Science.gov

Sample records for aberrant cell division

  1. Study of Cell Division Aberrations Induced by Some Silica Dusts in Mammalian Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Béna, F; Danière, M C; Terzetti, F; Poirot, O; Elias, Z

    2000-01-01

    Previously we observed that some crystalline and amorphous (diatomaceous earths) silicas (but not pyrogenic amorphous silica) induced morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. In order to explore the mechanisms of the silica-induced cell transformation, in this study we have examined the possibility that silica may cause genomic changes by interfering with the normal events of mitotic division. The SHE cells were exposed to transforming samples of Min-U-Sil 5 quartz and amorphous diatomite earth (DE) as well as to inactive amorphous synthetic Aerosil 0X50 at concentrations between 9 and 36 μg/cm(2) of culture slide. Effects on the mitotic spindle and on chromosome congression and segregation through the mitotic stages were concurrently examined by differential and indirect immunofluorescence stainings using anti-β-tubulin antibody. Min-U-Sil 5 and DE dusts induced a significant increase in the number of aberrant mitotic cells detected by differential staining. Increased frequencies of monopolar mitoses and scattered chromosomes as well as a small incidence of lagging chromosomes in DE-treated cells were observed. The immunostaining was more efficient in the detection of spindle disturbances. Min-U-Sil induced a significantly concentration-dependent increase of monopolar spindles. At the highest concentration, highly disorganized prophase spindles and prometaphase multipolars were observed. These damages caused a concentration-dependent decrease in metaphase to anaphase transition. DE-induced spindle aberrations did not reach significant levels over control, although increase in monopolar and multipolar spindles were recorded. Exposure to OX50 particles did not disrupt spindle integrity. To determine whether micronuclei (MN) arise from divisional abnormalities induced by the active samples, we performed in SHE and human bronchial epithelial cells kinetochore (K)-specific and centromere (C)-specific staining, respectively. A concentration

  2. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: aberrant cellular division.

    PubMed

    Han, Thomas K; Derby, Melissa; Martin, Dean F; Wright, Scott D; Dao, My Lien

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells. PMID:12745987

  3. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: Aberrant cellular division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, T.K.; Derby, M.; Martin, D.F.; Wright, S.D.; Dao, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells.

  4. Trisomy 18: studies of the parent and cell division of origin and the effect of aberrant recombination on nondisjunction

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.M.; Harvey, J.F.; Jacobs, P.A.; Morton, N.E.

    1995-03-01

    We have studied the mechanism of origin of 63 cases of trisomy 18. In 2 the additional chromosome was paternal in origin, and in the remaining 61 it was maternal in origin. Both paternal cases were attributable to a postzygotic mitotic (PZM) error. Among the 54 maternal cases for which the cell division of error was established, only 16 were attributable to an error at the first meiotic division (mat MI), whereas no fewer than 35 were due an error at the second meiotic division (mat MII), the remaining 3 being the result of a PZM error involving the maternal chromosome 18. A standard map of chromosome 18 was constructed and compared with the nondisjunctional map. Approximately one-third of the mat MI errors were associated with complete absence of recombination, whereas in the remaining two-thirds and in all the mat MII errors recombination in the nondisjoined chromosomes appeared to be normal. All the maternal errors were associated with an increased maternal age, although this reached significance only for the mat MII category of nondisjunction. Our observations on chromosome 18 are compared with those on other chromosomes for which there are comparable data. 37 refs., 7 tabs.

  5. Cell division

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... hours after conception, the fertilized egg cell remains a single cell. After approximately 30 hours, it divides ... 3 days, the fertilized egg cell has become a berry-like structure made up of 16 cells. ...

  6. Cell division

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... structure made up of 16 cells. This structure is called a morula, which is Latin for mulberry. The cells continue to divide ... days following conception into a blastocyst. Although it is only the size of a pinhead, the blastocyst ...

  7. Frequency of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Types of Cells After Proton and Fe Ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Bowler, Deborah

    2016-07-01

    DNA damages induced by space radiation, consisting of protons and high-LET charged particles, can be complex in nature, which are often left unrepaired and cause chromosomal aberrations. Increased level of genomic instability is attributed to tumorigenesis and increased cancer risks. To investigate genomic instability induced by charged particles, human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblasts, and human mammary epithelial cells, as well as mouse bone marrow stem cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 strains were exposed to high energy protons and Fe ions. Metaphase chromosome spreads at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and, chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole chromosome-specific probes for human cells. With proton irradiation, levels of chromosome aberrations decreased by about 50% in both lymphocytes and epithelial cells after multiple cell divisions, compared to initial chromosome aberrations at 48 hours post irradiation in both cell types. With Fe ion irradiation, however, the frequency of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes after multiple cell divisions was significantly lower than that in epithelial cells at comparable cell divisions, while their initial chromosome aberrations were at similar levels. Similar to the human cells, after Fe ion irradiation, the frequency of late chromosome aberrations was similar to that of the early damages for radio-sensitive CBA cells, but different for radio-resistant C57 cells. Our results suggest that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values are dependent not only on radiation sources, but also on cell types and cell divisions.

  8. Frequency of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Types of Cells After Proton and Fe Ion Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    DNA damages induced by space radiation, consisting of protons and high-LET charged particles, can be complex in nature, which are often left unrepaired and cause chromosomal aberrations. Increased level of genomic instability is attributed to tumorigenesis and increased cancer risks. To investigate genomic instability induced by charged particles, human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblasts, and human mammary epithelial cells, as well as mouse bone marrow stem cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 strains were exposed to high energy protons and Fe ions. Metaphase chromosome spreads at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and, chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole chromosome-specific probes for human cells. With proton irradiation, levels of chromosome aberrations decreased by about 50% in both lymphocytes and epithelial cells after multiple cell divisions, compared to initial chromosome aberrations at 48 hours post irradiation in both cell types. With Fe ion irradiation, however, the frequency of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes after multiple cell divisions was significantly lower than that in epithelial cells at comparable cell divisions, while their initial chromosome aberrations were at similar levels. Similar to the human cells, after Fe ion irradiation, the frequency of late chromosome aberrations was similar to that of the early damages for radio-sensitive CBA cells, but different for radio-resistant C57 cells. Our results suggest that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values are dependent not only on radiation sources, but also on cell types and cell divisions.

  9. Aberrant immunophenotypes of mantle cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Wohlschlaeger, Ch; Lange, K; Merz, H; Feller, A C

    2003-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphomas (MCL) are characterized by cytomorphological criteria, a distinct immunophenotype and a characteristic chromosomal aberration (t(11;14)). In morphological variants of MCL the immunohistochemical constellation with CD5-positivity and CD23-negativity is a helpful and decisive diagnostic aid to differentiate MCL from other B-cell-lymphomas, e.g. lymphocytic lymphomas (B-CLL). In this study the morphological, immunophenotypical, and genetical features of 50 MCL were analysed. Five cases revealed an aberrant immunophenotype with lacking expression of CD5 (n = 3) and positive reactivity to CD23 (n = 2) while cyclin D1 expression could be demonstrated in all 5 cases. These constellations show that there is, besides morphological subgroups, a small group of MCL with aberrant immunophenotypes, which has to be taken into account in the differential diagnosis to lymphocytic lymphoma and other lymphomas. PMID:12688344

  10. The Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2009-01-01

    Plant cells have evolved a complex circuitry to regulate cell division. In many aspects, the plant cell cycle follows a basic strategy similar to other eukaryotes. However, several key issues are unique to plant cells. In this chapter, both the conserved and unique cellular and molecular properties of the plant cell cycle are reviewed. In addition to division of individual cells, the specific characteristic of plant organogenesis and development make that cell proliferation control is of primary importance during development. Therefore, special attention should be given to consider plant cell division control in a developmental context. Proper organogenesis depends on the formation of different cell types. In plants, many of the processes leading to cell differentiation rely on the occurrence of a different cycle, termed the endoreplication cycle, whereby cells undergo repeated full genome duplication events in the absence of mitosis and increase their ploidy. Recent findings are focusing on the relevance of changes in chromatin organization for a correct cell cycle progression and, conversely, in the relevance of a correct functioning of chromatin remodelling complexes to prevent alterations in both the cell cycle and the endocycle. PMID:22303246

  11. Circadian clocks and cell division

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Evolution has selected a system of two intertwined cell cycles: the cell division cycle (CDC) and the daily (circadian) biological clock. The circadian clock keeps track of solar time and programs biological processes to occur at environmentally appropriate times. One of these processes is the CDC, which is often gated by the circadian clock. The intermeshing of these two cell cycles is probably responsible for the observation that disruption of the circadian system enhances susceptibility to some kinds of cancer. The core mechanism underlying the circadian clockwork has been thought to be a transcription and translation feedback loop (TTFL), but recent evidence from studies with cyanobacteria, synthetic oscillators and immortalized cell lines suggests that the core circadian pacemaking mechanism that gates cell division in mammalian cells could be a post-translational oscillator (PTO). PMID:20890114

  12. Stochastic models for cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukalin, Evgeny; Sun, Sean

    2013-03-01

    The probability of cell division per unit time strongly depends of age of cells, i.e., time elapsed since their birth. The theory of cell populations in the age-time representation is systematically applied for modeling cell division for different spreads in generation times. We use stochastic simulations to address the same issue at the level of individual cells. Our approach unlike deterministic theory enables to analyze the size fluctuations of cell colonies at different growth conditions (in the absence and in the presence of cell death, for initially synchronized and asynchronous cell populations, for conditions of restricted growth). We find the simple quantitative relation between the asymptotic values of relative size fluctuations around mean values for initially synchronized cell populations under growth and the coefficients of variation of generation times. Effect of initial age distribution for asynchronous growth of cell cultures is also studied by simulations. The influence of constant cell death on fluctuations of sizes of cell populations is found to be essential even for small cell death rates, i.e., for realistic growth conditions. The stochastic model is generalized for biologically relevant case that involves both cell reproduction and cell differentiation.

  13. [The number of aberrations in aberrant cells as a parameter of chromosomal instability. 1. Characterization of dose dependency].

    PubMed

    Kutsokon', N K; Bezrukov, V F; Lazarenko, L M; Rashydov, N M; Hrodzyns'kyĭ, D M

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of chromosome instability (CI) is of great importance in view of pollution of the environment by genotoxic factors. Frequency of aberrant cells, spectrum of chromosome aberrations, damages of aberrant cell and distribution of aberrations in the cells are the most conventional parameters of CI. We have carried out the comparative analysis of the frequency of aberrant cells and the dynamics of aberrant cell damages induced by different mutagenic factors (alpha-irradiation from 241Am, gamma-irradiation from 60Co and tioTEPA) in Allium-test. This comparative analysis denotes that the studied parameters have different dynamics characterizing different mechanisms of CI in Allium cepa L. PMID:14569619

  14. Signaling to stomatal initiation and cell division

    PubMed Central

    Le, Jie; Zou, Junjie; Yang, Kezhen; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Stomata are two-celled valves that control epidermal pores whose opening and spacing optimizes shoot-atmosphere gas exchange. Arabidopsis stomatal formation involves at least one asymmetric division and one symmetric division. Stomatal formation and patterning are regulated by the frequency and placement of asymmetric divisions. This model system has already led to significant advances in developmental biology, such as the regulation of cell fate, division, differentiation, and patterning. Over the last 30 years, stomatal development has been found to be controlled by numerous intrinsic genetic and environmental factors. This mini review focuses on the signaling involved in stomatal initiation and in divisions in the cell lineage. PMID:25002867

  15. Signaling to stomatal initiation and cell division.

    PubMed

    Le, Jie; Zou, Junjie; Yang, Kezhen; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Stomata are two-celled valves that control epidermal pores whose opening and spacing optimizes shoot-atmosphere gas exchange. Arabidopsis stomatal formation involves at least one asymmetric division and one symmetric division. Stomatal formation and patterning are regulated by the frequency and placement of asymmetric divisions. This model system has already led to significant advances in developmental biology, such as the regulation of cell fate, division, differentiation, and patterning. Over the last 30 years, stomatal development has been found to be controlled by numerous intrinsic genetic and environmental factors. This mini review focuses on the signaling involved in stomatal initiation and in divisions in the cell lineage. PMID:25002867

  16. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  17. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P.; Belland, Robert J.; Cox, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  18. Gravity and the orientation of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    A novel culture system for mammalian cells was used to investigate division orientations in populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the influence of gravity on the positioning of division axes. The cells were tethered to adhesive sites, smaller in diameter than a newborn cell, distributed over a nonadhesive substrate positioned vertically. The cells grew and divided while attached to the sites, and the angles and directions of elongation during anaphase, projected in the vertical plane, were found to be random with respect to gravity. However, consecutive divisions of individual cells were generally along the same axis or at 90 degrees to the previous division, with equal probability. Thus, successive divisions were restricted to orthogonal planes, but the choice of plane appeared to be random, unlike the ordered sequence of cleavage orientations seen during early embryo development.

  19. Teaching Cell Division: Basics and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mike U.; Kindfield, Ann C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a concise overview of cell division that includes only the essential concepts necessary for understanding genetics and evolution. Makes recommendations based on published research and teaching experiences that can be used to judge the merits of potential activities and materials for teaching cell division. Makes suggestions regarding the…

  20. The fate of cells with chromosome aberrations after total-body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, F.; Ganser, A.; Fliedner, T.M.; Arnold, R.; Kubanek, B.

    1983-03-01

    Cytogenetic studies were done on bone marrow cells and peripheral lymphocytes of four patients (three with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, one with aplastic anemia) at various intervals up to 861 days after total-body X irradiation (TBI) at doses between 4.5 and 10 Gy (450-1000 rad) followed by syngeneic or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Whereas no radiation-induced aberrations could be found in the bone marrow, apart from a transient finding in the patient with the lowest radiation dose, aberrant metaphases were seen in the peripheral lymphocytes of three patients in the range from 2.5 to 46% even at 861 days after the exposure. There were no demonstrable aberrations related to TBI in the only patient developing graft-versus-host disease. The dicentric yield as determined in the aberrant metaphases with 46 centromeres ranged between 3.4 +/- 1.3 and 4.9 +/- 0.4. In one patient it was demonstrated by BUdR-labeling that after 10 Gy (1000 rad) TBI the surviving and heavily damaged lymphocytes can go into cell cycle and reach at least the third mitosis. The percentage of aberrant cells diminished by about 25% at each mitotic division.

  1. Nanoengineering: Super symmetry in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial cells can be sculpted into different shapes using nanofabricated chambers and then used to explore the spatial adaptation of protein oscillations that play an important role in cell division.

  2. Asymmetric cell division in plant development.

    PubMed

    Heidstra, Renze

    2007-01-01

    Plant embryogenesis creates a seedling with a basic body plan. Post-embryonically the seedling elaborates with a lifelong ability to develop new tissues and organs. As a result asymmetric cell divisions serve essential roles during embryonic and postembryonic development to generate cell diversity. This review highlights selective cases of asymmetric division in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and describes the current knowledge on fate determinants and mechanisms involved. Common themes that emerge are: 1. role of the plant hormone auxin and its polar transport machinery; 2. a MAP kinase signaling cascade and; 3. asymmetric segregating transcription factors that are involved in several asymmetric cell divisions. PMID:17585494

  3. RBE of Energetic Iron Ions for the Induction of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Hada, Megumi; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Numerous published studies have reported the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) values for chromosome aberrations induced by charged particles of different LET. The RBE for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo has been suggested to show a similar relationship as the quality factor for cancer induction. Therefore, increased chromosome aberrations in the astronauts' white blood cells post long-duration missions are used to determine the biological doses from exposures to space radiation. However, the RBE value is known to be very different for different types of cancer. Previously, we reported that, even though the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions, the RBE was significantly reduced after multiple cell divisions post irradiation. To test the hypothesis that RBE values for chromosome aberrations are cell type dependent, and different between early and late damages, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, and human mammary epithelial cells in vitro to various charged particles. Chromosome aberrations were quantified using the samples collected at first mitosis post irradiation for initial damages, and the samples collected after multiple generations for the remaining or late arising aberrations. Results of the study suggested that the effectiveness of high-LET charged particles for late chromosome aberrations may be cell type dependent, even though the RBE values are similar for early damages.

  4. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  5. Rab24 is required for normal cell division.

    PubMed

    Militello, Rodrigo D; Munafó, Daniela B; Berón, Walter; López, Luis A; Monier, Solange; Goud, Bruno; Colombo, María I

    2013-05-01

    Rab24 is an atypical member of the Rab GTPase family whose distribution in interphase cells has been characterized; however, its function remains largely unknown. In this study, we have analyzed the distribution of Rab24 throughout cell division. We have observed that Rab24 was located at the mitotic spindle in metaphase, at the midbody during telophase and in the furrow during cytokinesis. We have also observed partial co-localization of Rab24 and tubulin and demonstrated its association to microtubules. Interestingly, more than 90% of transiently transfected HeLa cells with Rab24 presented abnormal nuclear connections (i.e., chromatin bridges). Furthermore, in CHO cells stably transfected with GFP-Rab24wt, we observed a large percentage of binucleated and multinucleated cells. In addition, these cells presented an extremely large size and multiple failures in mitosis, as aberrant spindle formation (metaphase), delayed chromosomes (telophase) and multiple cytokinesis. A marked increase in binucleated, multinucleated and multilobulated nucleus formation was observed in HeLa cells depleted of Rab24. We also present evidence that a fraction of Rab24 associates with microtubules. In addition, Rab24 knock down resulted in misalignment of chromosomes and abnormal spindle formation in metaphase leading to the appearance of delayed chromosomes during late telophase and failures in cytokinesis. Our findings suggest that an adequate level of Rab24 is necessary for normal cell division. In summary, Rab24 modulates several mitotic events, including chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, perhaps through the interaction with microtubules. PMID:23387408

  6. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M.

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  7. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Hatzold, Julia; Conradt, Barbara

    2008-04-01

    Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death) are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well. PMID:18399720

  8. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  9. The Protective Role of Symmetric Stem Cell Division on the Accumulation of Heritable Damage

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Peter T.; Lander, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell divisions are either asymmetric—in which one daughter cell remains a stem cell and one does not—or symmetric, in which both daughter cells adopt the same fate, either stem or non-stem. Recent studies show that in many tissues operating under homeostatic conditions stem cell division patterns are strongly biased toward the symmetric outcome, raising the question of whether symmetry confers some benefit. Here, we show that symmetry, via extinction of damaged stem-cell clones, reduces the lifetime risk of accumulating phenotypically silent heritable damage (mutations or aberrant epigenetic changes) in individual stem cells. This effect is greatest in rapidly cycling tissues subject to accelerating rates of damage accumulation over time, a scenario that describes the progression of many cancers. A decrease in the rate of cellular damage accumulation may be an important factor favoring symmetric patterns of stem cell division. PMID:25121484

  10. The protective role of symmetric stem cell division on the accumulation of heritable damage.

    PubMed

    McHale, Peter T; Lander, Arthur D

    2014-08-01

    Stem cell divisions are either asymmetric-in which one daughter cell remains a stem cell and one does not-or symmetric, in which both daughter cells adopt the same fate, either stem or non-stem. Recent studies show that in many tissues operating under homeostatic conditions stem cell division patterns are strongly biased toward the symmetric outcome, raising the question of whether symmetry confers some benefit. Here, we show that symmetry, via extinction of damaged stem-cell clones, reduces the lifetime risk of accumulating phenotypically silent heritable damage (mutations or aberrant epigenetic changes) in individual stem cells. This effect is greatest in rapidly cycling tissues subject to accelerating rates of damage accumulation over time, a scenario that describes the progression of many cancers. A decrease in the rate of cellular damage accumulation may be an important factor favoring symmetric patterns of stem cell division. PMID:25121484

  11. Small GTPases as regulators of cell division

    PubMed Central

    Militello, Rodrigo; Colombo, María I.

    2013-01-01

    The superfamily of small GTPases serves as a signal transducer to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions. The members of this superfamily are structurally and functionally classified into at least 5 groups (Ras, Rho/Rac, Rab, Arf, and Ran) and they are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and nuclear transport. It is widely reported that members of the Rab family participate in the control of intracellular membrane trafficking through the interaction with specific effector molecules. However, many Rabs and other small GTPases have also been shown to function in cell division. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about Rab proteins regulating different stages of the cell cycle, such as the congregation and segregation of chromosomes (during metaphase) and the final stage of cell division known as cytokinesis, in which a cell is cleaved originating 2 daughter cells. PMID:24265858

  12. RBE of Energetic Iron Ions for the Induction of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Hada, Megumi; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Numerous published studies have reported the RBE values for chromosome chromosomes induced by charged particles of different LET. The RBE for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo showed a similar relationship as the quality factor for cancer induction. Consequently, increased chromosome aberrations in the astronauts' white blood cells post long-duration missions are used to determine the biological doses from exposures to space radiation. The RBE value is known to be very different for different types of cancer. Previously, we reported that the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions. After multiple cell divisions post irradiation, the RBE was significantly smaller. To test the hypothesis that the RBE values for chromosome aberrations are different between early and late damages and also different between different cell types, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, and human fibroblast cells and human mammary epithelial cells in vitro to 600 MeV/u Fe ions. Post irradiation, the cells were collected at first mitosis, or cultured for multiple generations for collections of remaining or late arising chromosome aberrations. The chromosome aberrations were quantified using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome specific probes. This study attempts to offer an explanation for the varying RBE values for different cancer types.

  13. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Podewitz, Nils; Zorn, Matthias; Oskar Rädler, Joachim; Elgeti, Jens

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations.

  14. Regulation of cell division in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant's essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  15. Collective dynamics during cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapperi, Stefano; Bertalan, Zsolt; Budrikis, Zoe; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    In order to correctly divide, cells have to move all their chromosomes at the center, a process known as congression. This task is performed by the combined action of molecular motors and randomly growing and shrinking microtubules. Chromosomes are captured by growing microtubules and transported by motors using the same microtubules as tracks. Coherent motion occurs as a result of a large collection of random and deterministic dynamical events. Understanding this process is important since a failure in chromosome segregation can lead to chromosomal instability one of the hallmarks of cancer. We describe this complex process in a three dimensional computational model involving thousands of microtubules. The results show that coherent and robust chromosome congression can only happen if the total number of microtubules is neither too small, nor too large. Our results allow for a coherent interpretation a variety of biological factors already associated in the past with chromosomal instability and related pathological conditions.

  16. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further

  17. Mechanics of cell division in fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fred

    2012-02-01

    Cytokinesis is the stage of cell division in which a cell divides into two. A paradigm of cytokinesis in animal cells is that the actomyosin contractile ring provides the primary force to squeeze the cell into two. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytokinesis also requires a actomyosin ring, which has been generally assumed to provide the force for cleavage. However, in contrast to animal cells, yeast cells assemble a cell wall septum concomitant with ring contraction and possess large (MPa) internal turgor pressure. Here, we show that the inward force generated by the division apparatus opposes turgor pressure; a decrease in effective turgor pressure leads to an increase in cleavage rate. We show that the ring cannot be the primary force generator. Scaling arguments indicate that the contractile ring can only provide a tiny fraction of the mechanical stress required to overcome turgor. Further, we show that cleavage can occur even in the absence of the contractile ring. Instead of the contractile ring, scaling arguments and modeling suggest that the large forces for cytokinesis are produced by the assembly of cell wall polymers in the growing septum.

  18. Optical micromanipulation inside the cell: a focus in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacconi, Leonardo; Tolic-Nørrelykke, Iva M.; Stringari, Chiara; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2006-02-01

    In eukaryotic cells, proper position of the mitotic spindle and the division plane is necessary for successful cell division and development. In this work the nature of forces governing the positioning and elongation of the mitotic spindle and the spatio-temporal regulation of the division plane positioning in fission yeast was studied. By using a mechanical perturbations induced by laser dissection of the spindle and astral microtubules, we found that astral microtubules push on the spindle poles. Further, laser dissection of the spindle midzone induced spindle collapse inward. This suggests that the spindle is driven by the sliding apart of antiparallel microtubules in the spindle midzone. Exploiting a combination of non-linear microscopy and optical trapping, we performed an optical manipulation procedure designed to displace the cell nucleus away from its normal position in the center of the cell. After the laser-induced displacement, the nucleus typically returned towards the cell center, in a manner correlated with the extension of a microtubule from the nucleus to the closer tip of the cell. This observation suggests that the centering of the nucleus is provided by microtubule pushing force. Moreover the cells in which the nucleus was displaced during interphase displayed asymmetric division, whereas when the nucleus was displaced during late prophase or metaphase, the division plane formed at the cell center as in non-manipulated cells. This result suggests that in fission yeast the division plane is selected before pro-metaphase and that the signal is not provided by the mitotic spindle.

  19. Investigation of an Aberrant Cell Voltage During the Filling of a Large Lithium Thionyl Chloride Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Quinzio, Michael V.

    1997-01-01

    The investigation of an aberrant cell voltage during the filling of a large lithium thionyl chloride cell summary is at: an aberrant voltage trace was noted during the review of cell filling data; incident was traced to an interruption during filling; experimentation suggested oxidizable sites within the carbon electrode were responsible for the drop in voltage; the voltage anomaly could be reproduced by interrupting the filling of similar cells; and anomalous voltage dip was not due to a short.

  20. Cell division, differentiation and dynamic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1994-08-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled nonlinear system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, providing a simple interpretation of the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of “open chaos” is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.

  1. Estrogen treatment induces MLL aberrations in human lymphoblastoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnyder, Sabine; Du, Nga T.; Le, Hongan B.; Singh, Sheetal; Loredo, Grace A.; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicates increased risk of infant acute leukemia involving MLL gene aberrations with use of oral contraceptives. To determine whether estrogens might be implicated, we examined the effect of estradiol (E2) or 4-OH-E2 in an in vitro model of translocation susceptibility. Genomic DNA from the TK6 human lymphoblastoid cell line was screened by ligation mediated PCR and inverse PCR at a rearrangement hot spot within the MLL breakpoint cluster region to detect DNA aberrations. An increase in DNA double strand breaks was observed within this region after exposure to either E2 or 4-OH-E2. An increase in the frequency of MLL translocations was only found after exposure to E2. Induction of cleavage due to increased activation of apoptotic nucleases was excluded by pre-treatment with the pancaspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk. We conclude that concentrations of E2 and 4-OH-E2 that may occur during pregnancy, or during use of oral contraceptives, can cause aberrations of the MLL gene and could thus be a factor in the early events of leukemogenesis occurring in utero. PMID:19264358

  2. Cell Division Drives Epithelial Cell Rearrangements during Gastrulation in Chick.

    PubMed

    Firmino, Joao; Rocancourt, Didier; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Moreau, Chloe; Gros, Jerome

    2016-02-01

    During early embryonic development, cells are organized as cohesive epithelial sheets that are continuously growing and remodeled without losing their integrity, giving rise to a wide array of tissue shapes. Here, using live imaging in chick embryo, we investigate how epithelial cells rearrange during gastrulation. We find that cell division is a major rearrangement driver that powers dramatic epithelial cell intercalation events. We show that these cell division-mediated intercalations, which represent the majority of epithelial rearrangements within the early embryo, are absolutely necessary for the spatial patterning of gastrulation movements. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these intercalation events result from overall low cortical actomyosin accumulation within the epithelial cells of the embryo, which enables dividing cells to remodel junctions in their vicinity. These findings uncover a role for cell division as coordinator of epithelial growth and remodeling that might underlie various developmental, homeostatic, or pathological processes in amniotes. PMID:26859350

  3. Effects of Polyhydroxybutyrate Production on Cell Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kathleen; Rahman, Asif; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biological engineering can be utilized to aide the advancement of improved long-term space flight. The potential to use synthetic biology as a platform to biomanufacture desired equipment on demand using the three dimensional (3D) printer on the International Space Station (ISS) gives long-term NASA missions the flexibility to produce materials as needed on site. Polyhydroxybutyrates (PHBs) are biodegradable, have properties similar to plastics, and can be produced in Escherichia coli using genetic engineering. Using PHBs during space flight could assist mission success by providing a valuable source of biomaterials that can have many potential applications, particularly through 3D printing. It is well documented that during PHB production E. coli cells can become significantly elongated. The elongation of cells reduces the ability of the cells to divide and thus to produce PHB. I aim to better understand cell division during PHB production, through the design, building, and testing of synthetic biological circuits, and identify how to potentially increase yields of PHB with FtsZ overexpression, the gene responsible for cell division. Ultimately, an increase in the yield will allow more products to be created using the 3D printer on the ISS and beyond, thus aiding astronauts in their missions.

  4. Proton and Fe Ion-Induced Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Lu, Tao; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Kadhim, Munira

    2016-01-01

    An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. To investigate GI induced by charged particles, we exposed human lymphocytes, human fibroblast cells, and human mammary epithelial cells to high energy protons and Fe ions. In addition, we also investigated GI in bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH (CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mice, by analyzing cell survival and chromosome aberrations in the cells after multiple cell divisions. Results analyzed so far from the experiments indicated different sensitivities to charged particles between CBA/CaH (CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mouse strains, suggesting that there are two main types of response to irradiation: 1) responses associated with survival of damaged cells and 2) responses associated with the induction of non-clonal chromosomal instability in the surviving progeny of stem cells. Previously, we reported that the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions. Our results with different cell types demonstrated different RBE values between different cell types and between early and late chromosomal damages. This study also attempts to offer an explanation for the varying RBE values for different cancer types.

  5. Cell adhesion in regulation of asymmetric stem cell division

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yukiko M.

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells inevitably communicate with their cellular neighbors within the tissues they sustain. Indeed, such communication, particularly with components of the stem cell niche, is essential for many aspects of stem cell behavior, including the maintenance of stem cell identity and asymmetric cell division. Cell adhesion mediates this communication by placing stem cells in close proximity to the signaling source and by providing a polarity cue that orients stem cells. Here, I review the recent discovery that cell adhesion molecules govern the behavior of stem cells. PMID:20724132

  6. Synthetic cell division system: Controlling equal vs. unequal divisions by design

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yoichi; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Kikuchi, Jun-ichi; Sato, Thomas N.

    2013-01-01

    Cell division is one of the most fundamental and evolutionarily conserved biological processes. Here, we report a synthetic system where we can control by design equal vs. unequal divisions. We synthesized a micro-scale inverse amphipathic droplet of which division is triggered by the increase of surface to volume ratio. Using this system, we succeeded in selectively inducing equal vs. unequal divisions of the droplet cells by adjusting the temperature or the viscosity of the solvent outside the droplet cell accordingly. Our synthetic division system may provide a platform for further development to a system where intracellular contents of the parent droplet cell could be divided into various ratios between the two daughter droplet cells to control their functions and fates. PMID:24327069

  7. Polarity, cell division, and out-of-equilibrium dynamics control the growth of epithelial structures

    PubMed Central

    Cerruti, Benedetta; Puliafito, Alberto; Shewan, Annette M.; Yu, Wei; Combes, Alexander N.; Little, Melissa H.; Chianale, Federica; Primo, Luca; Serini, Guido; Mostov, Keith E.; Celani, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The growth of a well-formed epithelial structure is governed by mechanical constraints, cellular apico-basal polarity, and spatially controlled cell division. Here we compared the predictions of a mathematical model of epithelial growth with the morphological analysis of 3D epithelial structures. In both in vitro cyst models and in developing epithelial structures in vivo, epithelial growth could take place close to or far from mechanical equilibrium, and was determined by the hierarchy of time-scales of cell division, cell–cell rearrangements, and lumen dynamics. Equilibrium properties could be inferred by the analysis of cell–cell contact topologies, and the nonequilibrium phenotype was altered by inhibiting ROCK activity. The occurrence of an aberrant multilumen phenotype was linked to fast nonequilibrium growth, even when geometric control of cell division was correctly enforced. We predicted and verified experimentally that slowing down cell division partially rescued a multilumen phenotype induced by altered polarity. These results improve our understanding of the development of epithelial organs and, ultimately, of carcinogenesis. PMID:24145168

  8. Gambogenic Acid Kills Lung Cancer Cells through Aberrant Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Wang; Dong, Chen; Hui, Cheng; Bin, Li; Fenggen, Yan; Jingjing, Su; Cheng, Peng; Meiling, Sun; Yawen, Hu; Xiaoshan, Wang; Guanghui, Wang; Zhiwu, Chen; Qinglin, Li

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common types of cancer and causes 1.38 million deaths annually, as of 2008 worldwide. Identifying natural anti-lung cancer agents has become very important. Gambogenic acid (GNA) is one of the active compounds of Gamboge, a traditional medicine that was used as a drastic purgative, emetic, or vermifuge for treating tapeworm. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that GNA exerts promising anti-tumor effects; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present paper, we found that GNA could induce the formation of vacuoles, which was linked with autophagy in A549 and HeLa cells. Further studies revealed that GNA triggers the initiation of autophagy based on the results of MDC staining, AO staining, accumulation of LC3 II, activation of Beclin 1 and phosphorylation of P70S6K. However, degradation of p62 was disrupted and free GFP could not be released in GNA treated cells, which indicated a block in the autophagy flux. Further studies demonstrated that GNA blocks the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes by inhibiting acidification in lysosomes. This dysfunctional autophagy plays a pro-death role in GNA-treated cells by activating p53, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 while decreasing Bcl-2. Beclin 1 knockdown greatly decreased GNA-induced cell death and the effects on p53, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2. Similar results were obtained using a xenograft model. Our findings show, for the first time, that GNA can cause aberrant autophagy to induce cell death and may suggest the potential application of GNA as a tool or viable drug in anticancer therapies. PMID:24427275

  9. Are There Really Animals Like That? No Cell Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwelder, R. E.; Garoian, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    Provides examples of animals in which growth occurs without cell division. Indicates that this phenomenon (called cell constancy or eutely) is an oddity of development that has arisen independently in several animal groups. (JN)

  10. Mechanisms of daughter cell-size control during cell division.

    PubMed

    Kiyomitsu, Tomomi

    2015-05-01

    Daughter cell size is tightly regulated during cell division. In animal cells, the position of the anaphase spindle specifies the cell cleavage site to dictate the relative size of the daughter cells. Although spindle orientation is regulated by dynein-dependent cortical pulling forces exerted on astral microtubules in many cell types, it was unclear how these forces are precisely regulated to center or displace the spindle. Recently, intrinsic signals derived from chromosomes or spindle poles have been demonstrated to regulate dynein-dependent pulling forces in symmetrically dividing cells. Unexpectedly, myosin-dependent contractile forces have also been shown to control spindle position by altering the cellular boundaries during anaphase. In this review, I discuss how dynein- and myosin-dependent forces are coordinately regulated to control daughter cell size. PMID:25548067

  11. Cell Fate Decision Making through Oriented Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to dictate cell fate decisions is critical during animal development. Moreover, faithful execution of this process ensures proper tissue homeostasis throughout adulthood, whereas defects in the molecular machinery involved may contribute to disease. Evolutionarily conserved protein complexes control cell fate decisions across diverse tissues. Maintaining proper daughter cell inheritance patterns of these determinants during mitosis is therefore a fundamental step of the cell fate decision-making process. In this review, we will discuss two key aspects of this fate determinant segregation activity, cortical cell polarity and mitotic spindle orientation, and how they operate together to produce oriented cell divisions that ultimately influence daughter cell fate. Our focus will be directed at the principal underlying molecular mechanisms and the specific cell fate decisions they have been shown to control. PMID:26844213

  12. Chromosomes and plant cell division in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives were: examination of chromosomal aberrations; development of an experimental system; and engineering design units (EDUs) evaluation. Evaluation criteria are presented. Procedures were developed for shuttle-based investigations which result in the procurement of plant root tips for subsequent cytological examination.

