ebeling, H.; Shan, H. Y.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Richard, J.; Atek, H.; Clément, B.; Egami, E.; Israel, H.; Knowles, K.; Limousin, M.; Natarajan, P.; Rexroth, M.; Taylor, P.; Tchernin, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a joint optical/X-ray analysis of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z=0.308). Our strong- and weak-lensing analysis within the central region of the cluster, i.e., at R < 1 Mpc from the brightest cluster galaxy, reveals eight substructures, including the main core. All of these dark-matter halos are detected with a significance of at least 5σ and feature masses ranging from 0.5 to 1.4× 1014M⊙ within R < 150 kpc. Merten et al. (2011) and Medezinski et al. (2016) substructures are also detected by us. We measure a slightly higher mass for the main core component than reported previously and attribute the discrepancy to the inclusion of our tightly constrained strong-lensing mass model built on Hubble Frontier Fields data. X-ray data obtained by XMM-Newton reveal four remnant cores, one of them a new detection, and three shocks. Unlike Merten et al. (2011), we find all cores to have both dark and luminous counterparts. A comparison with clusters of similar mass in the MXXL simulations yields no objects with as many massive substructures as observed in Abell 2744, confirming that Abell 2744 is an extreme system. We stress that these properties still do not constitute a challenge to ΛCDM, as caveats apply to both the simulation and the observations: for instance, the projected mass measurements from gravitational lensing and the limited resolution of the sub-haloes finders. We discuss implications of Abell 2744 for the plausibility of different dark-matter candidates and, finally, measure a new upper limit on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter of σDM < 1.28 cm2g-1(68% CL), in good agreement with previous results from Harvey et al. (2015).

  5. Proof of polar ejection from the close-binary core of the planetary nebula Abell 63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Deborah L.; Pollacco, Don; O'Brien, T. J.; Bryce, M.; López, J. A.; Meaburn, J.; Vaytet, N. M. H.

    2007-02-01

    We present the first detailed kinematical analysis of the planetary nebula Abell 63, which is known to contain the eclipsing close-binary nucleus UU Sge. Abell 63 provides an important test case in investigating the role of close-binary central stars on the evolution of planetary nebulae. Longslit observations were obtained using the Manchester echelle spectrometer combined with the 2.1-m San Pedro Martir Telescope. The spectra reveal that the central bright rim of Abell 63 has a tube-like structure. A deep image shows collimated lobes extending from the nebula, which are shown to be high-velocity outflows. The kinematic ages of the nebular rim and the extended lobes are calculated to be 8400 +/- 500 and 12900 +/- 2800 yr, respectively, which suggests that the lobes were formed at an earlier stage than the nebular rim. This is consistent with expectations that disc-generated jets form immediately after the common envelope phase. A morphological-kinematical model of the central nebula is presented and the best-fitting model is found to have the same inclination as the orbital plane of the central binary system; this is the first proof that a close-binary system directly affects the shaping of its nebula. A Hubble-type flow is well-established in the morphological-kinematical modelling of the observed line profiles and imagery. Two possible formation models for the elongated lobes of Abell 63 are considered, (i) a low-density, pressure-driven jet excavates a cavity in the remnant asymptotic giant branch (AGB) envelope; (ii) high-density bullets form the lobes in a single ballistic ejection event.

  6. Deciphering the bipolar planetary nebula Abell 14 with 3D ionization and morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akras, S.; Clyne, N.; Boumis, P.; Monteiro, H.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Redman, M. P.; Williams, S.

    2016-04-01

    Abell 14 is a poorly studied object despite being considered a born-again planetary nebula. We performed a detailed study of its 3D morphology and ionization structure using the SHAPE and MOCASSIN codes. We found that Abell 14 is a highly evolved, bipolar nebula with a kinematical age of ˜19 400 yr for a distance of 4 kpc. The high He abundance, and N/O ratio indicate a progenitor of 5 M⊙ that has experienced the third dredge-up and hot bottom burning phases. The stellar parameters of the central source reveal a star at a highly evolved stage near to the white dwarf cooling track, being inconsistent with the born-again scenario. The nebula shows unexpectedly strong [N I] λ5200 and [O I] λ6300 emission lines indicating possible shock interactions. Abell 14 appears to be a member of a small group of highly evolved, extreme type-I planetary nebulae (PNe). The members of this group lie at the lower-left corner of the PNe regime on the [N II]/Hα versus [S II]/Hα diagnostic diagram, where shock-excited regions/objects are also placed. The low luminosity of their central stars, in conjunction with the large physical size of the nebulae, result in a very low photoionization rate, which can make any contribution of shock interaction easily perceptible, even for small velocities.

  7. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software.

    PubMed

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the 'omics' context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  8. High-Performance Mixed Models Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis with omicABEL software

    PubMed Central

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Sharapov, Sodbo Zh.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To raise the power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and avoid false-positive results in structured populations, one can rely on mixed model based tests. When large samples are used, and when multiple traits are to be studied in the ’omics’ context, this approach becomes computationally challenging. Here we consider the problem of mixed-model based GWAS for arbitrary number of traits, and demonstrate that for the analysis of single-trait and multiple-trait scenarios different computational algorithms are optimal. We implement these optimal algorithms in a high-performance computing framework that uses state-of-the-art linear algebra kernels, incorporates optimizations, and avoids redundant computations, increasing throughput while reducing memory usage and energy consumption. We show that, compared to existing libraries, our algorithms and software achieve considerable speed-ups. The OmicABEL software described in this manuscript is available under the GNU GPL v. 3 license as part of the GenABEL project for statistical genomics at http: //www.genabel.org/packages/OmicABEL. PMID:25717363

  9. ASCA Temperature Maps of Three Clusters of Galaxies: Abell 1060, AWM 7, and the Centaurus Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusho, Tae; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ohashi, Takaya; Shibata, Ryo; Kagei, Tomohiro; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Ezawa, Hajime; Ikebe, Yasushi

    2001-06-01

    We present two-dimensional temperature maps of three bright clusters of galaxies (Abell 1060, AWM 7, and the Centaurus cluster), based on multi-pointing observations with the ASCA GIS. The temperatures were derived from hardness ratios by taking into account the XRT response. For the Centaurus cluster, we subtracted the central cool component using the previous ASCA and ROSAT results, and the metallicity gradients observed in AWM 7 and the Centaurus cluster were included in deriving the temperatures. The intracluster medium in Abell 1060 and AWM 7 is almost isothermal from the center to the outer regions with temperatures of 3.3 and 3.9 keV, respectively. The Centaurus cluster exhibits remarkable hot regions within about 30' from the cluster center, showing a temperature increase of ×0.8 keV from the surrounding level of 3.5keV, and the outer cool regions with lower temperatures by -1.3 keV. These results imply that a strong merger has occurred in the Centaurus in the recent 2-3Gyr, and that the central cool component has survived it. In contrast, the gas in Abell 1060 was well-mixed in an early period, which probably has prevented the development of a central cool component. In AWM 7, mixing of the gas should have occurred in a period earlier than the epoch of metal enrichment.

  10. Rich Imaginations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The story of Bernard Madoff rivals outrageous fiction. It was astonishing that this seemingly kindly, respectable financier, a pioneer in electronic trading, a founding partner in the Nasdaq exchange, turned out to have been running a $65-billion Ponzi scheme that victimized country-club elites, middle-class retirees, foundations, universities,…

  11. Two long H I tails in the outskirts of Abell 1367

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, T. C.; Cortese, L.; Brinks, E.; Bravo-Alfaro, H.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R.

    2012-01-01

    We present VLA D-array H I observations of the RSCG 42 and FGC 1287 galaxy groups, in the outskirts of the Abell 1367 cluster. These groups are projected ˜1.8 and 2.7 Mpc west from the cluster centre. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey provided evidence for H I extending over as much as 200 kpc in both groups. Our new, higher resolution observations reveal that the complex H I features detected by Arecibo are in reality two extraordinary long H I tails extending for ˜160 and 250 kpc, respectively, i.e. among the longest H I structures ever observed in groups of galaxies. Although in the case of RSCG 42 the morphology and dynamics of the H I tail, as well as the optical properties of the group members, support a low-velocity tidal interaction scenario, less clear is the origin of the unique features associated with FGC 1287. This galaxy displays an exceptionally long 'dog leg' H I tail, and the large distance from the X-ray-emitting region of Abell 1367 makes a ram-pressure stripping scenario highly unlikely. At the same time, a low-velocity tidal interaction seems unable to explain the extraordinary length of the tail and the lack of any sign of disturbance in the optical properties of FGC 1287. An intriguing possibility could be that this galaxy might have recently experienced a high-speed interaction with another member of the Coma-Abell 1367 Great Wall. We searched for the interloper responsible for this feature and, although we find a possible candidate, we show that without additional observations it is impossible to settle this issue. While the mechanism responsible for this extraordinary H I tail remains to be determined, our discovery highlights how little we know about environmental effects in galaxy groups.

  12. Inverting ion images without Abel inversion: maximum entropy reconstruction of velocity maps.

    PubMed

    Dick, Bernhard

    2014-01-14

    A new method for the reconstruction of velocity maps from ion images is presented, which is based on the maximum entropy concept. In contrast to other methods used for Abel inversion the new method never applies an inversion or smoothing to the data. Instead, it iteratively finds the map which is the most likely cause for the observed data, using the correct likelihood criterion for data sampled from a Poissonian distribution. The entropy criterion minimizes the information content in this map, which hence contains no information for which there is no evidence in the data. Two implementations are proposed, and their performance is demonstrated with simulated and experimental data: Maximum Entropy Velocity Image Reconstruction (MEVIR) obtains a two-dimensional slice through the velocity distribution and can be compared directly to Abel inversion. Maximum Entropy Velocity Legendre Reconstruction (MEVELER) finds one-dimensional distribution functions Q(l)(v) in an expansion of the velocity distribution in Legendre polynomials P((cos θ) for the angular dependence. Both MEVIR and MEVELER can be used for the analysis of ion images with intensities as low as 0.01 counts per pixel, with MEVELER performing significantly better than MEVIR for images with low intensity. Both methods perform better than pBASEX, in particular for images with less than one average count per pixel.

  13. The Utility and Psychometric Properties of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasingame, Gerry D.; Abel, Gene G.; Jordan, Alan; Wiegel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and utility of the Abel-Blasingame Assessment System for "individuals with intellectual disabilities" (ABID) for assessment of sexual interest and problematic sexual behaviors. The study examined the preliminary psychometric properties and evaluated the clinical utility of the ABID based on a sample of 495…

  14. 3C 323.1 - A QSO in a rich cluster of galaxies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oemler, A., Jr.; Gunn, J. E.; Oke, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The redshift and structural data on the compact cluster Zw Cl 1545.1+2104 have been determined from deep plates of the cluster region and from spectral scans of the central galaxy in the cluster. The cluster is of richness 1 on Abell's (1958) scale, and the redshift of its central galaxy agrees well with that of the quasar 3C 323.1 which lies at a projected distance of 6.5 sec from the center of the cluster. The data indicate that the quasar is a member of the cluster as opposed to the observed trend.

  15. X-ray constraints on the shape of the dark matter in five Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buote, David A.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray observations obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to constrain the shape of the dark matter in the inner regions of Abell clusters A401, A426, A1656, A2029, and A2199, each of which exhibits highly flattened optical isopleths. The dark matter is modeled as an ellipsoid with a mass density of about r exp -2. The possible shapes of the dark matter is constrained by comparing these model isophotes to the image isophotes. The X-ray isophotes, and therefore the gravitational potentials, have ellipticities of about 0.1-0.2. The dark matter within the central 1 Mpc is found to be substantially rounder for all the clusters. It is concluded that the shape of the galaxy distributions in these clusters traces neither the gravitational potential nor the gravitating matter.

  16. ULTRA DEEP AKARI OBSERVATIONS OF ABELL 2218: RESOLVING THE 15 {mu}m EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, R.; Serjeant, S.; Negrello, M.; Pearson, C.; Egami, E.; Im, M.; Ko, J.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, M. G.; Kneib, J.-P.; Matsuhara, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Takagi, T.; Smail, I.

    2010-06-10

    We present extragalactic number counts and a lower limit estimate for the cosmic infrared background (CIRB) at 15 {mu}m from AKARI ultra deep mapping of the gravitational lensing cluster Abell 2218. These data are the deepest taken by any facility at this wavelength and uniquely sample the normal galaxy population. We have de-blended our sources, to resolve photometric confusion, and de-lensed our photometry to probe beyond AKARI's blank-field sensitivity. We estimate a de-blended 5{sigma} sensitivity of 28.7 {mu}Jy. The resulting 15 {mu}m galaxy number counts are a factor of 3 fainter than previous results, extending to a depth of {approx} 0.01 mJy and providing a stronger lower limit constraint on the CIRB at 15 {mu}m of 1.9 {+-} 0.5 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1}.

  17. Dirac neutrino mass from a neutrino dark matter model for the galaxy cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus Maria

    2016-03-01

    The dark matter in the galaxy cluster Abell 1689 is modelled as an isothermal sphere of neutrinos. New data on the 2d mass density allow an accurate description of its core and halo. The model has no “missing baryon problem” and beyond 2.1 Mpc the baryons have the cosmic mass abundance. Combination of cluster data with the cosmic dark matter fraction - here supposed to stem from the neutrinos - leads to a solution of the dark matter riddle by left and right handed neutrinos with mass (1.861 ± 0.016)h 70 -2eV/c 2. The thus far observed absence of neutrinoless double beta decay points to (quasi-) Dirac neutrinos: uncharged electrons with different flavour and mass eigenbasis, as for quarks. Though the cosmic microwave background spectrum is matched up to some 10% accuracy only, the case is not ruled out because the plasma phase of the early Universe may be turbulent.

  18. Television documentary, history and memory. An analysis of Sergio Zavoli's The Gardens of Abel

    PubMed Central

    Foot, John

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a celebrated documentary made for Italian state TV in 1968 and transmitted in 1969 to an audience of millions. The programme – The Gardens of Abel – looked at changes introduced by the radical psychiatrist Franco Basaglia in an asylum in the north-east of Italy (Gorizia). The article examines the content of this programme for the first time, questions some of the claims that have been made for it, and outlines the sources used by the director, Sergio Zavoli. The article argues that the film was as much an expression of Zavoli's vision and ideas as it was linked to those of Franco Basaglia himself. Finally, the article highlights the way that this programme has become part of historical discourse and popular memory. PMID:25937804

  19. RADIO AND DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISTURBED COOL CORE CLUSTER ABELL 133

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, S. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Owers, M. S.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2010-10-10

    We present results based on new Chandra and multi-frequency radio observations of the disturbed cool core cluster Abell 133. The diffuse gas has a complex bird-like morphology, with a plume of emission extending from two symmetric wing-like features. The plume is capped with a filamentary radio structure that has been previously classified as a radio relic. X-ray spectral fits in the region of the relic indicate the presence of either high-temperature gas or non-thermal emission, although the measured photon index is flatter than would be expected if the non-thermal emission is from inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background by the radio-emitting particles. We find evidence for a weak elliptical X-ray surface brightness edge surrounding the core, which we show is consistent with a sloshing cold front. The plume is consistent with having formed due to uplift by a buoyantly rising radio bubble, now seen as the radio relic, and has properties consistent with buoyantly lifted plumes seen in other systems (e.g., M87). Alternatively, the plume may be a gas sloshing spiral viewed edge-on. Results from spectral analysis of the wing-like features are inconsistent with the previous suggestion that the wings formed due to the passage of a weak shock through the cool core. We instead conclude that the wings are due to X-ray cavities formed by displacement of X-ray gas by the radio relic. The central cD galaxy contains two small-scale cold gas clumps that are slightly offset from their optical and UV counterparts, suggestive of a galaxy-galaxy merger event. On larger scales, there is evidence for cluster substructure in both optical observations and the X-ray temperature map. We suggest that the Abell 133 cluster has recently undergone a merger event with an interloping subgroup, initialing gas sloshing in the core. The torus of sloshed gas is seen close to edge-on, leading to the somewhat ragged appearance of the elliptical surface brightness edge. We show

  20. An Approximation to the Periodic Solution of a Differential Equation of Abel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    2011-10-01

    The Abel equation, in canonical form, is y^' = sint- y^3 (*) and corresponds to the singular (ɛ --> 0) limit of the nonlinear, forced oscillator ɛy^'' + y^' + y^3 = sint, ɛ-> 0. (**) Equation (*) has the property that it has a unique periodic solution defined on (-∞,∞). Further, as t increases, all solutions are attracted into the strip |y| < 1 and any two different solutions y1(t) and y2(t) satisfy the condition Lim [y1(t) - y2(t)] = 0, (***) t --> ∞ and for t negatively decreasing, each solution, except for the periodic solution, becomes unbounded.ootnotetextU. Elias, American Mathematical Monthly, vol.115, (Feb. 2008), pps. 147-149. Our purpose is to calculate an approximation to the unique periodic solution of Eq. (*) using the method of harmonic balance. We also determine an estimation for the blow-up time of the non-periodic solutions.

  1. Beneficial Effects of Camellia Oil (Camellia oleifera Abel.) on Hepatoprotective and Gastroprotective Activities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that increased dietary intake of natural antioxidants is beneficial for health because of their bioactivities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammation actions. Camellia oil made from tea seed (Camellia oleifera Abel.) is commonly used as an edible oil and a traditional medicine in Taiwan and China. Until now, the camellia oil has been widely considered as a dietary oil for heath. In this review, we summarize the protective effects of camellia oil with antioxidant activity against oxidative stress leading to hepatic damage and gastrointestinal ulcers. The information in this review leads to the conclusion that camellia oil is not only an edible oil but also a vegetable oil with a potential function for human health. PMID:26598814

  2. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and evidence for radial orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Owen, Frazer N.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1986-01-01

    Published observational data on the tail orientations (TOs) of 60 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters of galaxies are analyzed statistically using a maximum-likelihood approach. The results are presented in a table, and it is found that the observed TO distributions in the whole sample and in subsamples of morphologically regular NATs and NATs with pericentric distances d greater than 500 kpc are consistent with isotropic orbits, whereas the TOs for NATs with d less than 500 kpc are consistent with highly radial orbits. If radial orbits were observed near the centers of other types of cluster galaxies as well, it could be inferred that violent relaxation during cluster formation was incomplete, and that clusters form by spherical collapse and secondary infall, as proposed by Gunn (1977).

  3. The Mass of Abell 1060 and AWM 7 from Spatially Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenstein, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1996-11-01

    Using X-ray temperature and surface brightness profiles of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) derived from ASCA (Astro-D) and ROSAT observations, we place constraints on the dark matter (DM) and baryon fraction distributions in the poor clusters Abell 1060 (A1060) and AWM 7. Although their total mass distributions are similar, AWM 7 has twice the baryon fraction of A1060 in the best-fit models. The functional form of the DM distribution is ill determined; however, mass models where the baryon fractions in A1060 and AWM 7 significantly overlap are excluded. Such variations in baryon fraction are not predicted by standard models and imply that some mechanism in addition to gravity plays a major role in organizing matter on cluster scales.

  4. Social Movements, Class, and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Shirley

    2005-01-01

    Social movements in South Africa, often organized around class-related issues, provide rich material to illustrate how class, intertwined with other social categories, shapes organizational and educational practices.

  5. Galaxy Luminosity Function of the Dynamically Young Abell 119 Cluster: Probing the Cluster Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngdae; Rey, Soo-Chang; Hilker, Michael; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the galaxy luminosity function (LF) of the Abell 119 cluster down to {M}r˜ -14 mag based on deep images in the u, g, and r bands taken by using MOSAIC II CCD mounted on the Blanco 4 m telescope at the CTIO. The cluster membership was accurately determined based on the radial velocity information and on the color-magnitude relation for bright galaxies and the scaling relation for faint galaxies. The overall LF exhibits a bimodal behavior with a distinct dip at r˜ 18.5 mag ({M}r˜ -17.8 mag), which is more appropriately described by a two-component function. The shape of the LF strongly depends on the clustercentric distance and on the local galaxy density. The LF of galaxies in the outer, low-density region exhibits a steeper slope and more prominent dip compared with that of counterparts in the inner, high-density region. We found evidence for a substructure in the projected galaxy distribution in which several overdense regions in the Abell 119 cluster appear to be closely associated with the surrounding, possible filamentary structure. The combined LF of the overdense regions exhibits a two-component function with a distinct dip, while the LF of the central region is well described by a single Schechter function. We suggest that, in the context of the hierarchical cluster formation scenario, the observed overdense regions are the relics of galaxy groups, retaining their two-component LFs with a dip, which acquired their shapes through a galaxy merging process in group environments, before they fall into a cluster.

  6. Deep spectroscopy of nearby galaxy clusters - I. Spectroscopic luminosity function of Abell 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Diaferio, A.; Barrena, R.; Dominguez Palmero, L.; Yu, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new deep spectroscopic catalogue for Abell 85, within 3.0 × 2.6 Mpc2 and down to Mr ˜ Mr^{ast } +6. Using the Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope and the AutoFiber 2 at the William Herschel Telescope, we obtained almost 1430 new redshifts for galaxies with mr ≤ 21 mag and <μe,r> ≤ 24 mag arcsec-2. These redshifts, together with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and NASA/IPAC Extragaalctic Database spectroscopic information, result in 460 confirmed cluster members. This data set allows the study of the luminosity function (LF) of the cluster galaxies covering three orders of magnitudes in luminosities. The total and radial LFs are best modelled by a double Schechter function. The normalized LFs show that their bright (Mr ≤ -21.5) and faint (Mr ≥ -18.0) ends are independent of clustercentric distance and similar to the field LFs unlike the intermediate luminosity range (-21.5 ≤ Mr ≤ -18.0). Similar results are found for the LFs of the dominant types of galaxies: red, passive, virialized and early-infall members. On the contrary, the LFs of blue, star forming, non-virialized and recent-infall galaxies are well described by a single Schechter function. These populations contribute to a small fraction of the galaxy density in the innermost cluster region. However, in the outskirts of the cluster, they have similar densities to red, passive, virialized and early-infall members at the LF faint end. These results confirm a clear dependence of the colour and star formation of Abell 85 members in the cluster centric distance.

  7. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  8. Revisiting Abell 2744: a powerful synergy of the GLASS spectroscopy and the HFF photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Borello Schmidt, Kasper; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-08-01

    We present new emission line identifications and improve the strong lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744 using the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) observations and the full depth of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging. We performed a blind and targeted search for emission lines in objects within the full field of view (FoV) of the GLASS prime pointings, including all the previously known multiple arc images. We report over 50 high quality spectroscopic redshifts, 4 of which are for the arc images. We also present an extensive analysis based on the HFF photometry, measuring the colors and photometric redshifts of all objects within the FoV, and comparing the spectroscopic and photometric results of the same ensemble of sources. In order to improve the lens model of Abell 2744, we develop a rigorous alogorithm to screen arc images, based on their colors and morphology, and selecting the most reliable ones to use. As a result, 21 systems (corresponding to 59 images) pass the screening process and are used to reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive mesh. The resulting total mass distribution is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data in a fashion very similar to the reduction of the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP) clusters, in order to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made publicly available in the standard HFF format.

  9. Suzaku observation of a high-entropy cluster Abell 548W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Kato, Yuichi; Gu, Liyi; Kawaharada, Madoka; Takizawa, Motokazu; Fujita, Yutaka; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    Abell 548W, one of the galaxy clusters located in the Abell 548 region, has about an order of magnitude lower X-ray luminosity compared to ordinal clusters in view of the well-known intracluster medium (ICM) temperature vs. X-ray luminosity (kT-LX) relation. The cluster hosts a pair of diffuse radio sources to the northwest and north, both about 10' apart from the cluster center. They are candidate radio relics, frequently associated with merging clusters. A Suzaku deep observation with exposure of 84.4 ks was performed to search for signatures of merging in this cluster. The XIS detectors successfully detected the ICM emission out to 16' from the cluster center. The temperature is ˜ 3.6 keV around its center, and ˜ 2 keV at the outermost regions. The hot region (˜ 6 keV) beside the relic candidates shifted to the cluster center reported by XMM-Newton was not seen in the Suzaku data, although its temperature of 3.6 keV itself is higher than the average temperature of 2.5 keV around the radio sources. In addition, the signature of a cool (kT ˜ 0.9 keV) component was found around the northwest source. A marginal temperature jump at its outer edge was also found, consistent with the canonical idea of the shock acceleration origin of the radio relics. The cluster has among the highest central entropy of ˜ 400 keV cm2 and is one of the so-called low surface brightness clusters. Taking into account the fact that its shape itself is relatively circular and smooth and also that its temperature structure is nearly flat, possible scenarios for merging are discussed.

  10. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived From Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From analysis of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging data we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the SZE toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: r' photometry of Abell 1367 and Coma (Iglesias-Paramo+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Boselli, A.; Gavazzi, G.; Cortese, L.; Vilchez, J. M.

    2002-11-01

    We provide the total r'-band galaxy counts corresponding to our observed fields of the clusters of galaxies Abell 1367 and Coma, as well as the r'-band background counts from Yasuda et al. (2001AJ....122.1104Y). We also provide some basic properties of the galaxies detected in our r'-band survey of the clusters of galaxies Abell 1367 and Coma: coordinates, r'-band magnitudes and surface brightness, position angles, recession velocities and ellipticities are provided. The observations were carried out with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) attached to the Prime Focus of the INT 2.5m located at Observatorio de El Roque de los Muchachos, on 26 and 28 April 2000, under photometric conditions, excepting the last half of the second night. (3 data files).

  12. "Racializing" Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  13. Class Counts: Education, Inequality, and the Shrinking Middle Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Allan

    2007-01-01

    Class differences and class warfare have existed since the beginning of western civilization, but the gap in income and wealth between the rich (top 10 percent) and the rest has increased steadily in the last twenty-five years. The U.S. is heading for a financial oligarchy much worse than the aristocratic old world that our Founding Fathers feared…

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hα galaxies in Abell 1367 and Coma (Iglesias-Paramo+, 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Boselli, A.; Cortese, L.; Vilchez, J. M.; Gavazzi, G.

    2002-04-01

    We present a deep wide field Hα imaging survey of the central regions of the two nearby clusters of galaxies Coma and Abell 1367, taken with the WFC at the Prime Focus at the NT 2.5m telescope located at Observatorio de El Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma), on April 26th and 28th 2000. We determine for the first time the Schechter parameters of the Hα luminosity function (LF) of cluster galaxies. (2 data files).

  15. The physical structure of planetary nebulae around sdO stars: Abell 36, DeHt 2, and RWT 152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, A.; Miranda, L. F.; Olguín, L.; Vázquez, R.; Guillén, P. F.; Oreiro, R.; Ulla, A.; Solano, E.

    2015-01-01

    We present narrow-band Hα and [O III] images, and high-resolution, long-slit spectra of the planetary nebulae (PNe) Abell 36, DeHt 2, and RWT 152 aimed at studying their morphology and internal kinematics. These data are complemented with intermediate-resolution, long-slit spectra to describe the spectral properties of the central stars and nebulae. The morphokinematical analysis shows that Abell 36 consists of an inner spheroid and two bright point-symmetric arcs; DeHt 2 is elliptical with protruding polar regions and a bright non-equatorial ring; and RWT 152 is bipolar. The formation of Abell 36 and DeHt 2 requires several ejection events including collimated bipolar outflows that probably are younger than and have disrupted the main shell. The nebular spectra of the three PNe show a high excitation and also suggest a possible deficiency in heavy elements in DeHt 2 and RWT 152. The spectra of the central stars strongly suggest an sdO nature and their association with PNe points out that they have most probably evolved through the asymptotic giant branch. We analyse general properties of the few known sdOs associated with PNe and find that most of them are relatively or very evolved PNe, show complex morphologies, host binary central stars, and are located at relatively high Galactic latitudes.

  16. Analysis of the optical emission of the young precataclysmic variables HS 1857+5144 and ABELL 65

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimansky, V. V.; Pozdnyakova, S. A.; Borisov, N. V.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Vlasyuk, V. V.; Spiridonova, O. I.; Galeev, A. I.; Mel'Nikov, S. S.

    2009-10-01

    We analyze the physical state and the properties of the close binary systems HS 1857+5144 and Abell 65. We took the spectra of both systems over a wide range of orbital phases with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SAO RAS) and obtained their multicolor light curves with the RTT150 and Zeiss-1000 telescopes of the SAO RAS. We demonstrate that both Abell 65 and HS 1857+5144 are young precataclysmic variables (PV) with orbital periods of P orb = 1. d 003729 and P orb = 0. d 26633331, respectively. The observed brightness and spectral variations during the orbital period are due to the radiation of the cold component, which absorbs the short-wave radiation of the hot component and reemits it in the visual part of the spectrum. A joint analysis of the brightness and radial velocity curves allowed us to find the possible and optimum sets of their fundamental parameters. We found the luminosity excesses of the secondary components of HS 1857+5144 and Abell 65 with respect to the corresponding Main Sequence stars to be typical for such objects. The excess luminosities of the secondary components of all young PVs are indicative of their faster relaxation rate towards the quiescent state compared to the rates estimated in earlier studies.

  17. On the Merging Cluster Abell 578 and Its Central Radio Galaxy 4C+67.13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, K.; Stawarz, Ł.; Siemiginowska, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Szostek, A.; Madejski, G.; Harris, D. E.; Simionescu, A.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-06-01

    Here we analyze radio, optical, and X-ray data for the peculiar cluster Abell 578. This cluster is not fully relaxed and consists of two merging sub-systems. The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), CGPG 0719.8+6704, is a pair of interacting ellipticals with projected separation ˜10 kpc, the brighter of which hosts the radio source 4C+67.13. The Fanaroff-Riley type-II radio morphology of 4C+67.13 is unusual for central radio galaxies in local Abell clusters. Our new optical spectroscopy revealed that both nuclei of the CGPG 0719.8+6704 pair are active, albeit at low accretion rates corresponding to the Eddington ratio ˜ {{10}-4} (for the estimated black hole masses of ˜ 3× {{10}8} {{M}⊙ } and ˜ {{10}9} {{M}⊙ }). The gathered X-ray (Chandra) data allowed us to confirm and to quantify robustly the previously noted elongation of the gaseous atmosphere in the dominant sub-cluster, as well as a large spatial offset (˜60 kpc projected) between the position of the BCG and the cluster center inferred from the modeling of the X-ray surface brightness distribution. Detailed analysis of the brightness profiles and temperature revealed also that the cluster gas in the vicinity of 4C+67.13 is compressed (by a factor of about ˜1.4) and heated (from ≃ 2.0 keV up to 2.7 keV), consistent with the presence of a weak shock (Mach number ˜1.3) driven by the expanding jet cocoon. This would then require the jet kinetic power of the order of ˜ {{10}45} erg s-1, implying either a very high efficiency of the jet production for the current accretion rate, or a highly modulated jet/accretion activity in the system. Based on service observations made with the WHT operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  18. A Census of Star Formation and Active Galactic Nuclei Populations in Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Logan H.; Atlee, David Wesley

    2016-01-01

    A recent survey of low-z galaxy clusters observed a disjunction between X-ray and mid-infrared selected populations of active galactic nuclei (X-ray and IR AGNs) (Atlee+ 2011, ApJ 729, 22.). Here we present an analysis of near-infrared spectroscopic data of star-forming galaxies in cluster Abell 1689 in order to confirm the identity of some of their IR AGN and to provide a check on their reported star formation rates. Our sample consists of 24 objects in Abell 1689. H and K band spectroscopic observations of target objects and standard stars were obtained by David Atlee between 2010 May 17 and 2011 June 6 using the Large Binocular Telescope's LUCI instrument. After undergoing initial reductions, standard stars were corrected for telluric absorption using TelFit (Gullikson+ 2014, AJ, 158, 53). Raw detector counts were converted to physical units using the wavelength-dependent response of the grating and the star's reported H and K band magnitudes to produce conversion factors that fully correct for instrumental effects. Target spectra were flux-calibrated using the airmass-corrected transmission profiles produced by TelFit and the associated H band conversion factor (or the average of the two factors, for nights with two standard stars). Star formation rates were calculated using the SFR-L(Ha) relation reported in Kennicutt (1998), with the measured luminosity of the Pa-a emission line at the luminosity distance of the cluster used as a proxy for L(Ha) (Kennicutt 1998, ARA&A 36, 189; Hummer & Stoney 1987, MNRAS 346, 1055). The line ratios H2 2.121 mm/Brg and [FeII]/Pab were used to classify targets as starburst galaxies, AGNs, or LINERs (Rodriguez-Ardila+ 2005, MNRAS, 364, 1041). Jones was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  19. A Cosmic Train Wreck: JVLA Radio Observations of the HST Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Connor; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Kraft, Ralph P.; Dawson, William; Brüggen, Marcus; Roediger, Elke; Bulbul, Esra; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The galaxy cluster mergers observed in the HST Frontier Fields represent some of the most energetic events in the Universe. Major cluster mergers leave distinct signatures in the ICM in the form of shocks, turbulence, and diffuse cluster radio sources. These diffuse radio sources, so-called radio relics and halos, provide evidence for the acceleration of relativistic particles and the presence of large scale magnetic fields in the ICM. Observations of these halos and relics allow us to (i) study the physics of particle acceleration and its relation with shocks and turbulence in the ICM and (ii) constrain the dynamical evolution of the merger eventsWe present Jansky Very Large Array 1-4 GHz observations of the Frontier cluster Abell 2744. We confirm the presence of the known giant radio halo and radio relic via our deep radio images. Owing to the much greater sensitivity of the JVLA compared to previous observations, we are able to detect a previously unobserved long Mpc-size filament of synchrotron emission to the south west of the cluster core. We also present a radio spectral index image of the diffuse cluster emission to test the origin of the radio relic and halo, related to the underlying particle acceleration mechanism. Finally, we carry out a search for radio emission from the 'jellyfish' galaxies in A2744 to estimate their star formation rate. These highly disturbed galaxies are likely influenced by the cluster merger event, although the precise origin of these galaxies is still being debated.

  20. JVLA S- and X-band polarimetry of the merging cluster Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Takeaki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Akahori, Takuya; Anraku, Kenta; Takizawa, Motokazu; Takahashi, Ikumi; Onodera, Sachiko; Tsuda, Yuya; Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2015-12-01

    We report on polarimetry results of a merging cluster of galaxies, Abell 2256, with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). We performed new observations with JVLA at the S band (2051-3947 MHz) and X band (8051-9947 MHz) in the C array configuration, and detected significant polarized emissions from the radio relic, Source A, and Source B in this cluster. We calculated the total magnetic-field strengths toward the radio relic using revised equipartition formula, which is 1.8-5.0 μG. With dispersions of Faraday rotation measure, the magnetic-field strengths toward Sources A and B are estimated to be 0.63-1.26 μG and 0.11-0.21 μG, respectively. An extremely high degree of linear polarization, as high as ˜ 35%, about a half of the maximum polarization, was detected toward the radio relic, which indicates highly ordered magnetic lines of force over the beam sizes (˜ 52 kpc). The fractional polarization of the radio relic decreases from ˜ 35% to ˜ 20% at around 3 GHz as the frequency decreases, and is nearly constant between 1.37 and 3 GHz. Both analyses with depolarization models and Faraday tomography suggest multiple depolarization components toward the radio relic and imply the existence of turbulent magnetic fields.

  1. Systematic Uncertainties in Characterizing Cluster Outskirts: The Case of Abell 133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, Jennie; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Nulsen, Paul; Farrah, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    The outskirts of galaxy clusters have low surface brightness compared to the X-ray background, making accurate background subtraction particularly important for analyzing cluster spectra out to and beyond the virial radius. We analyze the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) of Abell 133 and assess the extent to which uncertainties on background subtraction affect measured quantities. We implement two methods of analyzing the ICM spectra: one in which the blank-sky background is subtracted, and another in which the sky background is modeled. We find that the two methods are consistent within the 90% confidence ranges. We were able to measure the thermodynamic properties of the cluster up to R500. Even at R500, the systematic uncertainties associated with the sky background in the direction of A133 are small, despite the ICM signal constituting only ~25% of the total signal. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution. GAO acknowledges support by NASA through a Hubble Fellowship grant HST-HF2-51345.001-A awarded by the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  2. Disentangling the ICL with the CHEFs: Abell 2744 as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Dupke, R.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of the intracluster light (ICL) are still prone to methodological ambiguities, and there are multiple techniques in the literature to address them, mostly based on the binding energy, the local density distribution, or the surface brightness. A common issue with these methods is the a priori assumption of a number of hypotheses on either the ICL morphology, its surface brightness level, or some properties of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). The discrepancy in the results is high, and numerical simulations just place a boundary on the ICL fraction in present-day galaxy clusters in the range 10%-50%. We developed a new algorithm based on the Chebyshev-Fourier functions to estimate the ICL fraction without relying on any a priori assumption about the physical or geometrical characteristics of the ICL. We are able to not only disentangle the ICL from the galactic luminosity but mark out the limits of the BCG from the ICL in a natural way. We test our technique with the recently released data of the cluster Abell 2744, observed by the Frontier Fields program. The complexity of this multiple merging cluster system and the formidable depth of these images make it a challenging test case to prove the efficiency of our algorithm. We found a final ICL fraction of 19.17 ± 2.87%, which is very consistent with numerical simulations.

  3. Peculiar velocities of cD galaxies - MX spectroscopy of Abell 1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Hintzen, Paul; Oegerle, W. R.; Romanishin, W.; Lesser, M. P.; Eisenhamer, J. D.; Batuski, D. J.

    1988-09-01

    Spectroscopic observations of galaxies in the Abell 1795 field have been obtained using the MX multiple-object spectrograph on the Steward Observatory 2.3 m telescope. Redshifts are presented for 46 galaxies, including 41 cluster members. It is found that the A1795 cD galaxy is not at rest in the cluster gravitational potential well; it has a peculiar radial velocity, cz, of 365 km/s, and the hypothesis that the mean cluster velocity is as large as the cD's velocity can be rejected at the 99.5 percent confidence level. This conclusion is supported by spectroscopic data for the 'cooling flow' gas found in the central region of the cluster; this gas, except for the portion coincident with the cD nucleus, lies at the velocity derived for the cluster mean. It is suggested that current models of the formation of cD galaxies are unlikely to account for the large peculiar velocities of the cD galaxies in A1795 and A2670 unless substantial subclustering is still present. However, the available data show no evidence for velocity subclustering in either A1795 or A2670.

  4. An efficient and flexible Abel-inversion method for noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhin, Igor I.

