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Sample records for aberrant cell cycle

  1. Aberrant cell cycle regulation in rat liver cells induced by post-initiation treatment with hepatocarcinogens/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoters.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Watanabe, Yousuke; Onda, Nobuhiko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to determine the onset time of hepatocarcinogen/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoter-specific cell proliferation, apoptosis and aberrant cell cycle regulation after post-initiation treatment. Six-week-old rats were treated with the genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, carbadox (CRB), the marginally hepatocarcinogenic leucomalachite green (LMG), the tumor promoter, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) or the non-carcinogenic hepatotoxicant, acetaminophen, for 2, 4 or 6 weeks during the post-initiation phase using a medium-term liver bioassay. Cell proliferation activity, expression of G2 to M phase- and spindle checkpoint-related molecules, and apoptosis were immunohistochemically analyzed at week 2 and 4, and tumor promotion activity was assessed at week 6. At week 2, hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific aberrant cell cycle regulation was not observed. At week 4, BNF and LMG increased cell proliferation together with hepatotoxicity, while CRB did not. Additionally, BNF and CRB reduced the number of cells expressing phosphorylated-histone H3 in both ubiquitin D (UBD)(+) cells and Ki-67(+) proliferating cells, suggesting development of spindle checkpoint dysfunction, regardless of cell proliferation activity. At week 6, examined hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increased preneoplastic hepatic foci expressing glutathione S-transferase placental form. These results suggest that some hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increase their toxicity after post-initiation treatment, causing regenerative cell proliferation. In contrast, some genotoxic hepatocarcinogens may disrupt the spindle checkpoint without facilitating cell proliferation at the early stage of tumor promotion. This suggests that facilitation of cell proliferation and disruption of spindle checkpoint function are induced by different mechanisms during hepatocarcinogenesis. Four weeks of post-initiation treatment may be sufficient to induce hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific cellular responses. PMID

  2. The Endocrine Dyscrasia that Accompanies Menopause and Andropause Induces Aberrant Cell Cycle Signaling that Triggers Cell Cycle Reentry of Post-mitotic Neurons, Neurodysfunction, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Craig S.; Bowen, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are the physiological factors that regulate neurogenesis during embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. These hormones support the formation of brain structures such as dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture of information (memories). Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories in animals (e.g. infantile amnesia). In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Since sex hormones control when and how neurons proliferate and differentiate, the endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause is a key signaling event that impacts neurogenesis and the acquisition, processing, storage and recall of memories. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in endocrine signaling with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle with neurite retraction that leads to neuron dysfunction and death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the ratio of LH:sex steroids as driving aberrant mitotic events mediated by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor, amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ, and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and

  3. Ochratoxin A induces karyomegaly and cell cycle aberrations in renal tubular cells without relation to induction of oxidative stress responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Taniai, Eriko; Yafune, Atsunori; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hayashi, Shim-Mo; Nakane, Fumiyuki; Itahashi, Megu; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a renal carcinogen that induces karyomegaly in target renal tubular cells of the outer stripe of the outer medulla (OSOM). This study was performed to clarify the relationship between oxidative stress and the karyomegaly-inducing potential involving cell cycle aberration of OTA in the OSOM. Rats were treated with OTA for 28 days in combination with enzymatically modified isoquercitrin (EMIQ) or α-lipoic acid (ALA) as antioxidants. OTA increased the mRNA levels of the antioxidant enzyme-related genes Gpx1, Gpx2, Gstm1 and Nfe2l2, but did not increase the levels of Gsta5, Keap1, Nqo1, Hmox1, Aldh1a1, Por, Prdx1 and Txn1. OTA also did not change the levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, glutathione disulfide/reduced glutathione, and the immunoreactive tubular cell distribution of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 in the OSOM. Co-treatment with EMIQ or ALA did not cause any changes in these parameters. As previously reported, OTA increased cell proliferation activity, apoptosis and immunohistochemical cellular distributions of molecules suggestive of induction of DNA damage and cell cycle aberrations involving spindle checkpoint disruption and cell cycle arrest. However, co-treatment with EMIQ or ALA did not suppress these changes, and ALA co-treatment increased the cell proliferation activity induced by OTA. These results suggest that OTA facilitates cell cycling involving cell cycle aberrations and apoptosis as a basis of the mechanism behind the development of karyomegaly and subsequent carcinogenicity targeting the OSOM, without relation to induction of oxidative stress. On the other hand, ALA may promote the OTA-induced proliferation of carcinogenic target cells.

  4. Cellular distribution of cell cycle-related molecules in the renal tubules of rats treated with renal carcinogens for 28 days: relationship between cell cycle aberration and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Taniai, Eriko; Hayashi, Hitomi; Yafune, Atsunori; Watanabe, Maiko; Akane, Hirotoshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    Some renal carcinogens can induce karyomegaly, which reflects aberrant cell division in the renal tubules, from the early stages of exposure. To clarify the cell cycle-related changes during the early stages of renal carcinogenesis, we performed immunohistochemical analysis of tubular cells in male F344 rats treated with carcinogenic doses of representative renal carcinogens for 28 days. For this purpose, the karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens ochratoxin A (OTA), ferric nitrilotriacetic acid, and monuron, and the non-karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate and potassium bromate were examined. For comparison, a karyomegaly-inducing non-carcinogen, p-nitrobenzoic acid, and a non-carcinogenic non-karyomegaly-inducing renal toxicant, acetaminophen, were also examined. The outer stripe of the outer medulla (OSOM) and the cortex + OSOM were subjected to morphometric analysis of immunoreactive proximal tubular cells. Renal carcinogens, irrespective of their karyomegaly-inducing potential, increased proximal tubular cell proliferation accompanied by an increase in topoisomerase IIα-immunoreactive cells, suggesting a reflection of cell proliferation. Karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens increased nuclear Cdc2-, γH2AX-, and phosphorylated Chk2-immunoreactive cells in both areas, the former two acting in response to DNA damage and the latter one suggestive of sustained G₂. OTA, an OSOM-targeting carcinogen, could easily be distinguished from untreated controls and non-carcinogens by evaluation of molecules responding to DNA damage and G₂/M transition in the OSOM. Thus, all renal carcinogens examined facilitated proximal tubular proliferation by repeated short-term treatment. Among these, karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens may cause DNA damage and G₂ arrest in the target tubular cells.

  5. The endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause induces aberrant cell cycle signaling that triggers re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle, neurodysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive disease.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Sex hormones are physiological factors that promote neurogenesis during embryonic and fetal development. During childhood and adulthood these hormones support the maintenance of brain structure and function via neurogenesis and the formation of dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture, processing and retrieval of information (memories). Not surprisingly, changes in these reproductive hormones that occur with menopause and during andropause are strongly correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of adult neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories while decreasing neurogenesis after memory formation during infancy mitigated forgetting. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in sex hormone signaling associated with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle that leads to neurite retraction, neuron dysfunction and neuron death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, gonadotropins such as luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the LH:sex steroid ratio as driving aberrant mitotic events. These include the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor; amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ; and

  6. Aberrant life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF15_01B-like clinical isolates from Thailand in human CD4+ T-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Warachit, Jiranan; Iwabu, Yukie; Li, Yong-Gang; Li, Gui-Mei; Isarangkura, Panasda; Ibrahim, Madiha S; Balachandra, Kruavon; Tsuji, Shoutaro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2007-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is separated into several subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Here, infections of 4 clinical isolates (0-47-1, CU98-26, CU98-28, and CU98-31) from Thailand were examined in human CD4(+) T-cell lines, MT-4 and MOLT-4. The CU98-26 isolates in both cells and 0-47-1 in MT-4 established chronic infections, as in control 2 subtype B isolates from Japan, while 0-47-1 in MOLT-4 caused a latent infection. In contrast, CU98-28 and CU98-31 established aberrant infections in both cells. Integrated provirus was detected in all the chronic infections, including 0-47-1 in both cells. In contrast, extrachromosomal circular forms of HIV-1 DNA were detected in CU98-28- and CU98-31-infected cells, whereas the amount of the integrated form was below the limit of detection. Interestingly, phylogenetic trees and sequencing revealed that all the Thai isolates, except 0-47-1, displayed CRF15_01B-like mosaic structures of CRF01_AE with subtype B-like sequences in several regions that were apparently different from those of the inocula in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Thus, in the infections of most of the above Thai isolates it was suggested that a minor population with mosaic patterns having multiple breakpoints between CRF01_AE and subtype B in the inocula could be selected by the T-cell lines.

  7. Aberrant cell cycle progression contributes to the early-stage accelerated carcinogenesis in transgenic epidermis expressing the dominant negative TGFbetaRII.

    PubMed

    Go, C; He, W; Zhong, L; Li, P; Huang, J; Brinkley, B R; Wang, X J

    2000-07-27

    Mutations in the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor (TGFbetaRII) have been found in various malignant tumors, suggesting that loss of TGFbeta signaling plays a causal role in late-stage cancer development. To test whether loss of TGFbetaRII is involved in early-stage carcinogenesis, we have generated transgenic mice expressing a dominant negative TGFbetaRII (deltabetaRII) in the epidermis. These mice exhibited an increased susceptibility to chemical carcinogenesis protocols at both early and late stages. In the current study, parameters for cell cycle progression and chromosome instability were analysed in deltabetaRII tumors. DeltabetaRII papillomas showed an increased S phase in flow cytometry. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling and mitotic indices in deltabetaRII papillomas also showed a threefold increase compared to papillomas developing in non-transgenic mice. When papillomas further progressed to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), both control and deltabetaRII SCC showed similar BrdU labeling indices and percentages of S phase cells. However, deltabetaRII SCC cells showed a sixfold increase in the G2/M population. Mitotic indices in deltabetaRII SCC also showed a threefold increase compared to non-transgenic SCC. Consistent with a perturbed cell cycle, deltabetaRII papillomas and SCC showed reduced expression of the TGFbeta target genes p15 (INK4b), p21 (WAF-1) and p27 (Kip1), inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). However, most deltabetaRII papilloma cells exhibited normal centrosome numbers, and deltabetaRII SCC exhibited a similar extent of centrosome abnormalities compared to control SCC (35-40% cells). Most of deltabetaRII SCC exhibited diploid chromosome profiles. These data indicate that inactivation of TGFbetaRII accelerates skin tumorigenesis at early stages by the acceleration of loss of cell cycle control, but not by increased chromosome instability.

  8. Mechanisms of formation of chromosomal aberrations: insights from studies with DNA repair-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Palitti, F

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of formation of chromosomal aberrations, studies performed on human syndromes with genomic instability can be fruitful. In this report, the results from studies in our laboratory on the importance of the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) pathway on the induction of chromosomal damage and apoptosis by ultraviolet light (UV) are discussed. UV61 cells (hamster homologue of human Cockayne's syndrome group B) deficient in TCR showed a dramatic increase in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis following UV treatment. At relatively low UV doses, the induction of chromosomal aberrations preceded the apoptotic process. Chromosomal aberrations probably lead to apoptosis and most of the cells had gone through an S phase after the UV treatment before entering apoptosis. At higher doses of UV, the cells could go into apoptosis already in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Abolition of TCR by treatment with alpha-amanitin (an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II) in the parental cell line AA8 also resulted in the induction of elevated chromosomal damage and apoptotic response similar to the one observed in UV61 cells treated with UV alone. This suggests that the lack of TCR is responsible for the increased frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis in UV61 cells. Hypersensitivity to the induction of chromosomal damage by inhibitors of antitopoisomerases I and II in Werner's syndrome cells is also discussed in relation to the compromised G2 phase processes involving the Werner protein. PMID:15162020

  9. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  10. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  11. Induction of chromosome aberrations and mitotic arrest by cytomegalovirus in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    AbuBakar, S.; Au, W.W.; Legator, M.S.; Albrecht, T.

    1988-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is potentially an effective but often overlooked genotoxic agent in humans. We report here evidence that indicates that infection by CMV can induce chromosome alterations and mitotic inhibition. The frequency of chromosome aberrations induced was dependent on the input multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) for human lung fibroblasts (LU), but not for human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) when both cell types were infected at the GO phase of the cell cycle. The aberrations induced by CMV were mostly chromatid breaks and chromosome pulverizations that resembled prematurely condensed S-phase chromatin. Pulverized chromosomes were not observed in LU cells infected with virus stocks that had been rendered nonlytic by UV-irradiation at 24,000 ergs/mm2 or from infection of human lymphocytes. In LU cells infected with UV-irradiated CMV, the frequency of aberrations induced was inversely dependent on the extent of the exposure of the CMV stock to the UV-light. In permissive CMV infection of proliferating LU cells at 24 hr after subculture, a high percentage (greater than 40%) of the metaphase cells were arrested at their first metaphase and displayed severely condensed chromosomes when harvested 48 hr later. A significant increase (p less than 0.05) in the chromosome aberration frequency was also observed. Our study shows that CMV infection is genotoxic to host cells. The types and extent of damage are dependent on the viral genome expression and on the cell cycle stage of the cells at the time of infection. The possible mechanisms for induction of chromosome damage by CMV are discussed.

  12. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Cross, Frederick R; Umen, James G

    2015-05-01

    The position of Chlamydomonas within the eukaryotic phylogeny makes it a unique model in at least two important ways: as a representative of the critically important, early-diverging lineage leading to plants; and as a microbe retaining important features of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) that has been lost in the highly studied yeast lineages. Its cell biology has been studied for many decades and it has well-developed experimental genetic tools, both classical (Mendelian) and molecular. Unlike land plants, it is a haploid with very few gene duplicates, making it ideal for loss-of-function genetic studies. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle has a striking temporal and functional separation between cell growth and rapid cell division, probably connected to the interplay between diurnal cycles that drive photosynthetic cell growth and the cell division cycle; it also exhibits a highly choreographed interaction between the cell cycle and its centriole-basal body-flagellar cycle. Here, we review the current status of studies of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. We begin with an overview of cell-cycle control in the well-studied yeast and animal systems, which has yielded a canonical, well-supported model. We discuss briefly what is known about similarities and differences in plant cell-cycle control, compared with this model. We next review the cytology and cell biology of the multiple-fission cell cycle of Chlamydomonas. Lastly, we review recent genetic approaches and insights into Chlamydomonas cell-cycle regulation that have been enabled by a new generation of genomics-based tools.

  13. Cytogenetically aberrant cells in the stem cell compartment (CD34+lin-) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, B; George, T I; Kavanau, K; Avet-Loiseau, H; Moore, D; Willman, C L; Slovak, M L; Atwater, S; Head, D R; Pallavicini, M G

    1995-08-01

    Leukemia may be viewed as a clonal expansion of blast cells; however, the role of primitive cells and/or stem cells in disease etiology and progression is unclear. We investigated stem cell involvement in leukemia using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), immunofluorescence labeling of hematopoietic subpopulations, and flow cytometric analysis/sorting to discriminate and quantify cytogenetically aberrant stem cells in 12 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and three myelodysplastic (MDS) specimens. Flow cytometric analysis and sorting were used to discriminate and collect a primitive subpopulation enriched in stem cells expressing CD34+ and lacking CD33 and CD38 (CD34+lin-). A subpopulation containing progenitors and differentiating myeloid cells expressed CD34, CD33, and CD38 (CD34+lin+). Nine specimens contained less than 10% CD34+ cells and, thus, were considered to be CD34- leukemias. Mature lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid subpopulations were sorted on the basis of antigen-linked immunofluorescence. Cytogenetically aberrant cells in sorted subpopulations were identified using FISH with enumerator probes selected on the basis of diagnosis karyotype. Cytogenetically aberrant CD34+lin- cells were present at frequencies between 9% and 99% in all specimens. CD34+lin- cytogenetically aberrant cells comprised between 0.05% and 11.9% of the marrow/blood specimens. Cytogenetically aberrant CD34+lin+ cells constituted 0.01% tp 56% of the marrow/blood population. These data demonstrate that aberrant cells are present in primitive CD34+ stem cell compartments, even in CD34- leukemias. Stem cell involvement was confirmed further by sorting lymphoid and erythroid subpopulations from eight specimens in which the predominant leukemic population lacked lymphoid/erythroid differentiation markers. In these specimens, as well as in multiple lineages, suggests involvement of a cell(s) with multilineage capabilities. The ability of aberrant CD34+lin- stem cells to contribute to

  14. Induction of chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells after heavy ion exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, S.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Scholz, M.; Kraft, G.

    The induction of chromosome aberrations by heavy charged particles was studied in V79 Chinese hamster cells over a wide range of energies (3-100 MeV/u) and LET (20-16000 keV/μm). For comparison, X-ray experiments were performed. Our data indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the response of cells to particle and x-ray irradiation. For the same level of cell survival the amount of damaged cells which can be observed is smaller in heavy ion (11.4 MeV/u Ar) irradiated samples. The highest yield of damaged cells is found 8 to 12 hours after particle irradiation and 4 hours after x-irradiation. Differences in the amount of damaged cells are attributed to cell cycle perturbations which interfere with the expression of damage. After heavy ion exposure the amount of cells reaching mitosis (mitotic index) decreases drastically and not all damaged cells reach mitosis within 48 hours after exposure. A portion of cells die in interphase. Cell cycle delays induced by x-ray irradiation are less pronounced and all cells reach the first post-irradiation mitosis within 24 hours after irradiation. Additionally, the damage produced by charged particles seems to be more severe. The disintegration of chromosomes was only observed after high LET radiation: an indication of the high and local energy deposition in the particle track. Only cross sections for the induction of chromosome aberrations in mitotic cells were reported in this paper because of the problems arising from the drastic cell cycle perturbations. In this case, cells were irradiated in mitosis and assayed immediately.

  15. Investigation of an Aberrant Cell Voltage During the Filling of a Large Lithium Thionyl Chloride Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Quinzio, Michael V.

    1997-01-01

    The investigation of an aberrant cell voltage during the filling of a large lithium thionyl chloride cell summary is at: an aberrant voltage trace was noted during the review of cell filling data; incident was traced to an interruption during filling; experimentation suggested oxidizable sites within the carbon electrode were responsible for the drop in voltage; the voltage anomaly could be reproduced by interrupting the filling of similar cells; and anomalous voltage dip was not due to a short.

  16. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  17. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  18. Production and distribution of aberrations in resting or cycling human lymphocytes following Fe-ion or Cr-ion irradiation: Emphasis on single track effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Lee, Ryonfa; Nasonova, Elena; Ritter, Sylvia; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2012-09-01

    In the present study we examined the cytogenetic effects of 177 MeV/u Fe-ions (LET = 335 keV/μm) and 4.1 MeV/u Cr-ions (LET = 3160 keV/μm) in human lymphocytes under exposure conditions that result on average in one particle hit per cell nucleus. In non-cycling (G0-phase) lymphocytes the induction and the repair of excess fragments was measured by means of the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique and the distribution of breaks among cells was analysed. The PCC-data were further compared with those reported recently for stimulated lymphocytes at the first post-irradiation mitosis. Our experiments show that a single nuclear traversal by a Fe-ion produced more initial chromatin breakage than one Cr-ion, but after 24 h of repair the number of excess fragments/cell was similar for both ion species. All distributions of aberrations were overdispersed. For low energy Cr-ions, where the track radius is smaller than the radius of the cell nucleus, the data could be well described by a Neyman type A distribution. In contrast, the data obtained for high energy Fe-ions were fitted with a convoluted Poisson-Neyman distribution to account for the fact that the dose is deposited not only in the cell actually traversed but also in neighbouring cells. By applying metaphase analysis a different picture emerged with respect to the aberration yield, i.e. more aberrations were detected in cells exposed to Fe-ions than in those irradiated with Cr-ions. Yet, as observed for non-cycling lymphocytes all aberration distributions generated for metaphase cells were overdispersed. The obtained results are discussed with respect to differences in particle track structure. Additionally, the impact of confounding factors such as apoptosis that affect the number of aberrations expressed in a cell population is addressed.

  19. PLK-1: Angel or devil for cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shiv; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Kim, Jaebong

    2016-04-01

    PLK-1 is a key player in the eukaryotic cell cycle. Cell cycle progression is precisely controlled by cell cycle regulatory kinases. PLK-1 is a mitotic kinase that actively regulates the G2/M transition, mitosis, mitotic exit, and cytokinesis. During cell cycle progression, PLK-1 controls various events related to the cell cycle maturation, directly and/or indirectly. On the contrary, aberrant expression of PLK-1 is strongly associated with tumorigenesis and its poor prognosis. The misexpression of PLK-1 causes the abnormalities including aneuploidy, mitotic defects, leading to tumorigenesis through inhibiting the p53 and pRB genes. Therefore, we reviewed the role of PLK-1 in the cell cycle progression and in the tumorigenesis either as a cell cycle regulator or on an attractive anti-cancer drug target. PMID:26899266

  20. Natural flavonoids targeting deregulated cell cycle progression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana Pratap; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2006-03-01

    The prolonged duration requiring alteration of multi-genetic and epigenetic molecular events for cancer development provides a strong rationale for cancer prevention, which is developing as a potential strategy to arrest or reverse carcinogenic changes before the appearance of the malignant disease. Cell cycle progression is an important biological event having controlled regulation in normal cells, which almost universally becomes aberrant or deregulated in transformed and neoplastic cells. In this regard, targeting deregulated cell cycle progression and its modulation by various natural and synthetic agents are gaining widespread attention in recent years to control the unchecked growth and proliferation in cancer cells. In fact, a vast number of experimental studies convincingly show that many phytochemicals halt uncontrolled cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Among these phytochemicals, natural flavonoids have been identified as a one of the major classes of natural anticancer agents exerting antineoplastic activity via cell cycle arrest as a major mechanism in various types of cancer cells. This review is focused at the modulatory effects of natural flavonoids on cell cycle regulators including cyclin-dependent kinases and their inhibitors, cyclins, p53, retinoblastoma family of proteins, E2Fs, check-point kinases, ATM/ATR and survivin controlling G1/S and G2/M check-point transitions in cell cycle progression, and discusses how these molecular changes could contribute to the antineoplastic effects of natural flavonoids.

  1. Analysis of Heavy Ion-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblast Cells Using In Situ Hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 0 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Unrejoined chromosomal breaks and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, indicating the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track. 2

  2. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Congjun

    2011-01-01

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells. We explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells and we characterize the properties of butyrate-induced cell cycle arrest. The site of growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest was analyzed using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and flow cytometry analyses. Exposure of MDBK cells to 10 mM butyrate caused growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest in a reversible manner. Butyrate affected the cell cycle at a specific point both immediately after mitosis and at a very early stage of the G1 phase. After release from butyrate arrest, MDBK cells underwent synchronous cycles of DNA synthesis and transited through the S phase. It takes at least 8 h for butyrate-induced G1-synchronized cells to begin the progression into the S phase. One cycle of cell division for MDBK cells is about 20 h. By combining BrdU incorporation and DNA content analysis, not only can the overlapping of different cell populations be eliminated, but the frequency and nature of individual cells that have synthesized DNA can also be determined.

  3. Cell cycle effects of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Cell Growth and Division Cycle; Cell Cycle Effects of Alkylating Agents; Biological Effects of Folic Acid Antagonists with Antineoplastic Activity; and Bleomycin-Mode of Action with Particular Reference to the Cell Cycle.

  4. High- and low-LET Radiation-induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured in 3-dimensional Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2008-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts who participate in extended ISS missions and will be an even greater concern for future manned lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D in vitro cellular environment can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultured at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected in the first cell cycle after irradiation using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference in the

  5. Molecular aberrations of the G1-S checkpoint in myxoid and round cell liposarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Dei Tos, A. P.; Piccinin, S.; Doglioni, C.; Vukosavljevic, T.; Mentzel, T.; Boiocchi, M.; Fletcher, C. D.

    1997-01-01

    Myxoid and round cell liposarcoma represents a morphological spectrum in which tumor progression from low-grade myxoid to high-grade round cell areas is frequently observed. A distinctive t(12;16)(q13;p11) reciprocal translocation rearranges the CHOP gene localized to 12q13 in most cases. Data concerning the occurrence of cell cycle aberrations in this subset of mesenchymal malignancies are very limited. Therefore, we analyzed a histologically homogeneous series of 21 cases of myxoid and round cell liposarcoma. The p53 pathway was studied by investigating the TP53 gene and protein, mdm2 protein, and p21Waf1 protein. The Rb-cyclin D pathway was analyzed by studying the pRb protein, the p16MTS1 gene, cyclin D1, cyclin D3, p27Kip1, cdk4, and cdk6 proteins. In contrast with the rare involvement of the TP53 gene in well differentiated liposarcoma, aberrations of the TP53 gene were observed in approximately 30% of cases of myxoid and round cell liposarcoma. Notably, mdm2 overexpression was seen in 56% of cases and correlated with histological grade, therefore indicating a possible role in tumor progression. Abnormalities involving the Rb-cyclin D pathway were observed in more than 90% of cases. pRb loss was present in one-third of cases and, at variance with that observed in other subsets of sarcoma, overexpression of cyclin Ds represented a rare event. Interestingly, upregulation of either cdk4 or cdk6 was demonstrated in 85% of cases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9403703

  6. How do prokaryotic cells cycle?

    PubMed

    Margolin, William; Bernander, Rolf

    2004-09-21

    This issue of Current Biology features five reviews covering various key aspects of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The topics include initiation of chromosome replication, assembly of the mitotic spindle, cytokinesis, the regulation of cell-cycle progression, and cell-cycle modeling, focusing mainly on budding yeast, fission yeast and animal cell model systems. The reviews underscore common themes as well as key differences in the way these processes are carried out and regulated among the different model organisms. Consequently, an important question is how cell-cycle mechanisms and controls have evolved, particularly in the broader perspective of the three domains of life.

  7. The Distribution of Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Predicted by a Generalized Time-Dependent Model of Radiation-Induced Formation of Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    New experimental data show how chromosomal aberrations for low- and high-LET radiation are dependent on DSB repair deficiencies in wild-type, AT and NBS cells. We simulated the development of chromosomal aberrations in these cells lines in a stochastic track-structure-dependent model, in which different cells have different kinetics of DSB repair. We updated a previously formulated model of chromosomal aberrations, which was based on a stochastic Monte Carlo approach, to consider the time-dependence of DSB rejoining. The previous version of the model had an assumption that all DSBs would rejoin, and therefore we called it a time-independent model. The chromosomal-aberrations model takes into account the DNA and track structure for low- and high-LET radiations, and provides an explanation and prediction of the statistics of rare and more complex aberrations. We compared the program-simulated kinetics of DSB rejoining to the experimentally-derived bimodal exponential curves of the DSB kinetics. We scored the formation of translocations, dicentrics, acentric and centric rings, deletions, and inversions. The fraction of DSBs participating in aberrations was studied in relation to the rejoining time. Comparisons of simulated dose dependence for simple aberrations to the experimental dose-dependence for HF19, AT and NBS cells will be made.

  8. Variation in sensitivity to. gamma. -ray-induced chromosomal aberrations during the mitotic cycle of the sea urchin egg

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Y.; Nakamura, I.; Shiroya, T.

    1982-11-01

    Sea urchin eggs were irradiated with /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays at various stages of the mitotic cycle, and chromosomal aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis and embryonic abnormalities at later developmental stages were examined. The radiosensitivity of the eggs to both endpoints varied in parallel with the mitotic stage at the time of irradiation, suggesting a possible relationship between chromosomal damage and embryonic abnormalities.

  9. Pancreatic Tumor Cell Secreted CCN1/Cyr61 Promotes Endothelial cell migration and Aberrant Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Gargi; Mehta, Smita; Haque, Inamul; Dhar, Kakali; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K.; Banerjee, Snigdha

    2014-01-01

    The complex signaling networks between cancer cells and adjacent endothelial cells make it challenging to unravel how cancer cells send extracellular messages to promote aberrant vascularization or tumor angiogenesis. Here, in vitro and in vivo models show that pancreatic cancer cell generated unique microenvironments can underlie endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, we find that pancreatic cancer cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 matricellular protein rewires the microenvironment to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. This event can be overcome by Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) antibody treatment. Collectively, these studies identify a novel CCN1 signaling program in pancreatic cancer cells which activates SHh through autocrine-paracrine circuits to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis and suggests that CCN1 signaling of pancreatic cancer cells is vital for the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. Thus CCN1 signaling could be an ideal target for tumor vascular disruption in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24833309

  10. Induction of chromosomal aberrations by propoxur in mouse bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, R C

    1999-12-01

    Propoxur is a widely used dithiocarbamate insecticide. In this study, the clastogenic effect of propoxur has been evaluated using chromosomal aberration assay in mouse bone marrow cells. Single i.p. administration of propoxur, at 25 mg/kg b.wt., a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and 12.5 mg/kg b.wt (50% of MTD) have significantly induced different types of aberrations after 24 h of treatment. The aberrations were dose and time dependent and reached a maximum after 24 h of exposure. The results suggest a genotoxic potential of propoxur.

  11. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    FISH, mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromere probes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. High-LET induced damages are mostly a single track effect. Unrejoined chromosome breaks (incomplete exchanges) and complex type aberrations were higher for high-LET. Biosignatures may depend on the method the samples are collected. Recent mBAND analysis has revealed more information about the nature of intra-chromosome exchanges. Whether space flight/microgravity affects radiation-induced chromosome aberration frequencies is still an open question.

  12. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: Aberrant cellular division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, T.K.; Derby, M.; Martin, D.F.; Wright, S.D.; Dao, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells.

  13. NrasG12D/+ promotes leukemogenesis by aberrantly regulating hematopoietic stem cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyong; Kong, Guangyao; Liu, Yangang; Du, Juan; Chang, Yuan-I; Tey, Sin Ruow; Zhang, Xinmin; Ranheim, Erik A.; Saba-El-Leil, Marc K.; Meloche, Sylvain; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Zhang, Jingfang; Zhang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic NRAS mutations are frequently identified in human myeloid leukemias. In mice, expression of endogenous oncogenic Nras (NrasG12D/+) in hematopoietic cells leads to expansion of myeloid progenitors, increased long-term reconstitution of bone marrow cells, and a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). However, acute expression of NrasG12D/+ in a pure C57BL/6 background does not induce hyperactivated granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor signaling or increased proliferation in myeloid progenitors. It is thus unclear how NrasG12D/+ signaling promotes leukemogenesis. Here, we show that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) expressing NrasG12D/+ serve as MPN-initiating cells. They undergo moderate hyperproliferation with increased self-renewal. The aberrant NrasG12D/+ HSC function is associated with hyperactivation of ERK1/2 in HSCs. Conversely, downregulation of MEK/ERK by pharmacologic and genetic approaches attenuates the cycling of NrasG12D/+ HSCs and prevents the expansion of NrasG12D/+ HSCs and myeloid progenitors. Our data delineate critical mechanisms of oncogenic Nras signaling in HSC function and leukemogenesis. PMID:23687087

  14. Creatine kinase in cell cycle regulation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong-Bin

    2016-08-01

    The phosphocreatine-creatine kinase (CK) shuttle system is increasingly recognized as a fundamental mechanism for ATP homeostasis in both excitable and non-excitable cells. Many intracellular processes are ATP dependent. Cell division is a process requiring a rapid rate of energy turnover. Cell cycle regulation is also a key point to understanding the mechanisms underlying cancer progression. It has been known for about 40 years that aberrant CK levels are associated with various cancers and for over 30 years that CK is involved in mitosis regulation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been investigated sufficiently until recently. By maintaining ATP at sites of high-energy demand, CK can regulate cell cycle progression by affecting the intracellular energy status as well as by influencing signaling pathways that are essential to activate cell division and cytoskeleton reorganization. Aberrant CK levels may impair cell viability under normal or stressed conditions and induce cell death. The involvement of CK in cell cycle regulation and cellular energy metabolism makes it a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in cancer. To understand the multiple physiological/pathological functions of CK, it is necessary to identify CK-binding partners and regulators including proteins, non-coding RNAs and participating endogenous small molecular weight chemical compounds. This review will focus on molecular mechanisms of CK in cell cycle regulation and cancer progression. It will also discuss the implications of recent mechanistic studies, the emerging problems and future challenges of the multifunctional enzyme CK. PMID:27020776

  15. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  16. Proton and Fe Ion-Induced Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability, induced by various metabolic, genetic, and environmental factors, is the driving force of tumorigenesis. Radiation exposure from different types of radiation sources induces different types of DNA damages, increases mutation and chromosome aberration rates, and increases cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo experiments. The cell survival rates and frequency of chromosome aberrations depend on the genetic background and radiation sources. To further understand genomic instability induced by charged particles, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblast cells, human mammary epithelial cells, and bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 mice to high energy protons and Fe ions, and collected chromosomes at different generations after exposure. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescent in situ hybridization with whole chromosome specific probes.

  17. Aberrant expression of the CHFR prophase checkpoint gene in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Aiqin; Ye, Junli; Zhang, Kunpeng; Yu, Hongsheng; Gao, Yanhua; Wang, Hongfang; Sun, Lirong; Xing, Xiaoming; Yang, Kun; Zhao, Min

    2015-05-01

    Checkpoint with FHA and Ring Finger (CHFR) is a checkpoint protein that reportedly initiates a cell cycle delay in response to microtubule stress during prophase in mitosis, which has become an interesting target for understanding cancer pathogenesis. Recently, aberrant methylation of the CHFR gene associated with gene silencing has been reported in several cancers. In the present study, we examined the expression of CHFR in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the expression level of CHFR mRNA and protein was reduced in B-NHL tissue samples and B cell lines. Furthermore, CHFR methylation was detected in 39 of 122 B-NHL patients, which was not found in noncancerous reactive hyperplasia of lymph node (RH) tissues. CHFR methylation correlated with the reduced expression of CHFR, high International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and later pathologic Ann Arbor stages of B-NHL. Treatment with demethylation reagent, 5-Aza-dC, could eliminate the hypermethylation of CHFR, enhance CHFR expression and cell apoptosis and inhibit the cell proliferation of Raji cells, which could be induced by high expression of CHFR in Raji cells. Our results indicated that aberrant methylation of CHFR may be associated with the pathogenesis, progression for B-NHL, which might be a novel molecular marker as prognosis and treatment for B-NHL. PMID:25798877

  18. Imaging nanometre-scale structure in cells using in situ aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Fuller, C J; Straight, A F

    2012-10-01

    Accurate distance measurements of cellular structures on a length scale relevant to single macromolecules or macromolecular complexes present a major challenge for biological microscopy. In addition to the inherent challenges of overcoming the limits imposed by the diffraction of light, cells themselves are a complex and poorly understood optical environment. We present an extension of the high-resolution colocalization method to measure three dimensional distances between diffraction-limited objects using standard widefield fluorescence microscopy. We use this method to demonstrate that in three dimensions, cells intrinsically introduce a large and variable amount of chromatic aberration into optical measurements. We present a means of correcting this aberration in situ [termed 'Colocalization and In-situ Correction of Aberration for Distance Analysis' (CICADA)] by exploiting the fact that there is a linear relationship between the degree of aberration between different wavelengths. By labelling a cellular structure with redundantly multi-colour labelled antibodies, we can create an intracellular fiducial marker for correcting the individual aberrations between two different wavelengths in the same cells. Our observations demonstrate that with suitable corrections, nanometre scale three-dimensional distance measurements can be used to probe the substructure of macromolecular complexes within cells.

  19. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Regulates a Redox Cycle Within the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sarsour, Ehab H.; Kalen, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a nuclear-encoded and mitochondria-matrix-localized oxidation-reduction (redox) enzyme that regulates cellular redox homeostasis. Cellular redox processes are known to regulate proliferative and quiescent growth states. Therefore, MnSOD and mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be critical regulators of quiescent cells' entry into the cell cycle and exit from the proliferative cycle back to the quiescent state. Recent Advances/Critical Issues: Recent evidence suggests that the intracellular redox environment fluctuates during the cell cycle, shifting toward a more oxidized status during mitosis. MnSOD activity is higher in G0/G1 cells compared with S, G2 and M phases. After cell division, MnSOD activity increases in the G1 phase of the daughter generation. The periodic fluctuation in MnSOD activity during the cell cycle inversely correlates with cellular superoxide levels as well as glucose and oxygen consumption. Based on an inverse correlation between MnSOD activity and glucose consumption during the cell cycle, it is proposed that MnSOD is a central molecular player for the “Warburg effect.” Future Directions: In general, loss of MnSOD activity results in aberrant proliferation. A better understanding of the MnSOD and mitochondrial ROS-dependent cell cycle processes may lead to novel approaches to overcome aberrant proliferation. Since ROS have both deleterious (pathological) and beneficial (physiological) effects, it is proposed that “eustress” should be used when discussing ROS processes that regulate normal physiological functions, while “oxidative stress” should be used to discuss the deleterious effects of ROS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1618–1627. PMID:23590434

  20. Frequency of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Types of Cells After Proton and Fe Ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Bowler, Deborah

    2016-07-01

    DNA damages induced by space radiation, consisting of protons and high-LET charged particles, can be complex in nature, which are often left unrepaired and cause chromosomal aberrations. Increased level of genomic instability is attributed to tumorigenesis and increased cancer risks. To investigate genomic instability induced by charged particles, human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblasts, and human mammary epithelial cells, as well as mouse bone marrow stem cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 strains were exposed to high energy protons and Fe ions. Metaphase chromosome spreads at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and, chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole chromosome-specific probes for human cells. With proton irradiation, levels of chromosome aberrations decreased by about 50% in both lymphocytes and epithelial cells after multiple cell divisions, compared to initial chromosome aberrations at 48 hours post irradiation in both cell types. With Fe ion irradiation, however, the frequency of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes after multiple cell divisions was significantly lower than that in epithelial cells at comparable cell divisions, while their initial chromosome aberrations were at similar levels. Similar to the human cells, after Fe ion irradiation, the frequency of late chromosome aberrations was similar to that of the early damages for radio-sensitive CBA cells, but different for radio-resistant C57 cells. Our results suggest that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values are dependent not only on radiation sources, but also on cell types and cell divisions.

  1. Frequency of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Types of Cells After Proton and Fe Ion Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    DNA damages induced by space radiation, consisting of protons and high-LET charged particles, can be complex in nature, which are often left unrepaired and cause chromosomal aberrations. Increased level of genomic instability is attributed to tumorigenesis and increased cancer risks. To investigate genomic instability induced by charged particles, human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblasts, and human mammary epithelial cells, as well as mouse bone marrow stem cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 strains were exposed to high energy protons and Fe ions. Metaphase chromosome spreads at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and, chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole chromosome-specific probes for human cells. With proton irradiation, levels of chromosome aberrations decreased by about 50% in both lymphocytes and epithelial cells after multiple cell divisions, compared to initial chromosome aberrations at 48 hours post irradiation in both cell types. With Fe ion irradiation, however, the frequency of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes after multiple cell divisions was significantly lower than that in epithelial cells at comparable cell divisions, while their initial chromosome aberrations were at similar levels. Similar to the human cells, after Fe ion irradiation, the frequency of late chromosome aberrations was similar to that of the early damages for radio-sensitive CBA cells, but different for radio-resistant C57 cells. Our results suggest that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values are dependent not only on radiation sources, but also on cell types and cell divisions.

  2. Autoradiography and the Cell Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. Weldon

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the stages of a cell biology "pulse-chase" experiment in which the students apply autoradiography techniques to learn about the concept of the cell cycle. Includes (1) seed germination and plant growth; (2) radioactive labeling and fixation of root tips; (3) feulgen staining of root tips; (4) preparation of autoradiograms; and (5)…

  3. Aberrant tropoelastin secretion in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Curtiss, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    The secretion of newly synthesized tropoelastin, the soluble precursor of the extracellular matrix protein elastin, is not well understood. MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells were found by immunoblot analysis to synthesize 62 kD and 64 kD tropoelastins. Media from 63 cells labelled for five hours with ({sup 3}H)-valine contain no detectable tropoelastin, unlike media from other tropoelastin-synthesizing cells. Immunoblots of conditioned media and 1Ox-concentrated conditioned media left on the cells for six days also show an absence of tropoelastin from the cell media. No insoluble elastin is associated with the cell layer, as determined by amino acid analysis and electron microscopy of 18-21 day cell cultures. The absence of tropoelastin from the cell medium and elastin from the extracellular matrix indicates that MG63 cells do not secrete tropoelastin as expected, but accumulate it intracellularly. This accumulation is transient: immunoblots and immunofluorescence microscopy show that cells three days after passage have the highest steady-state levels of tropoelastin per cell, that day 8 cells contain lower but still significant amounts of tropoelastin, and that by day 22 tropoelastin is no longer present in the cell cultures. Cell density is a critical factor in the observed pattern of tropoelastin expression. Cells seeded at ten fold their usual initial density have high tropoelastin levels at one day after passage, sooner than cells seeded normally. Tropoelastin also disappears from high density-seeded cells more quickly and is no longer detectable at day 10. Lysosome-like vesicles containing membranous structures appear by immunoelectron microscopy to be the primary site of intracellular tropoelastin localization.

  4. Regulation of Neuronal Cell Cycle and Apoptosis by MicroRNA 34a

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Prashant Kumar; Jaiswal, Surbhi

    2015-01-01

    The cell cycle of neurons remains suppressed to maintain the state of differentiation and aberrant cell cycle reentry results in loss of neurons, which is a feature in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Present studies revealed that the expression of microRNA 34a (miR-34a) needs to be optimal in neurons, as an aberrant increase or decrease in its expression causes apoptosis. miR-34a keeps the neuronal cell cycle under check by preventing the expression of cyclin D1 and promotes cell cycle arrest. Neurotoxic amyloid β1–42 peptide (Aβ42) treatment of cortical neurons suppressed miR-34a, resulting in unscheduled cell cycle reentry, which resulted in apoptosis. The repression of miR-34a was a result of degradation of TAp73, which was mediated by aberrant activation of the MEK extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway by Aβ42. A significant decrease in miR-34a and TAp73 was observed in the cortex of a transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD, which correlated well with cell cycle reentry observed in the neurons of these animals. Importantly, the overexpression of TAp73α and miR-34a reversed cell cycle-related neuronal apoptosis (CRNA). These studies provide novel insights into how modulation of neuronal cell cycle machinery may lead to neurodegeneration and may contribute to the understanding of disorders like AD. PMID:26459758

  5. Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia-Telangiectasia Cells Exposed to Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Ito, H.; Liu, C.; Shigematsu, N.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Although cells derived from Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients are known to exhibit abnormal responses to ionizing radiations, its underlying mechanism still remains unclear. Previously, the authors reported that at the same gamma-irradiation dose AT cells show higher frequencies of misrepair and deletions compared to normal human fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/m), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/m) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/m) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/m and then decreased at 440 keV/m. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/m there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for AT cells when it was compared at 185 keV/m but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types

  6. Cell Cycle Regulation and Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; McArthur, Grant

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulation of cell cycle control is a hallmark of melanomagenesis. Agents targeting the G1-S and G2-M checkpoints, as well as direct anti-mitotic agents, have all shown promising preclinical activity in melanoma. However, in vivo, standalone single agents targeting cell cycle regulation have only demonstrated modest efficacy in unselected patients. The advent of specific CDK 4/6 inhibitors targeting the G1-S transition, with an improved therapeutic index, is a significant step forward. Potential synergy exists with the combination of CDK4/6 inhibitors with existing therapies targeting the MAPK pathway, particularly in subsets of metastatic melanomas such as NRAS and BRAF mutants. This reviews summaries of the latest developments in both preclinical and clinical data with cell cycle-targeted therapies in melanoma. PMID:27106898

  7. Gender differences in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations in rodent germ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, Ilse-Dore; Carere, Angelo; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2007-05-15

    Germ cell mutagenicity testing provides experimental data to quantify genetic risk for exposed human populations. The majority of tests are performed with exposure of males, and female data are relatively rare. The reason for this paucity lies in the differences between male and female germ cell biology. Male germ cells are produced throughout reproductive life and all developmental stages can be ascertained by appropriate breeding schemes. In contrast, the female germ cell pool is limited, meiosis begins during embryogenesis and oocytes are arrested over long periods of time until maturation processes start for small numbers of oocytes during the oestrus cycle in mature females. The literature data are reviewed to point out possible gender differences of germ cells to exogenous agents such as chemicals or ionizing radiation. From the limited information, it can be concluded that male germ cells are more sensitive than female germ cells to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations. However, exceptions are described which shed doubt on the extrapolation of experimental data from male rodents to the genetic risk of the human population. Furthermore, the female genome may be more sensitive to mutation induction during peri-conceptional stages compared to the male genome of the zygote. With few exceptions, germ cell experiments have been carried out under high acute exposure to optimize the effects and to compensate for the limited sample size in animal experiments. Human exposure to environmental agents, on the other hand, is usually chronic and involves low doses. Under these conditions, gender differences may become apparent that have not been studied so far. Additionally, data are reviewed that suggest a false impression of safety when responses are negative under high acute exposure of male rodents while a mutational response is induced by low chronic exposure. The classical (morphological) germ cell mutation tests are not performed anymore

  8. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. High-LET Radiation Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia Telangiectasia Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Ito, Hisao; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uno, Takashi

    We investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/micron), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/micron) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/micron) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exchanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/micron and then decreased at 440 keV/micron. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/micron there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for normal fibroblast cells when it was compared at 185 keV/micron, but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types between normal and AT fibroblast appeared different probably due to difference in the ATM gene function.

  10. Aberrant epithelial GREM1 expression initiates colonic tumorigenesis from cells outside the stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Davis, Hayley; Irshad, Shazia; Bansal, Mukesh; Rafferty, Hannah; Boitsova, Tatjana; Bardella, Chiara; Jaeger, Emma; Lewis, Annabelle; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Giner, Francesc C; Rodenas-Cuadrado, Pedro; Mallappa, Sreelakshmi; Clark, Susan; Thomas, Huw; Jeffery, Rosemary; Poulsom, Richard; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Novelli, Marco; Chetty, Runjan; Silver, Andrew; Sansom, Owen J; Greten, Florian R; Wang, Lai Mun; East, James E; Tomlinson, Ian; Leedham, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome (HMPS) is characterized by the development of mixed-morphology colorectal tumors and is caused by a 40-kb genetic duplication that results in aberrant epithelial expression of the gene encoding mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein antagonist, GREM1. Here we use HMPS tissue and a mouse model of the disease to show that epithelial GREM1 disrupts homeostatic intestinal morphogen gradients, altering cell fate that is normally determined by position along the vertical epithelial axis. This promotes the persistence and/or reacquisition of stem cell properties in Lgr5-negative progenitor cells that have exited the stem cell niche. These cells form ectopic crypts, proliferate, accumulate somatic mutations and can initiate intestinal neoplasia, indicating that the crypt base stem cell is not the sole cell of origin of colorectal cancer. Furthermore, we show that epithelial expression of GREM1 also occurs in traditional serrated adenomas, sporadic premalignant lesions with a hitherto unknown pathogenesis, and these lesions can be considered the sporadic equivalents of HMPS polyps.

  11. Induction of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of asbestotic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fatma, N.; Khan, S.G.; Aslam, M.; Rahman, Q. )

    1992-04-01

    In the present study, cytogenetic effects of Indian chrysotile asbestos in rat bone marrow cells after 290 days of intratracheal inoculation, when it develops massive pulmonary fibrosis, were investigated. The pulmonary fibrosis was confirmed by both histopathological studies and increased collagen content in the lung of the treated animals. In the asbestotic rats a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations was recorded and a decrease in mitotic index of bone marrow cells. The types of chromosomal aberrations in these cells were chromatid gaps and breaks. The results indicate the significant cytogenetic changes in the bone marrow cells of asbestotic rats and also suggest that these changes directly or indirectly may be one of the biological events involved in eliciting the asbestos-mediated toxic responses.

  12. Cell cycle deregulation by methyl isocyanate: Implications in liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Hariom; Raghuram, Gorantla V; Jain, Deepika; Ahirwar, Alok K; Khan, Saba; Jain, Subodh K; Pathak, Neelam; Banerjee, Smita; Maudar, Kewal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2014-03-01

    Liver is often exposed to plethora of chemical toxins. Owing to its profound physiological role and central function in metabolism and homeostasis, pertinent succession of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells is of prime importance to maintain cellular proliferation. Although recent evidence has displayed a strong association between exposures to methyl isocyanate (MIC), one of the most toxic isocyanates, and neoplastic transformation, molecular characterization of the longitudinal effects of MIC on cell cycle regulation has never been performed. Here, we sequentially delineated the status of different proteins arbitrating the deregulation of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells treated with MIC. Our data reaffirms the oncogenic capability of MIC with elevated DNA damage response proteins pATM and γ-H2AX, deregulation of DNA damage check point genes CHK1 and CHK2, altered expression of p53 and p21 proteins involved in cell cycle arrest with perturbation in GADD-45 expression in the treated cells. Further, alterations in cyclin A, cyclin E, CDK2 levels along with overexpression of mitotic spindle checkpoints proteins Aurora A/B, centrosomal pericentrin protein, chromosomal aberrations, and loss of Pot1a was observed. Thus, MIC impacts key proteins involved in cell cycle regulation to trigger genomic instability as a possible mechanism of developmental basis of liver carcinogenesis.

  13. NUTRIENT REGULATION OF CELL CYCLE PROGRESSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell replication is tightly controlled in normal tissues and aberrant during disease progression, such as in tumorigenesis. The replication of cells can be divided into four distinct phases: Gap 1 (G1), synthesis (S), gap 2 (G2), and mitosis (M). The progression from one phase to the next is intrica...

  14. Analysis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M; Grallert, Agnes; Simanis, Viesturs

    2016-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells are rod shaped, and they grow by tip elongation. Growth ceases during mitosis and cell division; therefore, the length of a septated cell is a direct measure of the timing of mitotic commitment, and the length of a wild-type cell is an indicator of its position in the cell cycle. A large number of documented stage-specific changes can be used as landmarks to characterize cell cycle progression under specific experimental conditions. Conditional mutations can permanently or transiently block the cell cycle at almost any stage. Large, synchronously dividing cell populations, essential for the biochemical analysis of cell cycle events, can be generated by induction synchrony (arrest-release of a cell cycle mutant) or selection synchrony (centrifugal elutriation or lactose-gradient centrifugation). Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle studies routinely combine particular markers, mutants, and synchronization procedures to manipulate the cycle. We describe these techniques and list key landmarks in the fission yeast mitotic cell division cycle.

  15. Persistent chromosome aberrations in the somatic cells of A-bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Awa, A A

    1991-03-01

    Current status of knowledge on the radiation-induced chromosome aberrations persisting since their induction in 1945 to date in the somatic cells of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki is reviewed. Dose-response relationship for chromosome aberration frequencies observed with the use of the old A-bomb dosimetry system (T65D) is also demonstrable based on the new dosimetry system (DS86). Despite the fact that the remarkable decrease in the amount of neutron component relative to the total dose in Hiroshima, there still exist inter-city differences in aberration frequency per unit dose both for kerma and bone marrow dose; the dose-square term is smaller in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. The differential contribution of neutron radiation may be responsible in some part for the observed difference between Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although proof still remains to be obtained. There is a wide variability of the frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations between survivors within a given dose range. Random errors in the dose estimates assigned to individual survivors seem responsible, to a large extent, for the observed overdispersions in aberration frequencies in both cities. New molecular biology-oriented techniques to differentially stain specific chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific composite DNA probes seem extremely promising for future rapid, accurate and extensive screening of reciprocal translocations observed predominantly in A-bomb survivors. Such data may be utilized to establish a better biological dosimetry system, especially for those persons who are irradiated in vivo many years before cytogenetic examinations.

  16. Simulation of the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Chromosome Aberrations in Irradiated Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Wu, Honglu; Blattnig, Steve; George, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations is an important consequence of ionizing radiation. To simulate DNA double-strand breaks and the formation of chromosome aberrations, we have recently merged the codes RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) and NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image). The program RITRACKS is a stochastic code developed to simulate detailed event-by-event radiation track structure: [1] This code is used to calculate the dose in voxels of 20 nm, in a volume containing simulated chromosomes, [2] The number of tracks in the volume is calculated for each simulation by sampling a Poisson distribution, with the distribution parameter obtained from the irradiation dose, ion type and energy. The program NASARTI generates the chromosomes present in a cell nucleus by random walks of 20 nm, corresponding to the size of the dose voxels, [3] The generated chromosomes are located within domains which may intertwine, and [4] Each segment of the random walks corresponds to approx. 2,000 DNA base pairs. NASARTI uses pre-calculated dose at each voxel to calculate the probability of DNA damage at each random walk segment. Using the location of double-strand breaks, possible rejoining between damaged segments is evaluated. This yields various types of chromosomes aberrations, including deletions, inversions, exchanges, etc. By performing the calculations using various types of radiations, it will be possible to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for several types of chromosome aberrations.