  13. Quantitative phase imaging of cell division in yeast cells and E.coli using digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Digital holographic microscope (DHM) is an emerging quantitative phase imaging technique with unique imaging scales and resolutions leading to multitude of applications. DHM is promising as a novel investigational and applied tool for cell imaging, studying the morphology and real time dynamics of cells and a number of related applications. The use of numerical propagation and computational digital optics offer unique flexibility to tune the depth of focus, and compensate for image aberrations. In this work, we report imaging the dynamics of cell division in E.coli and yeast cells using a DHM platform. We demonstrate 3-D and depth imaging as well as reconstruction of phase profiles of E.coli and yeast cells using the system. We record a digital hologram of E.coli and yeast cells and reconstruct the image using Fresnel propagation algorithm. We also use aberration compensation algorithms for correcting the aberrations that are introduced by the microscope objective in the object path using linear least square fitting techniques. This work demonstrates the strong potential of a DHM platform in 3-D live cell imaging, fast clinical quantifications and pathological applications.

  14. Streptomyces: A Screening Tool for Bacterial Cell Division Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Charul; Tocheva, Elitza I.; McAuley, Scott; Craney, Arryn; Jensen, Grant J.; Nodwell, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Cell division is essential for spore formation but not for viability in the filamentous streptomycetes bacteria. Failure to complete cell division instead blocks spore formation, a phenotype that can be visualized by the absence of gray (in Streptomyces coelicolor) and green (in Streptomyces venezuelae) spore-associated pigmentation. Despite the lack of essentiality, the streptomycetes divisome is similar to that of other prokaryotes. Therefore, the chemical inhibitors of sporulation in model streptomycetes may interfere with the cell division in rod-shaped bacteria as well. To test this, we investigated 196 compounds that inhibit sporulation in S. coelicolor. We show that 19 of these compounds cause filamentous growth in Bacillus subtilis, consistent with impaired cell division. One of the compounds is a DNA-damaging agent and inhibits cell division by activating the SOS response. The remaining 18 act independently of known stress responses and may therefore act on the divisome or on divisome positioning and stability. Three of the compounds (Fil-1, Fil-2, and Fil-3) confer distinct cell division defects on B. subtilis. They also block B. subtilis sporulation, which is mechanistically unrelated to the sporulation pathway of streptomycetes but is also dependent on the divisome. We discuss ways in which these differing phenotypes can be used in screens for cell division inhibitors. PMID:25256667

  15. Towards a Minimal System for Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwille, Petra

    We have entered the "omics" era of the life sciences, meaning that our general knowledge about biological systems has become vast, complex, and almost impossible to fully comprehend. Consequently, the challenge for quantitative biology and biophysics is to identify appropriate procedures and protocols that allow the researcher to strip down the complexity of a biological system to a level that can be reliably modeled but still retains the essential features of its "real" counterpart. The virtue of physics has always been the reductionist approach, which allowed scientists to identify the underlying basic principles of seemingly complex phenomena, and subject them to rigorous mathematical treatment. Biological systems are obviously among the most complex phenomena we can think of, and it is fair to state that our rapidly increasing knowledge does not make it easier to identify a small set of fundamental principles of the big concept of "life" that can be defined and quantitatively understood. Nevertheless, it is becoming evident that only by tight cooperation and interdisciplinary exchange between the life sciences and quantitative sciences, and by applying intelligent reductionist approaches also to biology, will we be able to meet the intellectual challenges of the twenty-first century. These include not only the collection and proper categorization of the data, but also their true understanding and harnessing such that we can solve important practical problems imposed by medicine or the worldwide need for new energy sources. Many of these approaches are reflected by the modern buzz word "synthetic biology", therefore I briefly discuss this term in the first section. Further, I outline some endeavors of our and other groups to model minimal biological systems, with particular focus on the possibility of generating a minimal system for cell division.

  16. Ploidy-Dependent Unreductional Meiotic Cell Division in Polyploid Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meiosis includes one round of DNA replication and two successive nuclear divisions, i.e. meiosis I (reductional) and meiosis II (equational). This specialized cell division reduces chromosomes in half and generates haploid gametes in sexual reproduction of eukaryotes. It ensures faithful transmiss...

  17. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  18. Oriented cell division shapes carnivorous pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kenji; Fujita, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    Complex morphology is an evolutionary outcome of phenotypic diversification. In some carnivorous plants, the ancestral planar leaf has been modified to form a pitcher shape. However, how leaf development was altered during evolution remains unknown. Here we show that the pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea develop through cell division patterns of adaxial tissues that are distinct from those in bifacial and peltate leaves, subsequent to standard expression of adaxial and abaxial marker genes. Differences in the orientation of cell divisions in the adaxial domain cause bifacial growth in the distal region and adaxial ridge protrusion in the middle region. These different growth patterns establish pitcher morphology. A computer simulation suggests that the cell division plane is critical for the pitcher morphogenesis. Our results imply that tissue-specific changes in the orientation of cell division underlie the development of a morphologically complex leaf. PMID:25774486

  19. Oriented cell division shapes carnivorous pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Kenji; Fujita, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    Complex morphology is an evolutionary outcome of phenotypic diversification. In some carnivorous plants, the ancestral planar leaf has been modified to form a pitcher shape. However, how leaf development was altered during evolution remains unknown. Here we show that the pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea develop through cell division patterns of adaxial tissues that are distinct from those in bifacial and peltate leaves, subsequent to standard expression of adaxial and abaxial marker genes. Differences in the orientation of cell divisions in the adaxial domain cause bifacial growth in the distal region and adaxial ridge protrusion in the middle region. These different growth patterns establish pitcher morphology. A computer simulation suggests that the cell division plane is critical for the pitcher morphogenesis. Our results imply that tissue-specific changes in the orientation of cell division underlie the development of a morphologically complex leaf. PMID:25774486

  20. The Distribution of Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Predicted by a Generalized Time-Dependent Model of Radiation-Induced Formation of Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    New experimental data show how chromosomal aberrations for low- and high-LET radiation are dependent on DSB repair deficiencies in wild-type, AT and NBS cells. We simulated the development of chromosomal aberrations in these cells lines in a stochastic track-structure-dependent model, in which different cells have different kinetics of DSB repair. We updated a previously formulated model of chromosomal aberrations, which was based on a stochastic Monte Carlo approach, to consider the time-dependence of DSB rejoining. The previous version of the model had an assumption that all DSBs would rejoin, and therefore we called it a time-independent model. The chromosomal-aberrations model takes into account the DNA and track structure for low- and high-LET radiations, and provides an explanation and prediction of the statistics of rare and more complex aberrations. We compared the program-simulated kinetics of DSB rejoining to the experimentally-derived bimodal exponential curves of the DSB kinetics. We scored the formation of translocations, dicentrics, acentric and centric rings, deletions, and inversions. The fraction of DSBs participating in aberrations was studied in relation to the rejoining time. Comparisons of simulated dose dependence for simple aberrations to the experimental dose-dependence for HF19, AT and NBS cells will be made.

  1. Asymmetric Cell Division in Polyploid Giant Cancer Cells and Low Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, Yijia

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is critical for generating cell diversity in low eukaryotic organisms. We previously have reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) induced by cobalt chloride demonstrate the ability to use an evolutionarily conserved process for renewal and fast reproduction, which is normally confined to simpler organisms. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which reproduces by asymmetric cell division, has long been a model for asymmetric cell division studies. PGCCs produce daughter cells asymmetrically in a manner similar to yeast, in that both use budding for cell polarization and cytokinesis. Here, we review the results of recent studies and discuss the similarities in the budding process between yeast and PGCCs. PMID:25045675

  2. Coordination between chromosome replication and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M S; Helmstetter, C E

    1980-01-01

    Cell division properties of Escherichia coli B/r containing either a dnaC or a dnaI mutation were examined. Incubation at nonpermissive temperature resulted in the eventual production of cells of approximately normal size, or slightly smaller, which lacked chromosomal DNA. The cell division patterns in cultures which were grown at permissive temperature and then shifted to nonpermissive temperature were consistent with: first, division and equipartition of chromosomes by cells which were in the C and D periods at the time of the shift; second, an apparent delay in cell division; and third, commencement of the formation of chromosomeless cells. In glucose-grown cultures of the dnaI mutant, production of chromosomeless cells continued for at least 120 min, whereas in the dnaC mutant chromosomeless cells were formed during a single interval between 110 and 130 min after the temperature shift. The results are discussed in light of the hypothesis that replication of a specific chromosomal region is not an obligatory requirement for the initiation and completion of the processes leading to division in a cell which contains at least one functioning chromosome. PMID:6988405

  3. A unique cell division machinery in the Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Lindås, Ann-Christin; Karlsson, Erik A.; Lindgren, Maria T.; Ettema, Thijs J. G.; Bernander, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to the cell division machineries of bacteria, euryarchaea, and eukaryotes, no division components have been identified in the second main archaeal phylum, Crenarchaeota. Here, we demonstrate that a three-gene operon, cdv, in the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, forms part of a unique cell division machinery. The operon is induced at the onset of genome segregation and division, and the Cdv proteins then polymerize between segregating nucleoids and persist throughout cell division, forming a successively smaller structure during constriction. The cdv operon is dramatically down-regulated after UV irradiation, indicating division inhibition in response to DNA damage, reminiscent of eukaryotic checkpoint systems. The cdv genes exhibit a complementary phylogenetic range relative to FtsZ-based archaeal division systems such that, in most archaeal lineages, either one or the other system is present. Two of the Cdv proteins, CdvB and CdvC, display homology to components of the eukaryotic ESCRT-III sorting complex involved in budding of luminal vesicles and HIV-1 virion release, suggesting mechanistic similarities and a common evolutionary origin. PMID:18987308

  4. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division

    PubMed Central

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size. PMID:27456660

  5. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size. PMID:27456660

  6. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    FISH, mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromere probes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. High-LET induced damages are mostly a single track effect. Unrejoined chromosome breaks (incomplete exchanges) and complex type aberrations were higher for high-LET. Biosignatures may depend on the method the samples are collected. Recent mBAND analysis has revealed more information about the nature of intra-chromosome exchanges. Whether space flight/microgravity affects radiation-induced chromosome aberration frequencies is still an open question.

  7. Stationary Size Distributions of Growing Cells with Binary and Multiple Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rading, M. M.; Engel, T. A.; Lipowsky, R.; Valleriani, A.

    2011-10-01

    Populations of unicellular organisms that grow under constant environmental conditions are considered theoretically. The size distribution of these cells is calculated analytically, both for the usual process of binary division, in which one mother cell produces always two daughter cells, and for the more complex process of multiple division, in which one mother cell can produce 2 n daughter cells with n=1,2,3,… . The latter mode of division is inspired by the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The uniform response of the whole population to different environmental conditions is encoded in the individual rates of growth and division of the cells. The analytical treatment of the problem is based on size-dependent rules for cell growth and stochastic transition processes for cell division. The comparison between binary and multiple division shows that these different division processes lead to qualitatively different results for the size distribution and the population growth rates.

  8. Cell-Division Behavior in a Heterogeneous Swarm Environment.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Adam; Herrmann, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present a system of virtual particles that interact using simple kinetic rules. It is known that heterogeneous mixtures of particles can produce particularly interesting behaviors. Here we present a two-species three-dimensional swarm in which a behavior emerges that resembles cell division. We show that the dividing behavior exists across a narrow but finite band of parameters and for a wide range of population sizes. When executed in a two-dimensional environment the swarm's characteristics and dynamism manifest differently. In further experiments we show that repeated divisions can occur if the system is extended by a biased equilibrium process to control the split of populations. We propose that this repeated division behavior provides a simple model for cell-division mechanisms and is of interest for the formation of morphological structure and to swarm robotics. PMID:26545164

  9. The Staphylococcus aureus scdA gene: a novel locus that affects cell division and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, E W; de Jonge, B L; Bayles, K W

    1997-09-01

    A new Staphylococcus aureus gene termed scdA was found upstream of the autolysis regulatory genes, lytS and lytR, and was shown to potentially encode a hydrophilic 25 kDa protein. Analysis of scdA transcription revealed that it is transcribed as a monocistronic message and is lytSR-independent. A role in cell wall metabolism was indicated by examination of the scdA mutant S. aureus KB323, which had a grossly aberrant cellular morphology and formed large cell clusters when grown in liquid culture medium. Furthermore, KB323 exhibited a reduced rate of autolysis and had increased peptidoglycan cross-linking compared to the parental strain, NCTC 8325-4. These data suggest that scdA plays an important role in staphylococcal cell division. PMID:9308171

  10. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  11. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G; Davies, Jeffrey K

    2016-07-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  12. The PLASTID DIVISION1 and 2 Components of the Chloroplast Division Machinery Determine the Rate of Chloroplast Division in Land Plant Cell Differentiation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kumiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ichikawa, Takanari; Matsui, Minami; Nakanishi, Hiromitsu; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2009-01-01

    In most algae, the chloroplast division rate is held constant to maintain the proper number of chloroplasts per cell. By contrast, land plants evolved cell and chloroplast differentiation systems in which the size and number of chloroplasts change along with their respective cellular function by regulation of the division rate. Here, we show that PLASTID DIVISION (PDV) proteins, land plant–specific components of the division apparatus, determine the rate of chloroplast division. Overexpression of PDV proteins in the angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens increased the number but decreased the size of chloroplasts; reduction of PDV levels resulted in the opposite effect. The level of PDV proteins, but not other division components, decreased during leaf development, during which the chloroplast division rate also decreased. Exogenous cytokinins or overexpression of the cytokinin-responsive transcription factor CYTOKININ RESPONSE FACTOR2 increased the chloroplast division rate, where PDV proteins, but not other components of the division apparatus, were upregulated. These results suggest that the integration of PDV proteins into the division machinery enabled land plant cells to change chloroplast size and number in accord with the fate of cell differentiation. PMID:19567705

  13. A novel cell division factor from tobacco 2B-13 cells that induced cell division in auxin-starved tobacco BY-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Takashi; Eguchi, Kentaro; Nishida, Ikuo; Laukens, Kris; Witters, Erwin; van Onckelen, Harry; Nagata, Toshiyuki

    2006-06-01

    Effects of auxin as plant hormones are widespread; in fact in almost all aspects of plant growth and development auxin plays a pivotal role. Although auxin is required for propagating cell division in plant cells, its effect upon cell division is least understood. If auxin is depleted from the culture medium, cultured cells cease to divide. It has been demonstrated in this context that the addition of auxin to auxin-starved nondividing tobacco BY-2 cells induced semisynchronous cell division. On the other hand, there are some cell lines, named habituated cells, that can grow without auxin. The cause and reason for the habituated cells have not been clarified. A habituated cell line named 2B-13 is derived from the tobacco BY-2 cell line, which has been most intensively studied among plant cell lines. When we tried to find the difference between two cell lines of BY-2 and 2B-13 cells, we found that the addition of culture filtrated from the auxin-habituated 2B-13 cells induced semisynchronous cell division in auxin-starved BY-2 cells. The cell division factor (CDF) that is responsible for inducing cell division in auxin-starved BY-2 cells was purified to near-homogeneity by sequential passage through a hydroxyapatite column, a ConA Sepharose column and a Sephadex gel filtration column. The resulting purified fraction appeared as a single band of high molecular weight on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels by silver staining and was able to induce cell division in auxin-starved BY-2 cells. Identification of the protein by MALD-TOF-MS/MS revealed that it is structurally related to P-glycoprotein from Gossypioides kirkii, which belongs to ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporters. The significance of CDF as a possible ABC-transporter is discussed in relationship to auxin-autotrophic growth and auxin-signaling pathway.

  14. Snapping magnetosome chains by asymmetric cell division in magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Pan, Yongxin

    2011-12-01

    The mechanism by which prokaryotic cells organize and segregate their intracellular organelles during cell division has recently been the subject of substantial interest. Unlike other microorganisms, magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) form internal magnets (known as magnetosome chain) for magnetic orientation, and thus face an additional challenge of dividing and equipartitioning this magnetic receptor to their daughter cells. Although MTB have been investigated more than four decades, it is only recently that the basic mechanism of how MTB divide and segregate their magnetic organelles has been addressed. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, the cell cycle of the model magnetotactic bacterium, Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense is characterized by Katzmann and co-workers. The authors have found that M. gryphiswaldense undergoes an asymmetric cell division along two planes. A novel wedge-like type of cellular constriction is observed before separation of daughter cells and magnetosome chains, which is assumed to help cell cope with the magnetic force within the magnetosome chain. The data shows that the magnetosome chain becomes actively recruited to the cellular division site, in agreement with the previous suggestions described by Staniland et al. (2010), and the actin-like protein MamK is likely involved in this fast polar-to-midcell translocalization. With the use of cryo-electron tomography, an arc-shaped Z ring is observed near the division site, which is assumed to trigger the asymmetric septation of cell and magnetosome chain. PMID:22066928

  15. Cancer cells express aberrant DNMT3B transcripts encoding truncated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ostler, KR; Davis, EM; Payne, SL; Gosalia, BB; Expósito-Céspedes, J; Le Beau, MM; Godley, LA

    2008-01-01

    Cancer cells display an altered distribution of DNA methylation relative to normal cells. Certain tumor suppressor gene promoters are hypermethylated and transcriptionally inactivated, whereas repetitive DNA is hypomethylated and transcriptionally active. Little is understood about how the abnormal DNA methylation patterns of cancer cells are established and maintained. Here, we identify over 20 DNMT3B transcripts from many cancer cell lines and primary acute leukemia cells that contain aberrant splicing at the 5′ end of the gene, encoding truncated proteins lacking the C-terminal catalytic domain. Many of these aberrant transcripts retain intron sequences. Although the aberrant transcripts represent a minority of the DNMT3B transcripts present, Western blot analysis demonstrates truncated DNMT3B isoforms in the nuclear protein extracts of cancer cells. To test if expression of a truncated DNMT3B protein could alter the DNA methylation patterns within cells, we expressed DNMT3B7, the most frequently expressed aberrant transcript, in 293 cells. DNMT3B7-expressing 293 cells have altered gene expression as identified by microarray analysis. Some of these changes in gene expression correlate with altered DNA methylation of corresponding CpG islands. These results suggest that truncated DNMT3B proteins could play a role in the abnormal distribution of DNA methylation found in cancer cells. PMID:17353906

  16. Proton and Fe Ion-Induced Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability, induced by various metabolic, genetic, and environmental factors, is the driving force of tumorigenesis. Radiation exposure from different types of radiation sources induces different types of DNA damages, increases mutation and chromosome aberration rates, and increases cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo experiments. The cell survival rates and frequency of chromosome aberrations depend on the genetic background and radiation sources. To further understand genomic instability induced by charged particles, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblast cells, human mammary epithelial cells, and bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 mice to high energy protons and Fe ions, and collected chromosomes at different generations after exposure. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescent in situ hybridization with whole chromosome specific probes.

  17. Process for control of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cone, C. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method of controlling mitosis of biological cells was developed, which involved inducing a change in the intracellular ionic hierarchy accompanying the cellular electrical transmembrane potential difference (Esubm) of the cells. The ionic hierarchy may be varied by imposing changes on the relative concentrations of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-), or by directly imposing changes in the physical Esubm level across the cell surface.

  18. Oriented cell division affects the global stress and cell packing geometry of a monolayer under stretch.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Zhaoliang

    2016-02-01

    Cell division plays a vital role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, and the division plane is crucial for cell fate. For isolated cells, extensive studies show that the orientation of divisions is sensitive to cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. However, it is poorly understood that how the cell divides within a cell monolayer and how the local stress change, due to the division, affects the global stress of epithelial monolayers. Here, we use the vertex dynamics models to investigate the effects of division orientation on the configurations and mechanics of a cell monolayer under stretch. We examine three scenarios of the divisions: dividing along the stretch axis, dividing along the geometric long axis of cells, and dividing at a random angle. It is found that the division along the long cell axis can induce the minimal energy difference, and the global stress of the monolayer after stretch releases more rapidly in this case. Moreover, the long-axis division can result in more random cell orientations and more isotropic cell shapes within the monolayer, comparing with other two cases. This study helps understand the division orientation of cells within a monolayer under mechanical stimuli, and may shed light on linking individual cell׳s behaviors to the global mechanics and patterns of tissues. PMID:26774292

  19. Blue Light Regulation of Cell Division in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Münzner, Petra; Voigt, Jürgen

    1992-01-01

    A delay in cell division was observed when synchronized cultures of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii growing under heterotrophic conditions were exposed to white light during the second half of the growth period. This effect was also observed when photosynthesis was blocked by addition of the photosystem II inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. Light pulses of 10 minutes were sufficient to induce a delay in cell division in the presence or absence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. A delay in cell division was induced by blue light but not by illumination with red or far-red light. The equal intensity action spectrum revealed two peaks at 400 and 500 nm. PMID:16669046

  20. On robustness of phase resetting to cell division under entrainment.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hafiz; Ushirobira, Rosane; Efimov, Denis

    2015-12-21

    The problem of phase synchronization for a population of genetic oscillators (circadian clocks, synthetic oscillators, etc.) is considered in this paper, taking into account a cell division process and a common entrainment input in the population. The proposed analysis approach is based on the Phase Response Curve (PRC) model of an oscillator (the first order reduced model obtained for the linearized system and inputs with infinitesimal amplitude). The occurrence of cell division introduces state resetting in the model, placing it in the class of hybrid systems. It is shown that without common entraining input in all oscillators, the cell division acts as a disturbance causing phase drift, while the presence of entrainment guarantees boundedness of synchronization phase errors in the population. The performance of the obtained solutions is demonstrated via computer experiments for two different models of circadian/genetic oscillators (Neurospora׳s circadian oscillation model and the repressilator). PMID:26463679

  1. Covert Prepatterning of a Cell Division Wave.

    PubMed

    Veeman, Michael

    2016-04-18

    A directional wave of mitosis, progressing posterior to anterior across the epidermis, is important for neural tube closure in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Ogura and Sasakura (2016) show that the patterning of this wave unexpectedly has complex origins in the previous cell cycle. PMID:27093077

  2. Microtubule networks for plant cell division.

    PubMed

    de Keijzer, Jeroen; Mulder, Bela M; Janson, Marcel E

    2014-09-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called cell plate, which is constructed by localized deposition of membrane and cell wall material. Construction starts in the centre of the cell at the locus of the mitotic spindle and continues radially towards the existing plasma membrane. Finally the membrane of the cell plate and plasma membrane fuse to form two individual plasma membranes. Two microtubule-based cytoskeletal networks, the phragmoplast and the pre-prophase band (PPB), jointly control cytokinesis in plants. The bipolar microtubule array of the phragmoplast regulates cell plate deposition towards a cortical position that is templated by the ring-shaped microtubule array of the PPB. In contrast to most animal cells, plants do not use centrosomes as foci of microtubule growth initiation. Instead, plant microtubule networks are striking examples of self-organizing systems that emerge from physically constrained interactions of dispersed microtubules. Here we will discuss how microtubule-based activities including growth, shrinkage, severing, sliding, nucleation and bundling interrelate to jointly generate the required ordered structures. Evidence mounts that adapter proteins sense the local geometry of microtubules to locally modulate the activity of proteins involved in microtubule growth regulation and severing. Many of the proteins and mechanisms involved have roles in other microtubule assemblies as well, bestowing broader relevance to insights gained from plants. PMID:25136380

  3. Mitochondrial dynamics and inheritance during cell division, development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant; Chan, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Preface During cell division, it is critical to properly partition functional sets of organelles to each daughter cell. The partitioning of mitochondria shares some common features with other organelles, particularly in their interactions with cytoskeletal elements to facilitate delivery to the daughter cells. However, mitochondria have unique features – including their own genome and a maternal mode of germline transmission – that place additional demands on this process. We discuss the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial segregation during cell division, oogenesis, fertilization and tissue development. The mechanisms that ensure the integrity of these organelles and their DNA include fusion-fission dynamics, organelle transport, mitophagy, and genetic selection of functional genomes. Defects in these processes can lead to cell and tissue pathologies. PMID:25237825

  4. Chronic inflammation imposes aberrant cell fate in regenerating epithelia through mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Craig S; Odermatt, Pascal D; Azzolin, Luca; Hohnel, Sylke; Wagner, Erwin F; Fantner, Georg E; Lutolf, Matthias P; Barrandon, Yann; Piccolo, Stefano; Radtke, Freddy

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with a variety of pathological conditions in epithelial tissues, including cancer, metaplasia and aberrant wound healing. In relation to this, a significant body of evidence suggests that aberration of epithelial stem and progenitor cell function is a contributing factor in inflammation-related disease, although the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have delineated the effect of chronic inflammation on epithelial stem/progenitor cells using the corneal epithelium as a model tissue. Using a combination of mouse genetics, pharmacological approaches and in vitro assays, we demonstrate that chronic inflammation elicits aberrant mechanotransduction in the regenerating corneal epithelium. As a consequence, a YAP-TAZ/β-catenin cascade is triggered, resulting in the induction of epidermal differentiation on the ocular surface. Collectively, the results of this study demonstrate that chronic inflammation and mechanotransduction are linked and act to elicit pathological responses in regenerating epithelia. PMID:26689676

  5. How to Foster an Understanding of Growth and Cell Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, Dirk; Fleige, Jennifer; Riemeier, Tanja

    2006-01-01

    The study presents the frequencies of students' conceptions of growth and cell division before and after one hour of instruction. The investigation supplements qualitative results by directing attention to those conceptions which might occur most frequently to students: teachers can then concentrate their preparation on practical requirements. A…

  6. Polyalkoxyflavonoids as inhibitors of cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. V.; Semenova, M. N.

    2015-02-01

    Being structural analogues of natural microtubule-destabilizing cytostatics, polyalkoxyflavonoids represent a promising class of compounds for anticancer drug design. The review covers synthetic routes to various polyalkoxyflavonoids and the results of biological assays in vitro on human cancer cells and in vivo using sea urchin embryos as a model. Mechanisms of action and structure-relationship activity for polyalkoxyflavonoids are discussed. The bibliography includes 151 references.

  7. Aberrant tropoelastin secretion in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Curtiss, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    The secretion of newly synthesized tropoelastin, the soluble precursor of the extracellular matrix protein elastin, is not well understood. MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells were found by immunoblot analysis to synthesize 62 kD and 64 kD tropoelastins. Media from 63 cells labelled for five hours with ({sup 3}H)-valine contain no detectable tropoelastin, unlike media from other tropoelastin-synthesizing cells. Immunoblots of conditioned media and 1Ox-concentrated conditioned media left on the cells for six days also show an absence of tropoelastin from the cell media. No insoluble elastin is associated with the cell layer, as determined by amino acid analysis and electron microscopy of 18-21 day cell cultures. The absence of tropoelastin from the cell medium and elastin from the extracellular matrix indicates that MG63 cells do not secrete tropoelastin as expected, but accumulate it intracellularly. This accumulation is transient: immunoblots and immunofluorescence microscopy show that cells three days after passage have the highest steady-state levels of tropoelastin per cell, that day 8 cells contain lower but still significant amounts of tropoelastin, and that by day 22 tropoelastin is no longer present in the cell cultures. Cell density is a critical factor in the observed pattern of tropoelastin expression. Cells seeded at ten fold their usual initial density have high tropoelastin levels at one day after passage, sooner than cells seeded normally. Tropoelastin also disappears from high density-seeded cells more quickly and is no longer detectable at day 10. Lysosome-like vesicles containing membranous structures appear by immunoelectron microscopy to be the primary site of intracellular tropoelastin localization.

  8. Cytogenetic heterogeneity and their serial dynamic changes during acquisition of cytogenetic aberrations in cultured mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Im, Kyong Ok; Park, Si Nae; Kwon, Ji Seok; Kim, Seon Young; Oh, Keunhee; Lee, Dong-Sup; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Seong Who; Jang, Mi; Lee, Gene; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang Do; Lee, Dong Soon

    2015-07-01

    To minimize the risk of tumorigenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), G-banding analysis is widely used to detect chromosomal aberrations in MSCs. However, a critical limitation of G-banding is that it only reflects the status of metaphase cells, which can represent as few as 0.01% of tested cells. During routine cytogenetic testing in MSCs, we often detect chromosomal aberrations in minor cell populations. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether such a minority of cells can expand over time or if they ultimately disappear during MSC passaging. We passaged MSCs serially while monitoring quantitative changes for each aberrant clone among heterogeneous MSCs. To investigate the cytogenetic status of interphase cells, which represent the main population, we also performed interphase FISH analysis, in combination with G-banding and telomere length determination. In human adipose tissue-derived MSCs, 4 types of chromosomal aberrations were found during culturing, and in umbilical cord MSCs, 2 types of chromosomal aberrations were observed. Sequential dynamic changes among heterogeneous aberrant clones during passaging were similar to the dynamic changes observed in cancer stem cells during disease progression. Throughout all passages, the quantitative G-banding results were inconsistent with those of the interphase FISH analysis. Interphase FISH revealed hidden aberrations in stem cell populations with normal karyotypes by G-banding analysis. We found that telomere length gradually decreased during passaging until the point at which cytogenetic aberrations appeared. The present study demonstrates that rare aberrant clones at earlier passages can become predominant clones during later passages. Considering the risk of tumorigenesis due to aberrant MSCs, we believe that our results will help to establish proper safety guidelines for MSC use. In particular, we believe it is critical to test for chromosomal aberrations using both G-banding and FISH to ensure the safety

  9. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji; Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2007-02-01

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast.

  10. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as "The Central Dogma in Bacteriology," is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called "nucleoid complexity," is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  11. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-07-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant`s essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  12. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  13. Asymmetric cell division of stem cells in the lung and other systems

    PubMed Central

    Berika, Mohamed; Elgayyar, Marwa E.; El-Hashash, Ahmed H. K.

    2014-01-01

    New insights have been added to identification, behavior and cellular properties of embryonic and tissue-specific stem cells over the last few years. The modes of stem cell division, asymmetric vs. symmetric, are tightly regulated during development and regeneration. The proper choice of a stem cell to divide asymmetrically or symmetrically has great consequences for development and disease because inappropriate asymmetric division disrupts organ morphogenesis, whereas uncontrolled symmetric division induces tumorigenesis. Therefore, understanding the behavior of lung stem cells could identify innovative solutions for restoring normal morphogenesis and/or regeneration of different organs. In this concise review, we describe recent studies in our laboratory about the mode of division of lung epithelial stem cells. We also compare asymmetric cell division (ACD) in the lung stem cells with other tissues in different organisms. PMID:25364740

  14. Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia-Telangiectasia Cells Exposed to Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Ito, H.; Liu, C.; Shigematsu, N.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Although cells derived from Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients are known to exhibit abnormal responses to ionizing radiations, its underlying mechanism still remains unclear. Previously, the authors reported that at the same gamma-irradiation dose AT cells show higher frequencies of misrepair and deletions compared to normal human fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/m), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/m) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/m) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/m and then decreased at 440 keV/m. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/m there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for AT cells when it was compared at 185 keV/m but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types

  15. The Significance of Microspore Division and Division Symmetry for Vegetative Cell-Specific Transcription and Generative Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Eady, C.; Lindsey, K.; Twell, D.