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient and flexible method for solving Abel integral equation of the first kind, frequently appearing in many fields of astrophysics, physics, chemistry, and applied sciences. This equation represents an ill-posed problem, thus solving it requires some kind of regularization. Our method is based on solving the equation on a so-called compact set of functions and/or using Tikhonov's regularization. A priori constraints on the unknown function, defining a compact set, are very loose and can be set using simple physical considerations. Tikhonov's regularization on itself does not require any explicit a priori constraints on the unknown function and can be used independently of such constraints or in combination with them. Various target degrees of smoothness of the unknown function may be set, as required by the problem at hand. The advantage of the method, apart from its flexibility, is that it gives uniform convergence of the approximate solution to the exact solution, as the errors of input data tend to zero. The method is illustrated on several simulated models with known solutions. An example of astrophysical application of the method is also given.

  5. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING BY THE SUPER-MASSIVE cD GALAXY IN ABELL 3827

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, E. R.; Gomez, P. L.; Lee, H.; Diaz, R.; Bergmann, M.; Turner, J. E. H.; Miller, B. W.; West, M. J.; Verdugo, T.

    2010-06-01

    We have discovered strong gravitational lensing features in the core of the nearby cluster Abell 3827 by analyzing Gemini South GMOS images. The most prominent strong lensing feature is a highly magnified, ring-shaped configuration of four images around the central cD galaxy. GMOS spectroscopic analysis puts this source at z {approx} 0.2. Located {approx}20'' away from the central galaxy is a secondary tangential arc feature which has been identified as a background galaxy with z {approx} 0.4. We have modeled the gravitational potential of the cluster core, taking into account the mass from the cluster, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and other galaxies. We derive a total mass of (2.7 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 13} M {sub sun} within 37 h {sup -1} kpc. This mass is an order of magnitude larger than that derived from X-ray observations. The total mass derived from lensing data suggests that the BCG in this cluster is perhaps the most massive galaxy in the nearby universe.

  6. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas I.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief introduction identifying current issues and trends in research on class size, this brochure reviews five recent studies bearing on the relationship of class size to educational effectiveness. Part 1 is a review of two interrelated and highly controversial "meta-analyses" or statistical integrations of research findings on class size,…

  7. Class Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdata, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Ever since George Washington opted for the title of president rather than king, Americans have been uncomfortable with the idea of class distinctions. This article presents an interview with Dr. Janet Galligani Casey regarding the idea of class distinctions. Galligani Casey, who grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Somerville, Massachusetts,…

  8. Structure and Formation of cD Galaxies: NGC 6166 in ABELL 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Ralf; Kormendy, John; Cornell, Mark E.; Fisher, David B.

    2015-07-01

     Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) spectroscopy is used to measure the velocity dispersion profile of the nearest prototypical cD galaxy, NGC 6166 in the cluster Abell 2199. We also present composite surface photometry from many telescopes. We confirm the defining feature of a cD galaxy; i.e., (we suggest), a halo of stars that fills the cluster center and that is controlled dynamically by cluster gravity, not by the central galaxy. Our HET spectroscopy shows that the velocity dispersion of NGC 6166 rises from σ ≃ 300 km s-1 in the inner r˜ 10\\prime\\prime to σ =865+/- 58 km s-1 at r ˜ 100″ in the cD halo. This extends published observations of an outward σ increase and shows for the first time that σ rises all the way to the cluster velocity dispersion of 819 ± 32 km s-1. We also observe that the main body of NGC 6166 moves at +206 ± 39 km s-1 with respect to the cluster mean velocity, but the velocity of the inner cD halo is ˜70 km s-1 closer to the cluster velocity. These results support our picture that cD halos consist of stars that were stripped from individual cluster galaxies by fast tidal encounters.  However, our photometry does not confirm the widespread view that cD halos are identifiable as an extra, low-surface-brightness component that is photometrically distinct from the inner, steep-Sérsic-function main body of an otherwise-normal giant elliptical galaxy. Instead, all of the brightness profile of NGC 6166 outside its core is described to ±0.037 V mag arcsec-2 by a single Sérsic function with index n≃ 8.3. The cD halo is not recognizable from photometry alone. This blurs the distinction between cluster-dominated cD halos and the similarly-large-Sérsic-index halos of giant, core-boxy-nonrotating ellipticals. These halos are believed to be accreted onto compact, high-redshift progenitors (“red nuggets”) by large numbers of minor mergers. They belong dynamically to their central galaxies. Still, cDs and core-boxy-nonrotating Es

  9. The complex structure of Abell 2345: a galaxy cluster with non-symmetric radio relics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschin, W.; Barrena, R.; Girardi, M.

    2010-10-01

    Context. The connection of cluster mergers with the presence of extended, diffuse radio sources in galaxy clusters is still debated. Aims: We aim to obtain new insights into the internal dynamics of the cluster Abell 2345. This cluster exhibits two non-symmetric radio relics well studied through recent, deep radio data. Methods: Our analysis is based on redshift data for 125 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and on new photometric data acquired at the Isaac Newton Telescope. We also use ROSAT/HRI archival X-ray data. We combine galaxy velocities and positions to select 98 cluster galaxies and analyze the internal dynamics of the cluster. Results: We estimate a mean redshift < z > = 0.1789 and a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion σV ~ 1070 km s-1. The two-dimensional galaxy distribution reveals the presence of three significant peaks within a region of ~1 h70-1 Mpc (the E, NW, and SW peaks). The spectroscopic catalog confirms the presence of these three clumps. The SW and NW clumps have similar mean velocities, while the E clump has a larger mean velocity (Δ Vrf ~ 800 km s-1); this structure causes the presence of the two peaks we find in the cluster velocity distribution. The difficulty in separating the galaxy clumps leads to a very uncertain mass estimate M ~ 2 × 1015 h70-1 M⊙. Moreover, the E clump well coincides with the main mass peak as recovered from the weak gravitational lensing analysis and is off-set to the east from the BCG by ~1.3´. The ROSAT X-ray data also show a very complex structure, mainly elongated in the E-W direction, with two (likely three) peaks in the surface brightness distribution, which, however, are off-set from the position of the peaks in the galaxy density. The observed phenomenology agrees with the hypothesis that we are looking at a complex cluster merger occurring along two directions: a major merger along the ~E-W direction (having a component along the LOS) and a minor merger in the western cluster

  10. Linking star formation and galaxy kinematics in the massive cluster Abell 2163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menacho, Veronica; Verdugo, Miguel

    2015-02-01

    The origin of the morphology-density relation is still an open question in galaxy evolution. It is most likely driven by the combination of the efficient star formation in the highest peaks of the mass distribution at high-z and the transformation by environmental processes at later times as galaxies fall into more massive halos. To gain additional insights about these processes we study the kinematics, star formation and structural properties of galaxies in Abell 2163 a very massive (~4×1015 M⊙, Holz & Perlmutter 2012) merging cluster at z = 0.2. We use high resolution spectroscopy with VLT/VIMOS to derive rotation curves and dynamical masses for galaxies that show regular kinematics. Galaxies that show irregular rotation are also analysed to study the origin of their distortion. This information is combined with stellar masses and structural parameters obtained from high quality CFHT imaging. From narrow band photometry (2.2m/WFI), centered on the redshifted Hα line, we obtain star formation rates. Although our sample is still small, field and cluster galaxies lie in a similar Tully-Fisher relation as local galaxies. Controlling by additional parameters like SFRs or bulge-to-disk ratio do not affect this result. We find however that ~50% of the cluster galaxies display irregular kinematics in contrast to what is found in the field at similar redshifts (~30%, Böhm et al. 2004) and in agreement with other studies in clusters (e.g. Bösch et al. 2013, Kutdemir et al. 2010) which points out to additional processes operating in clusters that distort the galaxy kinematics.

  11. Mass, velocity anisotropy, and pseudo phase-space density profiles of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, E.; Biviano, A.; Mamon, G. A.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: We aim to compute the mass and velocity anisotropy profiles of Abell 2142 and, from there, the pseudo phase-space density profile Q(r) and the density slope - velocity anisotropy β - γ relation, and then to compare them with theoretical expectations. Methods: The mass profiles were obtained by using three techniques based on member galaxy kinematics, namely the caustic method, the method of dispersion-kurtosis, and MAMPOSSt. Through the inversion of the Jeans equation, it was possible to compute the velocity anisotropy profiles. Results: The mass profiles, as well as the virial values of mass and radius, computed with the different techniques agree with one another and with the estimates coming from X-ray and weak lensing studies. A combined mass profile is obtained by averaging the lensing, X-ray, and kinematics determinations. The cluster mass profile is well fitted by an NFW profile with c = 4.0 ± 0.5. The population of red and blue galaxies appear to have a different velocity anisotropy configuration, since red galaxies are almost isotropic, while blue galaxies are radially anisotropic, with a weak dependence on radius. The Q(r) profile for the red galaxy population agrees with the theoretical results found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that any bias, relative to the dark matter particles, in velocity dispersion of the red component is independent of radius. The β - γ relation for red galaxies matches the theoretical relation only in the inner region. The deviations might be due to the use of galaxies as tracers of the gravitational potential, unlike the non-collisional tracer used in the theoretical relation.

  12. Submillimetre observations of galaxy clusters with the BLAST: the star formation activity in Abell 3112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, Filiberto G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Edge, Alastair; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C.; Hughes, David H.; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ngo, Henry; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Valiante, Elisabetta; Viero, Marco P.; Wiebe, Donald V.

    2011-04-01

    We present observations at 250, 350 and 500 μm of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 3112 (z= 0.075) carried out with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope. Five cluster members are individually detected as bright submillimetre (submm) sources. Their far-infrared spectral energy distributions and optical colours identify them as normal star-forming galaxies of high mass, with globally evolved stellar populations. They all have (B-R) colours of 1.38 ± 0.08, transitional between the blue, active population and the red, evolved galaxies that dominate the cluster core. We stack to estimate the mean submm emission from all cluster members, which is determined to be 16.6 ± 2.5, 6.1 ± 1.9 and 1.5 ± 1.3 mJy at 250, 350 and 500 μm, respectively. Stacking analyses of the submm emission of cluster members reveal trends in the mean far-infrared luminosity with respect to clustercentric radius and KS-band magnitude. We find that a large fraction of submm emission comes from the boundary of the inner, virialized region of the cluster, at clustercentric distances around R500. Stacking also shows that the bulk of the submm emission arises in intermediate-mass galaxies with KS magnitude ˜1 mag fainter than the characteristic magnitude ?. The results and constraints obtained in this work will provide a useful reference for the forthcoming surveys to be conducted on galaxy clusters by Herschel.

  13. The growth of the galaxy cluster Abell 85: mergers, shocks, stripping and seeding of clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinohe, Y.; Werner, N.; Simionescu, A.; Allen, S. W.; Canning, R. E. A.; Ehlert, S.; Mernier, F.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of deep Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 85, which is currently undergoing at least two mergers, and in addition shows evidence for gas sloshing which extends out to r ≈ 600 kpc. One of the two infalling subclusters, to the south of the main cluster centre, has a dense, X-ray bright cool core and a tail extending to the south-east. The northern edge of this tail is strikingly smooth and sharp (narrower than the Coulomb mean free path of the ambient gas) over a length of 200 kpc, while towards the south-west the boundary of the tail is blurred and bent, indicating a difference in the plasma transport properties between these two edges. The thermodynamic structure of the tail strongly supports an overall north-westward motion. We propose, that a sloshing-induced tangential, ambient, coherent gas flow is bending the tail eastwards. The brightest galaxy of this subcluster is at the leading edge of the dense core, and is trailed by the tail of stripped gas, suggesting that the cool core of the subcluster has been almost completely destroyed by the time it reached its current radius of r ≈ 500 kpc. The surface-brightness excess, likely associated with gas stripped from the infalling southern subcluster, extends towards the south-east out to at least r500 of the main cluster, indicating that the stripping of infalling subclusters may seed gas inhomogeneities. The second merging subcluster appears to be a diffuse non-cool-core system. Its merger is likely supersonic with a Mach number of ≈1.4.

  14. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  15. Reconstructing the projected gravitational potential of Abell 1689 from X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernin, Céline; Majer, Charles L.; Meyer, Sven; Sarli, Eleonora; Eckert, Dominique; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters can be used as cosmological probes, but to this end, they need to be thoroughly understood. Combining all cluster observables in a consistent way will help us to understand their global properties and their internal structure. Aims: We provide proof of the concept that the projected gravitational potential of galaxy clusters can directly be reconstructed from X-ray observations. We also show that this joint analysis can be used to locally test the validity of the equilibrium assumptions in galaxy clusters. Methods: We used a newly developed reconstruction method, based on Richardson-Lucy deprojection, that allows reconstructing projected gravitational potentials of galaxy clusters directly from X-ray observations. We applied this algorithm to the well-studied cluster Abell 1689 and compared the gravitational potential reconstructed from X-ray observables to the potential obtained from gravitational lensing measurements. We also compared the X-ray deprojected profiles obtained by the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm with the findings from the more conventional onion-peeling technique. Results: Assuming spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium, the potentials recovered from gravitational lensing and from X-ray emission agree very well beyond 500 kpc. Owing to the fact that the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm allows deprojecting each line of sight independently, this result may indicate that non-gravitational effects and/or asphericity are strong in the central regions of the clusters. Conclusions: We demonstrate the robustness of the potential reconstruction method based on the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm and show that gravitational lensing and X-ray emission lead to consistent gravitational potentials. Our results illustrate the power of combining galaxy-cluster observables in a single, non-parametric, joint reconstruction of consistent cluster potentials that can be used to locally constrain the physical state

  16. THE DISTRIBUTION OF DARK MATTER OVER THREE DECADES IN RADIUS IN THE LENSING CLUSTER ABELL 611

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S.; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Sand, David J.; Richard, Johan; Capak, Peter; Miyazaki, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the baryonic and dark matter distribution in the lensing cluster Abell 611 (z = 0.288), with the goal of determining the dark matter profile over an unprecedented range of cluster-centric distance. By combining three complementary probes of the mass distribution, weak lensing from multi-color Subaru imaging, strong lensing constraints based on the identification of multiply imaged sources in Hubble Space Telescope images, and resolved stellar velocity dispersion measures for the brightest cluster galaxy secured using the Keck telescope, we extend the methodology for separating the dark and baryonic mass components introduced by Sand et al. Our resulting dark matter profile samples the cluster from approx3 kpc to 3.25 Mpc, thereby providing an excellent basis for comparisons with recent numerical models. We demonstrate that only by combining our three observational techniques can degeneracies in constraining the form of the dark matter profile be broken on scales crucial for detailed comparisons with numerical simulations. Our analysis reveals that a simple Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile is an unacceptable fit to our data. We confirm earlier claims based on less extensive analyses of other clusters that the inner profile of the dark matter profile deviates significantly from the NFW form and find a inner logarithmic slope beta flatter than 0.3 (68%; where rho{sub DM} propor to r{sup -b}eta at small radii). In order to reconcile our data with cluster formation in a LAMBDACDM cosmology, we speculate that it may be necessary to revise our understanding of the nature of baryon-dark matter interactions in cluster cores. Comprehensive weak and strong lensing data, when coupled with kinematic information on the brightest cluster galaxy, can readily be applied to a larger sample of clusters to test the universality of these results.

  17. Abell 262 and RXJ0341: Two Brightest Cluster Galaxies with Line Emission Blanketing a Cool Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Heng, Renita

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, integral field (IFU) analysis of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in several cool core clusters has revealed the central regions of these massive old red galaxies to be far from dead. Bright line emission alongside extended X-ray emission links nearby galaxies, is superposed upon vast dust lanes and extends out in long thin filaments from the galaxy core. Yet, to date no unifying picture has come into focus, and the activity across systems is currently seen as a grab-bag of possibile emission line mechanisms. Our primary goal is to work toward a consistent picture for why the BCGs seem are undergoing a renewed level of activity. One problem is most of the current data remains focused on mapping the very core of the BCG, but neglects surrounding galaxies. We propose to discover the full extent of line emission in a complementary pair of BCGs. In Abell 262, an extensive dust patch screens large portions of an otherwise smooth central galaxy, whereas RXJ0341 appears to be a double-core dust free BCG. We will map the full extent of the line emission in order to deduce whether the line emission is a product of local interactions, or the large-scale cluster X-ray gas. The narrow band filter set and large FOV afforded by the the Mayall MOSAIC-1 (MOSA) imager allows us to concurrently conduct an emission line survey of both clusters, locating all line emitting members and beginning a search for the effect of the environment of the different regions (outskirts vs. cluster core) out to the virial radius. We will combine our results with publically available data from 2MASS to determine the upper limits on specific star formation in the BCG and other cluster galaxies within the cluster virial radius.

  18. [The presence of the corpse and semiotic effectiveness in Geoffrey Chaucer and Caïn in Mctatio Abel].

    PubMed

    Bolens, Guillemette

    2011-01-01

    This article grapples with the question of the corpse through two particular literary texts. Rather than an elucidation of the physiological principle of the human body by means of dissection, the play Mactatio Abel, written in England in the 15th century, stages the difficulty of the relation to the corpse, via an amplification of the biblical narrative of Abel's murder by Cain. As for Chaucer's work, The Book of the Duchess, it rewrites Ovid's and Machaut's texts featuring the figure of Morpheus in a way that distinguishes between an imitation of the living and its simulacrum in the sense Wolfgang Iser gives this concept. Chaucer's Morpheus, instead of promoting verisimilitude, forbids it. Indeed, he animates a corpse from within instead of simulating an apparition of the deceased. The simulacrum, rather than a mimetic copy of the real, blocks all representational illusion, in order to formulate absence. The readability of the corpse in both works is relational. Both literary texts express the corpse as being always already grounded in a relational and narratorial space.

  19. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  20. Rich catalytic injection

    DOEpatents

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  1. Vitamins and Violence: Can Micronutrients Make Students Behave, Schools Safer and Test Scores Better? The Abell Report. Volume 23, No.6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joann Ellison

    2010-01-01

    The notion that vitamins, minerals, and other "supplemental" nutrients profoundly change behavior, mood, and intellect has origins as old as recorded history. Research has indeed suggested connections between nutrient deficiencies and behavior problems, but correlations are not the same as causality. This "Abell Report" is an…

  2. Research: Rags to Rags? Riches to Riches?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2004-01-01

    Everyone has read about what might be called the "gold gap"--how the rich in this country are getting richer and controlling an ever-larger share of the nation's wealth. The Century Foundation has started publishing "Reality Check", a series of guides to campaign issues that sometimes finds gaps in these types of cherished delusions. The guides…

  3. Triaxiality, principal axis orientation and non-thermal pressure in Abell 383

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, Andrea; Limousin, Marceau

    2012-04-01

    While clusters of galaxies are regarded as one of the most important cosmological probes, the conventional spherical modelling of the intracluster medium and the dark matter (DM), and the assumption of strict hydrostatic equilibrium (i.e. the equilibrium gas pressure is provided entirely by thermal pressure) are very approximate at best. Extending our previous works, we developed further a method to reconstruct for the first time the full 3D structure (triaxial shape and principal-axis orientation) of both DM and intracluster (IC) gas, and the level of non-thermal pressure of the IC gas. We outline an application of our method to the galaxy cluster Abell 383, taken as part of the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble (CLASH) multicycle treasury programme, presenting results of a joint analysis of X-ray and strong lensing measurements. We find that the intermediate-major and minor-major axis ratios of the DM are 0.71 ± 0.10 and 0.55 ± 0.06, respectively, and the major axis of the DM halo is inclined with respect to the line of sight of 21?1 ± 10?1. The level of non-thermal pressure has been evaluated to be about 10 per cent of the total energy budget. We discuss the implications of our method for the viability of the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario, focusing on the concentration parameter C and the inner slope of the DM, γ, since the cuspiness of DM density profiles in the central regions is one of the critical tests of the CDM paradigm for structure formation: we measure γ= 1.02 ± 0.06 on scales down to 25 Kpc, and C= 4.76 ± 0.51, values which are close to the predictions of the standard model, and providing further evidences that support the CDM scenario. Our method allows us to recover the 3D physical properties of clusters in a bias-free way, overcoming the limitations of the standard spherical modelling and enhancing the use of clusters as more precise cosmological probes.

  4. Disentangling the ICL with the CHEFs: Abell 2744 as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Teja, Yolanda; Dupke, Renato a.

    2015-08-01

    The intracluster light (ICL) is important for understanding the metal enrichment of the intracluster gas and constraining cosmological parameters independently of the other methods. However, its measurement it is not trivial due to the necessity of disentangling the light of stars locked up in galaxies from the proper ICL. Currently, there is no standard method to efficiently measure the ICL (Rudick et al. 2011, ApJ, 732, 48), and different approaches relying on the binding energy of the cluster galaxies, the density of the material, or the surface brightness distribution, have been tried. Moreover, a suitable way to disentangle the limits of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and the ICL still has not been developed.The CHEFs (from Chebyshev-Fourier bases, Jiménez-Teja & Benítez 2012, ApJ, 745, 150) are a mathematical tool especially designed to model the two-dimensional light distribution of galaxies. We use the CHEFs and tools from differential geometry to infer the light contribution of the ICL to the total brightness, without imposing any artificial thresholds and avoiding the ambiguity introduced by free parameters that are usually set in these studies (Rudick et al. 2011).We use the extremely deep optical images from Abell 2744, the Pandora cluster, a multi-cluster merger, observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields project to show the efficiency of this new method. The CHEFs can accurately fit and remove all the galaxies close to the cluster center, including the BCG. The limits of the BCG are marked out by determining the points where the surface curvature changes, thus disentangling the ICL from the BCG light in a completely natural way. Once we have the residual image just containing ICL and background, we extrapolate the value of this latter from images of individual pointings close to the main Pandora field. We finally estimate the ICL to be ~24% of the total light, which is very consistent with the predictions from numerical simulations (Montes

  5. Diffuse light and building history of the galaxy cluster Abell 2667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covone, G.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Kneib, J.-P.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Slezak, E.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.We searched for diffuse intracluster light in the galaxy cluster Abell 2667 (z=0.233) from HST images in three broad band-filters. Methods: .We applied an iterative multi-scale wavelet analysis and reconstruction technique to these images, which allows to subtract stars and galaxies from the original images. Results: .We detect a zone of diffuse emission southwest of the cluster center (DS1) and a second faint object (ComDif) within DS1. Another diffuse source (DS2) may be detected at lower confidence level northeast of the center. These sources of diffuse light contribute to 10-15% of the total visible light in the cluster. Whether they are independent entities or part of the very elliptical external envelope of the central galaxy remains unclear. Deep VLT VIMOS integral field spectroscopy reveals a faint continuum at the positions of DS1 and ComDif but do not allow a redshift to be computed, so we conclude if these sources are part of the central galaxy or not. A hierarchical substructure detection method reveals the presence of several galaxy pairs and groups defining a similar direction to the one drawn by the DS1 - central galaxy - DS2 axis. The analysis of archive XMM-Newton and Chandra observations shows X-ray emission elongated in the same direction. The X-ray temperature map shows the presence of a cool core, a broad cool zone stretching from north to south, and hotter regions towards the northeast, southwest, and northwest. This might suggest shock fronts along these directions produced by infalling material, even if uncertainties remain quite large on the temperature determination far from the center. Conclusions: .These various data are consistent with a picture in which diffuse sources are concentrations of tidal debris and harassed matter expelled from infalling galaxies by tidal stripping and undergoing an accretion process onto the central cluster galaxy; as such, they are expected to be found along the main infall directions. Note, however

  6. Summability of trigonometric Fourier series at d-points and a generalization of the Abel-Poisson method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigub, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    We study the convergence of linear means of the Fourier series \\sumk=-∞+∞λk,\\varepsilon\\hat{f}_keikx of a function f\\in L1 \\lbrack -π,π \\rbrack to f(x) as \\varepsilon\\searrow0 at all points at which the derivative \\bigl(\\int_0^xf(t) dt\\bigr)' exists (i.e. at the d-points). Sufficient conditions for the convergence are stated in terms of the factors \\{λk,\\varepsilon\\} and, in the case of λk,\\varepsilon=\\varphi(\\varepsilon k), in terms of the condition that the functions \\varphi and x\\varphi'(x) belong to the Wiener algebra A( R). We also study a new problem concerning the convergence of means of the Abel-Poisson type, \\sumk=-∞^∞r\\psi(\\vert k\\vert)\\hat{f}_keikx, as r\

  7. A 2163: Merger events in the hottest Abell galaxy cluster. I. Dynamical analysis from optical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurogordato, S.; Cappi, A.; Ferrari, C.; Benoist, C.; Mars, G.; Soucail, G.; Arnaud, M.; Pratt, G. W.; Bourdin, H.; Sauvageot, J.-L.

    2008-04-01

    Context: A 2163 is among the richest and most distant Abell clusters, presenting outstanding properties in different wavelength domains. X-ray observations have revealed a distorted gas morphology and strong features have been detected in the temperature map, suggesting that merging processes are important in this cluster. However, the merging scenario is not yet well-defined. Aims: We have undertaken a complementary optical analysis, aiming to understand the dynamics of the system, to constrain the merging scenario and to test its effect on the properties of galaxies. Methods: We present a detailed optical analysis of A 2163 based on new multicolor wide-field imaging and medium-to-high resolution spectroscopy of several hundred galaxies. Results: The projected galaxy density distribution shows strong subclustering with two dominant structures: a main central component (A), and a northern component (B), visible both in optical and in X-ray, with two other substructures detected at high significance in the optical. At magnitudes fainter than R=19, the galaxy distribution shows a clear elongation approximately with the east-west axis extending over 4~h70-1 Mpc, while a nearly perpendicular bridge of galaxies along the north-south axis appears to connect (B) to (A). The (A) component shows a bimodal morphology, and the positions of its two density peaks depend on galaxy luminosity: at magnitudes fainter than R = 19, the axis joining the peaks shows a counterclockwise rotation (from NE/SW to E-W) centered on the position of the X-ray maximum. Our final spectroscopic catalog of 512 objects includes 476 new galaxy redshifts. We have identified 361 galaxies as cluster members; among them, 326 have high precision redshift measurements, which allow us to perform a detailed dynamical analysis of unprecedented accuracy. The cluster mean redshift and velocity dispersion are respectively z= 0.2005 ± 0.0003 and 1434 ± 60 km s-1. We spectroscopically confirm that the northern

  8. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. I. Multiwavelength photometry of Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Buitrago, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Lotz, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Frontier Fields survey is a pioneering observational program aimed at collecting photometric data, both from space (Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope) and from ground-based facilities (VLT Hawk-I), for six deep fields pointing at clusters of galaxies and six nearby deep parallel fields, in a wide range of passbands. The analysis of these data is a natural outcome of the Astrodeep project, an EU collaboration aimed at developing methods and tools for extragalactic photometry and creating valuable public photometric catalogues. Aims: We produce multiwavelength photometric catalogues (from B to 4.5 μm) for the first two of the Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416 (plus their parallel fields). Methods: To detect faint sources even in the central regions of the clusters, we develop a robust and repeatable procedure that uses the public codes Galapagos and Galfit to model and remove most of the light contribution from both the brightest cluster members, and the intra-cluster light. We perform the detection on the processed HST H160 image to obtain a pure H-selected sample, which is the primary catalogue that we publish. We also add a sample of sources which are undetected in the H160 image but appear on a stacked infrared image. Photometry on the other HST bands is obtained using SExtractor, again on processed images after the procedure for foreground light removal. Photometry on the Hawk-I and IRAC bands is obtained using our PSF-matching deconfusion code t-phot. A similar procedure, but without the need for the foreground light removal, is adopted for the Parallel fields. Results: The procedure of foreground light subtraction allows for the detection and the photometric measurements of ~2500 sources per field. We deliver and release complete photometric H-detected catalogues, with the addition of the complementary sample of infrared-detected sources. All objects have multiwavelength coverage including B to H HST bands, plus K

  9. MUSE integral-field spectroscopy towards the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063. I. Data products and redshift identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karman, W.; Caputi, K. I.; Grillo, C.; Balestra, I.; Rosati, P.; Vanzella, E.; Coe, D.; Christensen, L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Krühler, T.; Lombardi, M.; Mercurio, A.; Nonino, M.; van der Wel, A.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first observations of the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063 taken with the newly commissioned Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field spectrograph. Because of the relatively large field of view (1 arcmin2), MUSE is ideal to simultaneously target multiple galaxies in blank and cluster fields over the full optical spectrum. We analysed the four hours of data obtained in the science verification phase on this cluster and measured redshifts for 53 galaxies. We confirm the redshift of five cluster galaxies, and determine the redshift of 29 other cluster members. Behind the cluster, we find 17 galaxies at higher redshift, including three previously unknown Lyman-α emitters at z> 3, and five multiply-lensed galaxies. We report the detection of a new z = 4.113 multiply lensed galaxy, with images that are consistent with lensing model predictions derived for the Frontier Fields. We detect C iii], C iv, and He ii emission in a multiply lensed galaxy at z = 3.116, suggesting the likely presence of an active galactic nucleus. We also created narrow-band images from the MUSE datacube to automatically search for additional line emitters corresponding to high-redshift candidates, but we could not identify any significant detections other than those found by visual inspection. With the new redshifts, it will become possible to obtain an accurate mass reconstruction in the core of Abell S1063 through refined strong lensing modelling. Overall, our results illustrate the breadth of scientific topics that can be addressed with a single MUSE pointing. We conclude that MUSE is a very efficient instrument to observe galaxy clusters, enabling their mass modelling, and to perform a blind search for high-redshift galaxies.

  10. Optical spectroscopy and the UV luminosity function of galaxies in the Abell 1367, Coma and Virgo clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Boselli, A.; Carrasco, L.

    2003-04-01

    Optical spectroscopy of 93 galaxies, 60 projected in the direction of Abell 1367, 21 onto the Coma cluster and 12 on Virgo, is reported. The targets were selected because they were detected in previous Hα , UV or r' surveys. The present observations bring to 100% the redshift completeness of Hα selected galaxies in the Coma region and to 75% in Abell 1367. All observed galaxies except one show Hα emission and belong to the clusters. This confirms previous determinations of the Hα luminosity function of the two clusters that were based on the assumption that all Hα detected galaxies were cluster members. Using the newly obtained data we re-determine the UV luminosity function of Coma and we compute for the first time the UV luminosity function of A1367. Their faint end slopes remain uncertain (-2.00

  11. Class Trash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students calculate the amount and types of trash thrown out by their class at school to investigate how much trash is generated, where it goes, and speculate about alternatives. Students need to be familiar with the concepts of weight, volume, and numbers. (MCO)

  12. Practical considerations for Abel inverting of photographic data with application to the analysis of a 15-kW wall-stabilized arc-light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Temperature profiles were measured for agron atmospheric pressure by using absolute line and continuum intensity and were compared with stark width and shift measurements. A detailed analysis of the engineering aspects of setting up for Abel inverting deta photographically is presented. The merits of using photographic detection and of using continuum radiation for temperature profile analysis are discussed. The importance of empirically determining the optical depth is emphasized by discrepancies between measured (two-path) and calculated estimates.

  13. The CBM RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Chernogorov, A.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höohne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2016-05-01

    The CBM RICH detector will use CO2 as radiator gas, focussing glass mirrors with Al+MgF2 reflective and protective coating and Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs as photon detectors. The detector will serve for electron to pion separation up to momenta of 8 GeV/c and thus enable in CBM the measurement of electromagnetic radiation from the early and dense fireball in A+A collisions at SIS 100. In this article, the current status of the CBM RICH development will be presented including new measurements of the radiation hardness of the H12700 MAPMT and WLS coatings with p-terphenyl, the new concept for the readout electronics, and optimizations ongoing with respect to the mirror mount structure and overall geometry. Prior to the usage in CBM, part of the already ordered MAPMTs will be used to upgrade the HADES RICH detector for a new measurement campaign at SIS 18 from 2018-2020.

  14. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Rupe, J. H.; Kushida, R. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by injecting air and hydrocarbon fuel at one end of a cylindrically shaped chamber to form a mixture and igniting the mixture to provide hot combustion gases by partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon fuel. The combustion gases move away from the ignition region to another region where water is injected to be turned into steam by the hot combustion gases. The steam which is formed mixes with the hot gases to yield a uniform hot gas whereby a steam reforming reaction with the hydrocarbon fuel takes place to produce a hydrogen rich gas.

  15. XMM-Newton and Chandra Observations of the Remarkable Dynamics of the Intracluster Medium and Radio Sources in the Clusters Abell 2061 and 3667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, C.; Hogge, T.; Chatzikos, M.; Wik, D.; Giacintucci, S.; Clarke, T.; Wong, K.; Gitti, M.; Finoguenov, A.

    2014-07-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of remarkable dynamic structures in the X-ray gas and connected radio sources in three clusters are presented. Abell 2061 is a highly irregular, merging cluster in the Corona Borealis supercluster. X-ray observations show that there is a plume of very cool gas (˜1 keV) to the NE of the cluster, and a hot (7.6 keV) shock region just NE of the center. There is a very bright radio relic to the far SW of the cluster, and a central radio halo/relic with an extension to the NE. Comparison to SLAM simulations show that this is an offset merger of a ˜5 × 10^{13} M⊙ subcluster with a ˜2.5 × 10^{14} M⊙ cluster seen after first core passage. The plume is the cool-core gas from the subcluster, which has been ``slingshot'' to the NE of the cluster. The plume gas is now falling back into the cluster center, and shocks when it hits the central gas. The model predicts a strong shock to the SW at the location of the bright radio relic, and another shock at the NE radio extension. Time permitting, the observations of Abell 2626 and Abell 3667 will also be presented.

  16. X-ray cavities and temperature jumps in the environment of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkamble, S. S.; Vagshette, N. D.; Pawar, P. K.; Patil, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present results based on the systematic analysis of high resolution 95 ks Chandra observations of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390 at the redshift of z = 0.228 that hosts an energetic radio AGN. This analysis has enabled us to investigate five X-ray deficient cavities in the atmosphere of Abell 2390 within central 30''. Presence of these cavities have been confirmed through a variety of image processing techniques like, the surface brightness profiles, unsharp masked image, as well as 2D elliptical model subtracted residual map. Temperature profile as well as 2D temperature map revealed structures in the distribution of ICM, in the sense that ICM in the NW direction is cooler than that on the SE direction. Temperature jump in all directions is evident near 25'' (90.5 kpc) corresponding to the average Mach number 1.44± 0.05, while another jump from 7.47 keV to 9.10 keV at 68'' (246 kpc) in the north-west direction, corresponding to Mach number 1.22± 0.06 and these jumps are associated with the cold fronts. Tricolour map as well as hardness ratio map detects cool gas clumps in the central 30 kpc region of temperature 4.45_{-0.10}^{+0.16} keV. The entropy profile derived from the X-ray analysis is found to fall systematically inward in a power-law fashion and exhibits a floor near 12.20± 2.54 keV cm2 in the central region. This flattening of the entropy profile in the core region confirms the intermittent heating at the centre by AGN. The diffuse radio emission map at 1.4 GHz using VLA L-band data exhibits highly asymmetric morphology with an edge in the north-west direction coinciding with the X-ray edge seen in the unsharp mask image. The mechanical power injected by the AGN in the form of X-ray cavities is found to be 5.94× 10^{45} erg s^{-1} and is roughly an order of magnitude higher than the energy lost by the ICM in the form of X-ray emission, confirming that AGN feedback is capable enough to quench the cooling flow in this cluster.

  17. First LOFAR observations at very low frequencies of cluster-scale non-thermal emission: the case of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rafferty, D. A.; Pizzo, R.; Bonafede, A.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Ferrari, C.; Orrù, E.; Heald, G.; McKean, J. P.; Tasse, C.; de Gasperin, F.; Bîrzan, L.; van Zwieten, J. E.; van der Tol, S.; Shulevski, A.; Jackson, N.; Offringa, A. R.; Conway, J.; Intema, H. T.; Clarke, T. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Miley, G. K.; White, G. J.; Hoeft, M.; Cassano, R.; Macario, G.; Morganti, R.; Wise, M. W.; Horellou, C.; Valentijn, E. A.; Wucknitz, O.; Kuijken, K.; Enßlin, T. A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Boonstra, A.-J.; Brentjens, M.; van de Brink, R. H.; Broderick, J.; Brouw, W. N.; Butcher, H. R.; van Cappellen, W.; Ciardi, B.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Garrett, M. A.; Gerbers, M.; Gunst, A.; van Haarlem, M. P.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Millenaar, R.; Munk, H.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J. E.; Pandey, V. N.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Polatidis, A.; Reich, W.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schoenmakers, A.; Sluman, J.; Stappers, B. W.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Vermeulen, R.; de Vos, M.; van Haarlem, M. P.

    2012-07-01

    Abell 2256 is one of the best known examples of a galaxy cluster hosting large-scale diffuse radio emission that is unrelated to individual galaxies. It contains both a giant radio halo and a relic, as well as a number of head-tail sources and smaller diffuse steep-spectrum radio sources. The origin of radio halos and relics is still being debated, but over the last years it has become clear that the presence of these radio sources is closely related to galaxy cluster merger events. Here we present the results from the first LOFAR low band antenna (LBA) observations of Abell 2256 between 18 and 67 MHz. To our knowledge, the image presented in this paper at 63 MHz is the deepest ever obtained at frequencies below 100 MHz in general. Both the radio halo and the giant relic are detected in the image at 63 MHz, and the diffuse radio emission remains visible at frequencies as low as 20 MHz. The observations confirm the presence of a previously claimed ultra-steep spectrum source to the west of the cluster center with a spectral index of -2.3 ± 0.4 between 63 and 153 MHz. The steep spectrum suggests that this source is an old part of a head-tail radio source in the cluster. For the radio relic we find an integrated spectral index of -0.81 ± 0.03, after removing the flux contribution from the other sources. This is relatively flat which could indicate that the efficiency of particle acceleration at the shock substantially changed in the last ~0.1 Gyr due to an increase of the shock Mach number. In an alternative scenario, particles are re-accelerated by some mechanism in the downstream region of the shock, resulting in the relatively flat integrated radio spectrum. In the radio halo region we find indications of low-frequency spectral steepening which may suggest that relativistic particles are accelerated in a rather inhomogeneous turbulent region.