  17. Frequent BCOR aberrations in extranodal NK/T-Cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Akito; Tsuyama, Naoko; Asaka, Reimi; Togashi, Yuki; Ueda, Kyoko; Sakata, Seiji; Baba, Satoko; Sakamoto, Kana; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Takeuchi, Kengo

    2016-05-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma (ENKTL) is a rare subtype of lymphoma. Recurrent mutations in the JAK-STAT pathway, recently reported in ENKTL cases, are interesting in terms of both pathogenesis and inhibitor therapy. However, the frequencies of these mutations are low and variable among reports, and other pathognomonic mutations in ENKTL remain to be elucidated. In the present study, targeted capture sequencing of 602 cancer-related genes from 25 frozen ENKTL samples was performed, 11 of which were matched to normal samples. Several recurrent somatic mutations involving BCOR (32%), TP53 (16%), DDX3X (12%), FAT4 (8%), NRAS (8%), MLL3 (12%), and MIR17HG (8%) were identified. The pattern of BCOR aberrations (1 nonsense and 5 frame-shift mutations, a mutation leading to a splicing error, and gene loss) suggested that loss of function of BCOR was the functionally important outcome of such changes. The literature was reviewed and the public data on BCOR aberrations was reanalyzed and it was found that the aberrations were frequently found in myeloid neoplasms, but, interestingly, were highly specific to ENKTL among lymphoid malignancies. Given the high frequency and pattern of aberration, BCOR is likely to play an important role in ENKTL pathogenesis as a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:26773734

  18. Identification of Targetable HER2 Aberrations in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Yanik, Megan; Tillman, Brittny N.; Scott, Megan V.; Foltin, Susan K.; Mann, Jacqueline E.; Michmerhuizen, Nicole L.; Ludwig, Megan L.; Sandelski, Morgan M.; Komarck, Christine M.; Carey, Thomas E.; Prince, Mark E.P.; Bradford, Carol R.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Spector, Matthew E.; Brenner, J. Chad

    2016-01-01

    Importance HER2 is an important drug target in breast cancer, where anti-HER2 therapy has been shown to lead to improvements in disease recurrence and overall survival. HER2 status in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not been well studied. Identification of HER2 positive tumors and characterization of response to HER2 therapy could lead to targeted treatment options in HNSCC. Objective To identify HER2 aberrations in HNSCCs and investigate potential for HER2 targeted therapy in HNSCCs. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective case series of patients with laryngeal and oral cavity SCC enrolled in the University of MichiganSPORE. Publically available sequencing data(TCGA) was reviewed to identify additional mutations and overexpression in HER2 in HNSCC. Established HNSCC cell lines were used for follow-up in vitro analysis. Interventions Using targeted, amplicon-based sequencing with the Oncomine Cancer Panel, we assessed the copy number and mutation status of commonly altered genes in HNSCCs. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on tissue microarrays of HNSCCs to assess expression of HER2. Western blotting for HNSCC cell line HER2 expression, and cell survival assays after treatment with HER2 inhibitors were performed. Main Outcomes and Measures Prevalence of HER2 genetic aberrations and HER2 overexpression in laryngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Prevalence of HER2 aberrations in HNSCC in TCGA. HER2 protein expression in HNSCC cell lines. Response of HNSCC cell lines to targeted HER2 inhibitors. Results Forty-two laryngeal SCC samples were screened by targeted sequencing, of which 4 were positive for HER2 amplification. Two samples identified with sequencing showed HER2 overexpression on immunohistochemistry. Two of 94 oral cavity SCC samples were positive for HER2 on immunohistochemistry. Analysis of 288 patients from publicly available HNSCC sequencing data revealed 9 amplifications in HER2. Protein expression

  19. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further

  20. Redox Control of the Cell Cycle in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarsour, Ehab H.; Kumar, Maneesh G.; Chaudhuri, Leena; Kalen, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The cellular oxidation and reduction (redox) environment is influenced by the production and removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In recent years, several reports support the hypothesis that cellular ROS levels could function as “second messengers” regulating numerous cellular processes, including proliferation. Periodic oscillations in the cellular redox environment, a redox cycle, regulate cell-cycle progression from quiescence (G0) to proliferation (G1, S, G2, and M) and back to quiescence. A loss in the redox control of the cell cycle could lead to aberrant proliferation, a hallmark of various human pathologies. This review discusses the literature that supports the concept of a redox cycle controlling the mammalian cell cycle, with an emphasis on how this control relates to proliferative disorders including cancer, wound healing, fibrosis, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. We hypothesize that reestablishing the redox control of the cell cycle by manipulating the cellular redox environment could improve many aspects of the proliferative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 2985–3011. PMID:19505186

  1. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the techniques used to analyze the damage done to chromosome from ion radiation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromereprobes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. There is some comparison of the different results from the various techniques. The results of the study are summarized.

  2. RBE of Energetic Iron Ions for the Induction of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Hada, Megumi; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Numerous published studies have reported the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) values for chromosome aberrations induced by charged particles of different LET. The RBE for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo has been suggested to show a similar relationship as the quality factor for cancer induction. Therefore, increased chromosome aberrations in the astronauts' white blood cells post long-duration missions are used to determine the biological doses from exposures to space radiation. However, the RBE value is known to be very different for different types of cancer. Previously, we reported that, even though the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions, the RBE was significantly reduced after multiple cell divisions post irradiation. To test the hypothesis that RBE values for chromosome aberrations are cell type dependent, and different between early and late damages, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, and human mammary epithelial cells in vitro to various charged particles. Chromosome aberrations were quantified using the samples collected at first mitosis post irradiation for initial damages, and the samples collected after multiple generations for the remaining or late arising aberrations. Results of the study suggested that the effectiveness of high-LET charged particles for late chromosome aberrations may be cell type dependent, even though the RBE values are similar for early damages.

  3. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  4. Aberrant DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, Miguel; Puig, Marta; Carmona, F Javier; Maqueda, María; Velásquez, Adriana; Gómez, Antonio; Labernadie, Anna; Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Rigat-Brugarolas, Luis G; Trepat, Xavier; Ramírez, Josep; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, Enrique; Reguart, Noemí; Perera, Alexandre; Esteller, Manel; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic changes through altered DNA methylation have been implicated in critical aspects of tumor progression, and have been extensively studied in a variety of cancer types. In contrast, our current knowledge of the aberrant genomic DNA methylation in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) or other stromal cells that act as critical coconspirators of tumor progression is very scarce. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling on lung TAFs and paired control fibroblasts (CFs) from non-small cell lung cancer patients using the HumanMethylation450 microarray. We found widespread DNA hypomethylation concomitant with focal gain of DNA methylation in TAFs compared to CFs. The aberrant DNA methylation landscape of TAFs had a global impact on gene expression and a selective impact on the TGF-β pathway. The latter included promoter hypermethylation-associated SMAD3 silencing, which was associated with hyperresponsiveness to exogenous TGF-β1 in terms of contractility and extracellular matrix deposition. In turn, activation of CFs with exogenous TGF-β1 partially mimicked the epigenetic alterations observed in TAFs, suggesting that TGF-β1 may be necessary but not sufficient to elicit such alterations. Moreover, integrated pathway-enrichment analyses of the DNA methylation alterations revealed that a fraction of TAFs may be bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Finally, survival analyses using DNA methylation and gene expression datasets identified aberrant DNA methylation on the EDARADD promoter sequence as a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Our findings shed light on the unique origin and molecular alterations underlying the aberrant phenotype of lung TAFs, and identify a stromal biomarker with potential clinical relevance. PMID:26449251

  5. Aberrant DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vizoso, Miguel; Puig, Marta; Carmona, F.Javier; Maqueda, María; Velásquez, Adriana; Gómez, Antonio; Labernadie, Anna; Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Rigat-Brugarolas, Luis G.; Trepat, Xavier; Ramírez, Josep; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, Enrique; Reguart, Noemí; Perera, Alexandre; Esteller, Manel; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes through altered DNA methylation have been implicated in critical aspects of tumor progression, and have been extensively studied in a variety of cancer types. In contrast, our current knowledge of the aberrant genomic DNA methylation in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) or other stromal cells that act as critical coconspirators of tumor progression is very scarce. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling on lung TAFs and paired control fibroblasts (CFs) from non-small cell lung cancer patients using the HumanMethylation450 microarray. We found widespread DNA hypomethylation concomitant with focal gain of DNA methylation in TAFs compared to CFs. The aberrant DNA methylation landscape of TAFs had a global impact on gene expression and a selective impact on the TGF-β pathway. The latter included promoter hypermethylation-associated SMAD3 silencing, which was associated with hyperresponsiveness to exogenous TGF-β1 in terms of contractility and extracellular matrix deposition. In turn, activation of CFs with exogenous TGF-β1 partially mimicked the epigenetic alterations observed in TAFs, suggesting that TGF-β1 may be necessary but not sufficient to elicit such alterations. Moreover, integrated pathway-enrichment analyses of the DNA methylation alterations revealed that a fraction of TAFs may be bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Finally, survival analyses using DNA methylation and gene expression datasets identified aberrant DNA methylation on the EDARADD promoter sequence as a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Our findings shed light on the unique origin and molecular alterations underlying the aberrant phenotype of lung TAFs, and identify a stromal biomarker with potential clinical relevance. PMID:26449251

  6. Aberrant epigenetic regulators control expansion of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Farnaz; Ponnusamy, Kanagaraju; Quagliano-Lo Coco, Isabell; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Grez, Manuel; Henschler, Reinhard; Wichmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Transcription is a tightly regulated process ensuring the proper expression of numerous genes regulating all aspects of cellular behavior. Transcription factors regulate multiple genes including other transcription factors that together control a highly complex gene network. The transcriptional machinery can be “hijacked” by oncogenic transcription factors, thereby leading to malignant cell transformation. Oncogenic transcription factors manipulate a variety of epigenetic control mechanisms to fulfill gene regulatory and cell transforming functions. These factors assemble epigenetic regulators at target gene promoter sequences, thereby disturbing physiological gene expression patterns. Retroviral vector technology and the availability of “healthy” human hematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells enable the generation of pre-leukemic cell models for the analysis of aberrant human hematopoietic progenitor cell expansion mediated by leukemogenic transcription factors. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the mechanism by which leukemogenic gene products control human hematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cell expansion by disrupting the normal epigenetic program. PMID:24348510

  7. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells after Irradiation with Filtered and Unfiltered Beams of 1 Gev/amu Iron Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P.; Williams, A.; Nagasawa, H.; Peng, Y.; Chatterjee, A.; Bedford, J.

    To determine whether shielding materials that might be utilized for radiation protection of astronauts would affect the RBE of HZE particles such as those of concern for deep space missions we irradiated non cycling G0 monolayer cultures of contact inhibited normal human fibroblasts with 1 Gev amu iron ions with and without filtration with various thicknesses of Aluminum Al or polyethylene CH 2 and then measured the frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations dicentrics and excess fragments in the first post-irradiation mitosis Irradiations were carried out at the NRSL facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory For doses ranging up to 4 to 6 Gy the dose response for the total of these aberrations per cell was not significantly affected by beam filtrations up to 5 4 cm Al or up to 11 cm polyethylene relative to the unfiltered beam Neither was the dose response significantly different for unfiltered beams of 300 or 600 Mev amu iron ions relative to the 1 Gev amu iron ions The studies with 1 Gev amu iron ions were repeated four different times over a period of four years in each case with coded samples so the individual scoring aberrations would not know the irradiation conditions employed Comparison of the same effects in parallel experiments using 137 Cs gamma-rays allowed us to estimate that the RBE for aberration induction by these HZE iron ions for these acute high dose-rate exposures was approximately

  8. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  9. Aberrant Circulating Th17 Cells in Patients with B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting; Yu, Shuang; Liu, Yan; Yin, Congcong; Ye, Jingjing; Liu, Zhi; Ma, Daoxin; Ji, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasm in which 90% are B-cell lymphomas and 10% T-cell lymphomas. Although T-helper 17 (Th17) cells have been implicated to be essential in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, its role in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) remains unknown. In this study, we observed a significantly decreased frequency of Th17 cells in peripheral blood from B-NHL patients compared with healthy individuals, accompanied with increased Th1 cells. IL-17AF plasma levels were remarkably decreased in B-NHL patients, accompanied with undetectable IL-17FF and unchangeable IL-17AA. Moreover, Th17 and Th1 cells became normalized after one or two cycles of chemotherapy. Interestingly, in B-NHL, circulating Th17 cells frequencies were significantly higher in relapsed patients than those in untreated patients or normal individuals. Meanwhile, there was no statistical difference regarding the frequencies of Th1 cells between relapsed and untreated patients. Taken these data together, circulating Th17 subset immune response may be associated with the response of patients to treatment and with different stages of disease. PMID:26812681

  10. Aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming during induced pluripotent stem cell generation is dependent on the choice of reprogramming factors.

    PubMed

    Planello, Aline C; Ji, Junfeng; Sharma, Vivek; Singhania, Rajat; Mbabaali, Faridah; Müller, Fabian; Alfaro, Javier A; Bock, Christoph; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Batada, Nizar N

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells via overexpression of reprogramming factors involves epigenetic remodeling. DNA methylation at a significant proportion of CpG sites in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) differs from that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Whether different sets of reprogramming factors influence the type and extent of aberrant DNA methylation in iPSCs differently remains unknown. In order to help resolve this critical question, we generated human iPSCs from a common fibroblast cell source using either the Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and cMYC) or the Thomson factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG and LIN28), and determined their genome-wide DNA methylation profiles. In addition to shared DNA methylation aberrations present in all our iPSCs, we identified Yamanaka-iPSC (Y-iPSC)-specific and Thomson-iPSC (T-iPSC)-specific recurrent aberrations. Strikingly, not only were the genomic locations of the aberrations different but also their types: reprogramming with Yamanaka factors mainly resulted in failure to demethylate CpGs, whereas reprogramming with Thomson factors mainly resulted in failure to methylate CpGs. Differences in the level of transcripts encoding DNMT3b and TET3 between Y-iPSCs and T-iPSCs may contribute partially to the distinct types of aberrations. Finally, de novo aberrantly methylated genes in Y-iPSCs were enriched for NANOG targets that are also aberrantly methylated in some cancers. Our study thus reveals that the choice of reprogramming factors influences the amount, location, and class of DNA methylation aberrations in iPSCs. These findings may provide clues into how to produce human iPSCs with fewer DNA methylation abnormalities. PMID:25408883

  11. M-BAND Analysis of Chromosome Aberration Induced by Fe-Ions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured in 3-Dimensional Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2008-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D cellular environment in vitro can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelia cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultued at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference of the chromosome aberration yield between 2D and 3D cell cultures for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures

  12. M-BAND analysis of chromosome aberration induced by Fe-ions in human epithelial cells cultured in 3-dimensional matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied lowand high-LET radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D cellular environment in vitro can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137 Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultured at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference of the chromosome aberration yield between 2D and 3D cell cultures for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures

  13. AMPK Promotes Aberrant PGC1β Expression To Support Human Colon Tumor Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kurt W.; Das, Binita; Kim, Hyun Seok; Clymer, Beth K.; Gehring, Drew; Smith, Deandra R.; Costanzo-Garvey, Diane L.; Fernandez, Mario R.; Brattain, Michael G.; Kelly, David L.; MacMillan, John

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of cancer research is the identification of tumor-specific vulnerabilities that can be exploited for the development of therapies that are selectively toxic to the tumor. We show here that the transcriptional coactivators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1β (PGC1β) and estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) are aberrantly expressed in human colon cell lines and tumors. With kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) depletion as a reference standard, we used functional signature ontology (FUSION) analysis to identify the γ1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as an essential contributor to PGC1β expression and colon tumor cell survival. Subsequent analysis revealed that a subunit composition of AMPK (α2β2γ1) is preferred for colorectal cancer cell survival, at least in part, by stabilizing the tumor-specific expression of PGC1β. In contrast, PGC1β and ERRα are not detectable in nontransformed human colon epithelial cells, and depletion of the AMPKγ1 subunit has no effect on their viability. These data indicate that Ras oncogenesis relies on the aberrant activation of a PGC1β-dependent transcriptional pathway via a specific AMPK isoform. PMID:26351140

  14. [Number of aberrations per cell as a parameter of chromosome instability. 2. Comparative analysis of the factors of different nature].

    PubMed

    Kutsokon', N K; Lazarenko, L M; Bezrukov, V F; Rashydov, N M; Grodzyns'kyĭ, D M

    2004-01-01

    The average number of aberrations per aberrant cell was concluded to carry out information on chromosome instability peculiarities induced by different mutagens as it was shown in our previous work. The purpose of the current study was to present comparative analysis of intercellular distribution of number of aberrations and their theoretical approximations. Distribution of numbers of aberrations per cell in Allium cepa L. and Allium fistulosum L. root tip cells induced by different mutagenic factors (gamma-irradiation, thiotepa, formaldehyde and seed aging) have been studied. The results were approximated to theoretical Poisson, geometric and negative binomial distributions. The intercellular distribution of aberrations did not correspond to any of the used theoretical distributions when A. cepa seeds were gamma-irradiated. There was some, but not regular, accordance with theoretical distributions when chemical mutagens thiotepa in A. cepa and formaldehyde in A. fistulosum and seed aging in both species were evaluated. During seed aging frequency of aberrant cells increased more quickly in A. fistulosum in comparison with A. cepa. PMID:15098449

  15. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  16. Differential expression of cell cycle regulators in CDK5-dependent medullary thyroid carcinoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karine; Hillmann, Antje; Augustyn, Alexander; Plattner, Florian; Hai, Tao; Singh, Tanvir; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Pfragner, Roswitha; Minna, John D; Cote, Gilbert J; Chen, Herbert; Bibb, James A; Nwariaku, Fiemu E

    2015-05-20

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer of thyroid C-cells, for which few treatment options are available. We have recently reported a role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in MTC pathogenesis. We have generated a mouse model, in which MTC proliferation is induced upon conditional overexpression of the CDK5 activator, p25, in C-cells, and arrested by interrupting p25 overexpression. Here, we identify genes and proteins that are differentially expressed in proliferating versus arrested benign mouse MTC. We find that downstream target genes of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein, including genes encoding cell cycle regulators such as CDKs, cyclins and CDK inhibitors, are significantly upregulated in malignant mouse tumors in a CDK5-dependent manner. Reducing CDK5 activity in human MTC cells down-regulated these cell cycle regulators suggesting that CDK5 activity is critical for cell cycle progression and MTC proliferation. Finally, the same set of cell cycle proteins was consistently overexpressed in human sporadic MTC but not in hereditary MTC. Together these findings suggest that aberrant CDK5 activity precedes cell cycle initiation and thus may function as a tumor-promoting factor facilitating cell cycle protein expression in MTC. Targeting aberrant CDK5 or its downstream effectors may be a strategy to halt MTC tumorigenesis. PMID:25900242

  17. Differential expression of cell cycle regulators in CDK5-dependent medullary thyroid carcinoma tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pozo, Karine; Hillmann, Antje; Augustyn, Alexander; Plattner, Florian; Hai, Tao; Singh, Tanvir; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Pfragner, Roswitha; Minna, John D.; Cote, Gilbert J.; Chen, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer of thyroid C-cells, for which few treatment options are available. We have recently reported a role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in MTC pathogenesis. We have generated a mouse model, in which MTC proliferation is induced upon conditional overexpression of the CDK5 activator, p25, in C-cells, and arrested by interrupting p25 overexpression. Here, we identify genes and proteins that are differentially expressed in proliferating versus arrested benign mouse MTC. We find that downstream target genes of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein, including genes encoding cell cycle regulators such as CDKs, cyclins and CDK inhibitors, are significantly upregulated in malignant mouse tumors in a CDK5-dependent manner. Reducing CDK5 activity in human MTC cells down-regulated these cell cycle regulators suggesting that CDK5 activity is critical for cell cycle progression and MTC proliferation. Finally, the same set of cell cycle proteins was consistently overexpressed in human sporadic MTC but not in hereditary MTC. Together these findings suggest that aberrant CDK5 activity precedes cell cycle initiation and thus may function as a tumor-promoting factor facilitating cell cycle protein expression in MTC. Targeting aberrant CDK5 or its downstream effectors may be a strategy to halt MTC tumorigenesis. PMID:25900242

  18. Differential expression of cell cycle regulators in CDK5-dependent medullary thyroid carcinoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karine; Hillmann, Antje; Augustyn, Alexander; Plattner, Florian; Hai, Tao; Singh, Tanvir; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Pfragner, Roswitha; Minna, John D; Cote, Gilbert J; Chen, Herbert; Bibb, James A; Nwariaku, Fiemu E

    2015-05-20

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer of thyroid C-cells, for which few treatment options are available. We have recently reported a role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in MTC pathogenesis. We have generated a mouse model, in which MTC proliferation is induced upon conditional overexpression of the CDK5 activator, p25, in C-cells, and arrested by interrupting p25 overexpression. Here, we identify genes and proteins that are differentially expressed in proliferating versus arrested benign mouse MTC. We find that downstream target genes of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein, including genes encoding cell cycle regulators such as CDKs, cyclins and CDK inhibitors, are significantly upregulated in malignant mouse tumors in a CDK5-dependent manner. Reducing CDK5 activity in human MTC cells down-regulated these cell cycle regulators suggesting that CDK5 activity is critical for cell cycle progression and MTC proliferation. Finally, the same set of cell cycle proteins was consistently overexpressed in human sporadic MTC but not in hereditary MTC. Together these findings suggest that aberrant CDK5 activity precedes cell cycle initiation and thus may function as a tumor-promoting factor facilitating cell cycle protein expression in MTC. Targeting aberrant CDK5 or its downstream effectors may be a strategy to halt MTC tumorigenesis.

  19. Proton and Fe Ion-Induced Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Lu, Tao; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Kadhim, Munira

    2016-01-01

    An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. To investigate GI induced by charged particles, we exposed human lymphocytes, human fibroblast cells, and human mammary epithelial cells to high energy protons and Fe ions. In addition, we also investigated GI in bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH (CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mice, by analyzing cell survival and chromosome aberrations in the cells after multiple cell divisions. Results analyzed so far from the experiments indicated different sensitivities to charged particles between CBA/CaH (CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mouse strains, suggesting that there are two main types of response to irradiation: 1) responses associated with survival of damaged cells and 2) responses associated with the induction of non-clonal chromosomal instability in the surviving progeny of stem cells. Previously, we reported that the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions. Our results with different cell types demonstrated different RBE values between different cell types and between early and late chromosomal damages. This study also attempts to offer an explanation for the varying RBE values for different cancer types.

  20. M-BAND Study of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells: Radiation Quality and Dose Rate Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is its ability to identify both inter- (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra- (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome) chromosome aberrations simultaneously. To study the detailed rearrangement of low- and high-LET radiation induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) in vitro, we performed a series of experiments with Cs-137 gamma rays of both low and high dose rates, neutrons of low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions of high dose rate, with chromosome 3 painted with multi-binding colors. We also compared the chromosome aberrations in both 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures. Results of these experiments revealed the highest chromosome aberration frequencies after low dose rate neutron exposures. However, detailed analysis of the radiation induced inversions revealed that all three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intra-chromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by inter-chromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges. The location of the breaks involved in chromosome exchanges was analyzed along the painted chromosome. The breakpoint distribution was found to be randomly localized on chromosome 3 after neutron or Fe ion exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering breakpoints was observed after -ray exposure. Our comparison of chromosome aberration yields between 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures indicated a significant difference for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures. These experimental results indicated that the track structure of the radiation and the cellular/chromosome structure can both affect radiation-induced chromosome

  1. RBE of Energetic Iron Ions for the Induction of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Hada, Megumi; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Numerous published studies have reported the RBE values for chromosome chromosomes induced by charged particles of different LET. The RBE for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo showed a similar relationship as the quality factor for cancer induction. Consequently, increased chromosome aberrations in the astronauts' white blood cells post long-duration missions are used to determine the biological doses from exposures to space radiation. The RBE value is known to be very different for different types of cancer. Previously, we reported that the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions. After multiple cell divisions post irradiation, the RBE was significantly smaller. To test the hypothesis that the RBE values for chromosome aberrations are different between early and late damages and also different between different cell types, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, and human fibroblast cells and human mammary epithelial cells in vitro to 600 MeV/u Fe ions. Post irradiation, the cells were collected at first mitosis, or cultured for multiple generations for collections of remaining or late arising chromosome aberrations. The chromosome aberrations were quantified using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome specific probes. This study attempts to offer an explanation for the varying RBE values for different cancer types.

  2. Aberrant protein phosphorylation in Alzheimer disease brain disturbs pro-survival and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Perluigi, M; Barone, E; Di Domenico, F; Butterfield, D A

    2016-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is one of the most prevalent post-translational modifications fundamental in mediating diverse cellular functions in living cells. Aberrant protein phosphorylation is currently recognized as a critical step in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). Changes in the pattern of protein phosphorylation of different brain regions are suggested to promote AD transition from a presymptomatic to a symptomatic state in response to accumulating amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Several experimental approaches have been utilized to profile alteration of protein phosphorylation in the brain, including proteomics. Among central pathways regulated by kinases/phosphatases those involved in the activation/inhibition of both pro survival and cell death pathways play a central role in AD pathology. We discuss in detail how aberrant phosphorylation could contribute to dysregulate p53 activity and insulin-mediated signaling. Taken together these results highlight that targeted therapeutic intervention, which can restore phosphorylation homeostasis, either acting on kinases and phosphatases, conceivably may prove to be beneficial to prevent or slow the development and progression of AD.

  3. Aberrant protein phosphorylation in Alzheimer disease brain disturbs pro-survival and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Perluigi, M; Barone, E; Di Domenico, F; Butterfield, D A

    2016-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is one of the most prevalent post-translational modifications fundamental in mediating diverse cellular functions in living cells. Aberrant protein phosphorylation is currently recognized as a critical step in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). Changes in the pattern of protein phosphorylation of different brain regions are suggested to promote AD transition from a presymptomatic to a symptomatic state in response to accumulating amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Several experimental approaches have been utilized to profile alteration of protein phosphorylation in the brain, including proteomics. Among central pathways regulated by kinases/phosphatases those involved in the activation/inhibition of both pro survival and cell death pathways play a central role in AD pathology. We discuss in detail how aberrant phosphorylation could contribute to dysregulate p53 activity and insulin-mediated signaling. Taken together these results highlight that targeted therapeutic intervention, which can restore phosphorylation homeostasis, either acting on kinases and phosphatases, conceivably may prove to be beneficial to prevent or slow the development and progression of AD. PMID:27425034

  4. The effect of track structure on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in murine cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Cella, L.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Saito, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure chromosome aberrations in C3H 10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts using FISH painting at the first mitosis following exposure to 30 keV/microm hydrogen or neon ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cells in plateau-phase were irradiated with 0.86 MeV protons at the TTT-3 Tandem accelerator in Naples (Italy), or with 400 MeV/n Ne ions at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (Japan). Colcemid-blocked cells were harvested at the first mitosis following exposure, and chromosome spreads were hybridized in situ with a fluorescein-labelled composite mouse DNA probe specific for chromosomes 2 and 8. RESULTS: Protons were more efficient than neon ions at the same LET in the induction of chromosome interchanges and breaks. Yields of complex exchanges were similar for both particles at the same dose, but protons produced mostly insertions, while with Ne exposure non-reciprocal exchanges were the most frequent complex-type exchange. CONCLUSIONS: Charged particles with the same LET produce different yields of chromosome aberrations, and some observed differences can be explained based on the available track-structure models.

  5. Analysis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M; Grallert, Agnes; Simanis, Viesturs

    2016-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells are rod shaped, and they grow by tip elongation. Growth ceases during mitosis and cell division; therefore, the length of a septated cell is a direct measure of the timing of mitotic commitment, and the length of a wild-type cell is an indicator of its position in the cell cycle. A large number of documented stage-specific changes can be used as landmarks to characterize cell cycle progression under specific experimental conditions. Conditional mutations can permanently or transiently block the cell cycle at almost any stage. Large, synchronously dividing cell populations, essential for the biochemical analysis of cell cycle events, can be generated by induction synchrony (arrest-release of a cell cycle mutant) or selection synchrony (centrifugal elutriation or lactose-gradient centrifugation). Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle studies routinely combine particular markers, mutants, and synchronization procedures to manipulate the cycle. We describe these techniques and list key landmarks in the fission yeast mitotic cell division cycle. PMID:27587785

  6. Induction of aberrant trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 by inflammation in mouse colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Hideyuki; Ikegami, Daigo; Wakabayashi, Mika; Niwa, Tohru; Kim, Young-Joon; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2012-12-01

    A field for cancerization (field defect), where genetic and epigenetic alterations are accumulated in normal-appearing tissues, is involved in human carcinogenesis, especially cancers associated with chronic inflammation. Although aberrant DNA methylation is involved in the field defect and induced by chronic inflammation, it is still unclear for trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3), which is involved in gene repression independent of DNA methylation and functions as a pre-mark for aberrant DNA methylation. In this study, using a mouse colitis model induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS), we aimed to clarify whether aberrant H3K27me3 is induced by inflammation and involved in a field defect. ChIP-on-chip analysis of colonic epithelial cells revealed that H3K27me3 levels were increased or decreased for 266 genomic regions by aging, and more extensively (23 increased and 3574 decreased regions) by colitis. Such increase or decrease of H3K27me3 was induced as early as 2 weeks after the initiation of DSS treatment, and persisted at least for 16 weeks even after the inflammation disappeared. Some of the aberrant H3K27me3 in colonic epithelial cells was carried over into colon tumors. Furthermore, H3K27me3 acquired at Dapk1 by colitis was followed by increased DNA methylation, supporting its function as a pre-mark for aberrant DNA methylation. These results demonstrated that aberrant H3K27me3 can be induced by exposure to a specific environment, such as colitis, and suggested that aberrant histone modification, in addition to aberrant DNA methylation, is involved in the formation of a field defect.

  7. Model Organisms for Studying the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of the cell-division cycle is fundamental for the growth, development, and reproduction of all species of life. In the past several decades, a conserved theme of cell cycle regulation has emerged from research in diverse model organisms. A comparison of distinct features of several diverse model organisms commonly used in cell cycle studies highlights their suitability for various experimental approaches, and recaptures their contributions to our current understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. A historic perspective presents a recollection of the breakthrough upon unfolding the universal principles of cell cycle control by scientists working with diverse model organisms, thereby appreciating the discovery pathways in this field. A comprehensive understanding is necessary to address current challenging questions about cell cycle control. Advances in genomics, proteomics, quantitative methodologies, and approaches of systems biology are redefining the traditional concept of what constitutes a model organism and have established a new era for development of novel, and refinement of the established model organisms. Researchers working in the field are no longer separated by their favorite model organisms; they have become more integrated into a larger community for gaining greater insights into how a cell divides and cycles. The new technologies provide a broad evolutionary spectrum of the cell-division cycle and allow informative comparisons among different species at a level that has never been possible, exerting unimaginable impact on our comprehensive understanding of cell cycle regulation.

  8. Silibinin inhibits aberrant lipid metabolism, proliferation and emergence of androgen-independence in prostate cancer cells via primarily targeting the sterol response element binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Dhanya K.; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) kills thousands of men every year, demanding additional approaches to better understand and target this malignancy. Recently, critical role of aberrant lipogenesis is highlighted in prostate carcinogenesis, offering a unique opportunity to target it to reduce PCA. Here, we evaluated efficacy and associated mechanisms of silibinin in inhibiting lipid metabolism in PCA cells. At physiologically achievable levels in human, silibinin strongly reduced lipid and cholesterol accumulation specifically in human PCA cells but not in non-neoplastic prostate epithelial PWR-1E cells. Silibinin also decreased nuclear protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 and 2 (SREBP1/2) and their target genes only in PCA cells. Mechanistically, silibinin activated AMPK, thereby increasing SREBP1 phosphorylation and inhibiting its nuclear translocation; AMPK inhibition reversed silibinin-mediated decrease in nuclear SREBP1 and lipid accumulation. Additionally, specific SREBP inhibitor fatostatin and stable overexpression of SREBP1 further confirmed the central role of SREBP1 in silibinin-mediated inhibition of PCA cell proliferation and lipid accumulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, silibinin also inhibited synthetic androgen R1881-induced lipid accumulation and completely abrogated the development of androgen-independent LNCaP cell clones via targeting SREBP1/2. Together, these mechanistic studies suggest that silibinin would be effective against PCA by targeting critical aberrant lipogenesis. PMID:25294820

  9. Gene copy number and cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bose, Indrani

    2006-03-01

    The cell cycle is an orderly sequence of events which ultimately lead to the division of a single cell into two daughter cells. In the case of DNA damage by radiation or chemicals, the damage checkpoints in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle are activated. This results in an arrest of the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired. Once this is done, the cell continues with its usual cycle of activity. We study a mathematical model of the DNA damage checkpoint in the G2 phase which arrests the transition from the G2 to the M (mitotic) phase of the cell cycle. The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in activating the pathways leading to cell cycle arrest in mammalian systems. If the DNA damage is severe, the p53 proteins activate other pathways which bring about apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Loss of the p53 gene results in the proliferation of cells containing damaged DNA, i.e., in the growth of tumors which may ultimately become cancerous. There is some recent experimental evidence which suggests that the mutation of a single copy of the p53 gene (in the normal cell each gene has two identical copies) is sufficient to trigger the formation of tumors. We study the effect of reducing the gene copy number of the p53 and two other genes on cell cycle arrest and obtain results consistent with experimental observations.

  10. Cytogenetic investigation of chromosomal aberrations in cells treated with plantamajoside from Plantago asiatica.

    PubMed

    Koo, Yun-Chang; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Yang, Ji-Hee; Ryu, Yung-Sun; Kim, Eun-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2009-10-01

    Plantago asiatica is a member of the Plantaginaceae family, and is widely distributed in East Asia. In our previous work, a single active compound, plantamajoside was isolated and confirmed to have glycation inhibitory activity, and did not possess toxicity during a 90 day repeated oral toxicity test in rats. In the present study, a chromosomal aberration test was performed to investigate the genotoxicity of plantamajoside. From the results of the cytotoxicity test, plantamajoside proved to be less toxic when it was treated combined with S9 cell fractions. However, there was a significant increase in structural aberrations during the short-term treatment of plantamajoside at its highest dose (5000 microg/mL) even when combined with S9. This seems to have been a natural phenomenon due to the very high dose of plantamajoside that was used. However, to confirm the safety of plantamajoside for its potential use as a phytochemical agent in health products, additional mutagenicity tests are necessary. PMID:19288521

  11. Ability of fourteen chemical agents used in dental practice to induce chromosome aberrations in Syrian hamster embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Hikiba, Hirohito; Watanabe, Eiko; Barrett, J Carl; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2005-01-01

    To assess the genotoxicity of 14 chemical agents used in dental practice, the ability of these agents to induce chromosome aberrations was examined using Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Statistically significant increases in the frequencies of chromosome aberrations were induced in SHE cells treated with 7 of 10 chemical agents used as endodontic medicaments, that is, carbol camphor, m-cresol, eugenol, guaiacol, zinc oxide, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde. The other 3 chemical agents, that is, thymol, glutaraldehyde, and iodoform, did not increase the levels of chromosome aberrations. Of the 4 chemical agents that are used as an antiseptic on the oral mucosa, chromosome aberrations were induced by iodine, but not by the other 3 antiseptics, benzalkonium chloride, benzethonium chloride, and chlorhexidine. Among the 6 chemical agents exhibiting a negative response in the assay, only thymol induced chromosome aberrations in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation. Our results indicate that chemical agents having a positive response in the present study are potentially genotoxic to mammalian cells and need to be studied further in detail. PMID:15665446

  12. Tumor-derived endothelial cells exhibit aberrant Rho-mediated mechanosensing and abnormal angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kaustabh; Thodeti, Charles K; Dudley, Andrew C; Mammoto, Akiko; Klagsbrun, Michael; Ingber, Donald E

    2008-08-12

    Tumor blood vessels exhibit abnormal structure and function that cause disturbed blood flow and high interstitial pressure, which impair delivery of anti-cancer agents. Past efforts to normalize the tumor vasculature have focused on inhibition of soluble angiogenic factors, such as VEGF; however, capillary endothelial (CE) cell growth and differentiation during angiogenesis are also influenced by mechanical forces conveyed by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we explored the possibility that tumor CE cells form abnormal vessels because they lose their ability to sense and respond to these physical cues. These studies reveal that, in contrast to normal CE cells, tumor-derived CE cells fail to reorient their actin cytoskeleton when exposed to uniaxial cyclic strain, exhibit distinct shape sensitivity to variations in ECM elasticity, exert greater traction force, and display an enhanced ability to retract flexible ECM substrates and reorganize into tubular networks in vitro. These behaviors correlate with a constitutively high level of baseline activity of the small GTPase Rho and its downstream effector, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). Moreover, decreasing Rho-mediated tension by using the ROCK inhibitor, Y27632, can reprogram the tumor CE cells so that they normalize their reorientation response to uniaxial cyclic strain and their ability to form tubular networks on ECM gels. Abnormal Rho-mediated sensing of mechanical cues in the tumor microenvironment may therefore contribute to the aberrant behaviors of tumor CE cells that result in the development of structural abnormalities in the cancer microvasculature.

  13. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  14. Stretched cell cycle model for proliferating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Mark R.; Kan, Andrey; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Wellard, Cameron J.; Markham, John F.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic variation in cell cycle time is a consistent feature of otherwise similar cells within a growing population. Classic studies concluded that the bulk of the variation occurs in the G1 phase, and many mathematical models assume a constant time for traversing the S/G2/M phases. By direct observation of transgenic fluorescent fusion proteins that report the onset of S phase, we establish that dividing B and T lymphocytes spend a near-fixed proportion of total division time in S/G2/M phases, and this proportion is correlated between sibling cells. This result is inconsistent with models that assume independent times for consecutive phases. Instead, we propose a stretching model for dividing lymphocytes where all parts of the cell cycle are proportional to total division time. Data fitting based on a stretched cell cycle model can significantly improve estimates of cell cycle parameters drawn from DNA labeling data used to monitor immune cell dynamics. PMID:24733943

  15. Metabolic control of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kalucka, Joanna; Missiaen, Rindert; Georgiadou, Maria; Schoors, Sandra; Lange, Christian; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cell division is a metabolically demanding process, requiring the production of large amounts of energy and biomass. Not surprisingly therefore, a cell's decision to initiate division is co-determined by its metabolic status and the availability of nutrients. Emerging evidence reveals that metabolism is not only undergoing substantial changes during the cell cycle, but it is becoming equally clear that metabolism regulates cell cycle progression. Here, we overview the emerging role of those metabolic pathways that have been best characterized to change during or influence cell cycle progression. We then studied how Notch signaling, a key angiogenic pathway that inhibits endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, controls EC metabolism (glycolysis) during the cell cycle. PMID:26431254

  16. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations.

  17. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations. PMID:25482192

  18. Random transitions and cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Brooks, R F

    1981-01-01

    Differences between the cycle times of sister cells are exponentially distributed, which means that these differences can be explained entirely by the existence of a single critical step in the cell cycle which occurs at random. Cycle times as a whole are not exponentially distributed, indicating an additional source of variation in the cell cycle. It follows that this additional variation must affect sister cells identically; ie, sister cell cycle times are correlated. This correlation and the overall distribution of cycle times can be predicted quantitatively by a model that was developed initially in order to explain certain problematic features of the response of quiescent cells to mitogenic stimulation - in particular, the significance of the lag that almost invariably occurs between stimulation and the onset of DNA synthesis. This model proposes that each cell cycle depends not on one but two random transitions, one of which (at reasonably high growth rates) occurs in the mother cell, its effects being inherited equally by the two daughter cells. The fundamental timing element in the cell cycle is proposed to be a lengthy process, called L, which accounts for most of the lag on mitogenic stimulation and also for the minimum cycle time in growing cultures. One of the random transitions is concerned with the initiation of L, whereas the other becomes possible on completion of L. The latter transition has two consequences: the first is the initiation of a sequence of events which includes S, G2 and M; the second is the restoration of the state from which L may be initiated once more. As a result, L may begin (at random) at any stage of the conventional cycle, ie, S, G2, M, or G1. There are marked similarities between the hypothetical process L and the biogenesis of mitotic centres - the structures responsible for organising the spindle poles. PMID:7312875

  19. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism Promotes Prostate Cancer: Role in Cell Survival under Hypoxia and Extracellular Vesicles Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Gagan; Schlaepfer, Isabel R.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the leading malignancy among men in United States. Recent studies have focused on the identification of novel metabolic characteristics of PCa, aimed at devising better preventive and therapeutic approaches. PCa cells have revealed unique metabolic features such as higher expression of several enzymes associated with de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid up-take and β-oxidation. This aberrant lipid metabolism has been reported to be important for PCa growth, hormone-refractory progression and treatment resistance. Furthermore, PCa cells effectively use lipid metabolism under adverse environmental conditions for their survival advantage. Specifically, hypoxic cancer cells accumulate higher amount of lipids through a combination of metabolic alterations including high glutamine and fatty acid uptake, as well as decreased fatty acid oxidation. These stored lipids serve to protect cancer cells from oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and play important roles in fueling cancer cell proliferation following re-oxygenation. Lastly, cellular lipids have also been implicated in extracellular vesicle biogenesis, which play a vital role in intercellular communication. Overall, the new understanding of lipid metabolism in recent years has offered several novel targets to better target and manage clinical PCa. PMID:27384557

  20. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism Promotes Prostate Cancer: Role in Cell Survival under Hypoxia and Extracellular Vesicles Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deep, Gagan; Schlaepfer, Isabel R

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the leading malignancy among men in United States. Recent studies have focused on the identification of novel metabolic characteristics of PCa, aimed at devising better preventive and therapeutic approaches. PCa cells have revealed unique metabolic features such as higher expression of several enzymes associated with de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid up-take and β-oxidation. This aberrant lipid metabolism has been reported to be important for PCa growth, hormone-refractory progression and treatment resistance. Furthermore, PCa cells effectively use lipid metabolism under adverse environmental conditions for their survival advantage. Specifically, hypoxic cancer cells accumulate higher amount of lipids through a combination of metabolic alterations including high glutamine and fatty acid uptake, as well as decreased fatty acid oxidation. These stored lipids serve to protect cancer cells from oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and play important roles in fueling cancer cell proliferation following re-oxygenation. Lastly, cellular lipids have also been implicated in extracellular vesicle biogenesis, which play a vital role in intercellular communication. Overall, the new understanding of lipid metabolism in recent years has offered several novel targets to better target and manage clinical PCa. PMID:27384557

  1. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations at Fluences of Less Than One HZE Particle per Cell Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J.; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high energy and charge (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells where irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with O (77 keV/ (long-s)m), Si (99 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (175 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (195 keV/ (long-s)m) or Fe (240 keV/ (long-s)m) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Non-linear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and non-linear dose response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblast irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by non-linear models motivated by a non-targeted effect (NTE). Best fits for the dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a NTE model for O and a linear response model fit best for Si and Fe particles. Additional evidence for NTE were found in low dose experiments measuring gamma-H2AX foci, a marker of double strand breaks (DSB), and split-dose experiments with human fibroblasts. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  2. Induction of chromosomal aberrations at fluences of less than one HZE particle per cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2014-10-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high-LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high-energy charged (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells were irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with oxygen (77 keV/μm), silicon (99 keV/μm) or Fe (175 keV/μm), Fe (195 keV/μm) or Fe (240 keV/μm) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Nonlinear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and nonlinear dose-response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblasts irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by nonlinear models motivated by a nontargeted effect (NTE). The best fits for dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a linear response model for all particles. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low-particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high-LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  3. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  4. High-Cycle-Life Lithium Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Carter, B.; Shen, D.; Somoano, R.

    1985-01-01

    Lithium-anode electrochemical cell offers increased number of charge/ discharge cycles. Cell uses components selected for compatibility with electrolyte solvent: These materials are wettable and chemically stable. Low vapor pressure and high electrochemical stability of solvent improve cell packaging, handling, and safety. Cell operates at modest temperatures - less than 100 degrees C - and is well suited to automotive, communications, and other applications.

  5. Linking the Cell Cycle to Cell Fate Decisions.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) retain the ability to differentiate into a wide range of cell types while undergoing self-renewal. They also exhibit an unusual mode of cell cycle regulation, reflected by a cell cycle structure where G1 and G2 phases are truncated. When individual PSCs are exposed to specification cues, they activate developmental programs and remodel the cell cycle so that the length of G1 and overall cell division times increase. The response of individual stem cells to pro-differentiation signals is strikingly heterogeneous, resulting in asynchronous differentiation. Recent evidence indicates that this phenomenon is due to cell cycle-dependent mechanisms that restrict the initial activation of developmental genes to the G1 phase. This suggests a broad biological mechanism where multipotent cells are 'primed' to initiate cell fate decisions during their transition through G1. Here, I discuss mechanisms underpinning the commitment towards the differentiated state and its relation to the cell cycle.

  6. Dietary Ziziphus jujuba Fruit Influence on Aberrant Crypt Formation and Blood Cells in Colitis-Associated Colorectal Cancer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Srinivasan; Liu, Chung-Teng; Wu, Wang-Hung; Chien, Se-Ping; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2015-01-01

    Ziziphus jujuba (ZJ) fruit is rich in bioactive functional components such as polysaccharides, triterpenoid acid, flavonoids and oleamide. It has been commonly used in the treatment of various diseases including diabetes, digestive disorders, diarrhea, skin infections, liver and urinary complaints. However, dietary effects with regard to chemoprevention of colon cancer have not been studied. The present study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of dietary ZJ against colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane (AOM)-dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-treated mice. AOM was injected (10 mg/kg b.wt., i.p.) and three cycles of 2% DSS in drinking water for 7 days with 14 days of normal drinking water in-between were administered to induce colitis-associated colon cancer. ZJ fruit was supplemented into feed at levels of 5 and 10%. Dietary ZJ significantly attenuated aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and also decreased the progression of hyperplasia to dysplasia. In addition, it significantly reduced circulating white blood cells, lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and platelets compared to colon cancer mice. We conclude that ZJ supplementation may delay the progression of colon cancer from hyperplasia to dysplasia and ultimately adenocarcinoma and cancer. In addition, it decreased circulating tumor-related leukocytes, main regulators of cancer inflammation. Dietary consumption of ZJ fruit attenuated the formation of ACF and delayed the progression of colon cancer.

  7. Aberrant Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Increased Adult Neurogenesis in Mice Lacking Chromatin Protein HMGB2

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Avanish S.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Aguirre, Adan; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) are distinct groups of cells found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Previously we determined that members of the High Mobility Group (HMG) B family of chromatin structural proteins modulate NSC proliferation and self-renewal. Among them HMGB2 was found to be dynamically expressed in proliferating and differentiating NSCs, suggesting that it may regulate NSC maintenance. We report now that Hmgb2−/− mice exhibit SVZ hyperproliferation, increased numbers of SVZ NSCs, and a trend towards aberrant increases in newly born neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) granule cell layer. Increases in the levels of the transcription factor p21 and the Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), along with down-regulation of the transcription/pluripotency factor Oct4 in the Hmgb2−/− SVZ point to a possible pathway for this increased proliferation/differentiation. Our findings suggest that HMGB2 functions as a modulator of neurogenesis in young adult mice through regulation of NSC proliferation, and identify a potential target via which CNS repair could be amplified following trauma or disease-based neuronal degeneration. PMID:24391977

  8. Aberrant caspase-activated DNase (CAD) transcripts in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S Y; Liaw, S F; Lee, S N; Hsieh, P S; Lin, K H; Chu, C M; Liaw, Y F

    2003-01-27

    The gene of caspase-activated DNase (CAD), the key enzyme for nucleosome cleavage during apoptosis, is mapped at chromosome 1p36, a region usually associated with hemizygous deletions in human cancers, particularly in hepatoma (HCC). It is tempting to speculate that CAD plays a tumour-suppressive role in hepatocarcinogenesis. To address this, we examined the CAD transcripts in six human HCC cell lines, one liver tissue from a non-HCC subject, and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from three healthy individuals. Alternatively spliced CAD transcripts with fusion of exon 1 to exon 7 were isolated in most of the examined samples including HCC cells and normal controls. However, relatively abundant alternatively spliced CAD transcripts with fusion of exon 2 to exon 6 or 7, in which the corresponding domain directing CAD interaction with ICAD was preserved, were found only in poorly differentiated Mahlavu and SK-Hep1 cells. Interestingly, an abnormal CAD transcript with its exon 3 replaced by a truncated transposable Alu repeat was isolated in Hep3B cells, indicative of the implication of an Alu-mediated genomic mutation. Moreover, mis-sense mutations in the CAD genes were identified in all six HCC cell lines. Upon UV-induced apoptosis, DNA fragmentation efficiency was found to be intact, partially reduced and remarkably reduced in Huh7 and J328, Hep3B and HepG2, and Mahlavu cells, respectively. That mutations and aberrantly spliced transcripts for the CAD gene are frequently present in human HCC cells, especially in poorly differentiated HCC cells, suggests a significant role of CAD in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

  9. Estimating the number of hematopoietic or lymphoid stem cells giving rise to clonal chromosome aberrations in blood T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M; Kodama, Y; Ohtaki, K; Itoh, M; Awa, A A; Cologne, J; Kusunoki, Y; Nakamura, N

    2004-03-01

    Quantifying the proliferative capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells in humans is important for bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. Obtaining appropriate data is difficult, however, because the experimental tools are limited. We hypothesized that tracking clonal descendants originating from hematopoietic stem cells would be possible if we used clonal chromosome aberrations as unique tags of individual hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. Using FISH, we screened 500 blood T lymphocytes from each of 513 atomic bomb survivors and detected 96 clones composed of at least three cells with identical aberrations. The number of clones was inversely related to their population size, which we interpreted to mean that the progenitor cells were heterogeneous in the number of progeny that they could produce. The absolute number of progenitor cells contributing to the formation of the observed clones was estimated as about two in an unexposed individual. Further, scrutiny of ten clones revealed that lymphocyte clones could originate roughly equally from hematopoietic stem cells or from mature T lymphocytes, thereby suggesting that the estimated two progenitor cells are shared as one hematopoietic stem cell and one mature T cell. Our model predicts that one out of ten people bears a non- aberrant clone comprising >10% of the total lymphocytes, which indicates that clonal expansions are common and probably are not health-threatening. PMID:14982487

  10. Gaucher Disease-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Display Decreased Erythroid Potential and Aberrant Myelopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Sgambato, Judi A.; Park, Tea Soon; Miller, Diana; Panicker, Leelamma M.; Sidransky, Ellen; Lun, Yu; Awad, Ola; Bentzen, Søren M.; Zambidis, Elias T.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common lysosomal storage disease resulting from mutations in the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The hematopoietic abnormalities in GD include the presence of characteristic Gaucher macrophages that infiltrate patient tissues and cytopenias. At present, it is not clear whether these cytopenias are secondary to the pathological activity of Gaucher cells or a direct effect of GCase deficiency on hematopoietic development. To address this question, we differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from patients with types 1, 2, and 3 GD to CD34+/CD45+/CD43+/CD143+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and examined their developmental potential. The formation of GD-HPCs was unaffected. However, these progenitors demonstrated a skewed lineage commitment, with increased myeloid differentiation and decreased erythroid differentiation and maturation. Interestingly, myeloid colony-formation assays revealed that GD-HPCs, but not control-HPCs, gave rise to adherent, macrophage-like cells, another indication of abnormal myelopoiesis. The extent of these hematologic abnormalities correlated with the severity of the GCase mutations. All the phenotypic abnormalities of GD-HPCs observed were reversed by incubation with recombinant GCase, indicating that these developmental defects were caused by the mutated GCase. Our results show that GCase deficiency directly impairs hematopoietic development. Additionally, our results suggest that aberrant myelopoiesis might contribute to the pathological properties of Gaucher macrophages, which are central to GD manifestations. The hematopoietic developmental defects we observed reflect hematologic abnormalities in patients with GD, demonstrating the utility of GD-iPSCs for modeling this disease. Significance This study showed that hematopoietic progenitors from patients with Gaucher disease (GD) have intrinsic developmental abnormalities that reflect characteristic clinical

  11. Genome aberrations in canine mammary carcinomas and their detection in cell-free plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Beck, Julia; Hennecke, Silvia; Bornemann-Kolatzki, Kirsten; Urnovitz, Howard B; Neumann, Stephan; Ströbel, Philipp; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Mammary tumors are the most frequent cancers in female dogs exhibiting a variety of histopathological differences. There is lack of knowledge about the genomes of these common dog tumors. Five tumors of three different histological subtypes were evaluated. Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) was performed in comparison to the respective somatic genome of each animal. Copy number and structural aberrations were validated using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Using mate-pair sequencing chromosomal aneuploidies were found in two tumors, frequent smaller deletions were found in one, inter-chromosomal fusions in one other, whereas one tumor was almost normal. These aberrations affect several known cancer associated genes such as cMYC, and KIT. One common deletion of the proximal end of CFA27, harboring the tumor suppressor gene PFDN5 was detected in four tumors. Using ddPCR, this deletion was validated and detected in 50% of tumors (N = 20). Breakpoint specific dPCRs were established for four tumors and tumor specific cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was detected in the plasma. In one animal tumor-specific cfDNA was found >1 year after surgery, attributable to a lung metastasis. Paired-end sequencing proved that copy-number imbalances of the tumor are reflected by the cfDNA. This report on chromosomal instability of canine mammary cancers reveals similarities to human breast cancers as well as special canine alterations. This animal model provides a framework for using MPS for screening for individual cancer biomarkers with cost effective confirmation and monitoring using ddPCR. The possibility exists that ddPCR can be expanded to screening for common cancer related variants. PMID:24098698

  12. Targeting prostate cancer based on signal transduction and cell cycle pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John T.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Terrian, David M.; Chappell, William H.; Stivala, Franca; Libra, Massimo; Martelli, Alberto M.; Steelman, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of death in men despite increased capacity to diagnose at earlier stages. After prostate cancer has become hormone independent, which often occurs after hormonal ablation therapies, it is difficult to effectively treat. Prostate cancer may arise from mutations and dysregulation of various genes involved in regulation signal transduction (e.g., PTEN, Akt, etc.,) and the cell cycle (e.g., p53, p21Cip1, p27Kip1, Rb, etc.,). This review focuses on the aberrant interactions of signal transduction and cell cycle genes products and how they can contribute to prostate cancer and alter therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:18594202

  13. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  14. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  15. Aberrant cell proliferation by enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis via mtTFA in arsenical skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Wu, Shi-Bei; Hong, Chien-Hui; Liao, Wei-Ting; Wu, Ching-Ying; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Wei, Yau-Huei; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD), a cutaneous carcinoma in situ, is thought to arise from gene mutation and uncontrolled proliferation. However, how mitochondria regulate the arsenic-induced cell proliferation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify whether arsenic interfered with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, leading to aberrant cell proliferation in As-BD. Skin biopsy samples from patients with As-BD and controls were stained for cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV), measured for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number and the expression levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA). The results showed that expression of cytochrome c oxidase, mtTFA, NRF-1, and PGC-1α was increased in As-BD compared with in healthy subjects. Treatment of primary keratinocytes with arsenic at concentrations lower than 1.0 μmol/L induced cell proliferation, along with enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, we observed that the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate and intracellular ATP level were increased in arsenic-treated keratinocytes. Blocking of mitochondrial function by oligomycin A (Complex V inhibitor) or knockdown of mtTFA by RNA interference abrogated arsenic-induced cell proliferation without affecting cyclin D1 expression. We concluded that mtTFA up-regulation, augmented mitochondrial biogenesis, and enhanced mitochondrial functions may contribute to arsenic-induced cell proliferation. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis may help treat arsenical cancers at the stage of cell proliferation.

  16. Interplay between cell growth and cell cycle in plants.

    PubMed

    Sablowski, Robert; Carnier Dornelas, Marcelo

    2014-06-01

    The growth of organs and whole plants depends on both cell growth and cell-cycle progression, but the interaction between both processes is poorly understood. In plants, the balance between growth and cell-cycle progression requires coordinated regulation of four different processes: macromolecular synthesis (cytoplasmic growth), turgor-driven cell-wall extension, mitotic cycle, and endocycle. Potential feedbacks between these processes include a cell-size checkpoint operating before DNA synthesis and a link between DNA contents and maximum cell size. In addition, key intercellular signals and growth regulatory genes appear to target at the same time cell-cycle and cell-growth functions. For example, auxin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroid all have parallel links to cell-cycle progression (through S-phase Cyclin D-CDK and the anaphase-promoting complex) and cell-wall functions (through cell-wall extensibility or microtubule dynamics). Another intercellular signal mediated by microtubule dynamics is the mechanical stress caused by growth of interconnected cells. Superimposed on developmental controls, sugar signalling through the TOR pathway has recently emerged as a central control point linking cytoplasmic growth, cell-cycle and cell-wall functions. Recent progress in quantitative imaging and computational modelling will facilitate analysis of the multiple interconnections between plant cell growth and cell cycle and ultimately will be required for the predictive manipulation of plant growth.