    1995-01-01

    The significance of the onset and symmetry of pollen mitosis I (PMI) for the subsequent differentiation of the vegetative and generative cells was investigated by the in vitro maturation of isolated microspores of transgenic tobacco. Free uninucleate microspores of transgenic plants harboring the vegetative cell (VC)-specific late anther tomato lat52 promoter fused to the [beta]-glucuronidase (gus) gene showed normal asymmetric cell division at PMI and activated the lat52 promoter specifically in the nascent VC during in vitro maturation. In vitro maturation in the presence of high levels of colchicine effectively blocked PMI, resulting in the formation of uninucleate pollen grains in which the lat52 promoter was activated. Furthermore, matured uninucleate pollen grains were capable of germination and pollen tube growth despite the absence of a functional generative cell (GC). Lower levels of colchicine induced symmetric division at PMI, producing two similar daughter cells in which typical GC chromatin condensation was prevented. Similar cultures of transgenic microspores harboring the lat52 promoter driving the expression of a nuclear-targeted GUS fusion protein showed that lat52 promoter activation occurred in both symmetric daughter cells. These results directly demonstrate that division asymmetry at PMI is essential for correct GC differentiation and that activation of VC-specific transcription and functional VC maturation may be uncoupled from cytokinesis at PMI. These results are discussed in relation to models proposed to account for the role and distribution of factors controlling the differing fates of the vegetative and generative cells. PMID:12242352

  16. The Role of Symmetric Stem Cell Divisions in Tissue Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jienian; Plikus, Maksim V.; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2015-01-01

    Successful maintenance of cellular lineages critically depends on the fate decision dynamics of stem cells (SCs) upon division. There are three possible strategies with respect to SC fate decision symmetry: (a) asymmetric mode, when each and every SC division produces one SC and one non-SC progeny; (b) symmetric mode, when 50% of all divisions produce two SCs and another 50%—two non-SC progeny; (c) mixed mode, when both the asymmetric and two types of symmetric SC divisions co-exist and are partitioned so that long-term net balance of the lineage output stays constant. Theoretically, either of these strategies can achieve lineage homeostasis. However, it remains unclear which strategy(s) are more advantageous and under what specific circumstances, and what minimal control mechanisms are required to operate them. Here we used stochastic modeling to analyze and quantify the ability of different types of divisions to maintain long-term lineage homeostasis, in the context of different control networks. Using the example of a two-component lineage, consisting of SCs and one type of non-SC progeny, we show that its tight homeostatic control is not necessarily associated with purely asymmetric divisions. Through stochastic analysis and simulations we show that asymmetric divisions can either stabilize or destabilize the lineage system, depending on the underlying control network. We further apply our computational model to biological observations in the context of a two-component lineage of mouse epidermis, where autonomous lineage control has been proposed and notable regional differences, in terms of symmetric division ratio, have been noted—higher in thickened epidermis of the paw skin as compared to ear and tail skin. By using our model we propose a possible explanation for the regional differences in epidermal lineage control strategies. We demonstrate how symmetric divisions can work to stabilize paw epidermis lineage, which experiences high level of micro

  17. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as “The Central Dogma in Bacteriology,” is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called “nucleoid complexity,” is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell’s center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  18. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-01

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells. PMID:25997796

  19. Formation of a cylindrical bridge in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citron, Daniel; Schmidt, Laura E.; Reichl, Elizabeth; Ren, Yixin; Robinson, Douglas; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2007-11-01

    In nature, the shape transition associated with the division of a mother cell into two daughter cells proceeds via a variety of routes. In the cylinder-thinning route, which has been observed in Dictyostelium and most animal cells, the mother cell first forms a broad bridge-like region, also known as a furrow, between two daughter cells. The furrow then rapidly evolves into a cylindrical bridge, which thins and eventually severs the mother cell into two. The fundamental mechanism underlying this division route is not understood. Recent experiments on Dictyostelium found that, while the cylinder-thinning route persists even when key actin cross-linking proteins are missing, it is disrupted by the removal of force-generating myosin-II proteins. Other measurements revealed that mutant cells lacking myosin-II have a much more uniform tension over the cell surface than wild-type cells. This suggests that tension variation may be important. Here we use a fluid model, previously shown to reproduce the thinning dynamics [Zhang & Robinson, PNAS 102, 7186 (2005)], to test this idea. Consistent with the experiments, the model shows that the cylinder formation process occurs regardless of the exact viscoelastic properties of the cell. In contrast to the experiments, a tension variation in the model hinders, rather then expedites, the cylinder formation.

  20. Auxin efflux carrier activity and auxin accumulation regulate cell division and polarity in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Petrásek, Jan; Elckner, Miroslav; Morris, David A; Zazímalová, Eva

    2002-12-01

    Division and growth of most types of in vitro-cultured plant cells require an external source of auxin. In such cultures, the ratio of external to internal auxin concentration is crucial for the regulation of the phases of the standard growth cycle. In this report the internal concentration of auxin in suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum L., strain VBI-0, was manipulated either (i) by increasing 10-fold the normal concentration of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in the external medium; or (ii) by addition 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA; an inhibitor of auxin efflux and of auxin efflux carrier traffic). Both treatments delayed the onset of cell division for 6-7 days without loss of cell viability. In both cases, cell division activity subsequently resumed coincident with a reduction in the ability of cells to accumulate [(3)H]NAA from an external medium. Following renewed cell division, a significant proportion of the NPA-treated cells but not those grown at high auxin concentration, exhibited changes in the orientation of new cell divisions and loss of polarity. We conclude that cell division, but not cell elongation, is prevented when the internal auxin concentration rises above a critical threshold value and that the directed traffic of auxin efflux carriers to the plasma membrane may regulate the orientation of cell divisions. PMID:12447544

  1. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. High-LET Radiation Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia Telangiectasia Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Ito, Hisao; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uno, Takashi

    We investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/micron), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/micron) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/micron) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exchanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/micron and then decreased at 440 keV/micron. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/micron there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for normal fibroblast cells when it was compared at 185 keV/micron, but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types between normal and AT fibroblast appeared different probably due to difference in the ATM gene function.

  3. Size-independent symmetric division in extraordinarily long cells

    PubMed Central

    Pende, Nika; Leisch, Nikolaus; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R.; Heindl, Niels R.; Ott, Jörg; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Two long-standing paradigms in biology are that cells belonging to the same population exhibit little deviation from their average size and that symmetric cell division is size limited. Here, ultrastructural, morphometric and immunocytochemical analyses reveal that two Gammaproteobacteria attached to the cuticle of the marine nematodes Eubostrichus fertilis and E. dianeae reproduce by constricting a single FtsZ ring at midcell despite being 45 μm and 120 μm long, respectively. In the crescent-shaped bacteria coating E. fertilis, symmetric FtsZ-based fission occurs in cells with lengths spanning one order of magnitude. In the E. dianeae symbiont, formation of a single functional FtsZ ring makes this the longest unicellular organism in which symmetric division has ever been observed. In conclusion, the reproduction modes of two extraordinarily long bacterial cells indicate that size is not the primary trigger of division and that yet unknown mechanisms time the localization of both DNA and the septum. PMID:25221974

  4. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  5. Cell division control by the Chromosomal Passenger Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Waal, Maike S. van der; Hengeveld, Rutger C.C.; Horst, Armando van der; Lens, Susanne M.A.

    2012-07-15

    The Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC) consisting of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin and Borealin, is essential for genomic stability by controlling multiple processes during both nuclear and cytoplasmic division. In mitosis it ensures accurate segregation of the duplicated chromosomes by regulating the mitotic checkpoint, destabilizing incorrectly attached spindle microtubules and by promoting the axial shortening of chromosomal arms in anaphase. During cytokinesis the CPC most likely prevents chromosome damage by imposing an abscission delay when a chromosome bridge connects the two daughter cells. Moreover, by controlling proper cytoplasmic division, the CPC averts tetraploidization. This review describes recent insights on how the CPC is capable of conducting its various functions in the dividing cell to ensure chromosomal stability.

  6. Effect of resveratrol on chromosomal aberrations induced by doxorubicin in rat bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Bingöl, Günsel; Gülkaç, Mehmet Doğan; Dillioğlugil, Meltem Özlen; Polat, Fikriye; Kanli, Aylin Özön

    2014-05-15

    This study investigated the effects of resveratrol (RES) on doxorubicin (DXR) induced rat bone marrow cell chromosome aberrations. RES, a polyphenolic compound, has attracted considerable attention because of its antioxidant and antimutagenic effects. DXR, a chemotherapeutic agent, is known to cause chromosomal aberrations in healthy cells in cancer patients. In this study, Wistar albino male rats were divided into 6 groups with 6 animals each. The control group received distilled water i.p. and the DXR group received an i.p. injection of doxorubicin (90mg/kgbw). For the 2 RES dose groups (12.5 and 25mg/kgbw, respectively), RES was injected i.p. 5 times during the 24h study period to coincide with the schedule for the DXR+RES groups. The DXR-RES groups received DXR (90mg/kgbw) and RES at either 12.5 or 25mg/kgbw, i.p. 30min before, concurrently, and then every 6h after DXR administration. Bone marrow collection was timed to coincide with 24h after DXR administration in all groups. RES administration alone did not induce any significant increase in frequency of chromosome aberrations or abnormal metaphases compared with controls (p>0.05) while DXR alone did (p<0.05). In the DXR-RES 12.5mg/kgbw group, frequency of chromosome aberrations and abnormal metaphases were slightly reduced compared to DXR alone, but this was not statistically significant. However, in the DXR-RES 25mg/kgbw group, RES resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the frequency of chromosome aberrations and abnormal metaphases compared to those induced by DXR alone (p<0.05). These results indicate that RES (25mg/kgbw) significantly reduces frequency of DXR induced chromosome damage in bone marrow cells. PMID:24713549

  7. Deciphering causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions in NCI-60 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer cells harbor a large number of molecular alterations such as mutations, amplifications and deletions on DNA sequences and epigenetic changes on DNA methylations. These aberrations may dysregulate gene expressions, which in turn drive the malignancy of tumors. Deciphering the causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms of clinical phenotypes. Results In this work, we proposed a computational method to reconstruct association modules containing driver aberrations, passenger mRNA or microRNA expressions, and putative regulators that mediate the effects from drivers to passengers. By applying the module-finding algorithm to the integrated datasets of NCI-60 cancer cell lines, we found that gene expressions were driven by diverse molecular aberrations including chromosomal segments' copy number variations, gene mutations and DNA methylations, microRNA expressions, and the expressions of transcription factors. In-silico validation indicated that passenger genes were enriched with the regulator binding motifs, functional categories or pathways where the drivers were involved, and co-citations with the driver/regulator genes. Moreover, 6 of 11 predicted MYB targets were down-regulated in an MYB-siRNA treated leukemia cell line. In addition, microRNA expressions were driven by distinct mechanisms from mRNA expressions. Conclusions The results provide rich mechanistic information regarding molecular aberrations and gene expressions in cancer genomes. This kind of integrative analysis will become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in the era of personalized medicine. PMID:22051105

  8. Patterns of Stem Cell Divisions Contribute to Plant Longevity.

    PubMed

    Burian, Agata; Barbier de Reuille, Pierre; Kuhlemeier, Cris

    2016-06-01

    The lifespan of plants ranges from a few weeks in annuals to thousands of years in trees. It is hard to explain such extreme longevity considering that DNA replication errors inevitably cause mutations. Without purging through meiotic recombination, the accumulation of somatic mutations will eventually result in mutational meltdown, a phenomenon known as Muller's ratchet. Nevertheless, the lifespan of trees is limited more often by incidental disease or structural damage than by genetic aging. The key determinants of tree architecture are the axillary meristems, which form in the axils of leaves and grow out to form branches. The number of branches is low in annual plants, but in perennial plants iterative branching can result in thousands of terminal branches. Here, we use stem cell ablation and quantitative cell-lineage analysis to show that axillary meristems are set aside early, analogous to the metazoan germline. While neighboring cells divide vigorously, axillary meristem precursors maintain a quiescent state, with only 7-9 cell divisions occurring between the apical and axillary meristem. During iterative branching, the number of branches increases exponentially, while the number of cell divisions increases linearly. Moreover, computational modeling shows that stem cell arrangement and positioning of axillary meristems distribute somatic mutations around the main shoot, preventing their fixation and maximizing genetic heterogeneity. These features slow down Muller's ratchet and thereby extend lifespan. PMID:27161504

  9. Frequent BCOR aberrations in extranodal NK/T-Cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Akito; Tsuyama, Naoko; Asaka, Reimi; Togashi, Yuki; Ueda, Kyoko; Sakata, Seiji; Baba, Satoko; Sakamoto, Kana; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Takeuchi, Kengo

    2016-05-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma (ENKTL) is a rare subtype of lymphoma. Recurrent mutations in the JAK-STAT pathway, recently reported in ENKTL cases, are interesting in terms of both pathogenesis and inhibitor therapy. However, the frequencies of these mutations are low and variable among reports, and other pathognomonic mutations in ENKTL remain to be elucidated. In the present study, targeted capture sequencing of 602 cancer-related genes from 25 frozen ENKTL samples was performed, 11 of which were matched to normal samples. Several recurrent somatic mutations involving BCOR (32%), TP53 (16%), DDX3X (12%), FAT4 (8%), NRAS (8%), MLL3 (12%), and MIR17HG (8%) were identified. The pattern of BCOR aberrations (1 nonsense and 5 frame-shift mutations, a mutation leading to a splicing error, and gene loss) suggested that loss of function of BCOR was the functionally important outcome of such changes. The literature was reviewed and the public data on BCOR aberrations was reanalyzed and it was found that the aberrations were frequently found in myeloid neoplasms, but, interestingly, were highly specific to ENKTL among lymphoid malignancies. Given the high frequency and pattern of aberration, BCOR is likely to play an important role in ENKTL pathogenesis as a tumor suppressor gene. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773734

  10. Simulation of the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Chromosome Aberrations in Irradiated Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Wu, Honglu; Blattnig, Steve; George, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations is an important consequence of ionizing radiation. To simulate DNA double-strand breaks and the formation of chromosome aberrations, we have recently merged the codes RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) and NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image). The program RITRACKS is a stochastic code developed to simulate detailed event-by-event radiation track structure: [1] This code is used to calculate the dose in voxels of 20 nm, in a volume containing simulated chromosomes, [2] The number of tracks in the volume is calculated for each simulation by sampling a Poisson distribution, with the distribution parameter obtained from the irradiation dose, ion type and energy. The program NASARTI generates the chromosomes present in a cell nucleus by random walks of 20 nm, corresponding to the size of the dose voxels, [3] The generated chromosomes are located within domains which may intertwine, and [4] Each segment of the random walks corresponds to approx. 2,000 DNA base pairs. NASARTI uses pre-calculated dose at each voxel to calculate the probability of DNA damage at each random walk segment. Using the location of double-strand breaks, possible rejoining between damaged segments is evaluated. This yields various types of chromosomes aberrations, including deletions, inversions, exchanges, etc. By performing the calculations using various types of radiations, it will be possible to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for several types of chromosome aberrations.

  11. Identification of Targetable HER2 Aberrations in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Yanik, Megan; Tillman, Brittny N.; Scott, Megan V.; Foltin, Susan K.; Mann, Jacqueline E.; Michmerhuizen, Nicole L.; Ludwig, Megan L.; Sandelski, Morgan M.; Komarck, Christine M.; Carey, Thomas E.; Prince, Mark E.P.; Bradford, Carol R.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Spector, Matthew E.; Brenner, J. Chad

    2016-01-01

    Importance HER2 is an important drug target in breast cancer, where anti-HER2 therapy has been shown to lead to improvements in disease recurrence and overall survival. HER2 status in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not been well studied. Identification of HER2 positive tumors and characterization of response to HER2 therapy could lead to targeted treatment options in HNSCC. Objective To identify HER2 aberrations in HNSCCs and investigate potential for HER2 targeted therapy in HNSCCs. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective case series of patients with laryngeal and oral cavity SCC enrolled in the University of MichiganSPORE. Publically available sequencing data(TCGA) was reviewed to identify additional mutations and overexpression in HER2 in HNSCC. Established HNSCC cell lines were used for follow-up in vitro analysis. Interventions Using targeted, amplicon-based sequencing with the Oncomine Cancer Panel, we assessed the copy number and mutation status of commonly altered genes in HNSCCs. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on tissue microarrays of HNSCCs to assess expression of HER2. Western blotting for HNSCC cell line HER2 expression, and cell survival assays after treatment with HER2 inhibitors were performed. Main Outcomes and Measures Prevalence of HER2 genetic aberrations and HER2 overexpression in laryngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Prevalence of HER2 aberrations in HNSCC in TCGA. HER2 protein expression in HNSCC cell lines. Response of HNSCC cell lines to targeted HER2 inhibitors. Results Forty-two laryngeal SCC samples were screened by targeted sequencing, of which 4 were positive for HER2 amplification. Two samples identified with sequencing showed HER2 overexpression on immunohistochemistry. Two of 94 oral cavity SCC samples were positive for HER2 on immunohistochemistry. Analysis of 288 patients from publicly available HNSCC sequencing data revealed 9 amplifications in HER2. Protein expression

  12. Constitutional genomic instability, chromosome aberrations in tumor cells and retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Amare Kadam, P S; Ghule, P; Jose, J; Bamne, M; Kurkure, P; Banavali, S; Sarin, R; Advani, S

    2004-04-01

    Although retinoblastoma (Rb) is initiated as a result of biallelic inactivation of the RB1 gene, additional genetic events (M3) in tumor cells are indicative of their role in the full transformation of retinal cells. We investigated the constitutional genetic instability by fragile site (FS) expression studies and checked its relationship with loci of tumor cytogenetics in a series of 36 retinoblastoma patients (34 nonfamilial and 2 familial cases). Tumor cytogenetics revealed -13/+13, del/t(13)(q14) (50%), +1/del/t(1p/q) (65%), +6/i(6p) (60%), and del(16)(q13)/(q22 approximately q23) (60%). Conventional cytogenetics in leukocytes revealed constitutional del(13q14) in five unilateral Rb (URB) and one trilateral Rb (TRB). Constitutional del(16)(q22) and t(6;12) were also identified in two cases. Constitutional FS analysis showed a significant increase in the cellular fragility, with high prevalence at 13q14, 3p14, 6p23, 16q22 approximately q23, and 13q22 loci in retinoblastoma patients (P<0.05). Patients with constitutional del(13)(q14) demonstrated higher fragility than those with normal constitution. A strong correlation between loci of constitutional FSs and loci of recurrent chromosomal abnormalities in tumors strengthen and support the proposal that FS loci present as inherent genomic instability in retinoblastoma. The chromosomal changes and resultant genetic mutations, along with RB1 mutation events, probably contribute synergistically to the development and progression of Rb malignancy. Implementation of fluorescence in situ hybridization to nonfamilial Rb on a large scale (113 cases) could detect constitutional RB1 deletion in 12.3% of cases, with equally higher incidence in URB (14.7%) and bilateral Rb (13.6%), demonstrating that the true prevalence of patients with predisposition to RB1 mutation in sporadic URB is definitely higher in our populations. Also, higher incidence of constitutional RB1 deletion mosaicism in unilateral than in bilateral Rb

  13. How PI3K-derived lipids control cell division

    PubMed Central

    Campa, Carlo C.; Martini, Miriam; De Santis, Maria C.; Hirsch, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    To succeed in cell division, intense cytoskeletal and membrane remodeling are required to allow accurate chromosome segregation and cytoplasm partitioning. Spatial restriction of the actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking define the cell symmetry and equivalent membrane scission events, respectively. Protein complexes coordinating mitosis are recruited to membrane microdomains characterized by the presence of the phosphatidylinositol lipid members (PtdIns), like PtdIns(3,4,5)P3,PtdIns(4,5)P2, and PtdIns(3)P. These PtdIns represent a minor component of cell membranes, defining membrane domain identity, ultimately controlling cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics during mitosis. The coordinated presence of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 at the cell poles and PtdIns(4,5)P2 at the cleavage furrow controls the polarity of the actin cytoskeleton leading to symmetrical cell division. In the endosomal compartment, the trafficking of PtdIns(3)P positive vesicles allows the recruitment of the protein machinery required for the abscission. PMID:26484344

  14. Oriented cell division: new roles in guiding skin wound repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaowei; Ma, Kui; Geng, Zhijun; Sun, Xiaoyan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis depends on precise regulation and timely co-ordination of cell division and also on the control of the direction of cell division. Establishment of polarity division axis, correct alignment of the mitotic spindle, segregation of fate determinants equally or unequally between daughter cells, are essential for the realization of oriented cell division. Furthermore, oriented cell division is regulated by intrinsic cues, extrinsic cues and other cues, such as cell geometry and polarity. However, dysregulation of cell division orientation could lead to abnormal tissue development and function. In the present study, we review recent studies on the molecular mechanism of cell division orientation and explain their new roles in skin repair and regeneration. PMID:26582817

  15. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the techniques used to analyze the damage done to chromosome from ion radiation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromereprobes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. There is some comparison of the different results from the various techniques. The results of the study are summarized.

  16. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  17. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review. PMID:25784047

  18. Asymmetric Cell Division in T Lymphocyte Fate Diversification.

    PubMed

    Arsenio, Janilyn; Metz, Patrick J; Chang, John T

    2015-11-01

    Immunological protection against microbial pathogens is dependent on robust generation of functionally diverse T lymphocyte subsets. Upon microbial infection, naïve CD4(+) or CD8(+) T lymphocytes can give rise to effector- and memory-fated progeny that together mediate a potent immune response. Recent advances in single-cell immunological and genomic profiling technologies have helped elucidate early and late diversification mechanisms that enable the generation of heterogeneity from single T lymphocytes. We discuss these findings here and argue that one such mechanism, asymmetric cell division, creates an early divergence in T lymphocyte fates by giving rise to daughter cells with a propensity towards the terminally differentiated effector or self-renewing memory lineages, with cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic cues from the microenvironment driving the final maturation steps. PMID:26474675

  19. Correlation between cationic lipid-based transfection and cell division.

    PubMed

    Kirchenbuechler, Inka; Kirchenbuechler, David; Elbaum, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate the temporal relation between protein expression by cationic lipid-mediated transfection and cell division using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. Detailed image analysis provides new insights on the single cell level while simultaneously achieving appropriate statistics. Earlier evidence by less direct methods such as flow cytometry indicates a primary route for transfection involving nuclear envelope breakdown, but also suggests the existence of a pathway independent of mitosis. We confirm and quantify both mechanisms. We found the timing for successful transfection to be unexpectedly flexible, contrary to assertions of a narrow time window. Specifically, cells dividing more than 24h after exposure to the transfection medium express the probed protein at a comparable level to cells in a mitotic state during or shortly after transfection. This finding can have a profound impact on the guidance and development of non-viral gene delivery materials. PMID:25556666

  20. Aberrant DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vizoso, Miguel; Puig, Marta; Carmona, F.Javier; Maqueda, María; Velásquez, Adriana; Gómez, Antonio; Labernadie, Anna; Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Rigat-Brugarolas, Luis G.; Trepat, Xavier; Ramírez, Josep; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, Enrique; Reguart, Noemí; Perera, Alexandre; Esteller, Manel; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes through altered DNA methylation have been implicated in critical aspects of tumor progression, and have been extensively studied in a variety of cancer types. In contrast, our current knowledge of the aberrant genomic DNA methylation in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) or other stromal cells that act as critical coconspirators of tumor progression is very scarce. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling on lung TAFs and paired control fibroblasts (CFs) from non-small cell lung cancer patients using the HumanMethylation450 microarray. We found widespread DNA hypomethylation concomitant with focal gain of DNA methylation in TAFs compared to CFs. The aberrant DNA methylation landscape of TAFs had a global impact on gene expression and a selective impact on the TGF-β pathway. The latter included promoter hypermethylation-associated SMAD3 silencing, which was associated with hyperresponsiveness to exogenous TGF-β1 in terms of contractility and extracellular matrix deposition. In turn, activation of CFs with exogenous TGF-β1 partially mimicked the epigenetic alterations observed in TAFs, suggesting that TGF-β1 may be necessary but not sufficient to elicit such alterations. Moreover, integrated pathway-enrichment analyses of the DNA methylation alterations revealed that a fraction of TAFs may be bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Finally, survival analyses using DNA methylation and gene expression datasets identified aberrant DNA methylation on the EDARADD promoter sequence as a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Our findings shed light on the unique origin and molecular alterations underlying the aberrant phenotype of lung TAFs, and identify a stromal biomarker with potential clinical relevance. PMID:26449251

  1. Aberrant expression of laminin-332 promotes cell proliferation and cyst growth in ARPKD.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Soundarapandian; Dang, Suparna; Marinkovich, M Peter; Lazarova, Zelmira; Yoder, Bradley; Torres, Vicente E; Wallace, Darren P

    2014-03-15

    Basement membrane abnormalities have often been observed in kidney cysts of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) patients and animal models. There is an abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix molecules, including laminin-α3,β3,γ2 (laminin-332), in human autosomal dominant PKD (ADPKD). Knockdown of PKD1 paralogs in zebrafish leads to dysregulated synthesis of the extracellular matrix, suggesting that altered basement membrane assembly may be a primary defect in ADPKD. In this study, we demonstrate that laminin-332 is aberrantly expressed in cysts and precystic tubules of human autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD) kidneys as well as in the kidneys of PCK rats, an orthologous ARPKD model. There was aberrant expression of laminin-γ2 as early as postnatal day 2 and elevated laminin-332 protein in postnatal day 30, coinciding with the formation and early growth of renal cysts in PCK rat kidneys. We also show that a kidney cell line derived from Oak Ridge polycystic kidney mice, another model of ARPKD, exhibited abnormal lumen-deficient and multilumen structures in Matrigel culture. These cells had increased proliferation rates and altered expression levels of laminin-332 compared with their rescued counterparts. A function-blocking polyclonal antibody to laminin-332 significantly inhibited their abnormal proliferation rates and rescued their aberrant phenotype in Matrigel culture. Furthermore, abnormal laminin-332 expression in cysts originating from collecting ducts and proximal tubules as well as in precystic tubules was observed in a human end-stage ADPKD kidney. Our results suggest that abnormal expression of laminin-332 contributes to the aberrant proliferation of cyst epithelial cells and cyst growth in genetic forms of PKD. PMID:24370592

  2. Aberrant DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, Miguel; Puig, Marta; Carmona, F Javier; Maqueda, María; Velásquez, Adriana; Gómez, Antonio; Labernadie, Anna; Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Rigat-Brugarolas, Luis G; Trepat, Xavier; Ramírez, Josep; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, Enrique; Reguart, Noemí; Perera, Alexandre; Esteller, Manel; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic changes through altered DNA methylation have been implicated in critical aspects of tumor progression, and have been extensively studied in a variety of cancer types. In contrast, our current knowledge of the aberrant genomic DNA methylation in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) or other stromal cells that act as critical coconspirators of tumor progression is very scarce. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling on lung TAFs and paired control fibroblasts (CFs) from non-small cell lung cancer patients using the HumanMethylation450 microarray. We found widespread DNA hypomethylation concomitant with focal gain of DNA methylation in TAFs compared to CFs. The aberrant DNA methylation landscape of TAFs had a global impact on gene expression and a selective impact on the TGF-β pathway. The latter included promoter hypermethylation-associated SMAD3 silencing, which was associated with hyperresponsiveness to exogenous TGF-β1 in terms of contractility and extracellular matrix deposition. In turn, activation of CFs with exogenous TGF-β1 partially mimicked the epigenetic alterations observed in TAFs, suggesting that TGF-β1 may be necessary but not sufficient to elicit such alterations. Moreover, integrated pathway-enrichment analyses of the DNA methylation alterations revealed that a fraction of TAFs may be bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Finally, survival analyses using DNA methylation and gene expression datasets identified aberrant DNA methylation on the EDARADD promoter sequence as a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Our findings shed light on the unique origin and molecular alterations underlying the aberrant phenotype of lung TAFs, and identify a stromal biomarker with potential clinical relevance. PMID:26449251

  3. Epigenetic inactivation and aberrant transcription of CSMD1 in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Toni M; Tong, Benton D; Scholnick, Steven B

    2005-01-01

    Background The p23.2 region of human chromosome 8 is frequently deleted in several types of epithelial cancer and those deletions appear to be associated with poor prognosis. Cub and Sushi Multiple Domains 1 (CSMD1) was positionally cloned as a candidate for the 8p23 suppressor but point mutations in this gene are rare relative to the frequency of allelic loss. In an effort to identify alternative mechanisms of inactivation, we have characterized CSMD1 expression and epigenetic modifications in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Results Only one of the 20 cell lines examined appears to express a structurally normal CSMD1 transcript. The rest express transcripts which either lack internal exons, terminate abnormally or initiate at cryptic promoters. None of these truncated transcripts is predicted to encode a functional CSMD1 protein. Cell lines that express little or no CSMD1 RNA exhibit DNA methylation of a specific region of the CpG island surrounding CSMD1's first exon. Conclusion Correlating methylation patterns and expression suggests that it is modification of the genomic DNA preceding the first exon that is associated with gene silencing and that methylation of CpG dinucleotides further 3' does not contribute to inactivation of the gene. Taken together, the cell line data suggest that epigenetic silencing and aberrant splicing rather than point mutations may be contributing to the reduction in CSMD1 expression in squamous cancers. These mechanisms can now serve as a focus for further analysis of primary squamous cancers. PMID:16153303

  4. Induction of chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells after heavy ion exposure.

    PubMed

    Ritter, S; Kraft-Weyrather, W; Scholz, M; Kraft, G

    1992-01-01

    The induction of chromosome aberrations by heavy charged particles was studied in V79 Chinese hamster cells over a wide range of energies (3-100 MeV/u) and LET (20-16000 keV/micrometer). For comparison, X-ray experiments were performed. Our data indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the response of cells to particle and x-ray irradiation. For the same level of cell survival the amount of damaged cells which can be observed is smaller in heavy ion (11.4 MeV/u Ar) irradiated samples. The highest yield of damaged cells is found 8 to 12 hours after particle irradiation and 4 hours after x-irradiation. Differences in the amount of damaged cells are attributed to cell cycle perturbations which interfere with the expression of damage. After heavy ion exposure the amount of cells reaching mitosis (mitotic index) decreases drastically and not all damaged cells reach mitosis within 48 hours after exposure. A portion of cells die in interphase. Cell cycle delays induced by x-ray irradiation are less pronounced and all cells reach the first post-irradiation mitosis within 24 hours after irradiation. Additionally, the damage produced by charged particles seems to be more severe. The disintegration of chromosomes was only observed after high LET radiation: an indication of the high and local energy deposition in the particle track. Only cross sections for the induction of chromosome aberrations in mitotic cells were reported in this paper because of the problems arising from the drastic cell cycle perturbations. In this case, cells were irradiated in mitosis and assayed immediately. PMID:11536999

  5. Induction of chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells after heavy ion exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, S.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Scholz, M.; Kraft, G.

    The induction of chromosome aberrations by heavy charged particles was studied in V79 Chinese hamster cells over a wide range of energies (3-100 MeV/u) and LET (20-16000 keV/μm). For comparison, X-ray experiments were performed. Our data indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the response of cells to particle and x-ray irradiation. For the same level of cell survival the amount of damaged cells which can be observed is smaller in heavy ion (11.4 MeV/u Ar) irradiated samples. The highest yield of damaged cells is found 8 to 12 hours after particle irradiation and 4 hours after x-irradiation. Differences in the amount of damaged cells are attributed to cell cycle perturbations which interfere with the expression of damage. After heavy ion exposure the amount of cells reaching mitosis (mitotic index) decreases drastically and not all damaged cells reach mitosis within 48 hours after exposure. A portion of cells die in interphase. Cell cycle delays induced by x-ray irradiation are less pronounced and all cells reach the first post-irradiation mitosis within 24 hours after irradiation. Additionally, the damage produced by charged particles seems to be more severe. The disintegration of chromosomes was only observed after high LET radiation: an indication of the high and local energy deposition in the particle track. Only cross sections for the induction of chromosome aberrations in mitotic cells were reported in this paper because of the problems arising from the drastic cell cycle perturbations. In this case, cells were irradiated in mitosis and assayed immediately.

  6. Mathematical model of the cell division cycle of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Novak, Bela; Pataki, Zsuzsa; Ciliberto, Andrea; Tyson, John J.