  18. Chiefs' Pocket Guide to Class Size: A Research Synthesis to Inform State Class Size Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Few questions in public education discourse benefit as much from research-based evidence as the question of class size--the pursuit of the ideal number of students that should be co-located for any particular period of instruction. But for policymakers, research on class size can be an embarrassment of riches, and much of the research appears to…

  19. Class distinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. Catherine

    Typical 101 courses discourage many students from pursuing higher level science and math courses. Introductory classes in science and math serve largely as a filter, screening out all but the most promising students, and leaving the majority of college graduates—including most prospective teachers—with little understanding of how science works, according to a study conducted for the National Science Foundation. Because few teachers, particularly at the elementary level, experience any collegiate science teaching that stresses skills of inquiry and investigation, they simply never learn to use those methods in their teaching, the report states.

  20. Near-infrared photometry and stellar populations of first-ranked galaxies in a complete sample of nearby Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinx X.; Puschell, Jeffery J.

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-four brightest cluster members (BCMs) in the complete sample of high Galactic latitude nearby Abell clusters of Hoessel, Gunn, and Thuan (HGT) are investigated. The stellar populations in BCMs using near-infrared and optical-near-infrared colors are studied. Brighter BCMs have redder (J-K) and (V-K) colors, suggesting a metallicity increase in brighter galaxies. The larger dispersion of their colors implies that BCMs possess more heterogeneous stellar populations than their lower luminosity counterparts, the normal elliptical galaxies. Special attention is paid to BCMs associated with cooling flows. BCMs with larger accretion rates have bluer (V-K) colors due to ultraviolet excesses and are brighter in the visual wavelength region, but not in the infrared. It is suggested that part of the X-ray emitting cooling gas is converted into high- and intermediate-mass stars emitting in the blue and visible, but not in the infrared. The properties of BCMs as standard candles in the near-infrared are examined and compared with those in the optical.

  1. Two New Oleanane-Type Saponins with Anti-Proliferative Activity from Camellia oleifera Abel. Seed Cake.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Fa; Peng, Yun-Ru; Bao, Guan-Hu; Hou, Ru-Yan; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Two new oleanane-type saponins, named oleiferasaponins C₄ (1) and C₅ (2), were isolated from Camellia oleifera Abel. seed cake residue. Their respective structures were identified as 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxymethylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galacto-pyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-galactopyranosy-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosid-uronic acid methyl ester (1) and 16α-hydroxy-22α-O-angeloyl-23α-aldehyde-28-dihydroxy-methylene-olean-12-ene-3β-O-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid methyl ester (2) through 1D- and 2D-NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and GC-MS spectroscopic methods. The two compounds exhibited potent cytotoxic activities against five human tumor cell lines (BEL-7402, BGC-823, MCF-7, HL-60 and KB).

  2. A multiwavelength view of cooling versus AGN heating in the X-ray luminous cool-core of Abell 3581

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canning, R. E. A.; Sun, M.; Sanders, J. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Fabian, A. C.; Giacintucci, S.; Lal, D. V.; Werner, N.; Allen, S. W.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Salomé, P.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2013-10-01

    We report the results of a multiwavelength study of the nearby galaxy group, Abell 3581 (z = 0.0218). This system hosts the most luminous cool core of any nearby group and exhibits active radio mode feedback from the supermassive black hole in its brightest group galaxy, IC 4374. The brightest galaxy has suffered multiple active galactic nucleus outbursts, blowing bubbles into the surrounding hot gas, which have resulted in the uplift of cool ionized gas into the surrounding hot intragroup medium. High velocities, indicative of an outflow, are observed close to the nucleus and coincident with the radio jet. Thin dusty filaments accompany the uplifted, ionized gas. No extended star formation is observed; however, a young cluster is detected just north of the nucleus. The direction of rise of the bubbles has changed between outbursts. This directional change is likely due to sloshing motions of the intragroup medium. These sloshing motions also appear to be actively stripping the X-ray cool core, as indicated by a spiralling cold front of high-metallicity, low-temperature, low entropy gas.

  3. Measuring the Hubble constant from Ryle Telescope and X-ray observations, with application to Abell 1413

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grainge, Keith; Jones, Michael E.; Pooley, Guy; Saunders, Richard; Edge, Alastair; Grainger, William F.; Kneissl, Rüdiger

    2002-06-01

    We describe our methods for measuring the Hubble constant from Ryle Telescope (RT) interferometric observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect from a galaxy cluster and observation of the cluster X-ray emission. We analyse the error budget in this method: as well as radio and X-ray random errors, we consider the effects of clumping and temperature differences in the cluster gas, of the kinetic SZ effect, of bremsstrahlung emission at radio wavelengths, of the gravitational lensing of background radio sources and of primary calibration error. Using RT, ASCA and ROSAT observations of the Abell 1413, we find that random errors dominate over systematic ones, and estimate H0=57- 16+23kms- 1Mpc- 1 for a an ΩM=1.0, ΩΛ=0.0 cosmology.

  4. An X-ray and optical study of the cluster of galaxies Abell 754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabricant, D.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gorenstein, P.; Huchra, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray and optical data for A754 are used to study the relative distribution of the luminous and dark matter in this dense, rich cluster of galaxies with X-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Coma Cluster. A quantitative statistical comparison is made of the galaxy positions with the total mass responsible for maintaining the X-ray emitting gas in hydrostatic equilibrium. A simple bimodal model which fits both the X-ray and optical data suggests that the galaxies are distributed consistently with the projected matter distribution within the region covered by the X-ray map (0.5-1 Mpc). The X-ray and optical estimates of the mass in the central region of the cluster are 2.9 x 10 to the 14th and 3.6 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the 14th solar masses, respectively.

  5. Galaxy clusters with multiple components. I - The dynamics of Abell 98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The nature and evolution of rich galaxy clusters containing multiple condensations is studied. Velocities for 13 members of A98 are presented and the determination of dynamical properties of the individual subclusters is substantially improved. The application of techniques for quantifying gravitational scale lengths are stressed without invocation of the symmetry arguments demanded by the usual parameter fitting procedures. The entire A98 cluster is modeled as a two-body system. The probability that A98 is bound is found to be 98 percent. From this model and the results of previous N-body simulations, it is shown that the most likely description of the system is that it reached maximum expansion about 3.5 billion years ago and is presently in a state of collapse. The subclusters will merge in another three billion years.

  6. A remarkable double-ring galaxy in the cluster Abell 2199

    SciTech Connect

    Pence, W.D.; Oegerle, W.; Borne, K.D. )

    1990-12-01

    B and R CCD images have been obtained of the morphologically peculiar galaxy A1627 + 39, which lies near the center of the rich cluster of galaxies A2199. The galaxy is determined to be a nearly face-on barred S0 galaxy containing two nonconcentric rings. The rings are quite unusual in that they are displaced in opposite directions from the galactic center. There is no color difference across the rings, indicating no recent burst of star formation. Two hypotheses for the origin of the rings have been investigated: (1) a resonance effect with the central bar, and (2) the result of an off-axis, deeply penetrating collision with another cluster member. Models of such a collision are presented, which can reproduce the observed rings. However, neither hypothesis can provide a completely satisfactory explanation of all the observations reported here. 32 refs.

  7. Data Rich, Information Poor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.G.; Rautman, C.A.

    1998-11-09

    Surviving in a data-rich environment means understanding the difference between data and information. This paper reviews an environmental case study that illustrates that understanding and shows its importance. In this study, a decision problem was stated in terms of au economic-objective fimction. The function contains a term that defines the stochastic relationship between the decision and the information obtained during field chamctetition for an environmental contaminant. Data is defied as samples drawn or experimental realizations of a mudom fimction. Information is defined as the quantitative change in the value of the objective fiction as a result of the sample.

  8. On the Origin of Temperature Substructure within Merging Clusters of Galaxies: Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack O.; Pinkney, Jason

    1995-11-01

    Recent ROSA T PSPC and ASCA observations of several rich clusters of galaxies have revealed complex temperature substructure within the X-ray emitting gas. One of the best and most detailed examples is A2256. Briel & Henry (1994) show four distinct temperature components within the central (<12') of A2256. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a plausible model, within reasonable parameter space, that explains the origin of the hottest (>8 keV) gas near the core of A2256. We find the temperature substructure in A2256 to be consistent with a model in which A2256 is currently in the early stages of a merger. We attempt to quantify this model by comparison with results from our parameter study of merging clusters of galaxies conducted with a numerical Hydro/N-body code. From this, we estimate that A2256 is actually two systems with a 2:1 mass ratio, whose cores are separated by ˜0.5 Mpc with a relative velocity of nearly 3000 km s-1. The proposed merger axis is projected into the plane of the sky by 45°-50° such that the less massive of the two clusters is approaching the observer. Within the frame work of this model, we find the hot gas (>8 keV) to be the result of shock heating during the merger event. We also use this model to explain the discrepancy between X-ray and galaxy-based mass estimates for A2256.

  9. Abell 3560, a galaxy cluster at the edge of a major merging event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardelli, S.; Venturi, T.; Zucca, E.; De Grandi, S.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.

    2002-12-01

    In this paper we study A3560, a rich cluster at the southern periphery of the A3558 complex, a chain of interacting clusters in the central part of the Shapley Concentration supercluster. From a ROSAT-PSPC map we find that the X-ray surface brightness distribution of A3560 is well described by two components, an elliptical King law and a more peaked and fainter structure, which has been modeled with a Gaussian. The main component, corresponding to the cluster, is elongated with the major axis pointing toward the A3558 complex. The second component, centered on the Dumb-bell galaxy which dominates the cluster, appears significantly offset (by ~ 0.15 h-1 Mpc) from the cluster X-ray centroid. From a Beppo-SAX observation we derive the radial temperature profile, finding that the temperature is constant (at kT ~ 3.7 keV) up to 8 arcmin, corresponding to 0.3 h-1 Mpc: for larger distances, the temperature significantly drops to kT ~ 1.7 keV. We analyze also temperature maps, dividing the cluster into 4 sectors and deriving the temperature profiles in each sector: we find that the temperature drop is more sudden in the sectors which point towards the A3558 complex. From VLA radio data, at 20 and 6 cm, we find a peculiar bright extended radio source (J1332-3308), composed of a core (centered on the northern component of the Dumb-bell galaxy), two lobes, a ``filament" and a diffuse component. The morphology of the source could be interpreted either by a strong interaction of the radio source with the intracluster medium or by the model of intermittency of the central engine.

  10. A CHANDRA X-RAY ANALYSIS OF ABELL 1664: COOLING, FEEDBACK, AND STAR FORMATION IN THE CENTRAL CLUSTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Kazemzadeh, F.; Cavagnolo, K. W.; Rafferty, D. A.; BIrzan, L.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Wise, M. W.; Gitti, M.

    2009-05-20

    The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the Abell 1664 cluster is unusually blue and is forming stars at a rate of {approx} 23 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The BCG is located within 5 kpc of the X-ray peak, where the cooling time of 3.5 x 10{sup 8} yr and entropy of 10.4 keV cm{sup 2} are consistent with other star-forming BCGs in cooling flow clusters. The center of A1664 has an elongated, 'barlike' X-ray structure whose mass is comparable to the mass of molecular hydrogen, {approx}10{sup 10} M {sub sun} in the BCG. We show that this gas is unlikely to have been stripped from interloping galaxies. The cooling rate in this region is roughly consistent with the star formation rate, suggesting that the hot gas is condensing onto the BCG. We use the scaling relations of BIrzan et al. to show that the active galactic nucleus (AGN) is underpowered compared to the central X-ray cooling luminosity by roughly a factor of three. We suggest that A1664 is experiencing rapid cooling and star formation during a low state of an AGN feedback cycle that regulates the rates of cooling and star formation. Modeling the emission as a single-temperature plasma, we find that the metallicity peaks 100 kpc from the X-ray center, resulting in a central metallicity dip. However, a multi-temperature cooling flow model improves the fit to the X-ray emission and is able to recover the expected, centrally peaked metallicity profile.

  11. Direct measurement of lensing amplification in Abell S1063 using a strongly lensed high redshift HII galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlevich, Roberto; Melnick, Jorge; Terlevich, Elena; Chávez, Ricardo; Telles, Eduardo; Bresolin, Fabio; Plionis, Manolis; Basilakos, Spyros; Fernández Arenas, David; González Morán, Ana Luisa; Díaz, Ángeles I.; Aretxaga, Itziar

    2016-08-01

    ID11 is an actively star-forming, extremely compact galaxy and Lyα emitter at z = 3.117 that is gravitationally magnified by a factor of ~17 by the cluster of galaxies Hubble Frontier Fields AS1063. The observed properties of this galaxy resemble those of low luminosity HII galaxies or giant HII regions such as 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Using the tight correlation correlation between the Balmer-line luminosities and the width of the emission lines (typically L(Hβ) - σ(Hβ)), which are valid for HII galaxies and giant HII regions to estimate their total luminosity, we are able to measure the lensing amplification of ID11. We obtain an amplification of 23 ± 11 that is similar within errors to the value of ~17 estimated or predicted by the best lensing models of the massive cluster Abell S1063. We also compiled, from the literature, luminosities and velocity dispersions for a set of lensed compact star-forming regions. There is more scatter in the L-σ correlation for these lensed systems, but on the whole the results tend to support the lensing model estimates of the magnification. Our result indicates that the amplification can be independently measured using the L - σ relation in lensed giant HII regions or HII galaxies. It also supports the suggestion, even if lensing is model dependent, that the L - σ relation is valid for low luminosity high-z objects. Ad hoc observations of lensed star-forming systems are required to determine the lensing amplification accurately.

  12. Does climate limit species richness by limiting individual species' ranges?

    PubMed

    Boucher-Lalonde, Véronique; Kerr, Jeremy T; Currie, David J

    2014-02-01

    Broad-scale geographical variation in species richness is strongly correlated with climate, yet the mechanisms underlying this correlation are still unclear. We test two broad classes of hypotheses to explain this pattern. Bottom-up hypotheses propose that the environment determines individual species' ranges. Ranges then sum up to yield species richness patterns. Top-down hypotheses propose that the environment limits the number of species that occur in a region, but not which ones. We test these two classes of hypotheses using a natural experiment: seasonal changes in environmental variables and seasonal range shifts of 625 migratory birds in the Americas. We show that richness seasonally tracks the environment. By contrast, individual species' geographical distributions do not. Rather, species occupy different sets of environmental conditions in two seasons. Our results are inconsistent with extant bottom-up hypotheses. Instead, a top-down mechanism appears to constrain the number of species that can occur in a given region.

  13. Does climate limit species richness by limiting individual species’ ranges?

    PubMed Central

    Boucher-Lalonde, Véronique; Kerr, Jeremy T.; Currie, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Broad-scale geographical variation in species richness is strongly correlated with climate, yet the mechanisms underlying this correlation are still unclear. We test two broad classes of hypotheses to explain this pattern. Bottom-up hypotheses propose that the environment determines individual species’ ranges. Ranges then sum up to yield species richness patterns. Top-down hypotheses propose that the environment limits the number of species that occur in a region, but not which ones. We test these two classes of hypotheses using a natural experiment: seasonal changes in environmental variables and seasonal range shifts of 625 migratory birds in the Americas. We show that richness seasonally tracks the environment. By contrast, individual species’ geographical distributions do not. Rather, species occupy different sets of environmental conditions in two seasons. Our results are inconsistent with extant bottom-up hypotheses. Instead, a top-down mechanism appears to constrain the number of species that can occur in a given region. PMID:24352946

  14. Application of a XMM-Newton EPIC Monte Carlo to Analysis And Interpretation of Data for Abell 1689, RXJ0658-55 And the Centaurus Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Karl E.; Peterson, J.R.; Madejski, G.M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-17

    We propose a new Monte Carlo method to study extended X-ray sources with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard XMM Newton. The Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI) technique, described in a companion paper, is applied here to the EPIC data for the clusters of galaxies Abell 1689, Centaurus and RXJ 0658-55 (the ''bullet cluster''). We aim to show the advantages of this method of simultaneous spectral-spatial modeling over traditional X-ray spectral analysis. In Abell 1689 we confirm our earlier findings about structure in temperature distribution and produce a high resolution temperature map. We also confirm our findings about velocity structure within the gas. In the bullet cluster, RXJ 0658-55, we produce the highest resolution temperature map ever to be published of this cluster allowing us to trace what looks like the motion of the bullet in the cluster. We even detect a south to north temperature gradient within the bullet itself. In the Centaurus cluster we detect, by dividing up the luminosity of the cluster in bands of gas temperatures, a striking feature to the north-east of the cluster core. We hypothesize that this feature is caused by a subcluster left over from a substantial merger that slightly displaced the core. We conclude that our method is very powerful in determining the spatial distributions of plasma temperatures and very useful for systematic studies in cluster structure.

  15. Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Brian J.; Seroyer, Shane T.; Filardo, Giuseppe; Bajaj, Sarvottam; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may affect soft tissue healing via growth factors released after platelet degranulation. Because of this potential benefit, clinicians have begun to inject PRP for the treatment of tendon, ligament, muscle, and cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was performed for studies relating to PRP, growth factors, and soft tissue injuries from 1990 to 2010. Relevant references from these studies were also retrieved. Results: Soft tissue injury is a major source of disability that may often be complicated by prolonged and incomplete recovery. Numerous growth factors may potentiate the healing and regeneration of tendons and ligaments. The potential benefits of biologically enhanced healing processes have led to a recent interest in the use of PRP in orthopaedic sports medicine. There has been widespread anecdotal use of PRP for muscle strains, tendinopathy, and ligament injuries and as a surgical adjuvant to rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and meniscal or labral repairs. Although the fascination with this emerging technology has led to a dramatic increase in its use, scientific data supporting this use are still in their infancy. Conclusions: The literature is replete with studies on the basic science of growth factors and their relation to the maintenance, proliferation, and regeneration of various tissues and tissue-derived cells. Despite the promising results of several animal studies, well-controlled human studies are lacking. PMID:23015939

  16. Social class, power, and selfishness: when and why upper and lower class individuals behave unethically.

    PubMed

    Dubois, David; Rucker, Derek D; Galinsky, Adam D

    2015-03-01

    Are the rich more unethical than the poor? To answer this question, the current research introduces a key conceptual distinction between selfish and unethical behavior. Based on this distinction, the current article offers 2 novel findings that illuminate the relationship between social class and unethical behavior. First, the effects of social class on unethical behavior are not invariant; rather, the effects of social class are moderated by whether unethical behavior benefits the self or others. Replicating past work, social class positively predicted unethical behavior; however, this relationship was only observed when that behavior was self-beneficial. When unethical behavior was performed to benefit others, social class negatively predicted unethical behavior; lower class individuals were more likely than upper class individuals to engage in unethical behavior. Overall, social class predicts people's tendency to behave selfishly, rather than predicting unethical behavior per se. Second, individuals' sense of power drove the effects of social class on unethical behavior. Evidence for this relationship was provided in three forms. First, income, but not education level, predicted unethical behavior. Second, feelings of power mediated the effect of social class on unethical behavior, but feelings of status did not. Third, two distinct manipulations of power produced the same moderation by self-versus-other beneficiary as was found with social class. The current theoretical framework and data both synthesize and help to explain a range of findings in the social class and power literatures.

  17. Type Ibn Supernovae: Not a Single Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Arcavi, Iair; Howell, Dale Andrew; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Type Ibn supernovae are a small yet diverse class of explosions whose spectra are characterized by low-velocity helium emission lines. The prevailing theory has been that these are the core-collapse explosions of very massive stars embedded in helium-rich circumstellar material. However, unlike the more common Type IIn supernovae, whose interaction with hydrogen-rich circumstellar material has been shown to generate a wide variety of light curve shapes, we find that light curves of Type Ibn supernovae are more homogeneous and faster evolving. Spectroscopically, we find that Type Ibn supernovae divide cleanly into two classes, only one of which resembles the archetypal Type Ibn SN 2006jc. We explore various photometric and spectroscopic parameter spaces in order to characterize these two classes. We consider the possibility that not all objects classified as Type Ibn have the same physical origin.

  18. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. II. Photometric redshifts and rest frame properties in Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Amorín, R.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; McLure, R. J.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Mortlock, A.; Parsa, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Balestra, I.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Rosati, P.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present the first public release of photometric redshifts, galaxy rest frame properties and associated magnification values in the cluster and parallel pointings of the first two Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416. The released catalogues aim to provide a reference for future investigations of extragalactic populations in these legacy fields: from lensed high-redshift galaxies to cluster members themselves. Methods: We exploit a multiwavelength catalogue, ranging from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to ground-based K and Spitzer IRAC, which is specifically designed to enable detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. The multiband information is used to derive photometric redshifts and physical properties of sources detected either in the H-band image alone, or from a stack of four WFC3 bands. To minimize systematics, median photometric redshifts are assembled from six different approaches to photo-z estimates. Their reliability is assessed through a comparison with available spectroscopic samples. State-of-the-art lensing models are used to derive magnification values on an object-by-object basis by taking into account sources positions and redshifts. Results: We show that photometric redshifts reach a remarkable ~3-5% accuracy. After accounting for magnification, the H-band number counts are found to be in agreement at bright magnitudes with number counts from the CANDELS fields, while extending the presently available samples to galaxies that, intrinsically, are as faint as H ~ 32-33, thanks to strong gravitational lensing. The Frontier Fields allow the galaxy stellar mass distribution to be probed, depending on magnification, at 0.5-1.5 dex lower masses with respect to extragalactic wide fields, including sources at Mstar ~ 107-108 M⊙ at z > 5. Similarly, they allow the detection of objects with intrinsic star formation rates (SFRs) >1 dex lower than in the CANDELS fields reaching 0.1-1 M⊙/yr at z ~ 6-10. The

  19. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND MORPHOLOGY OF A NEWLY IDENTIFIED COMPACT z = 4.04 LENSED SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY IN ABELL 2218

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Kirsten K.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Richard, Johan; Petitpas, Glen; Egami, Eiichi

    2010-01-20

    We present the identification of a bright submillimeter (submm) source, SMM J163555.5+661300, detected in the lensing cluster Abell 2218, for which we have accurately determined the position using observations from the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The identified optical counterpart has a spectroscopic redshift of z = 4.044 +- 0.001 if we attribute the single emission line detected at lambda = 6140 A to Lyalpha. This redshift identification is in good agreement with the optical/near-infrared photometric redshift as well as the submm flux ratio S{sub 450}/S{sub 850}approx 1.6, the radio-submm flux ratio S{sub 1.4}/S{sub 850} < 0.004, and the 24 mum to 850 mum flux ratio S{sub 24}/S{sub 850} < 0.005. Correcting for the gravitational lensing amplification of approx5.5, we find that the source has a far-infrared luminosity of 1.3 x 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}, which implies a star formation rate (SFR) of 230 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. This makes it the lowest-luminosity submillimeter galaxy (SMG) known at z>4 to date. Previous CO(4-3) emission line observations yielded a non-detection, for which we derived an upper limit of the CO line luminosity of L{sub CO}{sup '}= 0.3x10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup -2}, which is not inconsistent with the L{sup '}{sub CO}-L{sub FIR} relation for starburst galaxies. The best-fit model to the optical and near-infrared photometry give a stellar population with an age of 1.4 Gyr and a stellar mass of 1.6 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}. The optical morphology is compact and in the source plane the galaxy has an extent of approx6 x 3 kpc with individual star-forming knots of <500 pc in size. J163556 is not resolved in the SMA data, and we place a strict upper limit on the size of the starburst region of 8 kpc x 3 kpc, which implies a lower limit on the SFR surface density of 12 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup 2}. The redshift of J163556 extends the redshift distribution of faint, lensed SMGs, and we find no evidence that these have a different redshift

  20. Does Class Size Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Brewer, Dominic J.; Gamoran, Adam; Willms, J. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the significance of class size to student learning. Includes an overview of class size in various countries, the importance of teacher adaptability, and the Asian paradox of large classes allied to high test scores. (MM)

  1. What Makes a Rich Task?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Pete

    2009-01-01

    A common view seems to be emerging in the mathematics education world at the moment that the development and use of "rich tasks" is a good thing; a "right thing" to do. There are many examples of these "rich tasks" and teachers are encouraged to use them whenever they can. Professional learners don't just accept this uncritically, but question…

  2. SMALL CYSTEINE-RICH PEPTIDES RESEMBLING ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES HAVE BEEN UNDER-PREDICTED IN PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multicellular organisms produce small cysteine-rich anti-microbial peptides as an innate defense against pathogens. While defensins, a well-known class of such peptides, are common among eukaryotes, there are classes restricted to the plant kingdom. These include thionins, lipid transfer proteins,...

  3. Wavelet transform analysis of the small-scale X-ray structure of the cluster Abell 1367

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebeney, S. A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a new technique based on a wavelet transform analysis to quantify the small-scale (less than a few arcminutes) X-ray structure of clusters of galaxies. We apply this technique to the ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) and Einstein high-resolution imager (HRI) images of the central region of the cluster Abell 1367 to detect sources embedded within the diffuse intracluster medium. In addition to detecting sources and determining their fluxes and positions, we show that the wavelet analysis allows a characterization of the sources extents. In particular, the wavelet scale at which a given source achieves a maximum signal-to-noise ratio in the wavelet images provides an estimate of the angular extent of the source. To account for the widely varying point response of the ROSAT PSPC as a function of off-axis angle requires a quantitative measurement of the source size and a comparison to a calibration derived from the analysis of a Deep Survey image. Therefore, we assume that each source could be described as an isotropic two-dimensional Gaussian and used the wavelet amplitudes, at different scales, to determine the equivalent Gaussian Full Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) (and its uncertainty) appropriate for each source. In our analysis of the ROSAT PSPC image, we detect 31 X-ray sources above the diffuse cluster emission (within a radius of 24 min), 16 of which are apparently associated with cluster galaxies and two with serendipitous, background quasars. We find that the angular extents of 11 sources exceed the nominal width of the PSPC point-spread function. Four of these extended sources were previously detected by Bechtold et al. (1983) as 1 sec scale features using the Einstein HRI. The same wavelet analysis technique was applied to the Einstein HRI image. We detect 28 sources in the HRI image, of which nine are extended. Eight of the extended sources correspond to sources previously detected by Bechtold et al. Overall, using both the

  4. Perceptual presence without counterfactual richness.

    PubMed

    Madary, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, I suggest that non-visual perceptual modalities provide counterexamples to Seth's claim that perceptual presence depends on counterfactual richness. Then I suggest a modification to Seth's view that is not vulnerable to these counterexamples. PMID:24739124

  5. Frontier Field Abell 370

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Tom; Capak, Peter

    2014-08-01

    After considering valuable advice from the astronomical community and broad range of open questions in galaxy evolution an advisory committee unanimously recommended HST undertake a program of six deep fields centered on strong lensing galaxy clusters in p arallel with six deep blank fields". The key science goals of these twelve new frontier fields are: 1) to reveal hitherto inaccessible populations of z = 5 - 10 galaxies thatare 10 - 50 times fainter intrinsically than any presently known. 2) to solidify our understanding of the stellar masses and star formation histories of sub-L* galaxies at the earliest times 3) to provide the first statistically meaningful morphological characterization of star forming galaxies at z > 5 4) to find z > 8 galaxies stretched out enough by cluster lensing to discern internal structure and/or magnified enough by cluster lensing for spectroscopic follow-up. Spitzer data are essential to meeting these goals because it enables mass and physical parameter estimates for the high redshift sources and differentiates between low and high redshift galaxies. As a result Spitzer has committed to observing these fields as a major DDT program. The first 4 galaxies clusters and the first 4 deep "blank fields" will be observed by Spitzer over cycles 9 and 10.

  6. Gemini Frontier Fields: Wide-field Adaptive Optics Ks-band Imaging of the Galaxy Clusters MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; Pessev, P.; Garrel, V.; Winge, C.; Neichel, B.; Vidal, F.

    2015-04-01

    We have observed two of the six Frontier Fields galaxy clusters, MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744, using the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) and the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI). With 0.″ 08-0.″ 10 FWHM our data are nearly diffraction-limited over a 100\\prime\\prime × 100\\prime\\prime wide area. GeMS/GSAOI complements the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) redwards of 1.6 μm with twice the angular resolution. We reach a 5σ depth of {{K}s}˜ 25.6 mag (AB) for compact sources. In this paper, we describe the observations, data processing, and initial public data release. We provide fully calibrated, co-added images matching the native GSAOI pixel scale as well as the larger plate scales of the HST release, adding to the legacy value of the Frontier Fields. Our work demonstrates that even for fields at high galactic latitude where natural guide stars are rare, current multi-conjugated adaptive optics technology at 8 m telescopes has opened a new window on the distant universe. Observations of a third Frontier Field, Abell 370, are planned. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal Observatories, Chile.

  7. VOSGES, a long and rich geologic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominique, Carteaux; Cyrille, Delangle; Sophie, Demangel

    2015-04-01

    The study of geology in scientific classes is often too theoretical and abstract for the pupils. How can teachers make the link between some samples of rocks observed in a practical class and the geologic story of the region? There's nothing better than outdoor education to establish a relationship between the rock observed in macroscopic and microscopic scale in the classroom,with the outcrop scale and the landscape scale in the field: all of them are the result of a fascinating geologic history.Our pupils are lucky enough to live at the heart of a modest mountain massif that has a very rich geologic story: the massif from Vosges situated in the east of France. During two expeditions we show the students all the following tectonic processes: Accretion at the scale of the landscape with the Rhenish Ditch (tectonic and volcanic markers) Obductionis observed due to ophiolites found in the massive of Thalhorn (peridotite, gabbro and sedimentary marine rocks of great depth). Collisionis illuminated with numerous sites like the schists of Steige, the phyllite of Villé, the gneisses of Climont. Subductionis captured bystudying the outcrops of magmatic rocks within the continental crust (andesite, diorite, granodiorite). At each of the stops we have the students, from a hand sample, to findits story in a more global context. So the theory becomes reality. A study of thin slides of rocks observed on the ground finishes these exits and so various scales of understanding are approached. The long and rich geologic history of Vosges maybe reconstituted on hundreds of million years, allowing certainly giving another aspect to the living environment of our pupils.

  8. An Improved Cluster Richness Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy; Hao, Jiangang; Evrard, August; Wechsler, Risa H.; Hansen, Sarah; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Becker, Matthew R.; Annis, James T.; Bleem, Lindsey; Scranton, Ryan; /Pittsburgh U.

    2009-08-03

    Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L{sub X}-richness relation, from {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.86 {+-} 0.02){sup 2} to {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.69 {+-} 0.02){sup 2}. Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to our more sophisticated treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L{sub X}-richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can be easily generalized to other mass tracers.

  9. Partitioning sources of variation in vertebrate species richness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, R.B.; Krohn, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To explore biogeographic patterns of terrestrial vertebrates in Maine, USA using techniques that would describe local and spatial correlations with the environment. Location: Maine, USA. Methods: We delineated the ranges within Maine (86,156 km2) of 275 species using literature and expert review. Ranges were combined into species richness maps, and compared to geomorphology, climate, and woody plant distributions. Methods were adapted that compared richness of all vertebrate classes to each environmental correlate, rather than assessing a single explanatory theory. We partitioned variation in species richness into components using tree and multiple linear regression. Methods were used that allowed for useful comparisons between tree and linear regression results. For both methods we partitioned variation into broad-scale (spatially autocorrelated) and fine-scale (spatially uncorrelated) explained and unexplained components. By partitioning variance, and using both tree and linear regression in analyses, we explored the degree of variation in species richness for each vertebrate group that Could be explained by the relative contribution of each environmental variable. Results: In tree regression, climate variation explained richness better (92% of mean deviance explained for all species) than woody plant variation (87%) and geomorphology (86%). Reptiles were highly correlated with environmental variation (93%), followed by mammals, amphibians, and birds (each with 84-82% deviance explained). In multiple linear regression, climate was most closely associated with total vertebrate richness (78%), followed by woody plants (67%) and geomorphology (56%). Again, reptiles were closely correlated with the environment (95%), followed by mammals (73%), amphibians (63%) and birds (57%). Main conclusions: Comparing variation explained using tree and multiple linear regression quantified the importance of nonlinear relationships and local interactions between species

  10. Cosmo Girls: Configurations of Class and Femininity in Elite Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Alexandra; Charles, Claire

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we offer a unique contribution to understandings of schooling as a site for the production of social class difference. We bring together the rich body of work that has been conducted on middle-class educational identities, with explorations of the centrality of the feminine in representations of class difference from the field of…

  11. Forests, Trees, and Micronutrient-Rich Food Consumption in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ickowitz, Amy; Rowland, Dominic; Powell, Bronwen; Salim, Mohammad Agus; Sunderland, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiency remains a serious problem in Indonesia with approximately 100 million people, or 40% of the population, suffering from one or more micronutrient deficiencies. In rural areas with poor market access, forests and trees may provide an essential source of nutritious food. This is especially important to understand at a time when forests and other tree-based systems in Indonesia are being lost at unprecedented rates. We use food consumption data from the 2003 Indonesia Demographic Health Survey for children between the ages of one and five years and data on vegetation cover from the Indonesian Ministry of Forestry to examine whether there is a relationship between different tree-dominated land classes and consumption of micronutrient-rich foods across the archipelago. We run our models on the aggregate sample which includes over 3000 observations from 25 provinces across Indonesia as well as on sub-samples from different provinces chosen to represent the different land classes. The results show that different tree-dominated land classes were associated with the dietary quality of people living within them in the provinces where they were dominant. Areas of swidden/agroforestry, natural forest, timber and agricultural tree crop plantations were all associated with more frequent consumption of food groups rich in micronutrients in the areas where these were important land classes. The swidden/agroforestry land class was the landscape associated with more frequent consumption of the largest number of micronutrient rich food groups. Further research needs to be done to establish what the mechanisms are that underlie these associations. Swidden cultivation in is often viewed as a backward practice that is an impediment to food security in Indonesia and destructive of the environment. If further research corroborates that swidden farming actually results in better nutrition than the practices that replace it, Indonesian policy makers may need to

  12. Forests, Trees, and Micronutrient-Rich Food Consumption in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ickowitz, Amy; Rowland, Dominic; Powell, Bronwen; Salim, Mohammad Agus; Sunderland, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiency remains a serious problem in Indonesia with approximately 100 million people, or 40% of the population, suffering from one or more micronutrient deficiencies. In rural areas with poor market access, forests and trees may provide an essential source of nutritious food. This is especially important to understand at a time when forests and other tree-based systems in Indonesia are being lost at unprecedented rates. We use food consumption data from the 2003 Indonesia Demographic Health Survey for children between the ages of one and five years and data on vegetation cover from the Indonesian Ministry of Forestry to examine whether there is a relationship between different tree-dominated land classes and consumption of micronutrient-rich foods across the archipelago. We run our models on the aggregate sample which includes over 3000 observations from 25 provinces across Indonesia as well as on sub-samples from different provinces chosen to represent the different land classes. The results show that different tree-dominated land classes were associated with the dietary quality of people living within them in the provinces where they were dominant. Areas of swidden/agroforestry, natural forest, timber and agricultural tree crop plantations were all associated with more frequent consumption of food groups rich in micronutrients in the areas where these were important land classes. The swidden/agroforestry land class was the landscape associated with more frequent consumption of the largest number of micronutrient rich food groups. Further research needs to be done to establish what the mechanisms are that underlie these associations. Swidden cultivation in is often viewed as a backward practice that is an impediment to food security in Indonesia and destructive of the environment. If further research corroborates that swidden farming actually results in better nutrition than the practices that replace it, Indonesian policy makers may need to

  13. Forests, Trees, and Micronutrient-Rich Food Consumption in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Ickowitz, Amy; Rowland, Dominic; Powell, Bronwen; Salim, Mohammad Agus; Sunderland, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiency remains a serious problem in Indonesia with approximately 100 million people, or 40% of the population, suffering from one or more micronutrient deficiencies. In rural areas with poor market access, forests and trees may provide an essential source of nutritious food. This is especially important to understand at a time when forests and other tree-based systems in Indonesia are being lost at unprecedented rates. We use food consumption data from the 2003 Indonesia Demographic Health Survey for children between the ages of one and five years and data on vegetation cover from the Indonesian Ministry of Forestry to examine whether there is a relationship between different tree-dominated land classes and consumption of micronutrient-rich foods across the archipelago. We run our models on the aggregate sample which includes over 3000 observations from 25 provinces across Indonesia as well as on sub-samples from different provinces chosen to represent the different land classes. The results show that different tree-dominated land classes were associated with the dietary quality of people living within them in the provinces where they were dominant. Areas of swidden/agroforestry, natural forest, timber and agricultural tree crop plantations were all associated with more frequent consumption of food groups rich in micronutrients in the areas where these were important land classes. The swidden/agroforestry land class was the landscape associated with more frequent consumption of the largest number of micronutrient rich food groups. Further research needs to be done to establish what the mechanisms are that underlie these associations. Swidden cultivation in is often viewed as a backward practice that is an impediment to food security in Indonesia and destructive of the environment. If further research corroborates that swidden farming actually results in better nutrition than the practices that replace it, Indonesian policy makers may need to

  14. Pilot Class Testing: Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle. Washington Foreign Language Program.

    Statistics derived from test score data from the pilot classes participating in the Washington Foreign Language Program are presented in tables in this report. An index accompanies the tables, itemizing the classes by level (FLES, middle, and high school), grade test, language skill, and school. MLA-Coop test performances for each class were…

  15. First-Class Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesser, Kathi; Buck, Gayle; Dopp, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    In the activity described in this article, students will explore how variables in a first-class lever, specifically arm length, position of the fulcrum, and placement of the load, affect the effort needed to lift the load. To begin the lesson, demonstrate to the class how a first-class lever works and review what is meant by the terms fulcrum,…

  16. Girls' Class, Infinite Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ost, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    The co-director of a small independent school describes Girls' Class, which she created in order to have a special time together with the girls in grades 6 through 8. The class provides guidance and celebrates spirituality and the beginning of menses for the young women. To end the class, each person says a positive self-affirmation and gives…

  17. Hydrogen-rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for producing hydrogen-rich product gases. A spray of liquid hydrocarbon is mixed with a stream of air in a startup procedure and the mixture is ignited for partial oxidation. The stream of air is then heated by the resulting combustion to reach a temperature such that a signal is produced. The signal triggers a two way valve which directs liquid hydrocarbon from a spraying mechanism to a vaporizing mechanism with which a vaporized hydrocarbon is formed. The vaporized hydrocarbon is subsequently mixed with the heated air in the combustion chamber where partial oxidation takes place and hydrogen-rich product gases are produced.