  17. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

    PubMed

    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  18. Analysis of Cell Cycle Status of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Zukowska, Monika; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) act as paradigmatic tissue-specific adult stem cells. While they are quiescent in steady-state conditions, they enter the cell cycle and proliferate in stress conditions and during tissue regeneration. Therefore, analysis of cell cycle status of HSC is crucial for understanding their biology. However, due to low number of HSC in tissue and need to use many surface markers for their identification, analysis of their cycle status is technically complicated. Here, we presented our simple strategy to analyze cell cycle of strictly defined LKS CD48(-)CD150(+)CD34(-) HSC, together with Ki67 and DAPI staining by flow cytometry.

  19. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to High and Low LET Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Wilkins, R.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2006-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, high energy neutron at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) or Cs-137-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center. After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The results of the mBAND study showed a higher ratio of inversion involved with interchromosomal exchange in heavy ions compared to -ray irradiation. Analysis of chromosome aberrations using mBAND has the potential to provide useful information on human cell response to space-like radiation.

  20. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  1. Cytogenetic profiles in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a study in highly purified aberrant plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Rasillo, Ana; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Sayagués, José Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Bárcena, Paloma; Sanchez, María Luz; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in clonal plasma cell disorders have mainly been done in whole bone marrow or CD138+ microbead-enriched plasma cells and suggest that recurrent immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations - e.g. t(4;14) -are primary oncogenetic events. The aim of this study was to determine cytogenetic patterns of highly purified aberrant plasma cells (median purity ≥98%) in different clonal plasma cell disorders. We analyzed aberrant plasma cells from 208 patients with multiple myeloma (n=148) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=60) for the presence of del(13q14), del(17p13) and t(14q32) using multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene arrangements were analyzed and complementarity determining region 3 was sequenced in a subset of patients and combined multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunofluorescent protein staining analyses were performed in selected cases to confirm clonality and cytogenetic findings. At diagnosis, 96% of cases with multiple myeloma versus 77% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases showed at least one cytogenetic alteration and/or hyperdiploidy. The cytogenetic heterogeneity of individual cases reflected coexistence of cytogenetically-defined aberrant plasma cell clones, and led to the assumption that karyotypic alterations were acquired stepwise. Cases of multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance frequently showed different but related cytogenetic profiles when other cytogenetic alterations such as deletions/gains of the immunoglobulin heavy chain or the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 were additionally considered. Interestingly, in 24% of multiple myeloma versus 62% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients with an immunoglobulin heavy chain translocation, aberrant plasma cells with and without t(14q32) coexisted in the same patient. Our data suggest that

  2. Influence of radiofrequency radiation on chromosome aberrations in CHO cells and its interaction with DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Kerbacher, J J; Meltz, M L; Erwin, D N

    1990-09-01

    A limited number of contradictory reports have appeared in the literature about the ability of radiofrequency (rf) radiation to induce chromosome aberrations in different biological systems. The technical documentation associated with such reports is often absent or deficient. In addition, no information is available as to whether any additional genotoxic hazard would result from a simultaneous exposure of mammalian cells to rf radiation and a chemical which (by itself) induces chromosome aberrations. In the work described, we have therefore tested two hypotheses. The first is that rf radiation by itself, at power densities and exposure conditions which are higher than is consistent with accepted safety guidelines, can induce chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells. The second is that, during a simultaneous exposure to a chemical known to be genotoxic, rf radiation can affect molecules, biochemical processes, or cellular organelles, and thus result in an increase or decrease in chromosome aberrations. Mitomycin C (MMC) and Adriamycin (ADR) were selected because they act by different mechanisms, and because they might put normal cells at risk during combined-modality rf radiation (hyperthermia)-chemotherapy treatment of cancer. The studies were performed with suitable 37 degrees C and equivalent convection heating-temperature controls in a manner designed to discriminate between any thermal and possible nonthermal action. Radiofrequency exposures were conducted for 2 h under conditions resulting in measurable heating (a maximum increase of 3.2 degrees C), with pulsed-wave rf radiation at a frequency of 2450 MHz and an average net forward power of 600 W, resulting in an SAR of 33.8 W/kg. Treatments with MMC or ADR were for a total of 2.5 h and encompassed the 2-h rf radiation exposure period. The CHO cells from each of the conditions were subsequently analyzed for chromosome aberrations. In cells exposed to rf radiation alone, and where a maximum temperature of

  3. A festival of cell-cycle controls.

    PubMed

    Haase, S B; Clarke, D J

    2001-11-01

    The second biennial Salk Cell Cycle meeting convened on 22 June 2001 in San Diego, California. Organized by Tony Hunter and Susan Forsburg of the Salk Institute, the five-day conference was highlighted by enlightening science and plenty of San Diego sunshine. Presentations covered a broad range of contemporary cell-cycle topics, ranging from regulation of DNA replication and mitosis to DNA damage recognition and checkpoint control.

  4. Aberrant expression of Xist in aborted porcine fetuses derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lin; Wang, Anfeng; Yao, Chaogang; Huang, Yongye; Duan, Feifei; Lv, Qinyan; Wang, Dongxu; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-01-01

    Cloned pigs generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) show a greater ratio of early abortion during mid-gestation than normal controls. X-linked genes have been demonstrated to be important for the development of cloned embryos. To determine the relationship between the expression of X-linked genes and abortion of cloned porcine fetuses, the expression of X-linked genes were investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) and the methylation status of Xist DMR was performed by bisulfate-specific PCR (BSP). q-PCR analysis indicated that there was aberrant expression of X-linked genes, especially the upregulated expression of Xist in both female and male aborted fetuses compared to control fetuses. Results of BSP suggested that hypomethylation of Xist occurred in aborted fetuses, whether male or female. These results suggest that the abnormal expression of Xist may be associated with the abortion of fetuses derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos. PMID:25429426

  5. Cadmium chloride strongly enhances cyclophosphamide-induced chromosome aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pandurangarao, V.L.; Blazina, S.; Bherje, R.

    1997-10-01

    Earlier we reported that a single 5 mg cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2})/kg ip dose enhanced chromosome aberrations (ca) with 50 mg/kg cyclophosphamide (CP) in mouse bone marrow cells. In this report groups of 4 mice were injected ip with saline, 0.31, 0.62, 1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg CdCl{sub 2}, followed by saline injections at 24 h. Other mice similarly uninjected at 0 h were injected with 50 mg/kg CP at 24 h. All the mice were injected ip with 4 mg colchicine/kg at 44 h. At 48 h the bone marrow cells were processed for chromosome spreads. After dissection, visual examination revealed obvious internal hemorrhaging of the testes at 1.25 CdCl{sub 2} mg/kg and higher doses. This effect was not further increased by CP treatment. The lowest ca enhancing dose of CdCl{sub 2} on CP was 0.625 mg/kg. Our hypothesis is that Cd replaces zinc presents in numerous DNA repair enzymes and proteins resulting in diminished repair. Subsequently, the excess of unrepaired DNA damage is seen as chromatid breaks, deletions, fragments and exchanges.

  6. Growth rate of late passage sarcoma cells is independent of epigenetic events but dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Becerikli, Mustafa; Jacobsen, Frank; Rittig, Andrea; Köhne, Wiebke; Nambiar, Sandeep; Mirmohammadsadegh, Alireza; Stricker, Ingo; Tannapfel, Andrea; Wieczorek, Stefan; Epplen, Joerg Thomas; Tilkorn, Daniel; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2013-07-15

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are characterized by co-participation of several epigenetic and genetic events during tumorigenesis. Having bypassed cellular senescence barriers during oncogenic transformation, the factors further affecting growth rate of STS cells remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of gene silencing (DNA promoter methylation of LINE-1, PTEN), genetic aberrations (karyotype, KRAS and BRAF mutations) as well as their contribution to the proliferation rate and migratory potential that underlies “initial” and “final” passage sarcoma cells. Three different cell lines were used, SW982 (synovial sarcoma), U2197 (malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) and HT1080 (fibrosarcoma). Increased proliferative potential of final passage STS cells was not associated with significant differences in methylation (LINE-1, PTEN) and mutation status (KRAS, BRAF), but it was dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that these fairly differentiated/advanced cancer cell lines have still the potential to gain an additional spontaneous growth benefit without external influences and that maintenance of increased proliferative potential towards longevity of STS cells (having crossed senescence barriers) may be independent of overt epigenetic alterations. -- Highlights: Increased proliferative potential of late passage STS cells was: • Not associated with epigenetic changes (methylation changes at LINE-1, PTEN). • Not associated with mutation status of KRAS, BRAF. • Dependent on presence/absence of chromosomal aberrations.

  7. Aberration corrected emittance exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (rf) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by multiple orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dogleg emittance exchange setup with a five cell rf deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of an EEX line with emittances differing by four orders of magnitude, i.e., an initial transverse emittance of 1 pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of 10 nm-rad.

  8. Fuel cell and advanced turbine power cycle

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.J.

    1995-10-19

    Solar Turbines, Incorporated (Solar) has a vested interest in the integration of gas turbines and high temperature fuel cells and in particular, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Solar has identified a parallel path approach to the technology developments needed for future products. The primary approach is to move away from the simple cycle industrial machines of the past and develop as a first step more efficient recuperated engines. This move was prompted by the recognition that the simple cycle machines were rapidly approaching their efficiency limits. Improving the efficiency of simple cycle machines is and will become increasingly more costly. Each efficiency increment will be progressively more costly than the previous step.

  9. M-Band Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Induced By Low- and High-Let Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Gersey, B.; Saganti, P. B.; Wilkins, R.; Gonda, S. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Energetic primary and secondary particles pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in the induction of various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer. Most of these biological endpoints are closely correlated to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insult. In this study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma rays, 1 GeV/nucleon Fe ions and secondary neutrons whose spectrum is similar to that measured inside the Space Station. Chromosomes were condensed using a premature chromosome condensation technique and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with the multi-color banding (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of both interchromosomal (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Results of the study confirmed the observation of higher incidence of inversions for high-LET irradiation. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed in the low-LET irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosome aberrations, but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosome aberrations. In contrast, Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both the inter- and intrachromosome exchanges.

  10. Cell Cycle Synchronization in Xenopus Egg Extracts.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Peter J; Neusiedler, Julia; Creavin, Kevin; Chadha, Gaganmeet Singh; Blow, J Julian

    2016-01-01

    Many important discoveries in cell cycle research have been made using cell-free extracts prepared from the eggs of the South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. These extracts efficiently support the key nuclear functions of the eukaryotic cell cycle in vitro under apparently the same controls that exist in vivo. The Xenopus cell-free system is therefore uniquely suited to the study of the mechanisms, dynamics and integration of cell cycle regulated processes at a biochemical level. Here, we describe methods currently in use in our laboratory for the preparation of Xenopus egg extracts and demembranated sperm nuclei. We detail how these extracts can be used to study the key transitions of the eukaryotic cell cycle and describe conditions under which these transitions can be manipulated by addition of drugs that either retard or advance passage. In addition, we describe in detail essential techniques that provide a practical starting point for investigating the function of proteins involved in the operation of the eukaryotic cell cycle.

  11. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M; Safirstein, Robert L; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute kidney injury.

  12. An improved system for exposure of cultured mammalian cells to gaseous compounds in the chromosomal aberration assay.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Masumi; Sasaki, Toshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshie; Arito, Heihachiro; Fukushima, Shoji; Matsushima, Taijiro

    2008-04-30

    A gas exposure system using rotating vessels was improved for exposure of cultured mammalian cells to gaseous compounds in the chromosomal aberration assay. This system was composed of 12 square culture vessels, a device for preparation of air containing test gas, and positive and negative control gases at target concentrations and for supplying these gases to the culture vessels, and a roller apparatus in an incubator. Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU) were grown on one side of the inner surface of the square culture vessel in the MEM medium. Immediately prior to exposure, the medium was changed to the modified MEM. Air in the culture vessel was replaced with air containing test gas, positive or negative control gas. Then, the culture vessels were rotated at 1.0 rpm. The monolayered culture cells were exposed to test gas during about 3/4 rotation at upper positions and alternatively immersed into the culture medium during about 1/4 rotation at lower positions. This system allowed the chromosomal aberration assay simultaneously at least at three different concentrations of a test gas together with positive and negative control gases with and without metabolic activations, and duplicate culture at each exposure concentration. Seven gaseous compounds, 1,3-butadiene, chlorodifluoromethane, ethyl chloride, methyl bromide, methyl chloride, propyne, and vinyl chloride, none of which has been tested to date, were tested on CHL/IU for the chromosomal aberration assay using this gas exposure system. All the compounds except chlorodifluoromethane showed positive responses of the structural chromosomal aberrations, whereas polyploidy was not induced by any of these gases. This improved gas exposure system proved to be useful for detecting chromosomal aberrations of gaseous compounds.

  13. An improved system for exposure of cultured mammalian cells to gaseous compounds in the chromosomal aberration assay.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Masumi; Sasaki, Toshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshie; Arito, Heihachiro; Fukushima, Shoji; Matsushima, Taijiro

    2008-04-30

    A gas exposure system using rotating vessels was improved for exposure of cultured mammalian cells to gaseous compounds in the chromosomal aberration assay. This system was composed of 12 square culture vessels, a device for preparation of air containing test gas, and positive and negative control gases at target concentrations and for supplying these gases to the culture vessels, and a roller apparatus in an incubator. Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU) were grown on one side of the inner surface of the square culture vessel in the MEM medium. Immediately prior to exposure, the medium was changed to the modified MEM. Air in the culture vessel was replaced with air containing test gas, positive or negative control gas. Then, the culture vessels were rotated at 1.0 rpm. The monolayered culture cells were exposed to test gas during about 3/4 rotation at upper positions and alternatively immersed into the culture medium during about 1/4 rotation at lower positions. This system allowed the chromosomal aberration assay simultaneously at least at three different concentrations of a test gas together with positive and negative control gases with and without metabolic activations, and duplicate culture at each exposure concentration. Seven gaseous compounds, 1,3-butadiene, chlorodifluoromethane, ethyl chloride, methyl bromide, methyl chloride, propyne, and vinyl chloride, none of which has been tested to date, were tested on CHL/IU for the chromosomal aberration assay using this gas exposure system. All the compounds except chlorodifluoromethane showed positive responses of the structural chromosomal aberrations, whereas polyploidy was not induced by any of these gases. This improved gas exposure system proved to be useful for detecting chromosomal aberrations of gaseous compounds. PMID:18342567

  14. Cell cycle inhibition as a strategy for treatment of central nervous system diseases which must not block normal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Da-Zhi; Ander, Bradley P.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2009-01-01

    Classically, the cell cycle is regarded as the central process leading to cellular proliferation. However, increasing evidence over the last decade supports the notion that neuronal cell cycle re-entry results in post-mitotic death. A mature neuron that re-enters the cell cycle can neither advance to a new G0 quiescent state nor revert to its earlier G0 state. This presents a critical dilemma to the neuron from which death may be an unavoidable, but necessary, outcome for adult neurons attempting to complete the cell cycle. In contrast, tumor cells that undergo aberrant cell cycle re-entry divide and can survive. Thus, cell cycle inhibition strategies are of interest in cancer treatment, but may also represent an important means of protecting neurons. In this review, we put forth the concept of the “expanded cell cycle” and summarize the cell cycle proteins, signal transduction events and mitogenic molecules that can drive a neuron into the cell cycle in various CNS diseases. We also discuss the pharmacological approaches that interfere with the mitogenic pathways and prevent mature neurons from attempting cell cycle re-entry, protecting them from cell death. Lastly, future attempts at blocking the cell cycle to rescue mature neurons from injury should be designed so as to not block normal neurogenesis. PMID:19944161

  15. The cell cycle DB: a systems biology approach to cell cycle analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alfieri, Roberta; Merelli, Ivan; Mosca, Ettore; Milanesi, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    The cell cycle database is a biological resource that collects the most relevant information related to genes and proteins involved in human and yeast cell cycle processes. The database, which is accessible at the web site http://www.itb.cnr.it/cellcycle, has been developed in a systems biology context, since it also stores the cell cycle mathematical models published in the recent years, with the possibility to simulate them directly. The aim of our resource is to give an exhaustive view of the cell cycle process starting from its building-blocks, genes and proteins, toward the pathway they create, represented by the models. PMID:18160409

  16. Cycle life test of secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the life cycling program on rechargeable calls are reported. Information on required data, the use of which the data will be put, application details, including orbital description, charge control methods, load rquirements, etc., are given. Cycle tests were performed on 660 sealed, nickel cadmium cells. The cells consisted of seven sample classifications ranging form 3.0 to 20 amp. hours. Nickel cadmium, silver cadmium, and silver zinc sealed cells, excluding synchronous orbit and accelerated test packs were added. The capacities of the nickel cadmium cells, the silver cadmium and the silver zinc cells differed in range of amp hrs. The cells were cylced under different load, charge control, and temperature conditions. All cell packs are recharged by use of a pack voltage limit. All charging is constant current until the voltage limit is reached.

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration.

    PubMed

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar β1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  18. Helicobacter pylori inhibits gastric cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A; Smoot, D; Littleton, G; Tackey, R; Walters, C S; Kashanchi, F; Allen, C R; Ashktorab, H

    2000-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa is associated with changes in gastric epithelial cell proliferation. In vitro studies have shown that exposure to H. pylori inhibits proliferation of gastric cells. This study sought to investigate the cell cycle progression of gastric epithelial cell lines in the presence and absence of H. pylori. Unsynchronized and synchronized gastric epithelial cell lines AGS and KatoIII were exposed to H. pylori over a 24-h period. Cell cycle progression was determined by flow cytometry using propidium iodide (PI), and by analysis of cyclin E, p21, and p53 protein expression using Western blots. In the absence of H. pylori 40, 45, and 15% of unsynchronized AGS cells were in G(0)-G(1), S, and G(2)-M phases, respectively, by flow cytometry analysis. When AGS cells were cultured in the presence of H. pylori, the S phase decreased 10% and the G(0)-G(1) phase increased 17% after 24 h compared with the controls. KatoIII cells, which have a deleted p53 gene, showed little or no response to H. pylori. When G1/S synchronized AGS cells were incubated with media containing H. pylori, the G(1) phase increased significantly (25%, P < 0.05) compared with controls after 24 h. In contrast, the control cells were able to pass through S phase. The inhibitory effects of H. pylori on the cell cycle of AGS cells were associated with a significant increase in p53 and p21 expression after 24 h. The expression of cyclin E was downregulated in AGS cells following exposure of AGS cells to H. pylori for 24 h. This study shows that H. pylori-induced growth inhibition in vitro is predominantly at the G(0)-G(1) checkpoint. Our results suggest that p53 may be important in H. pylori-induced cell cycle arrest. These results support a role for cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in the G(1) cell cycle arrest exerted by H. pylori and its involvement in changing the regulatory proteins, p53, p21, and cyclin E in the cell cycle. PMID:11008106

  19. Identification of candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian-Yun; Mei, Li-Li; Qiu, Yun-Tan; Shi, Zhi-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were applied to analyze the copy number changes and expression level of candidate genes, respectively. Integrative analysis revealed that homozygous deletions of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKN) 2A and CDKN2B and gains of fascin actin-bundling protein 1 (FSCN1) and homer scaffolding protein 3 (HOMER3) occurred frequently in ESCC. The results demonstrated that the homozygous deletion of CDKN2A or CDKN2B was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis. Notably, the expression of CDKN2A and CDKN2B was lower in dysplasia than in normal esophageal epithelium. We also observed that the copy number increase of FSCN1 was significantly associated with pT, pN and pStage, and that the gain of HOMER3 was significantly linked with pN and pStage. We further revealed that FSCN1 and HOMER3 were overexpressed in ESCC, and that their overexpression was correlated with copy number increase. In conclusion, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, FSCN1 and HOMER3 are candidate cancer-associated genes and may play a tumorigenic role in ESCC.

  20. Identification of candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian-Yun; Mei, Li-Li; Qiu, Yun-Tan; Shi, Zhi-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were applied to analyze the copy number changes and expression level of candidate genes, respectively. Integrative analysis revealed that homozygous deletions of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKN) 2A and CDKN2B and gains of fascin actin-bundling protein 1 (FSCN1) and homer scaffolding protein 3 (HOMER3) occurred frequently in ESCC. The results demonstrated that the homozygous deletion of CDKN2A or CDKN2B was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis. Notably, the expression of CDKN2A and CDKN2B was lower in dysplasia than in normal esophageal epithelium. We also observed that the copy number increase of FSCN1 was significantly associated with pT, pN and pStage, and that the gain of HOMER3 was significantly linked with pN and pStage. We further revealed that FSCN1 and HOMER3 were overexpressed in ESCC, and that their overexpression was correlated with copy number increase. In conclusion, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, FSCN1 and HOMER3 are candidate cancer-associated genes and may play a tumorigenic role in ESCC. PMID:27698883

  1. Antimutagenic effects of piperine on cyclophosphamide-induced chromosome aberrations in rat bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Wongpa, Sareeya; Himakoun, Lakana; Soontornchai, Sarisak; Temcharoen, Punya

    2007-01-01

    Piperine is a major pungent substance and active component of black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn.) and long pepper (Piper longum Linn.). Both plants are used worldwide as household spices and condiments. They are also used as important ingredients in folklore medicine in many Asian countries. Therefore, it is of interest to study antimutagenic effects of piperine. In this study, its influence on chromosomes was investigated in rat bone marrow cells. Male Wistar rats were orally administered piperine at the doses of 100, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight for 24 hours then challenged with cyclophosphamide at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight by intraperitoneal injection. Twenty-four hours thereafter, all animals were sacrificed and bone marrow samples were collected for chromosomal analysis. The results demonstrated that piperine at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight gave a statistically significant reduction in cyclophosphamide-induced chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, piperine may have antimutagenic potential. The underlying molecular mechanisms now require attention.

  2. Cell-cycle-specific initiation of replication.

    PubMed

    Nordström, K; Austin, S J

    1993-11-01

    The following characteristics are relevant when replication of chromosomes and plasmids is discussed in relation to the cell cycle: the timing or replication, the selection of molecules for replication, and the coordination of multiple initiation events within a single cell cycle. Several fundamentally different methods have been used to study these processes: Meselson-Stahl density-shift experiments, experiments with the so-called 'baby machine', sorting of cells according to size, and flow cytometry. The evidence for precise timing and co-ordination of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is overwhelming. Similarly, the high-copy-number plasmid ColE1 and the low-copy-number plasmids R1/R100 without any doubt replicate randomly throughout the cell cycle. Data about the low-copy-number plasmids F and P1 are conflicting. This calls for new types of experiments and for a better understanding of how these plasmids control their replication and partitioning.

  3. Flavonoids: from cell cycle regulation to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ho-Hyung; Jeong, Byeong Ryong; Hawes, Martha C

    2005-03-01

    Flavonoids have been proposed to play diverse roles in plant growth and development, including defense, symbiosis, pollen development and male fertility, polar auxin transport, and protection against ultraviolet radiation. Recently, a new role in cell cycle regulation has emerged. Genetic alteration of glucuronide metabolism by altered expression of a Pisum sativum UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (PsUGT1) results in an altered cell cycle in pea, alfalfa, and Arabidopsis. In alfalfa, altered expression of PsUGT1 results in accumulation of a flavonoid-like compound that suppresses growth of cultured cells. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that PsUGT1 functions by controlling cellular levels of a factor controlling cell cycle (FCC). PMID:15834800

  4. Cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 associated with cell cycle withdrawal of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumrejkanchanakij, Piyamas; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Masa-Aki . E-mail: mikeda.emb@tmd.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    The regulation of D-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity is critical for neuronal differentiation and apoptosis. We recently showed that cyclin D1 is sequestered in the cytoplasm and that its nuclear localization induces apoptosis in postmitotic primary neurons. Here, we further investigated the role of the subcellular localization of cyclin D1 in cell cycle withdrawal during the differentiation of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. We show that cyclin D1 became predominantly cytoplasmic after differentiation. Targeting cyclin D1 expression to the nucleus induced phosphorylation of Rb and cdk2 kinase activity. Furthermore, cyclin D1 nuclear localization promoted differentiated N1E-115 cells to reenter the cell cycle, a process that was inhibited by p16{sup INK4a}, a specific inhibitor of D-type cyclin activity. These results indicate that cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 plays a role in neuronal cell cycle withdrawal, and suggests that the abrogation of machinery involved in monitoring aberrant nuclear cyclin D1 activity contributes to neuronal tumorigenesis.

  5. Cell-Cycle Gene Alterations in 4,864 Tumors Analyzed by Next-Generation Sequencing: Implications for Targeted Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Helsten, Teresa; Kato, Shumei; Schwaederle, Maria; Tomson, Brett N; Buys, Timon P H; Elkin, Sheryl K; Carter, Jennifer L; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-retinoblastoma (RB) machinery disrupt cell-cycle regulation and are being targeted in drug development. To understand the cancer types impacted by this pathway, we analyzed frequency of abnormalities in key cell-cycle genes across 4,864 tumors using next-generation sequencing (182 or 236 genes; Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments laboratory). Aberrations in the cell-cycle pathway were identified in 39% of cancers, making this pathway one of the most commonly altered in cancer. The frequency of aberrations was as follows: CDKN2A/B (20.1% of all patients), RB1 (7.6%), CCND1 (6.1%), CCNE1 (3.6%), CDK4 (3.2%), CCND3 (1.8%), CCND2 (1.7%), and CDK6 (1.7%). Rates and types of aberrant cell-cycle pathway genes differed between cancer types and within histologies. Analysis of coexisting and mutually exclusive genetic aberrations showed that CCND1, CCND2, and CCND3 aberrations were all positively associated with CDK6 aberrations [OR and P values, multivariate analysis: CCND1 and CDK6 (OR = 3.5; P < 0.0001), CCND2 and CDK6 (OR = 4.3; P = 0.003), CCND3 and CDK6 (OR = 3.6; P = 0.007)]. In contrast, RB1 alterations were negatively associated with multiple gene anomalies in the cell-cycle pathway, including CCND1 (OR = 0.25; P = 0.003), CKD4 (OR = 0.10; P = 0.001), and CDKN2A/B (OR = 0.21; P < 0.0001). In conclusion, aberrations in the cell-cycle pathway were very common in diverse cancers (39% of 4,864 neoplasms). The frequencies and types of alterations differed between and within tumor types and will be informative for drug development strategies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1682-90. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Cell-Cycle Gene Alterations in 4,864 Tumors Analyzed by Next-Generation Sequencing: Implications for Targeted Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Helsten, Teresa; Kato, Shumei; Schwaederle, Maria; Tomson, Brett N; Buys, Timon P H; Elkin, Sheryl K; Carter, Jennifer L; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-retinoblastoma (RB) machinery disrupt cell-cycle regulation and are being targeted in drug development. To understand the cancer types impacted by this pathway, we analyzed frequency of abnormalities in key cell-cycle genes across 4,864 tumors using next-generation sequencing (182 or 236 genes; Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments laboratory). Aberrations in the cell-cycle pathway were identified in 39% of cancers, making this pathway one of the most commonly altered in cancer. The frequency of aberrations was as follows: CDKN2A/B (20.1% of all patients), RB1 (7.6%), CCND1 (6.1%), CCNE1 (3.6%), CDK4 (3.2%), CCND3 (1.8%), CCND2 (1.7%), and CDK6 (1.7%). Rates and types of aberrant cell-cycle pathway genes differed between cancer types and within histologies. Analysis of coexisting and mutually exclusive genetic aberrations showed that CCND1, CCND2, and CCND3 aberrations were all positively associated with CDK6 aberrations [OR and P values, multivariate analysis: CCND1 and CDK6 (OR = 3.5; P < 0.0001), CCND2 and CDK6 (OR = 4.3; P = 0.003), CCND3 and CDK6 (OR = 3.6; P = 0.007)]. In contrast, RB1 alterations were negatively associated with multiple gene anomalies in the cell-cycle pathway, including CCND1 (OR = 0.25; P = 0.003), CKD4 (OR = 0.10; P = 0.001), and CDKN2A/B (OR = 0.21; P < 0.0001). In conclusion, aberrations in the cell-cycle pathway were very common in diverse cancers (39% of 4,864 neoplasms). The frequencies and types of alterations differed between and within tumor types and will be informative for drug development strategies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1682-90. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196769

  7. Cell cycle-specific effects of lovastatin.

    PubMed Central

    Jakóbisiak, M; Bruno, S; Skierski, J S; Darzynkiewicz, Z

    1991-01-01

    Lovastatin (LOV), the drug recently introduced to treat hypercholesteremia, inhibits the synthesis of mevalonic acid. The effects of LOV on the cell cycle progression of the human bladder carcinoma T24 cell line expressing activated p21ras were investigated. At a concentration of 2-10 microM, LOV arrested cells in G1 and also prolonged--or arrested a minor fraction of cells in--the G2 phase of the cell cycle; at a concentration of 50 microM, LOV was cytotoxic. The cytostatic effects were reversed by addition of exogenous mevalonate. Cells arrested in the cycle by LOV were viable for up to 72 hr and did not show any changes in RNA or protein content or chromatin condensation, which would be typical of either unbalanced growth or deep quiescence. The expression of the proliferation-associated nuclear proteins Ki-67 and p105 in these cells was reduced by up to 72% and 74%, respectively, compared with exponentially growing control cells. After removal of LOV, the cells resumed progression through the cycle; they entered S phase asynchronously after a lag of approximately 6 hr. Because mevalonate is essential for the posttranslational modification (isoprenylation) of p21ras, which in turn allows this protein to become attached to the cell membrane, the data suggest that the LOV-induced G1 arrest may be a consequence of the loss of the signal transduction capacity of p21ras. Indeed, while exposure of cells to LOV had no effect on the cellular content of p21ras (detected immunocytochemically), it altered the intracellular location of this protein, causing its dissociation from the cell membrane and translocation toward the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, it is also possible that inhibition of isoprenylation of proteins other than p21ras (e.g., nuclear lamins) by LOV may be responsible for the observed suppression of growth of T24 cells. Images PMID:1673788

  8. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  9. Genomic aberration patterns and expression profiles of squamous cell carcinomas of the vulva.

    PubMed

    Micci, Francesca; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Haugom, Lisbeth; Dahlback, Hanne-Sofie S; Pretorius, Maria E; Davidson, Ben; Abeler, Vera M; Tropé, Claes G; Danielsen, Håvard E; Heim, Sverre

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the genomic abnormalities of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the vulva and how they correlate with gene expression. We determined the genomic and expression profiles of 15 such SCC using karyotyping, DNA ploidy analysis, arrayCGH, and expression arrays. Four of the five cases with clonal chromosomal aberrations found by G-banding showed highly abnormal karyotypes with multiple rearrangements. The imbalances scored by arrayCGH mapped to different chromosomes with losses being more common than gains. Frequent losses were scored from 3p and 8p whereas gains were frequent from 3q and 8q (loss of 8p with concomitant gain of 8q mostly occurred via 8q isochromosome formation). This is the first study of vulvar tumors using arrayCGH, and some frequent imbalances could be defined precisely. Of particular note were the sometimes large, sometimes small deletions of 3p and 9p which had minute areas in 3p14 and 9p23 as minimal commonly deleted regions. FHIT (3p14) and PTPRD (9p23) are the only genes here. They were both lost in seven cases, including homozygous losses of PTPRD in four tumors. Using qPCR we could demonstrate deregulation of the FHIT gene in tumor cells. Hence, this gene is likely to play a pathogenetic role in vulvar SCC tumorigenesis. Expression array analyses also identified a number of other genes whose expression profile was altered. Notable among the downregulated genes were MAL (in 2q11), KRT4 (in 12q13), and OLFM4 (in 13q14), whereas upregulated genes included SPRR2G (in 1q21.3) and S100A7A (in 1q21.3).

  10. Modeling of Sonos Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories (NVSMS) have many advantages. These memories are electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs). They utilize low programming voltages, endure extended erase/write cycles, are inherently resistant to radiation, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. The SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. The SONOS floating gate charge and voltage, tunneling current, threshold voltage, and drain current were characterized during an erase cycle. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental device data.

  11. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to Space-like Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells and lymphocytes were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) or Cs-137 gamma radiation source at the Baylor College (Houston, TX). After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The possible relationship between the frequency of inter- and intra-chromosomal exchanges and the track structure of radiation is discussed. The work was supported by the NASA Space Radiation Health Program.

  12. Cell Cycle Regulation of DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, R. A.; Holzen, T. M.

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication is regulated to ensure all chromosomes replicate once and only once per cell cycle. Replication begins at many origins scattered along each chromosome. Except for budding yeast, origins are not defined DNA sequences and probably are inherited by epigenetic mechanisms. Initiation at origins occurs throughout the S phase according to a temporal program that is important in regulating gene expression during development. Most replication proteins are conserved in evolution in eukaryotes and archaea, but not in bacteria. However, the mechanism of initiation is conserved and consists of origin recognition, assembly of pre-replication (pre-RC) initiative complexes, helicase activation, and replisome loading. Cell cycle regulation by protein phosphorylation ensures that pre-RC assembly can only occur in G1 phase, whereas helicase activation and loading can only occur in S phase. Checkpoint regulation maintains high fidelity by stabilizing replication forks and preventing cell cycle progression during replication stress or damage. PMID:17630848

  13. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1. Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  14. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G₀-G₁ phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1). Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  15. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  16. Cell cycle checkpoint regulators reach a zillion

    PubMed Central

    Yasutis, Kimberly M.; Kozminski, Keith G.

    2013-01-01

    Entry into mitosis is regulated by a checkpoint at the boundary between the G2 and M phases of the cell cycle (G2/M). In many organisms, this checkpoint surveys DNA damage and cell size and is controlled by both the activation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and the inhibition of an opposing phosphatase, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Misregulation of mitotic entry can often lead to oncogenesis or cell death. Recent research has focused on discovering the signaling pathways that feed into the core checkpoint control mechanisms dependent on Cdk and PP2A. Herein, we review the conserved mechanisms of the G2/M transition, including recently discovered upstream signaling pathways that link cell growth and DNA replication to cell cycle progression. Critical consideration of the human, frog and yeast models of mitotic entry frame unresolved and emerging questions in this field, providing a prediction of signaling molecules and pathways yet to be discovered. PMID:23598718

  17. Aberrant TAL1 activation is mediated by an interchromosomal interaction in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, B; Kang, Y; Cui, K; Litt, M; Riberio, M S J; Deng, C; Salz, T; Casada, S; Fu, X; Qiu, Y; Zhao, K; Huang, S

    2014-02-01

    Long-range chromatin interactions control metazoan gene transcription. However, the involvement of intra- and interchromosomal interactions in development and oncogenesis remains unclear. TAL1/SCL is a critical transcription factor required for the development of all hematopoietic lineages; yet, aberrant TAL1 transcription often occurs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we report that oncogenic TAL1 expression is regulated by different intra- and interchromosomal loops in normal hematopoietic and leukemic cells, respectively. These intra- and interchromosomal loops alter the cell-type-specific enhancers that interact with the TAL1 promoter. We show that human SET1 (hSET1)-mediated H3K4 methylations promote a long-range chromatin loop, which brings the +51 enhancer in close proximity to TAL1 promoter 1 in erythroid cells. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) facilitates this long-range enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in erythroid cells while blocking the same enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in human T-cell leukemia. In human T-ALL, a T-cell-specific transcription factor c-Maf-mediated interchromosomal interaction brings the TAL1 promoter into close proximity with a T-cell-specific regulatory element located on chromosome 16, activating aberrant TAL1 oncogene expression. Thus, our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism involving changes in three-dimensional chromatin interactions that activate the TAL1 oncogene in human T-cell leukemia. PMID:23698277

  18. SAFT nickel hydrogen cell cycling status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borthomieu, Yannick; Duquesne, Didier

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NiH2 cell development is given. The NiH2 SAFT system is an electrochemical (single or dual) stack (IPV). The stack is mounted in an hydroformed Inconel 718 vessel operating at high pressure, equipped with 'rabbit ears' ceramic brazed electrical feedthroughs. The cell design is described: positive electrode, negative electrode, and stack configuration. Overviews of low earth orbit and geostationary earth orbit cyclings are provided. DPA results are also provided. The cycling and DPA results demonstrate that SAFT NiH2 is characterized by high reliability and very stable performances.

  19. Potassium channels in cell cycle and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Urrego, Diana; Tomczak, Adam P.; Zahed, Farrah; Stühmer, Walter; Pardo, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Normal cell-cycle progression is a crucial task for every multicellular organism, as it determines body size and shape, tissue renewal and senescence, and is also crucial for reproduction. On the other hand, dysregulation of the cell-cycle progression leading to uncontrolled cell proliferation is the hallmark of cancer. Therefore, it is not surprising that it is a tightly regulated process, with multifaceted and very complex control mechanisms. It is now well established that one of those mechanisms relies on ion channels, and in many cases specifically on potassium channels. Here, we summarize the possible mechanisms underlying the importance of potassium channels in cell-cycle control and briefly review some of the identified channels that illustrate the multiple ways in which this group of proteins can influence cell proliferation and modulate cell-cycle progression. PMID:24493742

  20. High-level DNA amplifications are common genetic aberrations in B-cell neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, C. A.; Döhner, H.; Joos, S.; Trümper, L. H.; Baudis, M.; Barth, T. F.; Ott, G.; Möller, P.; Lichter, P.; Bentz, M.

    1997-01-01

    Gene amplification is one of the molecular mechanisms resulting in the up-regulation of gene expression. In non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, such gene amplifications have been identified rarely. Using comparative genomic hybridization, a technique that has proven to be very sensitive for the detection of high-level DNA amplifications, we analyzed 108 cases of B-cell neoplasms (42 chronic B-cell leukemias, 5 mantle cell lymphomas, and 61 aggressive B-cell lymphomas). Twenty-four high-level amplifications were identified in 13% of the patients and mapped to 15 different genomic regions. Regions most frequently amplified were bands Xq26-28, 2p23-24, and 2p14-16 as well as 18q21 (three times each). Amplification of several proto-oncogenes and a cell cycle control gene (N-MYC (two cases), BCL2, CCND2, and GLI) located within the amplified regions was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization to interphase nuclei of tumor cells. These data demonstrate that gene amplifications in B-cell neoplasms are much more frequent than previously assumed. The identification of highly amplified DNA regions and genes included in the amplicons provides important information for further analyses of genetic events involved in lymphomagenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250147

  1. ES cell cycle progression and differentiation require the action of the histone methyltransferase Dot1L.

    PubMed

    Barry, Evan R; Krueger, Winfried; Jakuba, Caroline M; Veilleux, Eric; Ambrosi, Dominic J; Nelson, Craig E; Rasmussen, Theodore P

    2009-07-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) proliferate with rapid cell cycle kinetics but without loss of pluripotency. The histone methyltransferase Dot1L is responsible for methylation of histone H3 at lysine 79 (H3K79me). We investigated whether ESCs require Dot1L for proper stem cell behavior. ESCs deficient in Dot1L tolerate a nearly complete loss of H3K79 methylation without a substantial impact on proliferation or morphology. However, shortly after differentiation is induced, Dot1L-deficient cells cease proliferating and arrest in G2/M-phase of the cell cycle, with increased levels of aneuploidy. In addition, many aberrant mitotic spindles occur in Dot1L-deficient cells. Surprisingly, these mitotic and cell cycle defects fail to trigger apoptosis, indicating that mouse ESCs lack stringent cell cycle checkpoint control during initial stages of differentiation. Transcriptome analysis indicates that Dot1L deficiency causes the misregulation of a select set of genes, including many with known roles in cell cycle control and cellular proliferation as well as markers of endoderm differentiation. The data indicate a requirement for Dot1L function for early stages of ESC differentiation where Dot1L is necessary for faithful execution of mitosis and proper transcription of many genes throughout the genome. PMID:19544450

  2. Aberrant immunoglobulin class switch recombination and switch translocations in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Georg; Nagel, Inga; Siebert, Reiner; Roschke, Anna V; Sanger, Warren; Wright, George W; Dave, Sandeep S; Tan, Bruce; Zhao, Hong; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Smeland, Erlend B; Fisher, Richard I; Kuehl, W Michael; Chan, Wing C; Staudt, Louis M

    2007-03-19

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying chromosomal translocations in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we investigated the nature and extent of immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) in these tumors. We used Southern blotting to detect legitimate and illegitimate CSR events in tumor samples of the activated B cell-like (ABC), germinal center B cell-like (GCB), and primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) subgroups of DLBCL. The frequency of legitimate CSR was lower in ABC DLBCL than in GCB DLBCL and PMBL. In contrast, ABC DLBCL had a higher frequency of internal deletions within the switch mu (Smu) region compared with GCB DLBCL and PMBL. ABC DLBCLs also had frequent deletions within Sgamma and other illegitimate switch recombinations. Sequence analysis revealed ongoing Smu deletions within ABC DLBCL tumor clones, which were accompanied by ongoing duplications and activation-induced cytidine deaminase-dependent somatic mutations. Unexpectedly, short fragments derived from multiple chromosomes were interspersed within Smu in one case. These findings suggest that ABC DLBCLs have abnormalities in the regulation of CSR that could predispose to chromosomal translocations. Accordingly, aberrant switch recombination was responsible for translocations in ABC DLBCLs involving BCL6, MYC, and a novel translocation partner, SPIB. PMID:17353367

  3. Primary Cilia and the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikova, Olga V.; Pugacheva, Elena N.; Golemis, Erica A.

    2009-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based structures that protrude from the cell surface, and function as sensors for mechanical and chemical environmental cues that regulate cellular differentiation or division. In metazoans, ciliary signaling is important both during organismal development and in the homeostasis controls of adult tissues, with receptors for the Hedgehog, PDGF, Wnt, and other signaling cascades arrayed and active along the ciliary membrane. In normal cells, cilia are dynamically regulated during cell cycle progression: present in G0 and G1 cells, and usually in S/G2 cells, but almost invariably resorbed before mitotic entry, to re-appear post-cytokinesis. This periodic resorption and reassembly of cilia, specified by interaction with the intrinsic cell cycle machinery, influences the susceptibility of cells to the influence of extrinsic signals with cilia-associated receptors. Pathogenic conditions of mammals associated with loss of or defects in ciliary integrity include a number of developmental disorders, cystic syndromes in adults, and some cancers. With the continuing expansion of the list of human diseases associated with ciliary abnormalities, the identification of the cellular mechanisms regulating ciliary growth and disassembly has become a topic of intense research interest. Although these mechanisms are far from being understood, a number of recent studies have begun to identify key regulatory factors that may begin to offer insight into disease pathogenesis and treatment. In this chapter we will discuss the current state of knowledge regarding cell cycle control of ciliary dynamics, and provide general methods that can be applied to investigate cell cycle-dependent ciliary growth and disassembly. PMID:20362089

  4. Control points within the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures.

  5. Comparison of cell repair mechanisms by means of chromosomal aberration induced by proton and gamma irradiation - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, A.; Czerski, K.; Kaczmarski, M.; Lewocki, M.; Masojć, B.; Łukowiak, A.

    2015-03-01

    DNA damage of peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to gamma and proton irradiation is studied by means of chromosome aberrations to validate the efficiency of the repair mechanisms of individual cells. A new method based on an observed deviation from the Poisson statistics of the chromosome aberration number is applied for estimation of a repair factor ( RF) defined as a ratio between originally damaged cells to the amount of finally observed aberrations. The repair factors are evaluated by studying the variance of individual damage factors in a collective of healthy persons at a given dose as well as by using the chi-square analysis for the dose-effect curves. The blood samples from fifteen donors have been irradiated by Co60 gamma rays and from nine persons by 150 MeV protons with different doses up to 2 Gy. A standard extraction of lymphocyte has been used whereby dicentrics, acentrics and rings have been scored under a microscope. The RF values determined for the proton radiation are slightly larger than for gamma rays, indicating that up to 70% DNA double strand breaks can be repaired.

  6. Oncogenic Ras pushes (and pulls) cell cycle progression through ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling cascade is capable of channeling a wide variety of extracellular signals into control of cell proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and death. Because aberrant regulation at all steps of this signaling axis is observed in cancer, it remains an area of great interest in the field of tumor biology. Here we present evidence of the intricate and delicate levels of control of this pathway as it pertains to cell cycle regulation and illustrate how this control is not simply a rheostat.

  7. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  8. The Silencing of CCND2 by Promoter Aberrant Methylation in Renal Cell Cancer and Analysis of the Correlation between CCND2 Methylation Status and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Cui, Yun; Zhang, Lian; Sheng, Jindong; Yang, Yang; Kuang, Guanyu; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Qian; Jin, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D2 (CCND2) is a member of the D-type cyclins, which plays a pivotal role in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and malignant transformation. However, its expression status and relative regulation mechanism remains unclear in renal cell cancer (RCC). In our study, the mRNA expression level of CCND2 is down-regulated in 22/23 paired RCC tissues (p<0.05). In addition, its protein expression level is also decreased in 43/43 RCC tumor tissues compared with its corresponding non-malignant tissues (p<0.001). We further detected that CCND2 was down-regulated or silenced in 6/7 RCC cell lines, but expressed in “normal” human proximal tubular (HK-2) cell line. Subsequently, MSP and BGS results showed that the methylation status in CCND2 promoter region is closely associated with its expression level in RCC cell lines. Treatment with 5-Aza with or without TSA restored CCND2 expression in several methylated RCC cell lines. Among the 102 RCC tumors, methylation of CCND2 was detected in 29/102 (28%) cases. Only 2/23 (8.7%) adjacent non-malignant tissues showed methylation. We then analyzed the correlation of clinical features and its promoter methylation. Collectively, our data suggested that loss of CCND2 expression is closely associated with the promoter aberrant methylation. PMID:27583477

  9. The Silencing of CCND2 by Promoter Aberrant Methylation in Renal Cell Cancer and Analysis of the Correlation between CCND2 Methylation Status and Clinical Features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Cui, Yun; Zhang, Lian; Sheng, Jindong; Yang, Yang; Kuang, Guanyu; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Qian; Jin, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D2 (CCND2) is a member of the D-type cyclins, which plays a pivotal role in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and malignant transformation. However, its expression status and relative regulation mechanism remains unclear in renal cell cancer (RCC). In our study, the mRNA expression level of CCND2 is down-regulated in 22/23 paired RCC tissues (p<0.05). In addition, its protein expression level is also decreased in 43/43 RCC tumor tissues compared with its corresponding non-malignant tissues (p<0.001). We further detected that CCND2 was down-regulated or silenced in 6/7 RCC cell lines, but expressed in "normal" human proximal tubular (HK-2) cell line. Subsequently, MSP and BGS results showed that the methylation status in CCND2 promoter region is closely associated with its expression level in RCC cell lines. Treatment with 5-Aza with or without TSA restored CCND2 expression in several methylated RCC cell lines. Among the 102 RCC tumors, methylation of CCND2 was detected in 29/102 (28%) cases. Only 2/23 (8.7%) adjacent non-malignant tissues showed methylation. We then analyzed the correlation of clinical features and its promoter methylation. Collectively, our data suggested that loss of CCND2 expression is closely associated with the promoter aberrant methylation. PMID:27583477

  10. Phytochemicals attenuating aberrant activation of ß-catenin in cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytochemicals are a rich source of chemoprevention agents but their effects on modulating the Wnt/ß-catenin signaling pathway have remained largely uninvestigated. Aberrantly activated Wnt signaling can result in the abnormal stabilization of ß-catenin, a key causative step in a broad spectrum of c...

  11. Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Lowe, Keith S.; Larkins, Brian A.; Dilkes, Brian R.; Sun, Yuejin

    2007-08-14

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

  12. FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

    1999-12-01

    A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

  13. Cell proliferation and cell cycle control: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Golias, C H; Charalabopoulos, A; Charalabopoulos, K

    2004-12-01

    Tumourigenesis is the result of cell cycle disorganisation, leading to an uncontrolled cellular proliferation. Specific cellular processes-mechanisms that control cell cycle progression and checkpoint traversation through the intermitotic phases are deregulated. Normally, these events are highly conserved due to the existence of conservatory mechanisms and molecules such as cell cycle genes and their products: cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKI) and extra cellular factors (i.e. growth factors). Revolutionary techniques using laser cytometry and commercial software are available to quantify and evaluate cell cycle processes and cellular growth. S-phase fraction measurements, including ploidy values, using histograms and estimation of indices such as the mitotic index and tumour-doubling time indices, provide adequate information to the clinician to evaluate tumour aggressiveness, prognosis and the strategies for radiotherapy and chemotherapy in experimental researches.

  14. The Cell Cycle Ontology: an application ontology for the representation and integrated analysis of the cell cycle process

    PubMed Central

    Antezana, Erick; Egaña, Mikel; Blondé, Ward; Illarramendi, Aitzol; Bilbao, Iñaki; De Baets, Bernard; Stevens, Robert; Mironov, Vladimir; Kuiper, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The Cell Cycle Ontology ( is an application ontology that automatically captures and integrates detailed knowledge on the cell cycle process. Cell Cycle Ontology is enabled by semantic web technologies, and is accessible via the web for browsing, visualizing, advanced querying, and computational reasoning. Cell Cycle Ontology facilitates a detailed analysis of cell cycle-related molecular network components. Through querying and automated reasoning, it may provide new hypotheses to help steer a systems biology approach to biological network building. PMID:19480664

  15. Targeting Cell Cycle Proteins in Breast Cancer Cells with siRNA by Using Lipid-Substituted Polyethylenimines

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Manoj B.; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Mahdipoor, Parvin; Kucharski, Cezary; Maranchuk, Robert; Hugh, Judith C.; Uludağ, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The cell cycle proteins are key regulators of cell cycle progression whose deregulation is one of the causes of breast cancer. RNA interference (RNAi) is an endogenous mechanism to regulate gene expression and it could serve as the basis of regulating aberrant proteins including cell cycle proteins. Since the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a main barrier for implementation of RNAi therapy, we explored the potential of a non-viral delivery system, 2.0 kDa polyethylenimines substituted with linoleic acid and caprylic acid, for this purpose. Using a library of siRNAs against cell cycle proteins, we identified cell division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), a recombinase RAD51, and serine–threonine protein kinase CHEK1 as effective targets for breast cancer therapy, and demonstrated their therapeutic potential in breast cancer MDA-MB-435, MDA-MB-231, and MCF7 cells with respect to another well-studied cell cycle protein, kinesin spindle protein. We also explored the efficacy of dicer-substrate siRNA (DsiRNA) against CDC20, RAD51, and CHEK1, where a particular DsiRNA against CDC20 showed an exceptionally high inhibition of cell growth in vitro. There was no apparent effect of silencing selected cell cycle proteins on the potency of the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin. The efficacy of DsiRNA against CDC20 was subsequently assessed in a xenograft model, which indicated a reduced tumor growth as a result of CDC20 DsiRNA therapy. The presented study highlighted specific cell cycle protein targets critical for breast cancer therapy, and provided a polymeric delivery system for their effective down-regulation. PMID:25763370

  16. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  17. Solid oxide fuel cell combined cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Bevc, F.P.; Lundberg, W.L.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The integration of the solid oxide fuel cell and combustion turbine technologies can result in combined-cycle power plants, fueled with natural gas, that have high efficiencies and clean gaseous emissions. Results of a study are presented in which conceptual designs were developed for 3 power plants based upon such an integration, and ranging in rating from 3 to 10 MW net ac. The plant cycles are described and characteristics of key components summarized. Also, plant design-point efficiency estimates are presented as well as values of other plant performance parameters.

  18. Cell shape dynamics during the staphylococcal cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, João M; Fernandes, Pedro B; Vaz, Filipa; Pereira, Ana R; Tavares, Andreia C; Ferreira, Maria T; Pereira, Pedro M; Veiga, Helena; Kuru, Erkin; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S; Brun, Yves V; Filipe, Sérgio R; Pinho, Mariana G

    2015-08-17

    Staphylococcus aureus is an aggressive pathogen and a model organism to study cell division in sequential orthogonal planes in spherical bacteria. However, the small size of staphylococcal cells has impaired analysis of changes in morphology during the cell cycle. Here we use super-resolution microscopy and determine that S. aureus cells are not spherical throughout the cell cycle, but elongate during specific time windows, through peptidoglycan synthesis and remodelling. Both peptidoglycan hydrolysis and turgor pressure are required during division for reshaping the flat division septum into a curved surface. In this process, the septum generates less than one hemisphere of each daughter cell, a trait we show is common to other cocci. Therefore, cell surface scars of previous divisions do not divide the cells in quadrants, generating asymmetry in the daughter cells. Our results introduce a need to reassess the models for division plane selection in cocci.

  19. Increased miR-374b promotes cell proliferation and the production of aberrant glycosylated IgA1 in B cells of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuai; Bao, Hao; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhou, Xianguang; Qin, Weisong; Zeng, Caihong; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-12-21

    The number of B cells is increased and the O-glycans of IgA1 are incompletely galactosylated in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Here we report that expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and Cosmc is decreased in B cells, and correlates with B cell number and the aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 in IgAN. Patients with IgAN exhibit higher miR-374b in B cells compared to controls. We show that miR-374b targets PTEN and Cosmc by luciferase assays and western blot analysis. Inhibition of miR-374b increased PTEN and Cosmc expression, and prevented cell proliferation and aberrant glycosylation of IgA1, thus representing a new therapeutic approach for IgAN.

  20. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  1. Aberrant mural cell recruitment to lymphatic vessels and impaired lymphatic drainage in a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Meinecke, Anna-Katharina; Nagy, Nadine; Lago, Gabriela D'Amico; Kirmse, Santina; Klose, Ralph; Schrödter, Katrin; Zimmermann, Annika; Helfrich, Iris; Rundqvist, Helene; Theegarten, Dirk; Anhenn, Olaf; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique; Johnson, Randall S; Alitalo, Kari; Fischer, Jens W; Fandrey, Joachim; Stockmann, Christian

    2012-06-14

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive disease with unknown etiology that is characterized by extensive remodeling of the lung parenchyma, ultimately resulting in respiratory failure. Lymphatic vessels have been implicated with the development of pulmonary fibrosis, but the role of the lymphatic vasculature in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis remains enigmatic. Here we show in a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis that lymphatic vessels exhibit ectopic mural coverage and that this occurs early during the disease. The abnormal lymphatic vascular patterning in fibrotic lungs was driven by expression of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) in lymphatic endothelial cells and signaling through platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-β in associated mural cells. Because of impaired lymphatic drainage, aberrant mural cell coverage fostered the accumulation of fibrogenic molecules and the attraction of fibroblasts to the perilymphatic space. Pharmacologic inhibition of the PDGF-B/PDGFR-β signaling axis disrupted the association of mural cells and lymphatic vessels, improved lymphatic drainage of the lung, and prevented the attraction of fibroblasts to the perilymphatic space. Our results implicate aberrant mural cell recruitment to lymphatic vessels in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and that the drainage capacity of pulmonary lymphatics is a critical mediator of fibroproliferative changes.