    2001-03-01

    Much is known about the genes and proteins controlling the cell cycle of fission yeast. Can these molecular components be spun together into a consistent mechanism that accounts for the observed behavior of growth and division in fission yeast cells? To answer this question, we propose a mechanism for the control system, convert it into a set of 14 differential and algebraic equations, study these equations by numerical simulation and bifurcation theory, and compare our results to the physiology of wild-type and mutant cells. In wild-type cells, progress through the cell cycle (G1-->S-->G2-->M) is related to cyclic progression around a hysteresis loop, driven by cell growth and chromosome alignment on the metaphase plate. However, the control system operates much differently in double-mutant cells, wee1(-) cdc25Delta, which are defective in progress through the latter half of the cell cycle (G2 and M phases). These cells exhibit "quantized" cycles (interdivision times clustering around 90, 160, and 230 min). We show that these quantized cycles are associated with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the mechanism, when the wee1 and cdc25 genes are disabled. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779461

  7. PDMP sensitizes neuroblastoma to paclitaxel by inducing aberrant cell cycle progression leading to hyperploidy.

    PubMed

    Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Klappe, Karin; Jacobs, Susan; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Kamps, Willem; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    2006-03-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide has been recognized as an important mediator in the apoptotic machinery, and its efficient conversion to glucosylceramide has been associated with multidrug resistance. Therefore, inhibitors of glucosylceramide synthase are explored as tools for treatment of cancer. In this study, we used D,L-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol to sensitize Neuro-2a murine neuroblastoma cells to the microtubule-stabilizing agent paclitaxel. This treatment resulted in a synergistic inhibition of viable cell number increase, which was based on a novel mechanism: (a) After a transient mitotic arrest, cells proceeded through an aberrant cell cycle resulting in hyperploidy. Apoptosis also occurred but to a very limited extent. (b) Hyperploidy was not abrogated by blocking de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis using ISP-1, ruling out involvement of ceramide as a mediator. (c) Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and 2 activities were synergistically decreased on treatment. In conclusion, instead of inducing apoptosis through ceramide accumulation, D,L-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol by itself affects cell cycle-related proteins in paclitaxel-arrested Neuro-2a cells resulting in aberrant cell cycle progression leading to hyperploidy. PMID:16546973

  8. Chromokinesin: Kinesin superfamily regulating cell division through chromosome and spindle.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ai; Tan, Fu-Qing; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-09-01

    Material transportation is essential for appropriate cellular morphology and functions, especially during cell division. As a motor protein moving along microtubules, kinesin has several intracellular functions. Many kinesins play important roles in chromosome condensation and separation and spindle organization during the cell cycle. Some of them even can directly bind to chromosomes, as a result, these proteins are called chromokinesins. Kinesin-4 and kinesin-10 family are two major families of chromokinesin and many members can regulate some processes, both in mitosis and meiosis. Their functions have been widely studied. Here, we summarize current knowledge about known chromokinesins and introduce their intracellular features in accordance with different families. Furthermore, we have also introduced some new-found but unconfirmed kinesins which may have a relationship with chromosomes or the cell cycle. PMID:27196062

  9. Huntingtin regulates mammary stem cell division and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Elias, Salah; Thion, Morgane S; Yu, Hua; Sousa, Cristovao Marques; Lasgi, Charlène; Morin, Xavier; Humbert, Sandrine

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation during mammary gland morphogenesis. Here, we report the presence of huntingtin, the protein mutated in Huntington's disease, in mouse mammary basal and luminal cells throughout mammogenesis. Keratin 5-driven depletion of huntingtin results in a decreased pool and specification of basal and luminal progenitors, and altered mammary morphogenesis. Analysis of mitosis in huntingtin-depleted basal progenitors reveals mitotic spindle misorientation. In mammary cell culture, huntingtin regulates spindle orientation in a dynein-dependent manner. Huntingtin is targeted to spindle poles through its interaction with dynein and promotes the accumulation of NUMA and LGN. Huntingtin is also essential for the cortical localization of dynein, dynactin, NUMA, and LGN by regulating their kinesin 1-dependent trafficking along astral microtubules. We thus suggest that huntingtin is a component of the pathway regulating the orientation of mammary stem cell division, with potential implications for their self-renewal and differentiation properties. PMID:24749073

  10. Unraveling the chromosomal aberrations of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Patmore, Harriet S; Cawkwell, Lynn; Stafford, Nicholas D; Greenman, John

    2005-10-01

    Information from the genetic analysis of head and neck cancer has grown enormously in the last 20 years. The advent of high-resolution genetic analysis techniques such as microarray technology will further expand this field in the future. Here we review the data on chromosomal aberrations of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, focusing on the data generated by comparative genomic hybridization analysis, and suggest how such findings will be taken forward over the next decade. With the search engine PUBMED, the key words "comparative genomic hybridisation," "head and neck," "oral," "hypopharyngeal," "laryngeal," and "squamous cell carcinoma" were used. Publications unavailable in English were excluded. PMID:16132373

  11. Evidence for equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis in a marine green alga Monostroma angicava

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Tatsuya; Horinouchi, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hironobu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In cell divisions, relative size of daughter cells should play fundamental roles in gametogenesis and embryogenesis. Differences in gamete size between the two mating types underlie sexual selection. Size of daughter cells is a key factor to regulate cell divisions during cleavage. In cleavage, the form of cell divisions (equal/unequal in size) determines the developmental fate of each blastomere. However, strict validation of the form of cell divisions is rarely demonstrated. We cannot distinguish between equal and unequal cell divisions by analysing only the mean size of daughter cells, because their means can be the same. In contrast, the dispersion of daughter cell size depends on the forms of cell divisions. Based on this, we show that gametogenesis in the marine green alga, Monostroma angicava, exhibits equal size cell divisions. The variance and the mean of gamete size (volume) of each mating type measured agree closely with the prediction from synchronized equal size cell divisions. Gamete size actually takes only discrete values here. This is a key theoretical assumption made to explain the diversified evolution of isogamy and anisogamy in marine green algae. Our results suggest that germ cells adopt equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis. PMID:26333414

  12. Aberrantly Expressed OTX Homeobox Genes Deregulate B-Cell Differentiation in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.

    2015-01-01

    In Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) we recently reported that deregulated homeobox gene MSX1 mediates repression of the B-cell specific transcription factor ZHX2. In this study we investigated regulation of MSX1 in this B-cell malignancy. Accordingly, we analyzed expression and function of OTX homeobox genes which activate MSX1 transcription during embryonal development in the neural plate border region. Our data demonstrate that OTX1 and OTX2 are aberrantly expressed in both HL patients and cell lines. Moreover, both OTX loci are targeted by genomic gains in overexpressing cell lines. Comparative expression profiling and subsequent pathway modulations in HL cell lines indicated that aberrantly enhanced FGF2-signalling activates the expression of OTX2. Downstream analyses of OTX2 demonstrated transcriptional activation of genes encoding transcription factors MSX1, FOXC1 and ZHX1. Interestingly, examination of the physiological expression profile of ZHX1 in normal hematopoietic cells revealed elevated levels in T-cells and reduced expression in B-cells, indicating a discriminatory role in lymphopoiesis. Furthermore, two OTX-negative HL cell lines overexpressed ZHX1 in correlation with genomic amplification of its locus at chromosomal band 8q24, supporting the oncogenic potential of this gene in HL. Taken together, our data demonstrate that deregulated homeobox genes MSX1 and OTX2 respectively impact transcriptional inhibition of (B-cell specific) ZHX2 and activation of (T-cell specific) ZHX1. Thus, we show how reactivation of a specific embryonal gene regulatory network promotes disturbed B-cell differentiation in HL. PMID:26406991

  13. Cell Division Resets Polarity and Motility for the Bacterium Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Cameron W.; Madukoma, Chinedu S.; Mahserejian, Shant; Alber, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Links between cell division and other cellular processes are poorly understood. It is difficult to simultaneously examine division and function in most cell types. Most of the research probing aspects of cell division has experimented with stationary or immobilized cells or distinctly asymmetrical cells. Here we took an alternative approach by examining cell division events within motile groups of cells growing on solid medium by time-lapse microscopy. A total of 558 cell divisions were identified among approximately 12,000 cells. We found an interconnection of division, motility, and polarity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. For every division event, motile cells stop moving to divide. Progeny cells of binary fission subsequently move in opposing directions. This behavior involves M. xanthus Frz proteins that regulate M. xanthus motility reversals but is independent of type IV pilus “S motility.” The inheritance of opposing polarity is correlated with the distribution of the G protein RomR within these dividing cells. The constriction at the point of division limits the intracellular distribution of RomR. Thus, the asymmetric distribution of RomR at the parent cell poles becomes mirrored at new poles initiated at the site of division. PMID:25157084

  14. Targeting aberrant glutathione metabolism to eradicate human acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Neering, Sarah J; Lagadinou, Eleni D; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A; Becker, Michael W; Jordan, Craig T

    2013-11-22

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34(+)) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34(+) AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34(+) AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34(+) cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34(+) AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34(+) cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  15. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  16. Quantitative analysis of protein dynamics during asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Bernd; Emery, Gregory; Berdnik, Daniela; Wirtz-Peitz, Frederik; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2005-10-25

    In dividing Drosophila sensory organ precursor (SOP) cells, the fate determinant Numb and its associated adaptor protein Pon localize asymmetrically and segregate into the anterior daughter cell, where Numb influences cell fate by repressing Notch signaling. Asymmetric localization of both proteins requires the protein kinase aPKC and its substrate Lethal (2) giant larvae (Lgl). Because both Numb and Pon localization require actin and myosin, lateral transport along the cell cortex has been proposed as a possible mechanism for their asymmetric distribution. Here, we use quantitative live analysis of GFP-Pon and Numb-GFP fluorescence and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to characterize the dynamics of Numb and Pon localization during SOP division. We demonstrate that Numb and Pon rapidly exchange between a cytoplasmic pool and the cell cortex and that preferential recruitment from the cytoplasm is responsible for their asymmetric distribution during mitosis. Expression of a constitutively active form of aPKC impairs membrane recruitment of GFP-Pon. This defect can be rescued by coexpression of nonphosphorylatable Lgl, indicating that Lgl is the main target of aPKC. We propose that a high-affinity binding site is asymmetrically distributed by aPKC and Lgl and is responsible for asymmetric localization of cell-fate determinants during mitosis. PMID:16243032

  17. A MECHANISM FOR ASYMMETRIC CELL DIVISION RESULTING IN PROLIFERATIVE ASYNCHRONICITY

    PubMed Central

    Dey-Guha, Ipsita; Alves, Cleidson P.; Yeh, Albert C.; Salony; Sole, Xavier; Darp, Revati; Ramaswamy, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    All cancers contain an admixture of rapidly and slowly proliferating cancer cells. This proliferative heterogeneity complicates the diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients because slow proliferators are hard to eradicate, can be difficult to detect, and may cause disease relapse sometimes years after apparently curative treatment. While clonal selection theory explains the presence and evolution of rapid proliferators within cancer cell populations, the circumstances and molecular details of how slow proliferators are produced is not well understood. Here, a β1-integrin/FAK/mTORC2/AKT1-associated signaling pathway is discovered that can be triggered for rapidly proliferating cancer cells to undergo asymmetric cell division and produce slowly proliferating AKT1low daughter cells. In addition, evidence indicates that the proliferative output of this signaling cascade involves a proteasome-dependent degradation process mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase TTC3. These findings reveal that proliferative heterogeneity within cancer cell populations, in part, is produced through a targetable signaling mechanism, with potential implications for understanding cancer progression, dormancy, and therapeutic resistance. PMID:25582703

  18. Aberrant hedgehog signaling is responsible for the highly invasive behavior of a subpopulation of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y-H; Ding, J; Nguyen, S; Liu, X-J; Xu, G; Zhou, H-Y; Duan, N-N; Yang, S-M; Zern, M A; Wu, J

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoma exhibits a series of heterogeneous subpopulations in its cell surface markers, tumorigenicity, invasion and metastatic capability. We previously demonstrated that the CD133(-)/EpCAM(-) hepatoma subpopulation was more metastatic than its counterpart; however, the controlling mechanisms are unexplored. The present study aimed to delineate the significance of aberrant hedgehog (Hh) signaling in the mediation of metastases. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting-enriched CD133(-)/EpCAM(-) (double negative, DN), Huh-7 cells underwent a transwell selection for metastatic cells (transwell-selected, TS). The TS cells displayed much greater metastatic activity as evidenced by an increased invasion rate, extremely upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1/2/9 genes compared with DN and double-positive (DP) subpopulations. In contrast to DP cells, TS cells lost E-cadherin and were all vimentin-positive as shown by immunocytochemistry. There was a transitional increase in Gli-1/2 gene expression levels from DP, DN to TS subpopulations, which was consistent with elevated Gli-1/2 or Twist-1 protein levels in the nuclear fraction. Furthermore, truncated Gli-1 (tGli-1), which transactivates molecules involved in metastasis, was detected in the highly invasive Huh-7 cell subpopulation, but not in less metastatic hepatoma cells or normal hepatocytes. The enhanced metastatic features with increased expression of MMPs as well as the presence of twist and snail genes in TS Huh-7 cells were reversed by LDE225, a potent Smoothened antagonist. In conclusion, the highly metastatic capability of a unique TS subpopulation was highly attributed to significant epithelial-mesenchymal transition, enhanced Hh activity and aberrant occurrence of a tGli-1 variant, which appears to be responsible for the highly invasive behavior. PMID:25772244

  19. A factor that positively regulates cell division by activating transcription of the major cluster of essential cell division genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X D; de Boer, P A; Rothfield, L I

    1991-01-01

    Cell division in Escherichia coli requires the products of the ftsQ, ftsA and ftsZ genes. It is not known how the cell regulates the cellular concentrations of these essential elements of the division system. We describe here a factor that activates cell division by specifically increasing transcription from one of the two promoters that lie immediately upstream of the ftsQAZ gene cluster. The trans-acting factor is the product of the sdiA gene, which was isolated on the basis of its ability to suppress the division inhibitory effect of the MinC/MinD division inhibitor. In addition, the sdiA gene product suppressed the action of other chromosomally encoded division inhibitors, induced minicell formation in wild type cells, and restored division activity to an ftsZ temperature-sensitive mutant grown under nonpermissive conditions. All of these properties were explained by the ability of the sdiA gene product specifically to increase transcription of the ftsQAZ gene cluster, resulting in an increase in cellular concentration of the FtsZ protein. The sdiA gene product is the first factor thus far identified that specifically regulates expression of this key group of cell division genes. Images PMID:1915297

  20. Aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming during induced pluripotent stem cell generation is dependent on the choice of reprogramming factors.

    PubMed

    Planello, Aline C; Ji, Junfeng; Sharma, Vivek; Singhania, Rajat; Mbabaali, Faridah; Müller, Fabian; Alfaro, Javier A; Bock, Christoph; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Batada, Nizar N

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells via overexpression of reprogramming factors involves epigenetic remodeling. DNA methylation at a significant proportion of CpG sites in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) differs from that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Whether different sets of reprogramming factors influence the type and extent of aberrant DNA methylation in iPSCs differently remains unknown. In order to help resolve this critical question, we generated human iPSCs from a common fibroblast cell source using either the Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and cMYC) or the Thomson factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG and LIN28), and determined their genome-wide DNA methylation profiles. In addition to shared DNA methylation aberrations present in all our iPSCs, we identified Yamanaka-iPSC (Y-iPSC)-specific and Thomson-iPSC (T-iPSC)-specific recurrent aberrations. Strikingly, not only were the genomic locations of the aberrations different but also their types: reprogramming with Yamanaka factors mainly resulted in failure to demethylate CpGs, whereas reprogramming with Thomson factors mainly resulted in failure to methylate CpGs. Differences in the level of transcripts encoding DNMT3b and TET3 between Y-iPSCs and T-iPSCs may contribute partially to the distinct types of aberrations. Finally, de novo aberrantly methylated genes in Y-iPSCs were enriched for NANOG targets that are also aberrantly methylated in some cancers. Our study thus reveals that the choice of reprogramming factors influences the amount, location, and class of DNA methylation aberrations in iPSCs. These findings may provide clues into how to produce human iPSCs with fewer DNA methylation abnormalities. PMID:25408883

  1. Aberrant cochlear hair cell attachments caused by Nectin-3 deficiency result in hair bundle abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Terunobu; Kominami, Kanoko; Wang, Shujie; Togashi, Hideru; Hirata, Ken-ichi; Mizoguchi, Akira; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Takai, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    The organ of Corti consists of sensory hair cells (HCs) interdigitated with nonsensory supporting cells (SCs) to form a checkerboard-like cellular pattern. HCs are equipped with hair bundles on their apical surfaces. We previously reported that cell-adhesive nectins regulate the checkerboard-like cellular patterning of HCs and SCs in the mouse auditory epithelium. Nectin-1 and -3 are differentially expressed in normal HCs and SCs, respectively, and in Nectin-3-deficient mice a number of HCs are aberrantly attached to each other. We show here that these aberrantly attached HCs in Nectin-3-deficient mice, but not unattached ones, show disturbances of the orientation and morphology of the hair bundles and the positioning of the kinocilium, with additional abnormal localisation of cadherin-catenin complexes and the apical-basal polarity proteins Pals1 and Par-3. These results indicate that, owing to the loss of Nectin-3, hair cells contact each other inappropriately and form abnormal junctions, ultimately resulting in abnormal hair bundle orientation and morphology. PMID:24381198

  2. Reversal of Aberrant Cancer Methylome and Transcriptome upon Direct Reprogramming of Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Dashayini; Kong, Chiou Mee; Lai, Jason; Tay, Ling Lee; Yang, Henry; Wang, Xueying

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports on direct reprogramming of cancer cells (iPCs) which results in reduced tumorigenic potential has attributed the importance of epigenetics in tumorigenesis, but lacked genome-wide analysis. Here we describe successful generation of iPCs from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Following reprogramming, they resembled embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells in pluripotency markers expression, gene expression patterns and in vitro differentiation ability. Genome-wide methylation analysis revealed that aberrantly methylated promoters which were mostly developmental-associated genes and tumor suppressors; as well as commonly upregulated genes in NSCLC i.e. KRT19 and S100P were reversed in iPCs upon reprogramming. Also, the reversal of oncogenes and tumor suppressors status were partially explainable by DNA methylation. These findings suggest that DNA methylation patterns explain the downstream transcriptional effects, which potentially caused the reduced tumorigenicity in iPCs, thus providing evidence that reprogramming reverses the aberrantly dysregulated genes in NSCLC both epigenetically and transcriptionally. PMID:22912920

  3. AMPK Promotes Aberrant PGC1β Expression To Support Human Colon Tumor Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kurt W.; Das, Binita; Kim, Hyun Seok; Clymer, Beth K.; Gehring, Drew; Smith, Deandra R.; Costanzo-Garvey, Diane L.; Fernandez, Mario R.; Brattain, Michael G.; Kelly, David L.; MacMillan, John

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of cancer research is the identification of tumor-specific vulnerabilities that can be exploited for the development of therapies that are selectively toxic to the tumor. We show here that the transcriptional coactivators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1β (PGC1β) and estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) are aberrantly expressed in human colon cell lines and tumors. With kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) depletion as a reference standard, we used functional signature ontology (FUSION) analysis to identify the γ1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as an essential contributor to PGC1β expression and colon tumor cell survival. Subsequent analysis revealed that a subunit composition of AMPK (α2β2γ1) is preferred for colorectal cancer cell survival, at least in part, by stabilizing the tumor-specific expression of PGC1β. In contrast, PGC1β and ERRα are not detectable in nontransformed human colon epithelial cells, and depletion of the AMPKγ1 subunit has no effect on their viability. These data indicate that Ras oncogenesis relies on the aberrant activation of a PGC1β-dependent transcriptional pathway via a specific AMPK isoform. PMID:26351140

  4. Analysis of Heavy Ion-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblast Cells Using In Situ Hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 0 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Unrejoined chromosomal breaks and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, indicating the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track. 2

  5. Disruption of the keratin filament network during epithelial cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, E B; Goodman, S L; Trejdosiewicz, L K

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of keratin filaments during cell division was examined in a wide range of epithelial lines from several species. Almost half of them show keratin disruption as described previously: by immunofluorescence, filaments are replaced during mitosis by a 'speckled' pattern of discrete cytoplasmic dots. In the electron microscope these ' speckles ' are seen as granules around the cell periphery, just below the actin cortical mesh, with no detectable 10 nm filament structure inside them and no keratin filament bundles in the rest of the cytoplasm. A time course of the filament reorganization was constructed from double immunofluorescence data; filaments are disrupted in prophase, and the filament network is intact again by cytokinesis. The phenomenon is restricted to cells rich in keratin filaments, such as keratinocytes; it is unrelated to the co-existence of vimentin in many of these cells, and vimentin is generally maintained as filaments while the keratin is restructured. Some resistance to the effect may be conferred by an extended cycle time. Filament reorganization takes place within minutes, so that a reversible mechanism seems more likely than one involving de novo protein synthesis, at this metabolically quiet stage of the cell cycle. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6202508

  6. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Thomas W.

    2000-02-29

    Research in the latter part of the grant period was divided into two parts: (1) expansion of the macromolecular tool kit for studying plant cell division; (2) experiments in which the roles played by plant cell cycle regulators were to be cast in the light of the emerging yeast and animal cell paradigm for molecular control of the mitotic cycle. The first objectives were accomplished to a very satisfactory degree. With regard to the second part of the project, we were driven to change our objectives for two reasons. First, the families of cell cycle control genes that we cloned encoded such closely related members that the prospects for success at raising distinguishing antisera against each were sufficiently dubious as to be impractical. Epitope tagging is not feasible in Pisum sativum, our experimental system, as this species is not realistically transformable. Therefore, differentiating the roles of diverse cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases was problematic. Secondly, our procedure for generating mitotically synchronized pea root meristems for biochemical studies was far too labor intensive for the proposed experiments. We therefore shifted our objectives to identifying connections between the conserved proteins of the cell cycle engine and factors that interface it with plant physiology and development. In this, we have obtained some very exciting results.

  7. Long-range ordered vorticity patterns in living tissue induced by cell division

    PubMed Central

    Rossen, Ninna S.; Tarp, Jens M.; Mathiesen, Joachim; Jensen, Mogens H.; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2014-01-01

    In healthy blood vessels with a laminar blood flow, the endothelial cell division rate is low, only sufficient to replace apoptotic cells. The division rate significantly increases during embryonic development and under halted or turbulent flow. Cells in barrier tissue are connected and their motility is highly correlated. Here we investigate the long-range dynamics induced by cell division in an endothelial monolayer under non-flow conditions, mimicking the conditions during vessel formation or around blood clots. Cell divisions induce long-range, well-ordered vortex patterns extending several cell diameters away from the division site, in spite of the system’s low Reynolds number. Our experimental results are reproduced by a hydrodynamic continuum model simulating division as a local pressure increase corresponding to a local tension decrease. Such long-range physical communication may be crucial for embryonic development and for healing tissue, for instance around blood clots. PMID:25483750

  8. Long-range ordered vorticity patterns in living tissue induced by cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossen, Ninna S.; Tarp, Jens M.; Mathiesen, Joachim; Jensen, Mogens H.; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2014-12-01

    In healthy blood vessels with a laminar blood flow, the endothelial cell division rate is low, only sufficient to replace apoptotic cells. The division rate significantly increases during embryonic development and under halted or turbulent flow. Cells in barrier tissue are connected and their motility is highly correlated. Here we investigate the long-range dynamics induced by cell division in an endothelial monolayer under non-flow conditions, mimicking the conditions during vessel formation or around blood clots. Cell divisions induce long-range, well-ordered vortex patterns extending several cell diameters away from the division site, in spite of the system’s low Reynolds number. Our experimental results are reproduced by a hydrodynamic continuum model simulating division as a local pressure increase corresponding to a local tension decrease. Such long-range physical communication may be crucial for embryonic development and for healing tissue, for instance around blood clots.

  9. Aberrant cytokine production by non-malignant cells in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative tumors and response to JAK inhibitor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Belver, Laura; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Kleppe, Kwak, and collegues use detailed cytokine profiling analyses to investigate the role of aberrant pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Their analyses implicate constitutive activation of STAT3 in both malignant and non-malignant bone marrow cell populations as a driver of aberrant cytokine secretion and as a cellular target mediating the therapeutic activity of ruxolitinib. PMID:25749974

  10. Dissociation of gemcitabine chemosensitization by CHK1 inhibition from cell cycle checkpoint abrogation and aberrant mitotic entry.

    PubMed

    Parsels, Leslie A; Tanska, Daria M; Parsels, Joshua D; Zabludoff, Sonya D; Cuneo, Kyle C; Lawrence, Theodore S; Maybaum, Jonathan; Morgan, Meredith A

    2016-03-01

    In order to determine the relative contribution of checkpoint abrogation and subsequent aberrant mitotic entry to gemcitabine chemosensitization by CHK1 inhibition, we established a model utilizing the CDK inhibitors roscovitine or purvalanol A to re-establish cell cycle arrest and prevent aberrant mitotic entry in pancreatic cancer cells treated with gemcitabine and the CHK inhibitor AZD7762. In this study, we report that the extent of aberrant mitotic entry, as determined by flow cytometry for the mitotic marker phospho-Histone H3 (Ser10), did not reflect the relative sensitivities of pancreatic cancer cell lines to gemcitabine chemosensitization by AZD7762. In addition, re-establishing gemcitabine-induced cell cycle arrest either pharmacologically, with roscovitine or purvalanol A, or genetically, with cyclin B1 siRNA, did not inhibit chemosensitization uniformly across the cell lines. Furthermore, we found that AZD7762 augmented high-intensity γH2AX signaling in gemcitabine-treated cells, suggesting the presence of replication stress when CHK1 is inhibited. Finally, the ability of roscovitine to prevent chemosensitization correlated with its ability to inhibit AZD7762-induced high-intensity γH2AX, but not aberrant pHH3, suggesting that the effects of AZD7762 on DNA replication or repair rather than aberrant mitotic entry determine gemcitabine chemosensitization in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:26890478

  11. From HeLa cell division to infectious diarrhoea

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen, J.; Osborne, M.P.; Spencer, A.J.; Warley, A. )

    1990-09-01

    Hela S3 cells were grown in suspension both randomly and, synchronously using hydroxyurea which blocks cells at the G1/S interface. Cryosections were prepared, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. As cells moved into S and through M phases (Na) and (Cl) increased; both returned to normal levels upon re-entering G1 phase. The Na/K ratio was 1:1 in G1 phase. Infection of HeLa S3 cells in G1 phase with vaccinia virus resulted in no change in intracellular (Na). Infection of neonatal mice with murine rotavirus was localized to villus tip enterocytes and gave rise to diarrhoea which was maximal at 72h post-infection (p.i.). Diarrhoea was preceded by ischemia of villi (18-42h p.i.) and villus shortening (maximal at 42h p.i.), and was also coincident with a dramatic regrowth of villi. At 48h p.i. a proliferative zone of electron lucent cells was observed in villus base regions. Cryosections of infected gut, taken before, during, and after infection, together with corresponding age-matched controls, were freeze-dried and analysed by X-ray microanalysis. At 48h p.i. electron lucent villus base cells were shown to be more hydrated, and, to contain higher levels of both Na and Cl and lower levels of P, S, K and Mg than corresponding control cells. These studies increase confidence in the use of X-ray microanalysis in studying biological systems, provide some insight into the process of cell division, and constitute the basis of a new concept of diarrhoeal secretion.27 references.

  12. Pyp1 and Pyp2 PTPases dephosphorylate an osmosensing MAP kinase controlling cell size at division in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Millar, J B; Buck, V; Wilkinson, M G

    1995-09-01

    Simultaneous inactivation of pyp1 and pyp2 PTPases in fission yeast leads to aberrant cell morphology and growth arrest. Spontaneous recessive mutations that bypass the requirement for pyp1 and pyp2 and reside in two complementation groups were isolated, sty1 and sty2. sty1- and sty2- mutant cells are substantially delayed in the timing of mitotic initiation. We have isolated the sty1 gene, which encodes a MAP kinase that is closely related to a subfamily of MAP kinases regulated by osmotic stress including Saccharomyces cervisiae HOG1 and human CSBP1. We find that sty2 is allelic to the wis1 MAP kinase kinase and that delta sty1 and delta wis1 cells are unable to grow in high osmolarity medium. Osmotic stress induces both tyrosine phosphorylation of Sty1 and a reduction in cell size at division. Pyp2 associates with and tyrosine dephosphorylates Sty1 in vitro. We find that wis1-dependent induction of pyp2 mRNA is responsible for tyrosine dephosphorylation of Sty1 in vivo on prolonged exposure to osmotic stress. We conclude that Pyp1 and Pyp2 are tyrosine-specific MAP kinase phosphatases that inactivate an osmoregulated MAP kinase, Sty1, which acts downstream of the Wis1 MAP kinase kinase to control cell size at division in fission yeast. PMID:7657164

  13. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  14. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  15. The cytological changes of tobacco zygote and proembryo cells induced by beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent suggest the involvement of arabinogalactan proteins in cell division and cell plate formation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In dicotyledonous plant, the first asymmetric zygotic division and subsequent several cell divisions are crucial for proembryo pattern formation and later embryo development. Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a family of extensively glycosylated cell surface proteins that are thought to have important roles in various aspects of plant growth and development, including embryogenesis. Previous results from our laboratory show that AGPs are concerned with tobacco egg cell fertilization and zygotic division. However, how AGPs interact with other factors involved in zygotic division and proembryo development remains unknown. Results In this study, we used the tobacco in vitro zygote culture system and series of meticulous cell biology techniques to investigate the roles of AGPs in zygote and proembryo cell division. For the first time, we examined tobacco proembryo division patterns detailed to every cell division. The bright-field images and statistical results both revealed that with the addition of an exogenous AGPs inhibitor, beta-glucosyl Yariv (beta-GlcY) reagent, the frequency of aberrant division increased remarkably in cultured tobacco zygotes and proembryos, and the cell plate specific locations of AGPs were greatly reduced after beta-GlcY treatment. In addition, the accumulations of new cell wall materials were also significantly affected by treating with beta-GlcY. Detection of cellulose components by Calcofluor white stain showed that strong fluorescence was located in the newly formed wall of daughter cells after the zygotic division of in vivo samples and the control samples from in vitro culture without beta-GlcY treatment; while there was only weak fluorescence in the newly formed cell walls with beta-GlcY treatment. Immunocytochemistry examination with JIM5 and JIM7 respectively against the low- and high-esterified pectins displayed that these two pectins located in opposite positions of zygotes and proembryos in vivo and the polarity was

  16. Physical Description of Mitotic Spindle Orientation During Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Théry, Manuel; Racine, Victor; Bornens, Michel; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-03-01

    During cell division, the duplicated chromosomes are physically separated by the action of the mitotic spindle. The spindle is a dynamic structure of the cytoskeleton, which consists of two microtubule asters. Its orientation defines the axis along which the cell divides. Recent experiments show that the spindle orientation depends on the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites. Here we show that the experimentally observed spindle orientation can be understood as the result of the action of cortical force generators acting on the spindle. We assume that the local activity of force generators is controlled by the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites determined by the particular geometry of the adhesive substrate. We develop a simple physical description of the spindle mechanics, which allows us to calculate the torque acting on the spindle, as well as the energy profile and the angular distribution of spindle orientation. Our model accounts for the preferred spindle orientation, as well as the full shape of the angular distributions of spindle orientation observed in a large variety of pattern geometries. M. Th'ery, A. Jim'enez-Dalmaroni, et al., Nature 447, 493 (2007).