  18. The NA62 RICH detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cassese, A.

    2011-07-01

    The NA62 experiment is designed to measure the very rare kaon decay K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} at the CERN SPS with a 10% accuracy. The Standard Model prediction for the Branching Ratio is (8.5 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -11}. One of the challenging aspect of the experiment is the suppression of the K{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +} v{sub {mu}} background at the 10{sup -12} level. To satisfy this requirement a Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector (RICH), able to separate {pi}{sup {+-}} from {mu}{sup {+-}} in the momentum range between 15 and 35 GeV/c, with a {mu}, rejection factor better than 10{sup -2}, is needed. The RICH must also have a time resolution of about 100 ps to disentangle accidental time associations of beam particles with pions. The RICH will have a very long focal length (17 m) and will be filled with Ne gas at atmospheric pressure. Two test beams were held at CERN in 2007 and 2009 with a RICH prototype. The results of the two test beams will be presented: the {mu}, mis-identification probability is found to be about 0.7% and the time resolution better than 100 ps in the whole momentum range. (authors)

  19. Rich-Cores in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Athen; Mondragón, Raúl J.

    2015-01-01

    A core comprises of a group of central and densely connected nodes which governs the overall behaviour of a network. It is recognised as one of the key meso-scale structures in complex networks. Profiling this meso-scale structure currently relies on a limited number of methods which are often complex and parameter dependent or require a null model. As a result, scalability issues are likely to arise when dealing with very large networks together with the need for subjective adjustment of parameters. The notion of a rich-club describes nodes which are essentially the hub of a network, as they play a dominating role in structural and functional properties. The definition of a rich-club naturally emphasises high degree nodes and divides a network into two subgroups. Here, we develop a method to characterise a rich-core in networks by theoretically coupling the underlying principle of a rich-club with the escape time of a random walker. The method is fast, scalable to large networks and completely parameter free. In particular, we show that the evolution of the core in World Trade and C. elegans networks correspond to responses to historical events and key stages in their physical development, respectively. PMID:25799585

  20. Rich-cores in networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Athen; Mondragón, Raúl J

    2015-01-01

    A core comprises of a group of central and densely connected nodes which governs the overall behaviour of a network. It is recognised as one of the key meso-scale structures in complex networks. Profiling this meso-scale structure currently relies on a limited number of methods which are often complex and parameter dependent or require a null model. As a result, scalability issues are likely to arise when dealing with very large networks together with the need for subjective adjustment of parameters. The notion of a rich-club describes nodes which are essentially the hub of a network, as they play a dominating role in structural and functional properties. The definition of a rich-club naturally emphasises high degree nodes and divides a network into two subgroups. Here, we develop a method to characterise a rich-core in networks by theoretically coupling the underlying principle of a rich-club with the escape time of a random walker. The method is fast, scalable to large networks and completely parameter free. In particular, we show that the evolution of the core in World Trade and C. elegans networks correspond to responses to historical events and key stages in their physical development, respectively.

  1. Be Bold ... Be Enrollment Rich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, marketing specialist Mark Perna offers advice on how career and technical schools can market themselves and their programs. To become "enrollment rich," he suggests the following: (1) develop a brand plan--something that separates your organization from competitors in the mind of the community; (2) deliver the message--the community…

  2. Technology-Rich Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thach, Kim J.; Norman, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses one of the authors' classroom experiences to explore how teachers can create technology-rich learning environments that support upper elementary students' mathematical understanding of algebra and number and operations. They describe a unit that presents a common financial problem (the use of credit cards) to engage sixth graders…

  3. Astrometry With the Hubble Space Telescope: Trigonometric Parallaxes of Planetary Nebula Nuclei NGC 6853, NGC 7293, ABELL 31, and DeHt 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, G. F.; McArthur, Barbara E.; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Harrison, Thomas E.; Harris, Hugh C.; Nelan, Edmund; Bond, Howard E; Patterson, Richard J.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2009-01-01

    We present absolute parallaxes and relative proper motions for the central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 6853 (The Dumbbell), NGC 7293 (The Helix), Abell 31, and DeHt 5. This paper details our reduction and analysis using DeHt 5 as an example. We obtain these planetary nebula nuclei (PNNi) parallaxes with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors FGS 1r and FGS 3, white-light interferometers on the Hubble Space Telescope. Proper motions, spectral classifications and VJHKT2M and DDO51 photometry of the stars comprising the astrometric reference frames provide spectrophotometric estimates of reference star absolute parallaxes. Introducing these into our model as observations with error, we determine absolute parallaxes for each PNN. Weighted averaging with previous independent parallax measurements yields an average parallax precision, sigma (sub pi)/ pi = 5%. Derived distances are: d(sub NGC6853) = 405(exp +28 sub -25) pc, d(sub NGC7293) = 216(exp +14 sub -12) pc, d(sub Abell31) = 621(exp +91 sub -70) pc, and d(sub DeHt5) = 345(exp +19 sub -17) pc. These PNNi distances are all smaller than previously derived from spectroscopic analyses of the central stars. To obtain absolute magnitudes from these distances requires estimates of interstellar extinction. We average extinction measurements culled from the literature, from reddening based on PNNi intrinsic colors derived from model SEDs, and an assumption that each PNN experiences the same rate of extinction as a function of distance as do the reference stars nearest (in angular separation) to each central star. We also apply Lutz-Kelker bias corrections. The absolute magnitudes and effective temperatures permit estimates of PNNi radii through both the Stefan-Boltzmann relation and Eddington fluxes. Comparing absolute magnitudes with post-AGB models provides mass estimates. Masses cluster around 0.57 solar Mass, close to the peak of the white dwarf mass distribution. Adding a few more PNNi with well

  4. Astrometry with the Hubble Space Telescope: Trigonometric Parallaxes of Planetary Nebula Nuclei NGC 6853, NGC 7293, Abell 31, and DeHt 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Harrison, Thomas E.; Harris, Hugh C.; Nelan, Edmund; Bond, Howard E.; Patterson, Richard J.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2009-12-01

    We present absolute parallaxes and relative proper motions for the central stars of the planetary nebulae NGC 6853 (The Dumbbell), NGC 7293 (The Helix), Abell 31, and DeHt 5. This paper details our reduction and analysis using DeHt 5 as an example. We obtain these planetary nebula nuclei (PNNi) parallaxes with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensors FGS 1r and FGS 3, white-light interferometers on the Hubble Space Telescope. Proper motions, spectral classifications and VJHKT2M and DDO51 photometry of the stars comprising the astrometric reference frames provide spectrophotometric estimates of reference star absolute parallaxes. Introducing these into our model as observations with error, we determine absolute parallaxes for each PNN. Weighted averaging with previous independent parallax measurements yields an average parallax precision, σπ/π = 5%. Derived distances are: d NGC 6853 = 405+28 -25 pc, d NGC 7293 = 216+14 -12 pc, d Abell 31 = 621+91 -70 pc, and d DeHt 5 = 345+19 -17 pc. These PNNi distances are all smaller than previously derived from spectroscopic analyses of the central stars. To obtain absolute magnitudes from these distances requires estimates of interstellar extinction. We average extinction measurements culled from the literature, from reddening based on PNNi intrinsic colors derived from model SEDs, and an assumption that each PNN experiences the same rate of extinction as a function of distance as do the reference stars nearest (in angular separation) to each central star. We also apply Lutz-Kelker bias corrections. The absolute magnitudes and effective temperatures permit estimates of PNNi radii through both the Stefan-Boltzmann relation and Eddington fluxes. Comparing absolute magnitudes with post-AGB models provides mass estimates. Masses cluster around 0.57 M_{⊙}, close to the peak of the white dwarf mass distribution. Adding a few more PNNi with well-determined distances and masses, we compare all the PNNi with cooler white dwarfs

  5. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived from Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From an analysis of X-ray spectroscopy and imaging data, we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster. The X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect observations are combined to determine the angular diameter distance to the cluster of D(sub A) = 1294(sup +294 +438, sub -283 -458) Mpc (Statistical followed by systematic uncertainty), implying a Hubble constant of H(sub 0) = 52.2(sup +11.4 +18.5, sub -11.9 -17.7) km/s.Mpc for Omega(sub M) = 0.3 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0.7. We find a best-fit H(sub 0) of 46 km/s.Mpc for the Omega(sub M) = 1 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0 cosmology, and 48 km/s.Mpc for Omega(sub M) = 0.3 and Omega(sub lambda) = 0.0. The X-ray data are also used to derive a total cluster mass of M(sup HSE, sub tot)(r(sub 500)) = 5.18(sup +0.62, sub -0.48) x 10(exp 14)/h solar mass; the optical velocity dispersion yields an independent and consistent estimate of M(sup virial, sub tot)(r(sub 500)) = 6.35(sup +1.51, sub -1.19) X 10(exp 14) /h solar mass. Both of the total mass estimates are evaluated at a fiducial radius, r(sub 500) = 830 /h kpc, where the overdensity is 500 times the critical density. The total cluster mass is then combined with gas mass measurements to determine a cluster gas mass fraction of F(sub g) = 0.056(sup +0.010, sub -0.013) /h(sup 3/2) in combination with recent baryon density constraints, the measured gas mass fraction yields an upper limit on the mass density parameter of Omega(sub M) h(sup 1/2) <= 0.34(sup +/0.06, sub 0.05.

  6. The Development of the Conception of Economic Inequality. I. Descriptions and Comparisons of Rich and Poor People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Robert L.

    1981-01-01

    Children and adolescents from four social classes were asked to describe rich and poor people and to indicate how the rich and the poor are different from and similar to each other. Responses were classified into three categories of person description: peripheral (possessions, appearances, and behavior), central (traits and thoughts), and…

  7. Class network routing

    DOEpatents

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  8. Orthobiologics and platelet rich plasma

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Mandeep S; Behera, Prateek; Patel, Sandeep; Shetty, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Orthobiologics have evolved to the extent that they significantly influence modern orthopedic surgical practice. A better understanding of the role of various growth factors and cells in the process of tendon healing, ligament repair, cartilage regeneration and bone formation has stimulated focused research in many chronic musculoskeletal ailments. Investigators have published results of laboratory as well as clinical studies, using orthobiologics like platelet rich plasma, stem cells, autologous conditioned serum etc., with variable results. However, a clear consensus over the best orthobiologic substance and the method of preparation and usage of these substances is lacking. Much of the confusion is due to the fact that studies ranging from RCTs to case reports present variable results, and the interpretations are wide-ranging. We have reviewed the available orthobiologics related data with a focus on platelet rich plasma in orthopedic conditions. PMID:24600055

  9. Fuel-Rich Catalytic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Olson, Sandra L.

    1987-01-01

    Two-stage combustion system reduces particulate emissions. Program on catalytic oxidation of iso-octane demonstrates feasibility of two-stage combustion system for reducing particulate emissions. With fuel-rich (fuel/air equivalence ratios of 4.8 to 7.8) catalytic-combustion preburner as first stage, combustion process free of soot at reactor-outlet temperatures of 1,200 K or less.

  10. Class and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Mechthild

    2005-01-01

    Everyone is dependent on caring labor. Because women's labor is financially beneficial to global capitalism, gender is inseparable from class, regardless of the specific national or cultural contexts.

  11. Online, Bigger Classes May Be Better Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Marc

    2010-01-01

    In his work as a professor, Stephen Downes used to feel that he was helping those who least needed it. His students at places like the University of Alberta already had a leg up in life and could afford the tuition. When a colleague suggested they co-teach an online class in learning theory at the University of Manitoba, in 2008, Downes welcomed…

  12. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the limits to open class performance. The contents include: 1) Standard Class; 2) 15m/Racing Class; 3) Open Class; and 4) Design Solutions associated with assumptions, limiting parameters, airfoil performance, current trends, and analysis.

  13. The Technology-Rich Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiene, Drew; Luft, Pamela

    2002-01-01

    Observes the use of educational technology in four middle-school classes at the Ameritech Electronic University School Classroom located on the campus of Kent State University. Draws implications for the effective use of educational technology (both hardware and software) in the classroom. (PKP)

  14. Sulfate-rich Archean Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brainard, J. L.; Choney, A. P.; Ohmoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    There is a widely held belief that prior to 2.4 Ga, the Archean oceans and atmosphere were reducing, and therefore sulfate poor (concentrations <0.1 mmol). However, there is mounting evidence from diverse rock types of Archean ages that sulfate concentrations were likely similar to those in the modern ocean (~28 mmol). In this study we demonstrate that in different lithologies, representing a wide range of marine environments, there is ubiquitous evidence for abundant seawater sulfate. One of the more apparent lines of evidence for sulfate rich Archean waters are bedded barite (BaSO4) deposits, such as those in the ~3.4 Ga Fig Tree Group, South Africa and ~3.5 Ga Dresser Formation, Western Australia (WA). These deposits are thick (>100 m), widely distributed (> km2), and contain only minor amounts of sulfides. These barite beds may have developed from reactions between Ba-rich hydrothermal fluids and evaporate bodies. Simple mass balance calculations suggest that the sulfate contents of the pre-evaporitic seawater must have been greater than ~1 mM. Some researchers have suggested that the SO4 for these beds was derived from the hydrolysis of SO2-rich magmatic fluids. However, this was unlikely as the reaction, 4SO2 + 4H2O → 3H2SO4 + H2S would have produced large amounts of sulfide, as well as sulfate minerals. Many Archean-aged volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, much like those of the younger ages, record evidence for abundant seawater sulfate. As VMS deposits are most likely formed by submarine hydrothermal fluids that developed from seawater circulating through the seafloor rock, much of the seawater sulfate is reduced to from sulfides at depths. However, some residual sulfate in the hydrothermal fluids, with or without the addition of sulfate from the local seawater, can form sulfate minerals such as barite at near the seafloor. The d34S relationships between barites and pyrites in the Archean VMS deposits are similar to those of the younger VMS

  15. A Metadata-Rich File System

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, S; Gokhale, M B; Maltzahn, C

    2009-01-07

    Despite continual improvements in the performance and reliability of large scale file systems, the management of file system metadata has changed little in the past decade. The mismatch between the size and complexity of large scale data stores and their ability to organize and query their metadata has led to a de facto standard in which raw data is stored in traditional file systems, while related, application-specific metadata is stored in relational databases. This separation of data and metadata requires considerable effort to maintain consistency and can result in complex, slow, and inflexible system operation. To address these problems, we have developed the Quasar File System (QFS), a metadata-rich file system in which files, metadata, and file relationships are all first class objects. In contrast to hierarchical file systems and relational databases, QFS defines a graph data model composed of files and their relationships. QFS includes Quasar, an XPATH-extended query language for searching the file system. Results from our QFS prototype show the effectiveness of this approach. Compared to the defacto standard, the QFS prototype shows superior ingest performance and comparable query performance on user metadata-intensive operations and superior performance on normal file metadata operations.

  16. Gas Sloshing in the Rich Cluster A2204: Putting Constraints on the Properties of the Magnetized Hot Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Chen, Huanqing; Li, Zhiyuan; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Zuhone, John

    2016-01-01

    We present results from our detailed analysis of the gas sloshing structures in the rich galaxy cluster Abell 2204, based on deep Chandra observations. We investigate the spiral structure in the X-ray surface brightness, which is a common signature of gas sloshing caused by an interaction with another nearby cluster. We identify discontinuities (edges) in the cluster surface brightness profiles in different directions from the cluster center. We measure the gas temperature, pressure and entropy across these surface brightness edges and find that the prominant surface brightness edges in the east and west are both typical "cold fronts", likely produced by gas sloshing. We use the results of our analysis to constrain the strength of the magnetic field in the cluster. We also use our measurements to provide an upper limit on the velocity of the cold gas beneath the front surface of the cold front. Finally we identify two subcluster candidates in the cluster outskirts, which may have been responsible for the gas sloshing.This research was supported by the Smithsonian Institution, Chandra Prime Contract NAS8-03060, Nanjing University, and the Massachusetts Institute for Technology.

  17. The Last Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhl, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    The last class of the semester is like a goodbye. It can be cold and perfunctory or warm and heartfelt. For many years, I erred on the side of "cold and perfunctory." No more. Now my last classes are a time of celebration and ritual as I invite students to focus on qualities such as acceptance and gratitude.

  18. The Conversation Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Acy L.

    2012-01-01

    The conversation class occupies a unique place in the process of learning English as a second or foreign language. From the author's own experience in conducting special conversation classes with Persian-speaking adults, he has drawn up a number of simple but important guidelines, some of which he hopes may provide helpful suggestions for the…

  19. Teaching Large Evening Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wambuguh, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    High enrollments, conflicting student work schedules, and the sheer convenience of once-a-week classes are pushing many colleges to schedule evening courses. Held from 6 to 9 pm or 7 to 10 pm, these classes are typically packed, sometimes with more than 150 students in a large lecture theater. How can faculty effectively teach, control, or even…

  20. The Class Size Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.; Rothstein, Richard, Ed.

    This collection of papers debates the merits of smaller class sizes and research methods used to evaluate the efficacy of this education reform measure. Four chapters focus on (1) "Understanding the Magnitude and Effect of Class Size on Student Achievement" (Alan B. Krueger), which discusses expenditures per student and economic criterion; (2)…

  1. Teaching Social Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tablante, Courtney B.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Discussing socioeconomic status in college classes can be challenging. Both teachers and students feel uncomfortable, yet social class matters more than ever. This is especially true, given increased income inequality in the United States and indications that higher education does not reduce this inequality as much as many people hope. Resources…

  2. Proline-rich Sequence Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Schlundt, Andreas; Sticht, Jana; Piotukh, Kirill; Kosslick, Daniela; Jahnke, Nadin; Keller, Sandro; Schuemann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Freund, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The tumor maintenance protein Tsg101 has recently gained much attention because of its involvement in endosomal sorting, virus release, cytokinesis, and cancerogenesis. The ubiquitin-E2-like variant (UEV) domain of the protein interacts with proline-rich sequences of target proteins that contain P(S/T)AP amino acid motifs and weakly binds to the ubiquitin moiety of proteins committed to sorting or degradation. Here we performed peptide spot analysis and phage display to refine the peptide binding specificity of the Tsg101 UEV domain. A mass spectrometric proteomics approach that combines domain-based pulldown experiments, binding site inactivation, and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was then used to delineate the relative importance of the peptide and ubiquitin binding sites. Clearly “PTAP” interactions dominate target recognition, and we identified several novel binders as for example the poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), Sec24b, NFκB2, and eIF4b. For PABP1 and eIF4b the interactions were confirmed in the context of the corresponding full-length proteins in cellular lysates. Therefore, our results strongly suggest additional roles of Tsg101 in cellular regulation of mRNA translation. Regulation of Tsg101 itself by the ubiquitin ligase TAL (Tsg101-associated ligase) is most likely conferred by a single PSAP binding motif that enables the interaction with Tsg101 UEV. Together with the results from the accompanying article (Kofler, M., Schuemann, M., Merz, C., Kosslick, D., Schlundt, A., Tannert, A., Schaefer, M., Lührmann, R., Krause, E., and Freund, C. (2009) Proline-rich sequence recognition: I. Marking GYF and WW domain assembly sites in early spliceosomal complexes. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 8, 2461–2473) on GYF and WW domain pathways our work defines major proline-rich sequence-mediated interaction networks that contribute to the modular assembly of physiologically relevant protein complexes. PMID:19542561

  3. Vascular plant and vertebrate species richness in national parks of the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatfield, Jeffrey S.; Myrick, Kaci E.; Huston, Michael A.; Weckerly, Floyd W.; Green, M. Clay

    2013-01-01

    Given the estimates that species diversity is diminishing at 50-100 times the normal rate, it is critical that we be able to evaluate changes in species richness in order to make informed decisions for conserving species diversity. In this study, we examined the potential of vascular plant species richness to be used as a surrogate for vertebrate species richness in the classes of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Vascular plants, as primary producers, represent the biotic starting point for ecological community structure and are the logical place to start for understanding vertebrate species associations. We used data collected by the United States (US) National Park Service (NPS) on species presence within parks in the eastern US to estimate simple linear regressions between plant species richness and vertebrate richness. Because environmental factors may also influence species diversity, we performed simple linear regressions of species richness versus natural logarithm of park area, park latitude, mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature, and human population density surrounding the parks. We then combined plant species richness and environmental variables in multiple regressions to determine the variables that remained as significant predictors of vertebrate species richness. As expected, we detected significant relationships between plant species richness and amphibian, bird, and mammal species richness. In some cases, plant species richness was predicted by park area alone. Species richness of mammals was only related to plant species richness. Reptile species richness, on the other hand, was related to plant species richness, park latitude and annual precipitation, while amphibian species richness was related to park latitude, park area, and plant species richness. Thus, plant species richness predicted species richness of different vertebrate groups to varying degrees and should not be used exclusively as a surrogate for vertebrate

  4. Poetry: It's Not Just for English Class Anymore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor-Greene, Patricia A.; Young, Art; Paul, Catherine; Murdoch, Janice W.

    2005-01-01

    Higher level thought involves both critical and creative thinking skills. Although the psychological literature is rich with research on teaching critical thinking, relatively little published work addresses ways of promoting creative thinking. In this article we describe the use of poetry writing in an abnormal psychology class to encourage…

  5. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  6. Species richness of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: associations with grassland plant richness and biomass.

    PubMed

    Hiiesalu, Inga; Pärtel, Meelis; Davison, John; Gerhold, Pille; Metsis, Madis; Moora, Mari; Öpik, Maarja; Vasar, Martti; Zobel, Martin; Wilson, Scott D

    2014-07-01

    Although experiments show a positive association between vascular plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) species richness, evidence from natural ecosystems is scarce. Furthermore, there is little knowledge about how AMF richness varies with belowground plant richness and biomass. We examined relationships among AMF richness, above- and belowground plant richness, and plant root and shoot biomass in a native North American grassland. Root-colonizing AMF richness and belowground plant richness were detected from the same bulk root samples by 454-sequencing of the AMF SSU rRNA and plant trnL genes. In total we detected 63 AMF taxa. Plant richness was 1.5 times greater belowground than aboveground. AMF richness was significantly positively correlated with plant species richness, and more strongly with below- than aboveground plant richness. Belowground plant richness was positively correlated with belowground plant biomass and total plant biomass, whereas aboveground plant richness was positively correlated only with belowground plant biomass. By contrast, AMF richness was negatively correlated with belowground and total plant biomass. Our results indicate that AMF richness and plant belowground richness are more strongly related with each other and with plant community biomass than with the plant aboveground richness measures that have been almost exclusively considered to date.

  7. New circumstellar dust component in oxygen rich environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, John H.; Gerbault, Florence

    1989-01-01

    Spectra of oxygen rich stars in the IRAS low-resolution spectra (LRS) catalog were found to display two distinct classes of curcumstellar excess emission. The first group has the normal silicate with emission peaking at 10 and 18 microns. The second group has an emission spectrum peaking at 13 and 20 microns. There are also spectra with a mixture of the above types. Generally the continuum temperature associated with the second group is much warmer than that associated with the normal silicate group. Laboratory spectra are compared with the new excess which associates the emission with a class of materials represented by hydrated aluminates and silicates. Possible interpretations include equilibrium condensation sequences and peculiar metal abundance ratios.

  8. Venture Class Launch Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Provide an introduction to the Launch Services Program, and specifically the strategic initiative that drove the Venture Class Launch Services contracts. Provide information from the VCLS request for proposals, as well as the Agency's CubeSat Launch Initiative.

  9. Class, health and justice.

    PubMed

    Marchand, S; Wikler, D; Landesman, B

    1998-01-01

    Class inequalities in health are intuitively unjust. Although the link between social class and health status has been fully documented, the precise nature of the injustice has not been made clear. Four alternative views are presented, corresponding to four goals: (1) maximizing the sum total of health; (2) equalizing the health status of higher and lower social classes; (3) maximizing the health status of the lowest social class; and (4) maximizing the health status of the sickest individuals in society. The nature of the injustice is further obscured by several theoretical and empirical questions, like the degree and significance of personal responsibility for illness and the relation of the degree of economic inequality to sum total of health.

  10. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  11. Teaching Heterogeneous Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millrood, Radislav

    2002-01-01

    Discusses an approach to teaching heterogeneous English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classes. Draws on classroom research data to describe the features of a success-building lesson context. (Author/VWL)

  12. Universality classes of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Roest, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We investigate all single-field, slow-roll inflationary models whose slow-roll parameters scale as 1/N in the limit of a large number of e-folds N. We proof that all such models belong to two universality classes, characterised by a single parameter. One class contains small field models like hilltop inflation, while the other class consists of large field models like chaotic inflation. We give the leading expressions for the spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio r, which are universal for each class, plus subleading corrections for a number of models. This predicts r either to be unobservably small, r < 0.01, or close to the present observational limit, r ≈ 0.07.

  13. A class in astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airieau, S. A.

    1999-09-01

    The goal of this class is to provide basic astrobiology knowledge to upper division science students. The scope is broad and in-depth coverage is not possible in this introductory course. Instead, science students from various branches of academia can acquire a broad basis and understanding of the other fields: astronomy, biology, geology, biochemistry, planetary and space sciences. The class is highly modular and allows instructors to concentrate on or eliminate topics according to their priorities and preferences.

  14. The spatial distribution, kinematics, and dynamics of the galaxies in the region of Abell 2634 and 2666

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scodeggio, Marco; Solanes, Jose, M.; Giovanelli, Ricardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    1995-01-01

    A total of 663 galaxies with known redshifts in a 12 deg x 12 deg field centered on A2634, including 211 new measurements, are used to study in detail the structure of the region. In it we find six main galaxy concentrations: the nearby clusters A2634 and A2666, two groups in the vicinity of A2634, and two distant clusters at approximately 18,000 (A2622) and approximately 37,000 km/s seen in projection near the core of A2634. For A2634, the most richly sampled of those concentrations, we are able to apply strict cluster membership criteria. Two samples - one containing 200 galaxies within 2 deg from the cluster center and a second, magnitude-limited, of 118 galaxies within the central half degree - are used to examine the structure, kinematics, dynamics, and morphological segregation of the cluster. We show that early type galaxies appear to be a relaxed system, while the spiral population eschews the center of the cluster and exhibits both a multimodal velocity distribution and a much larger velocity dispersion that the ellipticals. We propose that the spiral galaxies of A2634 represent a dynamically young cluster population. For the galaxy component of A2634, we find no evidence of significant substructure in the central regions. We also conclude that the adoption of lenient membership criteria that ignore the dynamical complexity of A2634 are unlikely to be responsible for the conflicting results reported on the motion of this cluster with respect ot the CMB. The kinematical and dynamical analysis is extended to A2634's close companion, A2666, and the two distant background clusters.

  15. THE GRISM LENS-AMPLIFIED SURVEY FROM SPACE (GLASS). IV. MASS RECONSTRUCTION OF THE LENSING CLUSTER ABELL 2744 FROM FRONTIER FIELD IMAGING AND GLASS SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Schmidt, K. B.; Jones, T. A.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.-H.; Bradac, M.; Treu, T.; Brammer, G. B.; Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Vulcani, B.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Trenti, M.

    2015-09-20

    We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain five high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and two tentative ones. We confirm one strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all three multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometric redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.

  16. Beneficial effects of Camellia Oil (Camellia oleifera Abel.) on ketoprofen-induced gastrointestinal mucosal damage through upregulation of HO-1 and VEGF.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Wu, Shu-Li; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Huang, Shang-Ming; Cheng, Chun-Lung; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2014-01-22

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ketoprofen, are generally used to treat pain and inflammation and as pyretic agents in clinical medicine. However, the usage of these drugs may lead to oxidative injury to the gastrointestinal mucosa. Camellia oil ( Camellia oleifera Abel.) is commonly used in Taiwan and China as cooking oil. Traditional remedies containing this oil exert beneficial health effects on the bowel, stomach, liver, and lungs. However, the effects of camellia oil on ketoprofen-induced oxidative gastrointestinal mucosal lesions remain unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of camellia oil on ketoprofen-induced acute gastrointestinal ulcers. The results showed that treatment of Int-407 cells with camellia oil (50-75 μg/mL) not only increased the levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) mRNA expression but also increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) protein secretion, which served as a mucosal barrier against gastrointestinal oxidative injury. Moreover, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats treated with camellia oil (2 mL/kg/day) prior to the administration of ketoprofen (50 mg/kg/day) successfully inhibited COX-2 protein expression, inhibited the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and nitrite oxide (NO), reversed the impairment of the antioxidant system, and decreased oxidative damage in the gastrointestinal mucosa. More importantly, pretreatment of SD rats with camellia oil strongly inhibited gastrointestinal mucosal injury induced by ketoprofen, which was proved by the histopathological staining of gastrointestinal tissues. Our data suggest that camellia oil exerts potent antiulcer effects against oxidative damage in the stomach and intestine induced by ketoprofen.

  17. Substructure lensing in galaxy clusters as a constraint on low-mass sterile neutrinos in tensor-vector-scalar theory: The straight arc of Abell 2390

    SciTech Connect

    Feix, Martin; Zhao Hongsheng; Fedeli, Cosimo; Hoekstra, Henk

    2010-12-15

    Certain covariant theories of the modified Newtonian dynamics paradigm seem to require an additional hot dark matter (HDM) component--in the form of either heavy ordinary neutrinos or more recently light sterile neutrinos (SNs) with a mass around 11 eV--to be relieved of problems ranging from cosmological scales down to intermediate ones relevant for galaxy clusters. Here we suggest using gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters to test such a marriage of neutrino HDM and modified gravity, adopting the framework of tensor-vector-scalar theory (TeVeS). Unlike conventional cold dark matter (CDM), such HDM is subject to strong phase-space constraints, which allows one to check cluster lens models inferred within the modified framework for consistency. Since the considered HDM particles cannot collapse into arbitrarily dense clumps and only form structures well above the galactic scale, systems which indicate the need for dark substructure are of particular interest. As a first example, we study the cluster lens Abell 2390 and its impressive straight arc with the help of numerical simulations. Based on our results, we outline a general and systematic approach to model cluster lenses in TeVeS which significantly reduces the calculation complexity. We further consider a simple bimodal lens configuration, capable of producing the straight arc, to demonstrate our approach. We find that such a model is marginally consistent with the hypothesis of 11 eV SNs. Future work including more detailed and realistic lens models may further constrain the necessary SN distribution and help to conclusively assess this point. Cluster lenses could therefore provide an interesting discriminator between CDM and such modified gravity scenarios supplemented by SNs or other choices of HDM.

  18. The Grism Lens-amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). IV. Mass Reconstruction of the Lensing Cluster Abell 2744 from Frontier Field Imaging and GLASS Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.-H.; Treu, T.; Bradač, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Brammer, G. B.; Vulcani, B.; Jones, T. A.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Trenti, M.

    2015-09-01

    We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain five high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and two tentative ones. We confirm one strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all three multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometric redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.

  19. Team Conflict in ICT-Rich Environments: Roles of Technologies in Conflict Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Ana-Paula

    2008-01-01

    This study looks at how an information and communication technologies (ICT)-rich environment impacts team conflict and conflict management strategies. A case study research method was used. Three teams, part of a graduate class in instructional design, participated in the study. Data were collected through observations of team meetings, interviews…

  20. Elementary School Children's Reasoning about Social Class: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mistry, Rashmita S.; Brown, Christia S.; White, Elizabeth S.; Chow, Kirby A.; Gillen-O'Neel, Cari

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined children's identification and reasoning about their subjective social status (SSS), their beliefs about social class groups (i.e., the poor, middle class, and rich), and the associations between the two. Study participants were 117 10- to 12-year-old children of diverse racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds…

  1. Teachers and the Emotional Dimensions of Class in Resource-Affected Rural Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pini, Barbara; Price, Robin; McDonald, Paula

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, a "cultural turn" in the study of class has resulted in a rich body of work detailing the ways in which class advantage and disadvantage are emotionally inscribed and embodied in educational settings. To date, however, much of this literature has focused on the urban sphere. In order to address this gap in the literature, this…

  2. Robust Optical Richness Estimation with Reduced Scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Rykoff, E.S.; Koester, B.P.; Rozo, E.; Annis, J.; Evrard, A.E.; Hansen, S.M.; Hao, J.; Johnston, D.E.; McKay, T.A.; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-07

    Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. (2009b), and evaluate their impact on the scatter in X-ray luminosity at fixed richness. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that {sigma}{sub ln L{sub X}|{lambda}} = 0.63 {+-} 0.02 for clusters with M{sub 500c} {approx}> 1.6 x 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is {sigma}{sub ln M|{lambda}} {approx} 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a-priori calibrations of the red-sequence. We also demonstrate that the recovered richness is robust to up to 50% uncertainties in the galaxy background, as well as to the choice of photometric filter employed, so long as the filters span the 4000 {angstrom} break of red-sequence galaxies. Consequently, our richness estimator can be used to compare richness estimates of different clusters, even if they do not share the same photometric data. Appendix A includes 'easy-bake' instructions for implementing our optimal richness estimator, and we are releasing an implementation of the code that works with SDSS data, as well as an augmented maxBCG catalog with the {lambda} richness measured for each cluster.

  3. Discovery and applications of disulfide-rich cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Cemazar, Masa; Kwon, Soohyun; Mahatmanto, Tunjung; Ravipati, Anjaneya S; Craik, David J

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic peptides typically have much higher stability and improved biopharmaceutical properties over their linear counterparts. Our work focuses on the discovery of naturally occurring disulfide-rich cyclic peptides and their applications in drug design. These peptides provide a design basis for re-engineering natural acyclic peptides to improve their biopharmaceutical properties by chemically linking their termini. Here we describe examples of the discovery of the cyclotide family of peptides, their chemical re-engineering to introduce desired pharmaceutical activities, studies of their biopharmaceutical properties and applications of cyclization technologies to naturally occurring toxins, including conotoxins and scorpion toxins. In the case of the conotoxin Vc1.1, we produced an orally active peptide with potential for the treatment of neuropathic pain by cyclising the native peptide. In the case of the scorpion toxin chlorotoxin, a cyclised derivative had improved biopharmaceutical properties as a tumour imaging agent over the naturally occurring linear chlorotoxin. Ongoing chemical and structural studies of these classes of disulfide-rich peptides promise to increase their value for use in dissecting biological processes in plants and mammals while also providing leads to new classes of biopharmaceuticals.

  4. Richness of lichen species, especially of threatened ones, is promoted by management methods furthering stand continuity.

    PubMed

    Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Hessenmöller, Dominik; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Fischer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Lichens are a key component of forest biodiversity. However, a comprehensive study analyzing lichen species richness in relation to several management types, extending over different regions and forest stages and including information on site conditions is missing for temperate European forests. In three German regions (Schwäbische Alb, Hainich-Dün, Schorfheide-Chorin), the so-called Biodiversity Exploratories, we studied lichen species richness in 631 forest plots of 400 m(2) comprising different management types (unmanaged, selection cutting, deciduous and coniferous age-class forests resulting from clear cutting or shelterwood logging), various stand ages, and site conditions, typical for large parts of temperate Europe. We analyzed how lichen species richness responds to management and habitat variables (standing biomass, cover of deadwood, cover of rocks). We found strong regional differences with highest lichen species richness in the Schwäbische Alb, probably driven by regional differences in former air pollution, and in precipitation and habitat variables. Overall, unmanaged forests harbored 22% more threatened lichen species than managed age-class forests. In general, total, corticolous, and threatened lichen species richness did not differ among management types of deciduous forests. However, in the Schwäbische-Alb region, deciduous forests had 61% more lichen species than coniferous forests and they had 279% more threatened and 76% more corticolous lichen species. Old deciduous age classes were richer in corticolous lichen species than young ones, while old coniferous age-classes were poorer than young ones. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of stand continuity for conservation. To increase total and threatened lichen species richness we suggest (1) conserving unmanaged forests, (2) promoting silvicultural methods assuring stand continuity, (3) conserving old trees in managed forests, (4) promoting stands of native deciduous tree species

  5. Richness of lichen species, especially of threatened ones, is promoted by management methods furthering stand continuity.

    PubMed

    Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Hessenmöller, Dominik; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Fischer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Lichens are a key component of forest biodiversity. However, a comprehensive study analyzing lichen species richness in relation to several management types, extending over different regions and forest stages and including information on site conditions is missing for temperate European forests. In three German regions (Schwäbische Alb, Hainich-Dün, Schorfheide-Chorin), the so-called Biodiversity Exploratories, we studied lichen species richness in 631 forest plots of 400 m(2) comprising different management types (unmanaged, selection cutting, deciduous and coniferous age-class forests resulting from clear cutting or shelterwood logging), various stand ages, and site conditions, typical for large parts of temperate Europe. We analyzed how lichen species richness responds to management and habitat variables (standing biomass, cover of deadwood, cover of rocks). We found strong regional differences with highest lichen species richness in the Schwäbische Alb, probably driven by regional differences in former air pollution, and in precipitation and habitat variables. Overall, unmanaged forests harbored 22% more threatened lichen species than managed age-class forests. In general, total, corticolous, and threatened lichen species richness did not differ among management types of deciduous forests. However, in the Schwäbische-Alb region, deciduous forests had 61% more lichen species than coniferous forests and they had 279% more threatened and 76% more corticolous lichen species. Old deciduous age classes were richer in corticolous lichen species than young ones, while old coniferous age-classes were poorer than young ones. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of stand continuity for conservation. To increase total and threatened lichen species richness we suggest (1) conserving unmanaged forests, (2) promoting silvicultural methods assuring stand continuity, (3) conserving old trees in managed forests, (4) promoting stands of native deciduous tree species

  6. Coming out in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnon, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This article shares how the author explained her trans status to her students. Everyone has been extremely supportive of her decision to come out in class and to completely mask the male secondary-sex characteristics, especially in the workplace. The department chair and the faculty in general have been willing to do whatever they can to assist…

  7. Shrinking Your Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron-Thorpe, Farren L.; Olson, Jo Clay; Davis, Denny

    2010-01-01

    Toys in the classroom was the result of a National Science Foundation grant that brought two engineering graduate students to a middle school math class. The graduate students and teachers collaborated in an effort to enhance students' mathematical learning. An engineering context was theorized as a way to further develop students' understanding…

  8. IQ and Social Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbein, Siv

    1980-01-01

    Swedish longitudinal studies of twins support Scarr-Salapatek's explanation of nature-nurture influences on intelligence. This model predicts more genetic variance in test results for advantaged than disadvantaged groups. Jensen's work, however, suggests equal amounts of variance among different social classes. (Author/CP)

  9. Financing Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Class size reduction has been shown to, among other things, improve academic achievement for all students and particularly for low-income and minority students. With the No Child Left Behind Act's heavy emphasis on scientifically based research, adequate yearly progress, and disaggregated results, one wonders why all children aren't enrolled in…

  10. Virtual Classes, Real Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Kate

    2010-01-01

    As Internet technology encroached on the public school classroom about a decade ago, Kim Ross, superintendent of the Houston School District in Houston, Minnesota, saw an opportunity. At first, he and his administrative team simply wanted to offer students in the district of 1,300 access to more classes via the web than what a district that size…

  11. Class D sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Woodings, R. T.

    1984-10-23

    It has been found that API Class D sucker rods can be made inexpensively from low-alloy, low-cost steel by following a suitable induction-normalizing process and using a suitable steel to which there has been added 0.07 to 0.15 percent of vanadium.