  2. Suppression of adiponectin by aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in glomerular mesangial cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tatsuyuki; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Masashi; Takiue, Keiichi; Morinaga, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Ayu; Kikumoto, Yoko; Kitamura, Shinji; Maeshima, Yohei; Makino, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) may be associated with the mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1. To identify mediators affected by aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in cultured human mesangial cells (HMCs), we generated enzymatically modified desialylated and degalactosylated (deSial/deGal) IgA1. The state of deglycosylated IgA1 was confirmed by lectin binding to Helix aspersa (HAA) and Sambucus nigra (SNA). In the cytokine array analysis, 52 proteins were upregulated and 34 were downregulated in HMCs after stimulation with deSial/deGal IgA1. Among them, the secretion of adiponectin was suppressed in HMCs after stimulation with deSial/deGal IgA1. HMCs expressed mRNAs for adiponectin and its type 1 receptor, but not the type 2 receptor. Moreover, we revealed a downregulation of adiponectin expression in the glomeruli of renal biopsy specimens from patients with IgAN compared to those with lupus nephritis. We also demonstrated that aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 was deposited in the mesangium of patients with IgAN by dual staining of HAA and IgA. Moreover, the urinary HAA/SNA ratio of lectin binding was significantly higher in IgAN compared to other kidney diseases. Since adiponectin has anti-inflammatory effects, including the inhibition of adhesion molecules and cytokines, these data suggest that the local suppression of this adipokine by aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 could be involved in the regulation of glomerular inflammation and sclerosis in IgAN.

  3. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  4. Westinghouse fuel cell combined cycle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.

    1996-12-31

    Efficiency (voltage) of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) should increase with operating pressure, and a pressurized SOFC could function as the heat addition process in a Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) engine. An overall cycle efficiency of 70% should be possible. In cogeneration, half of the waste heat from a PSOFC/GT should be able to be captured in process steam and hot water, leading to a fuel effectiveness of about 85%. In order to make the PSOFC/GT a commercial reality, satisfactory operation of the SOFC at elevated pressure must be verified, a pressurized SOFC generator module must be designed, built, and tested, and the combined cycle and parameters must be optimized. A prototype must also be demonstrated. This paper describes progress toward making the PSOFC/GT a reality.

  5. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi . E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-10-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells.

  6. Aberrant production of extracellular matrix proteins and dysfunction in kidney endothelial cells with a short duration of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Grutzmacher, Cathy; Park, SunYoung; Zhao, Yun; Morrison, Margaret E; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In the United States, microvascular complications during diabetic nephropathy contribute to high morbidity and mortality rates. However, the cell-autonomous impact of diabetes on kidney endothelial cell function requires further investigation. Male Akita/+ [autosomal dominant mutation in the insulin II gene (Ins2)] mice reproducibly develop diabetes by 4 wk of age. Here, we examined the impact a short duration of diabetes had on kidney endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells were prepared from nondiabetic and diabetic mice (4 wk of diabetes) to delineate the early changes in endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice following 4 wk of diabetes demonstrated aberrant expression of extracellular matrix proteins including decreased osteopontin and increased fibronectin expression which correlated with increased α5-integrin expression. These changes were associated with the attenuation of migration and capillary morphogenesis. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice had decreased VEGF levels but increased levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) and NO, suggesting uncoupling of VEGF-mediated NO production. Knocking down eNOS expression in Akita/+ kidney endothelial cells increased VEGF expression, endothelial cell migration, and capillary morphogenesis. Furthermore, attenuation of sprouting angiogenesis of aortas from Akita/+ mice with 8 wk of diabetes was restored in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. These studies demonstrate that aberrant endothelial cell function with a short duration of diabetes may set the stage for vascular dysfunction and rarefaction at later stages of diabetes.

  7. Metabolism, cell growth and the bacterial cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue D; Levin, Petra A

    2009-11-01

    Adaptation to fluctuations in nutrient availability is a fact of life for single-celled organisms in the 'wild'. A decade ago our understanding of how bacteria adjust cell cycle parameters to accommodate changes in nutrient availability stemmed almost entirely from elegant physiological studies completed in the 1960s. In this Opinion article we summarize recent groundbreaking work in this area and discuss potential mechanisms by which nutrient availability and metabolic status are coordinated with cell growth, chromosome replication and cell division.

  8. Brahmarasayana protects against Ethyl methanesulfonate or Methyl methanesulfonate induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine has given great emphasis to the promotion of health. Rasayana is one of the eight branches of Ayurveda which refers to rejuvenant therapy. It has been reported that rasayanas have immuno-modulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions, however, the genotoxic potential and modulation of DNA repair of many rasayanas have not been evaluated. Methods The present study assessed the role of Brahmarasayana (BR) on Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-and Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced genotoxicity and DNA repair in in vivo mouse test system. The mice were orally fed with BR (5 g or 8 mg / day) for two months and 24 h later EMS or MMS was given intraperitoneally. The genotoxicity was analyzed by chromosomal aberrations, sperm count, and sperm abnormalities. Results The results have revealed that BR did not induce significant chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control animals (p >0.05). On the other hand, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by EMS (240 mg / kg body weight) or MMS (125 mg / kg body weight) were significantly higher (p<0.05) to that of the control group. The treatment of BR for 60 days and single dose of EMS or MMS on day 61, resulted in significant (p <0.05) reduction in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in comparison to EMS or MMS treatment alone, indicating a protective effect of BR. Constitutive base excision repair capacity was also increased in BR treated animals. Conclusion The effect of BR, as it relates to antioxidant activity was not evident in liver tissue however rasayana treatment was observed to increase constitutive DNA base excision repair and reduce clastogenicity. Whilst, the molecular mechanisms of such repair need further exploration, this is the first report to demonstrate these effects and provides further evidence for the role of brahmarasayana in the possible improvement of quality of life. PMID:22853637

  9. Icariside II, a natural mTOR inhibitor, disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis via suppressing mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis in sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Geng, Ya-di; An, Fa-Liang; Xia, Yuan-Zheng; Guo, Chao; Luo, Jian-Guang; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Guo, Qing-Long; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2016-05-10

    The aberrant energy homeostasis that characterized by high rate of energy production (glycolysis) and energy consumption (mRNA translation) is associated with the development of cancer. As mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of aberrant energy homeostasis, it is an attractive target for anti-tumor intervention. The flavonoid compound Icariside II (IS) is a natural mTOR inhibitor derived from Epimedium. Koreanum. Herein, we evaluate the effect of IS on aberrant energy homeostasis. The reduction of glycolysis and mRNA translation in U2OS (osteosarcoma), S180 (fibrosarcoma) and SW1535 (chondrosarcoma) cells observed in our study, indicate that, IS inhibits aberrant energy homeostasis. This inhibition is found to be due to suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) axis through blocking the assembly of mTORC1. Furthermore, IS inhibits the cap-dependent translation of c-myc through mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis which links the relationship between mRNA translation and glycolysis. Inhibition of aberrant energy homeostasis by IS, contributes to its in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferation activity. These data indicate that IS disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis of sarcoma cells through suppression of mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis, providing a novel mechanism of IS to inhibit cell proliferation in sarcoma cells.

  10. Icariside II, a natural mTOR inhibitor, disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis via suppressing mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis in sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Geng, Ya-di; An, Fa-Liang; Xia, Yuan-Zheng; Guo, Chao; Luo, Jian-Guang; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Guo, Qing-Long; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2016-05-10

    The aberrant energy homeostasis that characterized by high rate of energy production (glycolysis) and energy consumption (mRNA translation) is associated with the development of cancer. As mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of aberrant energy homeostasis, it is an attractive target for anti-tumor intervention. The flavonoid compound Icariside II (IS) is a natural mTOR inhibitor derived from Epimedium. Koreanum. Herein, we evaluate the effect of IS on aberrant energy homeostasis. The reduction of glycolysis and mRNA translation in U2OS (osteosarcoma), S180 (fibrosarcoma) and SW1535 (chondrosarcoma) cells observed in our study, indicate that, IS inhibits aberrant energy homeostasis. This inhibition is found to be due to suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) axis through blocking the assembly of mTORC1. Furthermore, IS inhibits the cap-dependent translation of c-myc through mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis which links the relationship between mRNA translation and glycolysis. Inhibition of aberrant energy homeostasis by IS, contributes to its in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferation activity. These data indicate that IS disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis of sarcoma cells through suppression of mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis, providing a novel mechanism of IS to inhibit cell proliferation in sarcoma cells. PMID:27056897

  11. Icariside II, a natural mTOR inhibitor, disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis via suppressing mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis in sarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Geng, Ya-di; An, Fa-liang; Xia, Yuan-zheng; Guo, Chao; Luo, Jian-guang; Zhang, Lu-yong; Guo, Qing-long; Kong, Ling-yi

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant energy homeostasis that characterized by high rate of energy production (glycolysis) and energy consumption (mRNA translation) is associated with the development of cancer. As mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of aberrant energy homeostasis, it is an attractive target for anti-tumor intervention. The flavonoid compound Icariside II (IS) is a natural mTOR inhibitor derived from Epimedium. Koreanum. Herein, we evaluate the effect of IS on aberrant energy homeostasis. The reduction of glycolysis and mRNA translation in U2OS (osteosarcoma), S180 (fibrosarcoma) and SW1535 (chondrosarcoma) cells observed in our study, indicate that, IS inhibits aberrant energy homeostasis. This inhibition is found to be due to suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) axis through blocking the assembly of mTORC1. Furthermore, IS inhibits the cap-dependent translation of c-myc through mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis which links the relationship between mRNA translation and glycolysis. Inhibition of aberrant energy homeostasis by IS, contributes to its in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferation activity. These data indicate that IS disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis of sarcoma cells through suppression of mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis, providing a novel mechanism of IS to inhibit cell proliferation in sarcoma cells. PMID:27056897

  12. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed. PMID:25914884

  13. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed. PMID:25914884

  14. Elutriation for Cell Cycle Synchronization in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kume, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Cell synchronization is a powerful technique for studying the eukaryotic cell cycle events precisely. The fission yeast is a rod-shaped cell whose growth is coordinated with the cell cycle. Monitoring the cellular growth of fission yeast is a relatively simple way to measure the cell cycle stage of a cell. Here, we describe a detailed method of unperturbed cell synchronization, named centrifugal elutriation, for fission yeast. PMID:26254921

  15. The Cell Cycle Ontology: an application ontology for the representation and integrated analysis of the cell cycle process.

    PubMed

    Antezana, Erick; Egaña, Mikel; Blondé, Ward; Illarramendi, Aitzol; Bilbao, Iñaki; De Baets, Bernard; Stevens, Robert; Mironov, Vladimir; Kuiper, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The Cell Cycle Ontology (http://www.CellCycleOntology.org) is an application ontology that automatically captures and integrates detailed knowledge on the cell cycle process. Cell Cycle Ontology is enabled by semantic web technologies, and is accessible via the web for browsing, visualizing, advanced querying, and computational reasoning. Cell Cycle Ontology facilitates a detailed analysis of cell cycle-related molecular network components. Through querying and automated reasoning, it may provide new hypotheses to help steer a systems biology approach to biological network building.

  16. Biomarker for Space Radiation Risk: Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2007-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Over the years, we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast, epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world. We have also studied chromosome aberrations in astronaut s peripheral blood lymphocytes before and after space flight. Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell. We will summarize the results of the investigations, and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure.

  17. The heterogenic final cell cycle of chicken retinal Lim1 horizontal cells is not regulated by the DNA damage response pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi Fard, Shahrzad; All-Ericsson, Charlotta; Hallböök, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Cells with aberrations in chromosomal ploidy are normally removed by apoptosis. However, aneuploid neurons have been shown to remain functional and active both in the cortex and in the retina. Lim1 horizontal progenitor cells in the chicken retina have a heterogenic final cell cycle, producing some cells that enter S-phase without proceeding into M-phase. The cells become heteroploid but do not undergo developmental cell death. This prompted us to investigate if the final cell cycle of these cells is under the regulation of an active DNA damage response. Our results show that the DNA damage response pathway, including γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci, is not triggered during any phase of the different final cell cycles of horizontal progenitor cells. However, chemically inducing DNA adducts or double-strand breaks in Lim1 horizontal progenitor cells activated the DNA damage response pathway, showing that the cells are capable of a functional response to DNA damage. Moreover, manipulation of the DNA damage response pathway during the final cell cycle using inhibitors of ATM/ATR, Chk1/2, and p38MAPK, neither induced apoptosis nor mitosis in the Lim1 horizontal progenitor cells. We conclude that the DNA damage response pathway is functional in the Lim1 horizontal progenitor cells, but that it is not directly involved in the regulation of the final cell cycle that gives rise to the heteroploid horizontal cell population. PMID:24247150

  18. Mitochondrial Regulation of Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Antico Arciuch, Valeria Gabriela; Elguero, María Eugenia; Poderoso, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Eukaryotic mitochondria resulted from symbiotic incorporation of α-proteobacteria into ancient archaea species. During evolution, mitochondria lost most of the prokaryotic bacterial genes and only conserved a small fraction including those encoding 13 proteins of the respiratory chain. In this process, many functions were transferred to the host cells, but mitochondria gained a central role in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis, and in the modulation of metabolism; accordingly, defective organelles contribute to cell transformation and cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most cell and transcriptional effects of mitochondria depend on the modulation of respiratory rate and on the production of hydrogen peroxide released into the cytosol. The mitochondrial oxidative rate has to remain depressed for cell proliferation; even in the presence of O2, energy is preferentially obtained from increased glycolysis (Warburg effect). In response to stress signals, traffic of pro- and antiapoptotic mitochondrial proteins in the intermembrane space (B-cell lymphoma-extra large, Bcl-2-associated death promoter, Bcl-2 associated X-protein and cytochrome c) is modulated by the redox condition determined by mitochondrial O2 utilization and mitochondrial nitric oxide metabolism. In this article, we highlight the traffic of the different canonical signaling pathways to mitochondria and the contributions of organelles to redox regulation of kinases. Finally, we analyze the dynamics of the mitochondrial population in cell cycle and apoptosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1150–1180. PMID:21967640

  19. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  20. PAX8 is transcribed aberrantly in cervical tumors and derived cell lines due to complex gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    López-Urrutia, Eduardo; Pedroza-Torres, Abraham; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; De Leon, David Cantu; Morales-González, Fermín; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Mendez, Jorge; García-Castillo, Verónica; Bautista-Isidro, Osvaldo; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor PAX8, a member of the paired box-containing gene family with an important role in embryogenesis of the kidney, thyroid gland and nervous system, has been described as a biomarker in tumors of the thyroid, parathyroid, kidney and thymus. The PAX8 gene gives rise to four isoforms, through alternative mRNA splicing, but the splicing pattern in tumors is not yet established. Cervical cancer has a positive expression of PAX8; however, there is no available data determining which PAX8 isoform or isoforms are present in cervical cancer tissues as well as in cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines. Instead of a differential pattern of splicing isoforms, we found numerous previously unreported PAX8 aberrant transcripts ranging from 378 to 542 bases and present in both cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines and tumor samples. This is the first report of PAX8 aberrant transcript production in cervical cancer. Reported PAX8 isoforms possess differential transactivation properties; therefore, besides being a helpful marker for detection of cancer, PAX8 isoforms can plausibly exert differential regulation properties during carcinogenesis. PMID:27175788

  1. The inhibition of CHO-K1-BH4 cell proliferation and induction of chromosomal aberrations by brevetoxins in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, A.N.; Hu, Q.; Bourdelais, A.J.; Baden, D.G.; Gibson, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Brevetoxins (PbTxs) are highly potent trans-syn polyether neurotoxins produced during blooms of several species of marine dinoflagellates, most notably Karenia brevis. These neurotoxins act on voltage-sensitive sodium channels prolonging the active state. During red tides, the commercial fishing and tourism industries experience millions of dollars of lost revenue. Human consumption of shellfish contaminated with PbTxs results in neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). Additionally, blooms of K. brevis are potentially responsible for adverse human health effects such as respiratory irritation and airway constriction in coastal residents. There is little information regarding the full range of potential toxic effects caused by PbTxs. Recent evidence suggests that PbTxs are genotoxic substances. The purpose of this study was to determine if PbTxs could induce chromosomal aberrations and inhibit cellular proliferation in CHO-K1-BH4 cells, and if so, could the damage be negated or reduced by the PbTx antagonist brevenal. Results from the chromosomal aberrations assay demonstrated that PbTxs are potent inducers of CHO-K1-BH4 chromosome damage. Results from the inhibition of cellular proliferation assays demonstrated that PbTxs inhibit the ability of CHO-K1-BH4 cells to proliferate, an effect which can be reduced with brevenal. PMID:16487644

  2. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eun Jee; Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah; Cho, Jin Won; Lee, Joon H.

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  3. Persistent Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Drives Differentiation, Aberrant Accumulation, and Latent Infection of Germinal Center Follicular T Helper Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Malam, Naomi; Aye, Pyone P.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD4+ follicular T helper (Tfh) cells play a prominent role in humoral immune responses, but the mechanisms of their accumulation and infection in AIDS remain unclear. Here we found that germinal center (GC) Tfh cells, defined here as CXCR5+ PD-1HIGH CD4+ T cells, do not express the HIV coreceptor CCR5 yet serve as a latent reservoir in GCs. With disease progression, an expansion of GC Tfh cells is accompanied by increases in dysfunctional CD8+ T cells. In contrast, Tfh precursor (CXCR5− CD4+ T) cells in lymph nodes do express CCR5 and differentiate into GC Tfh cells following interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-21 stimulation, and viral DNA is detectable in fully differentiated GC Tfh cells ex vivo. This suggests that SIV-infected GC Tfh cells may be derived from Tfh precursor cell subsets that become infected in marginal zones and then migrate into GCs as fully mature GC Tfh cells that serve as persistent virus reservoirs. These findings suggest that viral persistence in lymph nodes drives compensatory differentiation, aberrant accumulation, and latent infection of GC Tfh cells, resulting in marked impairment of humoral immune responses. IMPORTANCE Generation of antibodies that can effectively eliminate viruses requires interactions of B cells with highly specialized T cells in GCs of lymphoid tissues called follicular T helper cells. Here we show that in simian immunodeficiency virus infection, these cells are initially infected in a precursor stage that leads to alterations in their homing, accumulation, and function that may be responsible for the inability of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients to generate effective antibody responses. PMID:26608323

  4. Shared clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aberrant mast cells and leukemic myeloid blasts detected by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based whole-genome scanning.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Shao, Lina; Bixby, Dale L; Ross, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of aberrant mast cells within extracutaneous sites. In a subset of SM cases, a second associated hematologic non-mast cell disease (AHNMD) is also present, usually of myeloid origin. Polymerase chain reaction and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization studies have provided evidence that, in at least some cases, the aberrant mast cells are related clonally to the neoplastic cells of the AHNMD. In this work, a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-A) was used to characterize the cytogenetics of the aberrant mast cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and concomitant mast cell leukemia associated with a KIT D816A mutation. The results demonstrate the presence of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the mast cells and myeloid blasts, as well as additional abnormalities within mast cells (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) not detectable by routine karyotypic analysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of SNP-A whole-genome scanning to the detection of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the two components of a case of SM-AHNMD. The findings provide additional evidence of a frequent clonal link between aberrant mast cells and cells of myeloid AHNMDs, and also highlight the importance of direct sequencing for identifying uncommon activating KIT mutations.

  5. The cell cycle rallies the transcription cycle: Cdc28/Cdk1 is a cell cycle-regulated transcriptional CDK.

    PubMed

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Enserink, Jorrit M

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) Kin28, Bur1 and Ctk1 regulate basal transcription by phosphorylating the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II. However, very little is known about the involvement of the cell cycle CDK Cdc28 in the transcription process. We have recently shown that, upon cell cycle entry, Cdc28 kinase activity boosts transcription of a subset of genes by directly stimulating the basal transcription machinery. Here, we discuss the biological significance of this finding and give our view of the kinase-dependent role of Cdc28 in regulation of RNA polymerase II.

  6. Urnaloricus gadi nov. gen. et nov. sp. (Loricifera, Urnaloricidae nov. fam.), an aberrant Loricifera with a viviparous pedogenetic life cycle.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Iben; Kristensen, Reinhardt Møbjerg

    2009-02-01

    A new species of Loricifera, Urnaloricus gadi nov. gen. et nov. sp., is described from the Faroe Bank, located Southwest of the Faroe Islands, North Atlantic. The new species does not fit into any known families of Loricifera and therefore it is grouped into a new family Urnaloricidae nov. fam. The new species is characterized by having a very complicated life cycle that involves a large cyst-like mega-larva, two reduced larval instars and the Higgins-larvae eating their maternal stage from within. An adult stage is missing. This form of reproduction is called viviparous pedogenesis and normally is found only in nematodes and insects. In the life cycle of Urnaloricidae nov. fam., there are two types of free-living larval stages: a Higgins-larva and a mega-larva. The latter is found in two different forms, a pre- and a cyst-forming mega-larva. Additionally, there are two reduced life history stages, the reduced larval stage (probably a postlarva) and the ghost-larval stage inside the cyst-forming mega-larva. The external morphology of the two forms of mega-larvae is much reduced, e.g., the introvert has only a few rows of scalids when compared with the Higgins-larva. The pre mega-larva is free-living and can sometimes be covered with coccoliths. Internally, a large ovary with a few oocytes, a digestive system, and an internal armature with retracted scalids are present. The pre mega-larva presumably molts into a cyst-forming mega-larva and thereby the ovary is now seen inside the cyst-forming mega-larva. The cyst-forming mega-larva has the same structures as in the pre mega-larva though here the scalids are protruded and there is a gonopore. Inside the cyst-forming mega-larva the ovary produces more oocytes and begins to fill out the entire lumen. At this stage the cyst-forming mega-larva molts first to the presumed postlarval stage, and then this stage molts to a ghost-larva. Hence, the ovary now matures inside the ghost-larva, which is surrounded by both the

  7. Transcription coupled repair deficiency results in increased chromosomal aberrations and apoptotic death in the UV61 cell line, the Chinese hamster homologue of Cockayne's syndrome B.

    PubMed

    Proietti De Santis, L; Garcia, C L; Balajee, A S; Brea Calvo, G T; Bassi, L; Palitti, F

    2001-03-01

    Transcription coupled repair (TCR), a special sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER), removes transcription blocking lesions rapidly from the transcribing strand of active genes. In this study, we have evaluated the importance of the TCR pathway in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis in isogenic Chinese hamster cell lines, which differ in TCR efficiency. AA8 is the parental cell line, which is proficient in the genome overall repair of UV-C radiation induced 6-4 photoproducts (6-4 PP) and the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) from the transcribing strand of active genes. UV61 cells (hamster homologue of human Cockayne's syndrome (CS) group B cells) originally isolated from AA8, exhibit proficient repair of 6-4 PP but are deficient in CPD removal by the TCR pathway. Upon UV-C irradiation of cells in G1-phase, UV61 showed a dramatic increase in apoptotic response as compared to AA8 cells. Abolition of TCR by treatment with alpha-amanitin (an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II) in AA8 cells also resulted in an elevated apoptotic response like that observed in UV61 cells treated with UV alone. This suggests that the lack of TCR is largely responsible for increased apoptotic response in UV61 cells. Furthermore, the chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induced by UV were also found to be higher in UV61 cells than in TCR proficient AA8 cells. This study shows that the increased chromosomal aberrations and apoptotic death in UV61 cells is due to their inability to remove CPD from the transcribing strand of active genes and suggests a protective role for TCR in the prevention of both chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis and time-course appearance of apoptotic cells suggest that the conversion of UV-DNA damage into chromosomal aberrations precedes and determines the apoptotic process. PMID:11182543

  8. Centrosome aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells driven by cooperative interactions between p16INK4a deficiency and telomere-dependent genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Daniel; Feijoo, Purificación; Bernal, Aina; Ercilla, Amaia; Agell, Neus; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all human cancers display chromosome instability (CIN), a condition in which chromosomes are gained or lost at a high rate. CIN occurs early in cancer development where it may undermine the advance of the neoplastic disease. With the aim of establishing the mechanisms underlying CIN in cancer, we investigated possible links between telomere-dysfunction and centrosome defects, which were seen to coincide in early in breast carcinogenesis using human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). In this study, we show that TP53 proficient vHMECs cells develop centrosome aberrations when telomere-dysfunction genotoxic stress is produced in the presence of a defective p16INK4a setting and in parallel with an activation of the DNA damage checkpoint response. These aberrations consist of the accumulation of centrosomes in polyploid vHMECs, plus centriole overduplication in both diploid and polyploid cells, thus reflecting that distinct mechanisms underlie the generation of centrosome aberrations in vHMECs. Transduction of vHMEC with hTERT, which rescued the telomere dysfunction phenotype and consequently reduced DNA damage checkpoint activation, led to a progressive reduction of centrosome aberrations with cell culture, both in diploid and in polyploid vHMECs. Radiation-induced DNA damage also raised centrosome aberrations in vHMEC-hTERT. Collectively, our results, using vHMECs define a model where p16INK4a deficiency along with short dysfunctional telomeres cooperatively engenders centrosome abnormalities before p53 function is compromised. PMID:26318587

  9. Feedback and Modularity in Cell Cycle Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skotheim, Jan

    2009-03-01

    Underlying the wonderful diversity of natural forms is the ability of an organism to grow into its appropriate shape. Regulation ensures that cells grow, divide and differentiate so that the organism and its constitutive parts are properly proportioned and of suitable size. Although the size-control mechanism active in an individual cell is of fundamental importance to this process, it is difficult to isolate and study in complex multi-cellular systems and remains poorly understood. This motivates our use of the budding yeast model organism, whose Start checkpoint integrates multiple internal (e.g. cell size) and external signals into an irreversible decision to enter the cell cycle. We have endeavored to address the following two questions: What makes the Start transition irreversible? How does a cell compute its own size? I will report on the progress we have made. Our work is part of an emerging framework for understanding biological control circuits, which will allow us to discern the function of natural systems and aid us in engineering synthetic systems.

  10. Combined analysis of DNA methylation and cell cycle in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Desjobert, Cécile; El Maï, Mounir; Gérard-Hirne, Tom; Guianvarc'h, Dominique; Carrier, Arnaud; Pottier, Cyrielle; Arimondo, Paola B; Riond, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a chemical modification of DNA involved in the regulation of gene expression by controlling the access to the DNA sequence. It is the most stable epigenetic mark and is widely studied for its role in major biological processes. Aberrant DNA methylation is observed in various pathologies, such as cancer. Therefore, there is a great interest in analyzing subtle changes in DNA methylation induced by biological processes or upon drug treatments. Here, we developed an improved methodology based on flow cytometry to measure variations of DNA methylation level in melanoma and leukemia cells. The accuracy of DNA methylation quantification was validated with LC-ESI mass spectrometry analysis. The new protocol was used to detect small variations of cytosine methylation occurring in individual cells during their cell cycle and those induced by the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5AzadC). Kinetic experiments confirmed that inheritance of DNA methylation occurs efficiently in S phase and revealed a short delay between DNA replication and completion of cytosine methylation. In addition, this study suggests that the uncoupling of 5AzadC effects on DNA demethylation and cell proliferation might be related to the duration of the DNA replication phase. PMID:25531272

  11. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo; Isegawa, Naohisa; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  12. Chromosome aberrations in workers exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Beckman, G; Beckman, L; Nordenson, I

    1977-08-01

    The occurrence of chromosome aberrations was studied in short-term cultured lymphocytes from nine workers exposed to arsenic at the Rönnskär smeltery in northern Sweden. In the smelter workers, 87 aberrations were found in 819 mitoses. The number of aberrations varied individually from 0 to 25 aberrations per 100 cells. In a control material 13 aberrations were found in 1012 mitoses. The frequency of chromosome aberrations was significantly increased among the smelter workers, but due to the simultaneous exposure to other agents the effect of arsenic per se can not be assessed with certainty.

  13. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  14. Benzene-Induced Aberrant miRNA Expression Profile in Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haiyan; Zhang, Juan; Tan, Kehong; Sun, Rongli; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-11-12

    Benzene is a common environmental pollutant that causes hematological alterations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may play a role in benzene-induced hematotoxicity. In this study, C57BL/6 mice showed significant hematotoxicity after exposure to 150 mg/kg benzene for 4 weeks. Benzene exposure decreased not only the number of cells in peripheral blood but also hematopoietic progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Meanwhile, RNA from Lin(-) cells sorted from the bone marrow was applied to aberrant miRNA expression profile using Illumina sequencing. We found that 5 miRNAs were overexpressed and 45 miRNAs were downregulated in the benzene exposure group. Sequencing results were confirmed through qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we also identified five miRNAs which significantly altered in Lin(-)c-Kit⁺ cells obtained from benzene-exposed mice, including mmu-miR-34a-5p; mmu-miR-342-3p; mmu-miR-100-5p; mmu-miR-181a-5p; and mmu-miR-196b-5p. In summary, we successfully established a classical animal model to induce significant hematotoxicity by benzene injection. Benzene exposure may cause severe hematotoxicity not only to blood cells in peripheral circulation but also to hematopoietic cells in bone marrow. Benzene exposure also alters miRNA expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells. This study suggests that benzene induces alteration in hematopoiesis and hematopoiesis-associated miRNAs.

  15. Interphase Molecular Cytogenetic Detection Rates of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia-Specific Aberrations Are Higher in Cultivated Cells Than in Blood or Bone Marrow Smears.

    PubMed

    Alhourani, Eyad; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Harutyunyan, Tigran; Glaser, Anita; Schlie, Cordula; Pohle, Beate; Liehr, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Banding cytogenetics is still the gold standard in many fields of leukemia diagnostics. However, in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), GTG-banding results are hampered by a low mitotic rate of the corresponding malignant lymphatic cells. Thus, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) for the detection of specific cytogenetic aberrations is done nowadays as a supplement to or even instead of banding cytogenetics in many diagnostic laboratories. These iFISH studies can be performed on native blood or bone marrow smears or in nuclei after cultivation and stimulation by a suitable mitogen. As there are only few comparative studies with partially conflicting results for the detection rates of aberrations in cultivated and native cells, this question was studied in 38 CLL cases with known aberrations in 11q22.2, 11q22.3, 12, 13q14.3, 14q32.33, 17p13.1, or 18q21.32. The obtained results implicate that iFISH directly applied on smears is in general less efficient for the detection of CLL-specific genetic abnormalities than for cultivated cells. This also shows that applied cell culture conditions are well suited for malignant CLL cells. Thus, to detect malignant aberrant cells in CLL, cell cultivation and cytogenetic workup should be performed and the obtained material should be subjected to banding cytogenetics and iFISH. PMID:27315825

  16. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  17. Cell cycle measurement of mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Srour, Edward F

    2014-01-01

    Lifelong production of blood cells is sustained by hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). HSC reside in a mitotically quiescent state within specialized areas of the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment known as the hematopoietic niche (HN). HSC enter into active phases of cell cycle in response to intrinsic and extrinsic biological cues thereby undergoing differentiation or self-renewal divisions. Quiescent and mitotically active HSC have different metabolic states and different functional abilities such as engraftment and BM repopulating potential following their transplantation into conditioned recipients. Recent studies reveal that various cancers also utilize the same mechanisms of quiescence as normal stem cells and preserve the root of malignancy thus contributing to relapse and metastasis. Therefore, exploring the stem cell behavior and function in conjunction with their cell cycle status has significant clinical implications in HSC transplantation and in treating cancers. In this chapter, we describe methodologies to isolate or analytically measure the frequencies of quiescent (G0) and active (G1, S, and G2-M) hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells among murine BM cells.

  18. The suppression of aberrant crypt multiplicity in colonic tissue of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-treated C57BL/6J mice by dietary flavone is associated with an increased expression of Krebs cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Isabel; Diehl, Daniela; Oesterle, Doris; Daniel, Hannelore; Wenzel, Uwe

    2007-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide with diet playing a prominent role in disease initiation and progression. Flavonoids are secondary plant compounds that are suggested as protective ingredients of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. We here tested whether flavone, a flavonoid that proved to be an effective apoptosis inducer in colon cancer cells in culture, can affect the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACFs) in C57BL/6J mice in vivo when preneoplastic lesions were induced by the carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Flavone applied at either a low dose (15 mg/kg body wt per day) or a high dose (400 mg/kg body wt per day) reduced the numbers of ACFs significantly, independent of whether it was supplied simultaneously with the carcinogen (blocking group) or subsequent to the tumor induction phase (suppressing group). Proteome analysis performed in colonic tissue samples revealed that flavone treatment increased the expression of a number of Krebs cycle enzymes in the suppressing group and this was associated with reduced crypt multiplicity. It suggests that mitochondrial substrate oxidation is increased by flavone in colonic cells in vivo as already observed in HT-29 cells in vitro as the prime mechanism underlying tumor cell apoptosis induction by flavone. In conclusion, flavone reduces the number of ACFs in DMH-treated mice at doses that can be achieved for flavonoids by a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. Moreover, reduction in crypt multiplicity by flavone is most probably due to the preservation of a normal oxidative metabolism.

  19. Local circadian clock gates cell cycle progression of transient amplifying cells during regenerative hair cycling.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V; Vollmers, Christopher; de la Cruz, Damon; Chaix, Amandine; Ramos, Raul; Panda, Satchidananda; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-06-01

    Regenerative cycling of hair follicles offers an unique opportunity to explore the role of circadian clock in physiological tissue regeneration. We focused on the role of circadian clock in actively proliferating transient amplifying cells, as opposed to quiescent stem cells. We identified two key sites of peripheral circadian clock activity specific to regenerating anagen hair follicles, namely epithelial matrix and mesenchymal dermal papilla. We showed that peripheral circadian clock in epithelial matrix cells generates prominent daily mitotic rhythm. As a consequence of this mitotic rhythmicity, hairs grow faster in the morning than in the evening. Because cells are the most susceptible to DNA damage during mitosis, this cycle leads to a remarkable time-of-day-dependent sensitivity of growing hair follicles to genotoxic stress. Same doses of γ-radiation caused dramatic hair loss in wild-type mice when administered in the morning, during mitotic peak, compared with the evening, when hair loss is minimal. This diurnal radioprotective effect becomes lost in circadian mutants, consistent with asynchronous mitoses in their hair follicles. Clock coordinates cell cycle progression with genotoxic stress responses by synchronizing Cdc2/Cyclin B-mediated G2/M checkpoint. Our results uncover diurnal mitotic gating as the essential protective mechanism in highly proliferative hair follicles and offer strategies for minimizing or maximizing cytotoxicity of radiation therapies.

  20. Local circadian clock gates cell cycle progression of transient amplifying cells during regenerative hair cycling

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Vollmers, Christopher; de la Cruz, Damon; Chaix, Amandine; Ramos, Raul; Panda, Satchidananda; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative cycling of hair follicles offers an unique opportunity to explore the role of circadian clock in physiological tissue regeneration. We focused on the role of circadian clock in actively proliferating transient amplifying cells, as opposed to quiescent stem cells. We identified two key sites of peripheral circadian clock activity specific to regenerating anagen hair follicles, namely epithelial matrix and mesenchymal dermal papilla. We showed that peripheral circadian clock in epithelial matrix cells generates prominent daily mitotic rhythm. As a consequence of this mitotic rhythmicity, hairs grow faster in the morning than in the evening. Because cells are the most susceptible to DNA damage during mitosis, this cycle leads to a remarkable time-of-day–dependent sensitivity of growing hair follicles to genotoxic stress. Same doses of γ-radiation caused dramatic hair loss in wild-type mice when administered in the morning, during mitotic peak, compared with the evening, when hair loss is minimal. This diurnal radioprotective effect becomes lost in circadian mutants, consistent with asynchronous mitoses in their hair follicles. Clock coordinates cell cycle progression with genotoxic stress responses by synchronizing Cdc2/Cyclin B-mediated G2/M checkpoint. Our results uncover diurnal mitotic gating as the essential protective mechanism in highly proliferative hair follicles and offer strategies for minimizing or maximizing cytotoxicity of radiation therapies. PMID:23690597

  1. The Cell Cycle Switch Computes Approximate Majority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, Luca; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2012-09-01

    Both computational and biological systems have to make decisions about switching from one state to another. The `Approximate Majority' computational algorithm provides the asymptotically fastest way to reach a common decision by all members of a population between two possible outcomes, where the decision approximately matches the initial relative majority. The network that regulates the mitotic entry of the cell-cycle in eukaryotes also makes a decision before it induces early mitotic processes. Here we show that the switch from inactive to active forms of the mitosis promoting Cyclin Dependent Kinases is driven by a system that is related to both the structure and the dynamics of the Approximate Majority computation. We investigate the behavior of these two switches by deterministic, stochastic and probabilistic methods and show that the steady states and temporal dynamics of the two systems are similar and they are exchangeable as components of oscillatory networks.

  2. Modeling the fission yeast cell cycle: Quantized cycle times in wee1 cdc25 mutant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveiczer, Akos; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Gyorffy, Bela; Tyson, John J.; Novak, Bela

    2000-07-01

    A detailed mathematical model for the fission yeast mitotic cycle is developed based on positive and negative feedback loops by which Cdc13/Cdc2 kinase activates and inactivates itself. Positive feedbacks are created by Cdc13/Cdc2-dependent phosphorylation of specific substrates: inactivating its negative regulators (Rum1, Ste9 and Wee1/Mik1) and activating its positive regulator (Cdc25). A slow negative feedback loop is turned on during mitosis by activation of Slp1/anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which indirectly re-activates the negative regulators, leading to a drop in Cdc13/Cdc2 activity and exit from mitosis. The model explains how fission yeast cells can exit mitosis in the absence of Ste9 (Cdc13 degradation) and Rum1 (an inhibitor of Cdc13/Cdc2). We also show that, if the positive feedback loops accelerating the G2/M transition (through Wee1 and Cdc25) are weak, then cells can reset back to G2 from early stages of mitosis by premature activation of the negative feedback loop. This resetting can happen more than once, resulting in a quantized distribution of cycle times, as observed experimentally in wee1- cdc25Delta mutant cells. Our quantitative description of these quantized cycles demonstrates the utility of mathematical modeling, because these cycles cannot be understood by intuitive arguments alone.

  3. ERα propelled aberrant global DNA hypermethylation by activating the DNMT1 gene to enhance anticancer drug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jinghuan; Ding, Haijian; Zhang, Xin A.; Shao, Lipei; Yang, Nan; Cheng, He; Sun, Luan; Zhu, Dongliang; Yang, Yin; Li, Andi; Han, Xiao; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced aberrant DNA methylation is the first identified epigenetic marker involved in chemotherapy resistance. Understanding how the aberrant DNA methylation is acquired would impact cancer treatment in theory and practice. In this study we systematically investigated whether and how ERα propelled aberrant global DNA hypermethylation in the context of breast cancer drug resistance. Our data demonstrated that anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) augmented ERα binding to the DNMT1 and DNMT3b promoters to activate DNMT1 and DNMT3b genes, enhancing the PTX resistance of breast cancer cells. In support of these observations, estrogen enhanced multi-drug resistance of breast cancer cells by up-regulation of DNMT1 and DNMT3b genes. Nevertheless, the aberrant global DNA hypermethylation was dominantly induced by ERα-activated-DNMT1, since DNMT1 over-expression significantly increased global DNA methylation and DNMT1 knockdown reversed the ERα-induced global DNA methylation. Altering DNMT3b expression had no detectable effect on global DNA methylation. Consistently, the expression level of DNMT1 was positively correlated with ERα in 78 breast cancer tissue samples shown by our immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis and negatively correlated with relapse-free survival (RFS) and distance metastasis-free survival (DMFS) of ERα-positive breast cancer patients. This study provides a new perspective for understanding the mechanism underlying drug-resistance-facilitating aberrant DNA methylation in breast cancer and other estrogen dependent tumors. PMID:26980709

  4. Cell cycle stage specific application of municipal landfill leachates to assess the genotoxicity in root meristem cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anjil Kumar; Kumar, Ravi Ranjan; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Municipal solid wastes (MSW) are unavoidable sources of environmental pollution. Improper disposal of municipal waste results in the leaching of toxic metals and organic chemicals, which can contaminate the surface and ground water leading to serious health hazard. In this study, the toxic effects of the leachate prepared from municipal solid waste samples were examined in root meristem cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) at various stages of cell cycle, i.e., G1, S, and G2. Seeds of barley were exposed to 2.5, 5, and 10 % of leachates in soil and aqueous media in 48 h at different cell cycle stages. The physicochemical data of the present study revealed that municipal solid waste leachate contains high amount of heavy metals, which significantly affected growth and physiological activities of barley. Significant inhibition in hypocotyl length, germination, and mitotic index were observed at all concentration of leachate treatment. Induction of chromosomal aberrations (CA's) and micronuclei (MN) formation were also observed with different concentrations of leachate treatment at 7, 17, and 27 h of presoaking durations, which falls in G1, S, and G2 phase of the cell cycle, respectively. Also, exposure of leachate at S phase of the cell cycle had significant effects in barley through chromosomal aberration and micronuclei formation.

  5. Conformational Characterization of Aberrant Disulfide-linked HIV-1 gp120 Dimers Secreted from Overexpressing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Finzi, Andrés; Pacheco, Beatriz; Zeng, Xin; Do Kwon, Young; Kwong, Peter D.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The envelope (Env) glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) mediate viral entry and are also the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. The gp160 envelope glycoprotein precursor undergoes proteolytic cleavage in the Golgi complex to produce the gp120 exterior glycoprotein and the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein, which remain associated non-covalently in the trimeric Env complex. Monomeric soluble gp120 has been used extensively to investigate conformational states, structure, antigenicity and immunogenicity of the HIV-1 Env glycoproteins. Expression of gp120 alone (without gp41) leads to the accumulation not only of monomeric gp120 but also an aberrant dimeric form. The gp120 dimers were sensitive to reducing agents. The formation of gp120 dimers was disrupted by a single amino acid change in the inner domain, and was reduced by removal of the V1/V2 variable loops or the N and C termini. Epitopes on the gp120 inner domain and the chemokine receptor-binding surface were altered or occluded by gp120 dimerization. Awareness of the existence and properties of gp120 dimers should assist interpretation of studies of this key viral protein. PMID:20471426

  6. Dynamin-dependent biogenesis, cell cycle regulation and mitochondrial association of peroxisomes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Isabelle; Sontam, Dharani; Johnson, Chad; Dillies, Clément; Hyams, Jeremy S

    2008-03-01

    Peroxisomes were visualized for the first time in living fission yeast cells. In small, newly divided cells, the number of peroxisomes was low but increased in parallel with the increase in cell length/volume that accompanies cell cycle progression. In cells grown in oleic acid, both the size and the number of peroxisomes increased. The peroxisomal inventory of cells lacking the dynamin-related proteins Dnm1 or Vps1 was similar to that in wild type. By contrast, cells of the double mutant dnm1Delta vps1Delta contained either no peroxisomes at all or a small number of morphologically aberrant organelles. Peroxisomes exhibited either local Brownian movement or longer-range linear displacements, which continued in the absence of either microtubules or actin filaments. On the contrary, directed peroxisome motility appeared to occur in association with mitochondria and may be an indirect function of intrinsic mitochondrial dynamics. We conclude that peroxisomes are present in fission yeast and that Dnm1 and Vps1 act redundantly in peroxisome biogenesis, which is under cell cycle control. Peroxisome movement is independent of the cytoskeleton but is coupled to mitochondrial dynamics.

  7. SUMOylation-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation plays critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancers were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could potentially be exploited in anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26601932

  8. Induction and repair of chromosome aberrations in scid cells measured by premature chromosome condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.W.; Kirchgessner, C.U.; Brown, J.M.; X.F. Liu

    1996-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficient (scid) murine cells, which are defective in both repair of DNA double-strand breaks and V(D)J recombination, are deficient in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a protein which forms an activated complex with the DNA end-binding Ku proteins (p80 and p70) upon association with damaged DNA. Xrs 5 cells are deficient in the Ku p80 protein and also fail to form an active DNA-PK repair complex. Since both scid and xrs cells are defective in the same protein complex, we compared the kinetics of chromosome repair in scid cells to results published previously for xrs 5 cells. C.B-17 cells, scid cells and scid cells complemented with a single human chromosome 8 were irradiated with 6 Gy and allowed to repair from 0-24 h before fusion to HeLa cells for chromosome condensation. Breaks and dicentrics were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization. All cells had the same initial amount of chromosome damage, but scid cells had a slower rate of rejoining, more unrejoined breaks and more dicentrics than C.B-17 and scid cells with human chromosome 8. The scid cells appear to respond differently than xrs 5 cells, despite both cells lacking an essential component of the same DNA repair complex. 40 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Toxicity of drinking water disinfection byproducts: cell cycle alterations induced by the monohaloacetonitriles.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Yukako; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are a chemical class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that form from reactions between disinfectants and nitrogen-containing precursors, the latter more prevalent in water sources impacted by algae bloom and municipal wastewater effluent discharge. HANs, previously demonstrated to be genotoxic, were investigated for their effects on the mammalian cell cycle. Treating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with monoHANs followed by the release from the chemical treatment resulted in the accumulation of abnormally high DNA content in cells over time (hyperploid). The potency for the cell cycle alteration followed the order: iodoacetonitrile (IAN) > bromoacetonitrile (BAN) ≫ chloroacetonitrile (CAN). Exposure to 6 μM IAN, 12 μM BAN and 900 μM CAN after 26 h post-treatment incubation resulted in DNA repair; however, subsequent cell cycle alteration effects were observed. Cell proliferation of HAN-treated cells was suppressed for as long as 43 to 52 h. Enlarged cell size was observed after 52 h post-treatment incubation without the induction of cytotoxicity. The HAN-mediated cell cycle alteration was mitosis- and proliferation-dependent, which suggests that HAN treatment induced mitosis override, and that HAN-treated cells proceeded into S phase and directly into the next cell cycle. Cells with multiples genomes would result in aneuploidy (state of abnormal chromosome number and DNA content) at the next mitosis since extra centrosomes could compromise the assembly of bipolar spindles. There is accumulating evidence of a transient tetraploid state proceeding to aneuploidy in cancer progression. Biological self-defense systems to ensure genomic stability and to eliminate tetraploid cells exist in eukaryotic cells. A key tumor suppressor gene, p53, is oftentimes mutated in various types of human cancer. It is possible that HAN disruption of the normal cell cycle and the generation of aberrant cells with an abnormal number of

  10. Chromosome aberration and micronucleus frequencies in Allium cepa cells exposed to petroleum polluted water--a case study.

    PubMed

    Leme, Daniela Morais; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2008-01-31

    In the present study, we applied Chromosome Aberration (CA) and Micronucleus (MN) tests to Allium cepa root cells, in order to evaluate the water quality of Guaecá river. This river, located in the city of São Sebastião, SP, Brazil, had been affected by an oil pipeline leak. Chemical analyses of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPHs) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also carried out in water samples, collected in July 2005 (dry season) and February 2006 (rainy season) in 4 different river sites. The largest CA and MN incidence in the meristematic cells of A. cepa was observed after exposure to water sample collected during the dry season, at the spring of the river, where the oil leak has arisen. The F(1) cells from roots exposed to such sample (non-merismatic region) were also analyzed for the incidence of MN, showing a larger frequency of irregularities, indicating a possible development of CA into MN. Lastly, our study reveals a direct correlation between water chemical analyses (contamination by TPHs and PAHs) and both genotoxic and mutagenic effects observed in exposed A. cepa cells. PMID:18068420

  11. Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle

    DOEpatents

    Micheli, Paul L.; Williams, Mark C.; Sudhoff, Frederick A.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

  12. Deregulated expression of circadian clock and clock-controlled cell cycle genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sobia; Munawar, Mustafa; Shahid, Adeela; Malik, Meera; Ullah, Hafeez; Fatima, Warda; Mohsin, Shahida; Mahmood, Saqib

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous and self-sustained oscillations of multiple biological processes with approximately 24-h rhythmicity. Circadian genes and their protein products constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator that form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends from core clock genes to various clock-controlled genes that include various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes, therefore, may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The current study encompasses the investigation of simultaneous expression of four circadian clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) and three clock-controlled cell cycle genes (Myc, Cyclin D1 and Wee1) at mRNA level and determination of serum melatonin levels in peripheral blood samples of 37 CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) patients and equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls in order to indicate association between deregulated circadian clock and manifestation of CLL. Results showed significantly down-regulated expression of Bmal1, Per1, Per2 and Wee1 and significantly up-regulated expression of Myc and Cyclin D1 (P < 0.0001) in CLL patients as compared to healthy controls. When expression of these genes was compared between shift-workers and non-shift-workers within the CLL group, the expression was found more aberrant in shift-workers as compared to non-shift-workers. However, this difference was found statistically significant for Myc and Cyclin D1 only (P < 0.05). Serum melatonin levels were found significantly low (P < 0.0001) in CLL subjects as compared to healthy controls whereas melatonin levels were found still lower in shift-workers as compared to non-shift-workers within CLL group (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that aberrant expression of circadian clock genes can lead to aberrant expression of their downstream targets that are

  13. QUANTITATION OF ABERRANT INTERLOCUS T-CELL RECEPTOR REARRANGEMENTS IN MOUSE THYMOCYTES AND THE EFFECT OF THE HERBICIDE 2,4- DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitation of aberrant interlocus T-cell receptor rearrangements in mouse thymocytes and the effect of the herbicide 2,4- Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    Small studies in human populations have suggested a correlation between the frequency of errors in antigen receptor gene a...

  14. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  15. STK31 Is a Cell-Cycle Regulated Protein That Contributes to the Tumorigenicity of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Pao-Lin; Huang, Yung-Ling; Hsieh, Christine Chin-Jung; Lee, Jenq-Chang; Lin, Bo-Wen; Hung, Liang-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Serine/threonine kinase 31 (STK31) is one of the novel cancer/testis antigens for which its biological functions remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that STK31 is overexpressed in many human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. STK31 co-localizes with pericentrin in the centrosomal region throughout all phases of the cell cycle. Interestingly, when cells undergo mitosis, STK31 also localizes to the centromeres, central spindle, and midbody. This localization behavior is similar to that of chromosomal passenger proteins, which are known to be the important players of the spindle assembly checkpoint. The expression of STK31 is cell cycle-dependent through the regulation of a putative D-box near its C-terminal region. Ectopically-expressed STK31-GFP increases cell migration and invasive ability without altering the proliferation rate of cancer cells, whereas the knockdown expression of endogenous STK31 by lentivirus-derived shRNA results in microtubule assembly defects that prolong the duration of mitosis and lead to apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that the aberrant expression of STK31 contributes to tumorigenicity in somatic cancer cells. STK31 might therefore act as a potential therapeutic target in human somatic cancers. PMID:24667656

  16. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle and specific cell synchronization with butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. The possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells was explored and the properties of butyrate-induced cell ...

  17. Diesel exhaust particles induce aberrant alveolar epithelial directed cell movement by disruption of polarity mechanisms.

    PubMed

    LaGier, Adriana J; Manzo, Nicholas D; Dye, Janice A

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following injury requires efficient and directed alveolar epithelial cell migration, this study's goal was to understand the mechanisms underlying alveolar epithelial cells response to DEP, particularly when exposure is accompanied with comorbid lung injury. Separate mechanistic steps of directed migration were investigated in confluent murine LA-4 cells exposed to noncytotoxic concentrations (0-100 μg/cm(2)) of either automobile-emitted diesel exhaust particles (DEP(A)) or carbon black (CB) particles. A scratch wound model ascertained how DEP(A) exposure affected directional cell migration and BCECF ratio fluorimetry-monitored intracellular pH (pHi). Cells were immunostained with giantin to assess cell polarity, and with paxillin to assess focal cell adhesions. Cells were immunoblotted for ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) to assess cytoskeletal anchoring. Data demonstrate herein that exposure of LA-4 cells to DEP(A) (but not CB) resulted in delayed directional cell migration, impaired de-adhesion of the trailing edge cell processes, disrupted regulation of pHi, and altered Golgi polarity of leading edge cells, along with modified focal adhesions and reduced ERM levels, indicative of decreased cytoskeletal anchoring. The ability of DEP(A) to disrupt directed cell migration at multiple levels suggests that signaling pathways such as ERM/Rho are critical for transduction of ion transport signals into cytoskeletal arrangement responses. These results provide insights into the mechanisms by which chronic exposure to traffic-based emissions may result in decrements in lung capacity. PMID:23294296

  18. Trichostatin A specifically improves the aberrant expression of transcription factor genes in embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Oikawa, Mami; Kamimura, Satoshi; Ogonuki, Narumi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Although mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established in various species, the low developmental efficiency has hampered its practical applications. Treatment of SCNT-derived embryos with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can improve their development, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. To address this question, we analysed gene expression profiles of SCNT-derived 2-cell mouse embryos treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a potent HDAC inhibitor that is best used for mouse cloning. Unexpectedly, TSA had no effect on the numbers of aberrantly expressed genes or the overall gene expression pattern in the embryos. However, in-depth investigation by gene ontology and functional analyses revealed that TSA treatment specifically improved the expression of a small subset of genes encoding transcription factors and their regulatory factors, suggesting their positive involvement in de novo RNA synthesis. Indeed, introduction of one of such transcription factors, Spi-C, into the embryos at least partially mimicked the TSA-induced improvement in embryonic development by activating gene networks associated with transcriptional regulation. Thus, the effects of TSA treatment on embryonic gene expression did not seem to be stochastic, but more specific than expected, targeting genes that direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the 2-cell stage. PMID:25974394

  19. Chromosome aberration and sister chromatid exchange tests in Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro III: Results with 27 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, D.K. ); Witt, K.; Anderson, B.; Zeiger, E.; Shelby, M.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals previously tested in rodent carcinogenicity assays were tested for induction of chromosomal aberrations (ABS) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as part of a larger analysis of the correlation between results of in vitro genetic toxicity assays and carcinogenicity bioassays. Chemicals were tested up to toxic doses with and without exogenous metabolic activation. Seventeen of the chemicals tested were carcinogens; only two of these were negative for both ABS and SCE. Of the eight noncarcinogens tested, four were negative for both endpoints and four gave a positive response for at least one endpoint. Of the remaining two chemicals, one, diallylphthalate, gave an equivocal response in the bioassay and a positive response in these CHO cell cytogenetics tests. The other chemical, 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, was tested for carcinogenicity as a mixture with the 2,6-isomer; the mixture was carinogenic, but the cytogenetic test results for the 2,4-isomer were negative. Experiments with unsynchronized CHO cells demonstrated that mean SCE frequency increased with increasing culture time, and this may have been a factor in the positive results obtained for five chemicals in the SCE test under conditions of delayed harvest.