  17. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth and Cell Division of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Fievet, Anouchka; Ducret, Adrien; Mignot, Tâm; Valette, Odile; Robert, Lydia; Pardoux, Romain; Dolla, Alain R; Aubert, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well-documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle. In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells. PMID:26696987

  18. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth and Cell Division of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    PubMed Central

    Fievet, Anouchka; Ducret, Adrien; Mignot, Tâm; Valette, Odile; Robert, Lydia; Pardoux, Romain; Dolla, Alain R.; Aubert, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well-documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle. In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells. PMID:26696987

  19. Centromere Identity, Function, and Epigenetic Propagation Across Cell Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Black, Ben E.; Jansen, Lars E.T.; Foltz, Daniel R.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2011-01-01

    The key to understanding centromere identity is likely to lie in the chromatin containing the histone H3 variant, CENP-A. CENP-A is the prime candidate to carry the epigenetic information that specifies the chromosomal location of the centromere in nearly all eukaryotic species, raising questions fundamental to understanding chromosome inheritance: How is the epigenetic centromere mark propagated? What physical properties of CENP-A-containing complexes are important for epigenetically marking centromeres? What are the molecules that recognize centromeric chromatin and serve as the foundation for the mitotic kinetochore? We discuss recent advances from our research groups that have yielded substantial insight into these questions and present our current understanding of the centromere. Future work promises an understanding of the molecular processes that confer fidelity to genome transmission at cell division. PMID:21467140

  20. RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED1 Regulates Asymmetric Cell Divisions in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Annika K.; Nowack, Moritz K.; Bouyer, Daniel; Zhao, Xin’Ai; Harashima, Hirofumi; Naseer, Sadaf; De Winter, Freya; Dissmeyer, Nico; Geldner, Niko; Schnittger, Arp

    2012-01-01

    Formative, also called asymmetric, cell divisions produce daughter cells with different identities. Like other divisions, formative divisions rely first of all on the cell cycle machinery with centrally acting cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their cyclin partners to control progression through the cell cycle. However, it is still largely obscure how developmental cues are translated at the cellular level to promote asymmetric divisions. Here, we show that formative divisions in the shoot and root of the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are controlled by a common mechanism that relies on the activity level of the Cdk1 homolog CDKA;1, with medium levels being sufficient for symmetric divisions but high levels being required for formative divisions. We reveal that the function of CDKA;1 in asymmetric cell divisions operates through a transcriptional regulation system that is mediated by the Arabidopsis Retinoblastoma homolog RBR1. RBR1 regulates not only cell cycle genes, but also, independent of the cell cycle transcription factor E2F, genes required for formative divisions and cell fate acquisition, thus directly linking cell proliferation with differentiation. This mechanism allows the implementation of spatial information, in the form of high kinase activity, with intracellular gating of developmental decisions. PMID:23104828

  1. Emergence of homeostatic epithelial packing and stress dissipation through divisions oriented along the long cell axis

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Tom P. J.; Harris, Andrew R.; Lam, Maxine; Cheng, Qian; Bellis, Julien; Dimitracopoulos, Andrea; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Charras, Guillaume T.; Baum, Buzz

    2015-01-01

    Cell division plays an important role in animal tissue morphogenesis, which depends, critically, on the orientation of divisions. In isolated adherent cells, the orientation of mitotic spindles is sensitive to interphase cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. In epithelia, the relative importance of these two factors is challenging to assess. To do this, we used suspended monolayers devoid of ECM, where divisions become oriented following a stretch, allowing the regulation and function of epithelial division orientation in stress relaxation to be characterized. Using this system, we found that divisions align better with the long, interphase cell axis than with the monolayer stress axis. Nevertheless, because the application of stretch induces a global realignment of interphase long axes along the direction of extension, this is sufficient to bias the orientation of divisions in the direction of stretch. Each division redistributes the mother cell mass along the axis of division. Thus, the global bias in division orientation enables cells to act collectively to redistribute mass along the axis of stretch, helping to return the monolayer to its resting state. Further, this behavior could be quantitatively reproduced using a model designed to assess the impact of autonomous changes in mitotic cell mechanics within a stretched monolayer. In summary, the propensity of cells to divide along their long axis preserves epithelial homeostasis by facilitating both stress relaxation and isotropic growth without the need for cells to read or transduce mechanical signals. PMID:25908119

  2. M-BAND Study of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells: Radiation Quality and Dose Rate Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is its ability to identify both inter- (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra- (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome) chromosome aberrations simultaneously. To study the detailed rearrangement of low- and high-LET radiation induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) in vitro, we performed a series of experiments with Cs-137 gamma rays of both low and high dose rates, neutrons of low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions of high dose rate, with chromosome 3 painted with multi-binding colors. We also compared the chromosome aberrations in both 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures. Results of these experiments revealed the highest chromosome aberration frequencies after low dose rate neutron exposures. However, detailed analysis of the radiation induced inversions revealed that all three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intra-chromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by inter-chromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges. The location of the breaks involved in chromosome exchanges was analyzed along the painted chromosome. The breakpoint distribution was found to be randomly localized on chromosome 3 after neutron or Fe ion exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering breakpoints was observed after -ray exposure. Our comparison of chromosome aberration yields between 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures indicated a significant difference for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures. These experimental results indicated that the track structure of the radiation and the cellular/chromosome structure can both affect radiation-induced chromosome

  3. Radioisotopic Method for Measuring Cell Division Rates of Individual Species of Diatoms from Natural Populations †

    PubMed Central

    Rivkin, Richard B.

    1986-01-01

    Silicon is an essential element for diatom frustule synthesis and is usually taken up only by dividing cells. With 68Ge, a radioactive analog of Si, the cell cycle marker event of frustule formation was identified for individual species of diatom. The frequency of cells within a population undergoing this division event was estimated, and the cell division rate was calculated. In laboratory cultures, these rates of cell division and those calculated from changes in cell numbers were similar. By dual labeling with 68Ge(OH)4 and NaH14CO3, rates of cell division and photosynthesis were coincidently measured for diatoms both in laboratory cultures and when isolated from natural populations in estuarine, offshore, and polar environments. These techniques permit the coupling between photosynthesis and cell division to be examined in situ for individual species of diatom. PMID:16347039

  4. A DNA Damage-Induced, SOS-Independent Checkpoint Regulates Cell Division in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Modell, Joshua W.; Kambara, Tracy K.; Perchuk, Barrett S.; Laub, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage. PMID:25350732

  5. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Modell, Joshua W; Kambara, Tracy K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage. PMID:25350732

  6. Regulation of the Cell Division Cycle in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The cell division cycle is tightly regulated by the activation and inactivation of a series of proteins that control the replication and segregation of organelles to the daughter cells. During the past decade, we have witnessed significant advances in our understanding of the cell cycle in Trypanosoma brucei and how the cycle is regulated by various regulatory proteins. However, many other regulators, especially those unique to trypanosomes, remain to be identified, and we are just beginning to delineate the signaling pathways that drive the transitions through different cell cycle stages, such as the G1/S transition, G2/M transition, and mitosis-cytokinesis transition. Trypanosomes appear to employ both evolutionarily conserved and trypanosome-specific molecules to regulate the various stages of its cell cycle, including DNA replication initiation, spindle assembly, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis initiation and completion. Strikingly, trypanosomes lack some crucial regulators that are well conserved across evolution, such as Cdc6 and Cdt1, which are involved in DNA replication licensing, the spindle motor kinesin-5, which is required for spindle assembly, the central spindlin complex, which has been implicated in cytokinesis initiation, and the actomyosin contractile ring, which is located at the cleavage furrow. Conversely, trypanosomes possess certain regulators, such as cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases, and mitotic centromere-associated kinesins, that are greatly expanded and likely play diverse cellular functions. Overall, trypanosomes apparently have integrated unique regulators into the evolutionarily conserved pathways to compensate for the absence of those conserved molecules and, additionally, have evolved certain cell cycle regulatory pathways that are either different from its human host or distinct between its own life cycle forms. PMID:22865501

  7. Cell cycle and centromere FISH studies in premature centromere division

    PubMed Central

    Corona-Rivera, Alfredo; Salamanca-Gomez, Fabio; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Palomino-Cueva, Cesar; Garcia-Cobian, Teresa A; Corona-Rivera, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    Background Mitotic configurations consistent in split centromeres and splayed chromatids in all or most of the chromosomes or premature centromere division (PCD) have been described in three categories. (1) Low frequency of PCD observed in colchicines-treated lymphocyte cultures from normal individuals. (2) High frequency of PCD with mosaic variegated aneuploidy. (3) High frequency of PCD as a sole chromosome abnormality observed in individuals with no recognizable clinical pattern. We report four members of a family with the third category of PCD. Methods Cell cycle duration assessed by average generation time using differential sister chromatid stain analysis and FISH studies of DNA centromere sequences in PCD individuals, are included and compared with previously reported PCD individuals from 9 families. Results We observed PCD in colchicine-treated cultures from the propositus, his father, and two paternal aunts but not in his mother and four other paternal and maternal family members, as well as in untreated cultures from the propositus and his father. We observed cytological evidence of active centromeres by Cd stain. Significative cell cycle time reduction in anaphases of PCD individuals (average generation time of 21.8 h;SD 0.4) with respect to individuals without PCD (average generation time of 31.8 h;SD 3.9) was observed (P < 0.005, Student t-test for independent samples). Increased cell proliferation kinetics was observed in anaphasic cells of individuals with PCD, by differential sister chromatid stain analysis. FISH studies revealed the presence of alpha satellite DNA from chromosomes 1, 13, 21/18, X, all centromeres, and CENP-B box sequences in metaphasic and anaphasic cells from PCD individuals. Conclusion This report examines evidences of a functional relationship between PCD and cell cycle impairment. It seems that essential centromere integrity is present in these cases. PMID:16174301

  8. Aberrant protein phosphorylation in Alzheimer disease brain disturbs pro-survival and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Perluigi, M; Barone, E; Di Domenico, F; Butterfield, D A

    2016-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is one of the most prevalent post-translational modifications fundamental in mediating diverse cellular functions in living cells. Aberrant protein phosphorylation is currently recognized as a critical step in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). Changes in the pattern of protein phosphorylation of different brain regions are suggested to promote AD transition from a presymptomatic to a symptomatic state in response to accumulating amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Several experimental approaches have been utilized to profile alteration of protein phosphorylation in the brain, including proteomics. Among central pathways regulated by kinases/phosphatases those involved in the activation/inhibition of both pro survival and cell death pathways play a central role in AD pathology. We discuss in detail how aberrant phosphorylation could contribute to dysregulate p53 activity and insulin-mediated signaling. Taken together these results highlight that targeted therapeutic intervention, which can restore phosphorylation homeostasis, either acting on kinases and phosphatases, conceivably may prove to be beneficial to prevent or slow the development and progression of AD. PMID:27425034

  9. The effect of track structure on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in murine cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Cella, L.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Saito, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure chromosome aberrations in C3H 10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts using FISH painting at the first mitosis following exposure to 30 keV/microm hydrogen or neon ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cells in plateau-phase were irradiated with 0.86 MeV protons at the TTT-3 Tandem accelerator in Naples (Italy), or with 400 MeV/n Ne ions at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (Japan). Colcemid-blocked cells were harvested at the first mitosis following exposure, and chromosome spreads were hybridized in situ with a fluorescein-labelled composite mouse DNA probe specific for chromosomes 2 and 8. RESULTS: Protons were more efficient than neon ions at the same LET in the induction of chromosome interchanges and breaks. Yields of complex exchanges were similar for both particles at the same dose, but protons produced mostly insertions, while with Ne exposure non-reciprocal exchanges were the most frequent complex-type exchange. CONCLUSIONS: Charged particles with the same LET produce different yields of chromosome aberrations, and some observed differences can be explained based on the available track-structure models.

  10. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies.

  11. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division.

    PubMed

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies. PMID:27575162

  12. Effect of lead chromate on chromosome aberration, sister-chromatid exchange and DNA damage in mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Douglas, G R; Bell, R D; Grant, C E; Wytsma, J M; Bora, K C

    1980-02-01

    Possible mutagenic activity of lead chromate in mammalian cells was studied using assays for chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchanges in cultured human lymphocytes, and DNA fragmentation as detected by alkaline-sucrose gradient sedimentation in cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Lead chromate caused dose-related increases in chromosome aberration and sister-chromatid exchange in human lymphocytes. No increase in DNA damage was observed in CHO cells, possibly due to the relative insensitivity of the CHO cells and the limited solubility of lead chromate in tissue culture medium. The mutagenicity of lead chromate in human lymphocytes appears to be entirely due to the chromate ion since chromosome aberrations were induced by potassium chromate but not lead chloride. PMID:7374664

  13. Phenotypic heterogeneity and aberrant markers expression in T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Babusíková, O; Glasová, M; Koníková, E; Kusenda, J; Cáp, J; Gyárfás, J; Koubek, K

    1998-01-01

    For exact determination of lineage assessment there is a need of surface membrane and intracellular (cytoplasmic and nuclear) immunophenotyping performed by flow cytometry. We evaluated in detail the results of surface and intracellular immunophenotyping of 34 T-ALL cases. The great heterogeneity of T-cell differentiation markers has been observed which did not allow relevant subclassification of T-ALL according to the existing subclassification schemes and the proposed three-stage model of physiological T-cell differentiation. Therefore, a simplified classification based on the CD3 marker expression either on cell membrane or in cytoplasm has been created with allocation of T-ALL into two main phenotypic groups. From 34 in detail examined T-ALL cases a great deal-27 (79%) belonged to an immature phenotype (Stage I) and only 7 (21%) expressed more mature phenotype (Stage II). Simultaneously the presence of atypical/aberrant T-cell phenotypes has been studied. We showed that in T-ALL it was possible to specify some cases with leukemia-associated phenotype with coexistence of atypical markers which are absent in nonleukemic cells. In a majority of cases early B-lineage marker (CD10) and in a smaller proportion of them non-lineage associated marker (CD34) were observed. Myeloid marker CD13 was observed in one case of the immature T-ALL, together with CD10 and CD34. As these atypical markers were present through all differentiation stages of T-ALL we obtained a strong evidence that they might represent an abnormal rather than an immature phenotype. The prognostic significance of T-ALL subtypes and aberrant markers coexpression have been discussed. Simultaneously it was shown that quantitative immunofluorescence could provide an additional important diagnostic marker also in T-ALL cases. PMID:9717523

  14. Analytical model for macromolecular partitioning during yeast cell division

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Asymmetric cell division, whereby a parent cell generates two sibling cells with unequal content and thereby distinct fates, is central to cell differentiation, organism development and ageing. Unequal partitioning of the macromolecular content of the parent cell — which includes proteins, DNA, RNA, large proteinaceous assemblies and organelles — can be achieved by both passive (e.g. diffusion, localized retention sites) and active (e.g. motor-driven transport) processes operating in the presence of external polarity cues, internal asymmetries, spontaneous symmetry breaking, or stochastic effects. However, the quantitative contribution of different processes to the partitioning of macromolecular content is difficult to evaluate. Results Here we developed an analytical model that allows rapid quantitative assessment of partitioning as a function of various parameters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model exposes quantitative degeneracies among the physical parameters that govern macromolecular partitioning, and reveals regions of the solution space where diffusion is sufficient to drive asymmetric partitioning and regions where asymmetric partitioning can only be achieved through additional processes such as motor-driven transport. Application of the model to different macromolecular assemblies suggests that partitioning of protein aggregates and episomes, but not prions, is diffusion-limited in yeast, consistent with previous reports. Conclusions In contrast to computationally intensive stochastic simulations of particular scenarios, our analytical model provides an efficient and comprehensive overview of partitioning as a function of global and macromolecule-specific parameters. Identification of quantitative degeneracies among these parameters highlights the importance of their careful measurement for a given macromolecular species in order to understand the dominant processes responsible for its observed partitioning. PMID

  15. MioC and GidA proteins promote cell division in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Lies, Mark; Visser, Bryan J.; Joshi, Mohan C.; Magnan, David; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    The well-conserved genes surrounding the E. coli replication origin, mioC and gidA, do not normally affect chromosome replication and have little known function. We report that mioC and gidA mutants exhibit a moderate cell division inhibition phenotype. Cell elongation is exacerbated by a fis deletion, likely owing to delayed replication and subsequent cell cycle stress. Measurements of replication initiation frequency and origin segregation indicate that mioC and gidA do not inhibit cell division through any effect on oriC function. Division inhibition is also independent of the two known replication/cell division checkpoints, SOS and nucleoid occlusion. Complementation analysis indicates that mioC and gidA affect cell division in trans, indicating their effect is at the protein level. Transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing showed that expression of a cell division septum component, YmgF, is significantly altered in mioC and gidA mutants. Our data reveal new roles for the gene products of gidA and mioC in the division apparatus, and we propose that their expression, cyclically regulated by chromatin remodeling at oriC, is part of a cell cycle regulatory program coordinating replication initiation and cell division. PMID:26074904

  16. Identification of aberrant gene expression associated with aberrant promoter methylation in primordial germ cells between E13 and E16 rat F3 generation vinclozolin lineage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Transgenerational epigenetics (TGE) are currently considered important in disease, but the mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood. TGE abnormalities expected to cause disease are likely to be initiated during development and to be mediated by aberrant gene expression associated with aberrant promoter methylation that is heritable between generations. However, because methylation is removed and then re-established during development, it is not easy to identify promoter methylation abnormalities by comparing normal lineages with those expected to exhibit TGE abnormalities. Methods This study applied the recently proposed principal component analysis (PCA)-based unsupervised feature extraction to previously reported and publically available gene expression/promoter methylation profiles of rat primordial germ cells, between E13 and E16 of the F3 generation vinclozolin lineage that are expected to exhibit TGE abnormalities, to identify multiple genes that exhibited aberrant gene expression/promoter methylation during development. Results The biological feasibility of the identified genes were tested via enrichment analyses of various biological concepts including pathway analysis, gene ontology terms and protein-protein interactions. All validations suggested superiority of the proposed method over three conventional and popular supervised methods that employed t test, limma and significance analysis of microarrays, respectively. The identified genes were globally related to tumors, the prostate, kidney, testis and the immune system and were previously reported to be related to various diseases caused by TGE. Conclusions Among the genes reported by PCA-based unsupervised feature extraction, we propose that chemokine signaling pathways and leucine rich repeat proteins are key factors that initiate transgenerational epigenetic-mediated diseases, because multiple genes included in these two categories were identified in this study. PMID:26677731

  17. Control of Asymmetric Cell Divisions during Root Ground Tissue Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Won; Lim, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the production of diverse cell/tissue types is essential for the development of multicellular organisms such as animals and plants. The Arabidopsis thaliana root, which contains distinct cells/tissues along longitudinal and radial axes, has served as an elegant model to investigate how genetic programs and environmental signals interact to produce different cell/tissue types. In the root, a series of asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs) give rise to three ground tissue layers at maturity (endodermis, middle cortex, and cortex). Because the middle cortex is formed by a periclinal (parallel to the axis) ACD of the endodermis around 7 to 14 days post-germination, middle cortex formation is used as a parameter to assess maturation of the root ground tissue. Molecular, genetic, and physiological studies have revealed that the control of the timing and extent of middle cortex formation during root maturation relies on the interaction of plant hormones and transcription factors. In particular, abscisic acid and gibberellin act synergistically to regulate the timing and extent of middle cortex formation, unlike their typical antagonism. The SHORT-ROOT, SCARECROW, SCARECROW-LIKE 3, and DELLA transcription factors, all of which belong to the plant-specific GRAS family, play key roles in the regulation of middle cortex formation. Recently, two additional transcription factors, SEUSS and GA- AND ABA-RESPONSIVE ZINC FINGER, have also been characterized during ground tissue maturation. In this review, we provide a detailed account of the regulatory networks that control the timing and extent of middle cortex formation during post-embryonic root development. PMID:27306644

  18. Teaching Cell Division to Secondary School Students: An Investigation of Difficulties Experienced by Turkish Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztap, Haydar; Ozay, Esra; Oztap, Fulya

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the difficulties biology teachers face when teaching cell division in the secondary schools of the central part of the Erzurum province in Turkey. During this research, a questionnaire was distributed to a total of 36 secondary school biology teachers. Findings of the study indicate biology teachers perceive cell division as…

  19. The Analysis of Cell Cycle, Proliferation, and Asymmetric Cell Division by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Filby, Andrew; Day, William; Purewal, Sukhveer; Martinez-Martin, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Measuring cellular DNA content by conventional flow cytometry (CFC) and fluorescent DNA-binding dyes is a highly robust method for analysing cell cycle distributions within heterogeneous populations. However, any conclusions drawn from single-parameter DNA analysis alone can often be confounded by the asynchronous nature of cell proliferation. We have shown that by combining fluorescent DNA stains with proliferation tracking dyes and antigenic staining for mitotic cells one can elucidate the division history and cell cycle position of any cell within an asynchronously dividing population. Furthermore if one applies this panel to an imaging flow cytometry (IFC) system then the spatial information allows resolution of the four main mitotic phases and the ability to study molecular distributions within these populations. We have employed such an approach to study the prevalence of asymmetric cell division (ACD) within activated immune cells by measuring the distribution of key fate determining molecules across the plane of cytokinesis in a high-throughput, objective, and internally controlled manner. Moreover the ability to perform high-resolution, temporal dissection of the cell division process lends itself perfectly to investigating the influence chemotherapeutic agents exert on the proliferative capacity of transformed cell lines. Here we describe the method in detail and its application to both ACD and general cell cycle analysis. PMID:27460238

  20. Highly Deviated Asymmetric Division in Very Low Proportion of Mycobacterial Mid-log Phase Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Mukkayyan, Nagaraja; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we show that about 20% of the septating Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium xenopi cells in the exponential phase populationdivideasymmetrically, with an unusually high deviation (17 ± 4%) in the division site from the median, to generate short cells and long cells, thereby generating population heterogeneity. This mode of division is very different from the symmetric division of themajority (about 80%) of the septating cells in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium marinum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG exponential phase population, with 5-10% deviation in the division site from the mid-cell site, as reported by recent studies. The short cells and the long cells further grew and divided to generate a population. We speculate that the generation of the short cells and the long cells through the highly deviated asymmetric divisionin the low proportions of mycobacterial population may have a role in stress tolerance. PMID:24949109

  1. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  2. Ability of fourteen chemical agents used in dental practice to induce chromosome aberrations in Syrian hamster embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Hikiba, Hirohito; Watanabe, Eiko; Barrett, J Carl; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2005-01-01

    To assess the genotoxicity of 14 chemical agents used in dental practice, the ability of these agents to induce chromosome aberrations was examined using Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Statistically significant increases in the frequencies of chromosome aberrations were induced in SHE cells treated with 7 of 10 chemical agents used as endodontic medicaments, that is, carbol camphor, m-cresol, eugenol, guaiacol, zinc oxide, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde. The other 3 chemical agents, that is, thymol, glutaraldehyde, and iodoform, did not increase the levels of chromosome aberrations. Of the 4 chemical agents that are used as an antiseptic on the oral mucosa, chromosome aberrations were induced by iodine, but not by the other 3 antiseptics, benzalkonium chloride, benzethonium chloride, and chlorhexidine. Among the 6 chemical agents exhibiting a negative response in the assay, only thymol induced chromosome aberrations in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation. Our results indicate that chemical agents having a positive response in the present study are potentially genotoxic to mammalian cells and need to be studied further in detail. PMID:15665446

  3. Aberrant cell cycle regulation in rat liver cells induced by post-initiation treatment with hepatocarcinogens/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoters.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Watanabe, Yousuke; Onda, Nobuhiko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to determine the onset time of hepatocarcinogen/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoter-specific cell proliferation, apoptosis and aberrant cell cycle regulation after post-initiation treatment. Six-week-old rats were treated with the genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, carbadox (CRB), the marginally hepatocarcinogenic leucomalachite green (LMG), the tumor promoter, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) or the non-carcinogenic hepatotoxicant, acetaminophen, for 2, 4 or 6 weeks during the post-initiation phase using a medium-term liver bioassay. Cell proliferation activity, expression of G2 to M phase- and spindle checkpoint-related molecules, and apoptosis were immunohistochemically analyzed at week 2 and 4, and tumor promotion activity was assessed at week 6. At week 2, hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific aberrant cell cycle regulation was not observed. At week 4, BNF and LMG increased cell proliferation together with hepatotoxicity, while CRB did not. Additionally, BNF and CRB reduced the number of cells expressing phosphorylated-histone H3 in both ubiquitin D (UBD)(+) cells and Ki-67(+) proliferating cells, suggesting development of spindle checkpoint dysfunction, regardless of cell proliferation activity. At week 6, examined hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increased preneoplastic hepatic foci expressing glutathione S-transferase placental form. These results suggest that some hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increase their toxicity after post-initiation treatment, causing regenerative cell proliferation. In contrast, some genotoxic hepatocarcinogens may disrupt the spindle checkpoint without facilitating cell proliferation at the early stage of tumor promotion. This suggests that facilitation of cell proliferation and disruption of spindle checkpoint function are induced by different mechanisms during hepatocarcinogenesis. Four weeks of post-initiation treatment may be sufficient to induce hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific cellular responses. PMID

  4. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  5. Arabidopsis  SABRE and CLASP interact to stabilize cell division plane orientation and planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Pietra, Stefano; Gustavsson, Anna; Kiefer, Christian; Kalmbach, Lothar; Hörstedt, Per; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Stepanova, Anna N.; Alonso, Jose M.; Grebe, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The orientation of cell division and the coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) contribute to shape diverse multicellular organisms. The root of Arabidopsis thaliana displays regularly oriented cell divisions, cell elongation and planar polarity providing a plant model system to study these processes. Here we report that the SABRE protein, which shares similarity with proteins of unknown function throughout eukaryotes, has important roles in orienting cell division and planar polarity. SABRE localizes at the plasma membrane, endomembranes, mitotic spindle and cell plate. SABRE stabilizes the orientation of CLASP-labelled preprophase band microtubules predicting the cell division plane, and of cortical microtubules driving cell elongation. During planar polarity establishment, sabre is epistatic to clasp at directing polar membrane domains of Rho-of-plant GTPases. Our findings mechanistically link SABRE to CLASP-dependent microtubule organization, shedding new light on the function of SABRE-related proteins in eukaryotes. PMID:24240534

  6. Control of cell growth, division and death: information processing in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Novak, Bela

    2014-01-01

    By way of surface receptor molecules and internal surveillance mechanisms, the living cell receives information about its external environment and internal state. In light of this information, the cell must determine its most appropriate course of action under the circumstances and initiate the relevant response pathways. Typical responses include growth and division, sexual reproduction, movement, differentiation and programmed cell death. Similar to a digital computer that uses bistable electrical switches to store and process information, the living cell uses bistable biochemical switches to implement its decision-making capabilities. In this review article, we describe some of the lines of thought that led, over the last 50 years, to our current understanding of cellular information processing, particularly related to cell growth, division and death. PMID:24904735

  7. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations. PMID:25482192

  8. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism Promotes Prostate Cancer: Role in Cell Survival under Hypoxia and Extracellular Vesicles Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deep, Gagan; Schlaepfer, Isabel R

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the leading malignancy among men in United States. Recent studies have focused on the identification of novel metabolic characteristics of PCa, aimed at devising better preventive and therapeutic approaches. PCa cells have revealed unique metabolic features such as higher expression of several enzymes associated with de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid up-take and β-oxidation. This aberrant lipid metabolism has been reported to be important for PCa growth, hormone-refractory progression and treatment resistance. Furthermore, PCa cells effectively use lipid metabolism under adverse environmental conditions for their survival advantage. Specifically, hypoxic cancer cells accumulate higher amount of lipids through a combination of metabolic alterations including high glutamine and fatty acid uptake, as well as decreased fatty acid oxidation. These stored lipids serve to protect cancer cells from oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and play important roles in fueling cancer cell proliferation following re-oxygenation. Lastly, cellular lipids have also been implicated in extracellular vesicle biogenesis, which play a vital role in intercellular communication. Overall, the new understanding of lipid metabolism in recent years has offered several novel targets to better target and manage clinical PCa. PMID:27384557

  9. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism Promotes Prostate Cancer: Role in Cell Survival under Hypoxia and Extracellular Vesicles Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Gagan; Schlaepfer, Isabel R.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the leading malignancy among men in United States. Recent studies have focused on the identification of novel metabolic characteristics of PCa, aimed at devising better preventive and therapeutic approaches. PCa cells have revealed unique metabolic features such as higher expression of several enzymes associated with de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid up-take and β-oxidation. This aberrant lipid metabolism has been reported to be important for PCa growth, hormone-refractory progression and treatment resistance. Furthermore, PCa cells effectively use lipid metabolism under adverse environmental conditions for their survival advantage. Specifically, hypoxic cancer cells accumulate higher amount of lipids through a combination of metabolic alterations including high glutamine and fatty acid uptake, as well as decreased fatty acid oxidation. These stored lipids serve to protect cancer cells from oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and play important roles in fueling cancer cell proliferation following re-oxygenation. Lastly, cellular lipids have also been implicated in extracellular vesicle biogenesis, which play a vital role in intercellular communication. Overall, the new understanding of lipid metabolism in recent years has offered several novel targets to better target and manage clinical PCa. PMID:27384557

  10. Light can rescue auxin-dependent synchrony of cell division in a tobacco cell line

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Fei; Petrášek, Jan; Nick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Pattern formation in plants has to cope with ambient variability and therefore must integrate environmental cues such as light. Synchrony of cell divisions was previously observed in cell files of tobacco suspension cultures, which represents a simple case of pattern formation. To develop cellular approaches for light-dependent patterning, light-responsive tobacco cell lines were screened from the cell line Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Virginia Bright Italia 0 (VBI-0). The light responsive and auxin-autonomous cell line VBI-3 was isolated. As in the progenitor line VBI-0, cell divisions are synchronized in VBI-3 during exponential growth phase. This synchrony can be inhibited by 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor, and this process was accompanied by the disassembly of actin filaments. However, the synchrony could be rescued when the cells were cultured under white light or with exogenous indolyl-3-acetic acid. The rescue was most efficient for continuous far-red light followed by continuous blue light, whereas continuous red light was least effective. These findings are discussed in the context of phytochrome-induced auxin biosynthesis and auxin-dependent synchrony of cell division. PMID:19884227

  11. Antioxidants in aqueous extract of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) suppress mitosis and cyclophosphamide-induced chromosomal aberrations in Allium cepa L. cells

    PubMed Central

    Akinboro, Akeem; Mohamed, Kamaruzaman Bin; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza; Sofiman, Othman Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    In this study, freeze-dried water extract from the leaves of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) was tested for mutagenic and antimutagenic potentials using the Allium cepa assay. Freeze-dried water extract alone and its combination with cyclophosphamide (CP) (50 mg/kg) were separately dissolved in tap water at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 mg/kg. Onions (A. cepa) were suspended in the solutions and controls for 48 h in the dark. Root tips were prepared for microscopic evaluation. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals’ scavenging power of the extract was tested using butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as standards. Water extract of Myristica fragrans scavenged free radicals better than BHA, but worse than BHT. The extract alone, as well as in combination with CP suppressed cell division, and induced chromosomal aberrations that were insignificantly different from the negative control (P≤0.05). However, cytotoxic and mutagenic actions of CP were considerably suppressed. The observed effects on cell division and chromosomes of A. cepa may be principally connected to the antioxidant properties of the extract. The obtained results suggest mitodepressive and antimutagenic potentials of water extract of the leaves of M. fragrans as desirable properties of a promising anticancer agent. PMID:22042656

  12. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations at Fluences of Less Than One HZE Particle per Cell Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J.; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high energy and charge (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells where irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with O (77 keV/ (long-s)m), Si (99 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (175 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (195 keV/ (long-s)m) or Fe (240 keV/ (long-s)m) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Non-linear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and non-linear dose response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblast irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by non-linear models motivated by a non-targeted effect (NTE). Best fits for the dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a NTE model for O and a linear response model fit best for Si and Fe particles. Additional evidence for NTE were found in low dose experiments measuring gamma-H2AX foci, a marker of double strand breaks (DSB), and split-dose experiments with human fibroblasts. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  13. Mitotic spindle rotation and mode of cell division in the developing telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Haydar, Tarik F; Ang, Eugenius; Rakic, Pasko

    2003-03-01

    The mode of neural stem cell division in the forebrain proliferative zones profoundly influences neocortical growth by regulating the number and diversity of neurons and glia. Long-term time-lapse multiphoton microscopy of embryonic mouse cortex reveals new details of the complex three-dimensional rotation and oscillation of the mitotic spindle before stem cell division. Importantly, the duration and amplitude of spindle movement predicts and specifies the eventual mode of mitotic division. These technological advances have provided dramatic data and insights into the kinetics of neural stem cell division by elucidating the involvement of spindle rotation in selection of the cleavage plane and the mode of neural stem cell division that together determine the size of the mammalian neocortex. PMID:12589023

  14. Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle 20.1 Is Required for Normal Meiotic Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Baixiao; Wang, Liudan; Ren, Ding; Ren, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Cell division requires proper spindle assembly; a surveillance pathway, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), monitors whether the spindle is normal and correctly attached to kinetochores. The SAC proteins regulate mitotic chromosome segregation by affecting CDC20 (Cell Division Cycle 20) function. However, it is unclear whether CDC20 regulates meiotic spindle assembly and proper homolog segregation. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CDC20.1 gene is indispensable for meiosis and male fertility. We demonstrate that cdc20.1 meiotic chromosomes align asynchronously and segregate unequally and the metaphase I spindle has aberrant morphology. Comparison of the distribution of meiotic stages at different time points between the wild type and cdc20.1 reveals a delay of meiotic progression from diakinesis to anaphase I. Furthermore, cdc20.1 meiocytes exhibit an abnormal distribution of a histone H3 phosphorylation mark mediated by the Aurora kinase, providing evidence that CDC20.1 regulates Aurora localization for meiotic chromosome segregation. Further evidence that CDC20.1 and Aurora are functionally related was provided by meiosis-specific knockdown of At-Aurora1 expression, resulting in meiotic chromosome segregation defects similar to those of cdc20.1. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role for CDC20.1 in SAC-dependent meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:26672070

  15. The equatorial position of the metaphase plate ensures symmetric cell divisions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chia Huei; Gasic, Ivana; Huber-Reggi, Sabina P; Dudka, Damian; Barisic, Marin; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome alignment in the middle of the bipolar spindle is a hallmark of metazoan cell divisions. When we offset the metaphase plate position by creating an asymmetric centriole distribution on each pole, we find that metaphase plates relocate to the middle of the spindle before anaphase. The spindle assembly checkpoint enables this centering mechanism by providing cells enough time to correct metaphase plate position. The checkpoint responds to unstable kinetochore-microtubule attachments resulting from an imbalance in microtubule stability between the two half-spindles in cells with an asymmetric centriole distribution. Inactivation of the checkpoint prior to metaphase plate centering leads to asymmetric cell divisions and daughter cells of unequal size; in contrast, if the checkpoint is inactivated after the metaphase plate has centered its position, symmetric cell divisions ensue. This indicates that the equatorial position of the metaphase plate is essential for symmetric cell divisions. PMID:26188083