  12. Openers for Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, C. Robert R.

    This teaching guide contains 200 activities that are suitable for openers and demonstrations in biology classes. Details are provided regarding the use of these activities. Some of the broad topics under which the activities are organized include algae, amphibians, bacteria, biologists, crustaceans, dinosaurs, ecology, evolution, flowering plants,…

  13. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  14. Class Attitudes among Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, James F.; Lancaster, Diana M.

    Class attitudes among dental students were studied at Louisiana State University in spring 1986, with attention to attitudes toward leadership, faculty and administration, study habits, labs and clinics, information acquisition, social life, and class unification. Class attitudes became more uniform and deeply held as the classes progressed…

  15. Mass, shape and thermal properties of Abell 1689 using a multiwavelength X-ray, lensing and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, Mauro; Ettori, Stefano; Umetsu, Keiichi; Baldi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the mass and concentration of galaxy clusters is crucial for an understanding of their formation and evolution. Unbiased estimates require an understanding of the shape and orientation of the halo as well as its equilibrium status. We propose a novel method to determine the intrinsic properties of galaxy clusters from a multiwavelength data set, spanning from X-ray spectroscopic and photometric data to gravitational lensing to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The method relies on two non-informative geometrical assumptions: the distributions of total matter or gas are approximately ellipsoidal and co-aligned; they have different, constant axial ratios but share the same degree of triaxiality. Weak and strong lensing probe the features of the total mass distribution in the plane of the sky. X-ray data measure the size and orientation of the gas in the plane of the sky. Comparison with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich amplitude fixes the elongation of the gas along the line of sight. These constraints are deprojected as a result of Bayesian inference. The mass distribution is described as a Navarro-Frenk-White halo with arbitrary orientation, and the gas density and temperature are modelled with parametric profiles. We have applied the method to Abell 1689. Independently of the priors, the cluster is massive, M200 = (1.3 ± 0.2) × 1015 M⊙, and overconcentrated, c200 = 8 ± 1, but it is still consistent with theoretical predictions. The total matter is triaxial (minor to major axial ratio ˜0.5 ± 0.1, exploiting priors from N-body simulations) with the major axis nearly orientated along the line of sight. The gas is rounder (minor to major axial ratio ˜0.6 ± 0.1) and deviates from hydrostatic equilibrium. The contribution of non-thermal pressure is ˜20-50 per cent in the inner regions, ≲ 300 kpc, and ˜25 ± 5 per cent at ˜1.5 Mpc. This picture of A1689 was obtained with a small number of assumptions and in a single framework, suitable for application to a

  16. Student Engagement in a Computer Rich Science Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Jeffrey C.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the student lived experience when using computers in a rural science classroom. The overarching question the project sought to examine was: How do rural students relate to computers as a learning tool in comparison to a traditional science classroom? Participant data were collected using a pre-study survey, Experience Sampling during class and post-study interviews. Students want to use computers in their classrooms. Students shared that they overwhelmingly (75%) preferred a computer rich classroom to a traditional classroom (25%). Students reported a higher level of engagement in classes that use technology/computers (83%) versus those that do not use computers (17%). A computer rich classroom increased student control and motivation as reflected by a participant who shared; "by using computers I was more motivated to get the work done" (Maggie, April 25, 2014, survey). The researcher explored a rural school environment. Rural populations represent a large number of students and appear to be underrepresented in current research. The participants, tenth grade Biology students, were sampled in a traditional teacher led class without computers for one week followed by a week using computers daily. Data supported that there is a new gap that separates students, a device divide. This divide separates those who have access to devices that are robust enough to do high level class work from those who do not. Although cellular phones have reduced the number of students who cannot access the Internet, they may have created a false feeling that access to a computer is no longer necessary at home. As this study shows, although most students have Internet access, fewer have access to a device that enables them to complete rigorous class work at home. Participants received little or no training at school in proper, safe use of a computer and the Internet. It is clear that the majorities of students are self-taught or receive guidance

  17. Distinct kimberlite pipe classes with contrasting eruption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, E. M. W.; Marsh, J. S.

    2004-09-01

    Field and Scott Smith [Field, M., Scott Smith, B.H., 1999. Contrasting geology and near-surface emplacement of kimberlite pipes in southern Africa and Canada. Proc. 7th Int. Kimb. Conf. (Eds. Gurney et al.) 1, 214-237.] propose that kimberlite pipes can be grouped into three types or classes. Classical or Class 1 pipes are the only class with characteristic low temperature, diatreme-facies kimberlite in addition to hypabyssal- and crater-facies kimberlite. Class 2 and 3 pipes are characterized only by hypabyssal-and crater-facies kimberlite. In an increasing number of Class 1 pipes a new kimberlite facies, transitional-facies kimberlite, is being found. In most cases this facies forms a zone several metres wide at the interface between the hypabyssal- and diatreme-facies. The transitional-facies exhibits textural and mineralogical features, which are continuously gradational between the hypabyssal and the diatreme types. The textural gradations are from a coherent magmatic texture to one where the rock becomes increasingly magmaclastic and this is accompanied by concomitant mineralogical gradations involving the decline and eventual elimination of primary calcite at the expense of microlitic diopside. Both transitional- and diatreme-facies kimberlites are considered to have formed in situ from intruding hypabyssal kimberlite magma as a consequence of exsolution of initially CO 2-rich volatiles from the volatile-rich kimberlite magma. The transitional-facies is initiated by volatile exsolution at depths of about 3 km below the original surface. With subsequent cracking through to the surface and resultant rapid decompression, the further catastrophic exsolution of volatiles and their expansion leads to the formation of the diatreme facies. Thus diatreme-facies kimberlite and Class 1 pipes are emplaced by essentially magmatic processes rather than by phreatomagmatism. Distinctly different petrographic features characterize crater-facies kimberlite in each of the

  18. Ceres' hydrogen-rich regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; McSween, Harry Y.; Schorghofer, Norbert; Toplis, Michael J.; Forni, Olivier; Joy, Steven P.; Marchi, Simone; Platz, Thomas; Polanskey, Carol A.; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Rayman, Marc D.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    Low-altitude mapping of Ceres by Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) began in December of 2015. GRaND will continue to acquire data for at least six months in a circular-polar orbit, at an altitude of about 0.8 body radii. Close-proximity enables global mapping of the elemental composition of Ceres' regolith, with regional-scale spatial resolution, similar to that achieved at Vesta. An initial analysis of the data shows that Ceres' regolith is rich in H, consistent with the detection of ammoniated phyllosilicates by Dawn's Visible to InfraRed (VIR) spectrometer. Global maps of neutron and gamma ray counting data reveal a strong latitude variation, with suppressed counts at the poles. Lower bound estimates of the concentration of polar H exceed that found in carbonaceous chondrites, which are the best meteorite analogs for Ceres. Thermal modeling predicts that water ice is stable near the surface at high latitudes, and, given Ceres' low obliquity, water ice and other volatile species may be concentrated in permanently shadowed regions near the poles. Excess hydrogen at high latitudes is likely in the form of water ice within the decimeter depths sensed by GRaND. Changes in the hydration state of phyllosilicates and hydrated salt minerals with temperature could also contribute to observed spatial variations. Some GRaND signatures show evidence for layering of hydrogen, consistent with ice stability models. Differences in the gamma ray spectra of Ceres and Vesta indicate that Ceres' surface is primitive (closely related to carbonaceous chondrite-like compositions), in contrast to Vesta's fractionated igneous composition. Strong gamma rays are observed at 7.6 MeV (Fe), 6.1 MeV (O), and 2.2 MeV (H). With additional accumulation time, it may be possible to quantify or bound the concentration of other elements, such as Mg, Ni, and C. Elements diagnostic of hydrothermal activity (K, Cl, and S) may be detectable if they are present in high concentrations over

  19. Coexistence of Si-rich and S-rich Materials at Gusev Crater, Columbia Hills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Bell, J. F.; Rice, M. S.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2008-03-01

    Si-rich species encountered by Spirit rover in the vicinity of S-rich soils show a characteristic feature in NIR spectra extracted from multicolor Pancam images. This feature is used to evaluate other potential Si-rich species at Gusev landing site.

  20. Economy class syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sahiar, F; Mohler, S R

    1994-10-01

    A recent case of the "Economy Class Syndrome" is presented, emphasizing the syndrome's aeromedical implications and prevention. The clinical presentation, current modes of prophylaxis and therapy, plus a brief but pertinent historical background, are described. The syndrome is potentially fatal, and the authors stress that the condition needs to be recognized as a preventable hazard of air travel. Adoption of the preventive measures described herein can assist in promoting healthy air travel.

  1. Preservice Teachers' Emerging TPACK in a Technology-Rich Methods Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgun-Koca, S. Asli; Meagher, Michael; Edwards, Michael Todd

    2010-01-01

    There is a dearth of research on the mechanisms for preservice teachers' development of the pedagogical knowledge necessary for effective use of such technologies. We explored the emergent Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) (Niess 2005, 2006, 2007) of a group of secondary mathematics preservice teachers in a methods course as…

  2. ROBUST OPTICAL RICHNESS ESTIMATION WITH REDUCED SCATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Rykoff, E. S.; Koester, B. P.; Rozo, E.; Annis, J.; Hao, J.; Johnston, D. E.; Evrard, A. E.; McKay, T. A.; Hansen, S. M.

    2012-02-20

    Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence-matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. implemented on the maxBCG cluster catalog and evaluate the impact of these changes on the scatter in X-ray luminosity (L{sub X} ) at fixed richness, using L{sub X} from the ROSAT All-Sky Catalog as the best mass proxy available for the large area required. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that {sigma}{sub ln{sub L{sub x|{lambda}}}}=0.63{+-}0.02 for clusters with M{sub 500c} {approx}> 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h{sup -1}{sub 70} M{sub Sun }. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is {sigma}{sub lnM|{lambda}} Almost-Equal-To 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a priori calibrations of the red sequence. We also demonstrate that the recovered richness is robust to up to 50% uncertainties in the galaxy background, as well as to the choice of photometric filter employed, so long as the filters span the 4000 A break of red-sequence galaxies. Consequently, our richness estimator can be used to compare richness estimates of different clusters, even if they do not share the same photometric data. Appendix A includes 'easy-bake' instructions for implementing our optimal richness estimator, and we are releasing an implementation of the code that works with Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, as well as an augmented maxBCG catalog with the {lambda} richness measured for each cluster.

  3. Class Participation: Promoting In-Class Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    Class participation has long been valued by faculty members interested in engaging students in the learning process. This paper discusses class participation and shares participation techniques that promote active student engagement during class meetings. Emphasis is placed on techniques that invite a larger number of students into a course's…

  4. Radial tail resolution in the SELEX RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Morelos, A.; Mata, J.; Cooper, P.S.; Engelfried, J.; Aguilera-Servin, J.L.; /San Luis Potosi U. /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The authors use a 7 Million event data sample of 600 GeV/c single track pion events, where the pion track is reconstructed upstream and downstream of the SELEX RICH. They build the RICH ring radius histogram distribution and count the tail events that fall outside 5{sigma}, giving a fraction of 4 x 10{sup -5} events outside the Gaussian tails. This control of events establishes the ability of using the RICH as velocity spectrometer for high precision searches of the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay like it is planned in the CKM experiment.

  5. Firm size diversity, functional richness, and resilience

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garmestani, A.S.; Allen, C.R.; Mittelstaedt, J.D.; Stow, C.A.; Ward, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper applies recent advances in ecology to our understanding of firm development, sustainability, and economic development. The ecological literature indicates that the greater the functional richness of species in a system, the greater its resilience - that is, its ability to persist in the face of substantial changes in the environment. This paper focuses on the effects of functional richness across firm size on the ability of industries to survive in the face of economic change. Our results indicate that industries with a richness of industrial functions are more resilient to employment volatility. ?? 2006 Cambridge University Press.

  6. Climate and landscape explain richness patterns depending on the type of species' distribution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsianou, Mariana A.; Koutsias, Nikolaos; Mazaris, Antonios D.; Kallimanis, Athanasios S.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the patterns of species richness and their environmental drivers, remains a central theme in ecological research and especially in the continental scales where many conservation decisions are made. Here, we analyzed the patterns of species richness from amphibians, reptiles and mammals at the EU level. We used two different data sources for each taxon: expert-drawn species range maps, and presence/absence atlases. As environmental drivers, we considered climate and land cover. Land cover is increasingly the focus of research, but there still is no consensus on how to classify land cover to distinct habitat classes, so we analyzed the CORINE land cover data with three different levels of thematic resolution (resolution of classification scheme ˗ less to more detailed). We found that the two types of species richness data explored in this study yielded different richness maps. Although, we expected expert-drawn range based estimates of species richness to exceed those from atlas data (due to the assumption that species are present in all locations throughout their region), we found that in many cases the opposite is true (the extreme case is the reptiles where more than half of the atlas based estimates were greater than the expert-drawn range based estimates). Also, we detected contrasting information on the richness drivers of biodiversity patterns depending on the dataset used. For atlas based richness estimates, landscape attributes played more important role than climate while for expert-drawn range based richness estimates climatic variables were more important (for the ectothermic amphibians and reptiles). Finally we found that the thematic resolution of the land cover classification scheme, also played a role in quantifying the effect of land cover diversity, with more detailed thematic resolution increasing the relative contribution of landscape attributes in predicting species richness.

  7. Kinematics and host-galaxy properties suggest a nuclear origin for calcium-rich supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Ryan J.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium-rich supernovae (Ca-rich SNe) are peculiar low-luminosity SNe Ib with relatively strong Ca spectral lines at ˜2 months after peak brightness. This class also has an extended projected offset distribution, with several members of the class offset from their host galaxies by 30-150 kpc. There is no indication of any stellar population at the SN positions. Using a sample of 13 Ca-rich SNe, we present kinematic evidence that the progenitors of Ca-rich SNe originate near the centres of their host galaxies and are kicked to the locations of the SN explosions. Specifically, SNe with small projected offsets have large line-of-sight velocity shifts as determined by nebular lines, while those with large projected offsets have no significant velocity shifts. Therefore, the velocity shifts must not be primarily the result of the SN explosion. Additionally, nearly every Ca-rich SN is hosted by a galaxy with indications of a recent merger and/or is in a dense environment. We propose a progenitor model which fits all current data: the progenitor system for a Ca-rich SN is a double white dwarf (WD) system where at least one WD has a significant He abundance. This system, through an interaction with a super-massive black hole (SMBH) is ejected from its host galaxy and the binary is hardened, significantly reducing the merger time. After 10-100 Myr (on average), the system explodes with a large physical offset. The rate for such events is significantly enhanced for galaxies which have undergone recent mergers, potentially making Ca-rich SNe new probes of both the galaxy merger rate and (binary) SMBH population.

  8. Class prediction for high-dimensional class-imbalanced data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The goal of class prediction studies is to develop rules to accurately predict the class membership of new samples. The rules are derived using the values of the variables available for each subject: the main characteristic of high-dimensional data is that the number of variables greatly exceeds the number of samples. Frequently the classifiers are developed using class-imbalanced data, i.e., data sets where the number of samples in each class is not equal. Standard classification methods used on class-imbalanced data often produce classifiers that do not accurately predict the minority class; the prediction is biased towards the majority class. In this paper we investigate if the high-dimensionality poses additional challenges when dealing with class-imbalanced prediction. We evaluate the performance of six types of classifiers on class-imbalanced data, using simulated data and a publicly available data set from a breast cancer gene-expression microarray study. We also investigate the effectiveness of some strategies that are available to overcome the effect of class imbalance. Results Our results show that the evaluated classifiers are highly sensitive to class imbalance and that variable selection introduces an additional bias towards classification into the majority class. Most new samples are assigned to the majority class from the training set, unless the difference between the classes is very large. As a consequence, the class-specific predictive accuracies differ considerably. When the class imbalance is not too severe, down-sizing and asymmetric bagging embedding variable selection work well, while over-sampling does not. Variable normalization can further worsen the performance of the classifiers. Conclusions Our results show that matching the prevalence of the classes in training and test set does not guarantee good performance of classifiers and that the problems related to classification with class-imbalanced data are exacerbated when

  9. The Class of '34

    PubMed Central

    Cairney, Richard

    1995-01-01

    The Great Depression raged, governments were beleaguered, the unemployment rate stood at 30%, scurvy stalked the poor and no one was immune to contagious diseases such as scarlet fever, polio and measles when the University of Alberta School of Medicine's Class of '34 graduated. For four alumni who recently gathered in Edmonton—Drs. Morley Hodgson, Melvin Gaudin, John McLurg and Edmund Cairns—their 60th-anniversary reunion was a time to recall the changes they have witnessed in medicine, including the arrival of antibiotic drugs and the medicare system. Imagesp558-a

  10. Synthesis of cyclic disulfide-rich peptides.

    PubMed

    Akcan, Muharrem; Craik, David J

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we describe two SPPS approaches for producing cyclic disulfide-rich peptides in our laboratory, including cyclotides from plants, cyclic conotoxins from cone snail venoms, chlorotoxin from scorpion venom, and the sunflower trypsin inhibitor peptide, SFTI-1.

  11. Tannin rich peanut skins lack anthelmintic properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) resistance to synthetic anthelmintics in small ruminants has led to the evaluation of feed sources containing naturally occurring bioactive secondary metabolites that lessen parasite activity. Plants rich in condensed tannins (CT) can have beneficial anthelmintic pro...

  12. Contrasting structure and composition of the understory in species-rich tropical rain forests.

    PubMed

    LaFrankie, James V; Ashton, Peter S; Chuyong, George B; Co, Leonardo; Condit, Richard; Davies, Stuart J; Foster, Robin; Hubbell, Stephen P; Kenfack, David; Lagunzad, Daniel; Losos, Elizabeth C; Nor, Noor Supardi Md; Tan, Sylvester; Thomas, Duncan W; Valencia, Renato; Villa, Gorky

    2006-09-01

    In large samples of trees > or = 1 cm dbh (more than 1 million trees and 3000 species), in six lowland tropical forests on three continents, we assigned species with >30 individuals to one of six classes of stature at maturity (SAM). We then compared the proportional representation of understory trees (1-2 cm dbh) among these classes. The understory of the three Asian sites was predominantly composed of the saplings of large-canopy trees whereas the African and American sites were more richly stocked with trees of the smaller SAM classes. Differences in class representation were related to taxonomic families that were present exclusively in one continent or another. Families found in the Asian plots but not in the American plot (e.g., Dipterocarpaceae, Fagaceae) were predominantly species of the largest SAM classes, whereas families exclusive to the American plots (e.g., Melastomataceae sensu stricto, Piperaceae, and Malvaceae [Bombacacoidea]) were predominantly species of small classes. The African plot was similar to Asia in the absence of those American families rich in understory species, while similar to America in lacking the Asian families rich in canopy species. The numerous understory species of Africa were chiefly derived from families shared with Asia and/or America. The ratio of saplings (1-2 cm dbh) to conspecific canopy trees (>40 cm dbh) was lower in American plots than in the Asian plots. Possible explanations for these differences include phenology, moisture and soil fertility regimes, phyletic constraints, and the role of early successional plants in forest development. These results demonstrate that tropical forests that appear similar in tree number, basal area, and the family taxonomy of canopy trees nonetheless differ in ecological structure in ways that may impact the ecology of pollinators, dispersers, and herbivores and might reflect fundamental differences in canopy tree regeneration. PMID:16995630

  13. Young tidal dwarf galaxies around the gas-rich disturbed lenticular NGC 5291

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, P.-A.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1998-05-01

    NGC 5291 is an early type galaxy at the edge of the cluster Abell 3574 which drew the attention because of the unusual high amount of atomic gas ( ~ 5 x 10(10) {M_{\\odot}}) found associated to it. The HI is distributed along a huge and fragmented ring, possibly formed after a tidal interaction with a companion galaxy. We present multi-slit optical spectroscopic observations and optical/near-infrared images of the system. We show that NGC 5291 is a LINER galaxy exhibiting several remnants of previous merging events, in particular a curved dust lane and a counter-rotation of the gas with respect to the stars. The atomic hydrogen has undoubtly an external origin and was probably accreted by the galaxy from a gas-rich object in the cluster. It is unlikely that the HI comes from the closest companion of NGC 5291, the so-called ``Seashell'' galaxy, which appears to be a fly-by object at a velocity greater than 400 km s(-1) . We have analyzed the properties of 11 optical counterparts to the clumps observed in the HI ring. The brightest knots show strong similarities with classical blue compact dwarf galaxies. They are dominated by active star forming regions; their most recent starburst is younger than 5 Myr; we did not find evidences for the presence of an old underlying stellar population. NGC 5291 appears to be a maternity of extremely young objects most probably forming their first generation of stars. Born in pre-enriched gas clouds, these recycled galaxies have an oxygen abundance which is higher than BCDGs ({Z_{\\odot}}/3 on average) and which departs from the luminosity-metallicity relation observed for typical dwarf and giant galaxies. We propose this property as a tool to identify tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) among the dwarf galaxy population. Several TDGs in NGC 5291 exhibit strong velocity gradients in their ionized gas and may already be dynamically independent galaxies. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile

  14. Combination Classes and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jaime L.

    2012-01-01

    Using the ECLS-K and considering first graders in single-grade and K-1 and 1-2 combination classes, I discuss the mechanisms underlying the combination-class effect and address the systematic school-, teacher-, and student-level differences that confound estimates of this effect. I find evidence for positive selection into 1-2 classes, but using a…

  15. A Class Traitor in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on his feelings as a working-class transplant into academic culture and the middle class. He draws on his feelings of alienation from the people who surround him and his observations of the cultural subordination necessary to succeed in the middle class world to explain his desire to do more to help other…

  16. Team Learning in Large Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Information and suggestions are provided on the use of team learning in large college classes. Introductory material discusses the negative cycle of student-teacher interaction that may be provoked by large classes, and the use of permanent, heterogeneous, six- or seven-member student learning groups as the central focus of class activity as a…

  17. Tests of Zinc Rich Anticorrosion Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. D.; Paton, W. J.; Rowe, A.

    1986-01-01

    Condition of zinc-rich anticorrosion coatings after 10 years of exposure discussed in status report, which follows up on 18-month study of anticorrosion coatings on steel started in 1971. Test panels with various coatings mounted on racks on beach and checked periodically. Of panels with inorganic zinc-rich coatings, only one slightly rusted. Panels were in such good condition they were returned to beach for more exposure.

  18. Multimethod latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nussbeck, Fridtjof W.; Eid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Correct and, hence, valid classifications of individuals are of high importance in the social sciences as these classifications are the basis for diagnoses and/or the assignment to a treatment. The via regia to inspect the validity of psychological ratings is the multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) approach. First, a latent variable model for the analysis of rater agreement (latent rater agreement model) will be presented that allows for the analysis of convergent validity between different measurement approaches (e.g., raters). Models of rater agreement are transferred to the level of latent variables. Second, the latent rater agreement model will be extended to a more informative MTMM latent class model. This model allows for estimating (i) the convergence of ratings, (ii) method biases in terms of differential latent distributions of raters and differential associations of categorizations within raters (specific rater bias), and (iii) the distinguishability of categories indicating if categories are satisfyingly distinct from each other. Finally, an empirical application is presented to exemplify the interpretation of the MTMM latent class model. PMID:26441714

  19. Toxicological evaluation of arachidonic acid (ARA)-rich oil and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich oil.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kara D; Huang, Weifeng; Zheng, Xiaohui; Jiang, Yue; Feldman, Robin S; Falk, Michael C

    2016-10-01

    The safety of DHA-rich oil from Schizochytrium sp. and ARA-rich oil from Mortierella alpina was separately evaluated by testing for gene mutations, clastogenicity, and aneugenicity, and by conducting 28-day and 90-day dietary studies in Wistar rats. The results of all genotoxicity tests were negative. The 28-day and 90-day studies involved dietary exposure to 1000, 2500, and 5000 mg per kg bw of the DHA-rich and ARA-rich oils and two control diets: water and corn oil (vehicle control). There were no treatment-related effects of either the DHA-rich or ARA-rich oils on clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, behavior, hematology, clinical chemistry, coagulation, urinalysis parameters, or necropsy findings. Increases in cholesterol and triglyceride levels were considered related to a high oil diet and non-adverse. The no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) for both the DHA-rich and ARA-rich oils was 5000 mg per kg bw, the highest dose tested. The results confirm that these oils possess toxicity profiles similar to those of other currently marketed oils and support the safety of DHA-rich oil from Schizochytrium sp. and ARA-rich oil from Mortierella alpina for their proposed uses in food. PMID:27470615

  20. Revisiting spatial scale in the productivity-species richness relationship: fundamental issues and global change implications.

    PubMed

    McBride, Paul D; Cusens, Jarrod; Gillman, Len N

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between net primary productivity (NPP) and species richness has been the subject of long-running debate. A changing climate gives added impetus to resolving this debate, as it becomes increasingly necessary to predict biodiversity responses that might arise from shifts in productivity or its climatic correlates. It has become increasingly clear that at small scales productivity-species richness relationships (PSRs) are variable, while at macro scales relationships are typically positive. We demonstrate the importance of explicitly considering scale in discussions on PSRs even at large scales by showing that distinct patterns emerge in a global dataset of terrestrial ecoregions when ecoregions are binned into size classes. At all sizes, PSRs in ecoregions are positive, but the strength of the PSR scales positively with ecoregion size. In small ecoregions (10(3)-10(4) km(2)), factors correlating with productivity play only a minor role in species richness patterns, while in large ecoregions (>10(5) km(2)), NPP modelled from remotely sensed data is able to explain most of the variation in species richness. Better understanding the effects of scale on PSRs contributes to the debate on the relationship between species richness and productivity, which in turn allows us to better predict how both long- and short-term biodiversity patterns and ecosystem functioning might be altered under global change scenarios. This gives focus on future research to clarify causal pathways between species richness and productivity with appropriate attention to scale as an important focusing element. PMID:25249265

  1. CALCIUM-RICH GAP TRANSIENTS: SOLVING THE CALCIUM CONUNDRUM IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Mulchaey, John S.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2014-01-10

    X-ray measurements suggest that the abundance of calcium in the intracluster medium is higher than can be explained using favored models for core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae alone. We investigate whether the ''calcium conundrum'' in the intracluster medium can be alleviated by including a contribution from the recently discovered subclass of supernovae known as calcium-rich gap transients. Although the calcium-rich gap transients make up only a small fraction of all supernovae events, we find that their high calcium yields are sufficient to reproduce the X-ray measurements found for nearby rich clusters. We find the χ{sup 2} goodness-of-fit metric improves from 84 to 2 by including this new class. Moreover, calcium-rich supernovae preferentially occur in the outskirts of galaxies making it easier for the nucleosynthesis products of these events to be incorporated in the intracluster medium via ram-pressure stripping. The discovery of calcium-rich gap transients in clusters and groups far from any individual galaxy suggests that supernovae associated with intracluster stars may play an important role in enriching the intracluster medium. Calcium-rich gap transients may also help explain anomalous calcium abundances in many other astrophysical systems including individual stars in the Milky Way, the halos of nearby galaxies, and the circumgalactic medium. Our work highlights the importance of considering the diversity of supernovae types and corresponding yields when modeling the abundance of the intracluster medium and other gas reservoirs.

  2. Revisiting spatial scale in the productivity-species richness relationship: fundamental issues and global change implications.

    PubMed

    McBride, Paul D; Cusens, Jarrod; Gillman, Len N

    2014-09-23

    The relationship between net primary productivity (NPP) and species richness has been the subject of long-running debate. A changing climate gives added impetus to resolving this debate, as it becomes increasingly necessary to predict biodiversity responses that might arise from shifts in productivity or its climatic correlates. It has become increasingly clear that at small scales productivity-species richness relationships (PSRs) are variable, while at macro scales relationships are typically positive. We demonstrate the importance of explicitly considering scale in discussions on PSRs even at large scales by showing that distinct patterns emerge in a global dataset of terrestrial ecoregions when ecoregions are binned into size classes. At all sizes, PSRs in ecoregions are positive, but the strength of the PSR scales positively with ecoregion size. In small ecoregions (10(3)-10(4) km(2)), factors correlating with productivity play only a minor role in species richness patterns, while in large ecoregions (>10(5) km(2)), NPP modelled from remotely sensed data is able to explain most of the variation in species richness. Better understanding the effects of scale on PSRs contributes to the debate on the relationship between species richness and productivity, which in turn allows us to better predict how both long- and short-term biodiversity patterns and ecosystem functioning might be altered under global change scenarios. This gives focus on future research to clarify causal pathways between species richness and productivity with appropriate attention to scale as an important focusing element.

  3. Revisiting spatial scale in the productivity–species richness relationship: fundamental issues and global change implications

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Paul D.; Cusens, Jarrod; Gillman, Len N.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between net primary productivity (NPP) and species richness has been the subject of long-running debate. A changing climate gives added impetus to resolving this debate, as it becomes increasingly necessary to predict biodiversity responses that might arise from shifts in productivity or its climatic correlates. It has become increasingly clear that at small scales productivity–species richness relationships (PSRs) are variable, while at macro scales relationships are typically positive. We demonstrate the importance of explicitly considering scale in discussions on PSRs even at large scales by showing that distinct patterns emerge in a global dataset of terrestrial ecoregions when ecoregions are binned into size classes. At all sizes, PSRs in ecoregions are positive, but the strength of the PSR scales positively with ecoregion size. In small ecoregions (103–104 km2), factors correlating with productivity play only a minor role in species richness patterns, while in large ecoregions (>105 km2), NPP modelled from remotely sensed data is able to explain most of the variation in species richness. Better understanding the effects of scale on PSRs contributes to the debate on the relationship between species richness and productivity, which in turn allows us to better predict how both long- and short-term biodiversity patterns and ecosystem functioning might be altered under global change scenarios. This gives focus on future research to clarify causal pathways between species richness and productivity with appropriate attention to scale as an important focusing element. PMID:25249265

  4. Global patterns of species richness and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, D.J. )

    1994-06-01

    Why are there many species in some places and few in others Several studies have shown that the variation in the number of species over continent-sized areas is closely related to the variation in macroclimatic factors: heat and moisture for terrestrial plants, and heat for terrestrial vertebrates. Yet, most of these studies dealt primarily with temperature areas on single continents. If contemporary climate is the principle determinant of large-scale patterns of richness, then richness should be related to climate in similar ways on different continents, regardless of their evolutionary histories. To test the hypothesis, we have gathered published data on the distributions of birds and mammals in temperature and tropical areas. We found that richness varies as a function of potential evapotranspiration in very similar ways on different continents in temperate areas, although there is some significant variation among continents that is unrelated to climate. In tropical areas, richness is more closely related to precipitation and annual climatic variability. Re-analysis of published data on plant richness is consistent with these observations. We conclude that most of the variation in large-scale patterns of species richness can be accounted for by contemporary climate.

  5. Predicting spatial variations of tree species richness in tropical forests from high-resolution remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Fricker, Geoffrey A; Wolf, Jeffrey A; Saatchi, Sassan S; Gillespie, Thomas W

    2015-10-01

    There is an increasing interest in identifying theories, empirical data sets, and remote-sensing metrics that can quantify tropical forest alpha diversity at a landscape scale. Quantifying patterns of tree species richness in the field is time consuming, especially in regions with over 100 tree species/ha. We examine species richness in a 50-ha plot in Barro Colorado Island in Panama and test if biophysical measurements of canopy reflectance from high-resolution satellite imagery and detailed vertical forest structure and topography from light detection and ranging (lidar) are associated with species richness across four tree size classes (>1, 1-10, >10, and >20 cm dbh) and three spatial scales (1, 0.25, and 0.04 ha). We use the 2010 tree inventory, including 204,757 individuals belonging to 301 species of freestanding woody plants or 166 ± 1.5 species/ha (mean ± SE), to compare with remote-sensing data. All remote-sensing metrics became less correlated with species richness as spatial resolution decreased from 1.0 ha to 0.04 ha and tree size increased from 1 cm to 20 cm dbh. When all stems with dbh > 1 cm in 1-ha plots were compared to remote-sensing metrics, standard deviation in canopy reflectance explained 13% of the variance in species richness. The standard deviations of canopy height and the topographic wetness index (TWI) derived from lidar were the best metrics to explain the spatial variance in species richness (15% and 24%, respectively). Using multiple regression models, we made predictions of species richness across Barro Colorado Island (BCI) at the 1-ha spatial scale for different tree size classes. We predicted variation in tree species richness among all plants (adjusted r² = 0.35) and trees with dbh > 10 cm (adjusted r² = 0.25). However, the best model results were for understory trees and shrubs (dbh 1-10 cm) (adjusted r² = 0.52) that comprise the majority of species richness in tropical forests. Our results indicate that high

  6. Predicting spatial variations of tree species richness in tropical forests from high-resolution remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Fricker, Geoffrey A; Wolf, Jeffrey A; Saatchi, Sassan S; Gillespie, Thomas W

    2015-10-01

    There is an increasing interest in identifying theories, empirical data sets, and remote-sensing metrics that can quantify tropical forest alpha diversity at a landscape scale. Quantifying patterns of tree species richness in the field is time consuming, especially in regions with over 100 tree species/ha. We examine species richness in a 50-ha plot in Barro Colorado Island in Panama and test if biophysical measurements of canopy reflectance from high-resolution satellite imagery and detailed vertical forest structure and topography from light detection and ranging (lidar) are associated with species richness across four tree size classes (>1, 1-10, >10, and >20 cm dbh) and three spatial scales (1, 0.25, and 0.04 ha). We use the 2010 tree inventory, including 204,757 individuals belonging to 301 species of freestanding woody plants or 166 ± 1.5 species/ha (mean ± SE), to compare with remote-sensing data. All remote-sensing metrics became less correlated with species richness as spatial resolution decreased from 1.0 ha to 0.04 ha and tree size increased from 1 cm to 20 cm dbh. When all stems with dbh > 1 cm in 1-ha plots were compared to remote-sensing metrics, standard deviation in canopy reflectance explained 13% of the variance in species richness. The standard deviations of canopy height and the topographic wetness index (TWI) derived from lidar were the best metrics to explain the spatial variance in species richness (15% and 24%, respectively). Using multiple regression models, we made predictions of species richness across Barro Colorado Island (BCI) at the 1-ha spatial scale for different tree size classes. We predicted variation in tree species richness among all plants (adjusted r² = 0.35) and trees with dbh > 10 cm (adjusted r² = 0.25). However, the best model results were for understory trees and shrubs (dbh 1-10 cm) (adjusted r² = 0.52) that comprise the majority of species richness in tropical forests. Our results indicate that high

  7. Functional classes and equivalence relations

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, Murray; Wynne, Constance K.; Maguire, Russell W.; Barnes, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Three adult subjects were taught a set of two-choice simultaneous discriminations, with three positive and three negative stimuli; all possible combinations of positive and negative stimuli yielded nine different pairs. The discriminations were repeatedly reversed and rereversed, the former positive stimuli becoming negative and the former negative stimuli becoming positive. With all subjects, a reversal of the contingencies for one pair of stimuli became sufficient to change their responses to all of the other pairs. The reversals had produced functional stimulus classes. Then, all subjects showed conditional discriminations emerging between members of a functional class; given a sample from one class and comparisons from both classes, they selected the comparison that was in the same class as the sample. Next, 2 of the subjects showed that the within-class conditional relations possessed the symmetric and transitive properties of equivalence relations; after having been taught to relate new stimuli to existing class members, the subjects then matched other class members to the new stimuli. Subsequent tests of two-choice discriminations showed that the conditional discriminations had transferred functional class membership to the new stimuli. The 3rd subject, who did not show equivalence relations among functional class members, was also found to have lost the within-class conditional relations after the equivalence tests. PMID:16812597

  8. Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sassler, Sharon; Miller, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning cohabitation literature, research has failed to examine social class variation in processes of forming and advancing such unions. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 122 working- and middle-class cohabitors, we examine the duration between dating and moving in together, reasons for cohabiting, and subsequent plans. Transitions to cohabitation are more rapid among the working class. Respondents often cohabited for practical reasons—out of financial necessity, because it was convenient, or to meet a housing need. Regardless of social class status, few couples move in together as a “trial marriage.” Nonetheless, middle-class cohabitors were more likely to have become engaged than their working-class counterparts. Our findings indicate the need to reassess common beliefs regarding the role served by cohabitation and suggest that cohabitation has become another location where family outcomes are diverging by social class. PMID:23504506

  9. Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes.

    PubMed

    Sassler, Sharon; Miller, Amanda J

    2011-04-01

    Despite the burgeoning cohabitation literature, research has failed to examine social class variation in processes of forming and advancing such unions. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 122 working- and middle-class cohabitors, we examine the duration between dating and moving in together, reasons for cohabiting, and subsequent plans. Transitions to cohabitation are more rapid among the working class. Respondents often cohabited for practical reasons-out of financial necessity, because it was convenient, or to meet a housing need. Regardless of social class status, few couples move in together as a "trial marriage." Nonetheless, middle-class cohabitors were more likely to have become engaged than their working-class counterparts. Our findings indicate the need to reassess common beliefs regarding the role served by cohabitation and suggest that cohabitation has become another location where family outcomes are diverging by social class.