  20. Enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells during methamphetamine induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-W.; Ping, Y.-H.; Yen, J.-C.; Chang, C.-Y.; Wang, S.-F.; Yeh, C.-L.; Chi, C.-W.; Lee, H.-C. . E-mail: hclee2@ym.edu.tw

    2007-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an abused drug that may cause psychiatric and neurotoxic damage, including degeneration of monoaminergic terminals and apoptosis of non-monoaminergic cells in Brain. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these METH-induced neurotoxic effects remain to be clarified. In this study, we performed a time course assessment to investigate the effects of METH on intracellular oxidative stress and mitochondrial alterations in a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We characterized that METH induces a temporal sequence of several cellular events including, firstly, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential within 1 h of the METH treatment, secondly, an extensive decline in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 8 h of the treatment, thirdly, an increase in mitochondrial mass after the drug treatment for 24 h, and finally, a decrease in mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial proteins per mitochondrion as well as the occurrence of apoptosis after 48 h of the treatment. Importantly, vitamin E attenuated the METH-induced increases in intracellular ROS level and mitochondrial mass, and prevented METH-induced cell death. Our observations suggest that enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis may play critical roles in METH-induced neurotoxic effects.

  1. Cyclic AMP, a nonessential regulator of the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Coffino, P; Gray, J W; Tomkins, G M

    1975-01-01

    Flow-microfluorimetric analysis has been carried out on populations of exponentially growing S49 mouse lymphoma cells treated with dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The drug produces a specific concentration-dependent block in the G-1 phase of the cell cycle while other phases of the cycle are not perceptibly altered. The cell cycle of a line of mutant cells lacking the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase is not affected by the drug. Since these mutant cells have been shown to maintain a normal cell cycle, even in the presence of high levels of cyclic AMP, periodic fluctuations in the levels of the cyclic nucleotide cannot be required for or determine progression through the cell cycle. PMID:165491

  2. Aberrant Notch signaling in glioblastoma stem cells contributes to tumor recurrence and invasion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Hao; Zhan, Ren-Ya

    2016-08-01

    Upregulation of the Notch signaling pathway in cancer stem cells and side population (SP) cells has a major role in maintenance, self-renewal and chemoresistance. The present study isolated a cancer stem cell-like SP accounting for 4.1% of a glioblastoma cell population using a Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion assay. In this glioblastoma SP, the expression of of Notch1 signaling proteins Notch1 intracellular domain and Hes‑1 was markedly upregulated. Furthermore, knockdown of Notch1 by RNA interference significantly diminished the neurosphere formation ability, self‑renewal and chemoresistance of the SP cells. In addition, the expression of the stem‑cell surface genes Oct‑4, Sox2 and Nanog in SP cells was significantly reduced and the sensitivity to the SP cells to chemotherapeutics was enhanced following Notch1 knockdown. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that upregulation of Notch1 is involved in the chemotherapy resistance and tumor recurrence of glioblastoma. Hence, the development of novel anti‑cancer drugs targeting the Notch1 signaling pathway may be a promising strategy for curing glioblastoma. PMID:27315154

  3. CCR7 Deficiency Exacerbates Injury in Acute Nephritis Due to Aberrant Localization of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Kathrin; Weber, Tobias; Pruenster, Monika; Wolf, Anna M.; Mayer, Gert

    2010-01-01

    The homing of dendritic cells and T cells to secondary lymphoid organs requires chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expression on these cells. T cells mediate the pathogenesis of experimental accelerated nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTS), including its suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the contribution of CCR7 to this disease is unknown. Here, we compared the development of NTS in CCR7-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT mice, CCR7KO mice developed more severe disease with significantly more inflammatory cells infiltrating the kidney. These cells included FoxP3+ Tregs, which were virtually absent from WT kidneys. The adoptive transfer of WT Tregs into CCR7KO mice at the time of immunization protected the recipients from disease; these cells homed to secondary lymphoid organs but not to kidneys. Conversely, adoptive transfer of CCR7KO Tregs into WT mice did not inhibit development of NTS. These data suggest that NTS can develop without CCR7 expression, but Treg-mediated disease suppression, which seems to occur in secondary lymphoid organs, requires CCR7. PMID:19917782

  4. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  5. Mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh) "Sash" mutant mice display aberrant myelopoiesis leading to the accumulation of splenocytes that act as myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anastasija; Schüler, Andrea; Friedrich, Pamela; Döner, Fatma; Bopp, Tobias; Radsak, Markus; Hoffmann, Markus; Relle, Manfred; Distler, Ute; Kuharev, Jörg; Tenzer, Stefan; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Becker, Marc; Stassen, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh) "sash" mice are widely used to investigate mast cell functions. However, mutations of c-Kit also affect additional cells of hematopoietic and nonimmune origin. In this study, we demonstrate that Kit(W-sh) causes aberrant extramedullary myelopoiesis characterized by the expansion of immature lineage-negative cells, common myeloid progenitors, and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors in the spleen. A consistent feature shared by these cell types is the reduced expression of c-Kit. Populations expressing intermediate and high levels of Ly6G, a component of the myeloid differentiation Ag Gr-1, are also highly expanded in the spleen of sash mice. These cells are able to suppress T cell responses in vitro and phenotypically and functionally resemble myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). MDSC typically accumulate in tumor-bearing hosts and are able to dampen immune responses. Consequently, transfer of MDSC from naive sash mice into line 1 alveolar cell carcinoma tumor-bearing wild-type littermates leads to enhanced tumor progression. However, although it can also be observed in sash mice, accelerated growth of transplanted line 1 alveolar cell carcinoma tumors is a mast cell-independent phenomenon. Thus, the Kit(W-sh) mutation broadly affects key steps in myelopoiesis that may have an impact on mast cell research. PMID:23636054

  6. Analysis of aberrant methylation in DNA repair genes during malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells induced by cadmium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-heng; Lei, Yi-xiong; Wang, Cai-xia

    2012-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and its compounds are well-known human carcinogens, but the mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis are not entirely understood yet. Aberrant methylation was investigated in order to obtain insight into the DNA repair-related epigenetic mechanisms underlying CdCl(2)-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE). Gene expression and DNA methylation were assessed in untreated control cells; 5th, 15th, and 35th passage of CdCl2-treated cells and tumorigenic cells (TCs) from nude mice by using high-performance liquid chromatography, real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and methylation-specific PCR assay. During Cd-induced malignant transformation, global DNA methylation progressively increased and was associated with the overexpression of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3a but not DNMT3b. Expression of both the messenger RNA and proteins of the DNA repair genes (hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1) progressively reduced and DNA damage increased with Cd-induced transformation. The promoter regions of hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1 were heavily methylated in the 35th passage transformed cells and the TCs. The DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine could reverse the Cd-induced global DNA hypermethylation, DNMT hyperactivity, and the silencing of hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1 in a time-dependent manner. The results indicate that DNMT1 and DNMT3a overexpression can result in global DNA hypermethylation and silencing of the hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1 genes. They may partly explain the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis due to Cd.

  7. Insufficient role of cell proliferation in aberrant DNA methylation induction and involvement of specific types of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hur, Keun; Niwa, Tohru; Toyoda, Takeshi; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Tatematsu, Masae; Yang, Han-Kwang; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is deeply involved in induction of aberrant DNA methylation, but it is unclear whether any type of persistent inflammation can induce methylation and how induction of cell proliferation is involved. In this study, Mongolian gerbils were treated with five kinds of inflammation inducers [Helicobacter pylori with cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), H.pylori without CagA, Helicobacter felis, 50% ethanol (EtOH) and saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution]. Two control groups were treated with a mutagenic carcinogen that induces little inflammation (20 p.p.m. of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea) and without any treatment. After 20 weeks, chronic inflammation with lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration was prominent in the three Helicobacter groups, whereas neutrophil infiltration was mainly observed in the EtOH and NaCl groups. Methylation levels of eight CpG islands significantly increased only in the three Helicobacter groups. By Ki-67 staining, cell proliferation was most strongly induced in the NaCl group, demonstrating that induction of cell proliferation is not sufficient for methylation induction. Among the inflammation-related genes, Il1b, Nos2 and Tnf showed increased expression specifically in the three Helicobacter groups. In human gastric mucosae infected by H.pylori, NOS2 and TNF were also increased. These data showed that inflammation due to infection of the three Helicobacter strains has a strong potential to induce methylation, regardless of their CagA statuses, and increased cell proliferation was not sufficient for methylation induction. It was suggested that specific types of inflammation characterized by expression of specific inflammation-related genes, along with increased cell proliferation, are necessary for methylation induction.

  8. Cell cycle control by oscillating regulatory proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Holtzendorff, Julia; Reinhardt, Jens; Viollier, Patrick H

    2006-04-01

    Significant strides have been made in recent years towards understanding the molecular basis of cell cycle progression in the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. At the heart of cell cycle regulation is a multicomponent transcriptional feedback loop, governing the production of successive regulatory waves or pulses of at least three master regulatory proteins. These oscillating master regulators direct the execution of phase-specific events and, importantly, through intrinsic genetic switches not only determine the length of a given phase, but also provide the driving force that catapults the cell into the next stage of the cell cycle. The genetic switches act as fail safe mechanisms that prevent the cell cycle from relapsing and thus govern the ordered production and the periodicity of these regulatory waves. Here, we detail how the master regulators CtrA, GcrA and DnaA coordinate cell cycle progression and polar development in Caulobacter. PMID:16547950

  9. Cell cycle control by oscillating regulatory proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Holtzendorff, Julia; Reinhardt, Jens; Viollier, Patrick H

    2006-04-01

    Significant strides have been made in recent years towards understanding the molecular basis of cell cycle progression in the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. At the heart of cell cycle regulation is a multicomponent transcriptional feedback loop, governing the production of successive regulatory waves or pulses of at least three master regulatory proteins. These oscillating master regulators direct the execution of phase-specific events and, importantly, through intrinsic genetic switches not only determine the length of a given phase, but also provide the driving force that catapults the cell into the next stage of the cell cycle. The genetic switches act as fail safe mechanisms that prevent the cell cycle from relapsing and thus govern the ordered production and the periodicity of these regulatory waves. Here, we detail how the master regulators CtrA, GcrA and DnaA coordinate cell cycle progression and polar development in Caulobacter.

  10. Cell cycle controls stress response and longevity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dottermusch, Matthias; Lakner, Theresa; Peyman, Tobias; Klein, Marinella; Walz, Gerd; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a variety of genes and mechanisms that influence the rate of aging progression. In this study, we identified cell cycle factors as potent regulators of health and longevity in C. elegans. Focusing on the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk-2) and cyclin E (cye-1), we show that inhibition of cell cycle genes leads to tolerance towards environmental stress and longevity. The reproductive system is known as a key regulator of longevity in C. elegans. We uncovered the gonad as the central organ mediating the effects of cell cycle inhibition on lifespan. In particular, the proliferating germ cells were essential for conferring longevity. Steroid hormone signaling and the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 were required for longevity associated with cell cycle inhibition. Furthermore, we discovered that SKN-1 (ortholog of mammalian Nrf proteins) activates protective gene expression and induces longevity when cell cycle genes are inactivated. We conclude that both, germline absence and inhibition through impairment of cell cycle machinery results in longevity through similar pathways. In addition, our studies suggest further roles of cell cycle genes beyond cell cycle progression and support the recently described connection of SKN-1/Nrf to signals deriving from the germline. PMID:27668945

  11. Effects of ZnO nanoparticles in plants: Cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, deregulation of antioxidant defenses, and cell-cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Manosij; Jana, Aditi; Sinha, Sonali; Jothiramajayam, Manivannan; Nag, Anish; Chakraborty, Anirban; Mukherjee, Amitava; Mukherjee, Anita

    2016-09-01

    Cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and biochemical effects were evaluated in the plants Allium cepa, Nicotiana tabacum, and Vicia faba following exposure to ZnO nanoparticles (np; diameter, ∼85nm). In the root meristems of Allium cepa cells, we observed loss of membrane integrity, increased chromosome aberrations, micronucleus formation, DNA strand breaks, and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M checkpoint. In Vicia faba and Nicotiana tabacum, we observed increased intracellular ROS production, lipid peroxidation, and activities of some antioxidant enzymes. TEM images revealed gross morphological alterations and internalization of the np. Our findings provide evidence of ZnO np toxicity, characterized by deregulation of components of ROS-antioxidant machinery, leading to DNA damage, cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. These plants, especially Allium cepa, are reliable systems for assessment of np toxicology. PMID:27542712

  12. Aberrant epigenetic regulation in clear cell sarcoma of the kidney featuring distinct DNA hypermethylation and EZH2 overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Caroline; O'Sullivan, Maureen J.; Mengelbier, Linda Holmquist; Gisselsson, David

    2016-01-01

    The global methylation profile and the mutational status of 633 specific epigenetic regulators were analyzed in the pediatric tumor clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK). Methylation array analyses of 30 CCSKs revealed CCSK tumor DNA to be globally hypermethylated compared to Wilms tumor, normal fetal kidney, and adult kidney. The aberrant methylation pattern of CCSKs was associated with activation of genes involved in embryonic processes and with silencing of genes linked to normal kidney function. No epigenetic regulator was recurrently mutated in our cohort, but a mutation in the key epigenetic regulator EZH2 was discovered in one case. EZH2 mRNA was significantly higher in CCSK compared to Wilms tumor and normal kidney, and the EZH2 protein was strongly expressed in more than 90 % of CCSK tumor cells in 9/9 tumors analyzed. This was in striking contrast to the lack of EZH2 protein expression in Wilms tumor stromal elements, indicating that EZH2 could be explored further as a diagnostic marker and a potential drug target for CCSK. PMID:26848979

  13. Cigarette smoke extract induces aberrant cytochrome-c oxidase subunit II methylation and apoptosis in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Chen, Ping; Peng, Hong; Zhang, Hongliang; Chen, Yan; Cai, Shan; Lu, Qianjin; Guan, Chaxiang

    2015-03-01

    Cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the mechanisms responsible for endothelial apoptosis remain poorly understood. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate whether DNA methylation is involved in smoking-induced endothelial apoptosis. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) at a range of concentrations (0-10%). HUVECs were also incubated with a demethylating reagent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidinem (AZA), with and without CSE. Apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay and flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide staining. We found that CSE treatment significantly increased HUVEC apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot revealed that CSE treatment decreased cytochrome-c oxidase subunit II (COX II) mRNA and protein levels and decreased COX activity. Methylation-specific PCR and direct bisulfite sequencing revealed positive COX II gene methylation. AZA administration partly increased mRNA and protein expressions of COX II, and COX activity decreased by CSE and attenuated the toxic effects of CSE. Our results showed that CSE induced aberrant COX II methylation and apoptosis in HUVECs. PMID:25500741

  14. Subgroup J avian leukosis virus infection of chicken dendritic cells induces apoptosis via the aberrant expression of microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Dai, Manman; Zhang, Xu; Cao, Weisheng; Liao, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus that causes immunosuppression and enhances susceptibility to secondary infection. The innate immune system is the first line of defense in preventing bacterial and viral infections, and dendritic cells (DCs) play important roles in innate immunity. Because bone marrow is an organ that is susceptible to ALV-J, the virus may influence the generation of bone marrow-derived DCs. In this study, DCs cultured in vitro were used to investigate the effects of ALV infection. The results revealed that ALV-J could infect these cells during the early stages of differentiation, and infection of DCs with ALV-J resulted in apoptosis. miRNA sequencing data of uninfected and infected DCs revealed 122 differentially expressed miRNAs, with 115 demonstrating upregulation after ALV-J infection and the other 7 showing significant downregulation. The miRNAs that exhibited the highest levels of upregulation may suppress nutrient processing and metabolic function. These results indicated that ALV-J infection of chicken DCs could induce apoptosis via aberrant microRNA expression. These results provide a solid foundation for the further study of epigenetic influences on ALV-J-induced immunosuppression.

  15. Influence of retinol on carcinogen-induced sister chromatid exchangers and chromosome aberrations in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, S.; Batt, T.; Huang, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of retinol (Rol) on sister chromatid exchangers (SCE) in V79 cells induced by six indirect and two direct carcinogens, and on chromosome aberration (CA) in V79 cells induced by four indirect carcinogens were studied. The indirect carcinogens used were aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB), cyclophosphamide (CPP), benzo(a)anthracene (BA), benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benz(a)anthracene (DMBA), and 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). The two direct carcinogens were ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Rol effectively inhibited SCE and CA induced by AFB and CPP in a dose-dependent manner, but it had no effect on SCE induced by BA, BP, DMBA, MCA, EMS, and MNNG. To the contrary, Rol had an enhancing effect on CA induced by BP and DMBA. The possibility that Rol exerts its anticarcinogenic effects by inhibiting certain forms of the cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes required for activation of precarcinogens, such as AFB and CPP but not those enzymes required by BA, BP, DMBA, and MCA, is discussed.

  16. Aberrant immunoglobulin class switch recombination and switch translocations in activated B cell–like diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Georg; Nagel, Inga; Siebert, Reiner; Roschke, Anna V.; Sanger, Warren; Wright, George W.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Tan, Bruce; Zhao, Hong; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Smeland, Erlend B.; Fisher, Richard I.; Kuehl, W. Michael; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying chromosomal translocations in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we investigated the nature and extent of immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) in these tumors. We used Southern blotting to detect legitimate and illegitimate CSR events in tumor samples of the activated B cell–like (ABC), germinal center B cell–like (GCB), and primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) subgroups of DLBCL. The frequency of legitimate CSR was lower in ABC DLBCL than in GCB DLBCL and PMBL. In contrast, ABC DLBCL had a higher frequency of internal deletions within the switch μ (Sμ) region compared with GCB DLBCL and PMBL. ABC DLBCLs also had frequent deletions within Sγ and other illegitimate switch recombinations. Sequence analysis revealed ongoing Sμ deletions within ABC DLBCL tumor clones, which were accompanied by ongoing duplications and activation-induced cytidine deaminase–dependent somatic mutations. Unexpectedly, short fragments derived from multiple chromosomes were interspersed within Sμ in one case. These findings suggest that ABC DLBCLs have abnormalities in the regulation of CSR that could predispose to chromosomal translocations. Accordingly, aberrant switch recombination was responsible for translocations in ABC DLBCLs involving BCL6, MYC, and a novel translocation partner, SPIB. PMID:17353367

  17. Thermal stress cycling of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal stress cycling was performed on gallium arsenide solar cells to investigate their electrical, mechanical, and structural integrity. Cells were cycled under low Earth orbit (LEO) simulated temperature conditions in vacuum. Cell evaluations consisted of power output values, spectral response, optical microscopy and ion microprobe mass analysis, and depth profiles on both front surface inter-grid areas and metallization contact grid lines. Cells were examined for degradation after 500, 5,000, 10,000 and 15,245 thermal cycles. No indication of performance degradation was found for any vendor's cell lot.

  18. Aberrant Apoptotic Response of Colorectal Cancer Cells to Novel Nucleoside Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Harmse, Leonie; Dahan-Farkas, Nurit; Panayides, Jenny-Lee; van Otterlo, Willem; Penny, Clement

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increased understanding of colorectal cancer and the introduction of targeted drug therapy, the metastatic phase of the disease remains refractory to treatment. Since the deregulation of normal apoptosis contributes to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, novel nucleoside analogues were synthesized here and evaluated for their ability to induce apoptosis and cause cell death in two colorectal adeno-carcinoma cell lines, Caco-2 and HT-29. Three novel nucleoside analogues assessed here showed cytotoxic activity, as measured by the MTT assay against both cell lines: the IC50 values ranged between 3 and 37 μM, with Caco-2 cells being more sensitive than HT-29 cells. Compared to camptothecin, the positive control, the nucleoside analogues were significantly less toxic to normal unstimulated leukocytes (p>0.05). Moreover, the nucleosides were able to induce apoptosis as measured by an increase in caspase 8 and caspase 3 activity above that of the control. This was additionally supported by data derived from Annexin V-FITC assays. Despite marginal changes to the mitochondrial membrane potential, all three nucleosides caused a significant increase in cytosolic cytochrome c (p>0.05), with a corresponding decrease in mitochondrial cytochrome c. Morphological analysis of both cell lines showed the rapid appearance of vacuoles following exposure to two of the nucleosides, while a third caused cellular detachment, delayed cytoplasmic vacuolisation and nuclear abnormalities. Preliminary investigations, using the autophagic indicator monodansylcadaverine and chloroquine as positive control, showed that two of the nucleosides induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles. In summary, the novel nucleoside analogues showed selective cytotoxicity towards both cancer cell lines and are effective initiators of an unusual apoptotic response, demonstrating their potential to serve as structural scaffolds for more potent analogues. PMID:26390405

  19. Aberrant expression of the neuronal transcription factor FOXP2 in neoplastic plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew J; Lyne, Linden; Brown, Philip J; Launchbury, Rosalind J; Bignone, Paola; Chi, Jianxiang; Roncador, Giovanna; Lawrie, Charles H; Gatter, Kevin C; Kusec, Rajko; Banham, Alison H

    2010-04-01

    FOXP2 mutation causes a severe inherited speech and language defect, while the related transcription factors FOXP1, FOXP3 and FOXP4 are implicated in cancer. FOXP2 mRNA and protein expression were characterised in normal human tissues, haematological cell lines and multiple myeloma (MM) patients' samples. FOXP2 mRNA and protein were absent in mononuclear cells from different anatomical sites, lineages and stages of differentiation. However, FOXP2 mRNA and protein was detected in several lymphoma (8/20) and all MM-derived cell lines (n = 4). FOXP2 mRNA was expressed in bone marrow samples from 96% of MM patients (24/25), 66.7% of patients with the pre-neoplastic plasma cell proliferation monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (6/9), but not in reactive plasma cells. The frequency of FOXP2 protein expression in CD138(+) plasma cells was significantly higher in MGUS (P = 0.0005; mean 46.4%) and MM patients (P < or = 0.0001; mean 57.3%) than in reactive marrows (mean 2.5%). FOXP2 (>10% nuclear positivity) was detectable in 90.2% of MM (55/61) and 90.9% of MGUS (10/11) patients, showing more frequent expression than CD56 and labelling 75% of CD56-negative MM (9/12). FOXP2 represents the first transcription factor whose expression consistently differentiates normal and abnormal plasma cells and FOXP2 target genes are implicated in MM pathogenesis.

  20. Regulation of the Embryonic Cell Cycle During Mammalian Preimplantation Development.

    PubMed

    Palmer, N; Kaldis, P

    2016-01-01

    The preimplantation development stage of mammalian embryogenesis consists of a series of highly conserved, regulated, and predictable cell divisions. This process is essential to allow the rapid expansion and differentiation of a single-cell zygote into a multicellular blastocyst containing cells of multiple developmental lineages. This period of development, also known as the germinal stage, encompasses several important developmental transitions, which are accompanied by dramatic changes in cell cycle profiles and dynamics. These changes are driven primarily by differences in the establishment and enforcement of cell cycle checkpoints, which must be bypassed to facilitate the completion of essential cell cycle events. Much of the current knowledge in this area has been amassed through the study of knockout models in mice. These mouse models are powerful experimental tools, which have allowed us to dissect the relative dependence of the early embryonic cell cycles on various aspects of the cell cycle machinery and highlight the extent of functional redundancy between members of the same gene family. This chapter will explore the ways in which the cell cycle machinery, their accessory proteins, and their stimuli operate during mammalian preimplantation using mouse models as a reference and how this allows for the usually well-defined stages of the cell cycle to be shaped and transformed during this unique and critical stage of development. PMID:27475848

  1. Capacity-cycle life behavior in secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Carter, B. J.; Shen, D.; Yen, S. P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The practical utilization of high energy density rechargeable lithium cells is dependent upon maintaining high capacity for the duration of the required cycle life. However, a critical, yet generic problem with room temperature lithium systems is that the capacity often declines considerably during the early stages of cycling. The results of our studies are reported on electrolyte degradation which is observed after cells have undergone 300 and 700 deep cycles with 3-methylsulfolane- and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran-LiAsF6 electrolytes, respectively.

  2. Basal cell carcinoma and the carcinogenic role of aberrant Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Saran, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequent cancer in the white population and its incidence appears to be increasing worldwide. While the majority of BCCs arise sporadically, many cases are attributable to basal cell nevus syndrome, or Gorlin syndrome, an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder characterized by the occurrence of multiple BCCs and by extracutaneous tumors. Genetic studies on patients with basal cell nevus syndrome indicate deregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in epidermal keratinocytes as the primary event in the pathogenesis of BCC. This article summarizes the recent progress in understanding Hh-dependent BCC tumorigenesis, as well as evidence for deregulation of other molecular pathways, primarily the Wnt developmental pathway. Understanding the molecular genetics of BCC development has provided new opportunities for molecular therapy of this cancer by targeting Hh and other signaling pathways. PMID:20528237

  3. Aberrant expression of proPTPRN2 in cancer cells confers resistance to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Alexey V.; Nair, Binoj C.; Wei, Yongkun; Aziz, Kathryn E.; Evdokimova, Valentina; Hung, Mien-Chie; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor PTPRN2 is expressed predominantly in endocrine and neuronal cells where it functions in exocytosis. We found that its immature isoform proPTPRN2 is overexpressed in various cancers including breast cancer. High proPTPRN2 expression was associated strongly with lymph node-positive breast cancer and poor clinical outcome. Loss of proPTPRN2 in breast cancer cells promoted apoptosis and blocked tumor formation in mice, while enforced expression of proPTPRN2 in non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells exerted a converse effect. Mechanistic investigations suggested that ProPTPRN2 elicited these effects through direct interaction with TRAF2, a hub scaffold protein for multiple kinase cascades including ones that activate NF-kB. Overall our results suggest PTPRN2 as a novel candidate biomarker and therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25877877

  4. Painting analysis of chromosome aberrations induced by energetic heavy ions in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation genetic mutations and cancer induction Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults Over the years we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell We will summarize the results of the investigations and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure

  5. Segmentation and classification of cell cycle phases in fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Ilker; Bunyak, Filiz; Chagin, Vadim; Cardoso, M Christina; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2009-01-01

    Current chemical biology methods for studying spatiotemporal correlation between biochemical networks and cell cycle phase progression in live-cells typically use fluorescence-based imaging of fusion proteins. Stable cell lines expressing fluorescently tagged protein GFP-PCNA produce rich, dynamically varying sub-cellular foci patterns characterizing the cell cycle phases, including the progress during the S-phase. Variable fluorescence patterns, drastic changes in SNR, shape and position changes and abundance of touching cells require sophisticated algorithms for reliable automatic segmentation and cell cycle classification. We extend the recently proposed graph partitioning active contours (GPAC) for fluorescence-based nucleus segmentation using regional density functions and dramatically improve its efficiency, making it scalable for high content microscopy imaging. We utilize surface shape properties of GFP-PCNA intensity field to obtain descriptors of foci patterns and perform automated cell cycle phase classification, and give quantitative performance by comparing our results to manually labeled data.

  6. Mucinous spindle and tubular renal cell carcinoma: analysis of chromosomal aberration pattern of low-grade, high-grade, and overlapping morphologic variant with papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Peckova, Kvetoslava; Martinek, Petr; Sperga, Maris; Montiel, Delia Perez; Daum, Ondrej; Rotterova, Pavla; Kalusová, Kristýna; Hora, Milan; Pivovarcikova, Kristýna; Rychly, Boris; Vranic, Semir; Davidson, Whitney; Vodicka, Josef; Dubová, Magdaléna; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2015-08-01

    The chromosomal numerical aberration pattern in mucinous tubular and spindle renal cell carcinoma (MTSRCC) is referred to as variable with frequent gains and losses. The objectives of this study are to map the spectrum of chromosomal aberrations (extent and location) in a large cohort of the cases and relate these findings to the morphologic variants of MTSRCC. Fifty-four MTSRCCs with uniform morphologic pattern were selected (of 133 MTSRCCs available in our registry) and divided into 3 groups: classic low-grade MTSRCC (Fuhrman nucleolar International Society of Urological Pathology grade 2), high-grade MTSRCC (grade 3), and overlapping MTSRCC with papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) morphology. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis was applied to 16 cases in which DNA was well preserved. Four analyzable classic low-grade MTSRCCs showed multiple losses affecting chromosomes 1, 4, 8, 9, 14, 15, and 22. No chromosomal gains were found. Four analyzable cases of MTSRCC showing overlapping morphology with PRCC displayed a more variable pattern including normal chromosomal status; losses of chromosomes 1, 6, 8, 9, 14, 15, and 22; and gains of 3, 7, 16, and 17. The group of 4 high-grade MTSRCCs exhibited a more uniform chromosomal aberration pattern with losses of chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, and 22 and without any gains detected. (1) MTSRCC, both low-grade and high-grade, shows chromosomal losses (including 1, 4, 6, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, and 22) in all analyzable cases; this seems to be the most frequent chromosomal numerical aberration in this type of RCC. (2) Cases with overlapping morphologic features (MTSRCC and PRCC) showed a more variable pattern with multiple losses and gains, including gains of chromosomes 7 and 17 (2 cases). This result is in line with previously published morphologic and immunohistochemical studies that describe the broad morphologic spectrum of MTSRCC, with changes resembling papillary RCC. (3) The diagnosis of MTSRCC in

  7. U87MG Decoded: The Genomic Sequence of a Cytogenetically Aberrant Human Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Eskin, Ascia; Lee, Hane; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2010-01-01

    U87MG is a commonly studied grade IV glioma cell line that has been analyzed in at least 1,700 publications over four decades. In order to comprehensively characterize the genome of this cell line and to serve as a model of broad cancer genome sequencing, we have generated greater than 30× genomic sequence coverage using a novel 50-base mate paired strategy with a 1.4kb mean insert library. A total of 1,014,984,286 mate-end and 120,691,623 single-end two-base encoded reads were generated from five slides. All data were aligned using a custom designed tool called BFAST, allowing optimal color space read alignment and accurate identification of DNA variants. The aligned sequence reads and mate-pair information identified 35 interchromosomal translocation events, 1,315 structural variations (>100 bp), 191,743 small (<21 bp) insertions and deletions (indels), and 2,384,470 single nucleotide variations (SNVs). Among these observations, the known homozygous mutation in PTEN was robustly identified, and genes involved in cell adhesion were overrepresented in the mutated gene list. Data were compared to 219,187 heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms assayed by Illumina 1M Duo genotyping array to assess accuracy: 93.83% of all SNPs were reliably detected at filtering thresholds that yield greater than 99.99% sequence accuracy. Protein coding sequences were disrupted predominantly in this cancer cell line due to small indels, large deletions, and translocations. In total, 512 genes were homozygously mutated, including 154 by SNVs, 178 by small indels, 145 by large microdeletions, and 35 by interchromosomal translocations to reveal a highly mutated cell line genome. Of the small homozygously mutated variants, 8 SNVs and 99 indels were novel events not present in dbSNP. These data demonstrate that routine generation of broad cancer genome sequence is possible outside of genome centers. The sequence analysis of U87MG provides an unparalleled level of mutational

  8. Connecting the nucleolus to the cell cycle and human disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Robert Y L; Pederson, Thoru

    2014-08-01

    Long known as the center of ribosome synthesis, the nucleolus is connected to cell cycle regulation in more subtle ways. One is a surveillance system that reacts promptly when rRNA synthesis or processing is impaired, halting cell cycle progression. Conversely, the nucleolus also acts as a first-responder to growth-related stress signals. Here we review emerging concepts on how these "infraribosomal" links between the nucleolus and cell cycle progression operate in both forward and reverse gears. We offer perspectives on how new cancer therapeutic designs that target this infraribosomal mode of cell growth control may shape future clinical progress.

  9. VMP1-deficient Chlamydomonas exhibits severely aberrant cell morphology and disrupted cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The versatile Vacuole Membrane Protein 1 (VMP1) has been previously investigated in six species. It has been shown to be essential in macroautophagy, where it takes part in autophagy initiation. In addition, VMP1 has been implicated in organellar biogenesis; endo-, exo- and phagocytosis, and protein secretion; apoptosis; and cell adhesion. These roles underly its proven involvement in pancreatitis, diabetes and cancer in humans. Results In this study we analyzed a VMP1 homologue from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. CrVMP1 knockdown lines showed severe phenotypes, mainly affecting cell division as well as the morphology of cells and organelles. We also provide several pieces of evidence for its involvement in macroautophagy. Conclusion Our study adds a novel role to VMP1's repertoire, namely the regulation of cytokinesis. Though the directness of the observed effects and the mechanisms underlying them remain to be defined, the protein's involvement in macroautophagy in Chlamydomonas, as found by us, suggests that CrVMP1 shares molecular characteristics with its animal and protist counterparts. PMID:24885763

  10. Disruption of Rest Leads to the Early Onset of Cataracts with the Aberrant Terminal Differentiation of Lens Fiber Cells.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hitomi; Ogino, Hajime; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    REST (RE1-silencing transcription factor, also called Nrsf) is involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of neuronal stem/progenitor cells in vitro by preventing precocious expression of neuronal genes. REST expression was then decreased in developing neurons to down-regulate neuronal genes which allow their maturation. However, the function of REST during neurogenesis in vivo remains to be elucidated because of the early embryonic lethal phenotype of conventional Rest knockout mice. In order to investigate the role of REST in ocular tissues, we generated and examined the mice evoking genetic ablation to Rest specifically to neural tissues including ocular tissue. We used a Sox1-Cre allele to excise the floxed Rest gene in the early neural tissues including the lens and retinal primordia. The resulting Rest conditional knockout (CKO) and co cntrol mice were used in comparative morphological, histological, and gene expression analyses. Rest CKO mice had an abnormal lens morphology after birth. The proliferation of lens epithelial cells was likely to be slightly reduced, and vacuoles formed without a visible increase in apoptotic cells. Although the aberrant expression of late onset cataract marker proteins was not detected, the expression of Notch signaling-related genes including a previously identified REST-target gene was up-regulated around birth, and this was followed by the down-regulated expression of lens fiber regulators such as c-Maf and Prox1. Rest CKO induces a unique cataract phenotype just after birth. Augmented Notch signaling and the down-regulated expression of lens fiber regulator genes may be responsible for this phenotype. Our results highlight the significance of REST function in lens fiber formation, which is necessary for maintaining an intact lens structure. PMID:27631609

  11. Disruption of Rest Leads to the Early Onset of Cataracts with the Aberrant Terminal Differentiation of Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Hitomi; Ogino, Hajime; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    REST (RE1-silencing transcription factor, also called Nrsf) is involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of neuronal stem/progenitor cells in vitro by preventing precocious expression of neuronal genes. REST expression was then decreased in developing neurons to down-regulate neuronal genes which allow their maturation. However, the function of REST during neurogenesis in vivo remains to be elucidated because of the early embryonic lethal phenotype of conventional Rest knockout mice. In order to investigate the role of REST in ocular tissues, we generated and examined the mice evoking genetic ablation to Rest specifically to neural tissues including ocular tissue. We used a Sox1-Cre allele to excise the floxed Rest gene in the early neural tissues including the lens and retinal primordia. The resulting Rest conditional knockout (CKO) and co cntrol mice were used in comparative morphological, histological, and gene expression analyses. Rest CKO mice had an abnormal lens morphology after birth. The proliferation of lens epithelial cells was likely to be slightly reduced, and vacuoles formed without a visible increase in apoptotic cells. Although the aberrant expression of late onset cataract marker proteins was not detected, the expression of Notch signaling-related genes including a previously identified REST-target gene was up-regulated around birth, and this was followed by the down-regulated expression of lens fiber regulators such as c-Maf and Prox1. Rest CKO induces a unique cataract phenotype just after birth. Augmented Notch signaling and the down-regulated expression of lens fiber regulator genes may be responsible for this phenotype. Our results highlight the significance of REST function in lens fiber formation, which is necessary for maintaining an intact lens structure. PMID:27631609

  12. The Cell Cycle: An Activity Using Paper Plates to Represent Time Spent in Phases of the Cell Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, students are given the opportunity to combine skills in math and geometry for a biology lesson in the cell cycle. Students utilize the data they collect and analyze from an online onion-root-tip activity to create a paper-plate time clock representing a 24-hour cell cycle. By dividing the paper plate into appropriate phases of…

  13. Different cell cycle modulation by celecoxib at different concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mee; Pyo, Hongryull

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Different cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors were known to cause different cell cycle changes. We investigated whether this different effect on cell cycle change was due to concentration-dependent effect. We investigated the effects of celecoxib, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, on cell cycle regulation in irradiated cancer cells that express high or low levels of COX-2. Four stably COX-2 knocked-down or overexpressed cell lines were treated with various concentrations of celecoxib with or without radiation. Celecoxib differentially modulated the cell cycle according to the concentrations applied. G1 arrest was induced at lower concentrations, whereas G2/M arrest was induced at higher concentrations in each cell line tested. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was enhanced at lower concentrations but reduced at higher concentrations. The cutoff values to divide lower and higher concentrations were cell-type specific. Celecoxib treatment activated Cdc25C and inhibited p21 expression in both unirradiated and irradiated cells, regardless of COX-2 expression. Apoptosis was induced in irradiated cells 48 hours after treatment with celecoxib dependent of COX-2. These results imply that celecoxib deactivates the G2 checkpoint via both Cdc25C- and p21-dependent pathways in irradiated cells, which subsequently die by secondary apoptosis. Cell cycle modulating effects in irradiated cells resulting from treatment with celecoxib may have clinical importance with regard to the potential application of celecoxib in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:23268707

  14. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  15. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  16. Aberrant activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression in Philadelphia chromosome-positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Durkin, Lisa; Rogers, Heesun Joyce; Hsi, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in germinal center B cells and plays a critical role in somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes. Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis and is specifically treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Interestingly, AID has been shown to be aberrantly expressed and functional in Ph+ ALL and is thought to contribute to genetic instability. We hypothesized that AID might be detectable in routinely processed bone marrow biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and assist in identifying Ph+ ALL. We found that AID was expressed in 26 (70%) of 37 cases of Ph+ ALL but only 1 (2.9%) of 38 cases of Ph- ALL cases. There was a significant difference in AID expression between these 2 ALL groups (P < .001, Fisher exact test). The expression of AID was confirmed by RT-PCR (reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) and correlated with IHC scoring. AID protein is expressed in a large proportion of Ph+ ALL cases at levels detectable by IHC in clinical samples and might be useful to rapidly identify cases likely to have a BCR/ABL1 fusion. PMID:26980048

  17. Assessment of chromosomal aberration in the bone marrow cells of Swiss Albino mice treated by 4-methylimidazole.

    PubMed

    Norizadeh Tazehkand, Mostafa; Topaktas, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Mehmet Bertan

    2016-01-01

    4-Methylimidazole (4-MEI) is formed during the production of certain caramel coloring agents used in many food and drink products. It may also be formed during the cooking, roasting, or other processing of some foods and beverages. So it was unintentionally consumed in worldwide. This study was aimed to investigate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of 4-MEI using chromosome aberration (CA) and mitotic index (MI) in Swiss Albino mice. In this research, CA and MI of the mouse bone marrow cells were analyzed after treating the animals with 4-MEI (100, 130 and 160 mg/kg) for 12 h and 24 h treatment times. All data were analyzed using statistical methods. 4-MEI significantly increased the percentage of CAs at all concentrations for 12 h and at highest concentration for 24 h treatment periods. 4-MEI at highest concentration for 12 h and at all concentrations for 24 h decreased the MI in comparison with control. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of 4-MEI at 24 h treatment periods were concentration dependent. Consequently, it can be said that 4-MEI have genotoxic and cytotoxic effect in mouse. PMID:26634952

  18. Separating strain from composition in unit cell parameter maps obtained from aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, T.; Remmele, T.; Korytov, M.; Markurt, T.; Albrecht, M.; Duff, A.; Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Chèze, C.

    2014-01-21

    Based on the evaluation of lattice parameter maps in aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy images, we propose a simple method that allows quantifying the composition and disorder of a semiconductor alloy at the unit cell scale with high accuracy. This is realized by considering, next to the out-of-plane, also the in-plane lattice parameter component allowing to separate the chemical composition from the strain field. Considering only the out-of-plane lattice parameter component not only yields large deviations from the true local alloy content but also carries the risk of identifying false ordering phenomena like formations of chains or platelets. Our method is demonstrated on image simulations of relaxed supercells, as well as on experimental images of an In{sub 0.20}Ga{sub 0.80}N quantum well. Principally, our approach is applicable to all epitaxially strained compounds in the form of quantum wells, free standing islands, quantum dots, or wires.

  19. The lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome: study of 21 patients with CD3-CD4+ aberrant T-cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Guillaume; Copin, Marie-Christine; Staumont-Sallé, Delphine; Avenel-Audran, Martine; Aubert, Hélène; Taieb, Alain; Salles, Gilles; Maisonneuve, Hervé; Ghomari, Kamel; Ackerman, Félix; Legrand, Fanny; Baruchel, André; Launay, David; Terriou, Louis; Leclech, Christian; Khouatra, Chahera; Morati-Hafsaoui, Chafika; Labalette, Myriam; Borie, Raphäel; Cotton, François; Gouellec, Noémie Le; Morschhauser, Franck; Trauet, Jacques; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Capron, Monique; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Prin, Lionel; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    The CD3-CD4+ aberrant T-cell phenotype is the most described in the lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome (L-HES), a rare form of HES. Only a few cases have been reported, and data for these patients are scarce. To describe characteristics and outcome of CD3-CD4+ L-HES patients, we conducted a national multicentric retrospective study in the French Eosinophil Network. All patients who met the recent criteria of hypereosinophilia (HE) or HES and who had a persistent CD3-CD4+ T-cell subset on blood T-cell phenotyping were included. Clinical and laboratory data were retrospectively collected by chart review. CD3-CD4+ L-HES was diagnosed in 21 patients (13 females, median age 42 years [range, 5-75 yr]). Half (48%) had a history of atopic manifestations. Clinical manifestations were dermatologic (81%), superficial adenopathy (62%), rheumatologic (29%), gastrointestinal (24%), pulmonary (19%), neurologic (10%), and cardiovascular (5%). The median absolute CD3-CD4+ T-cell count was 0.35 G/L (range, 0.01-28.3), with a clonal TCRγδ rearrangement in 76% of patients. The mean follow-up duration after HES diagnosis was 6.9 ± 5.1 years. All patients treated with oral corticosteroids (CS) (n = 18) obtained remission, but 16 required CS-sparing treatments. One patient had a T-cell lymphoma 8 years after diagnosis, and 3 deaths occurred during follow-up.In conclusion, clinical manifestations related to CD3-CD4+ T cell-associated L-HES are not limited to skin, and can involve all tissue or organs affected in other types of HE. Contrary to FIP1L1-PDGFRA chronic eosinophilic leukemia patients, CS are always effective in these patients, but CS-sparing treatments are frequently needed. The occurrence of T-cell lymphoma, although rare in our cohort, remains a major concern during follow-up. PMID:25398061

  20. Brucella abortus Cell Cycle and Infection Are Coordinated.

    PubMed

    De Bolle, Xavier; Crosson, Sean; Matroule, Jean-Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular pathogens. The recent development of methods and genetically engineered strains allowed the description of cell-cycle progression of Brucella abortus, including unipolar growth and the ordered initiation of chromosomal replication. B. abortus cell-cycle progression is coordinated with intracellular trafficking in the endosomal compartments. Bacteria are first blocked at the G1 stage, growth and chromosome replication being resumed shortly before reaching the intracellular proliferation compartment. The control mechanisms of cell cycle are similar to those reported for the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and they are crucial for survival in the host cell. The development of single-cell analyses could also be applied to other bacterial pathogens to investigate their cell-cycle progression during infection.

  1. Aberrant TIRAP and MyD88 expression in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Antosz, Halina; Sajewicz, Joanna; Marzec-Kotarska, Barbara; Dmoszyńska, Anna; Baszak, Jacek; Jargiełło-Baszak, Małgorzata

    2013-06-01

    TIRAP and Myd88 are adaptor proteins for Toll-like receptors-2 and -4 (TLR2/4) which are engaged in transducing the signal to downstream molecules. Several studies have shown the increased role of infection factors in pathogenesis of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). This prompted us to test whether there is a correlation between MyD88-TIRAP dynamics before and after inflammatory stimuli. We determined the mRNA and protein expression of TIRAP and MyD88 in CD5(+)CD19(+) B-CLL cells and in a subpopulation of normal B CD19(+) lymphocytes. Additionally we determined the influence of lipopolysaccharide Escherichia coli - TLR4-ligand (LPS) and Staphylococcus aureus strain Cowan I - TLR2-ligand (SAC) on TIR-domain-containing adaptor protein, also called MyD88 adaptor-like (TIRAP) and myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) expression. We have found that the mRNA and protein expression of TIRAP and MyD88 in B-CLL lymphocytes is lower compared with that in normal B lymphocytes. LPS and SAC stimulation in normal lymphocytes significantly altered neither TIRAP nor MyD88 mRNA expression, whereas TIRAP protein level substantially decreased after TLR agonist treatment. We did not observe any changes in MyD88 protein level after B lymphocyte stimulation. There was a significant increase in TIRAP mRNA expression after LPS and SAC stimulation of B-CLL cells. MyD88 mRNA expression levels in B-CLL lymphocytes slightly decreased upon treatment with either stimulator. Stimulation with TLR agonists did not cause changes in TIRAP and MyD88 expression at the protein level in B-CLL lymphocytes. The results of our study suggest that there may exist a, yet unknown, defect of TIRAP and MyD88 proteins in B-CLL lymphocytes. PMID:23419703

  2. Comparison of RBE values of high- LET α-particles for the induction of DNA-DSBs, chromosome aberrations and cell reproductive death

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Various types of radiation effects in mammalian cells have been studied with the aim to predict the radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues, e.g. DNA double strand breaks (DSB), chromosome aberrations and cell reproductive inactivation. However, variation in correlations with clinical results has reduced general application. An additional type of information is required for the increasing application of high-LET radiation in cancer therapy: the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for effects in tumours and normal tissues. Relevant information on RBE values might be derived from studies on cells in culture. Methods To evaluate relationships between DNA-DSB, chromosome aberrations and the clinically most relevant effect of cell reproductive death, for ionizing radiations of different LET, dose-effect relationships were determined for the induction of these effects in cultured SW-1573 cells irradiated with gamma-rays from a Cs-137 source or with α-particles from an Am-241 source. RBE values were derived for these effects. Ionizing radiation induced foci (IRIF) of DNA repair related proteins, indicative of DSB, were assessed by counting gamma-H2AX foci. Chromosome aberration frequencies were determined by scoring fragments and translocations using premature chromosome condensation. Cell survival was measured by colony formation assay. Analysis of dose-effect relations was based on the linear-quadratic model. Results Our results show that, although both investigated radiation types induce similar numbers of IRIF per absorbed dose, only a small fraction of the DSB induced by the low-LET gamma-rays result in chromosome rearrangements and cell reproductive death, while this fraction is considerably enhanced for the high-LET alpha-radiation. Calculated RBE values derived for the linear components of dose-effect relations for gamma-H2AX foci, cell reproductive death, chromosome fragments and colour junctions are 1.0 ± 0.3, 14.7 ± 5.1, 15.3 ± 5.9 and

  3. Cycle life test. [of secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Statistical information concerning cell performance characteristics and limitations of secondary spacecraft cells is presented. Weaknesses in cell design as well as battery weaknesses encountered in various satellite programs are reported. Emphasis is placed on improving the reliability of space batteries.

  4. Aberrant T cell ERK pathway signaling and chromatin structure in lupus

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Gabriela; Richardson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibodies to nuclear components with subsequent immune complex formation and deposition in multiple organs. A combination of genetic and environmental factors is required for disease development, but how the environment interacts with the immune system in genetically predisposed hosts to cause lupus is unclear. Recent evidence suggests that environmental agents may alter T cell chromatin structure and gene expression through effects on DNA methylation, a repressive epigenetic mechanism promoting chromatin inactivation, to cause lupus in people with the appropriate genetic background. DNA methylation is regulated by ERK pathway signaling, and abnormalities in ERK pathway signaling may contribute to immune dysfunction in lupus through epigenetic effects on gene expression. This article reviews current evidence for epigenetic abnormalities, and in particular DNA demethylation, in the pathogenesis of idiopathic and some forms of drug induced lupus, and how impaired ERK pathway signaling may contribute to the development of human lupus through effects on T cell DNA methylation. PMID:18723128

  5. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  6. Cell cycle control, checkpoint mechanisms, and genotoxic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, R E; Kaufmann, W K; Paules, R S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cells to maintain genomic integrity is vital for cell survival and proliferation. Lack of fidelity in DNA replication and maintenance can result in deleterious mutations leading to cell death or, in multicellular organisms, cancer. The purpose of this review is to discuss the known signal transduction pathways that regulate cell cycle progression and the mechanisms cells employ to insure DNA stability in the face of genotoxic stress. In particular, we focus on mammalian cell cycle checkpoint functions, their role in maintaining DNA stability during the cell cycle following exposure to genotoxic agents, and the gene products that act in checkpoint function signal transduction cascades. Key transitions in the cell cycle are regulated by the activities of various protein kinase complexes composed of cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) molecules. Surveillance control mechanisms that check to ensure proper completion of early events and cellular integrity before initiation of subsequent events in cell cycle progression are referred to as cell cycle checkpoints and can generate a transient delay that provides the cell more time to repair damage before progressing to the next phase of the cycle. A variety of cellular responses are elicited that function in checkpoint signaling to inhibit cyclin/Cdk activities. These responses include the p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of Cdk inhibitors and the p53-independent inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk molecules themselves. Eliciting proper G1, S, and G2 checkpoint responses to double-strand DNA breaks requires the function of the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene product. Several human heritable cancer-prone syndromes known to alter DNA stability have been found to have defects in checkpoint surveillance pathways. Exposures to several common sources of genotoxic stress, including oxidative stress, ionizing radiation, UV radiation, and the genotoxic compound benzo[a]pyrene, elicit cell cycle

  7. Signatures of post-zygotic structural genetic aberrations in the cells of histologically normal breast tissue that can predispose to sporadic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Lars A.; Rasi, Chiara; Pekar, Gyula; Davies, Hanna; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin; Kruczak, Anna; Mandava, Geeta; Pasupulati, Saichand; Hacker, Julia; Prakash, K. Reddy; Dasari, Ravi Chandra; Lau, Joey; Penagos-Tafurt, Nelly; Olofsson, Helena M.; Hallberg, Gunilla; Skotnicki, Piotr; Mituś, Jerzy; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Jankowski, Michal; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Ryś, Janusz; Tot, Tibor; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer (SBC) is a common disease without robust means of early risk prediction in the population. We studied 282 females with SBC, focusing on copy number aberrations in cancer-free breast tissue (uninvolved margin, UM) outside the primary tumor (PT). In total, 1162 UMs (1–14 per breast) were studied. Comparative analysis between UM(s), PT(s), and blood/skin from the same patient as a control is the core of the study design. We identified 108 patients with at least one aberrant UM, representing 38.3% of cases. Gains in gene copy number were the principal type of mutations in microscopically normal breast cells, suggesting that oncogenic activation of genes via increased gene copy number is a predominant mechanism for initiation of SBC pathogenesis. The gain of ERBB2, with overexpression of HER2 protein, was the most common aberration in normal cells. Five additional growth factor receptor genes (EGFR, FGFR1, IGF1R, LIFR, and NGFR) also showed recurrent gains, and these were occasionally present in combination with the gain of ERBB2. All the aberrations found in the normal breast cells were previously described in cancer literature, suggesting their causative, driving role in pathogenesis of SBC. We demonstrate that analysis of normal cells from cancer patients leads to identification of signatures that may increase risk of SBC and our results could influence the choice of surgical intervention to remove all predisposing cells. Early detection of copy number gains suggesting a predisposition toward cancer development, long before detectable tumors are formed, is a key to the anticipated shift into a preventive paradigm of personalized medicine for breast cancer. PMID:26430163

  8. Signatures of post-zygotic structural genetic aberrations in the cells of histologically normal breast tissue that can predispose to sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Lars A; Rasi, Chiara; Pekar, Gyula; Davies, Hanna; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin; Kruczak, Anna; Mandava, Geeta; Pasupulati, Saichand; Hacker, Julia; Prakash, K Reddy; Dasari, Ravi Chandra; Lau, Joey; Penagos-Tafurt, Nelly; Olofsson, Helena M; Hallberg, Gunilla; Skotnicki, Piotr; Mituś, Jerzy; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Jankowski, Michal; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Ryś, Janusz; Tot, Tibor; Dumanski, Jan P

    2015-10-01

    Sporadic breast cancer (SBC) is a common disease without robust means of early risk prediction in the population. We studied 282 females with SBC, focusing on copy number aberrations in cancer-free breast tissue (uninvolved margin, UM) outside the primary tumor (PT). In total, 1162 UMs (1-14 per breast) were studied. Comparative analysis between UM(s), PT(s), and blood/skin from the same patient as a control is the core of the study design. We identified 108 patients with at least one aberrant UM, representing 38.3% of cases. Gains in gene copy number were the principal type of mutations in microscopically normal breast cells, suggesting that oncogenic activation of genes via increased gene copy number is a predominant mechanism for initiation of SBC pathogenesis. The gain of ERBB2, with overexpression of HER2 protein, was the most common aberration in normal cells. Five additional growth factor receptor genes (EGFR, FGFR1, IGF1R, LIFR, and NGFR) also showed recurrent gains, and these were occasionally present in combination with the gain of ERBB2. All the aberrations found in the normal breast cells were previously described in cancer literature, suggesting their causative, driving role in pathogenesis of SBC. We demonstrate that analysis of normal cells from cancer patients leads to identification of signatures that may increase risk of SBC and our results could influence the choice of surgical intervention to remove all predisposing cells. Early detection of copy number gains suggesting a predisposition toward cancer development, long before detectable tumors are formed, is a key to the anticipated shift into a preventive paradigm of personalized medicine for breast cancer.