  16. A plant cell division algorithm based on cell biomechanics and ellipse-fitting

    PubMed Central

    Abera, Metadel K.; Verboven, Pieter; Defraeye, Thijs; Fanta, Solomon Workneh; Hertog, Maarten L. A. T. M.; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolai, Bart M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The importance of cell division models in cellular pattern studies has been acknowledged since the 19th century. Most of the available models developed to date are limited to symmetric cell division with isotropic growth. Often, the actual growth of the cell wall is either not considered or is updated intermittently on a separate time scale to the mechanics. This study presents a generic algorithm that accounts for both symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells with isotropic and anisotropic growth. Actual growth of the cell wall is simulated simultaneously with the mechanics. Methods The cell is considered as a closed, thin-walled structure, maintained in tension by turgor pressure. The cell walls are represented as linear elastic elements that obey Hooke's law. Cell expansion is induced by turgor pressure acting on the yielding cell-wall material. A system of differential equations for the positions and velocities of the cell vertices as well as for the actual growth of the cell wall is established. Readiness to divide is determined based on cell size. An ellipse-fitting algorithm is used to determine the position and orientation of the dividing wall. The cell vertices, walls and cell connectivity are then updated and cell expansion resumes. Comparisons are made with experimental data from the literature. Key Results The generic plant cell division algorithm has been implemented successfully. It can handle both symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells coupled with isotropic and anisotropic growth modes. Development of the algorithm highlighted the importance of ellipse-fitting to produce randomness (biological variability) even in symmetrically dividing cells. Unlike previous models, a differential equation is formulated for the resting length of the cell wall to simulate actual biological growth and is solved simultaneously with the position and velocity of the vertices. Conclusions The algorithm presented can produce different

  17. Single cell lineage tracing reveals that oriented cell division contributes to trabecular morphogenesis and regional specification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Miao, Lianjie; Shieh, David; Spiotto, Ernest; Li, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Paul, Antoni; Schwartz, Robert J.; Firulli, Anthony B.; Singer, Harold A.; Huang, Guoying; Wu, Mingfu

    2016-01-01

    Summary The cardiac trabeculae are sheet-like structures extending from the myocardium that function to increase surface area. A lack of trabeculation causes embryonic lethality due to compromised cardiac function. To understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trabecular formation, we genetically labeled individual cardiomyocytes prior to trabeculation via the brainbow multicolor system, and traced and analyzed the labeled cells during trabeculation by whole-embryo clearing and imaging. The clones derived from labeled single cells displayed four different geometric patterns that are derived from different patterns of oriented cell division (OCD) and migration. Of the four types of clones, the inner, transmural, and mixed clones contributed to trabecular cardiomyocytes. Further studies showed that perpendicular OCD is an extrinsic asymmetric cell division that putatively contributes to trabecular regional specification. Furthermore, N-Cadherin deletion in labeled clones disrupted the clonal patterns. In summary, our data demonstrate that OCD contributes to trabecular morphogenesis and specification. PMID:27052172

  18. Aberrant Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Increased Adult Neurogenesis in Mice Lacking Chromatin Protein HMGB2

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Avanish S.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Aguirre, Adan; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) are distinct groups of cells found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Previously we determined that members of the High Mobility Group (HMG) B family of chromatin structural proteins modulate NSC proliferation and self-renewal. Among them HMGB2 was found to be dynamically expressed in proliferating and differentiating NSCs, suggesting that it may regulate NSC maintenance. We report now that Hmgb2−/− mice exhibit SVZ hyperproliferation, increased numbers of SVZ NSCs, and a trend towards aberrant increases in newly born neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) granule cell layer. Increases in the levels of the transcription factor p21 and the Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), along with down-regulation of the transcription/pluripotency factor Oct4 in the Hmgb2−/− SVZ point to a possible pathway for this increased proliferation/differentiation. Our findings suggest that HMGB2 functions as a modulator of neurogenesis in young adult mice through regulation of NSC proliferation, and identify a potential target via which CNS repair could be amplified following trauma or disease-based neuronal degeneration. PMID:24391977

  19. Apoptosis-Like Cell Death Induction and Aberrant Fibroblast Properties in Human Incisional Hernia Fascia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Ramon; Quiles, Maria T.; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Lopez-Cano, Manuel; Huguet, Pere; Ramon-y-Cajal, Santiago; Reventos, Jaume; Armengol, Manel; Arbos, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Incisional hernia often occurs following laparotomy and can be a source of serious problems. Although there is evidence that a biological cause may underlie its development, the mechanistic link between the local tissue microenvironment and tissue rupture is lacking. In this study, we used matched tissue-based and in vitro primary cell culture systems to examine the possible involvement of fascia fibroblasts in incisional hernia pathogenesis. Fascia biopsies were collected at surgery from incisional hernia patients and non-incisional hernia controls. Tissue samples were analyzed by histology and immunoblotting methods. Fascia primary fibroblast cultures were assessed at morphological, ultrastructural, and functional levels. We document tissue and fibroblast loss coupled to caspase-3 activation and induction of apoptosis-like cell-death mechanisms in incisional hernia fascia. Alterations in cytoskeleton organization and solubility were also observed. Incisional hernia fibroblasts showed a consistent phenotype throughout early passages in vitro, which was characterized by significantly enhanced cell proliferation and migration, reduced adhesion, and altered cytoskeleton properties, as compared to non-incisional hernia fibroblasts. Moreover, incisional hernia fibroblasts displayed morphological and ultrastructural alterations compatible with autophagic processes or lysosomal dysfunction, together with enhanced sensitivity to proapoptotic challenges. Overall, these data suggest an ongoing complex interplay of cell death induction, aberrant fibroblast function, and tissue loss in incisional hernia fascia, which may significantly contribute to altered matrix maintenance and tissue rupture in vivo. PMID:21641387

  20. Effect of the Min System on Timing of Cell Division in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shuxin; Keilberg, Daniela; Hot, Edina; Thanbichler, Martin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Lenz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the Min protein system plays an important role in positioning the division site. We show that this system also has an effect on timing of cell division. We do this in a quantitative way by measuring the cell division waiting time (defined as time difference between appearance of a division site and the division event) and the Z-ring existence time. Both quantities are found to be different in WT and cells without functional Min system. We develop a series of theoretical models whose predictions are compared with the experimental findings. Continuous improvement leads to a final model that is able to explain all relevant experimental observations. In particular, it shows that the chromosome segregation defect caused by the absence of Min proteins has an important influence on timing of cell division. Our results indicate that the Min system affects the septum formation rate. In the absence of the Min proteins this rate is reduced, leading to the observed strongly randomized cell division events and the longer division waiting times. PMID:25090009

  1. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape

    PubMed Central

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-01-01

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype. PMID:26515603

  2. Cell Division and Targeted Cell Cycle Arrest Opens and Stabilizes Basement Membrane Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Matus, David Q.; Chang, Emily; Makohon-Moore, Sasha C.; Hagedorn, Mary A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Large gaps in basement membrane (BM) occur during organ remodeling and cancer cell invasion. Whether dividing cells, which temporarily reduce their attachment to BM, influence these breaches is unknown. Here we analyse uterine-vulval attachment during development across 21 species of rhabditid nematodes and find that the BM gap that forms between these organs is always bounded by a non-dividing vulval cell. Through cell cycle manipulation and live cell imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that actively dividing vulval cells facilitate enlargement of this breach by promoting BM movement. In contrast, targeted cell-cycle arrest halts BM movement and limits gap opening. Further, we demonstrate that the BM component laminin accumulates at the BM gap edge and promotes increased integrin levels in non-dividing vulval cells, stabilizing gap position. Together, these studies reveal that cell division can be used as a mechanism to regulate BM breaches, thus controlling the exchange of cells between tissues. PMID:24924309

  3. Genomic aberrations in squamous cell lung carcinoma related to lymph node or distant metastasis.

    PubMed

    Boelens, Mirjam C; Kok, Klaas; van der Vlies, Pieter; van der Vries, Gerben; Sietsma, Hannie; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S; Groen, Harry J M; van den Berg, Anke

    2009-12-01

    About 50% of patients presenting with resectable lung cancer develop distant metastases within 5 years. Genomic markers predicting metastatic behaviour of squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC) are currently underexposed. We analyzed a cohort of patients with primary SCC using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify which genomic aberrations are related to metastatic behaviour. The cohort consisted of 34 patients with a follow-up of at least 5 years, 8 with metastases in regional lymph nodes only and 26 patients without any metastases at the time of surgery. Eleven of the latter 26 developed metastases in distant organs within 3 years after surgery. Copy number changes observed in at least 40% of all SCC included gains at chromosomal arms 3q, 5p, 8q, 19q, 20p, 22q and losses at 3p, 4p, 4q, 5q, 8p and 9p. High copy number amplifications were observed at 2p15-p16, 3q24-q29, 8p11-p12, 8q23-q24, and 12p12, containing candidate oncogenes such as BCL11A, REL, ECT2, PIK3CA, ADAM9, MYC and KRAS. Amplification of 2p15-p16 is a novel finding in SCC. Another novel finding is the homozygous deletion observed at 4q33-34.1 in 15% of the SCC cases. Gains at 7q36, 8p12, 10q22, 12p12, loss at 4p14 and the homozygous deletions at 4q occurred significantly more frequent in SCC from patients with lymph node metastases only. SCC from patients with distant metastases showed a significantly higher gain frequency at 8q22-q24 and loss at 8p23 and 13q21, and a significantly lower gain frequency at 2p12 and 2p16 and loss at 11q25 compared with SCC from patients without metastases. Of these, gains at 7q, 8p and 10q were restricted to SCC with lymph node metastasis and gain at 8q was restricted to patients with distant metastasis. Two genomic aberrations, i.e. loss of 4p and gain of 19q12 were observed more frequently in SCC with only lymph node metastases as compared to SCC with distant metastases. In conclusion, we identified genomic aberrations in primary SCC that were

  4. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization

    PubMed Central

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. PMID:26903973

  5. Evaluation of rapid cell division in non-uniform cell cycles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juyun; Jeon, Wonju; Chang, Man; Han, Myung-Soo

    2015-10-01

    To better understand the mechanisms of development of harmful algal blooms (HABs), accurate estimates of species-specific in situ growth rates are needed. HABs are caused by rapid cell division by the causative microorganisms. To accurately estimate the in situ growth rates of harmful algae having non-uniform and/or irregular cell cycles, we modified a standard equation based on the cell cycle, and calculated the in situ growth rate to describe the process of bloom development in nature. Sampling of a developing bloom of Heterosigma akashiwo in Pohang Bay, Korea, was conducted every 3 h from 15:00 on August 2 to 07:00 on August 4, 2006. The amount of H. akashiwo DNA was measured using flow cytometry following tyramide signal amplification-fluorescence in situ hybridization. On August 2, the percentage of G1 phase cells decreased from 15:00 to 19:00 then increased until 22:00; it then decreased until 07:00 on August 3, followed by an increase to 10:00. This indicates the ability of the cells in nature to undergo more than one round of division per day. During the following night two rounds of division did not occur. The in situ growth rates estimated using the modified equation ranged from 0.31 to 0.53 d(-1) . We conclude that the use of this equation enables more accurate estimates of bloom formation by rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26175341

  6. Genome-scale RNAi profiling of cell division in human tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Kittler, Ralf; Pelletier, Laurence; Heninger, Anne-Kristine; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Theis, Mirko; Miroslaw, Lukasz; Poser, Ina; Lawo, Steffen; Grabner, Hannes; Kozak, Karol; Wagner, Jan; Surendranath, Vineeth; Richter, Constance; Bowen, Wayne; Jackson, Aimee L; Habermann, Bianca; Hyman, Anthony A; Buchholz, Frank

    2007-12-01

    Cell division is fundamental for all organisms. Here we report a genome-scale RNA-mediated interference screen in HeLa cells designed to identify human genes that are important for cell division. We have used a library of endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNAs for gene silencing and have used DNA content analysis to identify genes that induced cell cycle arrest or altered ploidy on silencing. Validation and secondary assays were performed to generate a nine-parameter loss-of-function phenoprint for each of the genes. These phenotypic signatures allowed the assignment of genes to specific functional classes by combining hierarchical clustering, cross-species analysis and proteomic data mining. We highlight the richness of our dataset by ascribing novel functions to genes in mitosis and cytokinesis. In particular, we identify two evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory networks that govern cytokinesis. Our work provides an experimental framework from which the systematic analysis of novel genes necessary for cell division in human cells can begin. PMID:17994010

  7. Genome aberrations in canine mammary carcinomas and their detection in cell-free plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Beck, Julia; Hennecke, Silvia; Bornemann-Kolatzki, Kirsten; Urnovitz, Howard B; Neumann, Stephan; Ströbel, Philipp; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Mammary tumors are the most frequent cancers in female dogs exhibiting a variety of histopathological differences. There is lack of knowledge about the genomes of these common dog tumors. Five tumors of three different histological subtypes were evaluated. Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) was performed in comparison to the respective somatic genome of each animal. Copy number and structural aberrations were validated using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Using mate-pair sequencing chromosomal aneuploidies were found in two tumors, frequent smaller deletions were found in one, inter-chromosomal fusions in one other, whereas one tumor was almost normal. These aberrations affect several known cancer associated genes such as cMYC, and KIT. One common deletion of the proximal end of CFA27, harboring the tumor suppressor gene PFDN5 was detected in four tumors. Using ddPCR, this deletion was validated and detected in 50% of tumors (N = 20). Breakpoint specific dPCRs were established for four tumors and tumor specific cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was detected in the plasma. In one animal tumor-specific cfDNA was found >1 year after surgery, attributable to a lung metastasis. Paired-end sequencing proved that copy-number imbalances of the tumor are reflected by the cfDNA. This report on chromosomal instability of canine mammary cancers reveals similarities to human breast cancers as well as special canine alterations. This animal model provides a framework for using MPS for screening for individual cancer biomarkers with cost effective confirmation and monitoring using ddPCR. The possibility exists that ddPCR can be expanded to screening for common cancer related variants. PMID:24098698

  8. Genome Aberrations in Canine Mammary Carcinomas and Their Detection in Cell-Free Plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Julia; Hennecke, Silvia; Bornemann-Kolatzki, Kirsten; Urnovitz, Howard B.; Neumann, Stephan; Ströbel, Philipp; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Mammary tumors are the most frequent cancers in female dogs exhibiting a variety of histopathological differences. There is lack of knowledge about the genomes of these common dog tumors. Five tumors of three different histological subtypes were evaluated. Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) was performed in comparison to the respective somatic genome of each animal. Copy number and structural aberrations were validated using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Using mate-pair sequencing chromosomal aneuploidies were found in two tumors, frequent smaller deletions were found in one, inter-chromosomal fusions in one other, whereas one tumor was almost normal. These aberrations affect several known cancer associated genes such as cMYC, and KIT. One common deletion of the proximal end of CFA27, harboring the tumor suppressor gene PFDN5 was detected in four tumors. Using ddPCR, this deletion was validated and detected in 50% of tumors (N = 20). Breakpoint specific dPCRs were established for four tumors and tumor specific cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was detected in the plasma. In one animal tumor-specific cfDNA was found >1 year after surgery, attributable to a lung metastasis. Paired-end sequencing proved that copy-number imbalances of the tumor are reflected by the cfDNA. This report on chromosomal instability of canine mammary cancers reveals similarities to human breast cancers as well as special canine alterations. This animal model provides a framework for using MPS for screening for individual cancer biomarkers with cost effective confirmation and monitoring using ddPCR. The possibility exists that ddPCR can be expanded to screening for common cancer related variants. PMID:24098698

  9. Protein expression profile of celiac disease patient with aberrant T cell by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    De Re, Valli; Simula, Maria Paola; Caggiari, Laura; Ortz, Nicoletta; Spina, Michele; Da Ponte, Alessandro; De Appolonia, Leandro; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Cannizzaro, Renato

    2007-08-01

    One complication of celiac disease (CD) is refractory CD. These patients frequently show aberrant intraepithelial T cell clones and an increasing risk of evolution into enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL). There is debate in the literature whether these cases are actually a smoldering lymphoma from the outset. The mechanism inducing T cell proliferation and prognosis remains unknown. Recently, alemtuzumab has been proposed as a promising new approach to treat these patients. Only few single cases have been tested presently, nevertheless, in all of them a clinical improvement has been observed, while intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) effectively targeted by alemtuzumab are still a debated issue. Using 2D-DIGE, we found hyperexpressed proteins specifically associated with aberrant T cell in a patient with CD by comparing the protein expression with that of patients with CD and polyclonal T cell or with that of control subjects (patients with polyclonal T cell and no CD). Proteins with a higher expression in duodenal biopsy of the patient with aberrant T cell were identified as IgM, apolipoprotein C-III, and Charcot-Leyden crystal proteins. These preliminary data allow hypothesizing different clinical effects of alemtuzumab in patients with CD, since besides the probable effect of alemtuzumab on T cell, it could effect inflammatory-associated CD52(+) IgM(+)B cell and eosinophils cells, known to produce IgM and Charcot-Leyden crystal proteins, which we demonstrated to be altered in this patient. Results also emphasize the possible association of apolipoprotein with aberrant T cell proliferation. PMID:17785332

  10. Bacterial cell division: a moving MinE sweeper boggles the MinD.

    PubMed

    Margolin, W

    2001-05-15

    Placement of the division site in Escherichia coli is determined in part by three Min proteins. Recent studies have shown that MinE, previously thought to form a static ring near the division site at the midcell position, actually joins MinC and MinD in their rapid oscillation between the cell poles. PMID:11378404

  11. Stem and progenitor cell division kinetics during postnatal mouse mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Giraddi, Rajshekhar R; Shehata, Mona; Gallardo, Mercedes; Blasco, Maria A; Simons, Benjamin D; Stingl, John

    2015-01-01

    The cycling properties of mammary stem and progenitor cells is not well understood. To determine the division properties of these cells, we administered synthetic nucleosides for varying periods of time to mice at different stages of postnatal development and monitored the rate of uptake of these nucleosides in the different mammary cell compartments. Here we show that most cell division in the adult virgin gland is restricted to the oestrogen receptor-expressing luminal cell lineage. Our data also demonstrate that the oestrogen receptor-expressing, milk and basal cell subpopulations have telomere lengths and cell division kinetics that are not compatible with these cells being hierarchically organized; instead, our data indicate that in the adult homeostatic gland, each cell type is largely maintained by its own restricted progenitors. We also observe that transplantable stem cells are largely quiescent during oestrus, but are cycling during dioestrus when progesterone levels are high. PMID:26511661

  12. Cell division plane orientation based on tensile stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Louveaux, Marion; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2016-07-26

    Cell geometry has long been proposed to play a key role in the orientation of symmetric cell division planes. In particular, the recently proposed Besson-Dumais rule generalizes Errera's rule and predicts that cells divide along one of the local minima of plane area. However, this rule has been tested only on tissues with rather local spherical shape and homogeneous growth. Here, we tested the application of the Besson-Dumais rule to the divisions occurring in the Arabidopsis shoot apex, which contains domains with anisotropic curvature and differential growth. We found that the Besson-Dumais rule works well in the central part of the apex, but fails to account for cell division planes in the saddle-shaped boundary region. Because curvature anisotropy and differential growth prescribe directional tensile stress in that region, we tested the putative contribution of anisotropic stress fields to cell division plane orientation at the shoot apex. To do so, we compared two division rules: geometrical (new plane along the shortest path) and mechanical (new plane along maximal tension). The mechanical division rule reproduced the enrichment of long planes observed in the boundary region. Experimental perturbation of mechanical stress pattern further supported a contribution of anisotropic tensile stress in division plane orientation. Importantly, simulations of tissues growing in an isotropic stress field, and dividing along maximal tension, provided division plane distributions comparable to those obtained with the geometrical rule. We thus propose that division plane orientation by tensile stress offers a general rule for symmetric cell division in plants. PMID:27436908

  13. Cell division plane orientation based on tensile stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Louveaux, Marion; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cell geometry has long been proposed to play a key role in the orientation of symmetric cell division planes. In particular, the recently proposed Besson–Dumais rule generalizes Errera’s rule and predicts that cells divide along one of the local minima of plane area. However, this rule has been tested only on tissues with rather local spherical shape and homogeneous growth. Here, we tested the application of the Besson–Dumais rule to the divisions occurring in the Arabidopsis shoot apex, which contains domains with anisotropic curvature and differential growth. We found that the Besson–Dumais rule works well in the central part of the apex, but fails to account for cell division planes in the saddle-shaped boundary region. Because curvature anisotropy and differential growth prescribe directional tensile stress in that region, we tested the putative contribution of anisotropic stress fields to cell division plane orientation at the shoot apex. To do so, we compared two division rules: geometrical (new plane along the shortest path) and mechanical (new plane along maximal tension). The mechanical division rule reproduced the enrichment of long planes observed in the boundary region. Experimental perturbation of mechanical stress pattern further supported a contribution of anisotropic tensile stress in division plane orientation. Importantly, simulations of tissues growing in an isotropic stress field, and dividing along maximal tension, provided division plane distributions comparable to those obtained with the geometrical rule. We thus propose that division plane orientation by tensile stress offers a general rule for symmetric cell division in plants. PMID:27436908

  14. Noise and Epigenetic Inheritance of Single-Cell Division Times Influence Population Fitness.

    PubMed

    Cerulus, Bram; New, Aaron M; Pougach, Ksenia; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-05-01

    The fitness effect of biological noise remains unclear. For example, even within clonal microbial populations, individual cells grow at different speeds. Although it is known that the individuals' mean growth speed can affect population-level fitness, it is unclear how or whether growth speed heterogeneity itself is subject to natural selection. Here, we show that noisy single-cell division times can significantly affect population-level growth rate. Using time-lapse microscopy to measure the division times of thousands of individual S. cerevisiae cells across different genetic and environmental backgrounds, we find that the length of individual cells' division times can vary substantially between clonal individuals and that sublineages often show epigenetic inheritance of division times. By combining these experimental measurements with mathematical modeling, we find that, for a given mean division time, increasing heterogeneity and epigenetic inheritance of division times increases the population growth rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the heterogeneity and epigenetic inheritance of single-cell division times can be linked with variation in the expression of catabolic genes. Taken together, our results reveal how a change in noisy single-cell behaviors can directly influence fitness through dynamics that operate independently of effects caused by changes to the mean. These results not only allow a better understanding of microbial fitness but also help to more accurately predict fitness in other clonal populations, such as tumors. PMID:27068419

  15. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to High and Low LET Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Wilkins, R.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2006-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, high energy neutron at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) or Cs-137-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center. After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The results of the mBAND study showed a higher ratio of inversion involved with interchromosomal exchange in heavy ions compared to -ray irradiation. Analysis of chromosome aberrations using mBAND has the potential to provide useful information on human cell response to space-like radiation.

  16. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  17. The WD40 repeat protein NEDD1 functions in microtubule organization during cell division in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zeng, C J Tracy; Lee, Y-R Julie; Liu, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Although cells of flowering plants lack a structurally defined microtubule-organizing center like the centrosome, organization of the spindles and phragmoplasts in mitosis is known to involve the evolutionarily conserved gamma-tubulin complex. We have investigated the function of Arabidopsis thaliana NEDD1, a WD40 repeat protein related to the animal NEDD1/GCP-WD protein, which interacts with the gamma-tubulin complex. The NEDD1 protein decorates spindle microtubules (MTs) preferentially toward spindle poles and phragmoplast MTs toward their minus ends. A T-DNA insertional allele of the single NEDD1 gene was isolated and maintained in heterozygous sporophytes, and NEDD1's function in cell division was analyzed in haploid microspores produced by the heterozygote. In approximately half of the dividing microspores exhibiting aberrant MT organization, spindles were no longer restricted to the cell periphery and became abnormally elongated. After mitosis, MTs aggregated between reforming nuclei but failed to appear in a bipolar configuration. Consequently, defective microspores did not form a continuous cell plate, and two identical nuclei were produced with no differentiation into generative and vegetative cells. Our results support the notion that the plant NEDD1 homolog plays a critical role in MT organization during mitosis, and its function is likely linked to that of the gamma-tubulin complex. PMID:19383896

  18. Cytogenetic profiles in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a study in highly purified aberrant plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Rasillo, Ana; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Sayagués, José Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Bárcena, Paloma; Sanchez, María Luz; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in clonal plasma cell disorders have mainly been done in whole bone marrow or CD138+ microbead-enriched plasma cells and suggest that recurrent immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations - e.g. t(4;14) -are primary oncogenetic events. The aim of this study was to determine cytogenetic patterns of highly purified aberrant plasma cells (median purity ≥98%) in different clonal plasma cell disorders. We analyzed aberrant plasma cells from 208 patients with multiple myeloma (n=148) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=60) for the presence of del(13q14), del(17p13) and t(14q32) using multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene arrangements were analyzed and complementarity determining region 3 was sequenced in a subset of patients and combined multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunofluorescent protein staining analyses were performed in selected cases to confirm clonality and cytogenetic findings. At diagnosis, 96% of cases with multiple myeloma versus 77% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases showed at least one cytogenetic alteration and/or hyperdiploidy. The cytogenetic heterogeneity of individual cases reflected coexistence of cytogenetically-defined aberrant plasma cell clones, and led to the assumption that karyotypic alterations were acquired stepwise. Cases of multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance frequently showed different but related cytogenetic profiles when other cytogenetic alterations such as deletions/gains of the immunoglobulin heavy chain or the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 were additionally considered. Interestingly, in 24% of multiple myeloma versus 62% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients with an immunoglobulin heavy chain translocation, aberrant plasma cells with and without t(14q32) coexisted in the same patient. Our data suggest that

  19. Generalized time-dependent model of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in normal and repair-deficient human cells.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Artem L; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a model that can simulate the yield of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair-deficient cells. The model predicts the kinetics of chromosomal aberration formation after exposure in the G₀/G₁ phase of the cell cycle to either low- or high-LET radiation. A previously formulated model based on a stochastic Monte Carlo approach was updated to consider the time dependence of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair (proper or improper), and different cell types were assigned different kinetics of DSB repair. The distribution of the DSB free ends was derived from a mechanistic model that takes into account the structure of chromatin and DSB clustering from high-LET radiation. The kinetics of chromosomal aberration formation were derived from experimental data on DSB repair kinetics in normal and repair-deficient cell lines. We assessed different types of chromosomal aberrations with the focus on simple and complex exchanges, and predicted the DSB rejoining kinetics and misrepair probabilities for different cell types. The results identify major cell-dependent factors, such as a greater yield of chromosome misrepair in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells and slower rejoining in Nijmegen (NBS) cells relative to the wild-type. The model's predictions suggest that two mechanisms could exist for the inefficiency of DSB repair in AT and NBS cells, one that depends on the overall speed of joining (either proper or improper) of DNA broken ends, and another that depends on geometric factors, such as the Euclidian distance between DNA broken ends, which influences the relative frequency of misrepair. PMID:24611656

  20. Metabolic maintenance of cell asymmetry following division in activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Verbist, Katherine C; Guy, Cliff S; Milasta, Sandra; Liedmann, Swantje; Kamiński, Marcin M; Wang, Ruoning; Green, Douglas R

    2016-04-21

    Asymmetric cell division, the partitioning of cellular components in response to polarizing cues during mitosis, has roles in differentiation and development. It is important for the self-renewal of fertilized zygotes in Caenorhabditis elegans and neuroblasts in Drosophila, and in the development of mammalian nervous and digestive systems. T lymphocytes, upon activation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), can undergo asymmetric cell division, wherein the daughter cell proximal to the APC is more likely to differentiate into an effector-like T cell and the distal daughter is more likely to differentiate into a memory-like T cell. Upon activation and before cell division, expression of the transcription factor c-Myc drives metabolic reprogramming, necessary for the subsequent proliferative burst. Here we find that during the first division of an activated T cell in mice, c-Myc can sort asymmetrically. Asymmetric distribution of amino acid transporters, amino acid content, and activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is correlated with c-Myc expression, and both amino acids and mTORC1 activity sustain the differences in c-Myc expression in one daughter cell compared to the other. Asymmetric c-Myc levels in daughter T cells affect proliferation, metabolism, and differentiation, and these effects are altered by experimental manipulation of mTORC1 activity or c-Myc expression. Therefore, metabolic signalling pathways cooperate with transcription programs to maintain differential cell fates following asymmetric T-cell division. PMID:27064903

  1. Microdissection studies on the polarity of unequal division in grasshopper neuroblasts. I. Subsequent divisions in neuroblast-type cells produced against the polarity by micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Yamashiki, N; Kawamura, K

    1986-09-01

    Equal or unequal division against the polarity of normal division was induced in grasshopper neuroblasts by means of a microdissection technique. The subsequent cell divisions were traced in order to analyse the factors that determine the polarity. Daughter cells of two types (neuroblast-type and ganglion cell type) were produced by operations in which the mitotic apparatus was rotated or shifted. Cell types were classified by such characteristics as nuclear shape, mitotic activity, and inequality or equality of the subsequent cytokinesis. It became evident that the fate of daughter cells was determined simply by the cytoplasmic volume. In 27 cases out of 40 microdissecting operations, both sister cells were recognized as of neuroblast type. Mitosis of these neuroblast-type sister cells proceeded asynchronously. The time required for neuroblast-type cells to reach metaphase of the second division depended on their volume. It is considered that the polarity of unequal division in grasshopper neuroblasts may be maintained by a joint action of the cap cells attaching to one of the polar regions of the cell and the cortex differentiated in the previous cell division. PMID:3743651

  2. Influence of radiofrequency radiation on chromosome aberrations in CHO cells and its interaction with DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Kerbacher, J J; Meltz, M L; Erwin, D N

    1990-09-01

    A limited number of contradictory reports have appeared in the literature about the ability of radiofrequency (rf) radiation to induce chromosome aberrations in different biological systems. The technical documentation associated with such reports is often absent or deficient. In addition, no information is available as to whether any additional genotoxic hazard would result from a simultaneous exposure of mammalian cells to rf radiation and a chemical which (by itself) induces chromosome aberrations. In the work described, we have therefore tested two hypotheses. The first is that rf radiation by itself, at power densities and exposure conditions which are higher than is consistent with accepted safety guidelines, can induce chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells. The second is that, during a simultaneous exposure to a chemical known to be genotoxic, rf radiation can affect molecules, biochemical processes, or cellular organelles, and thus result in an increase or decrease in chromosome aberrations. Mitomycin C (MMC) and Adriamycin (ADR) were selected because they act by different mechanisms, and because they might put normal cells at risk during combined-modality rf radiation (hyperthermia)-chemotherapy treatment of cancer. The studies were performed with suitable 37 degrees C and equivalent convection heating-temperature controls in a manner designed to discriminate between any thermal and possible nonthermal action. Radiofrequency exposures were conducted for 2 h under conditions resulting in measurable heating (a maximum increase of 3.2 degrees C), with pulsed-wave rf radiation at a frequency of 2450 MHz and an average net forward power of 600 W, resulting in an SAR of 33.8 W/kg. Treatments with MMC or ADR were for a total of 2.5 h and encompassed the 2-h rf radiation exposure period. The CHO cells from each of the conditions were subsequently analyzed for chromosome aberrations. In cells exposed to rf radiation alone, and where a maximum temperature of

  3. Growth rate of late passage sarcoma cells is independent of epigenetic events but dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Becerikli, Mustafa; Jacobsen, Frank; Rittig, Andrea; Köhne, Wiebke; Nambiar, Sandeep; Mirmohammadsadegh, Alireza; Stricker, Ingo; Tannapfel, Andrea; Wieczorek, Stefan; Epplen, Joerg Thomas; Tilkorn, Daniel; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2013-07-15

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are characterized by co-participation of several epigenetic and genetic events during tumorigenesis. Having bypassed cellular senescence barriers during oncogenic transformation, the factors further affecting growth rate of STS cells remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of gene silencing (DNA promoter methylation of LINE-1, PTEN), genetic aberrations (karyotype, KRAS and BRAF mutations) as well as their contribution to the proliferation rate and migratory potential that underlies “initial” and “final” passage sarcoma cells. Three different cell lines were used, SW982 (synovial sarcoma), U2197 (malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) and HT1080 (fibrosarcoma). Increased proliferative potential of final passage STS cells was not associated with significant differences in methylation (LINE-1, PTEN) and mutation status (KRAS, BRAF), but it was dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that these fairly differentiated/advanced cancer cell lines have still the potential to gain an additional spontaneous growth benefit without external influences and that maintenance of increased proliferative potential towards longevity of STS cells (having crossed senescence barriers) may be independent of overt epigenetic alterations. -- Highlights: Increased proliferative potential of late passage STS cells was: • Not associated with epigenetic changes (methylation changes at LINE-1, PTEN). • Not associated with mutation status of KRAS, BRAF. • Dependent on presence/absence of chromosomal aberrations.

  4. Cadmium chloride strongly enhances cyclophosphamide-induced chromosome aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pandurangarao, V.L.; Blazina, S.; Bherje, R.

    1997-10-01

    Earlier we reported that a single 5 mg cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2})/kg ip dose enhanced chromosome aberrations (ca) with 50 mg/kg cyclophosphamide (CP) in mouse bone marrow cells. In this report groups of 4 mice were injected ip with saline, 0.31, 0.62, 1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg CdCl{sub 2}, followed by saline injections at 24 h. Other mice similarly uninjected at 0 h were injected with 50 mg/kg CP at 24 h. All the mice were injected ip with 4 mg colchicine/kg at 44 h. At 48 h the bone marrow cells were processed for chromosome spreads. After dissection, visual examination revealed obvious internal hemorrhaging of the testes at 1.25 CdCl{sub 2} mg/kg and higher doses. This effect was not further increased by CP treatment. The lowest ca enhancing dose of CdCl{sub 2} on CP was 0.625 mg/kg. Our hypothesis is that Cd replaces zinc presents in numerous DNA repair enzymes and proteins resulting in diminished repair. Subsequently, the excess of unrepaired DNA damage is seen as chromatid breaks, deletions, fragments and exchanges.