  10. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  11. Is Montgomery County's Housing Policy One Answer to Baltimore's Education Achievement Gap? The Abell Report. Volume 24, No.3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    In 1966, the Coleman Report firmly established the link between a family's socioeconomic status and a child's educational outcomes. Known as the "income achievement gap," the disparity between the achievement of poor and rich children has become entrenched in our nation's educational landscape: with few exceptions, schools…

  12. Network Class Superposition Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carl A. B.; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., for the yeast cell cycle process [1]), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix , which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for derived from Boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with . We show how to generate Derrida plots based on . We show that -based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on . We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology Boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for , for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses. PMID:23565141

  13. Network class superposition analyses.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Carl A B; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., ≈ 10(30) for the yeast cell cycle process), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix T, which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for T derived from boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying T to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with T. We show how to generate Derrida plots based on T. We show that T-based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on T. We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for T, for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses. PMID:23565141

  14. Lithium-rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhang, Andrew J.; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G.; Cunha, Katia

    2016-03-01

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  15. Microporoelastic Modeling of Organic-Rich Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosh Sokhan Monfared, S.; Abedi, S.; Ulm, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Organic-rich shale is an extremely complex, naturally occurring geo-composite. The heterogeneous nature of organic-rich shale and its anisotropic behavior pose grand challenges for characterization, modeling and engineering design The intricacy of organic-rich shale, in the context of its mechanical and poromechanical properties, originates in the presence of organic/inorganic constituents and their interfaces as well as the occurrence of porosity and elastic anisotropy, at multiple length scales. To capture the contributing mechanisms, of 1st order, responsible for organic-rich shale complex behavior, we introduce an original approach for micromechanical modeling of organic-rich shales which accounts for the effect of maturity of organics on the overall elasticity through morphology considerations. This morphology contribution is captured by means of an effective media theory that bridges the gap between immature and mature systems through the choice of system's microtexture; namely a matrix-inclusion morphology (Mori-Tanaka) for immature systems and a polycrystal/granular morphology for mature systems. Also, we show that interfaces play a role on the effective elasticity of mature, organic-rich shales. The models are calibrated by means of ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements of elastic properties and validated by means of nanoindentation results. Sensitivity analyses using Spearman's Partial Rank Correlation Coefficient shows the importance of porosity and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) as key input parameters for accurate model predictions. These modeling developments pave the way to reach a "unique" set of clay properties and highlight the importance of depositional environment, burial and diagenetic processes on overall mechanical and poromechanical behavior of organic-rich shale. These developments also emphasize the importance of understanding and modeling clay elasticity and organic maturity on the overall rock behavior which is of critical importance for a

  16. A Casualty in the Class War: Canada's Medicare

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    “There's class warfare, all right, but it's my class, the rich class, that's making war, and we're winning.” (Warren Buffett, five years ago.) Last year's Occupy Wall Street movement suggested that people are finally catching on. Note, making war: Buffett meant that there was deliberate intent and agency behind the huge transfer of wealth, since 1980, from the 99% to the 1%. Nor is the war metaphorical. There are real casualties, even if no body bags. Sadly, much Canadian commentary on inequality is pitiably naïve or deliberately obfuscatory. The 1% have captured national governments. The astronomical cost of American elections excludes the 99%. In Canada, parliamentary government permits one man to rule as a de facto dictator. The 1% don't like medicare. PMID:23372577

  17. A Casualty in the Class War: Canada's Medicare.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert G

    2012-02-01

    "There's class warfare, all right, but it's my class, the rich class, that's making war, and we're winning." (Warren Buffett, five years ago.) Last year's Occupy Wall Street movement suggested that people are finally catching on. Note, making war: Buffett meant that there was deliberate intent and agency behind the huge transfer of wealth, since 1980, from the 99% to the 1%. Nor is the war metaphorical. There are real casualties, even if no body bags. Sadly, much Canadian commentary on inequality is pitiably naïve or deliberately obfuscatory. The 1% have captured national governments. The astronomical cost of American elections excludes the 99%. In Canada, parliamentary government permits one man to rule as a de facto dictator. The 1% don't like medicare. PMID:23372577

  18. Exploring social class: voices of inter-class couples.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Teresa; Melendez-Rhodes, Tatiana; Althusius, Erin; Hergic, Sara; Sleeman, Gillian; Ton, Nicky Kieu My; Zimpfer-Bak, A J

    2013-01-01

    Social class is not often discussed or examined in-depth in couple and family therapy research and literature even though social class shapes familial relationships and is considered an important variable in marital satisfaction. In this qualitative study, we explored the perceptions of eight couples who made lasting commitments across class lines by asking them about the impact of their social class backgrounds on their relationships. Three categories of themes emerged including: (a) differences and similarities in values and attitudes toward education, work, money, and class awareness/classism, (b) relationship issues involving families of origin, friends, and class-based couple conflict, and (c) differences in economic resources, social capital and privileges/opportunities. Implications for assessment and treatment of couples are included. PMID:25073843

  19. Observations of EUV Waves in 3He-rich Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bučík, R.; Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.; Mason, G. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Small 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events with their anomalous abundances, markedly different from the solar system, provide evidence for a unique acceleration mechanism that operates routinely near solar active regions. Although the events are sometimes accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), it is believed that mass and isotopic fractionation is produced directly in the flare sites on the Sun. We report on a large-scale extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) coronal wave observed in association with 3He-rich SEP events. In the two examples discussed, the observed waves were triggered by minor flares and appeared concurrently with EUV jets and type III radio bursts, but without CMEs. The energy spectra from one event are consistent with so-called class-1 (characterized by power laws) 3He-rich SEP events, while the other with class-2 (characterized by rounded 3He and Fe spectra), suggesting different acceleration mechanisms in the two. The observation of EUV waves suggests that large-scale disturbances, in addition to more commonly associated jets, may be responsible for the production of 3He-rich SEP events.

  20. OBSERVATIONS OF EUV WAVES IN {sup 3}He-RICH SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bucík, R.; Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.; Mason, G. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2015-10-10

    Small {sup 3}He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events with their anomalous abundances, markedly different from the solar system, provide evidence for a unique acceleration mechanism that operates routinely near solar active regions. Although the events are sometimes accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), it is believed that mass and isotopic fractionation is produced directly in the flare sites on the Sun. We report on a large-scale extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) coronal wave observed in association with {sup 3}He-rich SEP events. In the two examples discussed, the observed waves were triggered by minor flares and appeared concurrently with EUV jets and type III radio bursts, but without CMEs. The energy spectra from one event are consistent with so-called class-1 (characterized by power laws) {sup 3}He-rich SEP events, while the other with class-2 (characterized by rounded {sup 3}He and Fe spectra), suggesting different acceleration mechanisms in the two. The observation of EUV waves suggests that large-scale disturbances, in addition to more commonly associated jets, may be responsible for the production of {sup 3}He-rich SEP events.

  1. Energetics of calcium-rich dolomite

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, L.; Navrotsky, A.; Reeder, R.J.

    1995-03-01

    The enthalpy of formation of sedimentary Ca-rich dolomite has been determined by oxide melt calorimetry. The results show that Ca-rich dolomite is energetically different from well-ordered stoichiometric dolomite. The enthalpy of formation from calcite and magnesite becomes strongly more endothermic with increasing excess Ca content. This supports the idea that the substitution of Ca in the Mg layer of dolomite is energetically unfavorable. Ca-rich dolomite is unstable relative to well-ordered stoichiometric dolomite and calcite. The enthalpy behavior for excess Ca substitution in dolomite is different from that of Mg substitution in calcite; the enthalpy change is much larger in magnitude in dolomite and is more strongly dependent on composition. Differences in cation order as well as the presence of a modulated structure and low-symmetry domains in Ca-rich dolomite cannot be discerned from the enthalpy data. The findings confirm that the growth and occurrence of Ca-rich dolomite in sedimentary environments must be attributed to kinetic factors rather than to equilibrium. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Energetics of calcium-rich dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, L.; Navrotsky, A.; Reeder, R. J.

    1995-03-01

    The enthalpy of formation of sedimentary Ca-rich dolomite has been determined by oxide melt calorimetry. The results show that Ca-rich dolomite is energetically different from well-ordered stoichiometric dolomite. The enthalpy of formation from calcite and magnesite becomes strongly more endothermic with increasing excess Ca content. This supports the idea that the substitution of Ca in the Mg layer of dolomite is energetically unfavorable. Ca-rich dolomite is unstable relative to well-ordered stoichiometric dolomite and calcite. The enthalpy behavior for excess Ca substitution in dolomite is different from that of Mg substitution in calcite; the enthalpy change is much larger in magnitude in dolomite and is more strongly dependent on composition. Differences in cation order as well as the presence of a modulated structure and low-symmetry domains in Ca-rich dolomite cannot be discerned from the enthalpy data. The findings confirm that the growth and occurrence of Ca-rich dolomite in sedimentary environments must be attributed to kinetic factors rather than to equilibrium.

  3. The distribution of nearby rich clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Huchra, John P.; Geller, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    Redshifts are acquired for a complete sample of 351 Abell clusters with tenth-ranked galaxy magnitudes (m10) less than or equal to 16.5, including 115 entirely new cluster redshifts. Analysis of the spatial distribution of these clusters reveals no clustering on scales larger than 75/h Mpc. The correlation length is 20.0 (+/-4.3)/h Mpc, consistent with the results from other surveys. The frequency of voids with radii of order 60/h Mpc or less is consistent with the form and amplitude of the observed two-point correlation function. There is no significant difference between the clustering properties of clusters with RC = 0 and RC not less than 1. A percolation analysis yields 23 superclusters, 17 of which are new. The superclusters are not significantly elongated in the radial direction; large-scale peculiar motions are of order 1000 km/s or less.

  4. Species richness changes lag behind climate change.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Rosa; Megías, Adela González; Hill, Jane K; Braschler, Brigitte; Willis, Stephen G; Collingham, Yvonne; Fox, Richard; Roy, David B; Thomas, Chris D

    2006-06-22

    Species-energy theory indicates that recent climate warming should have driven increases in species richness in cool and species-poor parts of the Northern Hemisphere. We confirm that the average species richness of British butterflies has increased since 1970-82, but much more slowly than predicted from changes of climate: on average, only one-third of the predicted increase has taken place. The resultant species assemblages are increasingly dominated by generalist species that were able to respond quickly. The time lag is confirmed by the successful introduction of many species to climatically suitable areas beyond their ranges. Our results imply that it may be decades or centuries before the species richness and composition of biological communities adjusts to the current climate. PMID:16777739

  5. Gas Rich Mergers in Disk Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, C. B.; Veilleux, V.; Kawata, D.; Martel, H.; Gibson, B. K.

    In order to explain disk galaxy formation within the hierarchical structure formation, it seems that gas rich mergers must play an important role. We review here our previous studies which have shown the importance of mergers at high redshift being gas rich, in the formation of both the stellar halo and thick disk components of disk galaxies. Regulation of star formation in the building blocks of our galaxy is required to form a low mass low metallicity stellar halo. This regulation results in high redshift, gas rich mergers during which the thick disk forms. In these proceedings, we categorise stars from our simulated disk galaxy into thin and thick disk components by using the Toomre diagram. Rotation velocity, metallicity and age histograms of the two populations are presented, along with alpha element abundances (oxygen, silicone, magnesium), age-height above the plane, age-radius, metallicity-height, and metalicity-radius gradients.

  6. Probing neutron rich matter with parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Many compact and energetic astrophysical systems are made of neutron rich matter. In contrast, most terrestrial nuclei involve approximately symmetric nuclear matter with more equal numbers of neutrons and protons. However, heavy nuclei have a surface region that contains many extra neutrons. Precision measurements of this neutron rich skin can determine properties of neutron rich matter. Parity violating electron scattering provides a uniquely clean probe of neutrons, because the weak charge of a neutron is much larger than that of a proton. We describe first results and future plans for the Jefferson Laboratory experiment PREX that measures the thickness of the neutron skin in 208Pb. Another JLAB experiment CREX will measure the neutron radius of 48Ca and test recent microscopic calculations of this neutron rich 48 nucleon system. Finally, we show how measuring parity violation at multiple momentum transfers can determine not just the neutron radius but the full radial structure of the neutron density in 48Ca. A neutron star is eighteen orders of magnitude larger than a nucleus (km vs fm) but both the star and the neutron rich nuclear skin are made of the same neutrons, with the same strong interactions, and the same equation of state. A large pressure pushes neutrons out against surface tension and gives a thick neutron skin. Therefore, PREX will constrain the equation of state of neutron rich matter and improve predictions for the structure of neutron stars. Supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  7. He-3-rich flares - A possible explanation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A plasma mechanism is proposed to explain the dramatic enhancements in He-3 observed in He-3-rich flares. It is shown that a common current instability in the corona may heat ambient He-3(2+) over any other ion and thus may preferentially inject He-3 into the flare acceleration process. This mechanism operates when the abundance of He-4 and heavier elements is larger than normal in the coronal plasma. It may also preferentially heat and thus inject certain ions of iron. The mechanism thus provides a possible explanation for the observed correlation between He-3 and heavy enhancements in He-3-rich flares.

  8. A gas-RICH detector for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francke, T.; Bergström, D.; Boezio, M.; Carlson, P.; Suffert, M.

    1999-08-01

    A gas-RICH counter using a C4F10 radiator and pad readout has been developed. The good transmission of the optical elements together with a low noise level in the electronics results that on average 12 photoelectrons are detected per event for /Z=1 particles with /β~1. The reconstructed Cherenkov angle has a resolution of 1.2mrad. The RICH detector is an important part of a balloon borne experiment, CAPRICE, which measures the flux of antiprotons and positrons in the cosmic radiation.

  9. Patterns of fine-scale plant species richness in dry grasslands across the eastern Balkan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palpurina, Salza; Chytrý, Milan; Tzonev, Rossen; Danihelka, Jiří; Axmanová, Irena; Merunková, Kristina; Duchoň, Mário; Karakiev, Todor

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale plant species richness varies across habitats, climatic and biogeographic regions, but the large-scale context of this variation is insufficiently explored. The patterns at the borders between biomes harbouring rich but different floras are of special interest. Dry grasslands of the eastern Balkan Peninsula, situated in the Eurasian forest-steppe zone and developed under Mediterranean influence, are a specific case of such biome transition. However, there are no studies assessing the patterns of fine-scale species richness and their underlying factors across the eastern Balkans. To explore these patterns, we sampled dry and semi-dry grasslands (phytosociological class Festuco-Brometea) across Bulgaria and SE Romania. In total, 172 vegetation plots of 10 × 10 m2 were sampled, in which all vascular plant species were recorded, soil depth was measured, and soil samples were collected and analysed in a laboratory for pH and plant-available nutrients. Geographic coordinates were used to extract selected climatic variables. Regression trees and linear regressions were used to quantify the relationships between species richness and environmental variables. Climatic factors were identified as the main drivers of species richness: (1) Species richness was strongly positively correlated with the mean temperature of the coldest month: sub-Mediterranean areas of S and E Bulgaria, characterized by warmer winters, were more species-rich. (2) Outside the sub-Mediterranean areas, species richness strongly increased with annual precipitation, which was primarily controlled by altitude. (3) Bedrock type and soil pH also significantly affected dry grassland richness outside the sub-Mediterranean areas. These results suggest that fine-scale species richness of dry grasslands over large areas is driven by processes at the regional level, especially by the difference in the species pools of large regions, in our case the Continental and Mediterranean biogeographic regions

  10. A radar survey of M- and X-class asteroids II. Summary and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Michael K.; Clark, Beth Ellen; Ockert-Bell, Maureen; Nolan, Michael C.; Howell, Ellen S.; Magri, Christopher; Giorgini, Jon D.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Ostro, Steven J.; Harris, Alan W.; Warner, Brian D.; Stephens, Robert D.; Mueller, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Using the S-band radar at Arecibo Observatory, we observed six new M-class main-belt asteroids (MBAs), and re-observed one, bringing the total number of Tholen M-class asteroids observed with radar to 19. The mean radar albedo for all our targets is σ=0.28±0.13, significantly higher than the mean radar albedo of every other class (Magri, C., Nolan, M.C., Ostro, S.J., Giorgini, J.D. [2007]. Icarus 186, 126-151). Seven of these objects (Asteroids 16 Psyche, 129 Antigone, 216 Kleopatra, 347 Pariana, 758 Mancunia, 779 Nina, 785 Zwetana) have radar albedos indicative of a very high metal content (meanσ=0.41±0.13), and consistent with a remnant iron/nickel core interpretation (irons) or exotic high metal meteorite types such as CB. We propose designating these high radar albedo objects as Mm. Two asteroids, 110 Lydia and 678 Fredegundis, have more moderate radar albedos (meanσ=0.22), but exhibit high values (σ˜0.35) at some rotation phases suggesting a significant metal content. The remaining 10 objects have moderate radar albedos (σ=0.20±0.06) at all rotation phases. Most of our targets have visible/near-infrared spectra (Hardersen, P.S., Gaffey, M.J., Abell, P.A. [2005]. Icarus 175, 141-158; Fornasier, S., Clark, B.E., Dotto, E., Migliorini, A., Ockert-Bell, M., Barucci, M.A. [2009]. Icarus, submitted for publication) that indicate the presence of at least some silicate phases. All of the non-Mm asteroids show a positive correlation between visual and radar albedo but the reasons for this are not clear. All of the higher radar albedo targets (the 7 Mm asteroids, Lydia, and Fredegundis) show moderate to large variations in radar albedo with rotation phase. We suggest that their high radar reflectivity exaggerates irregularities in the asteroid shape to cause this behavior. One-third of our targets show evidence for asteroid-scale concavities or bifurcation. Based on all the evidence available, we suggest that most Tholen M-class asteroids are not remnant iron

  11. 47 CFR 80.1053 - Prohibition on certification, manufacture, importation, sale or use of Class A, Class B, Class S...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prohibition on certification, manufacture... certification, manufacture, importation, sale or use of Class A, Class B, Class S, and INMARSAT-E EPIRBs. The manufacture, importation, or sale in the United States of Class A, Class B, Class S, or INMARSAT-E EPIRBs...

  12. Class Matters in the Interview Setting? Positionality, Situatedness and Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellor, Jody; Ingram, Nicola; Abrahams, Jessie; Beedell, Phoebe

    2014-01-01

    In this article we argue that despite methodological and analytical advancements in the field of social class research, these developments have not led to a wholehearted discussion about class positionality and situatedness in relation to interviewer-participant dynamics. Despite--or perhaps due to--this methodological gap, there remains an…

  13. Technology-Rich Schools Up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Barbara B.; Schrum, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    This article observes that schools that use technology well have key commonalities, including a project-based curriculum and supportive, distributed leadership. The authors' research into tech-rich schools revealed that schools used three strategies to integrate technology successfully. They did so by establishing the vision and culture,…

  14. RICH Theory: The Promotion of Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.

    2004-01-01

    The acronym RICH stands for resources, intimacy, competence, and health. These characteristics are purported to define psychological health, which is assumed to be synonymous with happiness. The four characteristics encompass all possible reinforcers, are relatively obtainable by all individuals, are interrelated to the extent they incorporate…

  15. Experiments with neutron-rich isomeric beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rykaczewski, K. |; Grzywacz, R. |; Lewitowicz, M.; Pfuetzner, M.; Grawe, H.

    1998-01-01

    A review of experimental results obtained on microsecond-isomeric states in neutron-rich nuclei produced in fragmentation reactions and studied with SISSI-Alpha-LISE3 spectrometer system at GANIL Caen is given. The perspectives of experiments based on secondary reactions with isomeric beams are presented.

  16. The rich detail of cultural symbol systems.

    PubMed

    Read, Dwight W

    2014-08-01

    The goal of forming a science of intentional behavior requires a more richly detailed account of symbolic systems than is assumed by the authors. Cultural systems are not simply the equivalent in the ideational domain of culture of the purported Baldwin Effect in the genetic domain. PMID:25162879

  17. Mathematically Rich, Investigative Tasks for Teaching Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    A challenge for teachers is to incorporate the Standards for Mathematical Practice (CCSSI 2010) throughout their teaching of mathematics so that the Common Core Standards do not revert back to a purely content-driven curriculum. One way to achieve this is through the use of mathematically rich, investigative tasks. These tasks encourage students…

  18. Power Divider for Waveforms Rich in Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III

    2005-01-01

    A method for dividing the power of an electronic signal rich in harmonics involves the use of an improved divider topology. A divider designed with this topology could be used, for example, to propagate a square-wave signal in an amplifier designed with a push-pull configuration to enable the generation of more power than could be generated in another configuration.

  19. A Rich Metadata Filesystem for Scientific Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Hoang

    2012-01-01

    As scientific research becomes more data intensive, there is an increasing need for scalable, reliable, and high performance storage systems. Such data repositories must provide both data archival services and rich metadata, and cleanly integrate with large scale computing resources. ROARS is a hybrid approach to distributed storage that provides…

  20. CAPEOPEN.NET CLASS LIBRARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cape-Open for .Net class library is a collection of classes that implement the Cape-Open v.1.0 interfaces in the .Net framework. This is a tool to aid process modeling component (PMC) developers in producing CAPE-OPEN compliant objects using the latest version of the Visual S...

  1. Automatic discovery of optimal classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John; Freeman, Don; Self, Matthew

    1986-01-01

    A criterion, based on Bayes' theorem, is described that defines the optimal set of classes (a classification) for a given set of examples. This criterion is transformed into an equivalent minimum message length criterion with an intuitive information interpretation. This criterion does not require that the number of classes be specified in advance, this is determined by the data. The minimum message length criterion includes the message length required to describe the classes, so there is a built in bias against adding new classes unless they lead to a reduction in the message length required to describe the data. Unfortunately, the search space of possible classifications is too large to search exhaustively, so heuristic search methods, such as simulated annealing, are applied. Tutored learning and probabilistic prediction in particular cases are an important indirect result of optimal class discovery. Extensions to the basic class induction program include the ability to combine category and real value data, hierarchical classes, independent classifications and deciding for each class which attributes are relevant.

  2. Class and SLA: Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how class might be brought to the fore as an identity inscription in studies of second language learning, alongside other identity inscriptions such as gender, ethnicity and national identity, which have been the focus of rather more research. It begins by clarifying what is meant by class through a brief discussion of the…

  3. [Modified Class II tunnel preparation].

    PubMed

    Rimondini, L; Baroni, C

    1991-05-15

    Tunnel preparations for restoration of Class II carious lesions in primary molars preserve the marginal ridge and minimize sacrifice of healthy tooth substructure. Materials with improved bonding to tooth structure and increase potential for fluoride release allow Class II restorations without "extension for prevention". PMID:1864420

  4. Visions of the Special Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safford, Philip L.; Safford, Elizabeth J.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how the advent of public school special day-classes for children with disabilities marked a major shift in the service model in the direction of educational and societal inclusion. The different visions of the classes as cluster, clinic, and clearinghouse are explained. (Author/CR)

  5. A Touch of...Class!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netten, Joan W., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    A collection of ideas for class activities in elementary and secondary language classes includes a vocabulary review exercise and games of memory, counting, vocabulary, flashcard tic-tac-toe, dice, trashcans, questioning, and spelling. Some are designed specifically for French. (MSE)

  6. Eustace Tilley Comes to Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arin, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Of all the reasons to use "The New Yorker" in a college writing class, the most compelling may be that its articles go beyond--well beyond--the five-paragraph model. Why, oh why, did that paradigm become such a fixture in composition courses? Students in the author's writing classes invariably suppose they can compose a quick introduction, add…

  7. Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassler, Sharon; Miller, Amanda J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning cohabitation literature, research has failed to examine social class variation in processes of forming and advancing such unions. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 122 working- and middle-class cohabitors, we examine the duration between dating and moving in together, reasons for cohabiting, and subsequent plans.…

  8. Tucker2 Hierarchical Classes Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceulemans, Eva; Van Mechelen, Iven

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new hierarchical classes model, called Tucker2-HICLAS, for binary three-way three-mode data. As any three-way hierarchical classes model, the Tucker2-HICLAS model includes a representation of the association relation among the three modes and a hierarchical classification of the elements of each mode. A distinctive feature of…

  9. Translanguaging in a Reading Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaish, Viniti; Subhan, Aidil

    2015-01-01

    Using translanguaging as a theoretical foundation, this paper analyses findings from a Grade 2 reading class for low achieving students, where Malay was used as a scaffold to teach English. Data come from one class in one school in Singapore and its Learning Support Programme (LSP), which is part of a larger research project on biliteracy. The LSP…

  10. Class, Identity, and Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities of working with White, working-class teacher education students to explore the "complex social trajectory" (Reay in Women's Stud Int Forum 20(2):225-233, 1997a, p. 19) of class border crossing as they progress through college. Through analysis of a course that I have developed, "Education and the American…

  11. Student Engagement and Marketing Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven A.; Hunter, Gary L.; Melton, Horace; Goodwin, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    A study is reported that investigates the goals underlying undergraduate students' engagement in their major classes, nonmajor classes, and in extracurricular activities. The qualitative study employs both focus groups and goal-mapping exercises. The results suggest that students tend to focus on utilitarian, attribute-level considerations mainly…

  12. The relationship between community species richness and the richness of the parasite community in Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Tavis K; Sukhdeo, Michael V K

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between the metazoan parasite community in a focal species, Fundulus heteroclitus , and the species richness of the free-living community. Four distinct salt marsh areas were selected in order to reflect a gradient in free-living species richness and time post-restoration (unrestored, 0, 10, and 20 yr post-restoration). A total of 960 fish was studied, with 30 collected per site in each of 8 consecutive seasons between 2005 and 2007. Species richness and abundance of birds, fish, and benthic macroinvertebrates varied significantly between sites. However, increasing richness in the free-living community was neither positively nor negatively correlated with richness in the parasite infracommunity in F. heteroclitus . These results demonstrate that the relationship between community species richness and parasite richness is not linear. The data suggest that the diversity of parasites may be more correlated with measures of community composition, such as the structure and cohesiveness of the food web, rather than with prevailing measures of biodiversity.

  13. The relationship between community species richness and the richness of the parasite community in Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Tavis K; Sukhdeo, Michael V K

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between the metazoan parasite community in a focal species, Fundulus heteroclitus , and the species richness of the free-living community. Four distinct salt marsh areas were selected in order to reflect a gradient in free-living species richness and time post-restoration (unrestored, 0, 10, and 20 yr post-restoration). A total of 960 fish was studied, with 30 collected per site in each of 8 consecutive seasons between 2005 and 2007. Species richness and abundance of birds, fish, and benthic macroinvertebrates varied significantly between sites. However, increasing richness in the free-living community was neither positively nor negatively correlated with richness in the parasite infracommunity in F. heteroclitus . These results demonstrate that the relationship between community species richness and parasite richness is not linear. The data suggest that the diversity of parasites may be more correlated with measures of community composition, such as the structure and cohesiveness of the food web, rather than with prevailing measures of biodiversity. PMID:23198795

  14. Notes on the Comparison Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solt, Stephanie

    This paper investigates the role of comparison classes in the semantics of gradable adjectives in the positive form, focusing on the case where the comparison class is expressed overtly via a for-phrase (e.g. John is tall for a jockey). Two central questions are addressed: what information does the comparison class provide, and how is this information integrated compositionally? It is shown that the standard of comparison invoked by the positive form can be analyzed as a range of values whose width is based on the degree of dispersion in the comparison class. Compositionally, the comparison class can be analyzed as an argument of a null positive morpheme (contra Kennedy [13]), in parallel to recent proposals for the superlative (e.g. Heim [9]). The implications of the analysis for the choice between degree- and delineation-based analyses of gradable adjectives are discussed.

  15. Control Class Summaries and Control Class IV from April 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-02-22

    The D0 cryogenic control system is a complicated system with many facets. Because of the large number and variety of features in the system, a series of ongoing control system training seminars, or control classes, were created in order to keep people up to date on the operation of the system. As of the writing of this engineering note, there have been four classes. The original lecture notes from each class can be found in the cryogenic control room at the D0 Assembly Building, or in the Co-op office. This note provides a summary of the first three control classes, and it includes the entire set of notes from the fourth class, which was held in April of 1990. This class was taught by Jeff Wendlandt and Dan Markley. Dan should be consulted for more complete explanations than those given in the notes. The notes are, in fact, more of a reference for someone who has some experience with the system, than they are a training manual. Most of the pages include pictures and printouts of different menus and functions, useful for finding details without searching through the actual program. In general, this note serves as a pointer to the existence of the control class lecture notes, and as an explanation of their overall contents and purpose.

  16. Elite International Schools in the Global South: Transnational Space, Class Relationalities and the "Middling" International Schoolteacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarc, Paul; Mishra Tarc, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    The elite international school is a rich site for sociological inquiry in global times. In this paper, we conceptualize the international school as a transnational space of agonist social class-making given the dynamic positioning of the complement of international school actors. We position international schoolteachers in the middle of these…

  17. Determining pathogen and indicator levels in Class B municipal organic residuals used for land application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are nutrient rich organic residuals that are currently in use to amend soils for food production. Treatment requirements to inactivate pathogens for production of Class A biosolids are energy intensive. One less energy intensive alternative is to treat biosolids to Cl...

  18. Running Shoes, Auto Workers, and Labor: Business Writing Pedagogy in the Working-Class College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazurek, Raymond A.

    2002-01-01

    Considers how the introductory business writing course is appropriate for the development of critical literacy, especially for students at second-tier, working-class colleges. Notes that the opposition between labor and management offers rich opportunities for the critical examination of corporate rhetoric, opportunities that are as relevant in…

  19. Activities Contributing a Great Deal to the Students' Interactive Skills in Foreign Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asatryan, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    While teaching speaking it is desired to provide a rich environment in class for meaningful communication to take place. With this aim, various speaking activities can contribute a great deal to students in developing their interactive skills necessary for life. These activities make students active in the learning process and at the same time…

  20. Mapping Lunar Chemistry with CLASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, P.

    2012-07-01

    The Chandrayaan-2 Large Area Soft x-ray Spectrometer (CLASS) is planned to be flown on the second Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-2. It aims to map elemental abundance on the lunar surface by measuring X-ray Fluorescence emission when solar x-rays are incident. The primary objective of CLASS is to quantitatively estimate the abundance of the major elements Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti and Fe on the lunar surface at a spatial resolution of 25 km. CLASS will be able to detect Mg, Al and Si signatures at this scale even during a low intensity A-class solar flare, quantify abundance from B-class flares and above, and obtain high Z elemental abundance during brighter flares (C-class and above). This instrument is a follow up to C1XS payload flown earlier on Chandrayaan-1, but with enhanced sensitivity and finer spatial resolution. CLASS will also study particle-induced x-ray emission in the lunar orbit. We will discuss the instrument configuration and developmental status.

  1. Weighted species richness outperforms species richness as predictor of biotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Anna; Yu, Jun; Wardle, David A; Trygg, Johan; Englund, Göran

    2016-01-01

    The species richness hypothesis, which predicts that species-rich communities should be better at resisting invasions than species-poor communities, has been empirically tested many times and is often poorly supported. In this study, we contrast the species richness hypothesis with four alternative hypotheses with the aim of finding better descriptors of invasion resistance. These alternative hypotheses state that resistance to invasions is determined by abiotic conditions, community saturation (i.e., the number of resident species relative to the maximum number of species that can be supported), presence/absence of key species, or weighted species richness. Weighted species richness is a weighted sum of the number of species, where each species' weight describes its contribution to resistance. We tested these hypotheses using data on the success of 571 introductions of four freshwater fish species into lakes throughout Sweden, i.e., Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), tench (Tinca tinca), zander (Sander lucioperca), and whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus). We found that weighted species richness best predicted invasion success. The weights describing the contribution of each resident species to community resistance varied considerably in both strength and sign. Positive resistance weights, which indicate that species repel invaders, were as common as negative resistance weights, which indicate facilitative interactions. This result can be contrasted with the implicit assumption of the original species richness hypothesis, that all resident species have negative effects on invader success. We argue that this assumption is unlikely to be true in natural communities, and thus that we expect that weighted species richness is a better predictor of invader success than the actual number of resident species.

  2. Transitory O-rich chemistry in heavily obscured C-rich post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; García-Lario, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Engels, D.; Perea-Calderón, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    Spitzer/IRS spectra of eleven heavily obscured C-rich sources rapidly evolving from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to Planetary Nebulae are presented. IRAM 30m observations for three of these post-AGBs are also reported. A few (3) of these sources are known to exhibit strongly variable maser emission of O-bearing molecules such as OH and H2 O, suggesting a transitory O-rich chemistry because of the quickly changing physical and chemical conditions in this short evolutionary phase. Interestingly, the Spitzer/IRS spectra show a rich circumstellar carbon chemistry, as revealed by the detection of small hydrocarbon molecules such as C2H2, C4H2, C6H2, C6H6, and HCN. Benzene is detected towards two sources, bringing up to three the total number of Galactic post-AGBs where this molecule has been detected. In addition, we report evidence for the possible detection of other hydrocarbon molecules like HC3N, CH3C2H, and CH3 in several of these sources. The available IRAM 30m data confirm that the central stars are C-rich - in despite of the presence of O-rich masers - and the presence of high velocity molecular outflows together with extreme AGB mass-loss rates (∼⃒10-4 Mʘ /yr). Our observations confirm the polymerization model of Cernicharo [1] that predicts a rich photochemistry in the neutral regions of these objects on timescales shorter than the dynamical evolution of the central HII region, leading to the formation of small C-rich molecules and a transitory O-rich chemistry.

  3. RICH Detector for Jefferson Labs CLAS12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotta, Richard; Torisky, Ben; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-10-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to its Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beams. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new hybrid Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 8 GeV/c momentum range. This detector will be used for a variety of Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments. Cherenkov light can be accurately detected by a large array of sophisticated Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT) and heavier particles, like kaons, will span the inner radii. We are presenting our work on the creation of the RICH's geometry within the CLAS12 java framework. This development is crucial for future calibration, reconstructions and analysis of the detector.

  4. Platelet rich plasma in ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Riestra, A C; Alonso-Herreros, J M; Merayo-Lloves, J

    2016-10-01

    The use of platelet-rich preparations has experienced a significant increase in recent years due to its role in tissue-repair and regeneration. The aim of this study is to examine the available evidence regarding the application of plasma rich in growth factors, and its variations, on the ocular surface. A review is also presented on the effects of platelet-derived growth factors, the implications of the preparation methods, and the existing literature on the safety and efficacy of these therapies in ocular surface diseases. Despite the widespread use of platelet preparations there is no consensus on the most appropriate preparation method, and growth factors concentration vary with different systems. These preparations have been used in the treatment of ocular surface diseases, such as dry eye or persistent epithelial defects, among others, with good safety and efficacy profiles, but further studies are needed to compare to the currently available alternatives.

  5. Rubidium-rich asymptotic giant branch stars.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, D A; García-Lario, P; Plez, B; D'Antona, F; Manchado, A; Trigo-Rodríguez, J M

    2006-12-15

    A long-debated issue concerning the nucleosynthesis of neutron-rich elements in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is the identification of the neutron source. We report intermediate-mass (4 to 8 solar masses) AGB stars in our Galaxy that are rubidium-rich as a result of overproduction of the long-lived radioactive isotope (87)Rb, as predicted theoretically 40 years ago. This finding represents direct observational evidence that the (22)Ne(alpha,n)(25)Mg reaction must be the dominant neutron source in these stars. These stars challenge our understanding of the late stages of the evolution of intermediate-mass stars and would have promoted a highly variable Rb/Sr environment in the early solar nebula. PMID:17095658

  6. The rich club phenomenon in the classroom

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, Luis M.; Cebrian, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of the online interactions held by college students and report on novel relationships between social structure and performance. Our results indicate that more frequent and intense social interactions generally imply better score for students engaging in them. We find that these interactions are hosted within a “rich-club”, mediated by persistent interactions among high performing students, which is created during the first weeks of the course. Low performing students try to engage in the club after it has been initially formed, and fail to produce reciprocity in their interactions, displaying more transient interactions and higher social diversity. Furthermore, high performance students exchange information by means of complex information cascades, from which low performing students are selectively excluded. Failure to engage in the rich club eventually decreases these students' communication activity towards the end of the course. PMID:23378908

  7. The semantic richness of abstract concepts

    PubMed Central

    Recchia, Gabriel; Jones, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    We contrasted the predictive power of three measures of semantic richness—number of features (NFs), contextual dispersion (CD), and a novel measure of number of semantic neighbors (NSN)—for a large set of concrete and abstract concepts on lexical decision and naming tasks. NSN (but not NF) facilitated processing for abstract concepts, while NF (but not NSN) facilitated processing for the most concrete concepts, consistent with claims that linguistic information is more relevant for abstract concepts in early processing. Additionally, converging evidence from two datasets suggests that when NSN and CD are controlled for, the features that most facilitate processing are those associated with a concept's physical characteristics and real-world contexts. These results suggest that rich linguistic contexts (many semantic neighbors) facilitate early activation of abstract concepts, whereas concrete concepts benefit more from rich physical contexts (many associated objects and locations). PMID:23205008

  8. RICH upgrade: Current status and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, A.; LHCb RICH Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). The second long shutdown of the LHC is currently scheduled to begin in 2018. During this period the LHCb experiment with all its sub-detectors will be upgraded in order to run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2 × 10^{33} cm-2s-1 and to read out data at a rate of 40MHz into a flexible software-based trigger. The Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) system will require new photon detectors and modifications of the optics of the upstream detector. Tests of the prototype of the smallest constituent of the new RICH system have been performed during testbeam sessions at the Test Beam Facility SPS North Area (CERN) in Autumn 2014.

  9. Pair correlations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    We started a program to study the ground-state properties of heavy, neutron-rich nuclei using the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) approximation. This appears at present to be the most realistic approach for heavy nuclei that contain many loosely bound valence neutrons. The two-neutron density obtained in this approach can be decomposed into two components, one associated with the mean field and one associated with the pairing field. The latter has a structure that is quite similar to the pair-density obtained by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian for a two-neutron halo, which was studied earlier. This allows comparison of the HFB solutions against numerically exact solutions for two-neutron halos. This work is in progress. We intend to apply the HFB method to predict the ground-state properties of heavier, more neutron-rich nuclei that may be produced at future radioactive beam facilities.

  10. The CLAS12 large area RICH detector

    SciTech Connect

    M. Contalbrigo, E. Cisbani, P. Rossi

    2011-05-01

    A large area RICH detector is being designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer as part of the 12 GeV upgrade program of the Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall-B. This detector is intended to provide excellent hadron identification from 3 GeV/c up to momenta exceeding 8 GeV/c and to be able to work at the very high design luminosity-up to 1035 cm2 s-1. Detailed feasibility studies are presented for two types of radiators, aerogel and liquid C6F14 freon, in conjunction with a highly segmented light detector in the visible wavelength range. The basic parameters of the RICH are outlined and the resulting performances, as defined by preliminary simulation studies, are reported.

  11. The CLAS12 large area RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contalbrigo, M.; Cisbani, E.; Rossi, P.

    2011-05-01

    A large area RICH detector is being designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer as part of the 12 GeV upgrade program of the Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall-B. This detector is intended to provide excellent hadron identification from 3 GeV/ c up to momenta exceeding 8 GeV/ c and to be able to work at the very high design luminosity-up to 10 35 cm 2 s -1. Detailed feasibility studies are presented for two types of radiators, aerogel and liquid C 6F 14 freon, in conjunction with a highly segmented light detector in the visible wavelength range. The basic parameters of the RICH are outlined and the resulting performances, as defined by preliminary simulation studies, are reported.