  9. Landscape of Pin1 in the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Han; Li, Hao-Yi; Lee, Yu-Cheng; Calkins, Marcus J; Lee, Kuen-Haur

    2015-01-01

    Pin1 is a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase which plays a critical role in many diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. The essential role of Pin1 is to affect stability, localization or function of phosphoproteins by catalyzing structural changes. Among the collection of Pin1 substrates, many have been shown to be involved in regulating cell cycle progression. The cell cycle disorder caused by dysregulation of these substrates is believed to be a common phenomenon in cancer. A number of recent studies have revealed possible functions of several important Pin1-binding cell cycle regulators. Investigating the involvement of Pin1 in the cell cycle may assist in the development of future cancer therapeutics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge regarding the network of Pin1 substrates and Pin1 regulators in cell cycle progression. In G1/S progression, cyclin D1, RB, p53, p27, and cyclin E are all well-known cell cycle regulators that are modulated by Pin1. During G2/M transition, our lab has shown that Aurora A suppresses Pin1 activity through phosphorylation at Ser16 and cooperates with hBora to modulate G2/M transition. We conclude that Pin1 may be thought of as a molecular timer which modulates cell cycle progression networks. PMID:25662955

  10. Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells for Aberrant Class II Expression in Exocrine Glands from Estrogen-Deficient Mice of Healthy Background

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Rieko; Nagaoka, Ai; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Yamada, Akiko; Yoshida, Satoko; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Although it has been well documented that aberrant major histocompatibility complex class II molecules may contribute to the development of autoimmune disorders, the precise mechanisms responsible for their tissue-specific expression remain unknown. Here we show that estrogen deficiency induces aberrant class II major histocompatibility complex expression in exocrine glands via interactions between epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Relatively modest but functionally significant expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class II and class II transactivator molecules were observed in the exocrine glands of ovariectomized (Ovx) C57BL/6 (B6) mice, but were not seen in the exocrine glands of control B6 mice. We observed that the salivary dendritic cells adjacent to the apoptotic epithelial cells positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling, were activated in Ovx mice, but were not activated in control mice. We obtained evidence that the salivary gland cells express both interferon regulatory factor-1 and class II transactivator type IV molecules in Ovx mice. Salivary gland cells from Ovx mice were also capable of inducing the activation of antigen-specific T cells from OT-II transgenic mice. These findings indicate that estrogen deficiency initiates class II transactivator type IV mRNA expression in exocrine glands via interactions between epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, suggesting that plasmacytoid dendritic cells play a pivotal role in gender-based autoimmune disorders in postmenopausal women. PMID:19359524

  11. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin O Exhibits Cell Cycle Modulating Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hodille, Elisabeth; Alekseeva, Ludmila; Berkova, Nadia; Serrier, Asma; Badiou, Cedric; Gilquin, Benoit; Brun, Virginie; Vandenesch, François; Terman, David S.; Lina, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of an intact epithelial barrier constitutes a pivotal defense mechanism against infections. Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile pathogen that produces multiple factors including exotoxins that promote tissue alterations. The aim of the present study is to investigate the cytopathic effect of staphylococcal exotoxins SEA, SEG, SEI, SElM, SElN and SElO on the cell cycle of various human cell lines. Among all tested exotoxins only SEIO inhibited the proliferation of a broad panel of human tumor cell lines in vitro. Evaluation of a LDH release and a DNA fragmentation of host cells exposed to SEIO revealed that the toxin does not induce necrosis or apoptosis. Analysis of the DNA content of tumor cells synchronized by serum starvation after exposure to SEIO showed G0/G1 cell cycle delay. The cell cycle modulating feature of SEIO was confirmed by the flow cytometry analysis of synchronized cells exposed to supernatants of isogenic S. aureus strains wherein only supernatant of the SElO producing strain induced G0/G1 phase delay. The results of yeast-two-hybrid analysis indicated that SEIO’s potential partner is cullin-3, involved in the transition from G1 to S phase. In conclusion, we provide evidence that SEIO inhibits cell proliferation without inducing cell death, by delaying host cell entry into the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. We speculate that this unique cell cycle modulating feature allows SEIO producing bacteria to gain advantage by arresting the cell cycle of target cells as part of a broader invasive strategy. PMID:27148168

  12. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  13. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits.

    PubMed

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-09-25

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  14. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  15. mBAND analysis of chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells induced by gamma-rays and secondary neutrons of low dose rate.

    PubMed

    Hada, M; Gersey, B; Saganti, P B; Wilkins, R; Cucinotta, F A; Wu, H

    2010-08-14

    Human risks from chronic exposures to both low- and high-LET radiation are of intensive research interest in recent years. In the present study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma-rays at a dose rate of 17 mGy/h or secondary neutrons of 25 mGy/h. The secondary neutrons have a broad energy spectrum that simulates the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude, as well as the environment inside spacecrafts like the Russian MIR station and the International Space Station (ISS). Chromosome aberrations in the exposed cells were analyzed using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 colored bands that allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges including inversions. Comparison of present dose responses between gamma-rays and neutron irradiations for the fraction of cells with damaged chromosome 3 yielded a relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value of 26+/-4 for the secondary neutrons. Our results also revealed that secondary neutrons of low dose rate induced a higher fraction of intrachromosome exchanges than gamma-rays, but the fractions of inversions observed between these two radiation types were indistinguishable. Similar to the previous findings after acute radiation exposures, most of the inversions observed in the present study were accompanied by other aberrations. The fractions of complex type aberrations and of unrejoined chromosomal breakages were also found to be higher in the neutron-exposed cells than after gamma-rays. We further analyzed the location of the breaks involved in chromosome aberrations along chromosome 3, and observed hot spots after gamma-ray, but not neutron, exposures.

  16. mBAND analysis of chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells induced by gamma-rays and secondary neutrons of low dose rate.

    PubMed

    Hada, M; Gersey, B; Saganti, P B; Wilkins, R; Cucinotta, F A; Wu, H

    2010-08-14

    Human risks from chronic exposures to both low- and high-LET radiation are of intensive research interest in recent years. In the present study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma-rays at a dose rate of 17 mGy/h or secondary neutrons of 25 mGy/h. The secondary neutrons have a broad energy spectrum that simulates the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude, as well as the environment inside spacecrafts like the Russian MIR station and the International Space Station (ISS). Chromosome aberrations in the exposed cells were analyzed using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 colored bands that allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges including inversions. Comparison of present dose responses between gamma-rays and neutron irradiations for the fraction of cells with damaged chromosome 3 yielded a relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value of 26+/-4 for the secondary neutrons. Our results also revealed that secondary neutrons of low dose rate induced a higher fraction of intrachromosome exchanges than gamma-rays, but the fractions of inversions observed between these two radiation types were indistinguishable. Similar to the previous findings after acute radiation exposures, most of the inversions observed in the present study were accompanied by other aberrations. The fractions of complex type aberrations and of unrejoined chromosomal breakages were also found to be higher in the neutron-exposed cells than after gamma-rays. We further analyzed the location of the breaks involved in chromosome aberrations along chromosome 3, and observed hot spots after gamma-ray, but not neutron, exposures. PMID:20338263

  17. Chromosome aberrations induced by zebularine in triticale.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuhui; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yanzhi; Ma, Jieyun; Wu, Nan; Ni, Shuang; Luo, Tengxiao; Zhuang, Lifang; Chu, Chenggen; Cho, Seong-Woo; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Qi, Zengjun

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome engineering is an important approach for generating wheat germplasm. Efficient development of chromosome aberrations will facilitate the introgression and application of alien genes in wheat. In this study, zebularine, a DNA methylation transferase inhibitor, was successfully used to induce chromosome aberrations in the octoploid triticale cultivar Jinghui#1. Dry seeds were soaked in zebularine solutions (250, 500, and 750 μmol/L) for 24 h, and the 500 μmol/L treatment was tested in three additional treatment times, i.e., 12, 36, and 48 h. All treatments induced aberrations involving wheat and rye chromosomes. Of the 920 cells observed in 67 M1 plants, 340 (37.0%) carried 817 aberrations with an average of 0.89 aberrations per cell (range: 0-12). The aberrations included probable deletions, telosomes and acentric fragments (49.0%), large segmental translocations (28.9%), small segmental translocations (17.1%), intercalary translocations (2.6%), long chromosomes that could carry more than one centromere (2.0%), and ring chromosomes (0.5%). Of 510 M2 plants analyzed, 110 (21.6%) were found to carry stable aberrations. Such aberrations included 79 with varied rye chromosome numbers, 7 with wheat and rye chromosome translocations, 15 with possible rye telosomes/deletions, and 9 with complex aberrations involving variation in rye chromosome number and wheat-rye translocations. These indicated that aberrations induced by zebularine can be steadily transmitted, suggesting that zebularine is a new efficient agent for chromosome manipulation. PMID:27334255

  18. Cell-Cycle Inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Claudia; Sommi, Patrizia; Pasquetto, Maria Valentina; Cappelletti, Donata; Stivala, Simona; Mignosi, Paola; Savio, Monica; Chiarelli, Laurent Roberto; Valentini, Giovanna; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Merrell, Douglas Scott; Franchini, Silvia; Verona, Maria Luisa; Bolis, Cristina; Solcia, Enrico; Manca, Rachele; Franciotta, Diego; Casasco, Andrea; Filipazzi, Paola; Zardini, Elisabetta; Vannini, Vanio

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application. PMID:21085483

  19. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P < 0.05) compared with unliganded conditions. The alterations in cell cycle duration were observed in the S and G2/M phases, whereas the G1 phase was indistinguishable under liganded and unliganded conditions. In addition, ERα knockdown in MCF-7 cells accelerated mitotic exit, whereas transfection of ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with exogenous ERα significantly shortened the S and G2/M phases (by 9.1 hours, P < 0.05) compared with parental cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with antiestrogens revealed that tamoxifen yields a slower cell cycle progression through the S and G2/M phases than fulvestrant does, presumably because of the destabilizing effect of fulvestrant on ERα protein. Together, these results show that ERα modulates breast cancer cell proliferation by regulating events during the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen.

  20. Aberrant Methylation Inactivates Somatostatin and Somatostatin Receptor Type 1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Kiyoshi; Misawa, Yuki; Kondo, Haruki; Mochizuki, Daiki; Imai, Atsushi; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Uehara, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Mineta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to define somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor type 1 (SSTR1) methylation profiles for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors at diagnosis and follow up and to evaluate their prognostic significance and value as a biomarker. Methods Gene expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Promoter methylation status was determined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (Q-MSP) in HNSCC. Results Methylation was associated with transcription inhibition. SST methylation in 81% of HNSCC tumor specimens significantly correlated with tumor size (P = 0.043), stage (P = 0.008), galanin receptor type 2 (GALR2) methylation (P = 0.041), and tachykinin-1 (TAC1) (P = 0.040). SSTR1 hypermethylation in 64% of cases was correlated with tumor size (P = 0.037), stage (P = 0.037), SST methylation (P < 0.001), and expression of galanin (P = 0.03), GALR2 (P = 0.014), TAC1 (P = 0.023), and tachykinin receptor type 1 (TACR1) (P = 0.003). SST and SSTR1 promoter hypermethylation showed highly discriminating receiver operator characteristic curve profiles, which clearly distinguished HNSCC from adjacent normal mucosal tissues. Concurrent hypermethylation of galanin and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.0001). Among patients with oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, methylation of both SST and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.028). In multivariate logistic-regression analysis, concomitant methylation of galanin and SSTR1 was associated with an odds ratio for recurrence of 12.53 (95% CI, 2.62 to 59.8; P = 0.002). Conclusions CpG hypermethylation is a likely mechanism of SST and SSTR1 gene inactivation, supporting the hypothesis that SST and SSTR1 play a role in the tumorigenesis of HNSCC and that this hypermethylation may serve as an important biomarker. PMID:25734919

  1. M-BAND Analysis of Chromosome Aberration In Human Epithelial Cells exposed to Gamma-ray and Secondary Neutrons of Low Dose Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's "30L" beam line is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams at an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr or gamma-ray at 1.7cGy/hr, and assessed the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with mBAND. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results for gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate, the neutron data showed a higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. The low dose rate gamma-rays induced a lower frequency of chromosome aberrations than high dose rate gamma-rays, but the inversion spectrum was similar for the same cytotoxic effect. The distribution of damage sites on chromosome 3 for different radiation types will also be discussed.

  2. A recurrent 11q aberration pattern characterizes a subset of MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas resembling Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Wagener, Rabea; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Richter, Julia; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Adam, Patrick; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Damm-Welk, Christine; Drexler, Hans G; Hummel, Michael; Jaffe, Elaine S; Küppers, Ralf; Lefebvre, Christine; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Löffler, Markus; Macleod, Roderick A F; Nagel, Inga; Oschlies, Ilske; Rosolowski, Maciej; Russell, Robert B; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Schindler, Detlev; Schlesner, Matthias; Scholtysik, René; Schwaenen, Carsten; Spang, Rainer; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Vater, Inga; Wessendorf, Swen; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-02-20

    The genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is the t(8;14)(q24;q32) and its variants leading to activation of the MYC oncogene. It is a matter of debate whether true BL without MYC translocation exists. Here, we identified 59 lymphomas concordantly called BL by 2 gene expression classifiers among 753 B-cell lymphomas. Only 2 (3%) of these 59 molecular BL lacked a MYC translocation, which both shared a peculiar pattern of chromosome 11q aberration characterized by interstitial gains including 11q23.2-q23.3 and telomeric losses of 11q24.1-qter. We extended our analysis to 17 MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas with a similar 11q aberration and showed this aberration to be recurrently associated with morphologic and clinical features of BL. The minimal region of gain was defined by high-level amplifications in 11q23.3 and associated with overexpression of genes including PAFAH1B2 on a transcriptional and protein level. The recurrent region of loss contained a focal homozygous deletion in 11q24.2-q24.3 including the ETS1 gene, which was shown to be mutated in 4 of 16 investigated cases. These findings indicate the existence of a molecularly distinct subset of B-cell lymphomas reminiscent of BL, which is characterized by deregulation of genes in 11q.

  3. A recurrent 11q aberration pattern characterizes a subset of MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas resembling Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Wagener, Rabea; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Richter, Julia; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Adam, Patrick; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Damm-Welk, Christine; Drexler, Hans G; Hummel, Michael; Jaffe, Elaine S; Küppers, Ralf; Lefebvre, Christine; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Löffler, Markus; Macleod, Roderick A F; Nagel, Inga; Oschlies, Ilske; Rosolowski, Maciej; Russell, Robert B; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Schindler, Detlev; Schlesner, Matthias; Scholtysik, René; Schwaenen, Carsten; Spang, Rainer; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Vater, Inga; Wessendorf, Swen; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-02-20

    The genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is the t(8;14)(q24;q32) and its variants leading to activation of the MYC oncogene. It is a matter of debate whether true BL without MYC translocation exists. Here, we identified 59 lymphomas concordantly called BL by 2 gene expression classifiers among 753 B-cell lymphomas. Only 2 (3%) of these 59 molecular BL lacked a MYC translocation, which both shared a peculiar pattern of chromosome 11q aberration characterized by interstitial gains including 11q23.2-q23.3 and telomeric losses of 11q24.1-qter. We extended our analysis to 17 MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas with a similar 11q aberration and showed this aberration to be recurrently associated with morphologic and clinical features of BL. The minimal region of gain was defined by high-level amplifications in 11q23.3 and associated with overexpression of genes including PAFAH1B2 on a transcriptional and protein level. The recurrent region of loss contained a focal homozygous deletion in 11q24.2-q24.3 including the ETS1 gene, which was shown to be mutated in 4 of 16 investigated cases. These findings indicate the existence of a molecularly distinct subset of B-cell lymphomas reminiscent of BL, which is characterized by deregulation of genes in 11q. PMID:24398325

  4. Aberrant Proliferation of Differentiating Alveolar Cells Induces Hyperplasia in Resting Mammary Glands of SV40-TAg Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Quante, Timo; Wegwitz, Florian; Abe, Julia; Rossi, Alessandra; Deppert, Wolfgang; Bohn, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    WAP-T1 transgenic mice express SV40-TAg under control of the whey acidic protein (WAP) promoter, which directs activity of this strong viral oncogene to luminal cells of the mammary gland. Resting uniparous WAP-T1 glands develop hyperplasia composed of TAg positive cells prior to appearance of advanced tumor stages. We show that cells in hyperplasia display markers of alveolar differentiation, suggesting that TAg targets differentiating cells of the alveolar compartment. The glands show significant expression of Elf5 and milk genes (Lalba, Csn2, and Wap). TAg expressing cells largely co-stain with antibodies to Elf5, lack the epithelial marker Sca1, and are hormone receptor negative. High expression levels of Elf5 but not of milk genes are also seen in resting glands of normal BALB/c mice. This indicates that expression of Elf5 in resting WAP-T1 glands is not specifically induced by TAg. CK6a positive luminal cells lack TAg. These cells co-express the markers prominin-1, CK6a, and Sca1, and are positive for hormone receptors. These hormone sensitive cells localize to ducts and seem not to be targeted by TAg. Despite reaching an advanced stage in alveolar differentiation, the cells in hyperplasia do not exit the cell cycle. Thus, expression of TAg in conjunction with regular morphogenetic processes of alveologenesis seem to provide the basis for a hormone independent, unscheduled proliferation of differentiating cells in resting glands of WAP-T1 transgenic mice, leading to the formation of hyperplastic lesions. PMID:25019062

  5. Two cell cycle blocks caused by iron chelation of neuroblastoma cells: separating cell cycle events associated with each block

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Gamini; Seligman, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Studies have presented evidence that besides the well described S phase block, treatment of cancer cell lines with the iron chelator deferrioxamine (DFO) also results in an earlier block in G1 phase. In this article, measurements of cell cycle regulatory proteins define this block at a very specific point in G1. DFO treatment results in markedly decreased cyclin A protein levels. Cyclin E levels that accumulate in early to mid‐G1 are increased in cells treated with DFO as compared to the resting cells. The DFO S phase block is shown after cells are arrested at G1/S by (aphidicolin) then released into DFO. The same S phase block occurs with DFO treatment of a neuroblastoma cell line relatively resistant to the G1 DFO block. These experiments clearly differentiate the S phase DFO block from the earlier block pinpointed to a point in mid‐G1, before G1/S when cyclin E protein increases but before increased cyclin A synthesis. Apoptosis was observed in cells inhibited by DFO at both cell cycle arrest points. PMID:24744856

  6. Two cell cycle blocks caused by iron chelation of neuroblastoma cells: separating cell cycle events associated with each block.

    PubMed

    Siriwardana, Gamini; Seligman, Paul A

    2013-12-01

    Studies have presented evidence that besides the well described S phase block, treatment of cancer cell lines with the iron chelator deferrioxamine (DFO) also results in an earlier block in G1 phase. In this article, measurements of cell cycle regulatory proteins define this block at a very specific point in G1. DFO treatment results in markedly decreased cyclin A protein levels. Cyclin E levels that accumulate in early to mid-G1 are increased in cells treated with DFO as compared to the resting cells. The DFO S phase block is shown after cells are arrested at G1/S by (aphidicolin) then released into DFO. The same S phase block occurs with DFO treatment of a neuroblastoma cell line relatively resistant to the G1 DFO block. These experiments clearly differentiate the S phase DFO block from the earlier block pinpointed to a point in mid-G1, before G1/S when cyclin E protein increases but before increased cyclin A synthesis. Apoptosis was observed in cells inhibited by DFO at both cell cycle arrest points.

  7. Advanced glycation end products are mitogenic signals and trigger cell cycle reentry of neurons in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Angela; Ludwig, Sophie C; Kuhla, Björn; Münch, Gerald; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2015-02-01

    Neurons that reenter the cell cycle die rather than divide, a phenomenon that is associated with neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Reexpression of cell-cycle related genes in differentiated neurons in AD might be rooted in aberrant mitogenic signaling. Because microglia and astroglia proliferate in the vicinity of amyloid plaques, it is likely that plaque components or factors secreted from plaque-activated glia induce neuronal mitogenic signaling. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), protein-bound oxidation products of sugar, might be one of those mitogenic compounds. Cyclin D1 positive neurons are colocalized with AGEs or directly surrounded by extracellular AGE deposits in AD brain. However, a direct proof of DNA replication in these cells has been missing. Here, we report by using fluorescent in situ hybridization that consistent with the expression of cell cycle proteins, hyperploid neuronal cells are in colocalization with AGE staining in AD brains but not in nondemented controls. To complement human data, we used apolipoprotein E-deficient mice as model of neurodegeneration and showed that increased oxidative stress caused an intensified neuronal deposition of AGEs, being accompanied by an activation of the MAPK cascade via RAGE. This cascade, in turn, induced the expression of cyclin D1 and DNA replication. In addition, reduction of oxidative stress by application of α-lipoic acid decreased AGE accumulations, and this decrease was accompanied by a reduction in cell cycle reentry and a more euploid neuronal genome.

  8. TOUSLED Kinase Activity Oscillates during the Cell Cycle and Interacts with Chromatin Regulators1

    PubMed Central

    Ehsan, Hashimul; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Durfee, Tim; Roe, Judith L.

    2004-01-01

    The TOUSLED (TSL)-like nuclear protein kinase family is highly conserved in plants and animals. tsl loss of function mutations cause pleiotropic defects in both leaf and flower development, and growth and initiation of floral organ primordia is abnormal, suggesting that basic cellular processes are affected. TSL is more highly expressed in exponentially growing Arabidopsis culture cells than in stationary, nondividing cells. While its expression remains constant throughout the cell cycle in dividing cells, TSL kinase activity is higher in enriched late G2/M-phase and G1-phase populations of Arabidopsis suspension culture cells compared to those in S-phase. tsl mutants also display an aberrant pattern and increased expression levels of the mitotic cyclin gene CycB1;1, suggesting that TSL represses CycB1;1 expression at certain times during development or that cells are delayed in mitosis. TSL interacts with and phosphorylates one of two Arabidopsis homologs of the nucleosome assembly/silencing protein Asf1 and histone H3, as in humans, and a novel plant SANT/myb-domain protein, TKI1, suggesting that TSL plays a role in chromatin metabolism. PMID:15047893

  9. Mathematical model of the cell division cycle of fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Bela; Pataki, Zsuzsa; Ciliberto, Andrea; Tyson, John J.

    2001-03-01

    Much is known about the genes and proteins controlling the cell cycle of fission yeast. Can these molecular components be spun together into a consistent mechanism that accounts for the observed behavior of growth and division in fission yeast cells? To answer this question, we propose a mechanism for the control system, convert it into a set of 14 differential and algebraic equations, study these equations by numerical simulation and bifurcation theory, and compare our results to the physiology of wild-type and mutant cells. In wild-type cells, progress through the cell cycle (G1→S→G2→M) is related to cyclic progression around a hysteresis loop, driven by cell growth and chromosome alignment on the metaphase plate. However, the control system operates much differently in double-mutant cells, wee1- cdc25Δ, which are defective in progress through the latter half of the cell cycle (G2 and M phases). These cells exhibit "quantized" cycles (interdivision times clustering around 90, 160, and 230 min). We show that these quantized cycles are associated with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the mechanism, when the wee1 and cdc25 genes are disabled.

  10. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  11. Large scale spontaneous synchronization of cell cycles in amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, Carl

    2014-03-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. We show that substrate-growtn cell populations spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state and provide opportunities for synchronization theories beyond classic Kuramoto models.

  12. Cell-cycle-regulated activation of Akt kinase by phosphorylation at its carboxyl terminus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengda; Begley, Michael; Michowski, Wojciech; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Ginzberg, Miriam; Gao, Daming; Tsou, Peiling; Gan, Wenjian; Papa, Antonella; Kim, Byeong Mo; Wan, Lixin; Singh, Amrik; Zhai, Bo; Yuan, Min; Wang, Zhiwei; Gygi, Steven P.; Lee, Tae Ho; Lu, Kun-Ping; Toker, Alex; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Asara, John M.; Kirschner, Marc W.; Sicinski, Piotr; Cantley, Lewis; Wei, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    Akt, also known as protein kinase B, plays key roles in cell proliferation, survival and metabolism. Akt hyperactivation contributes to many pathophysiological conditions, including human cancers1–3, and is closely associated with poor prognosis and chemo- or radio-therapeutic resistance4. Phosphorylation of Akt at S473 (ref. 5) and T308 (ref. 6) activates Akt. However, it remains unclear whether further mechanisms account for full Akt activation, and whether Akt hyperactivation is linked to misregulated cell cycle progression, another cancer hallmark7. Here we report that Akt activity fluctuates across the cell cycle, mirroring cyclin A expression. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of S477 and T479 at the Akt extreme carboxy terminus by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2)/cyclin A or mTORC2, under distinct physiological conditions, promotes Akt activation through facilitating, or functionally compensating for, S473 phosphorylation. Furthermore, deletion of the cyclin A2 allele in the mouse olfactory bulb leads to reduced S477/T479 phosphorylation and elevated cellular apoptosis. Notably, cyclin A2-deletion-induced cellular apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells is partly rescued by S477D/T479E-Akt1, supporting a physiological role for cyclin A2 in governing Akt activation. Together, the results of our study show Akt S477/T479 phosphorylation to be an essential layer of the Akt activation mechanism to regulate its physiological functions, thereby providing a new mechanistic link between aberrant cell cycle progression and Akt hyperactivation in cancer. PMID:24670654

  13. Molecular markers and cell cycle inhibitors show the importance of cell cycle progression in nematode-induced galls and syncytia.

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Engler, J; De Vleesschauwer, V; Burssens, S; Celenza, J L; Inzé, D; Van Montagu, M; Engler, G; Gheysen, G

    1999-01-01

    Root knot and cyst nematodes induce large multinucleated cells, designated giant cells and syncytia, respectively, in plant roots. We have used molecular markers to study cell cycle progression in these specialized feeding cells. In situ hybridization with two cyclin-dependent kinases and two cyclins showed that these genes were induced very early in galls and syncytia and that the feeding cells progressed through the G2 phase. By using cell cycle blockers, DNA synthesis and progression through the G2 phase, or mitosis, were shown to be essential for gall and syncytium establishment. When mitosis was blocked, further gall development was arrested. This result demonstrates that cycles of endoreduplication or other methods of DNA amplification are insufficient to drive giant cell expansion. On the other hand, syncytium development was much less affected by a mitotic block; however, syncytium expansion was inhibited. PMID:10330466

  14. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Yde, Pernille; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2009-06-01

    During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent α that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent α was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences in the subdiffusive exponents from granules measured in different stages of cell division. Also, our results for the exponent displayed no significant dependence on the position of the granule within the cell. The observation that the cytoplasm is more elastic during interphase than during mitotic cell division is consistent with the fact that elastic cytoskeletal elements such as microtubules are less abundantly present during cell division than during interphase.

  15. A Regulatory Feedback between Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells and Regulatory B Cells Is Aberrant in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Madhvi; Blair, Paul A.; Isenberg, David A.; Mauri, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Summary Signals controlling the generation of regulatory B (Breg) cells remain ill-defined. Here we report an “auto”-regulatory feedback mechanism between plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and Breg cells. In healthy individuals, pDCs drive the differentiation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi (immature) B cells into IL-10-producing CD24+CD38hi Breg cells and plasmablasts, via the release of IFN-α and CD40 engagement. CD24+CD38hi Breg cells conversely restrained IFN-α production by pDCs via IL-10 release. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), this cross-talk was compromised; pDCs promoted plasmablast differentiation but failed to induce Breg cells. This defect was recapitulated in healthy B cells upon exposure to a high concentration of IFN-α. Defective pDC-mediated expansion of CD24+CD38hi Breg cell numbers in SLE was associated with altered STAT1 and STAT3 activation. Both altered pDC-CD24+CD38hi Breg cell interactions and STAT1-STAT3 activation were normalized in SLE patients responding to rituximab. We propose that alteration in pDC-CD24+CD38hi Breg cell interaction contributes to the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:26968426

  16. Keith's MAGIC: Cloning and the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Professor Keith Campbell's critical contribution to the discovery that a somatic cell from an adult animal can be fully reprogrammed by oocyte factors to form a cloned individual following nuclear transfer (NT)(Wilmut et al., 1997 ) overturned a dogma concerning the reversibility of cell fate that many scientists had considered to be biologically impossible. This seminal experiment proved the totipotency of adult somatic nuclei and finally confirmed that adult cells could differentiate without irreversible changes to the genetic material.

  17. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  18. Transient presence of clonal chromosomal aberrations in Ph-negative cells in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia remaining in deep molecular response on tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Gniot, Michał; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Ratajczak, Błażej; Lewandowska, Maria; Lehmann-Kopydłowska, Agata; Jarmuż-Szymczak, Małgorzata; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) turned this formerly fatal neoplasm into a manageable chronic condition. Therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) often leads to significant reduction of disease burden, known as the deep molecular response (DMR). Herein, we decided to analyze the cohort of CML patients treated in our center with TKIs, who obtain and retain DMR for a period longer than 24 months. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency of clonal cytogenetic aberrations in Philadelphia-negative (Ph-) cells in patients with DMR during TKI treatment. The analyzed data was obtained during routine molecular and cytogenetic treatment monitoring, using G-banded trypsin and Giemsa stain (GTG) karyotyping and reverse transcription quantitative PCR. We noticed that approximately 50% of patients (28 of 55) in DMR had, at some follow-up point, transient changes in the karyotype of their Ph- bone marrow cells. In 9.1% of cases (5 of 55), the presence of the same aberrations was observed at different time points. The most frequently appearing aberrations were monosomies of chromosomes 19, 20, 21, and Y. Statistical analysis suggests that the occurrence of such abnormalities in CML patients correlates with the TKI treatment time. PMID:25496750

  19. Modeling the cell division cycle: cdc2 and cyclin interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, J J

    1991-01-01

    The proteins cdc2 and cyclin form a heterodimer (maturation promoting factor) that controls the major events of the cell cycle. A mathematical model for the interactions of cdc2 and cyclin is constructed. Simulation and analysis of the model show that the control system can operate in three modes: as a steady state with high maturation promoting factor activity, as a spontaneous oscillator, or as an excitable switch. We associate the steady state with metaphase arrest in unfertilized eggs, the spontaneous oscillations with rapid division cycles in early embryos, and the excitable switch with growth-controlled division cycles typical of nonembryonic cells. PMID:1831270

  20. Effects of caffeine and inhibitors of DNA synthesis on chromatid-type aberrations induced by acetaldehyde in root-tip cells.

    PubMed

    Cortés, F; Mateos, S; Ortiz, T; Piñero, J

    1987-10-01

    Root-tip cells of Allium cepa were exposed to acetaldehyde (AA) and post-treated with caffeine and 3 inhibitors of DNA synthesis, namely hydroxyurea (HU), 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), and arabinofuranosylcytosine (araC). Caffeine strongly potentiated the frequency of chromatid-type aberrations when given immediately after the AA treatment or as a 5-h treatment starting 10 h before the addition of colchicine. In contrast, no enhancement was observed when caffeine was present for the last 2.5 h, simultaneously with colchicine. The inhibitors of DNA synthesis were given following this last schedule. Both HU and FdUrd clearly enhanced the yield of AA-induced chromatid aberrations, while no enhancement of chromosome damage was observed after exposure to araC.

  1. Werner's syndrome: a review of recent research with an analysis of connective tissue metabolism, growth control of cultured cells, and chromosomal aberrations.

    PubMed

    Salk, D

    1982-01-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive condition with multiple progeroid features, but it is an imitation of aging rather than accelerated or premature senescence. Somatic chromosome aberrations occur in multiple tissues in vivo and in vitro, and there is an increased incidence of neoplasia. Thus. Werner's syndrome can be classified in the group of chromosome instability syndromes. Recent findings provide additional support for the concept that there is an aberration of connective tissue metabolism in Werner's syndrome, but it is unclear whether this is a primary or secondary manifestation of the underlying genetic defect. Abnormal growth characteristics are observed in cultured skin fibroblast-like cells and this provides another avenue for current research. Identification of the basic genetic defect in Werner's syndrome might clarify our understanding of the normal aging process in general, or might elucidate specific aspects such as the development of neoplasia, atherosclerosis, diabetes, or osteoporosis.

  2. The Aberrant DNA Methylation Profile of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Is Connected to the Reprogramming Process and Is Normalized During In Vitro Culture

    PubMed Central

    Tesarova, Lenka; Simara, Pavel; Stejskal, Stanislav; Koutna, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The potential clinical applications of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are limited by genetic and epigenetic variations among hiPSC lines and the question of their equivalency with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We used MethylScreen technology to determine the DNA methylation profile of pluripotency and differentiation markers in hiPSC lines from different source cell types compared to hESCs and hiPSC source cells. After derivation, hiPSC lines compromised a heterogeneous population characterized by variable levels of aberrant DNA methylation. These aberrations were induced during somatic cell reprogramming and their levels were associated with the type of hiPSC source cells. hiPSC population heterogeneity was reduced during prolonged culture and hiPSCs acquired an hESC-like methylation profile. In contrast, the expression of differentiation marker genes in hiPSC lines remained distinguishable from that in hESCs. Taken together, in vitro culture facilitates hiPSC acquisition of hESC epigenetic characteristics. However, differences remain between both pluripotent stem cell types, which must be considered before their use in downstream applications. PMID:27336948

  3. Three-dimensional locations of gold-labeled proteins in a whole mount eukaryotic cell obtained with 3 nm precision using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, Madeline J.; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Jerome, W. Gray; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) maps of proteins within the context of whole cells are important for investigating cellular function. However, 3D reconstructions of whole cells are challenging to obtain using conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We describe a methodology to determine the 3D locations of proteins labeled with gold nanoparticles on whole eukaryotic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptors on COS7 cells were labeled with gold nanoparticles, and critical-point dried whole-mount cell samples were prepared. 3D focal series were obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), without tilting the specimen. The axial resolution was improved with deconvolution. The vertical locations of the nanoparticles in a whole-mount cell were determined with a precision of 3 nm. From the analysis of the variation of the axial positions of the labels we concluded that the cellular surface was ruffled. To achieve sufficient stability of the sample under the electron beam irradiation during the recording of the focal series, the sample was carbon coated. A quantitative method was developed to analyze the stability of the ultrastructure after electron beam irradiation using TEM. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using aberration-corrected STEM to study the 3D nanoparticle distribution in whole cells. PMID:21440635

  4. Three-dimensional locations of gold-labeled proteins in a whole mount eukaryotic cell obtained with 3nm precision using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dukes, Madeline J; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Gray Jerome, W; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) maps of proteins within the context of whole cells are important for investigating cellular function. However, 3D reconstructions of whole cells are challenging to obtain using conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We describe a methodology to determine the 3D locations of proteins labeled with gold nanoparticles on whole eukaryotic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptors on COS7 cells were labeled with gold nanoparticles, and critical-point dried whole-mount cell samples were prepared. 3D focal series were obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), without tilting the specimen. The axial resolution was improved with deconvolution. The vertical locations of the nanoparticles in a whole-mount cell were determined with a precision of 3nm. From the analysis of the variation of the axial positions of the labels we concluded that the cellular surface was ruffled. To achieve sufficient stability of the sample under electron beam irradiation during the recording of the focal series, the sample was carbon coated. A quantitative method was developed to analyze the stability of the ultrastructure after electron beam irradiation using TEM. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using aberration-corrected STEM to study the 3D nanoparticle distribution in whole cells.

  5. The Aberrant DNA Methylation Profile of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Is Connected to the Reprogramming Process and Is Normalized During In Vitro Culture.

    PubMed

    Tesarova, Lenka; Simara, Pavel; Stejskal, Stanislav; Koutna, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The potential clinical applications of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are limited by genetic and epigenetic variations among hiPSC lines and the question of their equivalency with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We used MethylScreen technology to determine the DNA methylation profile of pluripotency and differentiation markers in hiPSC lines from different source cell types compared to hESCs and hiPSC source cells. After derivation, hiPSC lines compromised a heterogeneous population characterized by variable levels of aberrant DNA methylation. These aberrations were induced during somatic cell reprogramming and their levels were associated with the type of hiPSC source cells. hiPSC population heterogeneity was reduced during prolonged culture and hiPSCs acquired an hESC-like methylation profile. In contrast, the expression of differentiation marker genes in hiPSC lines remained distinguishable from that in hESCs. Taken together, in vitro culture facilitates hiPSC acquisition of hESC epigenetic characteristics. However, differences remain between both pluripotent stem cell types, which must be considered before their use in downstream applications. PMID:27336948

  6. p53 and Cell Cycle Effects After DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Senturk, Emir; Manfredi, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry, a valuable technique that employs the principles of light scattering, light excitation, and emission of fluorochrome molecules, can be used to assess the cell cycle position of individual cells based on DNA content. After the permeabilization of cells, the DNA can be stained with a fluorescent dye. Cells which have a 2N amount of DNA can be distinguished from cells with a 4N amount of DNA, making flow cytometry a very useful tool for the analysis of cell cycle checkpoints following DNA damage. A critical feature of the cellular response to DNA damage is the ability to pause and repair the damage so that consequential mutations are not passed along to daughter generations of cells. If cells arrest prior to DNA replication, they will contain a 2N amount of DNA, whereas arrest after replication but before mitosis will result in a 4N amount of DNA. Using this technique, the role that p53 plays in cell cycle checkpoints following DNA damage can be evaluated based on changes in the profile of the G1, S, and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. PMID:23150436

  7. The response of normal and ataxia-telangiectasia cells to bleomycin: relationships between chromosome damage, cell cycle delay and cell killing.

    PubMed

    Zampetti-Bosseler, F; Scott, D

    1985-08-01

    In agreement with our earlier observation (Scott and Zampetti-Bosseler, 1982) on X-irradiated normal and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) fibroblasts, we now report that after bleomycin or neocarzinostatin treatment also, A-T cells exhibit less G2 delay than normal cells. We confirm that A-T cells sustain more chromosome damage and lethality than normal cells after bleomycin. These observations support the hypothesis (Painter and Young, 1980) that A-T cells are defective in the recognition of certain lesions which normally lead to delays in progression through the cell cycle, during which they are repaired, and which, if unrepaired, lead to cell-lethal chromosome damage. However, we find that after bleomycin, as opposed to X-rays, the contribution of this type of lesion to cell death is minimal. The predominant lesions leading to cell death after bleomycin are not manifested at chromosome aberrations and do not lead to G2 delay or DNA-synthesis inhibition. A-T cells are defective in the recognition and/or repair of both types of lesion.

  8. Targeting the cancer cell cycle by cold atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotskova, O.; Hawley, T. S.; Stepp, M. A.; Keidar, M.

    2012-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), a technology based on quasi-neutral ionized gas at low temperatures, is currently being evaluated as a new highly selective alternative addition to existing cancer therapies. Here, we present a first attempt to identify the mechanism of CAP action. CAP induced a robust ~2-fold G2/M increase in two different types of cancer cells with different degrees of tumorigenicity. We hypothesize that the increased sensitivity of cancer cells to CAP treatment is caused by differences in the distribution of cancer cells and normal cells within the cell cycle. The expression of γH2A.X (pSer139), an oxidative stress reporter indicating S-phase damage, is enhanced specifically within CAP treated cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. Together with a significant decrease in EdU-incorporation after CAP, these data suggest that tumorigenic cancer cells are more susceptible to CAP treatment.

  9. The Timing of T Cell Priming and Cycling.

    PubMed

    Obst, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of specific lymphocytes is the central tenet of the clonal selection paradigm. Antigen recognition by T cells triggers a series of events that produces expanded clones of differentiated effector cells. TCR signaling events are detectable within seconds and minutes and are likely to continue for hours and days in vivo. Here, I review the work done on the importance of TCR signals in the later part of the expansion phase of the primary T cell response, primarily regarding the regulation of the cell cycle in CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. The results suggest a degree of programing by early signals for effector differentiation, particularly in the CD8(+) T cell compartment, with optimal expansion supported by persistent antigen presentation later on. Differences to CD4(+) T cell expansion and new avenues toward a molecular understanding of cell cycle regulation in lymphocytes are discussed. PMID:26594213

  10. Interplay between flagellation and cell cycle control in Caulobacter.

    PubMed

    Ardissone, Silvia; Viollier, Patrick H

    2015-12-01

    The assembly of the flagellum, a sophisticated nanomachine powering bacterial locomotion in liquids and across surfaces, is highly regulated. In the synchronizable α-Proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum is built at a pre-selected cell pole and flagellar transcript abundance oscillates during the cell cycle. Conserved regulators not only dictate when the transcripts encoding flagellar structural proteins peak, but also those encoding polarization factors. Additionally, post-transcriptional cell cycle cues facilitate flagellar (dis-)assembly at the new cell pole. Because of this regulatory complexity and the power of bacterial genetics, motility is a suitable and simple proxy for dissecting how bacteria implement cell cycle progression and polarity, while also providing clues on how bacteria might decide when and where to display other surface structures. PMID:26476805

  11. The Dynamical Mechanisms of the Cell Cycle Size Checkpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shi-Fu; Yan, Jie; Liu, Zeng-Rong; Yang, Ling

    2012-10-01

    Cell division must be tightly coupled to cell growth in order to maintain cell size, whereas the mechanisms of how initialization of mitosis is regulated by cell size remain to be elucidated. We develop a mathematical model of the cell cycle, which incorporates cell growth to investigate the dynamical properties of the size checkpoint in embryos of Xenopus laevis. We show that the size checkpoint is naturally raised from a saddle-node bifurcation, and in a mutant case, the cell loses its size control ability due to the loss of this saddle-node point.

  12. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Controls Cell Cycle Progression by Regulating the Expression of Oncogenic Transcription Factor B-MYB

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Vidisha; Shen, Zhen; Chakraborty, Arindam; Giri, Sumanprava; Freier, Susan M.; Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yongqing; Gorospe, Myriam; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Lal, Ashish; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2013-01-01

    The long noncoding MALAT1 RNA is upregulated in cancer tissues and its elevated expression is associated with hyper-proliferation, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We demonstrate that MALAT1 levels are regulated during normal cell cycle progression. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses in normal human diploid fibroblasts reveal that MALAT1 modulates the expression of cell cycle genes and is required for G1/S and mitotic progression. Depletion of MALAT1 leads to activation of p53 and its target genes. The cell cycle defects observed in MALAT1-depleted cells are sensitive to p53 levels, indicating that p53 is a major downstream mediator of MALAT1 activity. Furthermore, MALAT1-depleted cells display reduced expression of B-MYB (Mybl2), an oncogenic transcription factor involved in G2/M progression, due to altered binding of splicing factors on B-MYB pre-mRNA and aberrant alternative splicing. In human cells, MALAT1 promotes cellular proliferation by modulating the expression and/or pre-mRNA processing of cell cycle–regulated transcription factors. These findings provide mechanistic insights on the role of MALAT1 in regulating cellular proliferation. PMID:23555285

  13. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A.; Hoegger, Dominik C.; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization. PMID:23267082

  14. Combined cycle phosphoric acid fuel cell electric power system

    SciTech Connect

    Mollot, D.J.; Micheli, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    By arranging two or more electric power generation cycles in series, combined cycle systems are able to produce electric power more efficiently than conventional single cycle plants. The high fuel to electricity conversion efficiency results in lower plant operating costs, better environmental performance, and in some cases even lower capital costs. Despite these advantages, combined cycle systems for the 1 - 10 megawatt (MW) industrial market are rare. This paper presents a low noise, low (oxides of nitrogen) NOx, combined cycle alternative for the small industrial user. By combining a commercially available phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with a low-temperature Rankine cycle (similar to those used in geothermal applications), electric conversion efficiencies between 45 and 47 percent are predicted. While the simple cycle PAFC is competitive on a cost of energy basis with gas turbines and diesel generators in the 1 to 2 MW market, the combined cycle PAFC is competitive, on a cost of energy basis, with simple cycle diesel generators in the 4 to 25 MW market. In addition, the efficiency and low-temperature operation of the combined cycle PAFC results in a significant reduction in carbon dioxide emissions with NO{sub x} concentration on the order of 1 parts per million (per weight) (ppmw).

  15. Post-transcriptional RNA Regulons Affecting Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Blackinton, Jeff G.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular growth cycle is initiated and maintained by punctual, yet agile, regulatory events involving modifications of cell cycle proteins as well as coordinated gene expression to support cyclic checkpoint decisions. Recent evidence indicates that post-transcriptional partitioning of messenger RNA subsets by RNA-binding proteins help physically localize, temporally coordinate, and efficiently translate cell cycle proteins. This dynamic organization of mRNAs encoding cell cycle components contributes to the overall economy of the cell cycle consistent with the post-transcriptional RNA regulon model of gene expression. This review examines several recent studies demonstrating the coordination of mRNA subsets encoding cell cycle proteins during nuclear export and subsequent coupling to protein synthesis, and discusses evidence for mRNA coordination of p53 targets and the DNA damage response pathway. We consider how these observations may connect to upstream and downstream post-transcriptional coordination and coupling of splicing, export, localization, and translation. Published examples from yeast, nematode, insect, and mammalian systems are discussed, and we consider genetic evidence supporting the conclusion that dysregulation of RNA regulons may promote pathogenic states of growth such as carcinogenesis. PMID:24882724

  16. How the cell cycle impacts chromatin architecture and influences cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yiqin; Kanakousaki, Kiriaki; Buttitta, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Since the earliest observations of cells undergoing mitosis, it has been clear that there is an intimate relationship between the cell cycle and nuclear chromatin architecture. The nuclear envelope and chromatin undergo robust assembly and disassembly during the cell cycle, and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of histone biogenesis and chromatin modification is controlled in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Chromatin binding proteins and chromatin modifications in turn influence the expression of critical cell cycle regulators, the accessibility of origins for DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell fate. In this review we aim to provide an integrated discussion of how the cell cycle machinery impacts nuclear architecture and vice-versa. We highlight recent advances in understanding cell cycle-dependent histone biogenesis and histone modification deposition, how cell cycle regulators control histone modifier activities, the contribution of chromatin modifications to origin firing for DNA replication, and newly identified roles for nucleoporins in regulating cell cycle gene expression, gene expression memory and differentiation. We close with a discussion of how cell cycle status may impact chromatin to influence cell fate decisions, under normal contexts of differentiation as well as in instances of cell fate reprogramming. PMID:25691891

  17. Hormone dependency of chromosome aberrations induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene in rat bone marrow cells: site-specific increase by erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, N.; Suglyama, T.; Chattopadhyay, S.C.; Goto-Mimura, K.; Maeda, S.

    1981-08-01

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) 6 hours after iv injection of 50 mg 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA0/kg was studied in bone marrow cells of the noninbred Long-Evans rat under various hematopoietic conditions. The percentage of metaphase cells with CA was enhanced by anemia and suppressed by polycythemia. The low incidence of CA in polycythemic rats was reversed by 6 U of sheep erythropoietin (EP) injected at the time of DMBA treatment. The interchromosomal and intrachromosomal distribution of CA indicated that hematopoietic stimuli, more specifically EP, greatly enhanced DMBA-induced CA in specific chromosomal regions.

  18. Aberrant Cytoplasm Localization and Protein Stability of SIRT1 is Regulated by PI3K/IGF-1R Signaling in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Byles, Vanessa; Chmilewski, Laura K.; Wang, Joyce; Zhu, Lijia; Forman, Lora W.; Faller, Douglas V.; Dai, Yan

    2010-01-01

    SIRT1, an NAD-dependent histone/protein deacetylase, has classically been thought of as a nuclear protein. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT1 is mainly localized in the nucleus of normal cells, but is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm of the cancer / transformed cells we tested. We found this predominant cytoplasmic localization of SIRT1 is regulated by elevated mitotic activity and PI3K/IGF-1R signaling in cancer cells. We show that aberrant cytoplasmic localization of SIRT1 is due to increased protein stability and is regulated by PI3K/IGF-1R signaling. In addition, we determined that SIRT1 is required for PI3K-mediated cancer cell growth. Our study represents the first identification that aberrant cytoplasm localization is one of the specific alternations to SIRT1 that occur in cancer cells, and PI3K/IGF-1R signaling plays an important role in the regulation of cytoplasmic SIRT1 stability. Our findings suggest that the over-expressed cytoplasmic SIRT1 in cancer cells may greatly contribute to its cancer-specific function by working downstream of the PI3K/IGF-1R signaling pathway. PMID:20941378

  19. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields and the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlke, Megan A.

    Exposure to nanosecond pulsed electrical fields (nsPEFs) can cause poration of external and internal cell membranes, DNA damage, and disassociation of cytoskeletal components, all of which are capable of disrupting a cell's ability to replicate. The phase of the cell cycle at the time of exposure is linked to differential sensitivities to nsPEFs across cell lines, as DNA structure, membrane elasticity, and cytoskeletal structure change dramatically during the cell cycle. Additionally, nsPEFs are capable of activating cell cycle checkpoints, which could lead to apoptosis or slow population growth. NsPEFs are emerging as a method for treating tumors via apoptotic induction; therefore, investigating the relevance of nsPEFs and the cell cycle could translate into improved efficacy in tumor treatment. Populations of Jurkat and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were examined post-exposure (10 ns pulse trains at 150kV/cm) by analysis of DNA content via propidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis at various time points (1, 6, and 12h post-exposure) to determine population distribution in cell cycle phases. Additionally, CHO and Jurkat cells were synchronized in G1/S and G2/M phases, pulsed, and analyzed to evaluate the role of cell cycle phase in survival of nsPEFs. CHO populations appeared similar to sham populations post-nsPEFs but exhibited arrest in the G1 phase at 6h after exposure. Jurkat cells exhibited increased cell death after nsPEFs compared to CHO cells but did not exhibit checkpoint arrest at any observed time point. The G1/S phase checkpoint is partially controlled by the action of p53; the lack of an active p53 response in Jurkat cells could contribute to their ability to pass this checkpoint and resist cell cycle arrest. Both cell lines exhibited increased sensitivity to nsPEFs in G2/M phase. Live imaging of CHO cells after nsPEF exposure supports the theory of G1/S phase arrest, as a reduced number of cells undergo mitosis within 24 h when

  20. Cell cycles and proliferation patterns in Haematococcus pluvialis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Litao

    2016-09-01

    Most studies on Haematococcus pluvialis have been focused on cell growth and astaxanthin accumulation; far less attention has been paid to cell cycles and proliferation patterns. The purpose of this study was to clarify cell cycles and proliferation patterns in H. pluvialis microscopically using a camera and video recorder system. The complicated life history of H. pluvialis can be divided into two stages: the motile stage and the non-motile stage. All the cells can be classified into forms as follows: motile cell, non-motile cell, zoospore and aplanospore. The main cell proliferation, both in the motile phase and non-motile phase in H. pluvialis, is by asexual reproduction. Under normal growth conditions, a motile cell usually produces two, sometimes four, and exceptionally eight zoospores. Under unfavorable conditions, the motile cell loses its flagella and transforms into a non-motile cell, and the non-motile cell usually produces 2, 4 or 8 aplanospores, and occasionally 20-32 aplanospores, which further develop into non-motile cells. Under suitable conditions, the non-motile cell is also able to release zoospores. The larger non-motile cells produce more than 16 zoospores, and the smaller ones produce 4 or 8 zoospores. Vegetative reproduction is by direct cell division in the motile phase and by occasional cell budding in the non-motile phase. There is, as yet, no convincing direct evidence for sexual reproduction.

  1. Cell cycle arrest is not yet senescence, which is not just cell cycle arrest: terminology for TOR-driven aging.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2012-03-01

    Cell cycle arrest is not yet senescence. When the cell cycle is arrested, an inappropriate growth-promotion converts an arrest into senescence (geroconversion). By inhibiting the growth-promoting mTOR pathway, rapamycin decelerates geroconversion of the arrested cells. And as a striking example, while causing arrest, p53 may decelerate or suppress geroconversion (in some conditions). Here I discuss the meaning of geroconversion and also the terms gerogenes, gerossuppressors, gerosuppressants, gerogenic pathways, gero-promoters, hyperfunction and feedback resistance, regenerative potential, hypertrophy and secondary atrophy, pro-gerogenic and gerogenic cells. PMID:22394614

  2. Digital Holographic Microscopy for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Cell Cycle Arrest in L929 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Falck Miniotis, Maria; Mukwaya, Anthonny; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has emerged as a powerful non-invasive tool for cell analysis. It has the capacity to analyse multiple parameters simultaneously, such as cell- number, confluence and phase volume. This is done while cells are still adhered and growing in their culture flask. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DHM was able to monitor drug-induced cell cycle arrest in cultured cells and thus provide a non-disruptive alternative to flow cytometry. DHM parameters from G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrested L929 mouse fibroblast cells were collected. Cell cycle arrest was verified with flow cytometry. This study shows that DHM is able to monitor phase volume changes corresponding to either a G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest. G1-phase arrest with staurosporine correlated with a decrease in the average cell phase volume and G2/M-phase arrest with colcemid and etoposide correlated with an increase in the average cell phase volume. Importantly, DHM analysis of average cell phase volume was of comparable accuracy to flow cytometric measurement of cell cycle phase distribution as recorded following dose-dependent treatment with etoposide. Average cell phase volume changes in response to treatment with cell cycle arresting compounds could therefore be used as a DHM marker for monitoring cell cycle arrest in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:25208094

  3. The architectural organization of human stem cell cycle regulatory machinery.

    PubMed

    Stein, Gary S; Stein, Janet L; van J Wijnen, Andre; Lian, Jane B; Montecino, Martin; Medina, Ricardo; Kapinas, Kristie; Ghule, Prachi; Grandy, Rodrigo; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Becker, Klaus A

    2012-01-01

    Two striking features of human embryonic stem cells that support biological activity are an abbreviated cell cycle and reduced complexity to nuclear organization. The potential implications for rapid proliferation of human embryonic stem cells within the context of sustaining pluripotency, suppressing phenotypic gene expression and linkage to simplicity in the architectural compartmentalization of regulatory machinery in nuclear microenvironments is explored. Characterization of the molecular and architectural commitment steps that license human embryonic stem cells to initiate histone gene expression is providing understanding of the principal regulatory mechanisms that control the G1/S phase transition in primitive pluripotent cells. From both fundamental regulatory and clinical perspectives, further understanding of the pluripotent cell cycle in relation to compartmentalization of regulatory machinery in nuclear microenvironments is relevant to applications of stem cells for regenerative medicine and new dimensions to therapy where traditional drug discovery strategies have been minimally effective.

  4. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  5. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-09-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process.

  6. IgA1-secreting cell lines from patients with IgA nephropathy produce aberrantly glycosylated IgA1.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Moldoveanu, Zina; Hall, Stacy; Brown, Rhubell; Vu, Huong L; Novak, Lea; Julian, Bruce A; Tomana, Milan; Wyatt, Robert J; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Alarcón, Graciela S; Kimberly, Robert P; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan

    2008-02-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. This abnormality is manifested by a deficiency of galactose in the hinge-region O-linked glycans of IgA1. Biosynthesis of these glycans occurs in a stepwise fashion beginning with the addition of N-acetylgalactosamine by the enzyme N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 and continuing with the addition of either galactose by beta1,3-galactosyltransferase or a terminal sialic acid by a N-acetylgalactosamine-specific alpha2,6-sialyltransferase. To identify the molecular basis for the aberrant IgA glycosylation, we established EBV-immortalized IgA1-producing cells from peripheral blood cells of patients with IgA nephropathy. The secreted IgA1 was mostly polymeric and had galactose-deficient O-linked glycans, characterized by a terminal or sialylated N-acetylgalactosamine. As controls, we showed that EBV-immortalized cells from patients with lupus nephritis and healthy individuals did not produce IgA with the defective galactosylation pattern. Analysis of the biosynthetic pathways in cloned EBV-immortalized cells from patients with IgA nephropathy indicated a decrease in beta1,3-galactosyltransferase activity and an increase in N-acetylgalactosamine-specific alpha2,6-sialyltransferase activity. Also, expression of beta1,3-galactosyltransferase was significantly lower, and that of N-acetylgalactosamine-specific alpha2,6-sialyltransferase was significantly higher than the expression of these genes in the control cells. Thus, our data suggest that premature sialylation likely contributes to the aberrant IgA1 glycosylation in IgA nephropathy and may represent a new therapeutic target.