  5. A recurrent pattern of chromosomal aberrations and immunophenotypic appearance defines anal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Heselmeyer, K.; du Manoir, S.; Blegen, H.; Friberg, B.; Svensson, C.; Schröck, E.; Veldman, T.; Shah, K.; Auer, G.; Ried, T.

    1997-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the anus are rare neoplasias that account for about 3% of large bowel tumours. Infections with human papillomaviruses are frequently detected in these cancers, suggesting that pathogenic pathways in anal carcinomas and in carcinomas of the uterine cervix are similar. Little is known regarding recurrent chromosomal aberrations in this subgroup of squamous cell carcinomas. We have applied comparative genomic hybridization to identify chromosomal gains and losses in 23 cases of anal carcinomas. A non-random copy number increase of chromosomes 17 and 19, and chromosome arm 3q was observed. Consistent losses were mapped to chromosome arms 4p, 11q, 13q and 18q. A majority of the tumours were aneuploid, and most of them showed increased proliferative activity as determined by staining for Ki-67 antigen. p53 expression was low or undetectable, and expression of p21/WAF-1 was increased in most tumours. Sixteen cancers were satisfactorily tested for the presence of HPV by consensus L1-primer polymerase chain reaction; nine were HPV positive, of which eight were positive for HPV 16. Images Figure 2 PMID:9374370

  6. Wnt and the Cancer Niche: Paracrine Interactions with Gastrointestinal Cancer Cells Undergoing Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Ray, Satyajit; Kim, Bo-Kyu; Koizumi, Tomotake; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Hari, Danielle; Mullinax, John E.; Jaiswal, Kshama R.; Garfield, Susan H.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Stem-like cancer cells contribute to cancer initiation and maintenance. Stem cells can self-renew by asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD with non-random chromosomal cosegregation (ACD-NRCC) is one possible self-renewal mechanism. There is a paucity of evidence supporting ACD-NRCC in human cancer. Our aim was to investigate ACD-NRCC and its potential interactions with the cancer niche (microenvironment) in gastrointestinal cancers. Design: We used DNA double and single labeling approaches with FACS to isolate live cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Results: Gastrointestinal cancers contain rare subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. ACD-NRCC was detected preferentially in subpopulations of cells previously suggested to be stem-like/tumor-initiating cancer cells. ACD-NRCC was independent of cell-to-cell contact, and was regulated by the cancer niche in a heat-sensitive paracrine fashion. Wnt pathway genes and proteins are differentially expressed in cells undergoing ACD-NRCC vs. symmetric cell division. Blocking the Wnt pathway with IWP2 (WNT antagonist) or siRNA-TCF4 resulted in suppression of ACD-NRCC. However, using a Wnt-agonist did not increase the relative proportion of cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Conclusion: Gastrointestinal cancers contain subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. Here we show for the first time that ACD-NRCC can be regulated by the Wnt pathway, and by the cancer niche in a paracrine fashion. However, whether ACD-NRCC is exclusively associated with stem-like cancer cells remains to be determined. Further study of these findings might generate novel insights into stem cell and cancer biology. Targeting the mechanism of ACD-NRCC might engender novel approaches for cancer therapy. PMID:23901343

  7. High- and low-LET Radiation-induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured in 3-dimensional Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2008-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts who participate in extended ISS missions and will be an even greater concern for future manned lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D in vitro cellular environment can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultured at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected in the first cell cycle after irradiation using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference in the

  8. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration. PMID:26487778

  9. Fatostatin Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation by Affecting Mitotic Microtubule Spindle Assembly and Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Gholkar, Ankur A; Cheung, Keith; Williams, Kevin J; Lo, Yu-Chen; Hamideh, Shadia A; Nnebe, Chelsea; Khuu, Cindy; Bensinger, Steven J; Torres, Jorge Z

    2016-08-12

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors have become attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition in the treatment of metabolic diseases and cancer. SREBPs are critical for the production and metabolism of lipids and cholesterol, which are essential for cellular homeostasis and cell proliferation. Fatostatin was recently discovered as a specific inhibitor of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which is required for SREBP activation. Fatostatin possesses antitumor properties including the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and it arrests cancer cells in G2/M phase. Although Fatostatin has been viewed as an antitumor agent due to its inhibition of SREBP and its effect on lipid metabolism, we show that Fatostatin's anticancer properties can also be attributed to its inhibition of cell division. We analyzed the effect of SREBP activity inhibitors including Fatostatin, PF-429242, and Betulin on the cell cycle and determined that only Fatostatin possessed antimitotic properties. Fatostatin inhibited tubulin polymerization, arrested cells in mitosis, activated the spindle assembly checkpoint, and triggered mitotic catastrophe and reduced cell viability. Thus Fatostatin's ability to inhibit SREBP activity and cell division could prove beneficial in treating aggressive types of cancers such as glioblastomas that have elevated lipid metabolism and fast proliferation rates and often develop resistance to current anticancer therapies. PMID:27378817

  10. Gender differences in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations in rodent germ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, Ilse-Dore; Carere, Angelo; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2007-05-15

    Germ cell mutagenicity testing provides experimental data to quantify genetic risk for exposed human populations. The majority of tests are performed with exposure of males, and female data are relatively rare. The reason for this paucity lies in the differences between male and female germ cell biology. Male germ cells are produced throughout reproductive life and all developmental stages can be ascertained by appropriate breeding schemes. In contrast, the female germ cell pool is limited, meiosis begins during embryogenesis and oocytes are arrested over long periods of time until maturation processes start for small numbers of oocytes during the oestrus cycle in mature females. The literature data are reviewed to point out possible gender differences of germ cells to exogenous agents such as chemicals or ionizing radiation. From the limited information, it can be concluded that male germ cells are more sensitive than female germ cells to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations. However, exceptions are described which shed doubt on the extrapolation of experimental data from male rodents to the genetic risk of the human population. Furthermore, the female genome may be more sensitive to mutation induction during peri-conceptional stages compared to the male genome of the zygote. With few exceptions, germ cell experiments have been carried out under high acute exposure to optimize the effects and to compensate for the limited sample size in animal experiments. Human exposure to environmental agents, on the other hand, is usually chronic and involves low doses. Under these conditions, gender differences may become apparent that have not been studied so far. Additionally, data are reviewed that suggest a false impression of safety when responses are negative under high acute exposure of male rodents while a mutational response is induced by low chronic exposure. The classical (morphological) germ cell mutation tests are not performed anymore

  11. How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activities that Relate Mendelian Genetics to Cell Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Heather R.; Gibson, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity designed to connect Mendelian laws with the physical processes of cell division. Included are materials production, procedures and worksheets for the meiosis-mitosis game and a genetics game. (CW)

  12. Polyethylene glycol, unique among laxatives, suppresses aberrant crypt foci, by elimination of cells

    PubMed Central

    Taché, Sylviane; Parnaud, Géraldine; Van Beek, Erik; Corpet, Denis E.

    2006-01-01

    Background Polyethylene glycol (PEG), an osmotic laxative, is a very potent inhibitor of colon cancer in rats. In a search for mechanisms, we tested the hypothesis that fecal bulking and moisture decreases colon carcinogenesis. We also looked for PEG effects on crypt cells in vivo. Methods Fischer 344 rats (N=272) were given an injection of the colon carcinogen azoxymethane. They were then randomized to a standard AIN76 diet containing one of 19 laxative agents (5% w/w in most cases): PEG 8000 and other PEG-like compounds, carboxymethylcellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone, sodium polyacrylate, calcium polycarbophil, karaya gum, psyllium, mannitol, sorbitol, lactulose, propylene glycol, magnesium hydroxide, sodium phosphate, bisacodyl, docusate, and paraffin oil. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and fecal values were measured blindly after a 30-day treatment. Proliferation, apoptosis, and the removal of cells from crypts were studied in control and PEG-fed rats by various methods, including TUNEL and fluorescein dextran labeling. Results PEG 8000 reduced nine-fold the number of ACF in rats (p<0.001). The other PEGs and magnesium-hydroxide modestly suppressed ACF, but not the other laxatives. ACF number did not correlate with fecal weight or moisture. PEG doubled the apoptotic bodies per crypt (p<0.05), increased proliferation by 25–50% (p<0.05) and strikingly increased (>40-fold) a fecal marker of epitheliolysis in the gut (p<0.001). PEG normalized the percentage of fluorescein dextran labeled cells on the top of ACF (p<0.001). Conclusions Among laxatives, only PEG afforded potent chemoprevention. PEG protection was not due to increased fecal bulking, but likely to the elimination of cells from precancerous lesions. PMID:16716974

  13. M-Band Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Induced By Low- and High-Let Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Gersey, B.; Saganti, P. B.; Wilkins, R.; Gonda, S. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Energetic primary and secondary particles pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in the induction of various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer. Most of these biological endpoints are closely correlated to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insult. In this study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma rays, 1 GeV/nucleon Fe ions and secondary neutrons whose spectrum is similar to that measured inside the Space Station. Chromosomes were condensed using a premature chromosome condensation technique and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with the multi-color banding (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of both interchromosomal (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Results of the study confirmed the observation of higher incidence of inversions for high-LET irradiation. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed in the low-LET irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosome aberrations, but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosome aberrations. In contrast, Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both the inter- and intrachromosome exchanges.

  14. A conformational switch controls cell wall remodeling enzymes required for bacterial cell division

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Desirée C.; Tan, Kemin; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Bernhardt, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Remodeling of the peptidoglycan (PG) exoskeleton is intimately tied to the growth and division of bacteria. Enzymes that hydrolyze PG are critical for these processes, but their activities must be tightly regulated to prevent the generation of lethal breaches in the PG matrix. Despite their importance, the mechanisms regulating PG hydrolase activity have remained elusive. Here we investigate the control of cell division hydrolases called amidases (AmiA, AmiB, and AmiC) required for Escherichia coli cell division. Poorly regulated amiB mutants were isolated encoding lytic AmiB variants with elevated basal PG hydrolase activities in vitro. The structure of an AmiB ortholog was also solved, revealing that the active site of AmiB is occluded by a conserved alpha-helix. Strikingly, most of the amino acid substitutions in the lytic AmiB variants mapped to this domain and are predicted to disrupt its interaction with the active site. Our results therefore support a model in which cell separation is stimulated by the reversible relief of amidase auto-inhibition governed by conserved sub-complexes within the cytokinetic ring. Analogous conformational control mechanisms are likely to be part of a general strategy used to control PG hydrolases present within multi-enzyme PG remodeling machines. PMID:22715947

  15. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  16. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar β1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  17. Microarray expression profile analysis of aberrant long non-coding RNAs in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Juan; Huang, Jun-Xing; Lin, Mei; Wu, Zheng-Dong; Yu, Hong; Wang, Peng-Cheng; Ye, Jun; Chen, Ping; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Guo-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) plays an important role in tumorigenesis. However, the function and regulatory mechanism of lncRNAs are still unclear in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). To address this challenge, we screened lncRNAs expression profiles in 3 pairs of ESCC and matched non-cancerous tissues by microarray assay and identified the relationship between lncRNAs expression in ESCC tissue and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of patients with ESCC. We found 182 lncRNAs that were significantly differently expressed in ESCC tissues versus the matched non-cancerous tissues. Gene ontology and pathway analysis results suggested that the primary biological processes of these genes were involved in extracellular matrix, immune responses, cell differentiation and cell proliferation. Through cis and trans analyzing, we found 4 lncRNAs (ENST00000480669, NONHSAT104436, NONHSAT126998 and NONHSAT112918) may play important roles in tumorigenesis of ESCC. The four lncRNAs were checked in 73 patients with ESCC. The results showed that they mainly related to tumor metastasis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that high expression of NONHSAT104436, NONHSAT126998 and low expression of ENST00000480669 were related to poor 3-year overall survival (P=0.003, 0.032 and 0.040, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that NONHSAT104436 was an independent prognostic factor (P=0.017). Thus we concluded that, lncRNAs showed differently expression patterns in ESCC versus matched non-cancerous tissues, and aberrantly expressed lncRNA may play important roles in ESCC development and progression. Interestingly, the overexpression of NONHSAT104436 was tightly correlated with distant metastasis and, poor survival rate, which might indicate that NONHSAT104436 might play a very important part in ESCC tumor progression. PMID:27035335

  18. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration.

    PubMed

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar β1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  19. Abnormal mitosis in hypertetraploid cells causes aberrant nuclear morphology in association with H2O2-induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu

    2008-09-01

    Aberrant nuclear morphology, such as nuclei with irregular shapes or fragmented nuclei, is often observed in senescent cells, but its biological significance is not fully understood. My previous study showed that aberrant nuclear morphology in senescent human fibroblasts is attributable to abnormal mitosis in later passages. In this study, the production of abnormal nuclei in association with premature senescence was investigated. Premature senescence was induced by brief exposure of human fibroblasts to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and mitosis was observed by time-lapse microscopy. In addition, cell cycle and nuclear morphology after exposure to H(2)O(2) were also analyzed using a laser scanning cytometer. Time-lapse analysis revealed that the induction of premature senescence caused abnormal mitoses, such as mitotic slippage or incomplete mitosis, especially in later days after H(2)O(2) exposure and often resulted in abnormal nuclear morphology. Analysis by laser scanning cytometer showed significantly higher frequency of abnormal cells with deformed nuclei and abnormal mitotic cells with misaligned chromosomes in a hypertetraploid subpopulation. These results suggest that unstable hypertetraploid cells, formed in association with H(2)O(2)-induced premature senescence, cause abnormal mitosis that leads to aberrant nuclear morphology. PMID:18618767

  20. Control of cell division and the spatial localization of assembled gene products in Caulobacter crescentus

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments are described that examine the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the regulation of cell division in Caulobacter crescentus; and the spatial localization of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in C. crescentus swarmer and predivisional cells. In the analysis of PBP function, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus PBPs with (/sup 3/H) penicillin G in wild type strain CB15, in a series of conditional cell division mutants and in new temperature sensitive cephalosporin C resistant mutants PC8002 and PC8003. 14 PBPs are characterized and a high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1B) that is required for cell division is identified. PBP 1B competes for ..beta..-lactams that induce filament formation and may be a high affinity binding protein. A second high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1C) is also associated with defective cell division. The examination of PBP patterns in synchronous swarmer cells reveals that the in vivo activity of PBP 1B and PBP 1C increases at the time that the cell division pathway is initiated. None of the PBPs, however, appear to be differentially localized in the C. crescentus cell. In the analysis of MCP localization, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus MCPs with methyl-/sup 3/H. MCPs are examined in flagellated and non-flagellated vesicles prepared from cells by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  1. Aberrant Regulation of the BST2 (Tetherin) Promoter Enhances Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis Evasion in High Grade Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sayeed, Aejaz; Luciani-Torres, Gloria; Meng, Zhenhang; Bennington, James L.; Moore, Dan H.; Dairkee, Shanaz H.

    2013-01-01

    Normal cellular phenotypes that serve an oncogenic function during tumorigenesis are potential candidates for cancer targeting drugs. Within a subset of invasive primary breast carcinoma, we observed relatively abundant expression of Tetherin, a cell surface protein encoded by the Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Antigen (BST2) known to play an inhibitory role in viral release from infected immune cells of the host. Using breast cancer cell lines derived from low and intermediate histopathologic grade invasive primary tumors that maintain growth-suppressive TGFβ signaling, we demonstrate that BST2 is negatively regulated by the TGFβ axis in epithelial cells. Binding of the transcription factor AP2 to the BST2 promoter was attenuated by inhibition of the TGFβ pathway thereby increasing BST2 expression in tumor cells. In contrast, inherent TGFβ resistance characteristic of high grade breast tumors is a key factor underlying compromised BST2 regulation, and consequently its constitutive overexpression relative to non-malignant breast epithelium, and to most low and intermediate grade cancer cells. In both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional growth conditions, BST2-silenced tumor cells displayed an enhancement in tamoxifen or staurosporine-induced apoptotic cell death together with a reduction in the S-phase fraction compared to BST2 overexpressing counterparts. In a subset of breast cancer patients treated with pro apoptotic hormonal therapy, BST2 expression correlated with a trend for poor clinical outcome, further supporting its role in conferring an anti apoptotic phenotype. Similar to the effects of gene manipulation, declining levels of endogenous BST2 induced by the phytoalexin – resveratrol, restored apoptotic function, and curbed cell proliferation. We provide evidence for a direct approach that diminishes aberrant BST2 expression in cancer cells as an early targeting strategy to assist in surmounting resistance to pro apoptotic therapies. PMID:23840623

  2. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging) of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Michelle W.; Yie, Anna M.; Eder, Elizabeth K.; Dennis, Richard G.; Basting, Preston J.; Martinez, Keith A.; Jones, Brian D.; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2015-01-01

    Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH), no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5) the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2–7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress. PMID:26713733

  3. Lineage correlations of single cell division time as a probe of cell-cycle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Oded; Mizrahi, Sivan Pearl; Weiss, Noga; Agam, Oded; Simon, Itamar; Balaban, Nathalie Q

    2015-03-26

    Stochastic processes in cells are associated with fluctuations in mRNA, protein production and degradation, noisy partition of cellular components at division, and other cell processes. Variability within a clonal population of cells originates from such stochastic processes, which may be amplified or reduced by deterministic factors. Cell-to-cell variability, such as that seen in the heterogeneous response of bacteria to antibiotics, or of cancer cells to treatment, is understood as the inevitable consequence of stochasticity. Variability in cell-cycle duration was observed long ago; however, its sources are still unknown. A central question is whether the variance of the observed distribution originates from stochastic processes, or whether it arises mostly from a deterministic process that only appears to be random. A surprising feature of cell-cycle-duration inheritance is that it seems to be lost within one generation but to be still present in the next generation, generating poor correlation between mother and daughter cells but high correlation between cousin cells. This observation suggests the existence of underlying deterministic factors that determine the main part of cell-to-cell variability. We developed an experimental system that precisely measures the cell-cycle duration of thousands of mammalian cells along several generations and a mathematical framework that allows discrimination between stochastic and deterministic processes in lineages of cells. We show that the inter- and intra-generation correlations reveal complex inheritance of the cell-cycle duration. Finally, we build a deterministic nonlinear toy model for cell-cycle inheritance that reproduces the main features of our data. Our approach constitutes a general method to identify deterministic variability in lineages of cells or organisms, which may help to predict and, eventually, reduce cell-to-cell heterogeneity in various systems, such as cancer cells under treatment. PMID:25762143

  4. Study of the mechanism of diatom cell division by means of 29Si isotope tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audinot, J.-N.; Guignard, C.; Migeon, H.-N.; Hoffmann, L.

    2006-07-01

    Diatoms are delicate unicellular organisms enclosed in a silica frustule, that is made up of two valves. Multiplication of the diatoms occurs by ordinary mitotic cell division. During cell division each cell produces two daughter cells, each of them keeping one of the two valves of the mother cell and producing a new valve by absorbing the silicon present in the environment. The NanoSIMS 50 allows ion imaging to be performed on diatoms in order to determine the site of fixation of silicon. The aim of this study was to observe and compare the mechanism of the construction of the new valve after cell division. To this end, different types of diatoms have been transferred in a culture medium enriched with 29Si and after several days, the distribution of the different isotopes of silicon has been determined by NanoSIMS50 imaging. The construction of new valves has been observed and the isotopic ratio has been determined.

  5. Cell Division During Inhibition of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Helmstetter, Charles E.; Pierucci, Olga

    1968-01-01

    When cultures of Escherichia coli B/r growing at various rates were exposed to ultraviolet light, mitomycin C, or nalidixic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis stopped but cell division continued for at least 20 min. The chromosome configurations in the cells which divided were estimated by determining the rate of DNA synthesis during the division cycle. The cultures were pulse-labeled with 14C-thymidine, and the amount of label incorporated into cells of different ages was found by measuring the radioactivity in cells born subsequent to the labeling period. The cells which divided in the absence of DNA synthesis were those which had completed a round of chromosome replication prior to the treatments. It was concluded that completion of a round of replication is a necessary and sufficient condition of DNA synthesis for cell division. PMID:4870278

  6. Novel insights into mammalian embryonic neural stem cell division: focus on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2015-01-01

    During stem cell divisions, mitotic microtubules do more than just segregate the chromosomes. They also determine whether a cell divides virtually symmetrically or asymmetrically by establishing spindle orientation and the plane of cell division. This can be decisive for the fate of the stem cell progeny. Spindle defects have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, yet the role of spindle orientation for mammalian neurogenesis has remained controversial. Here we explore recent advances in understanding how the microtubule cytoskeleton influences mammalian neural stem cell division. Our focus is primarily on the role of spindle microtubules in the development of the cerebral cortex. We also highlight unique characteristics in the architecture and dynamics of cortical stem cells that are tightly linked to their mode of division. These features contribute to setting these cells apart as mitotic “rule breakers,” control how asymmetric a division is, and, we argue, are sufficient to determine the fate of the neural stem cell progeny in mammals. PMID:26628750

  7. VMP1-deficient Chlamydomonas exhibits severely aberrant cell morphology and disrupted cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The versatile Vacuole Membrane Protein 1 (VMP1) has been previously investigated in six species. It has been shown to be essential in macroautophagy, where it takes part in autophagy initiation. In addition, VMP1 has been implicated in organellar biogenesis; endo-, exo- and phagocytosis, and protein secretion; apoptosis; and cell adhesion. These roles underly its proven involvement in pancreatitis, diabetes and cancer in humans. Results In this study we analyzed a VMP1 homologue from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. CrVMP1 knockdown lines showed severe phenotypes, mainly affecting cell division as well as the morphology of cells and organelles. We also provide several pieces of evidence for its involvement in macroautophagy. Conclusion Our study adds a novel role to VMP1's repertoire, namely the regulation of cytokinesis. Though the directness of the observed effects and the mechanisms underlying them remain to be defined, the protein's involvement in macroautophagy in Chlamydomonas, as found by us, suggests that CrVMP1 shares molecular characteristics with its animal and protist counterparts. PMID:24885763

  8. Mechanisms of Regulating Cell Topology in Proliferating Epithelia: Impact of Division Plane, Mechanical Forces, and Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingzi; Naveed, Hammad; Kachalo, Sema; Xu, Lisa X.; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth and cell division has a fundamental role in tissue formation, organ development, and cancer progression. Remarkable similarities in the topological distributions were found in a variety of proliferating epithelia in both animals and plants. At the same time, there are species with significantly varied frequency of hexagonal cells. Moreover, local topology has been shown to be disturbed on the boundary between proliferating and quiescent cells, where cells have fewer sides than natural proliferating epithelia. The mechanisms of regulating these topological changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a mechanical model to examine the effects of orientation of division plane, differential proliferation, and mechanical forces on animal epithelial cells. We find that regardless of orientation of division plane, our model can reproduce the commonly observed topological distributions of cells in natural proliferating animal epithelia with the consideration of cell rearrangements. In addition, with different schemes of division plane, we are able to generate different frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. In proliferating cells interfacing quiescent cells, our results show that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to reproduce the local changes in cell topology. Rather, increased tension on the boundary, in conjunction with differential proliferation, can reproduce the observed topological changes. We conclude that both division plane orientation and mechanical forces play important roles in cell topology in animal proliferating epithelia. Moreover, cell memory is also essential for generating specific topological distributions. PMID:22912800

  9. Aberrant plasmacytoid dendritic cell distribution and function in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, D C; Metzke, D; Guckelberger, O; Pascher, A; Grötzinger, C; Przesdzing, I; Dörffel, Y; Schmitz, J; Thomas, S

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) function is believed to be of critical importance for the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To date, most research in animal models and the few human data available is restricted to myeloid DC, while plasmacytoid DC (pDC) capable of controlling both innate and adaptive immune responses have not yet been investigated systematically in human Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). CD11c-, CD303+/CD304+ and CD123+ pDC from peripheral blood (n = 90), mucosal tissue (n = 28) or mesenteric lymph nodes (n = 40) (MLNs) of patients with UC and CD or controls were purified and cultured. Thereafter, pDC were enumerated, phenotyped and cytokine secretion measured by flow cytometry (FACS), immunohistochemistry and/or cytometric bead array, respectively. Interferon (IFN)-α secretion following cytosine phosphatidyl guanine (CpG) A oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) 2216 (5′-GGGGGACGATCGTCGGGGGG-3′) stimulation was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found a significantly higher frequency of pDC in the inflamed colonic mucosa and MLN of IBD patients. Moreover, the fraction of CD40 and CD86 expressing cultured peripheral blood pDC was significantly higher in flaring UC and CD patients and their secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 were increased significantly compared with controls. In contrast, the IFN-α secretion of peripheral blood pDC isolated from flaring IBD, particularly in UC patients, was reduced significantly compared with controls. Our data suggest an aberrant distribution and function of pDC in IBD, contrary to their generally implicated role as inducers of tolerance. We speculate that the impaired IFN-α secretion may relate to the hypothesized defect in innate immunity in IBD and could also impact upon the generation of regulatory T cells (Treg). PMID:21762123

  10. Omics and modelling approaches for understanding regulation of asymmetric cell divisions in arabidopsis and other angiosperm plants

    PubMed Central

    Kajala, Kaisa; Ramakrishna, Priya; Fisher, Adam; C. Bergmann, Dominique; De Smet, Ive; Sozzani, Rosangela; Weijers, Dolf; Brady, Siobhan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Asymmetric cell divisions are formative divisions that generate daughter cells of distinct identity. These divisions are coordinated by either extrinsic (‘niche-controlled’) or intrinsic regulatory mechanisms and are fundamentally important in plant development. Scope This review describes how asymmetric cell divisions are regulated during development and in different cell types in both the root and the shoot of plants. It further highlights ways in which omics and modelling approaches have been used to elucidate these regulatory mechanisms. For example, the regulation of embryonic asymmetric divisions is described, including the first divisions of the zygote, formative vascular divisions and divisions that give rise to the root stem cell niche. Asymmetric divisions of the root cortex endodermis initial, pericycle cells that give rise to the lateral root primordium, procambium, cambium and stomatal cells are also discussed. Finally, a perspective is provided regarding the role of other hormones or regulatory molecules in asymmetric divisions, the presence of segregated determinants and the usefulness of modelling approaches in understanding network dynamics within these very special cells. Conclusions Asymmetric cell divisions define plant development. High-throughput genomic and modelling approaches can elucidate their regulation, which in turn could enable the engineering of plant traits such as stomatal density, lateral root development and wood formation. PMID:24825294

  11. An ultradian clock controls locomotor behaviour and cell division in isolated cells of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Kippert, F

    1996-04-01

    An ultradian clock operates in fast growing cells of the large ciliate, Paramecium tetraurelia. The period of around 70 minutes is well temperature-compensated over the temperature range tested, i.e. between 18 degrees C and 33 degrees C. The Q10 between 18 degrees C and 27 degrees C is 1.08; above 27 degrees C there is a slight overcompensation. The investigation of individual cells has revealed that two different cellular functions are under temporal control by this ultradian clock. First, locomotor behaviour, which is an alternation between a phase of fast swimming with only infrequent turning, and a phase of slow swimming with frequent spontaneous changes of direction. In addition, the ultradian clock is involved in the timing of cell division. Generation times are not randomly distributed, but occur in well separated clusters. At all of the six temperatures tested, the clusters are separated by around 70 minutes which corresponds well to the period of the locomotor behaviour rhythm at the respective temperatures. Whereas the interdivision times were gradually lengthened both above and below the optimum growth temperature, the underlying periodicity remained unaffected. Also cells of different clonal age had identical periods, suggesting that neither the differences in DNA content, not other changes associated with ageing in Paramecium have an effect on the clock. A constant phase relationship was observed between the rhythm in locomotor behaviour and the time window for cell division; this strongly suggests that the same ultradian clock exerts temporal control over both processes. PMID:8718678

  12. Intracellular viscoelasticity of HeLa cells during cell division studied by video particle-tracking microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Quan; Kuo, Chia-Yu; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Wu, Kelly; Su, Pin-Tzu; Huang, Chien-Shiou; Chiou, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Cell division plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. It is managed by a complex sequence of cytoskeleton alteration that induces dividing cells to change their morphology to facilitate their division. The change in cytoskeleton structure is expected to affect the intracellular viscoelasticity, which may also contribute to cellular dynamic deformation during cell division. However, the intracellular viscoelasticity during cell division is not yet well understood. In this study, we injected 100-nm (diameter) carboxylated polystyrene beads into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells and applied video particle tracking microrheology to measure their intracellular viscoelasticity at different phases during cell division. The Brownian motion of the intracellular nanoprobes was analyzed to compute the viscoelasticity of HeLa cells in terms of the elastic modulus and viscous modulus as a function of frequency. Our experimental results indicate that during the course of cell division, both intracellular elasticity and viscosity increase in the transition from the metaphase to the anaphase, plausibly due to the remodeling of cytoskeleton and redistributions of molecular motors, but remain approximately the same from the anaphase to the telophase.

  13. From cell differentiation to cell collectives: Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In this study, we show how flagellum-independent migration is driven by the division of labor of two cell types that appear during Bacillus subtilis sliding motility. Cell collectives organize themselves into bundles (called "van Gogh bundles") of tightly aligned cell chains that form filamentous loops at the colony edge. We show, by time-course microscopy, that these loops migrate by pushing themselves away from the colony. The formation of van Gogh bundles depends critically on the synergistic interaction of surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells. We propose that surfactin-producing cells reduce the friction between cells and their substrate, thereby facilitating matrix-producing cells to form bundles. The folding properties of these bundles determine the rate of colony expansion. Our study illustrates how the simple organization of cells within a community can yield a strong ecological advantage. This is a key factor underlying the diverse origins of multicellularity. PMID:25894589

  14. Effects of Nitrogen on Mesophyll Cell Division and Epidermal Cell Elongation in Tall Fescue Leaf Blades 1

    PubMed Central

    MacAdam, Jennifer W.; Volenec, Jeffrey J.; Nelson, Curtis J.

    1989-01-01

    Leaf elongation rate (LER) in grasses is dependent on epidermal cell supply (number) and on rate and duration of epidermal cell elongation. Nitrogen (N) fertilization increases LER. Longitudinal sections from two genotypes of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), which differ by 50% in LER, were used to quantify the effects of N on the components of epidermal cell elongation and on mesophyll cell division. Rate and duration of epidermal cell elongation were determined by using a relationship between cell length and displacement velocity derived from the continuity equation. Rate of epidermal cell elongation was exponential. Relative rates of epidermal cell elongation increased by 9% with high N, even though high N increased LER by 89%. Duration of cell elongation was approximately 20 h longer in the high- than in the low-LER genotype regardless of N treatment. The percentage of mesophyll cells in division was greater in the high- than in the low-LER genotype. This increased with high N in both genotypes, indicating that LER increased with cell supply. Division of mesophyll cells adjacent to abaxial epidermal cells continued after epidermal cell division stopped, until epidermal cells had elongated to a mean length of 40 micrometers in the high-LER and a mean length of 50 micrometers in the low-LER genotype. The cell cycle length for mesophyll cells was calculated to be 12 to 13 hours. Nitrogen increased mesophyll cell number more than epidermal cell number: in both genotypes, the final number of mesophyll cells adjacent to each abaxial epidermal cell was 10 with low N and 14 with high N. A spatial model is used to describe three cell development processes relevant to leaf growth. It illustrates the overlap of mesophyll cell division and epidermal cell elongation, and the transition from epidermal cell elongation to secondary cell wall deposition. PMID:16666581

  15. Real-Time Lineage Analysis to Study Cell Division Orientation in the Arabidopsis Shoot Meristem.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Cory J; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-01-01

    Cells in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem are small and divide frequently throughout the life-time of the organism making them good candidates for studying the mechanisms of cell division in plants. But tracking these cell divisions requires multiple images to be taken of the same specimen over time which means the specimen must stay alive throughout the process. This chapter provides details on how to prepare plants for live imaging, keep them alive and growing through multiple time points, and how to process the data to extract cell boundary coordinates from three-dimensional images. PMID:26659961

  16. Dominant negative mutants of the Cdc2 kinase uncouple cell division from iterative plant development.

    PubMed Central

    Hemerly, A; Engler, J de A; Bergounioux, C; Van Montagu, M; Engler, G; Inzé, D; Ferreira, P

    1995-01-01

    Because plant cells do not move and are surrounded by a rigid cell wall, cell division rates and patterns are believed to be directly responsible for generating new structures throughout development. To study the relationship between cell division and morphogenesis, transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants were constructed expressing dominant mutations in a key regulator of the Arabidopsis cell cycle, the Cdc2a kinase. Plants constitutively overproducing the wild-type Cdc2a or the mutant form predicted to accelerate the cell cycle did not exhibit a significantly altered development. In contrast, a mutation expected to arrest the cell cycle abolished cell division when expressed in Arabidopsis, whereas some tobacco plants constitutively producing this mutant protein were recovered. These plants had a reduced histone H1 kinase activity and contained considerably fewer cells. These cells were, however, much larger and underwent normal differentiation. Morphogenesis, histogenesis and developmental timing were unaffected. The results indicate that, in plants, the developmental controls defining shape can act independently from cell division rates. Images PMID:7664733

  17. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to Space-like Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells and lymphocytes were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) or Cs-137 gamma radiation source at the Baylor College (Houston, TX). After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The possible relationship between the frequency of inter- and intra-chromosomal exchanges and the track structure of radiation is discussed. The work was supported by the NASA Space Radiation Health Program.