  12. Rubidium-rich asymptotic giant branch stars.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, D A; García-Lario, P; Plez, B; D'Antona, F; Manchado, A; Trigo-Rodríguez, J M

    2006-12-15

    A long-debated issue concerning the nucleosynthesis of neutron-rich elements in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is the identification of the neutron source. We report intermediate-mass (4 to 8 solar masses) AGB stars in our Galaxy that are rubidium-rich as a result of overproduction of the long-lived radioactive isotope (87)Rb, as predicted theoretically 40 years ago. This finding represents direct observational evidence that the (22)Ne(alpha,n)(25)Mg reaction must be the dominant neutron source in these stars. These stars challenge our understanding of the late stages of the evolution of intermediate-mass stars and would have promoted a highly variable Rb/Sr environment in the early solar nebula.

  13. Simplified Design Equations for Class-E Neural Prosthesis Transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Troyk, Philip; Hu, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Extreme miniaturization of implantable electronic devices is recognized as essential for the next generation of neural prostheses, owing to the need for minimizing the damage and disruption of the surrounding neural tissue. Transcutaneous power and data transmission via a magnetic link remains the most effective means of powering and controlling implanted neural prostheses. Reduction in the size of the coil, within the neural prosthesis, demands the generation of a high-intensity radio frequency magnetic field from the extracoporeal transmitter. The Class-E power amplifier circuit topology has been recognized as a highly effective means of producing large radio frequency currents within the transmitter coil. Unfortunately, design of a Class-E circuit is most often fraught by the need to solve a complex set of equations so as to implement both the zero-voltage-switching and zero-voltage-derivative-switching conditions that are required for efficient operation. This paper presents simple explicit design equations for designing the Class-E circuit topology. Numerical design examples are presented to illustrate the design procedure. PMID:23292784

  14. Protective Coats For Zinc-Rich Primers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis G, III

    1993-01-01

    Report describes tests of topcoats for inorganic zinc-rich primers on carbon steel. Topcoats intended to provide additional protection against corrosion in acidic, salty seacoast-air/rocket-engine-exhaust environment of Space Shuttle launch site. Tests focused on polyurethane topcoats on epoxy tie coats on primers. Part of study involved comparison between "high-build" coating materials and thin-film coating materials.

  15. Effective Interactions in Neutron-Rich Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sammarruca, F.; Krastev, P.; Barredo, W.

    2005-10-14

    We are generally concerned with probing the behavior of the isospin-asymmetric equation of state. In particular, we will discuss the one-body potentials for protons and neutrons obtained from our Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations of neutron-rich matter properties. We will also present predictions of proton-proton and neutron-neutron cross sections in the isospin-asymmetric nuclear medium.

  16. The E781 (SELEX) RICH detector

    SciTech Connect

    Engelfried, J.

    1997-06-01

    First results from a new RICH detector, operating in an experiment currently taking data - Fermilab E781 (SELEX), are presented. The detector utilizes a matrix of 2848 phototubes for the photocathode. In a 650 GeV/c ?r- beam the number of photons detected is 14 per ring, giving a Figure of Merit No of 106 cm-`. The ring radius resolution obtained is 1.2 %. Results showing the particle identification ability of the detector are discussed.

  17. Two decades of Neo-Marxist class analysis and health inequalities: A critical reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Muntaner, Carles; Ng, Edwin; Chung, Haejoo; Prins, Seth J

    2015-01-01

    Most population health researchers conceptualize social class as a set of attributes and material conditions of life of individuals. The empiricist tradition of ‘class as an individual attribute' equates class to an ‘observation', precluding the investigation of unobservable social mechanisms. Another consequence of this view of social class is that it cannot be conceptualized, measured, or intervened upon at the meso- or macro levels, being reduced to a personal attribute. Thus, population health disciplines marginalize rich traditions in Marxist theory whereby ‘class' is understood as a ‘hidden' social mechanism such as exploitation. Yet Neo-Marxist social class has been used over the last two decades in population health research as a way of understanding how health inequalities are produced. The Neo-Marxist approach views social class in terms of class relations that give persons control over productive assets and the labour power of others (property and managerial relations). We critically appraise the contribution of the Neo-Marxist approach during the last two decades and suggest realist amendments to understand class effects on the social determinants of health and health outcomes. We argue that when social class is viewed as a social causal mechanism it can inform social change to reduce health inequalities. PMID:26345311

  18. HOW TO FIND METAL-RICH ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Alan W.; Drube, Line

    2014-04-10

    The metal content of asteroids is of great interest, not only for theories of their origins and the evolution of the solar system but, in the case of near-Earth objects (NEOs), also for impact mitigation planning and endeavors in the field of planetary resources. However, since the reflection spectra of metallic asteroids are largely featureless, it is difficult to identify them and relatively few are known. We show how data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)/NEOWISE thermal-infrared survey and similar surveys, fitted with a simple thermal model, can reveal objects likely to be metal rich. We provide a list of candidate metal-rich NEOs. Our results imply that future infrared surveys with the appropriate instrumentation could discover many more metal-rich asteroids, providing valuable data for assessment of the impact hazard and the potential of NEOs as reservoirs of vital materials for future interplanetary space activities and, eventually perhaps, for use on Earth.

  19. 7 CFR 1006.51 - Class I differential, adjustments to Class I prices, and Class I price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Class Prices § 1006.51 Class I... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class I differential, adjustments to Class I prices, and Class I price. 1006.51 Section 1006.51 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  20. Class Size, Class Composition, and the Distribution of Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosworth, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Using richly detailed data on fourth- and fifth-grade students in the North Carolina public school system, I find evidence that students are assigned to classrooms in a non-random manner based on observable characteristics for a substantial portion of classrooms. Moreover, I find that this non-random assignment is statistically related to class…

  1. Automation of Presentation Record Production Based on Rich-Media Technology Using SNT Petri Nets Theory

    PubMed Central

    Martiník, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Rich-media describes a broad range of digital interactive media that is increasingly used in the Internet and also in the support of education. Last year, a special pilot audiovisual lecture room was built as a part of the MERLINGO (MEdia-rich Repository of LearnING Objects) project solution. It contains all the elements of the modern lecture room determined for the implementation of presentation recordings based on the rich-media technologies and their publication online or on-demand featuring the access of all its elements in the automated mode including automatic editing. Property-preserving Petri net process algebras (PPPA) were designed for the specification and verification of the Petri net processes. PPPA does not need to verify the composition of the Petri net processes because all their algebraic operators preserve the specified set of the properties. These original PPPA are significantly generalized for the newly introduced class of the SNT Petri process and agent nets in this paper. The PLACE-SUBST and ASYNC-PROC algebraic operators are defined for this class of Petri nets and their chosen properties are proved. The SNT Petri process and agent nets theory were significantly applied at the design, verification, and implementation of the programming system ensuring the pilot audiovisual lecture room functionality. PMID:26258164

  2. Universality classes of the generalized epidemic process on random networks.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kihong; Baek, Yongjoo; Ha, Meesoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2016-05-01

    We present a self-contained discussion of the universality classes of the generalized epidemic process (GEP) on Poisson random networks, which is a simple model of social contagions with cooperative effects. These effects lead to rich phase transitional behaviors that include continuous and discontinuous transitions with tricriticality in between. With the help of a comprehensive finite-size scaling theory, we numerically confirm static and dynamic scaling behaviors of the GEP near continuous phase transitions and at tricriticality, which verifies the field-theoretical results of previous studies. We also propose a proper criterion for the discontinuous transition line, which is shown to coincide with the bond percolation threshold.

  3. Universality classes of the generalized epidemic process on random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kihong; Baek, Yongjoo; Ha, Meesoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2016-05-01

    We present a self-contained discussion of the universality classes of the generalized epidemic process (GEP) on Poisson random networks, which is a simple model of social contagions with cooperative effects. These effects lead to rich phase transitional behaviors that include continuous and discontinuous transitions with tricriticality in between. With the help of a comprehensive finite-size scaling theory, we numerically confirm static and dynamic scaling behaviors of the GEP near continuous phase transitions and at tricriticality, which verifies the field-theoretical results of previous studies. We also propose a proper criterion for the discontinuous transition line, which is shown to coincide with the bond percolation threshold.

  4. Universality classes of the generalized epidemic process on random networks.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kihong; Baek, Yongjoo; Ha, Meesoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2016-05-01

    We present a self-contained discussion of the universality classes of the generalized epidemic process (GEP) on Poisson random networks, which is a simple model of social contagions with cooperative effects. These effects lead to rich phase transitional behaviors that include continuous and discontinuous transitions with tricriticality in between. With the help of a comprehensive finite-size scaling theory, we numerically confirm static and dynamic scaling behaviors of the GEP near continuous phase transitions and at tricriticality, which verifies the field-theoretical results of previous studies. We also propose a proper criterion for the discontinuous transition line, which is shown to coincide with the bond percolation threshold. PMID:27300907

  5. Consumer Education in Any Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingo, Rosetta F.

    1977-01-01

    Examples are offered of how the classroom teacher can blend consumer education into typewriting, business English, business math, and other classes by intentionally focusing on principles and concepts or by including it incidentally when the opportunity arises. (TA)

  6. Integrals of the Ising Class

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.

    2006-06-01

    From an experimental-mathematical perspective we analyze"Ising-class" integrals. Our experimental results involvedextreme-precision, multidimensional quadrature on intricate integrands;thus, highly parallel computation was required.

  7. Wildflower Collecting: A Class Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Sheila V.

    1976-01-01

    Advocates wildflower collecting as a class project, citing instances of interest in studies of soil composition, growing wildflowers, and increased student motivation toward the subject of botany as basis for the activity. (CP)

  8. Class Sizes and Dissadvantaged Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, David

    1978-01-01

    Describes a program in which smaller class groups for socially and culturally deprived children resulted in enhanced social attitudes and more responsive, mature behavior in interaction with both adults and peers. (Author/IRT)

  9. Statistical Descriptors of School Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohnes, Paul R.

    1972-01-01

    It may be useful in evaluation research to employ the class as the unit of analysis, assessing its syntality by a vector of distribution cumulants or indices for each of several input tests administered. (Author)

  10. Whole Class Laboratories: More Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon

    2016-03-01

    Typically, introductory physics courses are taught with a combination of lectures and laboratories in which students have opportunities to discover the natural laws through hands-on activities in small groups. This article reports the use of Google Drive, a free online document-sharing tool, in physics laboratories for pooling experimental data from the whole class. This pedagogical method was reported earlier, and the present article offers a few more examples of such "whole class" laboratories.

  11. Less than a Class Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kristin Redington

    2012-01-01

    The iPad holds amazing potential for classroom use. Just a few--or even only one--is enough to get results. Having a class set promotes traditional, whole-class instruction, but fewer iPads facilitate individualized and tailored instruction. In this article, the author discusses the potential of the iPad and suggests ways to put the iPad to use in…

  12. Two classes of speculative peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2001-10-01

    Speculation not only occurs in financial markets but also in numerous other markets, e.g. commodities, real estate, collectibles, and so on. Such speculative movements result in price peaks which share many common characteristics: same order of magnitude of duration with respect to amplitude, same shape (the so-called sharp-peak pattern). Such similarities suggest (at least as a first approximation) a common speculative behavior. However, a closer examination shows that in fact there are (at least) two distinct classes of speculative peaks. For the first, referred to as class U, (i) the amplitude of the peak is negatively correlated with the price at the start of the peak (ii) the ensemble coefficient of variation exhibits a trough. Opposite results are observed for the second class that we refer to as class S. Once these empirical observations have been made we try to understand how they should be interpreted. First, we show that the two properties are in fact related in the sense that the second is a consequence of the first. Secondly, by listing a number of cases belonging to each class we observe that the markets in the S-class offer collection of items from which investors can select those they prefer. On the contrary, U-markets consist of undifferentiated products for which a selection cannot be made in the same way. All prices considered in the paper are real (i.e., deflated) prices.

  13. New ligand platforms featuring boron-rich clusters as organomimetic substituents*,**

    PubMed Central

    Spokoyny, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    200 years of research with carbon-rich molecules have shaped the development of modern chemistry. Research pertaining to the chemistry of boron-rich species has historically trailed behind its more distinguished neighbor (carbon) in the periodic table. Notably, a potentially rich and, in many cases, unmatched field of coordination chemistry using boronrich clusters remains fundamentally underdeveloped. Our work has been devoted to examining several basic concepts related to the functionalization of icosahedral boron-rich clusters and their use as ligands, aimed at designing fundamentally new hybrid molecular motifs and materials. Particularly interesting are icosahedral carboranes, which can be regarded as 3D analogs of benzene. These species comprise a class of boron-rich clusters that were discovered in the 1950s during the “space race” while researchers were developing energetic materials for rocket fuels. Ultimately, the unique chemical and physical properties of carborane species, such as rigidity, indefinite stability to air and moisture, and 3D aromaticity, may allow one to access a set of properties not normally available in carbon-based chemistry. While technically these species are considered as inorganic clusters, the chemical properties they possess make these boron-rich species suitable for replacing and/or altering structural and functional features of the organic and organometallic molecules—a phenomenon best described as “organomimetic”. Aside from purely fundamental features associated with the organomimetic chemistry of icosahedral carboranes, their use can also provide new avenues in the development of systems relevant to solving current problems associated with energy production, storage, and conversion. PMID:24311823

  14. Photographs and Classroom Response Systems in Middle School Astronomy Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunju; Feldman, Allan

    2015-08-01

    In spite of being readily available, photographs have played a minor and passive role in science classes. In our study, we present an active way of using photographs in classroom discussions with the use of a classroom response system (CRS) in middle school astronomy classes to teach the concepts of day-night and seasonal change. In this new pedagogical method, students observe objects or phenomena in photographs and use the information to develop understanding of the scientific concepts. They share their ideas in classroom discussion with the assistance of the CRS. Pre- and posttest results showed that the new pedagogy helped students overcome primitive conceptions and enhanced their understanding of the concepts. The observation of the rich details of photographs played three pedagogical roles in classroom discussion: easing students' anxiety about learning a new scientific concept; continuous stimulus of learning; and as evidence or data.

  15. School Class Size: Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.; And Others

    This book synthesizes research evidence to demonstrate that 1) class size is strongly related to pupil achievement; 2) smaller classes are more conducive to improved pupil performance than larger classes; 3) smaller classes provide more opportunities to adapt learning programs to individual needs; 4) pupils in smaller classes have more interest in…

  16. Carbon-rich planet formation in a solar composition disk

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Mousis, Olivier; Petit, Jean-Marc

    2014-04-20

    The C to O ratio is a crucial determinant of the chemical properties of planets. The recent observation of WASP 12b, a giant planet with a C/O value larger than that estimated for its host star, poses a conundrum for understanding the origin of this elemental ratio in any given planetary system. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for enhancing the value of C/O in the disk through the transport and distribution of volatiles. We construct a model that computes the abundances of major C- and O-bearing volatiles under the influence of gas drag, sublimation, vapor diffusion, condensation, and coagulation in a multi-iceline 1+1D protoplanetary disk. We find a gradual depletion in water and carbon monoxide vapors inside the water's iceline, with carbon monoxide depleting slower than water. This effect increases the gaseous C/O and decreases the C/H ratio in this region to values similar to those found in WASP 12b's day side atmosphere. Giant planets whose envelopes were accreted inside the water's iceline should then display C/O values larger than those of their parent stars, making them members of the class of so-called carbon-rich planets.

  17. Tyrosine-rich Conopeptides Affect Voltage-gated K+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Imperial, Julita S.; Chen, Ping; Sporning, Annett; Terlau, Heinrich; Daly, Norelle L.; Craik, David J.; Alewood, Paul F.; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2008-01-01

    Two venom peptides, CPY-Pl1 (EU000528) and CPY-Fe1 (EU000529), characterized from the vermivorous marine snails Conus planorbis and Conus ferrugineus, define a new class of conopeptides, the conopeptide Y (CPY) family. The peptides have no disulfide cross-links and are 30 amino acids long; the high content of tyrosine is unprecedented for any native gene product. The CPY peptides were chemically synthesized and shown to be biologically active upon injection into both mice and Caenorhabditis elegans; activity on mammalian Kv1 channel isoforms was demonstrated using an oocyte heterologous expression system, and selectivity for Kv1.6 was found. NMR spectroscopy revealed that the peptides were unstructured in aqueous solution; however, a helical region including residues 12–18 for one peptide, CPY-Pl1, formed in trifluoroethanol buffer. Clones obtained from cDNA of both species encoded prepropeptide precursors that shared a unique signal sequence, indicating that these peptides are encoded by a novel gene family. This is the first report of tyrosine-rich bioactive peptides in Conus venom. PMID:18505731

  18. Group Work Tests for Context-Rich Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The group work test is an assessment strategy that promotes higher-order thinking skills for solving context-rich problems. With this format, teachers are able to pose challenging, nuanced questions on a test, while providing the support weaker students need to get started and show their understanding. The test begins with a group discussion phase, when students are given a "number-free" version of the problem. This phase allows students to digest the story-like problem, explore solution ideas, and alleviate some test anxiety. After 10-15 minutes of discussion, students inform the instructor of their readiness for the individual part of the test. What follows next is a pedagogical phase change from lively group discussion to quiet individual work. The group work test is a natural continuation of the group work in our daily physics classes and helps reinforce the importance of collaboration. This method has met with success at York Mills Collegiate Institute, in Toronto, Ontario, where it has been used consistently for unit tests and the final exam of the grade 12 university preparation physics course.

  19. Optimization of DNA Extractions from Iron-rich Microbial Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, H.; Hilton, T. S.; Moyer, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is potentially one of the most abundant energy sources on the earth as an electron donor for chemolithoautotrophicgrowth coupled to Fe(II) oxidation. Many microbes have adapted to this energy source. One such bacterial class are the Zetaproteobacteria, which dominate Iron-rich microbial mats at Loihi seamount. Although cell counts are very high (up to 5.3x108 cells/ml), efficient DNA yields are low in comparison. In this study we compared extraction efficiency across different methods and with the addition of various buffers. Regardless of protocol (i.e., kit), the addition of sodium citrate drastically increased the DNA yield. The addition of sodium citrate did not alter community structure as determined by T-RFLP and qPCR. Citrate is a well-known ferric iron chelator and will bind ferrous as well. The chelated iron is then unable to participate in the Fenton reaction and this stops the generation of hydroxyl radicals which in turn can react and degrade the extracted DNA. We have utilized this relationship to allow us to obtain nearly an order of magnitude more microbial community DNA per sample, which should also have implications when processing low biomass samples, e.g., from the deep subsurface.

  20. Carbon-rich Planet Formation in a Solar Composition Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Mousis, Olivier; Petit, Jean-Marc; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2014-04-01

    The C to O ratio is a crucial determinant of the chemical properties of planets. The recent observation of WASP 12b, a giant planet with a C/O value larger than that estimated for its host star, poses a conundrum for understanding the origin of this elemental ratio in any given planetary system. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for enhancing the value of C/O in the disk through the transport and distribution of volatiles. We construct a model that computes the abundances of major C- and O-bearing volatiles under the influence of gas drag, sublimation, vapor diffusion, condensation, and coagulation in a multi-iceline 1+1D protoplanetary disk. We find a gradual depletion in water and carbon monoxide vapors inside the water's iceline, with carbon monoxide depleting slower than water. This effect increases the gaseous C/O and decreases the C/H ratio in this region to values similar to those found in WASP 12b's day side atmosphere. Giant planets whose envelopes were accreted inside the water's iceline should then display C/O values larger than those of their parent stars, making them members of the class of so-called carbon-rich planets.

  1. Design and Implementation of a Metadata-rich File System

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, S; Gokhale, M B; Maltzahn, C

    2010-01-19

    Despite continual improvements in the performance and reliability of large scale file systems, the management of user-defined file system metadata has changed little in the past decade. The mismatch between the size and complexity of large scale data stores and their ability to organize and query their metadata has led to a de facto standard in which raw data is stored in traditional file systems, while related, application-specific metadata is stored in relational databases. This separation of data and semantic metadata requires considerable effort to maintain consistency and can result in complex, slow, and inflexible system operation. To address these problems, we have developed the Quasar File System (QFS), a metadata-rich file system in which files, user-defined attributes, and file relationships are all first class objects. In contrast to hierarchical file systems and relational databases, QFS defines a graph data model composed of files and their relationships. QFS incorporates Quasar, an XPATH-extended query language for searching the file system. Results from our QFS prototype show the effectiveness of this approach. Compared to the de facto standard, the QFS prototype shows superior ingest performance and comparable query performance on user metadata-intensive operations and superior performance on normal file metadata operations.

  2. Hydrodynamic models for novae with ejecta rich in oxygen, neon and magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Sparks, W. M.; Truran, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of a new class of novae are identified and explained. This class consists of those objects that have been observed to eject material rich in oxygen, neon, magnesium, and aluminum at high velocities. We propose that for this class of novae the outburst is occurring not on a carbon-oxygen white dwarf but on an oxygen-neon-magnesium white dwarf which has evolved from a star which had a main sequence mass of approx. 8 solar masses to approx. 12 solar masses. An outburst was simulated by evolving 1.25 solar mass white dwarfs accreting hydrogen rich material at various rates. The effective enrichment of the envelope by ONeMg material from the core is simulated by enhancing oxygen in the accreted layers. The resulting evolutionary sequences can eject the entire accreted envelope plus core material at high velocities. They can also become super-Eddington at maximum bolometric luminosity. The expected frequency of such events (approx. 1/4) is in good agreement with the observed numbers of these novae.

  3. Persistence to antihypertensive drug classes

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnström, Miriam; Kahan, Thomas; Kieler, Helle; Brandt, Lena; Hasselström, Jan; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Manhem, Karin; Hjerpe, Per; Wettermark, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to study persistence to, and switching between, antihypertensive drug classes and to determine factors associated with poor persistence. This was an observational cohort study. The Swedish Primary Care Cardiovascular Database includes data from medical records, socioeconomic data, filled prescriptions, and hospitalizations from national registries for 75,000 patients with hypertension. Patients included in the study were initiated on antihypertensive drug treatment in primary healthcare in 2006 to 2007. We defined class persistence as the proportion remaining on the initial drug class, including 30 days of gap. Patients with a filled prescription of another antihypertensive drug class after discontinuation of the initial drug, including 30 days of gap, were classified as switchers. Persistence to the various drug classes were compared with that for diuretics. We identified 4997 patients (mean age 60 ± 12 years in men and 63 ± 13 years in women). Out of these, 95 (2%) filled their first prescription for fixed combination therapy and 4902 (98%) for monotherapy, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (37%), angiotensin receptor blockers (4%), beta blockers (21%), calcium channel blockers (8%), and diuretics (28%). Persistence to the initial drug class was 57% after 1 year and 43% after 2 years. There were no differences in persistence between diuretics and any of the other antihypertensive drug classes, after adjustment for confounders. Discontinuation (all adjusted) was more common in men (P = 0.004), younger patients (P < 0.001), those with mild systolic blood pressure elevation (P < 0.001), and patients born outside the Nordic countries (P < 0.001). Among 1295 patients who switched drug class after their first prescription, only 21% had a blood pressure recorded before the switch occurred; and out them 69% still had high blood pressures. In conclusion, there appears to be no difference in drug class

  4. Phosphorylation drives a dynamic switch in serine/arginine-rich proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shengqi; Gapsys, Vytautas; Kim, Hai-Young; Bessonov, Sergey; Hsiao, He-Hsuan; Möhlmann, Sina; Klaukien, Volker; Ficner, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; de Groot, Bert; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important players in RNA metabolism and are extensively phosphorylated at serine residues in RS repeats. Here, we show that phosphorylation switches the RS domain of the serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 from a fully disordered state to a partially rigidified arch-like structure. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the conformational switch is restricted to RS repeats, critically depends on the phosphate charge state and strongly decreases the conformational entropy of RS domains. The dynamic switch also occurs in the 100 kDa SR-related protein hPrp28, for which phosphorylation at the RS repeat is required for spliceosome assembly. Thus, a phosphorylation-induced dynamic switch is common to the class of serine/arginine-rich proteins and provides a molecular basis for the functional redundancy of serine/arginine-rich proteins and the profound influence of RS domain phosphorylation on protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. PMID:24183573

  5. Interaction between microalgal species richness and environmental variables in Peringalkuthu Reservoir, Western Ghats, Kerala.

    PubMed

    Nasser, K M Mohamed; Sureshkumar, S

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae are the most diverse group of aquatic organisms and are the primary food source for animals of higher trophic levels in the aquatic food web. Biomonitoring the fresh water habitats in terms of phycological evaluation provide useful information about the pollution status of the water body. The present investigation aimed to delineate the interaction between microalgal species richness and environmental variables in Peringalkuthu Reservoir of Western Ghats, Kerala. Samples were collected during 2009-2011 for the analysis of environmental variables and microalgal community. Ninety four species of microalgae belonged to 42 genera under the classes Chlorophyceae, Desmidiaceae, Bacillariophyceae, Cyanophyceae and Euglenophycea were recorded from the samples. The dominant groups were desmids followed by diatoms. Factor analysis and multivariate analysis were applied to evaluate the extent of interaction between the microalgal species richness and the environmental variables. Temperature, total alkalinity, BOD, phosphate, silicate and chloride showed positive relationship with the species richness of the microalgae. While pH, total hardness, nitrate, fluoride, calcium and magnesium hinder the microalgal species richness. Elucidation of the interactions between microalgae and various environmental parameters suggested a control over the anthropogenic interventions to the reservoir to check the conversion of the lake oligotrophic to eutrophic condition. PMID:24555328

  6. Forest age influences oak insect herbivore community structure, richness, and density.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, June M; Marquis, Robert J; Forkner, Rebecca E

    2006-06-01

    Plant succession is one of many factors that may affect the composition and structure of herbivorous insect communities. However, few studies have examined the effect of forest age on the diversity and abundance of insect communities. If forest age influences insect diversity, then the schedule of timber harvest rotation may have consequent effects on biodiversity. The insect herbivore community on Quercus alba (white oak) in the Missouri Ozarks was sampled in a chronoseries, from recently harvested (2 yr) to old-growth (approximately 313 yr) forests. A total of nine sites and 39 stands within those sites were sampled in May and August 2003. Unique communities of plants and insects were found in the oldest forests (122-313 yr). Density and species richness of herbivores were positively correlated with increasing forest age in August but not in May. August insect density was negatively correlated with heat load index; in addition, insect density and richness increased over the chronoseries, but not on the sunniest slopes. Forest structural diversity (number of size classes) was positively correlated with forest age, but woody plant species richness was not. In sum, richness, density, and community structure of white oak insect herbivores are influenced by variation in forest age, forest structure, relative abundance of plant species, and abiotic conditions. These results suggest that time between harvests of large, long-lived, tree species such as white oak should be longer than current practice in order to maintain insect community diversity. PMID:16826990

  7. The leucine-rich repeat superfamily of synaptic adhesion molecules: LRRTMs and Slitrks.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jaewon

    2012-10-01

    Synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions connected by multiple synaptic cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Synaptic CAMs function in various stages of synaptogenesis - the process of synapse creation - encompassing synapse formation, maturation, refinement, plasticity, and elimination. The list of synaptic CAMs has rapidly grown, although their precise functions of most CAMs at synapses remain incomplete. Members of an emerging class of transmembrane proteins containing leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains have received considerable recent research attention. In this minireview, I discuss recent findings on LRR-containing synaptic CAMs that impact synapse development and circuit formation, focusing on two families of LRR synaptic CAMs: leucine-rich transmembrane proteins (LRRTMs) and Slit and Trk-like family (Slitrks). Their basic biochemical properties, proposed functions at synapses, physiological significances, and open questions are summarized.

  8. Conservation of allelic richness in wild crop relatives is aided by assessment of genetic markers.

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, D J; Brown, A H

    1993-01-01

    Wild crop relatives are an important source of genetic variation for improving domesticated species. Given limited resources, methods for maximizing the genetic diversity of collections of wild relatives are needed to help spread protection over a larger number of populations and species. Simulations were conducted to investigate the optimal strategy of sampling materials from populations of wild relatives, with the objective of maximizing the number of alleles (allelic richness) in collections of fixed size. Two methods, based on assessing populations for variation at marker loci (e.g., allozymes, restriction fragment length polymorphisms), were developed and compared with several methods that are not dependent on markers. Marker-assisted methods yielded higher overall allelic richness in the simulated collections, and they were particularly effective in conserving geographically localized alleles, the class of alleles that is most subject to loss. PMID:8248153

  9. Zinc-rich coatings: A market survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizak, R.

    1975-01-01

    Zinc-rich coatings with both organic and inorganic binders were considered for coastal bridges which require more corrosion protection than inland bridges because of exposure to salt spray and fog. Inorganics give longer protection and may be applied without a finish coat; those currently available are harder to apply than organics. The NASA potassium silicate/zinc - dust coating appears to provide longer protection, resist thermal shock, and overcome the application problem. Panels coated with the formulation withstood 5308 hours in a salt spray chamber with no rusting or blistering.

  10. Mars: A water-rich planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    Good geomorphic evidence is presented for a planet that was once water rich, and that a lower limit on the amount of water available for a given Martian watershed may be estimated by assuming that the volume of material eroded was equal to the volume of water available. This estimate, coupled with high latitude water estimates of 50 to 100 m gives a global inventory of about 500 m total water in the subsurface. It was emphasized that this is a lower limit as considerable water may be bound in weathered debris and in primary minerals.

  11. Mass Evaluation for Proton Rich Nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-11-30

    The Atomic mass evaluation (AME) provides the reliable resource for the values related to atomic masses. Since the publication of the latest version of AME in 2003, many developments for atomic mass determination have been done and important results changed significantly our knowledge. A preliminary version of AME was released in April 2011, and an official version is foreseen to be published in early 2013. The general status of AME is presented and some specific features of AME for proton-rich nuclides are discussed.

  12. Elastic moduli of pyrope rich garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. K.; Pandey, A. K.; Singh, C. K.

    2013-06-01

    The elastic properties of minerals depend on its composition, crystal structure, temperature and level of defects. The elastic parameters are important for the interpretation of the structure and composition of the garnet rich family. In present work we have calculated the elastic moduli such as isothermal bulk modulus, Young's modulus and Shear modulus over a wide range of temperature from 300 K to 1000 K by using Birch EOS and Poirrier Tarantola equation of state. The obtained results are compared with the experimental results obtained by measuring the elastic moduli of single crystal. The calculated results show that the logarithmic isothermal EOS does not cooperate well with experimental results.

  13. New process hydrotreats metal-rich feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Langhout, W.C.V.Z.; Ouwerkerk, C.; Pronk, K.M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Shell Internationale Petroleum Maatschappij B.V. has developed a hydroprocessing procedure suitable for heavy residual feeds with metal contents of up to about 100 ppm, and Shell plans to introduce soon a process which will enable the catalytic hydrotreating of even the heaviest metal-rich feedstocks. This new process will be studied in an experimental unit expected to be on stream by the end of 1981 at a Venezuelan refinery. Also discussed are the catalytic hydroprocessing of residual material, including the roles of hydrodemetallization, h

  14. Shell states of neutron-rich matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Shen, G.

    2008-07-01

    The equation of state (EOS) for nuclear and neutron rich matter is investigated in a relativistic mean field (RMF) model. New shell states are found that minimize the free energy per baryon, calculated in a spherical Wigner-Seitz (WS) approximation, over a significant range of baryon densities. These shell states, that have both inside and outside surfaces, minimize the Coulomb energy of large proton number configurations at the expense of a larger surface energy. This is related to a possible depression in the central density of super heavy nuclei. As the baryon density increases, we find the system changes from normal nuclei, to shell states, and then to uniform matter.

  15. Shell states of neutron-rich matter

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, C. J.; Shen, G.

    2008-07-15

    The equation of state (EOS) for nuclear and neutron rich matter is investigated in a relativistic mean field (RMF) model. New shell states are found that minimize the free energy per baryon, calculated in a spherical Wigner-Seitz (WS) approximation, over a significant range of baryon densities. These shell states, that have both inside and outside surfaces, minimize the Coulomb energy of large proton number configurations at the expense of a larger surface energy. This is related to a possible depression in the central density of super heavy nuclei. As the baryon density increases, we find the system changes from normal nuclei, to shell states, and then to uniform matter.

  16. Testing of fuel/oxidizer-rich, high-pressure preburners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawver, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    Results of an evaluation of high pressure combustion of fuel rich and oxidizer rich LOX/RP-1 propellants using 4.0 inch diameter prototype preburner injectors and chambers are presented. Testing covered a pressure range from 8.9 to 17.5 MN/square meters (1292 to 2540 psia). Fuel rich mixture ratios ranged from 0.238 to 0.367; oxidizer rich mixture ratios ranged from 27.2 to 47.5. Performance, gas temperature uniformity, and stability data for two fuel rich and two ozidizer rich preburner injectors are presented for a conventional like-on-like (LOL) design and a platelet design injector. Kinetically limited combustion is shown by the excellent agreement of measured fuel rich gas composition and C performance data with kinetic model predictions. The oxidizer rich test results support previous equilibrium combustion predictions.

  17. Alloys For Corrosive, Hydrogen-Rich Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, William B.; Bhat, Biliyar N.; Chen, Po-Shou; Kuruvilla, A. K.; Panda, Binayak

    1993-01-01

    "NASA-23" denotes class of alloys resisting both embrittlement by hydrogen and corrosion. Weldable and castable and formed by such standard processes as rolling, forging, and wire drawing. Heat-treated to obtain desired combinations of strength and ductility in ranges of 100 to 180 kpsi yield strength, 120 to 200 kpsi ultimate tensile strength, and 10 to 30 percent elongation at break. Used in place of most common aerospace structural alloy, Inconel(R) 718.

  18. Cd-rich and Te-rich low-temperature photoluminescence in cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D. S. Kuciauskas, D.; Ma, J.; Metzger, W. K.; Burst, J. M.; Moutinho, H. R.; Dippo, P. C.

    2014-03-03

    Low-temperature photoluminescence emission spectra were measured in cadmium telluride (CdTe) samples in which composition was varied to promote either Cd or Te-rich stoichiometry. The ability to monitor stoichiometry is important, since it has been shown to impact carrier recombination. Te-rich samples show transitions corresponding to acceptor-bound excitons (∼1.58 eV) and free-electron to acceptor transitions (∼1.547 eV). In addition to acceptor-bound excitons, Cd-rich samples show transitions assigned to donor-bound excitons (1.591 eV) and Te vacancies at 1.552 eV. Photoluminescence is a noninvasive way to monitor stoichiometric shifts induced by post-deposition anneals in polycrystalline CdTe thin films deposited by close-spaced sublimation.

  19. Platelet-rich plasma and plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Monto, Raymond R

    2013-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain and can prove difficult to treat in its most chronic and severe forms. Advanced cases of plantar fasciitis are often associated with ankle stiffness, heel spurs, and other conditions and can lead to extensive physical disability and financial loss. Most available traditional treatments, including orthoses, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and steroid injections have a paucity of supportive clinical evidence. More invasive treatments, ranging from corticosteroid and botulinum-A toxin injections to shockwave therapy and plantar fasciotomy, have demonstrated varying clinical success in severe cases but carry the potential for serious complication and permanent disability. Platelet-rich plasma has recently been demonstrated to be helpful in managing chronic severe tendinopathies when other techniques have failed. This review examines the pathophysiology, diagnostic options, nonoperative treatment modalities, and surgical options currently used for plantar fasciitis. It also focuses on the clinical rationale and available evidence for using autologous platelet-rich plasma to treat severe refractory chronic plantar fasciitis.

  20. Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richard S. Tuthill

    2004-06-10

    The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

  1. Estimating species richness using environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; Renshaw, Mark A; Li, Yiyuan; Evans, Nathan T; Turner, Cameron R; Deiner, Kristy; Mahon, Andrew R; Brueseke, Michael A; Shirey, Patrick D; Pfrender, Michael E; Lodge, David M; Lamberti, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    The foundation for any ecological study and for the effective management of biodiversity in natural systems requires knowing what species are present in an ecosystem. We assessed fish communities in a stream using two methods, depletion-based electrofishing and environmental DNA metabarcoding (eDNA) from water samples, to test the hypothesis that eDNA provides an alternative means of determining species richness and species identities for a natural ecosystem. In a northern Indiana stream, electrofishing yielded a direct estimate of 12 species and a mean estimated richness (Chao II estimator) of 16.6 species with a 95% confidence interval from 12.8 to 42.2. eDNA sampling detected an additional four species, congruent with the mean Chao II estimate from electrofishing. This increased detection rate for fish species between methods suggests that eDNA sampling can enhance estimation of fish fauna in flowing waters while having minimal sampling impacts on fish and their habitat. Modern genetic approaches therefore have the potential to transform our ability to build a more complete list of species for ecological investigations and inform management of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27516876

  2. Estimating species richness using environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; Renshaw, Mark A; Li, Yiyuan; Evans, Nathan T; Turner, Cameron R; Deiner, Kristy; Mahon, Andrew R; Brueseke, Michael A; Shirey, Patrick D; Pfrender, Michael E; Lodge, David M; Lamberti, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    The foundation for any ecological study and for the effective management of biodiversity in natural systems requires knowing what species are present in an ecosystem. We assessed fish communities in a stream using two methods, depletion-based electrofishing and environmental DNA metabarcoding (eDNA) from water samples, to test the hypothesis that eDNA provides an alternative means of determining species richness and species identities for a natural ecosystem. In a northern Indiana stream, electrofishing yielded a direct estimate of 12 species and a mean estimated richness (Chao II estimator) of 16.6 species with a 95% confidence interval from 12.8 to 42.2. eDNA sampling detected an additional four species, congruent with the mean Chao II estimate from electrofishing. This increased detection rate for fish species between methods suggests that eDNA sampling can enhance estimation of fish fauna in flowing waters while having minimal sampling impacts on fish and their habitat. Modern genetic approaches therefore have the potential to transform our ability to build a more complete list of species for ecological investigations and inform management of aquatic ecosystems.