  7. Nicotine derived genotoxic effects in human primary parotid gland cells as assessed in vitro by comet assay, cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and chromosome aberrations test.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Steussloff, Gudrun; Koehler, Christian; Burghartz, Marc; Scherzed, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2014-08-01

    Genotoxic effects of nicotine were described in different human cells including salivary gland cells. Based on the high nicotine concentration in saliva of smokers or patients using therapeutic nicotine patches, the current study was performed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of nicotine in human salivary gland cells. Therefore, primary salivary gland cells from 10 patients undergoing parotid gland surgery were exposed to nicotine concentrations between 1 μM and 1000 μM for 1 h in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation. The acinar phenotype was proven by immunofluorescent staining of alpha-amylase. Genotoxic effects were evaluated using the Comet assay, the micronucleus test and the chromosome aberration test. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were determined by trypan blue exclusion test and Caspase-3 assay. Nicotine was able to induce genotoxic effects in all three assays. The chromosome aberration test was the most sensitive and increases in numerical and structural (chromatid-type and chromosome-type) aberrations were seen at ≥1 μM, whereas increases in micronuclei frequency were detected at 10 μM and DNA damage as measured in the Comet assay was noted at >100 μM. No cytotoxic damage or influence of apoptosis could be demonstrated. Nicotine as a possible risk factor for tumor initiation in salivary glands is still discussed controversially. Our results demonstrated the potential of nicotine to induce genotoxic effects in salivary gland cells. These results were observed at saliva nicotine levels similar to those found after oral or transdermal exposure to nicotine and suggest the necessity of careful monitoring of the use of nicotine in humans. PMID:24698733

  8. IgA1-secreting cell lines from patients with IgA nephropathy produce aberrantly glycosylated IgA1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Moldoveanu, Zina; Hall, Stacy; Brown, Rhubell; Vu, Huong L.; Novak, Lea; Julian, Bruce A.; Tomana, Milan; Wyatt, Robert J.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. This abnormality is manifested by a deficiency of galactose in the hinge-region O-linked glycans of IgA1. Biosynthesis of these glycans occurs in a stepwise fashion beginning with the addition of N-acetylgalactosamine by the enzyme N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 and continuing with the addition of either galactose by β1,3-galactosyltransferase or a terminal sialic acid by a N-acetylgalactosamine–specific α2,6-sialyltransferase. To identify the molecular basis for the aberrant IgA glycosylation, we established EBV-immortalized IgA1-producing cells from peripheral blood cells of patients with IgA nephropathy. The secreted IgA1 was mostly polymeric and had galactose-deficient O-linked glycans, characterized by a terminal or sialylated N-acetylgalactosamine. As controls, we showed that EBV-immortalized cells from patients with lupus nephritis and healthy individuals did not produce IgA with the defective galactosylation pattern. Analysis of the biosynthetic pathways in cloned EBV-immortalized cells from patients with IgA nephropathy indicated a decrease in β1,3-galactosyltransferase activity and an increase in N-acetylgalactosamine–specific α2,6-sialyltransferase activity. Also, expression of β1,3-galactosyltransferase was significantly lower, and that of N-acetylgalactosamine–specific α2,6-sialyltransferase was significantly higher than the expression of these genes in the control cells. Thus, our data suggest that premature sialylation likely contributes to the aberrant IgA1 glycosylation in IgA nephropathy and may represent a new therapeutic target. PMID:18172551

  9. Molecular mechanisms creating bistable switches at cell cycle transitions

    PubMed Central

    Verdugo, Anael; Vinod, P. K.; Tyson, John J.; Novak, Bela

    2013-01-01

    Progression through the eukaryotic cell cycle is characterized by specific transitions, where cells move irreversibly from stage i−1 of the cycle into stage i. These irreversible cell cycle transitions are regulated by underlying bistable switches, which share some common features. An inhibitory protein stalls progression, and an activatory protein promotes progression. The inhibitor and activator are locked in a double-negative feedback loop, creating a one-way toggle switch that guarantees an irreversible commitment to move forward through the cell cycle, and it opposes regression from stage i to stage i−1. In many cases, the activator is an enzyme that modifies the inhibitor in multiple steps, whereas the hypo-modified inhibitor binds strongly to the activator and resists its enzymatic activity. These interactions are the basis of a reaction motif that provides a simple and generic account of many characteristic properties of cell cycle transitions. To demonstrate this assertion, we apply the motif in detail to the G1/S transition in budding yeast and to the mitotic checkpoint in mammalian cells. Variations of the motif might support irreversible cellular decision-making in other contexts. PMID:23486222

  10. Aberrant activation of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Tsung-Chieh; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Hsieh, Yi-Yueh; Chen, Tse-Chin; Yeh, Chien-Yu; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lin, Deng-Yn; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 (NFAT2), the major NFAT protein in peripheral T cells, in sustained T cell activation and intractable inflammation in human ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: We used two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis, immunohistochemistry, double immunohistochemical staining, and confocal microscopy to inspect the expression of NFAT2 in 107, 15, 48 and 5 cases of UC, Crohn’s disease (CD), non-specific colitis, and 5 healthy individuals, respectively. RESULTS: Up-regulation with profound nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 of lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of colonic mucosa was found specifically in the affected colonic mucosa from patients with UC, as compared to CD or NC (P < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 primarily occurred in CD8+T, but was less prominent in CD4+ T cells or CD20+B cells. It was strongly associated with the disease activity, including endoscopic stage (τ = 0.2145, P = 0.0281) and histologic grade (τ = 0.4167, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We disclose for the first time the nucleo-translocation/activatin of NFAT2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis. Activation of NFAT2 was specific for ulcerative colitis and highly associated with disease activity. Since activation of NFAT2 is implicated in an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop of sustained T-cell activation and NFAT proteins play key roles in the calcium/calcineurin signaling pathways, our results not only provide new insights into the mechanism for sustained intractable inflammation, but also suggest the calcium-calcineurin/NFAT pathway as a new therapeutic target for ulcerative colitis. PMID:18350607

  11. Cycle life characteristics of Li-TiS2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deligiannis, Frank; Shen, D.; Huang, C. K.; Surampudi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The development of lithium ambient temperature rechargeable cells is discussed. During the development process, we hope to gain a greater understanding of the materials and the properties of the Li-TiS2 cell and its components. The design will meet the requirements of 100 Wh/Kg and 1000 cycles, at 50 percent depth-of-discharge, by 1995.

  12. Downregulation of cell cycle-related proteins in ovarian cancer line and cell cycle arrest induced by microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jian-Mei; Shi, Xue-Jun; Sun, Ping; Liu, Jun-Xia; Wang, Wei; Li, Ming; Ling, Feng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The effect of miR-449 and miR-34 on the growth, cell cycle and target gene expressions of ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 and SKOV3-ipl was discussed. Method: Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR was employed to detect the expressions of miR-449a/b and miR-34b, c in SKOV3 and SKOV3-ipl cells. The two miRNAs were successfully expressed in SKOV3-ipl cells by transfection. The variations in cell growth rate and cell cycle were determined by MTS assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The expressions of cell cycle-related proteins were detected by Western Blot. Results: miR-449b and miR-34c induced the decline of the adhesiveness of SKOV3-ipl cells by 20%-30%. The number of cells arrested in G1-phase increased and the number of cells arrested in S-phase decreased significantly. The cell cycle-related proteins CDK6 and CDC254 were downregulated. miR-449b caused the expression of CDK6 and CDC25A to decrease. After the co-transfection with miR-449b and miR-34c, the relevant proteins were downregulated more significantly. The expressions of CDK6, CDC25A and cyclin A were decreased significantly. Conclusion: miR-449b and miR-34c can induce cell cycle arrest in SKOV3-ipl cells and the downregulation of CDK6, CDC25A and cyclin A. PMID:26770455

  13. Cell cycling with the SEB: a personal view.

    PubMed

    Bryant, John

    2014-06-01

    This review, written from a personal perspective, traces firstly the development of plant cell cycle research from the 1970s onwards, with some focus on the work of the author and of Dr Dennis Francis. Secondly there is a discussion of the support for and discussion of plant cell cycle research in the SEB, especially through the activities of the Cell Cycle Group within the Society's Cell Biology Section. In the main part of the review, selected aspects of DNA replication that have of been of special interest to the author are discussed. These are DNA polymerases and associated proteins, pre-replication events, regulation of enzymes and other proteins, nature and activation of DNA replication origins, and DNA endoreduplication. For all these topics, there is mention of the author's own work, followed by a brief synthesis of current understanding and a look to possible future developments.

  14. Shortened estrous cycle length, increased FSH levels, FSH variance, oocyte spindle aberrations, and early declining fertility in aging senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAMP8) mice: concomitant characteristics of human midlife female reproductive aging.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Lori R; Mackenzie, Amelia C L; Kraemer, Duane C; Morley, John E; Farr, Susan; Chaffin, Charles L; Merchenthaler, István

    2014-06-01

    Women experience a series of specific transitions in their reproductive function with age. Shortening of the menstrual cycle begins in the mid to late 30s and is regarded as the first sign of reproductive aging. Other early changes include elevation and increased variance of serum FSH levels, increased incidences of oocyte spindle aberrations and aneuploidy, and declining fertility. The goal of this study was to investigate whether the mouse strain senescence-accelerated mouse-prone-8 (SAMP8) is a suitable model for the study of these midlife reproductive aging characteristics. Midlife SAMP8 mice aged 6.5-7.85 months (midlife SAMP8) exhibited shortened estrous cycles compared with SAMP8 mice aged 2-3 months (young SAMP8, P = .0040). Midlife SAMP8 mice had high FSH levels compared with young SAMP8 mice, and mice with a single day of high FSH exhibited statistically elevated FSH throughout the cycle, ranging from 1.8- to 3.6-fold elevation on the days of proestrus, estrus, metestrus, and diestrus (P < .05). Midlife SAMP8 mice displayed more variance in FSH than young SAMP8 mice (P = .01). Midlife SAMP8 ovulated fewer oocytes (P = .0155). SAMP8 oocytes stained with fluorescently labeled antitubulin antibodies and scored in fluorescence microscopy exhibited increased incidence of meiotic spindle aberrations with age, from 2/126 (1.59%) in young SAMP8 to 38/139 (27.3%) in midlife SAMP8 (17.2-fold increase, P < .0001). Finally, SAMP8 exhibited declining fertility from 8.9 pups/litter in young SAMP8 to 3.5 pups/litter in midlife SAMP8 mice (P < .0001). The age at which these changes occur is younger than for most mouse strains, and their simultaneous occurrence within a single strain has not been described previously. We propose that SAMP8 mice are a model of midlife human female reproductive aging.

  15. [Estimation of the methylation status of the promoter region of the cell cycle gene P14ARF in placental tissues of spontaneous abortuses with chromosomal mosaicism].

    PubMed

    Kashevarova, A A; Tolmacheva, E N; Sukhanova, N N; Sazhenova, E A; Lebedev, I N

    2009-06-01

    The methylation status of the promoter region of the cell cycle gene P14ARF was studied in the extraembryonic mesoderm and in the chorion cytotrophoblast of 46 human spontaneous abortuses with chromosomal mosaicism. Aberrant methylation of alleles of this gene was revealed for the first time in placental tissues of 9% of embryos. The identified epimutations were found to be characteristic of embryos with aneuploid cell clones of postzygotic origin. It is suggested that epigenetic inactivation of loci responsible for the regulation of cell division and for segregation of chromosomes is associated with the occurrence of mosaic forms of the karyotype at early stages of human embryonic development. PMID:19639877

  16. Regulation of the Cell Division Cycle in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The cell division cycle is tightly regulated by the activation and inactivation of a series of proteins that control the replication and segregation of organelles to the daughter cells. During the past decade, we have witnessed significant advances in our understanding of the cell cycle in Trypanosoma brucei and how the cycle is regulated by various regulatory proteins. However, many other regulators, especially those unique to trypanosomes, remain to be identified, and we are just beginning to delineate the signaling pathways that drive the transitions through different cell cycle stages, such as the G1/S transition, G2/M transition, and mitosis-cytokinesis transition. Trypanosomes appear to employ both evolutionarily conserved and trypanosome-specific molecules to regulate the various stages of its cell cycle, including DNA replication initiation, spindle assembly, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis initiation and completion. Strikingly, trypanosomes lack some crucial regulators that are well conserved across evolution, such as Cdc6 and Cdt1, which are involved in DNA replication licensing, the spindle motor kinesin-5, which is required for spindle assembly, the central spindlin complex, which has been implicated in cytokinesis initiation, and the actomyosin contractile ring, which is located at the cleavage furrow. Conversely, trypanosomes possess certain regulators, such as cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases, and mitotic centromere-associated kinesins, that are greatly expanded and likely play diverse cellular functions. Overall, trypanosomes apparently have integrated unique regulators into the evolutionarily conserved pathways to compensate for the absence of those conserved molecules and, additionally, have evolved certain cell cycle regulatory pathways that are either different from its human host or distinct between its own life cycle forms. PMID:22865501

  17. Aberrant DNA Methylation in Keratoacanthoma

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratoacanthoma (KA) is a self-limiting epidermal tumor for which histopathological examination sometimes suggests malignancy. Based on inconsistent clinical views, KA can be regarded as both a benign tumor and a variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Aberrant DNA methylation frequently occurs in malignant tumors but it scarcely occurs in benign tumors. Whether aberrant methylation occurs in KA has not been previously examined. Objective The aim is to elucidate whether aberrant methylation of CpG islands (CGI) containing a high density of cytosine-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) sites occurs in KA. Methods Five SCC cell lines, two cultured samples of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), 18 clinical SCC samples, and 21 clinical KA samples were analyzed with Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips, quantitative real-time methylation-specific PCR (RT-MSP) and/or bisulfite sequencing. Results Genome-wide analyses of NHEK, KA, and SCC indicated that there was a greater number of aberrantly hypermethylated CGIs in SCC than in KA and there were aberrantly hypermethylated CGIs which are common in both. Among the common hypermethylated CGIs, RT-MSP and bisulfite sequencing targeting CGIs located on CCDC17, PVR, and MAP3K11 gene bodies also showed that methylation levels were significantly higher in KA than in normal epidermis. Statistical analyses suggested that the methylation level of CGI located on PVR in SCC might be correlated to lymph node metastasis (P = 0.013, Mann-Whitney U test) and that the methylation level of CGI in MAP3K11 in KA might be correlated to age (P = 0.031, linear regression analysis). Conclusion Aberrant DNA methylation occurs in KA. PMID:27788211

  18. Cell cycle regulation of human WEE1.

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, C H; Russell, P

    1995-01-01

    WEE1 kinase negatively regulates entry into mitosis by catalyzing the inhibitory tyrosine phosphorylation of CDC2/cyclin B kinase. We report here an investigation of human WEE1. Endogenous WEE1 migrates as an approximately 94 kDa protein in SDS-PAGE, substantially larger than the 49 kDa protein encoded by the original human WEE1 cDNA clone that was truncated at the 5'-end. Antibody depletion experiments demonstrate that WEE1 accounts for most of the activity that phosphorylates CDC2 on Tyr15 in an in vitro assay of HeLa cell lysates, hence it is likely to have an important role in the mitotic control of human cells. WEE1 activity was not found to be elevated in HeLa cells arrested in S phase, suggesting that unreplicated DNA does not delay M phase by hyperactivating WEE1. WEE1 activity is strongly suppressed during M phase, suggesting that negative regulation of WEE1 could be part of the mechanism by which activation of CDC2/cyclin B kinase is promoted during the G2/M transition. M phase WEE1 is re-activated in samples prepared in the absence of protein phosphatase inhibitors, demonstrating that WEE1 is inhibited by a mechanism that requires protein phosphorylation. Images PMID:7774574

  19. Life-cycle costs of high-performance cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R.; Burger, D.; Reiter, L.

    1985-01-01

    A life cycle cost analysis of high efficiency cells was presented. Although high efficiency cells produce more power, they also cost more to make and are more susceptible to array hot-spot heating. Three different computer analysis programs were used: SAMICS (solar array manufacturing industry costing standards), PVARRAY (an array failure mode/degradation simulator), and LCP (lifetime cost and performance). The high efficiency cell modules were found to be more economical in this study, but parallel redundancy is recommended.

  20. Ionizing radiation and cell cycle progression in ataxia telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Beamish, H.; Khanna, K.K.; Lavin, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    Exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation causes delay in normal progress through the cell cycle at a number of different checkpoints. Abnormalities in these checkpoints have been described for ataxia telangiectasia cells after irradiation. In this report we show that these abnormalities occur at different phases in the cell cycle in several ataxia telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells. Ataxia telangiectasia cells, synchronized in late G{sub 1} phase with either mimosine or aphidicolin and exposed to radiation, showed a reduced delay in entering S phase compared to irradiated control cells. Failure to exhibit G{sub 1}-phase delay in ataxia telangiectasia cells is accompanied by a reduced ability of radiation to activate the product of the tumor suppressor gene p53, a protein involved in G{sub 1}/S-phase delay. When the progress of irradiated G{sub 1}-phase cells was followed into the subsequent G{sub 2} and G{sub 1} phases ataxia telangiectasia cells showed a more pronounced accumulation in G{sub 2} phase than control cells. When cells were irradiated in S phase and extent of delay was more evident in G{sub 2} phase and ataxia telangiectasia cells were delayed to a greater extent. These results suggest that the lack of initial delay in both G{sub 1} and S phases to the radiosensitivity observed in this syndrome. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Coordinating cell polarity and cell cycle progression: what can we learn from flies and worms?

    PubMed Central

    Noatynska, Anna; Tavernier, Nicolas; Gotta, Monica; Pintard, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Spatio-temporal coordination of events during cell division is crucial for animal development. In recent years, emerging data have strengthened the notion that tight coupling of cell cycle progression and cell polarity in dividing cells is crucial for asymmetric cell division and ultimately for metazoan development. Although it is acknowledged that such coupling exists, the molecular mechanisms linking the cell cycle and cell polarity machineries are still under investigation. Key cell cycle regulators control cell polarity, and thus influence cell fate determination and/or differentiation, whereas some factors involved in cell polarity regulate cell cycle timing and proliferation potential. The scope of this review is to discuss the data linking cell polarity and cell cycle progression, and the importance of such coupling for asymmetric cell division. Because studies in model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have started to reveal the molecular mechanisms of this coordination, we will concentrate on these two systems. We review examples of molecular mechanisms suggesting a coupling between cell polarity and cell cycle progression. PMID:23926048

  2. MicroRNA inhibition fine-tunes and provides robustness to the restriction point switch of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    del Rosario, Ricardo C. H.; Damasco, Joseph Ray Clarence G.; Aguda, Baltazar D.

    2016-01-01

    The restriction point marks a switch in G1 from growth factor-dependent to growth factor-independent progression of the cell cycle. The proper regulation of this switch is important for normal cell processes; aberrations could result in a number of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, stroke and myocardial infarction. To further understand the regulation of the restriction point, we extended a mathematical model of the Rb-E2F pathway to include members of the microRNA cluster miR-17-92. Our mathematical analysis shows that microRNAs play an essential role in fine-tuning and providing robustness to the switch. We also demonstrate how microRNA regulation can steer cells in or out of cancer states. PMID:27610602

  3. MicroRNA inhibition fine-tunes and provides robustness to the restriction point switch of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Damasco, Joseph Ray Clarence G; Aguda, Baltazar D

    2016-01-01

    The restriction point marks a switch in G1 from growth factor-dependent to growth factor-independent progression of the cell cycle. The proper regulation of this switch is important for normal cell processes; aberrations could result in a number of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, stroke and myocardial infarction. To further understand the regulation of the restriction point, we extended a mathematical model of the Rb-E2F pathway to include members of the microRNA cluster miR-17-92. Our mathematical analysis shows that microRNAs play an essential role in fine-tuning and providing robustness to the switch. We also demonstrate how microRNA regulation can steer cells in or out of cancer states. PMID:27610602

  4. A role for homologous recombination proteins in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Bosshard, Sandra; Urban, Zuzanna; Mermod, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA breaks, especially double-stranded breaks (DSBs), by activating the DNA damage response (DDR), which encompasses DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint signaling. The DNA damage signal is transmitted to the checkpoint machinery by a network of specialized DNA damage-recognizing and signal-transducing molecules. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA repair proteins themselves may also directly contribute to the checkpoint control. Here, we investigated the role of homologous recombination (HR) proteins in normal cell cycle regulation in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. For this purpose, we used Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing the Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators (Fucci). Systematic siRNA-mediated knockdown of HR genes in these cells demonstrated that the lack of several of these factors alters cell cycle distribution, albeit differentially. The knock-down of MDC1, Rad51 and Brca1 caused the cells to arrest in the G2 phase, suggesting that they may be required for the G2/M transition. In contrast, inhibition of the other HR factors, including several Rad51 paralogs and Rad50, led to the arrest in the G1/G0 phase. Moreover, reduced expression of Rad51B, Rad51C, CtIP and Rad50 induced entry into a quiescent G0-like phase. In conclusion, the lack of many HR factors may lead to cell cycle checkpoint activation, even in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, indicating that these proteins may play an essential role both in DNA repair and checkpoint signaling. PMID:26125600

  5. Determination of genotoxic effects of Imazethapyr herbicide in Allium cepa root cells by mitotic activity, chromosome aberration, and comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep; Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Öztürk, Nur Serap

    2015-02-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is an imidazolinone herbicide that is currently used for broad-spectrum weed control in soybean and other legume crops. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IM were investigated by using mitotic index (MI), mitotic phases, chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) and DNA damage on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC50 value was determined as 20 ppm, and 0.5xEC50, EC50 and 2xEC50 concentrations of IM herbicide were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, 10 mg/L) were used as a negative and positive control, respectively. As A. cepa cell cycle is 24 hours, so, application process was carried out for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. All the applied doses decreased MIs compared to control group and these declines were found to be statistically meaningful. Analysis of the chromosomes showed that 10 ppm IM except for 48 h induced CAs but 40 ppm IM except for 72 h decreased CAs. DNA damage was found significantly higher in 20 and 40 ppm of IM compared to the control in comet assay. These results indicated that IM herbicide exhibits cytotoxic activity but not genotoxic activity (except 10 ppm) and induced DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in A. cepa root meristematic cells. PMID:25752428

  6. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  7. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  8. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling. PMID:1030938

  9. Thermal stress cycling of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janousek, B. K.; Francis, R. W.; Wendt, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal cycling experiment was performed on GaAs solar cells to establish the electrical and structural integrity of these cells under the temperature conditions of a simulated low-Earth orbit of 3-year duration. Thirty single junction GaAs cells were obtained and tests were performed to establish the beginning-of-life characteristics of these cells. The tests consisted of cell I-V power output curves, from which were obtained short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and cell efficiency, and optical micrographs, spectral response, and ion microprobe mass analysis (IMMA) depth profiles on both the front surfaces and the front metallic contacts of the cells. Following 5,000 thermal cycles, the performance of the cells was reexamined in addition to any factors which might contribute to performance degradation. It is established that, after 5,000 thermal cycles, the cells retain their power output with no loss of structural integrity or change in physical appearance.

  10. Identification of a novel EGF-sensitive cell cycle checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Francesca . E-mail: francesca.walker@ludwig.edu.au; Zhang Huihua; Burgess, Antony W.

    2007-02-01

    The site of action of growth factors on mammalian cell cycle has been assigned to the boundary between the G1 and S phases. We show here that Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) is also required for mitosis. BaF/3 cells expressing the EGFR (BaF/wtEGFR) synthesize DNA in response to EGF, but arrest in S-phase. We have generated a cell line (BaF/ERX) with defective downregulation of the EGFR and sustained activation of EGFR signalling pathways: these cells undergo mitosis in an EGF-dependent manner. The transit of BaF/ERX cells through G2/M strictly requires activation of EGFR and is abolished by AG1478. This phenotype is mimicked by co-expression of ErbB2 in BaF/wtEGFR cells, and abolished by inhibition of the EGFR kinase, suggesting that sustained signalling of the EGFR, through impaired downregulation of the EGFR or heterodimerization, is required for completion of the cycle. We have confirmed the role of EGFR signalling in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle using a human tumor cell line which overexpresses the EGFR and is dependent on EGFR signalling for growth. These findings unmask an EGF-sensitive checkpoint, helping to understand the link between sustained EGFR signalling, proliferation and the acquisition of a radioresistant phenotype in cancer cells.

  11. Regulatory T-cell depletion in the gut caused by integrin β7 deficiency exacerbates DSS colitis by evoking aberrant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H L; Zheng, Y J; Pan, Y D; Xie, C; Sun, H; Zhang, Y H; Yuan, M Y; Song, B L; Chen, J F

    2016-03-01

    Integrin α4β7 controls lymphocyte trafficking into the gut and has essential roles in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The α4β7-blocking antibody vedolizumab is approved for IBD treatment; however, high dose of vedolizumab aggravates colitis in a small percentage of patients. Herein, we show that integrin β7 deficiency results in colonic regulatory T (Treg) cell depletion and exacerbates dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis by evoking aberrant innate immunity. In DSS-treated β7-deficient mice, the loss of colonic Treg cells induces excessive macrophage infiltration in the colon via upregulation of colonic epithelial intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and increases proinflammatory cytokine expression, thereby exacerbating DSS-induced colitis. Moreover, reconstitution of the colonic Treg cell population in β7-deficient mice suppresses aberrant innate immune response in the colon and attenuates DSS colitis. Thus, integrin α4β7 is essential for suppression of DSS colitis as it regulates the colonic Treg cell population and innate immunity.

  12. Modelling cell cycle synchronisation in networks of coupled radial glial cells.

    PubMed

    Barrack, Duncan S; Thul, Rüdiger; Owen, Markus R

    2015-07-21

    Radial glial cells play a crucial role in the embryonic mammalian brain. Their proliferation is thought to be controlled, in part, by ATP mediated calcium signals. It has been hypothesised that these signals act to locally synchronise cell cycles, so that clusters of cells proliferate together, shedding daughter cells in uniform sheets. In this paper we investigate this cell cycle synchronisation by taking an ordinary differential equation model that couples the dynamics of intracellular calcium and the cell cycle and extend it to populations of cells coupled via extracellular ATP signals. Through bifurcation analysis we show that although ATP mediated calcium release can lead to cell cycle synchronisation, a number of other asynchronous oscillatory solutions including torus solutions dominate the parameter space and cell cycle synchronisation is far from guaranteed. Despite this, numerical results indicate that the transient and not the asymptotic behaviour of the system is important in accounting for cell cycle synchronisation. In particular, quiescent cells can be entrained on to the cell cycle via ATP mediated calcium signals initiated by a driving cell and crucially will cycle in near synchrony with the driving cell for the duration of neurogenesis. This behaviour is highly sensitive to the timing of ATP release, with release at the G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle far more likely to lead to near synchrony than release during mid G1 phase. This result, which suggests that ATP release timing is critical to radial glia cell cycle synchronisation, may help us to understand normal and pathological brain development.

  13. Genome Wide Expression Profiling of Cancer Cell Lines Cultured in Microgravity Reveals Significant Dysregulation of Cell Cycle and MicroRNA Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Vidyasekar, Prasanna; Shyamsunder, Pavithra; Arun, Rajpranap; Santhakumar, Rajalakshmi; Kapadia, Nand Kishore; Kumar, Ravi; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2015-01-01

    Zero gravity causes several changes in metabolic and functional aspects of the human body and experiments in space flight have demonstrated alterations in cancer growth and progression. This study reports the genome wide expression profiling of a colorectal cancer cell line-DLD-1, and a lymphoblast leukemic cell line-MOLT-4, under simulated microgravity in an effort to understand central processes and cellular functions that are dysregulated among both cell lines. Altered cell morphology, reduced cell viability and an aberrant cell cycle profile in comparison to their static controls were observed in both cell lines under microgravity. The process of cell cycle in DLD-1 cells was markedly affected with reduced viability, reduced colony forming ability, an apoptotic population and dysregulation of cell cycle genes, oncogenes, and cancer progression and prognostic markers. DNA microarray analysis revealed 1801 (upregulated) and 2542 (downregulated) genes (>2 fold) in DLD-1 cultures under microgravity while MOLT-4 cultures differentially expressed 349 (upregulated) and 444 (downregulated) genes (>2 fold) under microgravity. The loss in cell proliferative capacity was corroborated with the downregulation of the cell cycle process as demonstrated by functional clustering of DNA microarray data using gene ontology terms. The genome wide expression profile also showed significant dysregulation of post transcriptional gene silencing machinery and multiple microRNA host genes that are potential tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes including MIR22HG, MIR17HG and MIR21HG. The MIR22HG, a tumor-suppressor gene was one of the highest upregulated genes in the microarray data showing a 4.4 log fold upregulation under microgravity. Real time PCR validated the dysregulation in the host gene by demonstrating a 4.18 log fold upregulation of the miR-22 microRNA. Microarray data also showed dysregulation of direct targets of miR-22, SP1, CDK6 and CCNA2. PMID:26295583

  14. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  15. High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, H.

    1995-10-19

    An outline of the Westinghouse high-efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle is presented. The following topics are discussed: The Westinghouse SOFC pilot manufacturing facility, cell scale-up plan, pressure effects on SOFC power and efficiency, sureCell versus conventional gas turbine plants, sureCell product line for distributed power applications, 20 MW pressurized-SOFC/gas turbine power plant, 10 MW SOFC/CT power plant, sureCell plant concept design requirements, and Westinghouse SOFC market entry.

  16. Vertebrate Cell Cycle Modulates Infection by Protozoan Parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, James A.; Crane, Mark St. J.

    1981-11-01

    Synchronized HeLa cell populations were exposed to Trypanosoma cruzi or Toxoplasma gondii, obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that cause Chagas' disease and toxoplasmosis, respectively, in humans. The ability of the two parasites to infect HeLa cells increased as the HeLa cells proceeded from the G1 phase to the S phase of their growth cycle and decreased as the cells entered G2-M. Characterization of the S-phase cell surface components responsible for this phenomenon could be beneficial in the development of vaccines against these parasitic diseases.

  17. WWP2 is required for normal cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byeong Hyeok; Che, Xun; Chen, Changyan; Lu, Luo; Dai, Wei

    2015-09-01

    WWP2 is a ubiquitin E3 ligase belonging to the Nedd4-like family. Given that WWP2 target proteins including PTEN that are crucial for regulating cell proliferation or suppressing tumorigenesis, we have asked whether WWP2 plays a role in controlling cell cycle progression. Here we report that WWP2 is necessary for normal cell cycle progression as its silencing significantly reduces the cell proliferation rate. We have identified that an isoform of WWP2 (WWP2-V4) is highly expressed in the M phase of the cell cycle. Silencing of WWP2 accelerates the turnover of cyclin E, which is accompanied by increased levels of phospho-histone H3 (p-H3) and cyclin B. Moreover, silencing of WWP2 results in compromised phosphorylation of Akt(S473), a residue whose phosphorylation is tightly associated with the activation of the kinase. Combined, these results strongly suggest that WWP2 is an important component in regulating the Akt signaling cascade, as well as cell cycle progression. PMID:26622940

  18. WWP2 is required for normal cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byeong Hyeok; Che, Xun; Chen, Changyan; Lu, Luo; Dai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    WWP2 is a ubiquitin E3 ligase belonging to the Nedd4-like family. Given that WWP2 target proteins including PTEN that are crucial for regulating cell proliferation or suppressing tumorigenesis, we have asked whether WWP2 plays a role in controlling cell cycle progression. Here we report that WWP2 is necessary for normal cell cycle progression as its silencing significantly reduces the cell proliferation rate. We have identified that an isoform of WWP2 (WWP2-V4) is highly expressed in the M phase of the cell cycle. Silencing of WWP2 accelerates the turnover of cyclin E, which is accompanied by increased levels of phospho-histone H3 (p-H3) and cyclin B. Moreover, silencing of WWP2 results in compromised phosphorylation of AktS473, a residue whose phosphorylation is tightly associated with the activation of the kinase. Combined, these results strongly suggest that WWP2 is an important component in regulating the Akt signaling cascade, as well as cell cycle progression. PMID:26622940

  19. Human Fucci Pancreatic Beta Cell Lines: New Tools to Study Beta Cell Cycle and Terminal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Géraldine; Maugein, Alicia; Cordier, Corinne; Pechberty, Séverine; Garfa-Traoré, Meriem; Martin, Patrick; Scharfmann, Raphaël; Albagli, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cell cycle in beta cells is poorly understood, especially in humans. We exploited here the recently described human pancreatic beta cell line EndoC-βH2 to set up experimental systems for cell cycle studies. We derived 2 populations from EndoC-βH2 cells that stably harbor the 2 genes encoding the Fucci fluorescent indicators of cell cycle, either from two vectors, or from a unique bicistronic vector. In proliferating non-synchronized cells, the 2 Fucci indicators revealed cells in the expected phases of cell cycle, with orange and green cells being in G1 and S/G2/M cells, respectively, and allowed the sorting of cells in different substeps of G1. The Fucci indicators also faithfully red out alterations in human beta cell proliferative activity since a mitogen-rich medium decreased the proportion of orange cells and inflated the green population, while reciprocal changes were observed when cells were induced to cease proliferation and increased expression of some beta cell genes. In the last situation, acquisition of a more differentiated beta cell phenotype correlates with an increased intensity in orange fluorescence. Hence Fucci beta cell lines provide new tools to address important questions regarding human beta cell cycle and differentiation. PMID:25259951

  20. The reproductive-cell cycle theory of aging: an update.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    The Reproductive-Cell Cycle Theory posits that the hormones that regulate reproduction act in an antagonistic pleiotrophic manner to control aging via cell cycle signaling; promoting growth and development early in life in order to achieve reproduction, but later in life, in a futile attempt to maintain reproduction, become dysregulated and drive senescence. Since reproduction is the most important function of an organism from the perspective of the survival of the species, if reproductive-cell cycle signaling factors determine the rate of growth, determine the rate of development, determine the rate of reproduction, and determine the rate of senescence, then by definition they determine the rate of aging and thus lifespan. The theory is able to explain: 1) the simultaneous regulation of the rate of aging and reproduction as evidenced by the fact that environmental conditions and experimental interventions known to extend longevity are associated with decreased reproductive-cell cycle signaling factors, thereby slowing aging and preserving fertility in a hostile reproductive environment; 2) two phenomena that are closely related to species lifespan-the rate of growth and development and the ultimate size of the animal; 3). the apparent paradox that size is directly proportional to lifespan and inversely proportional to fertility between species but vice versa within a species; 4). how differing rates of reproduction between species is associated with differences in their lifespan; 5). why we develop aging-related diseases; and 6). an evolutionarily credible reason for why and how aging occurs-these hormones act in an antagonistic pleiotrophic manner via cell cycle signaling; promoting growth and development early in life in order to achieve reproduction, but later in life, in a futile attempt to maintain reproduction, become dysregulated and drive senescence (dyosis). In essence, the Reproductive-Cell Cycle Theory can explain aging in all sexually reproductive life

  1. Does prolonged cycling of moderate intensity affect immune cell function?

    PubMed Central

    Scharhag, J; Meyer, T; Gabriel, H; Schlick, B; Faude, O; Kindermann, W; Shephard, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Prolonged exercise may induce temporary immunosuppression with a presumed increased susceptibility for infection. However, there are only few data on immune cell function after prolonged cycling at moderate intensities typical for road cycling training sessions. Methods: The present study examined the influence on immune cell function of 4 h of cycling at a constant intensity of 70% of the individual anaerobic threshold. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocyte and lymphocyte populations, activities of natural killer (NK), neutrophils, and monocytes were examined before and after exercise, and also on a control day without exercise. Results: Cycling for 4 h induced a moderate acute phase response with increases in IL-6 from 1.0 (SD 0.5) before to 9.6 (5.6) pg/ml 1 h after exercise and CRP from 0.5 (SD 0.4) before to 1.8 (1.3) mg/l 1 day after exercise. Although absolute numbers of circulating NK cells, monocytes, and neutrophils increased during exercise, on a per cell basis NK cell activity, neutrophil and monocyte phagocytosis, and monocyte oxidative burst did not significantly change after exercise. However, a minor effect over time for neutrophil oxidative burst was noted, tending to decrease after exercise. Conclusions: Prolonged cycling at moderate intensities does not seem to seriously alter the function of cells of the first line of defence. Therefore, the influence of a single typical road cycling training session on the immune system is only moderate and appears to be safe from an immunological point of view. PMID:15728699

  2. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  3. Multistage carcinogenesis modeling including cell cycle and DNA damage states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, W.; Moolgavkar, S.

    The multistage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis is generalized to include cell cycle states and corresponding DNA damage states with imperfect repair for normal and initiated stem cells. Initiated cells may undergo transformation to a malignant state, eventually leading to cancer incidence or death. The model allows oxidative or radiation induced DNA damage, checkpoint delay, DNA repair, apoptosis, and transformation rates to depend on the cell cycle state or DNA damage state of normal and initiated cells. A probability generating function approach is used to represent the time dependent probability distribution for cells in all states. The continuous time coupled Markov system representing this joint distribution satisfies a partial differential equation (pde). Time dependent survival and hazard functions are found through numerical solution of the characteristic equations for the pde. Although the hazard and survival can be calculated numerically, number and size distributions of pre-malignant lesions from models that are developed will be approximated through simulation. We use the model to explore predictions for hazard and survival as parameters representing cell cycle regulation and arrest are modified. Modification of these parameters may influence rates for cell division, apoptosis and malignant transformation that are important in carcinogenesis. We also explore enhanced repair that may be important for low-dose hypersensitivity and adaptive response, and degradation of repair processes or loss of checkpoint control that may drive genetic instability.

  4. Visualisation of cell cycle modifications by X-ray irradiation of single HeLa cells using fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators.

    PubMed

    Kaminaga, K; Noguchi, M; Narita, A; Sakamoto, Y; Kanari, Y; Yokoya, A

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effects of X-ray irradiation on mammalian cell cycle dynamics, single cells using the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) technique were tracked. HeLa cells expressing Fucci were used to visualise cell cycle modifications induced by irradiation. After cultured HeLa-Fucci cells were exposed to 5 Gy X-rays, fluorescent cell images were captured every 20 min for 48 h using a fluorescent microscope. Time dependence of the fluorescence intensity of S/G2 cells was analysed to examine the cell cycle dynamics of irradiated and non-irradiated control cells. The results showed that irradiated cells could be divided into two populations: one with similar cell cycle dynamics to that of non-irradiated cells, and another displaying a prolonged G2 phase. Based on these findings, it is proposed in this article that an underlying switch mechanism is involved in cell cycle regulation and the G2/M checkpoint of HeLa cells.

  5. Regulated protein kinases and phosphatases in cell cycle decisions

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Bela; Kapuy, Orsolya; Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Tyson, John J

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology are controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, which together determine the phosphorylation state of targeted substrates. Some of these target proteins are themselves kinases or phosphatases or other components of a regulatory network characterized by feedback and feed-forward loops. In this review we describe some common regulatory motifs involving kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates, focusing particularly on bistable switches involved in cellular decision processes. These general principles are applied to cell cycle transitions, with special emphasis on the roles of regulated phosphatases in orchestrating progression from one phase to the next of the DNA replication-division cycle. PMID:20678910

  6. Cyclin D type does not influence cell cycle response to DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation in multiple myeloma tumours.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean; Mann, David; Yong, Kwee

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by over-expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1) or D2 (CCND2), which control G1 phase cell-cycle progression. Proteolytic degradation of CCND1 (but not CCND2), resulting in G1 arrest, is reported in non-MM cells post-DNA damage, affecting DNA repair and survival. We examined the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on D-cyclin levels and cell-cycle kinetics of MM cells, exploring differences based on D-cyclin expression. We showed that CCND1 is downregulated, whereas CCND2 is not, following IR. This did not lead to hypo-phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein or G1 arrest. Both CCND1- and CCND2-expressing MM cells arrested in S/G2/M, and did not differ in other cell-cycle proteins or sensitivity to IR. When treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor, both CCND1 and CCND2 MM cells arrested in G1 and therefore are subject to physiological regulation at this checkpoint. Immunoprecipitation showed that, despite CCND1 degradation following IR, sufficient protein remains bound to CDK4/6 to prevent G1 arrest. Aberrant expression of CCND1 driven from the IGH promoter in t(11;14) MM cells maintains progression through G1 to arrest in S/G2/M. Differential expression of D-cyclin does not appear to affect cell-cycle response to IR, and is unlikely to underlie differential sensitivity to DNA damage. PMID:27146121

  7. Modeling cell response to low doses of photon irradiation: Part 2--application to radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Micaela; Testa, Etienne; Komova, Olga V; Nasonova, Elena A; Mel'nikova, Larisa A; Shmakova, Nina L; Beuve, Michaël

    2016-03-01

    The biological phenomena observed at low doses of ionizing radiation (adaptive response, bystander effects, genomic instability, etc.) are still not well understood. While at high irradiation doses, cellular death may be directly linked to DNA damage, at low doses, other cellular structures may be involved in what are known as non-(DNA)-targeted effects. Mitochondria, in particular, may play a crucial role through their participation in a signaling network involving oxygen/nitrogen radical species. According to the size of the implicated organelles, the fluctuations in the energy deposited into these target structures may impact considerably the response of cells to low doses of ionizing irradiation. Based on a recent simulation of these fluctuations, a theoretical framework was established to have further insight into cell responses to low doses of photon irradiation, namely the triggering of radioresistance mechanisms by energy deposition into specific targets. Three versions of a model are considered depending on the target size and on the number of targets that need to be activated by energy deposition to trigger radioresistance mechanisms. These model versions are applied to the fraction of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations measured at low doses in human carcinoma cells (CAL51). For this cell line, it was found in the present study that the mechanisms of radioresistance could not be triggered by the activation of a single small target (nanometric size, 100 nm), but could instead be triggered by the activation of a large target (micrometric, 10 μm) or by the activation of a great number of small targets. The mitochondria network, viewed either as a large target or as a set of small units, might be concerned by these low-dose effects. PMID:26708100

  8. α-Mangostin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun-Ho; Park, Bong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mangosteen has long been used as a traditional medicine and is known to have antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. Although the effects of α-mangostin, a natural compound extracted from the pericarp of mangosteen, have been investigated in many studies, there is limited data on the effects of the compound in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, α-mangostin was assessed as a potential anticancer agent against human OSCC cells. α-Mangostin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little to no effect on normal human PDLF cells. α-Mangostin treatment clearly showed apoptotic evidences such as nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of annexin V and PI-positive cells on OSCC cells. α-Mangostin treatment also caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and the translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. The expressions of the mitochondria-related proteins were activated by α-mangostin. Treatment with α-mangostin also induced G1 phase arrest and downregulated cell cycle-related proteins (CDK/cyclin). Hence, α-mangostin specifically induces cell death and inhibits proliferation in OSCC cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, suggesting that α-mangostin may be an effective agent for the treatment of OSCC. PMID:27478478

  9. Protection of renal cells from cisplatin toxicity by cell cycle inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M; Safirstein, Robert L; Megyesi, Judit

    2004-02-01

    The optimal use of cisplatin as a chemotherapeutic drug has been limited by its nephrotoxicity. Murine models have been used to study cisplatin-induced acute renal failure. After cisplatin administration, cells of the S3 segment in the renal proximal tubule are especially sensitive and undergo extensive necrosis in vivo. Similarly, cultured proximal tubule cells undergo apoptosis in vitro after cisplatin exposure. We have shown in vivo that kidney cells enter the cell cycle after cisplatin administration but that cell cycle-inhibitory proteins p21 and 14-3-3sigma are also upregulated. These proteins coordinate the cell cycle, and deletion of either of the genes resulted in increased nephrotoxicity in vivo or increased cell death in vitro after exposure to cisplatin. However, it was not known whether cell cycle inhibition before acute renal failure could protect from cisplatin-induced cell death, especially in cells with functional p21 and 14-3-3sigma genes. Using several cell cycle inhibitors, including a p21 adenovirus, and the drugs roscovitine and olomoucine, we have been able to completely protect a mouse kidney proximal tubule cell culture from cisplatin-induced apoptosis. The protection by p21 was independent of an effect on the cell cycle and was likely caused by selective inhibition of caspase-dependent and -independent cell death pathways in the cells.

  10. Characterization of gene rearrangements resulted from genomic structural aberrations in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma KYSE150 cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jia-Jie; Gong, Ting; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Zhi-Zhou; Xu, Xin; Dong, Jin-Tang; Zhan, Qi-Min; Fu, Song-Bin; Wang, Ming-Rong

    2013-01-15

    Chromosomal rearrangements and involved genes have been reported to play important roles in the development and progression of human malignancies. But the gene rearrangements in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain to be identified. In the present study, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was performed on the ESCC cell line KYSE150. Eight disrupted genes were detected according to the obviously distinct unbalanced breakpoints. The splitting of these genes was validated by dual-color fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), genome walking and sequencing analysis, we further identified gene disruptions and rearrangements. A fusion transcript DTL-1q42.2 was derived from an intrachromosomal rearrangement of chromosome 1. Highly amplified segments of DTL and PTPRD were self-rearranged. The sequences on either side of the junctions possess micro-homology with each other. FISH results indicated that the split DTL and PTPRD were also involved in comprising parts of the derivative chromosomes resulted from t(1q;9p;12p) and t(9;1;9). Further, we found that regions harboring DTL (1q32.3) and PTPRD (9p23) were also splitting in ESCC tumors. The data supplement significant information on the existing genetic background of KYSE150, which may be used as a model for studying these gene rearrangements.

  11. Cytogenetic evidence that DNA topoisomerase II is not involved in radiation induced chromsome-type aberrations.

    PubMed

    Mosesso, P; Pepe, G; Ottavianelli, A; Schinoppi, A; Cinelli, S

    2015-11-01

    ICRF-187 (Cardioxane™, Chiron) is a catalytic inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II), proposed to act by blocking Topo II-mediated DNA cleavage without stabilizing DNA-Topo II-"cleavable complexes". In this study ICRF-187 was used to evaluate the potential involvement of DNA topoisomerase II in the formation of the radiation-induced chromosome-type aberrations in the G0 phase of the cell cycle in human lymphocytes from three healthy male donors. This is based on many evidences that DNA topoisomerases are involved in DNA recombination, mainly of illegitimate type (non-homologous) both in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained clearly indicated that ICRF-187 did not induce per se any chromosomal damage. When challenged with the non-catalytic Topo II poison VP-16 (etoposide), which acts by stabilizing the "cleavable complex" generating "protein concealed" DSB's and thus chromosomal aberrations, it completely abolished the significant induction of chromosome-type aberrations and formation of dicentric chromosomes. This indicates that ICRF-187 acts effectively as catalytic inhibitor of Topo II. On the other hand, when X-ray treatments were challenged with ICRF-187 using experimental conditions as for VP-16 treatments, no modification of the incidence of chromosome-type aberrations and dicentric chromosomes was observed. On this basis, we conclude that Topo II is not involved in the formation of X-ray-induced chromosome-type aberrations and dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes in the G0 phase of the cell cycle. PMID:26520368

  12. Arginine starvation in colorectal carcinoma cells: Sensing, impact on translation control and cell cycle distribution.

    PubMed

    Vynnytska-Myronovska, Bozhena O; Kurlishchuk, Yuliya; Chen, Oleh; Bobak, Yaroslav; Dittfeld, Claudia; Hüther, Melanie; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Stasyk, Oleh V

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cells rely on a continued exogenous nutrient supply in order to maintain a high proliferative activity. Although a strong dependence of some tumor types on exogenous arginine sources has been reported, the mechanisms of arginine sensing by tumor cells and the impact of changes in arginine availability on translation and cell cycle regulation are not fully understood. The results presented herein state that human colorectal carcinoma cells rapidly exhaust the internal arginine sources in the absence of exogenous arginine and repress global translation by activation of the GCN2-mediated pathway and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Tumor suppressor protein p53 activation and G1/G0 cell cycle arrest support cell survival upon prolonged arginine starvation. Cells with the mutant or deleted TP53 fail to stop cell cycle progression at defined cell cycle checkpoints which appears to be associated with reduced recovery after durable metabolic stress triggered by arginine withdrawal.

  13. Identification of Proteins Related to Epigenetic Regulation in the Malignant Transformation of Aberrant Karyotypic Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Yang, Yixuan; Zeng, Sicong; Tan, Yueqiu; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) tend to develop genomic alterations and progress to a malignant state during long-term in vitro culture. This raises concerns of the clinical safety in using cultured hESCs. However, transformed hESCs might serve as an excellent model to determine the process of embryonic stem cell transition. In this study, ITRAQ-based tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify normal and aberrant karyotypic hESCs proteins from simple to more complex karyotypic abnormalities. We identified and quantified 2583 proteins, and found that the expression levels of 316 proteins that represented at least 23 functional molecular groups were significantly different in both normal and abnormal hESCs. Dysregulated protein expression in epigenetic regulation was further verified in six pairs of hESC lines in early and late passage. In summary, this study is the first large-scale quantitative proteomic analysis of the malignant transformation of aberrant karyotypic hESCs. The data generated should serve as a useful reference of stem cell-derived tumor progression. Increased expression of both HDAC2 and CTNNB1 are detected as early as the pre-neoplastic stage, and might serve as prognostic markers in the malignant transformation of hESCs. PMID:24465727

  14. Lithium/disulfide cells capable of long cycle life

    SciTech Connect

    Kaun, T.D.; Holifield, T.F.; DeLuca, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The lithium-alloy/disulfide cell has undergone improvements to provide a very stable, high performance upper-plateau (UP) FeS/sub 2/ electrode. Prismatic UP FeS/sub 2/ cell tests (12--24 Ah capacity) with a LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte have demonstrated 1000 deep discharge cycles at 400/degree/C with less than a 20% drop in capacity and without reduced power capability. Previous lithium-alloy/disulfide cells, which were based on a two voltage-plateau FeS/sub 2/ electrode and LiCl-KCl eutectic electrolyte had a life expectancy of only 100 cycles. Both time- and cycle-related capacity loss mechanisms have been eliminated with the improved cell design. In addition, new cell design features of overcharge tolerance and overdischarge safeguarding enhance battery durability. The performance prospects of a Li-alloy/UP FeS/sub 2/ battery for an IDSEP van application are discussed. A specific energy of 150 Wh/kg for this battery after 1000 cycles of operation is projected. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Lithium/disulfide cells capable of long cycle life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaun, T. D.; Holifield, T. F.; Deluca, W. H.

    The lithium-alloy/disulfide cell has undergone improvements to provide a very stable, high performance Upper-Plateau (UP) FeS2 electrode. Prismatic UP FeS2 cell tests (12 to 24 Ah capacity) with a LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte have demonstrated 1000 deep discharge cycles at 400 C with less than a 20 percent drop in capacity and without reduced power capability. Previous lithium-alloy/disulfide cells, which were based on a two voltage-plateau FeS2 electrode and LiCl-KCl eutectic electrolyte had a life expectancy of only 100 cycles. Both time- and cycle-related capacity loss mechanisms have been eliminated with the improved cell design. In addition, new cell design features of overcharge tolerance and overdischarge safeguarding enhance battery durability. The performance prospects of a Li-alloy/UP FeS2 battery for an IDSEP van application are discussed. A specific energy of 150 Wh/kg for this battery after 1000 cycles of operation is projected.

  16. Impaired Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Regulation in Response to Ionizing Radiation in Human Fibroblast Cells with Individual Knock-down of 25 Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish; Jeevarajan, Antony; Pierson, Duane; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have demonstrated that genes with upregulated expression induced by IR may play important roles in DNA damage sensing, cell cycle checkpoint and chromosomal repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR and its impact on cytogenetic responses to ionizing radiation has not been systematically studied. In our present study, the expression of 25 genes selected based on their transcriptional changes in response to IR or from their known DNA repair roles were individually knocked down by siRNA transfection in human fibroblast cells. Chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) formation were measured as the cytogenetic endpoints. Our results showed that the yield of MN and/or CA formation were significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes that included Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway; XPA in the NER pathway; RPA1 in the MMR pathway; RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes including MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, and SESN1 and SUMO1 showed significant inhibition of cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, p21 and MLH1 expression resulted in both enhanced cell cycle progression and significantly higher yield of cytogenetic damage, indicating the involvement of these gene products in both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Of these 11 genes that affected the cytogenetic response, 9 were up-regulated in the cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulating the biological consequences after IR. Failure to express these IR-responsive genes, such as by gene mutation, could seriously change the outcome of the post IR scenario and lead to carcinogenesis.

  17. Concise Review: Control of Cell Fate Through Cell Cycle and Pluripotency Networks.

    PubMed

    Boward, Ben; Wu, Tianming; Dalton, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) proliferate rapidly with a characteristic cell cycle structure consisting of short G1- and G2-gap phases. This applies broadly to PSCs of peri-implantation stage embryos, cultures of embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonal carcinoma cells. During the early stages of PSC differentiation however, cell division times increase as a consequence of cell cycle remodeling. Most notably, this is indicated by elongation of the G1-phase. Observations linking changes in the cell cycle with exit from pluripotency have raised questions about the role of cell cycle control in maintenance of the pluripotent state. Until recently however, this has been a difficult question to address because of limitations associated with experimental tools. Recent studies now show that pluripotency and cell cycle regulatory networks are intertwined and that cell cycle control mechanisms are an integral, mechanistic part of the PSC state. Studies in embryonal carcinoma, some 30 years ago, first suggested that pluripotent cells initiate differentiation when in the G1-phase. More recently, a molecular "priming" mechanism has been proposed to explain these observations in human embryonic stem cells. Complexity in this area has been increased by the realization that pluripotent cells exist in multiple developmental states and that in addition to each having their own characteristic gene expression and epigenetic signatures, they potentially have alternate modes of cell cycle regulation. This review will summarize current knowledge in these areas and will highlight important aspects of interconnections between the cell cycle, self-renewal, pluripotency, and cell fate decisions. Stem Cells 2016;34:1427-1436.

  18. Statistical analysis of the distribution of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by low and high energy heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Lee, Ryonfa; Nasonova, Elena; Ritter, Sylvia; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Kac, M.; Smoluchowski, M.