  3. Are bioactive-rich fractions functionally richer?

    PubMed

    Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Ooi, Der Jiun; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Sarega, Nadarajan; Chan, Kim Wei; Bhanger, Muhammad Iqbal

    2016-08-01

    Plant bioresources are relied upon as natural, inexpensive, and sustainable remedies for the management of several chronic diseases worldwide. Plants have historically been consumed for medicinal purposes based on traditional belief, but this trend is currently changing. The growing interest in the medicinal properties of plant bioresources stems from concerns of side effects and other adverse effects caused by synthetic drugs. This interest has yielded a better understanding of the roles of plant bioactive compounds in health promotion and disease prevention, including the underlying mechanisms involved in such functional effects. The desire to maximize the potential of phytochemicals has led to the development of "rich fractions," in which extracts contain bioactive compounds in addition to elevated levels of the primary compound. Although a rich fraction effectively increases the bioactivity of the extract, the standardization and quality assurance process can be challenging. However, the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) system is a promising green technology in this regard. Future clinical and pharmacological studies are needed to fully elucidate the implications of these preparations in the management of human diseases, thereby fostering a move toward evidence-based medicine.

  4. Catalytic oxidation of very fuel rich mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a catalytic reactor as a tool to study soot formation from the fuel rich side of the soot limit (null set = 3 - 6). The experimental approach to be taken in the first phase of the research is to document that a hydrocarbon fuel can be burnt at very rich equivalence ratios without forming soot. A simple mono-component fuel, iso-octane, will be used as the test fuel. To insure that combustion is uniform across the catalyst bed, measurements will be made of the fuel-air equivalence ratio profile across the inlet and the temperature and product distribution across the outlet. Phase Two will be to use this environment as a testing ground for determining the effect the structure of a hydrocarbon fuel has on its tendency to form soot. Various amounts of organic compounds such as benzene will be added to the iso-octane and the reaction products studied. Other compounds to be tested will xylene, toluene, and naphthalene.

  5. Constancy in Functional Space across a Species Richness Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Nathan G; Weiser, Michael D; Mao, Lingfeng; Normand, Signe; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Lin, Luxiang; Cao, Min; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between large-scale gradients in species richness and functional diversity provides important information regarding the mechanisms driving patterns of biodiversity. A classic hypothesis in ecology is that strong interspecific interactions should result in an increase in the functional volume of assemblages as the species richness increases, whereas climatic constraints may result in no change in functional volume. Most research of this kind examines latitudinal gradients in species richness, but the results are likely confounded by underlying gradients in climate and phylogenetic composition. We take an alternative approach that examines functional richness across a tree species richness anomaly where species richness doubles from Europe to eastern North America. The results demonstrate that the functional richness on both continents saturates at a similar point as species richness increases and that the packing of functional space becomes tighter. Further, the species richness anomaly is driven primarily by genera unique to North America, but those genera contribute less than expected functional richness to the region, indicating a high level of redundancy with genera shared between the continents. Taken together, the results indicate that the species richness anomaly is associated with diversification within a climatically constrained trait space. More generally, the work demonstrates the power of utilizing species richness anomalies in biodiversity research, particularly when they are coupled with information regarding organismal function.

  6. Productivity is a poor predictor of plant species richness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For 30 years, the relationship between net primary productivity and species richness has generated intense debate in ecology about the processes regulating fine-scale species richness. The true relationship was thought to be hump-shaped, with richness peaking at intermediate levels of productivity, ...

  7. Constancy in Functional Space across a Species Richness Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Nathan G; Weiser, Michael D; Mao, Lingfeng; Normand, Signe; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Lin, Luxiang; Cao, Min; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between large-scale gradients in species richness and functional diversity provides important information regarding the mechanisms driving patterns of biodiversity. A classic hypothesis in ecology is that strong interspecific interactions should result in an increase in the functional volume of assemblages as the species richness increases, whereas climatic constraints may result in no change in functional volume. Most research of this kind examines latitudinal gradients in species richness, but the results are likely confounded by underlying gradients in climate and phylogenetic composition. We take an alternative approach that examines functional richness across a tree species richness anomaly where species richness doubles from Europe to eastern North America. The results demonstrate that the functional richness on both continents saturates at a similar point as species richness increases and that the packing of functional space becomes tighter. Further, the species richness anomaly is driven primarily by genera unique to North America, but those genera contribute less than expected functional richness to the region, indicating a high level of redundancy with genera shared between the continents. Taken together, the results indicate that the species richness anomaly is associated with diversification within a climatically constrained trait space. More generally, the work demonstrates the power of utilizing species richness anomalies in biodiversity research, particularly when they are coupled with information regarding organismal function. PMID:27028083

  8. Habitability constraints on water-rich exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Höning, Dennis; Rivoldini, Attilio; Heistracher, Clemens; Zimov, Nastasia; Journaux, Baptiste; Lammer, Helmut; Van Hoolst, Tim; Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan

    2016-04-01

    This research addresses the characterization, modelling, thermal evolution and possible habitability of water-rich exoplanets. Water is necessary for the origin and survival of life as we know it. In the search for habitable worlds, water-rich planets therefore seem obvious candidates. The water layer on such planets could be hundreds of kilometers deep. Depending on the temperature profile and the pressure gradient, it is likely that at great depths a significant part of the water layer is solid high pressure ice. Whether the solid ice layer extends to the bottom of the water layer, or if a shallow lower ocean forms above the silicate mantle, depends amongst others on the thermal state of the planet. We therefore model the thermal evolution of water-rich planets with a 1D parameterized model. Depth-dependent profiles for thermodynamic properties as well as pressure and gravity are obtained by solving the Poisson equation for the gravity and the hydrostatic pressure equation for pre-defined mass and composition (in terms of iron, silicates and water) [1]. For density, equations of state are applied. For the simulation of the thermal evolution of water-rich planets, several parameters (as initial temperatures or layer thicknesses) are unknown. We therefore employ a quantitatve study with more than 20'000 simulations, where we investigated which parameters have the largest influence on the appearance of a lower ocean, i.e. the possible melting of high-pressure ice by heat flowing out of the silicate mantle [2]. We find that the surface temperature has the largest influence on the thickness of water layers, for which a lower ocean can still form between the high-pressure ice layer and the silicate mantle. For higher surface temperatures, not only entirely liquid oceans are possible for deeper water shells, also a liquid ocean can form under high-pressure ice layers of hundreds of kilometer thickness (for a 1 Earth-mass planet). Deeper down, the lower ocean can still

  9. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discusses open or unlimited class aircraft performance limitations and design solutions. Limitations in this class of aircraft include slow climbing flight which requires low wing loading, high cruise speed which requires high wing loading, gains in induced or viscous drag alone which result in only half the gain overall and other structural problems (yaw inertia and spins, flutter and static loads integrity). Design solutions include introducing minimum induced drag for a given span (elliptical span load or winglets) and introducing minimum induced drag for a bell shaped span load. It is concluded that open class performance limits (under current rules and technologies) is very close to absolute limits, though some gains remain to be made from unexplored areas and new technologies.

  10. Universality class in conformal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu

    2013-07-01

    We develop a new class of chaotic inflation models with spontaneously broken conformal invariance. Observational consequences of a broad class of such models are stable with respect to strong deformations of the scalar potential. This universality is a critical phenomenon near the point of enhanced symmetry, SO(1,1), in case of conformal inflation. It appears because of the exponential stretching of the moduli space and the resulting exponential flattening of scalar potentials upon switching from the Jordan frame to the Einstein frame in this class of models. This result resembles stretching and flattening of inhomogeneities during inflationary expansion. It has a simple interpretation in terms of velocity versus rapidity near the Kähler cone in the moduli space, similar to the light cone of special theory of relativity. This effect makes inflation possible even in the models with very steep potentials. We describe conformal and superconformal versions of this cosmological attractor mechanism.

  11. Metal-rich or misclassified? The case of four RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L.; Juhasz, A. L.; Plachy, E.; Szabo, R.

    2016-06-01

    We analysed the light curve of four, apparently extremely metal-rich fundamenta-mode RR Lyrae stars. We identified two stars, MT Tel and ASAS J091803-3022.6 as RRc (first-overtone) pulsators that were misclassified as RRab ones in the ASAS survey. In the case of the other two stars, V397 Gem and ASAS J075127-4136.3, we could not decide conclusively, as they are outliers in the period-Fourier-coefficient space from the loci of both classes, but their photometric metallicities also favour the RRc classification.

  12. Draft genome sequences of three chemically rich actinomycetes isolated from Mediterranean sponges.

    PubMed

    Horn, Hannes; Cheng, Cheng; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Hentschel, Ute; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomic analysis has shown the chemical richness of the sponge-associated actinomycetes Streptomyces sp. SBT349, Nonomureae sp. SBT364, and Nocardiopsis sp. SBT366. The genomes of these actinomycetes were sequenced and the genomic potential for secondary metabolism was evaluated. Their draft genomes have sizes of 8.0, 10, and 5.8 Mb having 687, 367, and 179 contigs with a GC content of 71.6, 70.7, and 72.7%, respectively. Moreover, antiSMASH 3.0 predicted 108, 149, and 75 secondary metabolite gene clusters, respectively which highlight the metabolic capacity of the three actinomycete species to produce diverse classes of natural products.

  13. Oxygen-rich Mira variables: Near-infrared luminosity calibrations. Populations and period-luminosity relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, R.; Mennessier, M.-O.; Barthes, D.; Luri, X.; Mattei, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Hipparcos astrometric and kinematical data of oxygen-rich Mira variables are used to calibrate absolute near-infrared magnitudes and kinematic parameters. Three distinct classes of stars with different kinematics and scale heights were identified. The two most significant groups present characteristics close to those usually assigned to extended/thick disk-halo populations and old disk populations, respectively, and thus they may differ by their metallicity abundance. Two parallel period-luminosity relations are found, one for each population. The shift between these relations is interpreted as the consequence of the effects of metallicity abundance on the luminosity.

  14. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  15. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  16. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  17. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  18. 77 FR 17362 - Proposed Modification of Class D and Class E Airspace and Revocation of Class E Airspace...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... an extension to a Class D or E surface area at Bellingham International Airport. This action... airspace and Class E airspace designated as surface area to meet current standards for IFR departures and... Class E airspace designated as an extension to a Class D or E surface area, and, therefore, would...

  19. 76 FR 64233 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Casper, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ..., published on August 25, 2011 (76 FR 53048), amends Class D airspace, Class E surface airspace, Class E..., the Class E airspace descriptions as published in the Federal Register of August 25, 2011 (76 FR 53048) (FR Doc. 2011-21663) for Natrona County International Airport, Casper, WY, is corrected under...

  20. Silica-Rich Soil Found by Spirit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has found a patch of bright-toned soil so rich in silica that scientists propose water must have been involved in concentrating it.

    The silica-rich patch, informally named 'Gertrude Weise' after a player in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, was exposed when Spirit drove over it during the 1,150th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's Mars surface mission (March 29, 2007). One of Spirit's six wheels no longer rotates, so it leaves a deep track as it drags through soil. Most patches of disturbed, bright soil that Spirit had investigated previously are rich in sulfur, but this one has very little sulfur and is about 90 percent silica.

    This image is a approximately true-color composite of three images taken through different filters by Spirit's panoramic camera on Sol 1,187 (May 6). The track of disturbed soil is roughly 20 centimeters (8 inches) wide.

    Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, which can assess a target's mineral composition from a distance, examined the Gertrude Weise patch on Sol 1,172 (April 20). The indications it found for silica in the overturned soil prompted a decision to drive Spirit close enough to touch the soil with the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, a chemical analyzer at the end of Spirit's robotic arm. The alpha particle X-ray spectrometer collected data about this target on sols 1,189 and 1,190 (May 8 and May 9) and produced the finding of approximately 90 percent silica.

    Silica is silicon dioxide. On Earth, it commonly occurs as the crystalline mineral quartz and is the main ingredient in window glass. The Martian silica at Gertrude Weise is non-crystalline, with no detectable quartz.

    In most cases, water is required to produce such a concentrated deposit of silica, according to members of the rover science team. One possible origin for the silica could have been interaction of soil with acidic steam produced by volcanic activity. Another could

  1. Silica-Rich Soil in Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has found a patch of bright-toned soil so rich in silica that scientists propose water must have been involved in concentrating it.

    The silica-rich patch, informally named 'Gertrude Weise' after a player in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, was exposed when Spirit drove over it during the 1,150th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's Mars surface mission (March 29, 2007). One of Spirit's six wheels no longer rotates, so it leaves a deep track as it drags through soil. Most patches of disturbed, bright soil that Spirit had investigated previously are rich in sulfur, but this one has very little sulfur and is about 90 percent silica.

    Spirit's panoramic camera imaged the bright patch through various filters on Sol 1,158 (April 6). This approximately true-color image combines images taken through three different filters. The track of disturbed soil is roughly 20 centimeters (8 inches) wide.

    Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, which can assess a target's mineral composition from a distance, examined the Gertrude Weise patch on Sol 1,172 (April 20). The indications it found for silica in the overturned soil prompted a decision to drive Spirit close enough to touch the soil with the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, a chemical analyzer at the end of Spirit's robotic arm. The alpha particle X-ray spectrometer collected data about this target on sols 1,189 and 1,190 (May 8 and May 9) and produced the finding of approximately 90 percent silica.

    Silica is silicon dioxide. On Earth, it commonly occurs as the crystalline mineral quartz and is the main ingredient in window glass. The Martian silica at Gertrude Weise is non-crystalline, with no detectable quartz.

    In most cases, water is required to produce such a concentrated deposit of silica, according to members of the rover science team. One possible origin for the silica could have been interaction of soil with acidic steam

  2. Fungal arachidonic acid-rich oil: research, development and industrialization.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiao-Jun; Ren, Lu-Jing; Nie, Zhi-Kui; Huang, He; Ouyang, Ping-Kai

    2014-09-01

    Fungal arachidonic acid (ARA)-rich oil is an important microbial oil that affects diverse physiological processes that impact normal health and chronic disease. In this article, the historic developments and technological achievements in fungal ARA-rich oil production in the past several years are reviewed. The biochemistry of ARA, ARA-rich oil synthesis and the accumulation mechanism are first introduced. Subsequently, the fermentation and downstream technologies are summarized. Furthermore, progress in the industrial production of ARA-rich oil is discussed. Finally, guidelines for future studies of fungal ARA-rich oil production are proposed in light of the current progress, challenges and trends in the field.

  3. An Abundance of Riches: Cross-Task Comparisons of Semantic Richness Effects in Visual Word Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Melvin J.; Pexman, Penny M.; Wellsby, Michele; Hargreaves, Ian S.; Huff, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence (e.g., Pexman et al., 2008) that semantically rich words, which are associated with relatively more semantic information, are recognized faster across different lexical processing tasks. The present study extends this earlier work by providing the most comprehensive evaluation to date of semantic richness effects on visual word recognition performance. Specifically, using mixed effects analyses to control for the influence of correlated lexical variables, we considered the impact of number of features, number of senses, semantic neighborhood density, imageability, and body–object interaction across five visual word recognition tasks: standard lexical decision, go/no-go lexical decision, speeded pronunciation, progressive demasking, and semantic classification. Semantic richness effects could be reliably detected in all tasks of lexical processing, indicating that semantic representations, particularly their imaginal and featural aspects, play a fundamental role in visual word recognition. However, there was also evidence that the strength of certain richness effects could be flexibly and adaptively modulated by task demands, consistent with an intriguing interplay between task-specific mechanisms and differentiated semantic processing. PMID:22529787

  4. Is torrefaction of polysaccharides-rich biomass equivalent to carbonization of lignin-rich biomass?

    PubMed

    Bilgic, E; Yaman, S; Haykiri-Acma, H; Kucukbayrak, S

    2016-01-01

    Waste biomass species such as lignin-rich hazelnut shell (HS) and polysaccharides-rich sunflower seed shell (SSS) were subjected to torrefaction at 300°C and carbonization at 600°C under nitrogen. The structural variations in torrefied and carbonized biomasses were compared. Also, the burning characteristics under dry air and pure oxygen (oxy-combustion) conditions were investigated. It was concluded that the effects of carbonization on HS are almost comparable with the effects of torrefaction on SSS in terms of devolatilization and deoxygenation potentials and the increases in carbon content and the heating value. Consequently, it can be proposed that torrefaction does not provide efficient devolatilization from the lignin-rich biomass while it is relatively more efficient for polysaccharides-rich biomass. Heat-induced variations in biomass led to significant changes in the burning characteristics under both burning conditions. That is, low temperature reactivity of biomass reduced considerably and the burning shifted to higher temperatures with very high burning rates.

  5. Downscaling the environmental associations and spatial patterns of species richness.

    PubMed

    Keil, Petr; Jetz, Walter

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a method that enables the estimation of species richness environment association and prediction of geographic patterns of species richness at grains finer than the original grain of observation. The method is based on a hierarchical model that uses coarse-grain values of species richness and fine-grain environmental data as input. In the model, the (unobserved) fine-grain species richness is linked to the observed fine-grain environment and upscaled using a simple species-area relationship (SAR). The upscaled values are then stochastically linked to the observed coarse-grain species richness. We tested the method on Southern African Bird Atlas data by downscaling richness from 2 degrees to 0.25 degrees (-250 km to -30 km) resolution. When prior knowledge of the SAR slope (average species turnover within coarse-grain cells) was available, the method predicted the fine-grain relationship between richness and environment and provided fine-grain predictions of richness that closely resembled results from native fine-grain models. Without the SAR knowledge the method still accurately quantified the richness-environment relationship, but accurately predicted only relative (rank) values of richness. The approach can be easily extended and it is a powerful path for cross-scale statistical modeling of richness-environment relationships, and for the provision of high-resolution maps for basic science and conservation.

  6. Teaching a Large Undergraduate Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trowbridge, Norma

    1975-01-01

    A professor describes how she teaches large undergraduate classes by dividing the group into smaller groups and including: weekly films or audiovisual aids, weekly sessions with smaller groups, definite reading material, independent study, and a multiple evaluation system. (Author/PG)

  7. Soviet KIROV class strike cruiser

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, J.W.; Brower, K.S.; Meier, H.A.

    1981-04-01

    The major design concepts and basic characteristics of the Soviet KIROV Class ship, an impressive nuclear-powered Strike Cruiser which recently appeared while undergoing sea trials in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, are discussed. Highlights are presented of the KIROV's hull form, the weapons, electronics and aviation systems, machinery, as well as the cruiser's speed and range.

  8. "Green" Classes Flourish in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Courses focused on renewable and alternative energy are taking hold across the country as educators seek to channel students' concerns about the environment and conservation into classroom lessons. This article talks about the rising interest in "green" curriculum. Here, the author describes the Green Tech class that introduces students to the…

  9. The class analysis of poverty.

    PubMed

    Wright, E O

    1995-01-01

    To understand more fully the nature of poverty it must be viewed as the result, in part, of inherent features of the social system. The author describes four general approaches to explaining poverty: poverty as a result of inherent individual attributes, as the by-product of contingent individual characteristics, as a by-product of social causes, and as a result of inherent properties of the social system. He then elaborates a class exploitation analysis of poverty by explaining how economic oppression, economic exploitation, and class generate a social system in which poverty plays a crucial functional role. The general problem of poverty must be broken down into two subproblems: poverty generated inside exploitative relations (the working poor) and poverty generated by nonexploitative oppression (the underclass). A class analysis of poverty argues that significant numbers of privileged people have a strong, positive material interest in maintaining poverty. Poverty can be reduced in the United States only through popular mobilization of pressure that challenges the power of the dominant classes.

  10. Emerging Scholars: Class of 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Valerie; Oguntoyinbo, Lekan; Davis, Crystal D.; Hawkins, B. Denise; Lum, Lydia; Cooper, Kenneth; Pluviose, David; Pember, Mary Annette; Watson, Jamal Eric; Nealy, Michelle J.; Hernandez, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This article presents "Diverse"'s 2011 Emerging Scholars. This year's class of award-winning academics consists of twelve gifted and passionate scholars who make their mark with relevant, impactful scholarship. The 2011 Emerging Scholars are: (1) Dr. Guillermina G. Nunez-Mchiri; (2) Dr. Ashlesh Murthy; (3) Charles O. Anderson; (4) Chekesha M.…

  11. A Touch of...Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtel, Claudine, Ed.; Amyot, Denise, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    A series of class activities for French instruction includes uses of the telephone book, tape recordings, advertising, word and pattern games, and creation of a radio program. Suggestions for instruction of Canadian natives include games for animal, body, and clothing vocabulary. (MSE)

  12. Exploring Class-Based Intersectionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David; Corona, Victor

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues that language, culture and identity researchers need to take the intersectionality of identity inscriptions seriously and, further to this, that an intersectional approach which emanates from an interest in social class provides a productive way to examine the lives and experience of individuals living in multicultural societies.…

  13. ALTERNATIVES FOR CLASS A BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation reviews the pathogenic microorganisms that may be found in sewage sludge and commonly employed Class A processes for controlling them including advanced digestion, alkaline treatment and heat drying. How extensively the processes are used as well as issues and co...

  14. Linguistics in the English Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Robert C., Jr.

    Designed for secondary school English teachers who want to help their students develop enthusiasm for words, their histories, and the way language structures words to produce meaning, this paper offers suggestions for a program of study employing dictionary projects and personal experience. The paper describes making a class dictionary of teen…

  15. Social Class and School Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Vincent C.

    2012-01-01

    This article takes a practical look at social class in school music by exploring the manifestations and impact of three of its dimensions: financial resources, cultural practices, and social networks. Three suggestions are discussed: provide a free and equal music education for all students, understand and respect each student's cultural…

  16. Creating Presentations on ICT Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on the creation of presentations on ICT classes. The first part highlights the most important steps when creating a presentation. The main idea is, that the computer presentation shouldn't consist only from the technological part, i.e. the editing of the presentation in a computer program. There are many steps before and after…

  17. Communication Repair and Response Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadan, Hedda; Halle, James W.

    2004-01-01

    A communicative repair has been defined as the ability to persist in communication and to modify, repeat, or revise a signal when the initial communication attempt failed. From an operant perspective, initial communicative acts and communicative repairs can be considered members of a response class in which each response produces the same outcome.…

  18. Social Class Differences in Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Frederick

    "Language and Poverty," a volume published in 1970 that dealt with various topics concerning language and social class differences, argued that in educational programs for the children of the poor it is important not to confuse differences with deficits. It indicated that poor children had adequate language structures and skills for their…

  19. Class Meetings in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Physical educators are often frustrated when a student behaves in a way that compromises the learning environment for the entire group. Inappropriate behavior may vary from kicking a ball across the room rather than returning it under the net, to consistent wisecracking during class. When such behavior is limited to one or two students, individual…

  20. Multiple Functions in Equivalence Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVeigh, Brian; Keenan, Mickey

    2009-01-01

    Four experiments examined the effects of training a "drawing" response to each of three stimuli in a 5-member equivalence class. In Experiment 1 the stimuli were an arbitrary word, a shape, or a mathematical symbol. Subjects then were trained to draw a separate component of a stickman at each of the 3 stimuli. Subsequent tests for function…

  1. The Hidden Injuries of Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sennett, Richard; Cobb, Jonathan

    The book examines the effect of class barriers on blue collar workers by mirroring occupational/ethnic backgrounds of the white manual-laboring population in the Boston area through urban anthropological observations as well as 150 in-depth interviews conducted in 1969-70. It mainly reflects the experience of middle-aged, third generation American…

  2. Class Struggle in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, Dan; Leiblum, Mishy

    2008-01-01

    Public higher education has undergone a process similar to that in the national polity: a one-sided struggle by those with power to shape the institution to be more market driven, more focused on what will generate (non-state) revenues, more dominated by top administrators, and less concerned about the working class and people of color. This…

  3. Defendants challenge class action certification.

    PubMed

    Dubin, C S; Wadleigh, J

    1995-04-01

    The National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) and the manufacturers of Anti-Hemophilia Factor Concentrates (AHF) are being sued in a class action case for ignoring and downplaying risks of HIV infection from AHF in order to enhance their financial gain. The defendants in the case, however, have challenged the class action certification. Their Petition for a Writ of Mandamus argues that a class action lawsuit is not an appropriate legal vehicle for this type of case because, among other reasons, it will place an entire industry's survival in the hands of a single jury decision. The two primary challenges to certification by the petition are that 1) it would complicate hemophilia/AIDS litigation and not simplify it, and 2) there is no common definition of negligence throughout state law. With certification in question, it is conceivable, according to attorney David Shrager, "that hundreds or even thousands of additional claims will now be filed in state and Federal courts throughout the country." Essentially, the defense against the Writ argues that the defendants knew in the 1960s of the high risk from known and new viruses in the plasma pools, that they had a duty to reduce such risk, and that they not only failed to withdraw their products from the market, they downplayed the harm done to persons who used contaminated AHF by making misleading statements. The class action trial is scheduled to begin October 2, 1995. PMID:11362336

  4. Platelet-rich plasma for osteoarthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Knop, Eduardo; Paula, Luiz Eduardo de; Fuller, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive and systematic search of the literature on the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of osteoarthritis, using the Medline, Lilacs, Cochrane and SciELO databases, from May 2012 to October 2013. A total of 23 studies were selected, with nine being controlled trials and, of these, seven randomized, which included 725 patients. In this series, the group receiving PRP showed improvement in pain and joint function compared to placebo and hyaluronic acid. The response lasted up to two years and was better in milder cases. However it was found that there is no standardization in the PRP production method, neither in the number, timing, and volume of applications. Furthermore, the populations studied were not clearly described in many studies. Thus, these results should be analyzed with caution, and further studies with more standardized methods would be necessary for a more consistent conclusion about the PRP role in osteoarthritis. PMID:27267529

  5. Kin selection, species richness and community.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    Can evolutionary and ecological dynamics operating at one level of the biological hierarchy affect the dynamics and structure at other levels? In social insects, strong hostility towards unrelated individuals can evolve as a kin-selected counter-adaptation to intraspecific social parasitism. This aggression in turn might cause intraspecific competition to predominate over interspecific competition, permitting coexistence with other social insect species. In other words, kin selection-a form of intra-population dynamics-might enhance the species richness of the community, a higher-level structure. The converse effect, from higher to lower levels, might also operate, whereby strong interspecific competition may limit the evolution of selfish individual traits. If the latter effect were to prove more important, it would challenge the common view that intra-population dynamics (via individual or gene selection) is the main driver of evolution.

  6. Platelet-rich plasma: applications in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Conde Montero, E; Fernández Santos, M E; Suárez Fernández, R

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the use of platelet-rich plasma has increased notably in a range of diseases and settings. Uses of these products now go beyond skin rejuvenation therapy in patients with facial ageing. Good outcomes for other dermatological indications such as skin ulcers and, more recently, alopecia have been reported in case series and controlled studies. However, these indications are not currently included in the labeling given that stronger scientific evidence is required to support their real benefits. With the increased use of these products, dermatologists need to become familiar with the underlying biological principles and able to critically assess the quality and outcomes of the studies of these products in different skin diseases.

  7. Clusters in neutron-rich light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelavić Malenica, D.; Milin, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Lattuada, M.; Miljanić, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Prepolec, L.; Scuderi, V.; Skukan, N.; Soić, N.; Torresi, D.; Uroić, M.

    2016-05-01

    Due to their high selectivity, transfer and sequential decay reactions are powerful tools for studies of both single particle (nucleon) and cluster states in light nuclei. Their use is particularly simple for investigations of α-particle clustering (because α-particle has Jπ=0+, which simplifies spin and parity assignments to observed cluster states), but they are also easily applicable to other types of clustering. Recent results on clustering in neutron-rich isotopes of beryllium, boron and carbon obtained measuring the 10B+10B reactions (at 50 and 72 MeV) are presented. The highly efficient and segmented detector systems used, built from 4 Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSD) allowed detection of double and multiple coincidences and, in that way, studies of states populated in transfer reactions, as well as their sequential decay.

  8. Platelet Rich Fibrin in Periodontal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Muthukumaraswamy; Pulikkotil, Shaju J.; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic bacterial infection resulting in destruction of the supporting structures of the teeth. Regeneration of the lost tissues has faced difficulties primarily due to the lack of support during the intricate healing processes. A surgical additive which can ‘jump start’ the healing process to a more predictable regenerative process is always on the wish list of any periodontist. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a second generation platelet concentrate that has been considered to be an important, easy to obtain, predictable surgical additive for periodontal regeneration. This autologous scaffold provides the much needed bio-chemical mediators which has the potential for enhancing reconstruction of the periodontium. This review article tries to understand as to why PRF would be an important link to reach predictable periodontal regeneration. PMID:27386002

  9. Graphics performance in rich Internet applications.

    PubMed

    Hoetzlein, Rama C

    2012-01-01

    Rendering performance for rich Internet applications (RIAs) has recently focused on the debate between using Flash and HTML5 for streaming video and gaming on mobile devices. A key area not widely explored, however, is the scalability of raw bitmap graphics performance for RIAs. Does Flash render animated sprites faster than HTML5? How much faster is WebGL than Flash? Answers to these questions are essential for developing large-scale data visualizations, online games, and truly dynamic websites. A new test methodology analyzes graphics performance across RIA frameworks and browsers, revealing specific performance outliers in existing frameworks. The results point toward a future in which all online experiences might be GPU accelerated. PMID:24806992

  10. Platelet Rich Plasma and Knee Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Mikel; Sánchez, Pello; Orive, Gorka; Anitua, Eduardo; Padilla, Sabino

    2014-01-01

    In orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, the knee joint has traditionally been considered the workhorse. The reconstruction of every damaged element in this joint is crucial in achieving the surgeon's goal to restore the knee function and prevent degeneration towards osteoarthritis. In the last fifteen years, the field of regenerative medicine is witnessing a boost of autologous blood-derived platelet rich plasma products (PRPs) application to effectively mimic and accelerate the tissue healing process. The scientific rationale behind PRPs is the delivery of growth factors, cytokines, and adhesive proteins present in platelets and plasma, as well as other biologically active proteins conveyed by the plasma such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, and fibronectin; with this biological engineering approach, new perspectives in knee surgery were opened. This work describes the use of PRP to construct and repair every single anatomical structure involved in knee surgery, detailing the process conducted in ligament, meniscal, and chondral surgery. PMID:25302310

  11. Antibacterial activity of resin rich plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    Shuaib, Mohd; Ali, Abuzer; Ali, Mohd; Panda, Bibhu Prasad; Ahmad, Mohd Imtiyaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: The in vitro antibacterial activity of resin rich methanolic extracts (RRMEs) of Commiphora myrrha, Operculina turpethum, and Pinus roxburghii. Materials and Methods: Different concentration were studied by agar-well diffusion method against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Shigella dysenteriae). Results: Among all the bacterial strains tested, E. faecalis was most sensitive and S. typhi was resistant to C. myrrha and P. roxburghii. The extracts of O. turpethum were active against all tested strains in which B. subtilis and S. aureus were the most sensitive. Conclusion: This suggested that the antibacterial activity of RRMEs of O. turpethum was more than C. myrrha and P. roxburghii. This probably explains the potential of these plants against a number of infections caused by bacterial strains tested. PMID:24302834

  12. Enhancing research publications using Rich Interactive Narratives.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kenji; Earl, Graeme; Frey, Jeremy; Keay, Simon; Wade, Alex

    2013-01-28

    It is desirable in many disciplines to include supplementary information to add value to research publications, particularly in digital form. The concept of interactive publications, in which the reader can browse and navigate through in a nonlinear manner, is one such medium that is explored in this paper. We describe the application of the Rich Interactive Narrative framework to provide such a mechanism in the fields of archaeology and chemistry, to supplement academic journal papers. This system provides both passive (pre-recorded) and active (user-led) interaction modes to navigate through data, including experimental datasets, maps, photos, video and three-dimensional models, and supports event-based audio and text narration. It includes an extensive authoring tool for deployment to the Web. We conclude by discussing the future possibilities of such a platform for e-science and scholarly communication.

  13. Platelet Rich Fibrin in Periodontal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Muthukumaraswamy; Pulikkotil, Shaju J; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic bacterial infection resulting in destruction of the supporting structures of the teeth. Regeneration of the lost tissues has faced difficulties primarily due to the lack of support during the intricate healing processes. A surgical additive which can 'jump start' the healing process to a more predictable regenerative process is always on the wish list of any periodontist. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a second generation platelet concentrate that has been considered to be an important, easy to obtain, predictable surgical additive for periodontal regeneration. This autologous scaffold provides the much needed bio-chemical mediators which has the potential for enhancing reconstruction of the periodontium. This review article tries to understand as to why PRF would be an important link to reach predictable periodontal regeneration. PMID:27386002

  14. Correlates of species richness in the largest Neotropical amphibian radiation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Voyer, A; Padial, J M; Castroviejo-Fisher, S; de la Riva, I; Vilà, C

    2011-05-01

    Although tropical environments are often considered biodiversity hotspots, it is precisely in such environments where least is known about the factors that drive species richness. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative analyses to study correlates of species richness for the largest Neotropical amphibian radiation: New World direct-developing frogs. Clade-age and species richness were nonsignificantly, negatively correlated, suggesting that clade age alone does not explain among-clade variation in species richness. A combination of ecological and morphological traits explained 65% of the variance in species richness. A more vascularized ventral skin, the ability to colonize high-altitude ranges, encompassing a large variety of vegetation types, correlated significantly with species richness, whereas larger body size was marginally correlated with species richness. Hence, whereas high-altitude ranges play a role in shaping clade diversity in the Neotropics, intrinsic factors, such as skin structures and possibly body size, might ultimately determine which clades are more speciose than others. PMID:21401771

  15. Correlates of species richness in the largest Neotropical amphibian radiation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Voyer, A; Padial, J M; Castroviejo-Fisher, S; de la Riva, I; Vilà, C

    2011-05-01

    Although tropical environments are often considered biodiversity hotspots, it is precisely in such environments where least is known about the factors that drive species richness. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative analyses to study correlates of species richness for the largest Neotropical amphibian radiation: New World direct-developing frogs. Clade-age and species richness were nonsignificantly, negatively correlated, suggesting that clade age alone does not explain among-clade variation in species richness. A combination of ecological and morphological traits explained 65% of the variance in species richness. A more vascularized ventral skin, the ability to colonize high-altitude ranges, encompassing a large variety of vegetation types, correlated significantly with species richness, whereas larger body size was marginally correlated with species richness. Hence, whereas high-altitude ranges play a role in shaping clade diversity in the Neotropics, intrinsic factors, such as skin structures and possibly body size, might ultimately determine which clades are more speciose than others.

  16. Atherogenicity of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1998-02-26

    There is increasing evidence that alterations in metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are of importance in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and its clinical consequences. Particles with the characteristics of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnants have been related to the extent and severity of atherosclerosis in humans and in animal models. These particles can be identified using ultracentrifugal procedures as small, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) with Svedberg flotation rates (Sf) of 12-60. Postprandial triglyceride levels also have been related to risk of coronary artery disease, consistent with a pathologic role for remnant lipoproteins. In studies in which measurements of lipoprotein subfractions have been carried out, levels of IDL have been more predictive than low-density lipoprotein (LDL) of atherosclerosis progression as assessed by coronary artery angiography or carotid artery ultrasonography. These findings suggest that a considerable portion of the coronary disease risk attributed to LDL may be accounted for by the IDL particles included in standard LDL measurements. Other metabolic changes associated with increased levels of plasma triglyceride may also adversely affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include reductions in HDL-cholesterol and apoprotein A1, increased levels of small dense LDL particles, redistribution of apoC-III from HDL to apoB-containing lipoproteins, diminished insulin sensitivity, and procoagulant changes, including increased levels of the fibrinolysis inhibitor, plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). A predominance of small dense LDL (subclass pattern B) is a discrete marker for this cluster of interrelated abnormalities and is found in 40-50% of patients with coronary artery disease. Therapeutic interventions with favorable effects on components of this dysmetabolic profile appear to be of value in decreasing atherosclerosis risk in a substantial proportion of

  17. Experimental Study of Olivine-rich Troctolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, S.; Faul, U.

    2014-12-01

    This experimental study is designed to complement field observations of olivine-rich troctolites in ophiolites and from mid-ocean ridges. The olivine-rich troctolites are characterized by high volume proportion of olivine with interstitial plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Typically the clinopyroxene occurs in the form of few large, poikilitic grains. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of cooling process on the geometry of the interstitial phases (clinopyroxene and plagioclase). Experiments are conducted in a piston cylinder apparatus by first annealing olivine plus a basaltic melt with a composition designed to be in equilibrium with four phases at ~ 1 GPa and 1250ºC. Initially, we anneal the olivine-basalt aggregates at 1350 °C and 0.7 GPa for one week to produce a steady state microstructure. At this temperature only olivine and minor opx are present as crystalline phases. We then cool the samples over two weeks below their solidus temperature, following different protocols. The post-run samples are sectioned, polished, and imaged at high resolution and analyzed by using a field emission SEM. Initial observations show that under certain conditions clinopyroxene nucleates distributed throughout the aggregate at many sites, forming relatively small, rounded to near euhedral grains. Under certain conditions few cpx grains nucleate and grow with a poikilitic shape, partially or fully enclosing olivine grains, as is observed in natural samples. As for partially molten aggregates quenched form the annealing temperature, the microstructure will be characterized by tracing phase boundaries on screen by using ImageJ software. The geometry of the interstitial phases will be quantified by determining the grain boundary wetness, in this case the ratio of the length of polyphase to single phase (olivine-olivine) boundaries. Compositional data will also be used to study the change in major element compositions before and after the cooling process.

  18. Class Action Suits against Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesibov, Laurie

    1984-01-01

    If a suit is brought as a class action, either plaintiff or defendant may move to uphold or challenge class certification. If neither does so, the court decides whether the action may be maintained as a class suit. Prerequisites for class certification from Rule 23 (Federal Rules of Civil Procedure) are explained. (TE)

  19. SOCIAL CLASS AND CHILD-REARING PRACTICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHESS, STELLA; AND OTHERS

    THE BEHAVIORAL NORMS OF LOWER CLASS DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN ARE DIFFERENT FROM CHILDREN IN MORE MIDDLE CLASS GROUPS. THE BEHAVIOR OF LOWER CLASS CHILDREN IS INFLUENCED NOT ONLY BY GENERAL SOCIAL CLASS AND CULTURAL BACKGROUND BUT ALSO BY SUCH SPECIFIC INTRACLASS VARIABLES AS FAMILY ENVIRONMENT. THE PRESENT ABSENCE IN THE LITERATURE AND IN PRACTICE…

  20. Gender and the Construction of Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Joan

    Only by recognizing that class is not gender neutral can the processes of class formation and reproduction be understood. Class is defined as a process in which human beings take an active part, rather than a structure of categories into which individuals may be inserted. Gender organizes or structures class in many different ways. For example,…