    Differences in the track structure of high LET (Linear Energy Transfer) particles are clearly visible on chromosomal level, in particular in the number of lesions produced by an ion traversal through a cell nucleus and in the distribution of aberrations among the cells. In the present study we focus on the effects of low energy C-and Cr-ions (<10 MeV/u) in comparison with high energy C-ions (90 MeV/u). For the experiments human lymphocytes were exposed to 9.5 MeV/u C-ions, 4.1 MeV/u Cr-ions or 90 MeV/u C-ions with LET values of 175 keV/µm, 3160 keV/µm and 29 keV/µm, respectively. Chromosome aberrations were measured at several post-irradiation sampling times (48, 60, 72 and 84h) in first cycle metaphases following Giemsa-staining. For 90 MeV/u C-ions, where the track radius is larger than the cell nucleus, the distribution of aberrations did not change significantly with sampling time and has been well described by Poisson statistics. In contrast, for low energy C-ions, where the track radius is smaller than the cell nucleus, distribution of aberration strongly deviates from uni-modal and displays two peaks representative for subpopulations of non-hit and hit cells, respectively. Following this pattern, also damage-dependent cell cycle delay was observed. At 48 h after irradiation a high number of undamaged and probably unhit cells was found to reach mitosis. This number of undamaged cells decreased further with sampling time, while the frequencies of cells carrying aberrations (1-11 per cell) were increasing. All distributions were found to conform a compound Poisson (Neyman-type A) statistics which allows estimating the average number of particle traversals through a cell nucleus and the average number of aberrations induced by one particle traversal. Similar response has also been observed at 48h after Cr-ion exposure. In this case, however, non-aberrant cells have been found to dominate in the population even at later sampling times and a low number of

  19. [Dynamics of the cell cycle in human endothelial cell culture infected with influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Prochukhanova, A R; Lyublinskaya, O G; Azarenok, A A; Nazarova, A V; Zenin, V V; Zhilinskaya, I N

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle in a culture of endothelial cells EAhy 926 infected with influenza virus was investigated. Cytometric analysis of culture, synchronized using contact inhibition, has shown that the exposure to the influenza virus in cells EAhy 926 lengthened S-phase of the cell cycle. This result has been tested and proven on culture EAhy 926 treated with nocodazole. Compared with lung carcinoma cells A549, in which influenza virus provokes the arrest of G0/G1 phase of the cycle, elongation of S-phase of cycle at a similar infection of endothelial culture EAhy 926 indicates that the influenza virus differently affects the dynamics of the cell cycle according to the origin of the infected culture.

  20. Aberrant gene expression patterns in placentomes are associated with phenotypically normal and abnormal cattle cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Everts, Robin E; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Razzak, Anthony; Hue, Isabelle; Green, Cheryl A; Oliveira, Rosane; Vignon, Xavier; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Tian, X Cindy; Yang, Xiangzhong; Renard, Jean-Paul; Lewin, Harris A

    2008-03-14

    Transcription profiling of placentomes derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, n = 20), in vitro fertilization (IVF, n = 9), and artificial insemination (AI, n = 9) at or near term development was performed to better understand why SCNT and IVF often result in placental defects, hydrops, and large offspring syndrome (LOS). Multivariate analysis of variance was used to distinguish the effects of SCNT, IVF, and AI on gene expression, taking into account the effects of parturition (term or preterm), sex of fetus, breed of dam, breed of fetus, and pathological finding in the offspring (hydrops, normal, or other abnormalities). Differential expression of 20 physiologically important genes was confirmed with quantitative PCR. The largest effect on placentome gene expression was attributable to whether placentas were collected at term or preterm (i.e., whether the collection was because of disease or to obtain stage-matched controls) followed by placentome source (AI, IVF, or SCNT). Gene expression in SCNT placentomes was dramatically different from AI (n = 336 genes; 276 >2-fold) and from IVF (n = 733 genes; 162 >2-fold) placentomes. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEG) showed that IVF has significant effects on genes associated with cellular metabolism. In contrast, DEG associated with SCNT are involved in multiple pathways, including cell cycle, cell death, and gene expression. Many DEG were shared between the gene lists for IVF and SCNT comparisons, suggesting that common pathways are affected by the embryo culture methods used for IVF and SCNT. However, the many unique gene functions and pathways affected by SCNT suggest that cloned fetuses may be starved and accumulating toxic wastes due to placental insufficiency caused by reprogramming errors. Many of these genes are candidates for hydrops and LOS.

  1. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicellular blastospores. Consequently, ΔFkh2 produced twice as many, but smaller, blastospores than wild-type under submerged conditions, and formed denser septa and shorter/broader cells in aberrantly branched hyphae. In these hyphae, clustered genes required for septation and conidiation were remarkedly up-regulated, followed by higher yield and slower germination of aerial conidia. Moreover, ΔFkh2 displayed attenuated virulence and decreased tolerance to chemical and environmental stresses, accompanied with altered transcripts and activities of phenotype-influencing proteins or enzymes. All the changes in ΔFkh2 were restored by Fkh2 complementation. All together, Fkh2-dependent transcriptional control is vital for the adaptation of B. bassiana to diverse habitats of host insects and hence contributes to its biological control potential against arthropod pests. PMID:25955538

  2. Cell cycle control of DNA joint molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Wild, Philipp; Matos, Joao

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of stable interactions between chromosomes underpins vital cellular processes such as recombinational DNA repair and bipolar chromosome segregation. On the other hand, timely disengagement of persistent connections is necessary to assure efficient partitioning of the replicated genome prior to cell division. Whereas great progress has been made in defining how cohesin-mediated chromosomal interactions are disengaged as cells prepare to undergo chromosome segregation, little is known about the metabolism of DNA joint molecules (JMs), generated during the repair of chromosomal lesions. Recent work on Mus81 and Yen1/GEN1, two conserved structure-selective endonucleases, revealed unforeseen links between JM-processing and cell cycle progression. Cell cycle kinases and phosphatases control Mus81 and Yen1/GEN1 to restrain deleterious JM-processing during S-phase, while safeguarding chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  3. Visualizing cell-cycle kinetics after hypoxia/reoxygenation in HeLa cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci).

    PubMed

    Goto, Tatsuaki; Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2015-12-10

    Hypoxia induces G1 arrest in many cancer cell types. Tumor cells are often exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation, especially under acute hypoxic conditions in vivo. In this study, we investigated cell-cycle kinetics and clonogenic survival after hypoxia/reoxygenation in HeLa cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci). Hypoxic treatment halted cell-cycle progression during mid-S to G2 phase, as determined by the cell cycle-regulated E3 ligase activities of SCF(Skp2) and APC/C(Cdh1), which are regulators of the Fucci probes; however, the DNA content of the arrested cells was equivalent to that in G1 phase. After reoxygenation, time-lapse imaging and DNA content analysis revealed that all cells reached G2 phase, and that Fucci fluorescence was distinctly separated into two fractions 24h after reoxygenation: red cells that released from G2 arrest after repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) exhibited higher clonogenic survival, whereas most cells that stayed green contained many DSBs and exhibited lower survival. We conclude that hypoxia disrupts coordination of DNA synthesis and E3 ligase activities associated with cell-cycle progression, and that DSB repair could greatly influence cell-cycle kinetics and clonogenic survival after hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  4. Cell-cycle quiescence maintains Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells independent of GLP-1/Notch.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Hannah S; Kimble, Judith

    2015-11-09

    Many types of adult stem cells exist in a state of cell-cycle quiescence, yet it has remained unclear whether quiescence plays a role in maintaining the stem cell fate. Here we establish the adult germline of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for facultative stem cell quiescence. We find that mitotically dividing germ cells--including germline stem cells--become quiescent in the absence of food. This quiescence is characterized by a slowing of S phase, a block to M-phase entry, and the ability to re-enter M phase rapidly in response to re-feeding. Further, we demonstrate that cell-cycle quiescence alters the genetic requirements for stem cell maintenance: The signaling pathway required for stem cell maintenance under fed conditions--GLP-1/Notch signaling--becomes dispensable under conditions of quiescence. Thus, cell-cycle quiescence can itself maintain stem cells, independent of the signaling pathway otherwise essential for such maintenance.

  5. A Coarse Estimation of Cell Size Region from a Mesoscopic Stochastic Cell Cycle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ming; Jia, Ya; Liu, Quan; Zhu, Chun-Lian; Yang, Li-Jian

    2007-07-01

    Based on a deterministic cell cycle model of fission yeast, the effects of the finite cell size on the cell cycle regulation in wee1- cdc25Δ double mutant type are numerically studied by using of the chemical Langevin equations. It is found that at a certain region of cell size, our numerical results from the chemical Langevin equations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The two resettings to the G2 phase from early stages of mitosis can be induced under the moderate cell size. The quantized cycle times can be observed during such a cell size region. Therefore, a coarse estimation of cell size is obtained from the mesoscopic stochastic cell cycle model.

  6. Thrombospondin-1 signaling through CD47 inhibits cell cycle progression and induces senescence in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qi; Chen, Kexin; Gao, Lu; Zheng, Yang; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    CD47 signaling in endothelial cells has been shown to suppress angiogenesis, but little is known about the link between CD47 and endothelial senescence. Herein, we demonstrate that the thrombospondin-1 (TSP1)-CD47 signaling pathway is a major mechanism for driving endothelial cell senescence. CD47 deficiency in endothelial cells significantly improved their angiogenic function and attenuated their replicative senescence. Lack of CD47 also suppresses activation of cell cycle inhibitors and upregulates the expression of cell cycle promoters, leading to increased cell cycle progression. Furthermore, TSP1 significantly accelerates replicative senescence and associated cell cycle arrest in a CD47-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that TSP1-CD47 signaling is an important mechanism driving endothelial cell senescence. Thus, TSP1 and CD47 provide attractive molecular targets for treatment of aging-associated cardiovascular dysfunction and diseases involving endothelial dysregulation. PMID:27607583

  7. Cell Cycle Control by a Minimal Cdk Network

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Claude; Tyson, John J.; Coudreuse, Damien; Novák, Béla

    2015-01-01

    In present-day eukaryotes, the cell division cycle is controlled by a complex network of interacting proteins, including members of the cyclin and cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk) families, and the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC). Successful progression through the cell cycle depends on precise, temporally ordered regulation of the functions of these proteins. In light of this complexity, it is surprising that in fission yeast, a minimal Cdk network consisting of a single cyclin-Cdk fusion protein can control DNA synthesis and mitosis in a manner that is indistinguishable from wild type. To improve our understanding of the cell cycle regulatory network, we built and analysed a mathematical model of the molecular interactions controlling the G1/S and G2/M transitions in these minimal cells. The model accounts for all observed properties of yeast strains operating with the fusion protein. Importantly, coupling the model’s predictions with experimental analysis of alternative minimal cells, we uncover an explanation for the unexpected fact that elimination of inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk is benign in these strains while it strongly affects normal cells. Furthermore, in the strain without inhibitory phosphorylation of the fusion protein, the distribution of cell size at division is unusually broad, an observation that is accounted for by stochastic simulations of the model. Our approach provides novel insights into the organization and quantitative regulation of wild type cell cycle progression. In particular, it leads us to propose a new mechanistic model for the phenomenon of mitotic catastrophe, relying on a combination of unregulated, multi-cyclin-dependent Cdk activities. PMID:25658582

  8. Evaluation program for secondary spacecraft cells: Cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The service life and storage stability for several storage batteries were determined. The batteries included silver-zinc batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, and silver-cadmium batteries. The cell performance characteristics and limitations are to be used by spacecraft power systems planners and designers. A statistical analysis of the life cycle prediction and cause of failure versus test conditions is presented.

  9. Cycle life status of SAFT VOS nickel-cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goualard, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    The SAFT prismatic VOS Ni-Cd cells have been flown in geosynchronous orbit since 1977 and in low earth orbit since 1983. Parallel cycling tests are performed by several space agencies in order to determine the cycle life for a wide range of temperature and depth of discharge (DOD). In low Earth orbit (LEO), the ELAN program is conducted on 24 Ah cells by CNES and ESA at the European Battery Test Center at temperatures ranging from 0 to 27 C and DOD from 10 to 40 percent. Data are presented up to 37,000 cycles. One pack (X-80) has achieved 49,000 cycles at 10 C and 23 percent DOD. The geosynchronous orbit simulation of a high DOD test is conducted by ESA on 3 batteries at 10 C and 70, 90, and 100 percent DOD. Thirty-one eclipse seasons are completed, and no signs of degradation have been found. The Air Force test at CRANE on 24 Ah and 40 Ah cells at 20 C and 80 percent DOD has achieved 19 shadow periods. Life expectancy is discussed. The VOS cell technology could be used for the following: (1) in geosynchronous conditions--15 yrs at 10-15 C and 80 percent DOD; and (2) in low earth orbit--10 yrs at 5-15 C and 25-30 percent DOD.

  10. Hydrogenosome behavior during the cell cycle in Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Benchimol, Marlene; Engelke, Flávio

    2003-07-01

    The hydrogenosome is an unusual organelle found in several trichomonad species and other protists living in oxygen poor or anoxic environments. The hydrogenosome behavior in the protist Tritrichomonas foetus, parasite of the urogenital tract of cattle, is reported here. The hydrogenosomes were followed by light and transmission electron microscopy during the whole cell cycle. Videomicroscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunocytochemistry were also used. It is shown that the hydrogenosomes divide at any phase of the cell cycle and that the organellar division is not synchronized. During the interphase the hydrogenosomes are distributed mainly along the axostyle and costa, and at the beginning of mitosis migrate to around the nucleus. Three forms of hydrogenosome division were seen: (1). segmentation, where elongated hydrogenosomes are further separated by external membranous profiles; (2). partition, where rounded hydrogenosomes, in a bulky form, are further separated by a membranous internal septum and, (3). a new dividing form: heart-shaped hydrogenosomes, which gradually present a membrane invagination leading to the organelle division. The hydrogenosomes divide at any phase of the cell cycle. A necklace of intramembranous particles delimiting the outer hydrogenosomal membrane in the region of organelle division was observed by freeze-etching. Similarities between hydrogenosomes and mitochondria behavior during the cell cycle are discussed.

  11. Programmed cell death 2 protein induces gastric cancer cell growth arrest at the early S phase of the cell cycle and apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wei, Wei; Jin, Hui-Cheng; Ying, Rong-Chao; Zhu, A-Kao; Zhang, Fang-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death 2 (PDCD2) is a highly conserved nuclear protein, and aberrant PDCD2 expression alters cell apoptosis. The present study aimed to investigate PDCD2 expression in gastric cancer. Tissue specimens from 34 gastric cancer patients were collected for analysis of PDCD2 expression using immunohistochemistry, western blotting and qRT-PCR. Gastric cancer cell lines (a p53-mutated MKN28 line and a wild-type p53 MKN45 line) were used to assess the effects of PDCD2 overexpression. p53-/- nude mice were used to investigate the effect of PDCD2 on ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced skin carcinogenesis. The data showed that PDCD2 expression was reduced in gastric cancer tissue specimens, and loss of PDCD2 expression was associated with the poor survival of patients. PDCD2 expression induced gastric cancer cell growth arrest at the early S phase of the cell cycle and apoptosis. The antitumor effects of PDCD2 expression were dependent on p53 expression in gastric cancer cells. Moreover, PDCD2 expression inhibited activity of the ATM/Chk1/2/p53 signaling pathway. In addition, PDCD2 expression suppressed UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in p53+/+ nude mice, but not in p53-/- mice. The data from the present study demonstrated that loss of PDCD2 expression could contribute to gastric cancer development and progression and that PDCD2-induced gastric cancer cell growth arrest at the early S phase of the cell cycle and apoptosis are p53-dependent. PMID:25334010

  12. Defective quorum sensing of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells: evidence of collective behavior of leukemic populations as semi-autonomous aberrant ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sapan J; Dao, Su; Darie, Costel C; Clarkson, Bayard D

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a generic term used to describe cell-cell communication and collective decision making by bacterial and social insects to regulate the expression of specific genes in controlling cell density and other properties of the populations in response to nutrient supply or changes in the environment. QS mechanisms also have a role in higher organisms in maintaining homeostasis, regulation of the immune system and collective behavior of cancer cell populations. In the present study, we used a p190(BCR-ABL) driven pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL3) cell line derived from the pleural fluid of a terminally ill patient with ALL to test the QS hypothesis in leukemia. ALL3 cells don't grow at low density (LD) in liquid media but grow progressively faster at increasingly high cell densities (HD) in contrast to other established leukemic cell lines that grow well at very low starting cell densities. The ALL3 cells at LD are poised to grow but shortly die without additional stimulation. Supernates of ALL3 cells (HDSN) and some other primary cells grown at HD stimulate the growth of the LD ALL3 cells without which they won't survive. To get further insight into the activation processes we performed microarray analysis of the LD ALL3 cells after stimulation with ALL3 HDSN at days 1, 3, and 6. This screen identified several candidate genes, and we linked them to signaling networks and their functions. We observed that genes involved in lipid, cholesterol, fatty acid metabolism, and B cell activation are most up- or down-regulated upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells using HDSN. We also discuss other pathways that are differentially expressed upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells. Our findings suggest that the Ph+ ALL population achieves dominance by functioning as a collective aberrant ecosystem subject to defective quorum-sensing regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27429840

  13. Defective quorum sensing of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells: evidence of collective behavior of leukemic populations as semi-autonomous aberrant ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapan J; Dao, Su; Darie, Costel C; Clarkson, Bayard D

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a generic term used to describe cell-cell communication and collective decision making by bacterial and social insects to regulate the expression of specific genes in controlling cell density and other properties of the populations in response to nutrient supply or changes in the environment. QS mechanisms also have a role in higher organisms in maintaining homeostasis, regulation of the immune system and collective behavior of cancer cell populations. In the present study, we used a p190BCR-ABL driven pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL3) cell line derived from the pleural fluid of a terminally ill patient with ALL to test the QS hypothesis in leukemia. ALL3 cells don’t grow at low density (LD) in liquid media but grow progressively faster at increasingly high cell densities (HD) in contrast to other established leukemic cell lines that grow well at very low starting cell densities. The ALL3 cells at LD are poised to grow but shortly die without additional stimulation. Supernates of ALL3 cells (HDSN) and some other primary cells grown at HD stimulate the growth of the LD ALL3 cells without which they won’t survive. To get further insight into the activation processes we performed microarray analysis of the LD ALL3 cells after stimulation with ALL3 HDSN at days 1, 3, and 6. This screen identified several candidate genes, and we linked them to signaling networks and their functions. We observed that genes involved in lipid, cholesterol, fatty acid metabolism, and B cell activation are most up- or down-regulated upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells using HDSN. We also discuss other pathways that are differentially expressed upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells. Our findings suggest that the Ph+ ALL population achieves dominance by functioning as a collective aberrant ecosystem subject to defective quorum-sensing regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27429840

  14. Cell Cycle Regulatory Functions of the KSHV Oncoprotein LANA

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang; Gan, Jin; Wang, Chong; Zhu, Caixia; Cai, Qiliang

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of cell cycle is a commonly employed strategy of viruses for achieving a favorable cellular environment during infection. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the primary etiological agent of several human malignancies including Kaposi’s sarcoma, and primary effusion lymphoma, encodes several oncoproteins that deregulate normal physiology of cell cycle machinery to persist with endothelial cells and B cells and subsequently establish a latent infection. During latency, only a small subset of viral proteins is expressed. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is one of the latent antigens shown to be essential for transformation of endothelial cells in vitro. It has been well demonstrated that LANA is critical for the maintenance of latency, episome DNA replication, segregation and gene transcription. In this review, we summarize recent studies and address how LANA functions as an oncoprotein to steer host cell cycle-related events including proliferation and apoptosis by interacting with various cellular and viral factors, and highlight the potential therapeutic strategy of disrupting LANA-dependent signaling as targets in KSHV-associated cancers. PMID:27065950

  15. Aberrant light directly impairs mood and learning through melanopsin-expressing neurons.

    PubMed

    LeGates, Tara A; Altimus, Cara M; Wang, Hui; Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Yang, Sunggu; Zhao, Haiqing; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Weber, E Todd; Hattar, Samer

    2012-11-22

    The daily solar cycle allows organisms to synchronize their circadian rhythms and sleep-wake cycles to the correct temporal niche. Changes in day-length, shift-work, and transmeridian travel lead to mood alterations and cognitive function deficits. Sleep deprivation and circadian disruption underlie mood and cognitive disorders associated with irregular light schedules. Whether irregular light schedules directly affect mood and cognitive functions in the context of normal sleep and circadian rhythms remains unclear. Here we show, using an aberrant light cycle that neither changes the amount and architecture of sleep nor causes changes in the circadian timing system, that light directly regulates mood-related behaviours and cognitive functions in mice. Animals exposed to the aberrant light cycle maintain daily corticosterone rhythms, but the overall levels of corticosterone are increased. Despite normal circadian and sleep structures, these animals show increased depression-like behaviours and impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation and learning. Administration of the antidepressant drugs fluoxetine or desipramine restores learning in mice exposed to the aberrant light cycle, suggesting that the mood deficit precedes the learning impairments. To determine the retinal circuits underlying this impairment of mood and learning, we examined the behavioural consequences of this light cycle in animals that lack intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. In these animals, the aberrant light cycle does not impair mood and learning, despite the presence of the conventional retinal ganglion cells and the ability of these animals to detect light for image formation. These findings demonstrate the ability of light to influence cognitive and mood functions directly through intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

  16. Aberrant light directly impairs mood and learning through melanopsin-expressing neurons.

    PubMed

    LeGates, Tara A; Altimus, Cara M; Wang, Hui; Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Yang, Sunggu; Zhao, Haiqing; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Weber, E Todd; Hattar, Samer

    2012-11-22

    The daily solar cycle allows organisms to synchronize their circadian rhythms and sleep-wake cycles to the correct temporal niche. Changes in day-length, shift-work, and transmeridian travel lead to mood alterations and cognitive function deficits. Sleep deprivation and circadian disruption underlie mood and cognitive disorders associated with irregular light schedules. Whether irregular light schedules directly affect mood and cognitive functions in the context of normal sleep and circadian rhythms remains unclear. Here we show, using an aberrant light cycle that neither changes the amount and architecture of sleep nor causes changes in the circadian timing system, that light directly regulates mood-related behaviours and cognitive functions in mice. Animals exposed to the aberrant light cycle maintain daily corticosterone rhythms, but the overall levels of corticosterone are increased. Despite normal circadian and sleep structures, these animals show increased depression-like behaviours and impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation and learning. Administration of the antidepressant drugs fluoxetine or desipramine restores learning in mice exposed to the aberrant light cycle, suggesting that the mood deficit precedes the learning impairments. To determine the retinal circuits underlying this impairment of mood and learning, we examined the behavioural consequences of this light cycle in animals that lack intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. In these animals, the aberrant light cycle does not impair mood and learning, despite the presence of the conventional retinal ganglion cells and the ability of these animals to detect light for image formation. These findings demonstrate the ability of light to influence cognitive and mood functions directly through intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. PMID:23151476

  17. Vibration Induces BAFF Overexpression and Aberrant O-Glycosylation of IgA1 in Cultured Human Tonsillar Mononuclear Cells in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Muyao; Liu, Chan; Yan, Wenzhe; Peng, Xiaofei; He, Liyu; Liu, Hong; Liu, Fuyou

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of in vitro vibratory stimulation of human tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMCs). Methods. Fourteen IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients with chronic tonsillitis (CT) and 12 CT patients with no renal pathology were enrolled. Group A TMCs were collected after 24 hours of culture and used to determine baseline levels. TMCs in groups B, C, D, E, and F were exposed to vibratory stimulation (60 Hz) for 0 (as the control group), 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively. Results. Baseline concentrations of B-cell-activation factor (BAFF) and IgA1, BAFF mRNA expression, and aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 level were higher in the IgAN group as compared to that in the CT group, and all increased after vibratory stimulation. Baseline mRNA expressions of core β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and core β1,3GalT-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) were lower in the IgAN group; the levels decreased further after vibratory stimulation. Conclusion. In patients with IgAN, vibratory stimulation of TMCs appears to induce IgA1 secretion through activation of BAFF release and to aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 by suppressing C1GALT1 and Cosmc expression. In vitro vibratory stimulation of human TMCs mimics the vibratory simulation of palatine tonsils produced by vocal cords during phonation.

  18. Vibration Induces BAFF Overexpression and Aberrant O-Glycosylation of IgA1 in Cultured Human Tonsillar Mononuclear Cells in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Muyao; Liu, Chan; Yan, Wenzhe; Peng, Xiaofei; He, Liyu; Liu, Hong; Liu, Fuyou

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of in vitro vibratory stimulation of human tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMCs). Methods. Fourteen IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients with chronic tonsillitis (CT) and 12 CT patients with no renal pathology were enrolled. Group A TMCs were collected after 24 hours of culture and used to determine baseline levels. TMCs in groups B, C, D, E, and F were exposed to vibratory stimulation (60 Hz) for 0 (as the control group), 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively. Results. Baseline concentrations of B-cell-activation factor (BAFF) and IgA1, BAFF mRNA expression, and aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 level were higher in the IgAN group as compared to that in the CT group, and all increased after vibratory stimulation. Baseline mRNA expressions of core β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and core β1,3GalT-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) were lower in the IgAN group; the levels decreased further after vibratory stimulation. Conclusion. In patients with IgAN, vibratory stimulation of TMCs appears to induce IgA1 secretion through activation of BAFF release and to aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 by suppressing C1GALT1 and Cosmc expression. In vitro vibratory stimulation of human TMCs mimics the vibratory simulation of palatine tonsils produced by vocal cords during phonation. PMID:27672662

  19. Aberrant cell divisions in root meristeme of maize following exposure to X-rays low doses compared to similar effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focea, R.; Capraru, G.; Racuciu, M.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-04-01

    The response of maize to radiation exposure was investigated by two cytogenetic methods considering the importance of the geno-toxic effect for environmental and agricultural purposes. Uniform genophond seeds, freshly germinated, were exposed to relatively low radiation doses using a radiotherapy X-ray applicator from a hospital irradiation device and to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field with about 10 mT magnetic induction (generated within laboratory assembled electromagnetic coils). Radicular meristeme tissue aliquots were prevailed for cytogenetic investigation based on microscopic observations and cell counting. Microscope slides were prepared following a specific procedure (squash technique and Feulgen method based on modified Carr reactive coloration). Mitotic index as well as chromosomal aberration percentage were calculated for more than 30,000 cells taken into account. From a qualitative viewpoint, chromosomal aberrations such as interchromatidian bridges, lagging and expelled chromosomes and multipolar divisions were evidenced - no distinct situation for either ionizing radiation or electromagnetic field being identified. The main quantitative difference consisted in the increased mitotic index for electromagnetic exposure increased times compared with the diminished mitotic index in the case of low X-ray doses.

  20. Relation Between the Cell Volume and the Cell Cycle Dynamics in Mammalian cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magno, A. C. G.; Oliveira, I. L.; Hauck, J. V. S.

    2016-08-01

    The main goal of this work is to add and analyze an equation that represents the volume in a dynamical model of the mammalian cell cycle proposed by Gérard and Goldbeter (2011) [1]. The cell division occurs when the cyclinB/Cdkl complex is totally degraded (Tyson and Novak, 2011)[2] and it reaches a minimum value. At this point, the cell is divided into two newborn daughter cells and each one will contain the half of the cytoplasmic content of the mother cell. The equations of our base model are only valid if the cell volume, where the reactions occur, is constant. Whether the cell volume is not constant, that is, the rate of change of its volume with respect to time is explicitly taken into account in the mathematical model, then the equations of the original model are no longer valid. Therefore, every equations were modified from the mass conservation principle for considering a volume that changes with time. Through this approach, the cell volume affects all model variables. Two different dynamic simulation methods were accomplished: deterministic and stochastic. In the stochastic simulation, the volume affects every model's parameters which have molar unit, whereas in the deterministic one, it is incorporated into the differential equations. In deterministic simulation, the biochemical species may be in concentration units, while in stochastic simulation such species must be converted to number of molecules which are directly proportional to the cell volume. In an effort to understand the influence of the new equation a stability analysis was performed. This elucidates how the growth factor impacts the stability of the model's limit cycles. In conclusion, a more precise model, in comparison to the base model, was created for the cell cycle as it now takes into consideration the cell volume variation

  1. Glucosylceramide synthesis inhibition affects cell cycle progression, membrane trafficking, and stage differentiation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Stefanić, Sasa; Spycher, Cornelia; Morf, Laura; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Schraner, Elisabeth; Wild, Peter; Hehl, Adrian B; Sonda, Sabrina

    2010-09-01

    Synthesis of glucosylceramide via glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) is a crucial event in higher eukaryotes, both for the production of complex glycosphingolipids and for regulating cellular levels of ceramide, a potent antiproliferative second messenger. In this study, we explored the dependence of the early branching eukaryote Giardia lamblia on GCS activity. Biochemical analyses revealed that the parasite has a GCS located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes that is active in proliferating and encysting trophozoites. Pharmacological inhibition of GCS induced aberrant cell division, characterized by arrest of cytokinesis, incomplete cleavage furrow formation, and consequent block of replication. Importantly, we showed that increased ceramide levels were responsible for the cytokinesis arrest. In addition, GCS inhibition resulted in prominent ultrastructural abnormalities, including accumulation of cytosolic vesicles, enlarged lysosomes, and clathrin disorganization. Moreover, anterograde trafficking of the encystations-specific protein CWP1 was severely compromised and resulted in inhibition of stage differentiation. Our results reveal novel aspects of lipid metabolism in G. lamblia and specifically highlight the vital role of GCS in regulating cell cycle progression, membrane trafficking events, and stage differentiation in this parasite. In addition, we identified ceramide as a potent bioactive molecule, underscoring the universal conservation of ceramide signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:20335568

  2. Chromosome aberrations in decondensed sperm DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Factors that could influence the chromosomal aberration frequency observed at first cleavage following in vivo exposure of germ cells to chemical mutagens are discussed. The techniques of chromosome aberration analysis following sperm DNA condensation by in vitro fertilization or fusion seem to be viable research areas for providing information of human germ cell exposures. However, the potential sensitivity of the assay needs to be better understood, and factors that can influence this sensitivity require a great deal of further study using animal models.

  3. NSA2, a novel nucleolus protein regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Heyu; Ma, Xi; Shi, Taiping; Song, Quansheng; Zhao, Hongshan; Ma, Dalong

    2010-01-01

    NSA2 (Nop seven-associated 2) was previously identified in a high throughput screen of novel human genes associated with cell proliferation, and the NSA2 protein is evolutionarily conserved across different species. In this study, we revealed that NSA2 is broadly expressed in human tissues and cultured cell lines, and located in the nucleolus of the cell. Both of the putative nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of NSA2, also overlapped with nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs), are capable of directing nucleolar accumulation. Moreover, over-expression of the NSA2 protein promoted cell growth in different cell lines and regulated the G1/S transition in the cell cycle. SiRNA silencing of the NSA2 transcript attenuated the cell growth and dramatically blocked the cell cycle in G1/S transition. Our results demonstrated that NSA2 is a nucleolar protein involved in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation.

  4. Aberrant expression and distribution of enzymes of the urea cycle and other ammonia metabolizing pathways in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts.

    PubMed

    van Straten, Giora; van Steenbeek, Frank G; Grinwis, Guy C M; Favier, Robert P; Kummeling, Anne; van Gils, Ingrid H; Fieten, Hille; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Holstege, Frank C P; Rothuizen, Jan; Spee, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The detoxification of ammonia occurs mainly through conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver via the urea cycle and glutamine synthesis. Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) in dogs cause hyperammonemia eventually leading to hepatic encephalopathy. In this study, the gene expression of urea cycle enzymes (carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS1), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1), argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), and arginase (ARG1)), N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), Glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1), and glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) was evaluated in dogs with CPSS before and after surgical closure of the shunt. Additionally, immunohistochemistry was performed on urea cycle enzymes and GLUL on liver samples of healthy dogs and dogs with CPSS to investigate a possible zonal distribution of these enzymes within the liver lobule and to investigate possible differences in distribution in dogs with CPSS compared to healthy dogs. Furthermore, the effect of increasing ammonia concentrations on the expression of the urea cycle enzymes was investigated in primary hepatocytes in vitro. Gene-expression of CPS1, OTC, ASL, GLUD1 and NAGS was down regulated in dogs with CPSS and did not normalize after surgical closure of the shunt. In all dogs GLUL distribution was localized pericentrally. CPS1, OTC and ASS1 were localized periportally in healthy dogs, whereas in CPSS dogs, these enzymes lacked a clear zonal distribution. In primary hepatocytes higher ammonia concentrations induced mRNA levels of CPS1. We hypothesize that the reduction in expression of urea cycle enzymes, NAGS and GLUD1 as well as the alterations in zonal distribution in dogs with CPSS may be caused by a developmental arrest of these enzymes during the embryonic or early postnatal phase. PMID:24945279

  5. Pseudolaric Acid B Induced Cell Cycle Arrest, Autophagy and Senescence in Murine Fibrosarcoma L929 Cell

    PubMed Central

    hua Yu, Jing; yu Liu, Chun; bin Zheng, Gui; Zhang, Li Ying; hui Yan, Ming; yan Zhang, Wen; ying Meng, Xian; fang Yu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Objective: PAB induced various cancer cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. But in cell line murine fibrosarcoma L929, PAB did not induce apoptosis, but autophagy, therefore it was thought by us as a good model to research the relationship of cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence bypass apoptosis. Methods: Inhibitory ratio was assessed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis. Phase contrast microscopy visualized cell morphology. Hoechst 33258 staining for nuclear change, propidium iodode (PI) staining for cell cycle, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining for autophagy, and rodanmine 123 staining for mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured by fluorescence microscopy or flowcytometry. Apoptosis was determined by DNA ladder test. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity was detected by PKC assay kit. SA-β-galactosidase assay was used to detect senescence. Protein expression was examined by western blot. Results: PAB inhibited L929 cell growth in time-and dose-dependent manner. At 12 h, 80 μmol/L PAB induced obvious mitotic arrest; at 24 h, PAB began to induce autophagy; at 36 h, cell-treated with PAB slip into G1 cell cycle; and 3 d PAB induced senescence. In time sequence PAB induced firstly cell cycle arrest, then autophagy, then slippage into G1 phase, lastly senescence. Senescent cells had high level of autophagy, inhibiting autophagy led to apoptosis, and no senescence. PAB activated PKC activity to induce cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence, inhibiting PKC activity suppressed cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence. Conclusion: PAB induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cell through PKC. PMID:23630435

  6. Barth Syndrome: From Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Associated with Aberrant Production of Reactive Oxygen Species to Pluripotent Stem Cell Studies

    PubMed Central

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie; Møller, Ian M.; Petit, Patrice X.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated with TAZ mutations. Tafazzin is a mitochondrial phospholipidlysophospholipid transacylase that shuttles acyl groups between phospholipids and regulates the remodeling of cardiolipin (CL), a unique inner mitochondrial membrane phospholipid dimer consisting of two phosphatidyl residues linked by a glycerol bridge. After their biosynthesis, the acyl chains of CLs may be modified in remodeling processes involving up to three different enzymes. Their characteristic acyl chain composition depends on the function of tafazzin, although the enzyme itself surprisingly lacks acyl specificity. CLs are crucial for correct mitochondrial structure and function. In addition to their function in the basic mitochondrial function of ATP production, CLs play essential roles in cardiac function, apoptosis, autophagy, cell cycle regulation and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Recent developments in tafazzin research have provided strong insights into the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An important tool has been the generation of BTHS-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from BTHS patients. In a complementary approach, disease-specific mutations have been introduced into wild-type iPSC lines enabling direct comparison with isogenic controls. iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes were then characterized using biochemical and classical bioenergetic

  7. Characterization of high-power lithium-ion cells during constant current cycling. Part I. Cycle performance and electrochemical diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2003-01-24

    Twelve-cm{sup 2} pouch type lithium-ion cells were assembled with graphite anodes, LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} cathodes and 1M LiPF{sub 6}/EC/DEC electrolyte. These pouch cells were cycled at different depths of discharge (100 percent and 70 percent DOD) at room temperature to investigate cycle performance and pulse power capability. The capacity loss and power fade of the cells cycled over 100 percent DOD was significantly faster than the cell cycled over 70 percent DOD. The overall cell impedance increased with cycling, although the ohmic resistance from the electrolyte was almost constant. From electrochemical analysis of each electrode after cycling, structural and/or impedance changes in the cathode are responsible for most of the capacity and power fade, not the consumption of cycleable Li from side-reactions.

  8. Periodic synthesis of phospholipids during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, E A; Bender, R A

    1987-01-01

    Net phospholipid synthesis is discontinuous during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle with synthesis restricted to two discrete periods. The first period of net phospholipid synthesis begins in the swarmer cell shortly after cell division and ends at about the time when DNA replication initiates. The second period of phospholipid synthesis begins at a time when DNA replication is about two-thirds complete and ends at about the same time that DNA replication terminates. Thus, considerable DNA replication, growth, and differentiation (stalk growth) occur in the absence of net phospholipid synthesis. In fact, when net phospholipid synthesis was inhibited by the antibiotic cerulenin through the entire cell cycle, both the initiation and the elongation phases of DNA synthesis occurred normally. An analysis of the kinetics of incorporation of radioactive phosphate into macromolecules showed that the periodicity of phospholipid synthesis could not have been detected by pulse-labeling techniques, and only an analysis of cells prelabeled to equilibrium allowed detection of the periodicity. Equilibrium-labeled cells also allowed determination of the absolute amount of phosphorus-containing macromolecules in newborn swarmer cells. These cells contain about as much DNA as one Escherichia coli chromosome and about four times as much RNA as DNA. The amount of phosphorus in phospholipids is about one-seventh of that in DNA, or about 3% of the total macromolecular phosphorus. PMID:3584065

  9. Effects of c-myc expression on cell cycle progression.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, K D; Shichiri, M; Follansbee, M R; Sedivy, J M

    1994-01-01

    We used targeted homologous recombination to disrupt one c-myc gene copy in a diploid fibroblast cell line and found that a twofold reduction in Myc expression resulted in lower exponential growth rates and a lengthening of the G0-to-S-phase transition (M. Shichiri, K. D. Hanson and J. M. Sedivy, Cell Growth Differ. 4:93-104, 1993). Myc is a transcription factor, and the number of target genes whose regulation could result in differential growth rates may be very large. We have approached this problem by examining effects of reduced c-myc expression in three broad areas: (i) secretion of growth factors, (ii) expression of growth factor receptors, and (iii) intracellular signal transduction between Myc and components of the intrinsic cell cycle clock. We have found no evidence that differential medium conditioning can account for the growth phenotypes. Likewise, the expression of receptors for platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor I was the same in diploid and heterozygous cells (platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor are the sole growth factors required by these cells for growth in serum-free medium). In contrast, expression of cyclin E, cyclin A, and Rb phosphorylation were delayed when quiescent c-myc heterozygous cells were stimulated to enter the cell cycle. Expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and Cdk2 was not affected. The timing of cyclin E induction was the earliest observable effect of reduced Myc expression. Our data indicate that Myc contributes to regulation of proliferation by a cell-autonomous mechanism that involves the modulation of cyclin E expression and, consequently, progression through the restriction point of the cell cycle. Images PMID:8065309

  10. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis of somatic cells primary cultures established for bovine cloning.

    PubMed

    Katska, L; Bochenek, M; Kania, G; Ryñska, B; Smorag, Z

    2002-12-01

    An important factor governing developmental rates of somatic cloned embryos is the phase of the cell cycle of donor nuclei. The aim of this experiment was to investigate the distribution of cell cycle phases in bovine cumulus and fibroblast cells cultured using routine treatment, and under cell cycle-arresting treatments. The highest percentages of cumulus cells in the G0 + G1 stage were observed in uncultured, frozen/thawed cells originating from immature oocytes (79.8 +/- 2.2%), fresh and frozen/thawed cells from in vitro matured oocytes (84.1 +/- 6.2 and 77.8 +/- 5.7%, respectively), and in cycling cells (72.7 +/- 16.3 and 78.4 +/- 11.2%, respectively for cumulus cells from immature and in vitro matured oocytes). Serum starvation of cumulus cultures markedly decreased percentages of cells in G0 + G1, and prolonged starvation significantly increased (P < 0.05) percentages of cells in G2 + M phase. Culture of cumulus cells to confluency did not increase percentages of cells in G0 + G1. Contrary to findings in cumulus cells, significantly higher percentages of cells in G0 + G1 were apparent when fibroblast cells were cultured to confluency or serum starved, and significantly increased (P < 0.01) as the starvation period was prolonged. It is concluded that for particular cell types specific strategies should be used to attain improvements in the efficiency of cloning procedures.

  11. Cell cycle constraints on capsulation and bacteriophage susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Ardissone, Silvia; Fumeaux, Coralie; Bergé, Matthieu; Beaussart, Audrey; Théraulaz, Laurence; Radhakrishnan, Sunish Kumar; Dufrêne, Yves F; Viollier, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of bacterial capsules in pathogenesis, it is still unknown if systemic cues such as the cell cycle can control capsule biogenesis. In this study, we show that the capsule of the synchronizable model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is cell cycle regulated and we unearth a bacterial transglutaminase homolog, HvyA, as restriction factor that prevents capsulation in G1-phase cells. This capsule protects cells from infection by a generalized transducing Caulobacter phage (φCr30), and the loss of HvyA confers insensitivity towards φCr30. Control of capsulation during the cell cycle could serve as a simple means to prevent steric hindrance of flagellar motility or to ensure that phage-mediated genetic exchange happens before the onset of DNA replication. Moreover, the multi-layered regulatory circuitry directing HvyA expression to G1-phase is conserved during evolution, and HvyA orthologues from related Sinorhizobia can prevent capsulation in Caulobacter, indicating that alpha-proteobacteria have retained HvyA activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03587.001 PMID:25421297

  12. Modeling circadian clock-cell cycle interaction effects on cell population growth rates.

    PubMed

    El Cheikh, R; Bernard, S; El Khatib, N

    2014-12-21

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are two tightly coupled oscillators. Recent analytical studies have shown counter-intuitive effects of circadian gating of the cell cycle on growth rates of proliferating cells which cannot be explained by a molecular model or a population model alone. In this work, we present a combined molecular-population model that studies how coupling the circadian clock to the cell cycle, through the protein WEE1, affects a proliferating cell population. We show that the cell cycle can entrain to the circadian clock with different rational period ratios and characterize multiple domains of entrainment. We show that coupling increases the growth rate for autonomous periods of the cell cycle around 24 h and above 48 h. We study the effect of mutation of circadian genes on the growth rate of cells and show that disruption of the circadian clock can lead to abnormal proliferation. Particularly, we show that Cry 1, Cry 2 mutations decrease the growth rate of cells, Per 2 mutation enhances it and Bmal 1 knockout increases it for autonomous periods of the cell cycle less than 21 h and decreases it elsewhere. Combining a molecular model to a population model offers new insight on the influence of the circadian clock on the growth of a cell population. This can help chronotherapy which takes benefits of physiological rhythms to improve anti-cancer efficacy and tolerance to drugs by administering treatments at a specific time of the day.

  13. Cell-Cycle Analyses Using Thymidine Analogues in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Anda, Silje; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine analogues are powerful tools when studying DNA synthesis including DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, these analogues have been reported to have severe effects on cell-cycle progression and growth, the very processes being investigated in most of these studies. Here, we have analyzed the effects of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) and 5-Chloro-2′-deoxyuridine (CldU) using fission yeast cells and optimized the labelling procedure. We find that both analogues affect the cell cycle, but that the effects can be mitigated by using the appropriate analogue, short pulses of labelling and low concentrations. In addition, we report sequential labelling of two consecutive S phases using EdU and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Furthermore, we show that detection of replicative DNA synthesis is much more sensitive than DNA-measurements by flow cytometry. PMID:24551125

  14. Short-Stalked Prosthecomicrobium hirschii Cells Have a Caulobacter-Like Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michelle; Hoffman, Michelle D.; Daniel, Jeremy J.; Madren, Seth M.; Dhroso, Andi; Korkin, Dmitry; Givan, Scott A.; Jacobson, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The dimorphic alphaproteobacterium Prosthecomicrobium hirschii has both short-stalked and long-stalked morphotypes. Notably, these morphologies do not arise from transitions in a cell cycle. Instead, the maternal cell morphology is typically reproduced in daughter cells, which results in microcolonies of a single cell type. In this work, we further characterized the short-stalked cells and found that these cells have a Caulobacter-like life cycle in which cell division leads to the generation of two morphologically distinct daughter cells. Using a microfluidic device and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we observed that motile short-stalked cells attach to a surface by means of a polar adhesin. Cells attached at their poles elongate and ultimately release motile daughter cells. Robust biofilm growth occurs in the microfluidic device, enabling the collection of synchronous motile cells and downstream analysis of cell growth and attachment. Analysis of a draft P. hirschii genome sequence indicates the presence of CtrA-dependent cell cycle regulation. This characterization of P. hirschii will enable future studies on the mechanisms underlying complex morphologies and polymorphic cell cycles. IMPORTANCE Bacterial cell shape plays a critical role in regulating important behaviors, such as attachment to surfaces, motility, predation, and cellular differentiation; however, most studies on these behaviors focus on bacteria with relatively simple morphologies, such as rods and spheres. Notably, complex morphologies abound throughout the bacteria, with striking examples, such as P. hirschii, found within the stalked Alphaproteobacteria. P. hirschii is an outstanding candidate for studies of complex morphology generation and polymorphic cell cycles. Here, the cell cycle and genome of P. hirschii are characterized. This work sets the stage for future studies of the impact of complex cell shapes on bacterial behaviors. PMID:26833409

  15. High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.

    1995-10-19

    Carbonate fuel cells developed by Energy Research Corporation, in commercial 2.85 MW size, have an efficiency of 57.9 percent. Studies of higher efficiency hybrid power cycles were conducted in cooperation with METC to identify an economically competitive system with an efficiency in excess of 65 percent. A hybrid power cycle was identified that includes a direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine and a steam cycle, which generates power at a LHV efficiency in excess of 70 percent. This new system is called a Tandem Technology Cycle (TTC). In a TTC operating on natural gas fuel, 95 percent of the fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for the reforming of the fuel, and flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell system which generates 72 percent of the power. The portion of the fuel cell anode exhaust which is not recycled, is burned and heat is transferred to the compressed air from a gas turbine, raising its temperature to 1800{degrees}F. The stream is then heated to 2000{degrees}F in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 13 percent of the power. Half the exhaust from the gas turbine flows to the anode exhaust burner, and the remainder flows to the fuel cell cathodes providing the O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the fuel cells flows to a steam system which includes a heat recovery steam generator and stages steam turbine which generates 15 percent of the TTC system power. Studies of the TTC for 200-MW and 20-MW size plants quantified performance, emissions and cost-of-electricity, and compared the characteristics of the TTC to gas turbine combined cycles. A 200-MW TTC plant has an efficiency of 72.6 percent, and is relatively insensitive to ambient temperature, but requires a heat exchanger capable of 2000{degrees}F. The estimated cost of electricity is 45.8 mills/kWhr which is not competitive with a combined cycle in installations where fuel cost is under $5.8/MMBtu.

  16. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. Material/Methods MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. Results ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27333866

  17. Chemical dissection of the cell cycle: probes for cell biology and anti-cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Senese, S; Lo, Y C; Huang, D; Zangle, T A; Gholkar, A A; Robert, L; Homet, B; Ribas, A; Summers, M K; Teitell, M A; Damoiseaux, R; Torres, J Z

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell proliferation relies on the ability of cancer cells to grow, transition through the cell cycle, and divide. To identify novel chemical probes for dissecting the mechanisms governing cell cycle progression and cell division, and for developing new anti-cancer therapeutics, we developed and performed a novel cancer cell-based high-throughput chemical screen for cell cycle modulators. This approach identified novel G1, S, G2, and M-phase specific inhibitors with drug-like properties and diverse chemotypes likely targeting a broad array of processes. We further characterized the M-phase inhibitors and highlight the most potent M-phase inhibitor MI-181, which targets tubulin, inhibits tubulin polymerization, activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, arrests cells in mitosis, and triggers a fast apoptotic cell death. Importantly, MI-181 has broad anti-cancer activity, especially against BRAF(V600E) melanomas.

  18. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Serena; Daly, Michele B; St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Shepard, Caitlin; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek; Wu, Li

    2016-08-01

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G1/G0 phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27183329

  19. Polyamines and the Cell Cycle of Catharanthus roseus Cells in Culture 1

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Hisae; Ando, Satoshi; Kodama, Hiroaki; Komamine, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    Investigation was made on the effect of partial depletion of polyamines (PAs), induced by treatment with inhibitors of the biosynthesis of PAs, on the distribution of cells at each phase of the cell cycle in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. cells in suspension cultures, using flow cytometry. More cells treated with inhibitors of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were accumulated in the G1 phase than those in the control, while the treatment with an inhibitor of spermidine (SPD) synthase showed no effect on the distribution of cells. The endogenous levels of the PAs, putrescine (PUT), SPD, and spermine (SPM), were determined during the cell cycle in synchronous cultures of C. roseus. Two peaks of endogenous level of PAs, in particular, of PUT and SPD, were observed during the cell cycle. Levels of PAs increased markedly prior to synthesis of DNA in the S phase and prior to cytokinesis. Activities of ADC and ODC were also assayed during the cell cycle. Activities of ADC was much higher than that of ODC throughout the cell cycle, but both activities of ODC and ADC changed in concert with changes in levels of PAs. Therefore, it is suggested that these enzymes may regulate PA levels during the cell cycle. These results indicate that inhibitors of PUT biosynthesis caused the suppression of cell proliferation by prevention of the progression of the cell cycle, probably from the G1 to the S phase, and PUT may play more important roles in the progression of the cell cycle than other PAs. PMID:16668290

  20. Testing for oncogenic molecular aberrations in cell-free DNA-based liquid biopsies in the clinic: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Polivka, Jiri; Pesta, Martin; Janku, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The optimal choice of cancer therapy depends upon analysis of the tumor genome for druggable molecular alterations. The spatial and temporal intratumor heterogeneity of cancers creates substantial challenges, as molecular profile depends on time and site of tumor tissue collection. To capture the entire molecular profile, multiple biopsies from primary and metastatic sites at different time points would be required, which is not feasible for ethical or economic reasons. Molecular analysis of circulating cell-free DNA offers a novel, minimally invasive method that can be performed at multiple time-points and plausibly better represents the prevailing molecular profile of the cancer. Molecular analysis of this cell-free DNA offers multiple clinically useful applications, such as identification of molecular targets for cancer therapy, monitoring of tumor molecular profile in real time, detection of emerging molecular aberrations associated with resistance to particular therapy, determination of cancer prognosis and diagnosis of cancer recurrence or progression.

  1. Characterization of Fuel Cell Vehicle Duty Cycle Elements

    SciTech Connect

    MAISH, ALEXANDER B.; NILAN, ERIC J.; BACA, PAUL M.

    2002-12-01

    This report covers research done as part of US Department of Energy contract DE-PS26-99FT14299 with the Fuel Cell Propulsion Institute on the fuel cell RATLER{trademark} vehicle, Lurch, as well as work done on the fuel cells designed for the vehicle. All work contained within this report was conducted at the Robotic Vehicle Range at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque New Mexico. The research conducted includes characterization of the duty cycle of the robotic vehicle. This covers characterization of its various abilities such as hill climbing and descending, spin-turns, and driving on level ground. This was accomplished with the use of current sensors placed in the vehicle in conjunction with a Data Acquisition System (DAS), which was also created at Sandia Labs. Characterization of the two fuel cells was accomplished using various measuring instruments and techniques that will be discussed later in the report. A Statement of Work for this effort is included in Appendix A. This effort was able to complete characterization of vehicle duty cycle elements using battery power, but problems with the fuel cell control systems prevented completion of the characterization of the fuel cell operation on the benchtop and in the vehicle. Some data was obtained characterizing the fuel cell current-voltage performance and thermal rise rate by bypassing elements of the control system.

  2. Do DNA double-strand breaks induced by Alu I lead to development of novel aberrations in the second and third post-treatment mitoses?

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, A.; Bonk, K.; Mueller, M.U.; Streffer, C.; Obe, G.

    1996-02-01

    Several authors have reported that ionizing radiation can give rise to novel aberrations several mitotic divisions after the exposure. At our institute this phenomenon has been observed in mouse preimplantation embryos. This cell system is uniquely well suited for such investigations because the first three cell divisions show a high degree of synchrony. Thus the expression of chromosomal aberrations at the first, second and third mitosis after irradiation can be scored unambiguously. To investigate whether DNA double-strand breaks may be the lesions responsible for the delayed expression of chromosomal aberrations, we have studied the frequencies of aberrations in the first, second and third mitosis after treatment of one-cell mouse embryos with the restriction enzyme Alu I. Embryos were permeabilized with Streptolysin-O. The results indicate that the induction of double-strand breaks does not lead to novel aberrations in the third post-treatment mitosis. Several embryos scored at the second mitosis showed very high numbers of aberrations, indicating that Alu I may remain active in the cells for a period of one cell cycle. After treatment with Streptolysin-O alone, enhanced aberration frequencies were observed in the third post-treatment mitosis, suggesting that membrane damage has a delayed effect on the cellular integrity. 44 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Polydatin inhibits growth of lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and causing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yusong; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Meng, Qinghui; Jiao, Yang; Xu, Jiaying; Fan, Saijun

    2014-01-01

    Polydatin (PD), a small natural compound from Polygonum cuspidatum, has a number of biological functions. However, the anticancer activity of PD has been poorly investigated. In the present study, thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of PD on cell growth. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry. In addition, the expression of several proteins associated with apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PD significantly inhibits the proliferation of A549 and NCI-H1975 lung cancer cell lines and causes dose-dependent apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PD induces S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of Bcl-2 decreased as that of Bax increased, and the expression of cyclin D1 was also suppressed. The results suggest that PD has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:24348867

  4. Size sensors in bacteria, cell cycle control, and size control

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria proliferate by repetitive cycles of cellular growth and division. The progression into the cell cycle is admitted to be under the control of cell size. However, the molecular basis of this regulation is still unclear. Here I will discuss which mechanisms could allow coupling growth and division by sensing size and transmitting this information to the division machinery. Size sensors could act at different stages of the cell cycle. During septum formation, mechanisms controlling the formation of the Z ring, such as MinCD inhibition or Nucleoid Occlusion (NO) could participate in the size-dependence of the division process. In addition or alternatively, the coupling of growth and division may occur indirectly through the control of DNA replication initiation. The relative importance of these different size-sensing mechanisms could depend on the environmental and genetic context. The recent demonstration of an incremental strategy of size control in bacteria, suggests that DnaA-dependent control of replication initiation could be the major size control mechanism limiting cell size variation. PMID:26074903