  18. Physical association between a novel plasma-membrane structure and centrosome orients cell division.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takefumi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    In the last mitotic division of the epidermal lineage in the ascidian embryo, the cells divide stereotypically along the anterior-posterior axis. During interphase, we found that a unique membrane structure invaginates from the posterior to the centre of the cell, in a microtubule-dependent manner. The invagination projects toward centrioles on the apical side of the nucleus and associates with one of them. Further, a cilium forms on the posterior side of the cell and its basal body remains associated with the invagination. A laser ablation experiment suggests that the invagination is under tensile force and promotes the posterior positioning of the centrosome. Finally, we showed that the orientation of the invaginations is coupled with the polarized dynamics of centrosome movements and the orientation of cell division. Based on these findings, we propose a model whereby this novel membrane structure orchestrates centrosome positioning and thus the orientation of cell division axis. PMID:27502556

  19. High frame-rate resolution of cell division during Candida albicans filamentation.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Darren D; Berman, Judith; Brand, Alexandra C

    2016-03-01

    The commensal yeast, Candida albicans, is an opportunistic pathogen in humans and forms filaments called hyphae and pseudohyphae, in which cell division requires precise temporal and spatial control to produce mononuclear cell compartments. High-frame-rate live-cell imaging (1 frame/min) revealed that nuclear division did not occur across the septal plane. We detected the presence of nucleolar fragments that may be extrachromosomal molecules carrying the ribosomal RNA genes. Cells occasionally maintained multiple nucleoli, suggesting either polyploidy, multiple nuclei and/or aneuploidy of ChrR., while the migration pattern of sister nuclei differed between unbranched and branched hyphae. The presented movie challenges and extends previous concepts of C. albicans cell division. PMID:26854071

  20. Cell division patterns and chromosomal segregation defects in oral cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kaseb, Hatem O; Lewis, Dale W; Saunders, William S; Gollin, Susanne M

    2016-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a serious public health problem caused primarily by smoking and alcohol consumption or human papillomavirus. The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory posits that CSCs show unique characteristics, including self-renewal and therapeutic resistance. Examining biomarkers and other features of CSCs is critical to better understanding their biology. To this end, the results show that cellular SOX2 immunostaining correlates with other CSC biomarkers in OSCC cell lines and marks the rare CSC population. To assess whether CSC division patterns are symmetrical, resulting in two CSC, or asymmetrical, leading to one CSC and one cancer cell, cell size and fluorescence intensity of mitotic cells stained with SOX2 were analyzed. Asymmetrical SOX2 distribution in ≈25% of the mitoses analyzed was detected. Chromosomal instability, some of which is caused by chromosome segregation defects (CSDs), is a feature of cancer cells that leads to altered gene copy numbers. We compare chromosomal instability (as measured by CSDs) between CSCs (SOX2+) and non-CSCs (SOX2-) from the same OSCC cell lines. CSDs were more common in non-CSCs (SOX2-) than CSCs (SOX2+) and in symmetrical CSC (SOX2+) mitotic pairs than asymmetrical CSC (SOX2+/SOX2-) mitotic pairs. CSCs showed fewer and different types of CSDs after ionizing radiation treatment than non-CSCs. Overall, these data are the first to demonstrate both symmetrical and asymmetrical cell divisions with CSDs in OSCC CSC. Further, the results suggest that CSCs may undergo altered behavior, including therapeutic resistance as a result of chromosomal instability due to chromosome segregation defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27123539

  1. From Cell Differentiation to Cell Collectives: Bacillus subtilis Uses Division of Labor to Migrate

    PubMed Central

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The organization of cells, emerging from cell–cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In this study, we show how flagellum-independent migration is driven by the division of labor of two cell types that appear during Bacillus subtilis sliding motility. Cell collectives organize themselves into bundles (called “van Gogh bundles”) of tightly aligned cell chains that form filamentous loops at the colony edge. We show, by time-course microscopy, that these loops migrate by pushing themselves away from the colony. The formation of van Gogh bundles depends critically on the synergistic interaction of surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells. We propose that surfactin-producing cells reduce the friction between cells and their substrate, thereby facilitating matrix-producing cells to form bundles. The folding properties of these bundles determine the rate of colony expansion. Our study illustrates how the simple organization of cells within a community can yield a strong ecological advantage. This is a key factor underlying the diverse origins of multicellularity. PMID:25894589

  2. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  3. Cell division versus cell elongation: the control of radicle elongation during thermoinhibition of Tagetes minuta achenes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicky J; Hills, Paul N; van Staden, Johannes

    2007-12-01

    Endogenous embryo factors, which act mainly in the radicle, prevent germination in Tagetes minuta at high temperatures. These factors act to prevent cell elongation, which is critical for radicle protrusion under optimal conditions. Once the radicle has emerged both cell elongation and cell division are required for post-germination growth. Germination can be induced at high temperatures by fusicoccin, which rapidly stimulates cell elongation. In addition, priming seeds at 25 degrees C on polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 and mannitol could also induce germination on water at 36 degrees C, indicating that priming prevents radicle protrusion at a point subsequent to the point of control in thermoinhibited achenes. Flow cytometry studies revealed that DNA synthesis occurs during thermoinhibition and the inhibition of DNA synthesis during this process inhibits subsequent germination on water under optimal conditions, suggesting a protective role for DNA synthesis in thermoinhibited achenes of T. minuta. PMID:17360069

  4. Mini-F plasmid genes that couple host cell division to plasmid proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, T; Hiraga, S

    1983-01-01

    A mechanism for stable maintenance of plasmids, besides the replication and partition mechanisms, has been found to be specified by genes of a mini-F plasmid. An oriC plasmid carrying both a mini-F segment necessary for partition [coordinates 46.4-49.4 kilobase pairs (kb) on the F map] and another segment (42.9-43.6 kb), designated ccd (coupled cell division), is more stably maintained than are oriC plasmids carrying only the partition segment; the stability is comparable to that of the parental mini-F plasmid. When replication of a plasmid carrying ccd is prevented and the plasmid copy number decreases, to as few as one per cell, host cell division is inhibited, but not increase of turbidity or chromosome replication. Appearance of plasmid-free segregants is therefore effectively prevented under such conditions. Experimental results suggest that reduction of the copy number of plasmids carrying the ccd region causes an inhibition of cell division and that the ccd region can be dissected into two functional regions; one (ccdB) inhibits cell division and the other (ccdA) releases the inhibition. The interplay of the ccdA and ccdB genes promotes stable plasmid maintenance by coupling host cell division to plasmid proliferation. PMID:6308648

  5. Comparison of chromosomal aberrations detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization with clinical parameters, DNA ploidy and Ki 67 expression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Y.; Igawa, M.; Shiina, H.; Shigeno, K.; Yokogi, H.; Urakami, S.; Yoneda, T.; Maruyama, R.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of chromosomal aberrations in renal cell carcinoma, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine its prevalence and correlation with clinical parameters of malignancy. In addition, correlation of chromosomal aberration with Ki 67 expression was analysed. We performed FISH with chromosome-specific DNA probes, and the signal number of pericentromeric sequences on chromosomes 3, 7, 9 and 17 was detected within interphase nuclei in touch preparations from tumour specimen. The incidence of loss of chromosome 3 was significantly higher than those of chromosomes 7, 9 and 17 (P < 0.001, P = 0.03 and P < 0.001 respectively). Hyperdiploid aberration of chromosomes 3 and 17 was significantly correlated with tumour stage (P = 0.03, P = 0.02 respectively), whereas hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 9 was associated with nuclear grade (P = 0.04). Disomy of chromosome 7 was correlated with venous involvement (P = 0.04). Ki 67 expression was significantly associated with hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 17 (P = 0.01), but not with aberration of chromosome 3. There was a significant relationship between hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 7 and Ki 67 expression (P = 0.01). In conclusions, gain of chromosome 17 may reflect tumour development, and aberration of chromosome 7 may affect metastatic potential of malignancy, whereas loss of chromosome 3 may be associated with early stage of tumour development in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:9667682

  6. Symmetric cell division in pseudohyphae of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kron, S J; Styles, C A; Fink, G R

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are dimorphic; in response to nitrogen starvation they switch from a yeast form (YF) to a filamentous pseudohyphal (PH) form. Time-lapse video microscopy of dividing cells reveals that YF and PH cells differ in their cell cycles and budding polarity. The YF cell cycle is controlled at the G1/S transition by the cell-size checkpoint Start. YF cells divide asymmetrically, producing small daughters from full-sized mothers. As a result, mothers and daughters bud asynchronously. Mothers bud immediately but daughters grow in G1 until they achieve a critical cell size. By contrast, PH cells divide symmetrically, restricting mitosis until the bud grows to the size of the mother. Thus, mother and daughter bud synchronously in the next cycle, without a G1 delay before Start. YF and PH cells also exhibit distinct bud-site selection patterns. YF cells are bipolar, producing their second and subsequent buds at either pole. PH cells are unipolar, producing their second and subsequent buds only from the end opposite the junction with their mother. We propose that in PH cells a G2 cell-size checkpoint delays mitosis until bud size reaches that of the mother cell. We conclude that yeast and PH forms are distinct cell types each with a unique cell cycle, budding pattern, and cell shape. Images PMID:7841518

  7. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  8. CD8 Memory Cells Develop Unique DNA Repair Mechanisms Favoring Productive Division

    PubMed Central

    Galgano, Alessia; Barinov, Aleksandr; Vasseur, Florence; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Rocha, Benedita

    2015-01-01

    Immune responses are efficient because the rare antigen-specific naïve cells are able to proliferate extensively and accumulate upon antigen stimulation. Moreover, differentiation into memory cells actually increases T cell accumulation, indicating improved productive division in secondary immune responses. These properties raise an important paradox: how T cells may survive the DNA lesions necessarily induced during their extensive division without undergoing transformation. We here present the first data addressing the DNA damage responses (DDRs) of CD8 T cells in vivo during exponential expansion in primary and secondary responses in mice. We show that during exponential division CD8 T cells engage unique DDRs, which are not present in other exponentially dividing cells, in T lymphocytes after UV or X irradiation or in non-metastatic tumor cells. While in other cell types a single DDR pathway is affected, all DDR pathways and cell cycle checkpoints are affected in dividing CD8 T cells. All DDR pathways collapse in secondary responses in the absence of CD4 help. CD8 T cells are driven to compulsive suicidal divisions preventing the propagation of DNA lesions. In contrast, in the presence of CD4 help all the DDR pathways are up regulated, resembling those present in metastatic tumors. However, this up regulation is present only during the expansion phase; i.e., their dependence on antigen stimulation prevents CD8 transformation. These results explain how CD8 T cells maintain genome integrity in spite of their extensive division, and highlight the fundamental role of DDRs in the efficiency of CD8 immune responses. PMID:26485718

  9. Phosphorus Deficiency Inhibits Cell Division But Not Growth in the Dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae.

    PubMed

    Li, Meizhen; Shi, Xinguo; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient element for the growth of phytoplankton. How P deficiency affects population growth and the cell division cycle in dinoflagellates has only been studied in some species, and how it affects photosynthesis and cell growth remains poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the impact of P deficiency on the cell division cycle, the abundance of the carbon-fixing enzyme Rubisco, and other cellular characteristics in the Gymnodiniales peridinin-plastid species Amphidinium carterae. We found that under P-replete condition, the cell cycle actively progressed in the culture in a 24-h diel cycle with daily growth rates markedly higher than the P-deficient cultures, in which cells were arrested in the G1 phase and cell size significantly enlarged. The results suggest that, as in previously studied dinoflagellates, P deficiency likely disenables A. carterae to complete DNA duplication or check-point protein phosphorylation. We further found that under P-deficient condition, overall photosystem II quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm ratio) and Rubisco abundance decreased but not significantly, while cellular contents of carbon, nitrogen, and proteins increased significantly. These observations indicated that under P-deficiency, this dinoflagellate was able to continue photosynthesis and carbon fixation, such that proteins and photosynthetically fixed carbon could accumulate resulting in continued cell growth in the absence of division. This is likely an adaptive strategy thereby P-limited cells can be ready to resume the cell division cycle upon resupply of phosphorus. PMID:27313570

  10. Phosphorus Deficiency Inhibits Cell Division But Not Growth in the Dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meizhen; Shi, Xinguo; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient element for the growth of phytoplankton. How P deficiency affects population growth and the cell division cycle in dinoflagellates has only been studied in some species, and how it affects photosynthesis and cell growth remains poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the impact of P deficiency on the cell division cycle, the abundance of the carbon-fixing enzyme Rubisco, and other cellular characteristics in the Gymnodiniales peridinin-plastid species Amphidinium carterae. We found that under P-replete condition, the cell cycle actively progressed in the culture in a 24-h diel cycle with daily growth rates markedly higher than the P-deficient cultures, in which cells were arrested in the G1 phase and cell size significantly enlarged. The results suggest that, as in previously studied dinoflagellates, P deficiency likely disenables A. carterae to complete DNA duplication or check-point protein phosphorylation. We further found that under P-deficient condition, overall photosystem II quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm ratio) and Rubisco abundance decreased but not significantly, while cellular contents of carbon, nitrogen, and proteins increased significantly. These observations indicated that under P-deficiency, this dinoflagellate was able to continue photosynthesis and carbon fixation, such that proteins and photosynthetically fixed carbon could accumulate resulting in continued cell growth in the absence of division. This is likely an adaptive strategy thereby P-limited cells can be ready to resume the cell division cycle upon resupply of phosphorus. PMID:27313570

  11. The BASL Polarity Protein Controls a MAPK Signaling Feedback Loop in Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Pengcheng; Shao, Wanchen; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Dong, Juan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell polarization is linked to fate determination during asymmetric division of plant stem cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In Arabidopsis, BREAKING OF ASYMMETRY IN THE STOMATAL LINEAGE (BASL) is polarized to control stomatal asymmetric division. A MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE (MAPK) cascade determines terminal stomatal fate by promoting the degradation of the lineage determinant SPEECHLESS (SPCH). Here we demonstrate that a positive feedback loop between BASL and the MAPK pathway constitutes a polarity module at the cortex. Cortical localization of BASL requires phosphorylation mediated by MPK3/6. Phosphorylated BASL functions as a scaffold and recruits the MAPKKK YODA and MPK3/6 to spatially concentrate signaling at the cortex. Activated MPK3/6 reinforces the feedback loop by phosphorylating BASL, and inhibits stomatal fate by phosphorylating SPCH. Polarization of the BASL-MAPK signaling feedback module represents a mechanism connecting cell polarity to fate differentiation during asymmetric stem cell division in plants. PMID:25843888

  12. Peroxisomes contribute to reactive oxygen species homeostasis and cell division induction in Arabidopsis protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Tiew, Terence W.-Y.; Sheahan, Michael B.; Rose, Ray J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to induce Arabidopsis protoplasts to dedifferentiate and divide provides a convenient system to analyze organelle dynamics in plant cells acquiring totipotency. Using peroxisome-targeted fluorescent proteins, we show that during protoplast culture, peroxisomes undergo massive proliferation and disperse uniformly around the cell before cell division. Peroxisome dispersion is influenced by the cytoskeleton, ensuring unbiased segregation during cell division. Considering their role in oxidative metabolism, we also investigated how peroxisomes influence homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Protoplast isolation induces an oxidative burst, with mitochondria the likely major ROS producers. Subsequently ROS levels in protoplast cultures decline, correlating with the increase in peroxisomes, suggesting that peroxisome proliferation may also aid restoration of ROS homeostasis. Transcriptional profiling showed up-regulation of several peroxisome-localized antioxidant enzymes, most notably catalase (CAT). Analysis of antioxidant levels, CAT activity and CAT isoform 3 mutants (cat3) indicate that peroxisome-localized CAT plays a major role in restoring ROS homeostasis. Furthermore, protoplast cultures of pex11a, a peroxisome division mutant, and cat3 mutants show reduced induction of cell division. Taken together, the data indicate that peroxisome proliferation and CAT contribute to ROS homeostasis and subsequent protoplast division induction. PMID:26379686

  13. Comparison of cell repair mechanisms by means of chromosomal aberration induced by proton and gamma irradiation - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, A.; Czerski, K.; Kaczmarski, M.; Lewocki, M.; Masojć, B.; Łukowiak, A.

    2015-03-01

    DNA damage of peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to gamma and proton irradiation is studied by means of chromosome aberrations to validate the efficiency of the repair mechanisms of individual cells. A new method based on an observed deviation from the Poisson statistics of the chromosome aberration number is applied for estimation of a repair factor ( RF) defined as a ratio between originally damaged cells to the amount of finally observed aberrations. The repair factors are evaluated by studying the variance of individual damage factors in a collective of healthy persons at a given dose as well as by using the chi-square analysis for the dose-effect curves. The blood samples from fifteen donors have been irradiated by Co60 gamma rays and from nine persons by 150 MeV protons with different doses up to 2 Gy. A standard extraction of lymphocyte has been used whereby dicentrics, acentrics and rings have been scored under a microscope. The RF values determined for the proton radiation are slightly larger than for gamma rays, indicating that up to 70% DNA double strand breaks can be repaired.

  14. Aberrant expression of the CHFR prophase checkpoint gene in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Aiqin; Ye, Junli; Zhang, Kunpeng; Yu, Hongsheng; Gao, Yanhua; Wang, Hongfang; Sun, Lirong; Xing, Xiaoming; Yang, Kun; Zhao, Min

    2015-05-01

    Checkpoint with FHA and Ring Finger (CHFR) is a checkpoint protein that reportedly initiates a cell cycle delay in response to microtubule stress during prophase in mitosis, which has become an interesting target for understanding cancer pathogenesis. Recently, aberrant methylation of the CHFR gene associated with gene silencing has been reported in several cancers. In the present study, we examined the expression of CHFR in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the expression level of CHFR mRNA and protein was reduced in B-NHL tissue samples and B cell lines. Furthermore, CHFR methylation was detected in 39 of 122 B-NHL patients, which was not found in noncancerous reactive hyperplasia of lymph node (RH) tissues. CHFR methylation correlated with the reduced expression of CHFR, high International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and later pathologic Ann Arbor stages of B-NHL. Treatment with demethylation reagent, 5-Aza-dC, could eliminate the hypermethylation of CHFR, enhance CHFR expression and cell apoptosis and inhibit the cell proliferation of Raji cells, which could be induced by high expression of CHFR in Raji cells. Our results indicated that aberrant methylation of CHFR may be associated with the pathogenesis, progression for B-NHL, which might be a novel molecular marker as prognosis and treatment for B-NHL. PMID:25798877

  15. Planar cell polarity aligns osteoblast division in response to substrate strain.

    PubMed

    Galea, Gabriel L; Meakin, Lee B; Savery, Dawn; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Delisser, Peter; Stein, Gary S; Copp, Andrew J; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lanyon, Lance E; Price, Joanna S

    2015-03-01

    Exposure of bone to dynamic strain increases the rate of division of osteoblasts and also influences the directional organization of the cellular and molecular structure of the bone tissue that they produce. Here, we report that brief exposure to dynamic substrate strain (sufficient to rapidly stimulate cell division) influences the orientation of osteoblastic cell division. The initial proliferative response to strain involves canonical Wnt signaling and can be blocked by sclerostin. However, the strain-related orientation of cell division is independently influenced through the noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Blockade of Rho-associated coiled kinase (ROCK), a component of the PCP pathway, prevents strain-related orientation of division in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Heterozygous loop-tail mutation of the core PCP component van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2) in mouse osteoblasts impairs the orientation of division in response to strain. Examination of bones from Vangl2 loop-tail heterozygous mice by µCT and scanning electron microscopy reveals altered bone architecture and disorganized bone-forming surfaces. Hence, in addition to the well-accepted role of PCP involvement in response to developmental cues during skeletal morphogenesis, our data reveal that this pathway also acts postnatally, in parallel with canonical Wnt signaling, to transduce biomechanical cues into skeletal adaptive responses. The simultaneous and independent actions of these two pathways appear to influence both the rate and orientation of osteoblast division, thus fine-tuning bone architecture to meet the structural demands of functional loading. PMID:25264362

  16. Dystrophin expression in muscle stem cells regulates their polarity and asymmetric division

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Nicolas A.; Wang, Yu Xin; von Maltzahn, Julia; Pasut, Alessandra; Bentzinger, C. Florian; Brun, Caroline E.; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin is expressed in differentiated myofibers where it is required for sarcolemmal integrity, and loss-of-function mutations in its gene result in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a disease characterized by progressive and severe skeletal muscle degeneration. Here we found that dystrophin is also highly expressed in activated muscle stem cells (also known as satellite cells) where it associates with the Ser/Thr kinase Mark2 (also known as Par1b), an important regulator of cell polarity. In the absence of dystrophin, expression of Mark2 protein is downregulated, resulting in the inability to polarize Pard3 to the opposite side of the cell. Consequently, the number of asymmetric divisions is strikingly reduced in dystrophin-deficient satellite cells, while also displaying a loss of polarity, abnormal division patterns including centrosome amplification, impaired mitotic spindle orientation, and prolonged cell divisions. Altogether, these intrinsic defects strongly reduce the generation of myogenic progenitors needed for proper muscle regeneration. Therefore, we conclude that dystrophin has an essential role in the regulation of satellite cell polarity and asymmetric division. Our findings indicate that muscle wasting in DMD is not only caused by myofiber fragility, but is also exacerbated by impaired regeneration due to intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction. PMID:26569381

  17. Induction of Aneuploidy, Centrosome Abnormality, Multipolar Spindle, and Multipolar Division in Cultured Mammalian Cells Exposed to an Arsenic Metabolite, Dimethylarsinate.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Toxicological studies of arsenic compounds were conducted in cultured mammalian cells to investigate the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. Dimethylarsinate DMA(V) was not cytotoxic in cells depleted of GSH, but was found to be cytotoxic when GSH was present outside the cells. The results suggested that a reactive form of DMA(V) was generated through interaction with GSH. Dimethylarsine iodide DMI(III) was used as a model compound of DMA(III), and the biological effects were investigated. DMI(III) was about 10000 times more toxic to the cells than DMA(V). Chromosome structural aberrations and numerical changes, such as aneuploidy, were induced by DMI(III). DMA(V) induced multiple foci of the centrosome protein, γ-tubulin, which were colocalized with multipolar spindles in mitotic cells. The multiple foci coalesced into a single dot on disruption of the microtubules (MT). However, reorganization of the MT caused multiple foci of γ-tubulin, suggesting that the induction of centrosome abnormalities by DMA(V) required intact MT. Inhibition of the MT-dependent motor, kinesin, prevented formation of multiple foci of γ-tubulin, which pointed to the involvement of the MT-dependent mitotic motor, kinesin, in the maintenance of centrosome abnormalities. DMI(III) caused abnormal cytokinesis (multipolar division). In addition, DMI(III) caused morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Consideration of the overall process following the centrosome abnormalities caused by DMA(V) suggested a mode of cytotoxicity in which the mitotic centrosome is a critical target. PMID:27252065

  18. Cytogenetic analysis of 101 giant cell tumors of bone: nonrandom patterns of telomeric associations and other structural aberrations.

    PubMed

    Gorunova, Ludmila; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Storlazzi, Clelia Tiziana; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Follerås, Gunnar; Heim, Sverre; Mandahl, Nils; Mertens, Fredrik

    2009-07-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a benign but locally aggressive tumor with metastatic potential. We performed cytogenetic analysis on 101 GCTB from 92 patients. Karyotypes were obtained from 95 tumors, 47 of which had clonal aberrations. The majority of the cytogenetically abnormal GCTB had multiple, up to 28 per tumor, clones. Clonal telomeric associations (tas) and other structural and numerical changes were found in about 70, 60, and 30%, respectively, of clonally abnormal tumors. Forty-seven aberrations were recurrent, of which 35 are novel. The vast majority of the recurrent aberrations were tas, confirming the important role of telomeric fusions in the development of GCTB. The frequency of tas in GCTB cultures increased with passaging, suggesting a selective advantage of tas-positive cells in vitro. The termini most frequently involved in tas were 22p, 13p, 15p, 21p, 14p, 19q, 1q, 12p, 11p, and 20q. The frequency of tas (irrespective of their clonality) was significantly higher in tumors carrying clonal changes, indicating that tas are precursors of other types of aberrations. In line with this assumption, the chromosomes preferentially involved in tas in a given tumor were also the ones most often affected by other rearrangements. We did not find the previously reported amplicon in 20q11.1, assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 10 tumors. Nor did we find any association between cytogenetic features and adverse clinical outcome. Thus, local recurrences probably depend more on the adequacy of surgical treatment than on the intrinsic biology of the tumors. PMID:19396867

  19. Aberrations of a cell adhesion molecule CADM4 in renal clear cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Masayoshi; Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Yamada, Daisuke; Goto, Akiteru; Ito, Akihiko; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Kume, Haruki; Morikawa, Teppei; Fukayama, Masashi; Homma, Yukio; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2012-03-15

    Renal clear cell carcinoma (RCCC) is the most frequent subpopulation of renal cell carcinoma and is derived from the proximal uriniferous tubules. We have previously reported that an actin-binding protein, 4.1B/DAL-1, is expressed in renal proximal tubules, whereas it is inactivated in 45% of RCCC by promoter methylation. In the lung and several epithelial tissues, 4.1B is shown to associate with a tumor suppressor protein, CADM1, belonging to the immunoglobulin-superfamily cell adhesion molecules. Here, we demonstrate by immunohistochemistry that another member of the CADM-family protein, CADM4, as well as 4.1B is expressed specifically in human proximal tubules, while CADM1 and 4.1N, another member of the 4.1 proteins, are expressed in the distal tubules. Immunoprecipitation analysis coupled with Western blotting revealed that CADM4 associated with 4.1B, while CADM1 associated with 4.1N in the lysate from normal human kidney, implicating that a cascade of CADM4 and 4.1B plays an important role in normal cell adhesion of the proximal tubules. On the other hand, CADM4 expression was lost or markedly reduced in 7 of 10 (70%) RCC cell lines and 28 of 40 (70%) surgically resected RCCC, including 10 of 16 (63%) tumors with T1a. CADM4 expression was more preferentially lost in RCCC with vascular infiltration (p = 0.04), suggesting that loss of CADM4 is involved in tumor invasion. Finally, introduction of CADM4 into an RCC cell line, 786-O, dramatically suppressed tumor formation in nude mice. These findings suggest that CADM4 is a novel tumor suppressor candidate in RCCC acting with its binding partner 4.1B. PMID:21544807

  20. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley JSC; Umen, James G

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a ‘counting’ mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10767.001 PMID:27015111

  1. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division.

    PubMed

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley Jsc; Umen, James G

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a 'counting' mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control. PMID:27015111

  2. Pollen ultrastructure in anther cultures of Datura innoxia. I. Division of the presumptive vegetative cell.

    PubMed

    Dunwell, J M; Sunderland, N

    1976-12-01

    Ultrastructural features of embryogenic pollen in Datura innoxia are described, just prior to, during, and after completion of the first division of the presumptive vegetative cell. In anther cultures initiated towards the end of the microspore phase and incubated at 28 degrees C in darkness, the spores divide within 24 h and show features consistent with those of dividing spores in vivo. Cytokinesis is also normal in most of the spores and the gametophytic cell-plate curves round the presumptive generative nucleus in the usual highly ordered way. Further differentiation of the 2 gametophytic cells does not take place and the pollen either switches to embryogenesis or degenerates. After 48-72 h, the remaining viable pollen shows the vegetative cell in division. The cell, which has a large vacuole and thin layer of parietal cytoplasm carried over from the microspore, divides consistently in a plane parallel to the microspore division. The dividing wall follows a less-ordered course than the gametophytic wall and usually traverses the vacuole, small portions of which are incorporated into the daughter cell adjacent to the generative cell. The only structural changes in the vegetative cell associated with the change in programme appear to be an increase in electron density of both plastids and mitochondria and deposition of an electron-dense material (possibly lipid) on the tonoplast. The generative cell is attached to the intine when the vegetative cell divides. Ribosomal density increases in the generative cell and exceeds that in the vegetative cell. A thin electron-dense layer also appears in the generative-cell wall. It is concluded that embryogenesis commences as soon as the 2 gametophytic cells are laid down. Gene activity associated with postmitotic synthesis of RNA and protein in the vegetative cell is switched off. The data are discussed in relation to the first division of the embryogenic vegetative cells in Nicotiana tabacum. PMID:1018041

  3. Phytochemicals attenuating aberrant activation of ß-catenin in cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytochemicals are a rich source of chemoprevention agents but their effects on modulating the Wnt/ß-catenin signaling pathway have remained largely uninvestigated. Aberrantly activated Wnt signaling can result in the abnormal stabilization of ß-catenin, a key causative step in a broad spectrum of c...

  4. Asymmetric cell division of granule neuron progenitors in the external granule layer of the mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Haldipur, Parthiv; Sivaprakasam, Iswariya; Periasamy, Vinod; Govindan, Subashika; Mani, Shyamala

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plane of division of granule neuron progenitors (GNPs) was analysed with respect to the pial surface in P0 to P14 cerebellum and the results showed that there was a significant bias towards the plane of cell division being parallel to pial surface across this developmental window. In addition, the distribution of β-Catenin in anaphase cells was analysed, which showed that there was a significant asymmetry in the distribution of β-Catenin in dividing GNPs. Further, inhibition of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signalling had an effect on plane of cell division. Asymmetric distribution of β-Catenin was shown to occur towards the source of a localized extracellular cue. PMID:25979710

  5. The equatorial position of the metaphase plate ensures symmetric cell divisions

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chia Huei; Gasic, Ivana; Huber-Reggi, Sabina P; Dudka, Damian; Barisic, Marin; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome alignment in the middle of the bipolar spindle is a hallmark of metazoan cell divisions. When we offset the metaphase plate position by creating an asymmetric centriole distribution on each pole, we find that metaphase plates relocate to the middle of the spindle before anaphase. The spindle assembly checkpoint enables this centering mechanism by providing cells enough time to correct metaphase plate position. The checkpoint responds to unstable kinetochore–microtubule attachments resulting from an imbalance in microtubule stability between the two half-spindles in cells with an asymmetric centriole distribution. Inactivation of the checkpoint prior to metaphase plate centering leads to asymmetric cell divisions and daughter cells of unequal size; in contrast, if the checkpoint is inactivated after the metaphase plate has centered its position, symmetric cell divisions ensue. This indicates that the equatorial position of the metaphase plate is essential for symmetric cell divisions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05124.001 PMID:26188083

  6. Cortical PAR polarity proteins promote robust cytokinesis during asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Shawn N; Davies, Tim; Zhuravlev, Yelena; Dumont, Julien; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi; Canman, Julie C

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis, the physical division of one cell into two, is thought to be fundamentally similar in most animal cell divisions and driven by the constriction of a contractile ring positioned and controlled solely by the mitotic spindle. During asymmetric cell divisions, the core polarity machinery (partitioning defective [PAR] proteins) controls the unequal inheritance of key cell fate determinants. Here, we show that in asymmetrically dividing Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, the cortical PAR proteins (including the small guanosine triphosphatase CDC-42) have an active role in regulating recruitment of a critical component of the contractile ring, filamentous actin (F-actin). We found that the cortical PAR proteins are required for the retention of anillin and septin in the anterior pole, which are cytokinesis proteins that our genetic data suggest act as inhibitors of F-actin at the contractile ring. Collectively, our results suggest that the cortical PAR proteins coordinate the establishment of cell polarity with the physical process of cytokinesis during asymmetric cell division to ensure the fidelity of daughter cell formation. PMID:26728855

  7. Cortical PAR polarity proteins promote robust cytokinesis during asymmetric cell division

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Shawn N.; Davies, Tim; Zhuravlev, Yelena; Dumont, Julien; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis, the physical division of one cell into two, is thought to be fundamentally similar in most animal cell divisions and driven by the constriction of a contractile ring positioned and controlled solely by the mitotic spindle. During asymmetric cell divisions, the core polarity machinery (partitioning defective [PAR] proteins) controls the unequal inheritance of key cell fate determinants. Here, we show that in asymmetrically dividing Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, the cortical PAR proteins (including the small guanosine triphosphatase CDC-42) have an active role in regulating recruitment of a critical component of the contractile ring, filamentous actin (F-actin). We found that the cortical PAR proteins are required for the retention of anillin and septin in the anterior pole, which are cytokinesis proteins that our genetic data suggest act as inhibitors of F-actin at the contractile ring. Collectively, our results suggest that the cortical PAR proteins coordinate the establishment of cell polarity with the physical process of cytokinesis during asymmetric cell division to ensure the fidelity of daughter cell formation. PMID:26728855

  8. An essential single domain response regulator required for normal cell division and differentiation in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, G B; Lane, T; Ohta, N; Sommer, J M; Newton, A

    1995-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways mediated by sensor histidine kinases and cognate response regulators control a variety of physiological processes in response to environmental conditions. Here we show that in Caulobacter crescentus these systems also play essential roles in the regulation of polar morphogenesis and cell division. Previous studies have implicated histidine kinase genes pleC and divJ in the regulation of these developmental events. We now report that divK encodes an essential, cell cycle-regulated homolog of the CheY/Spo0F subfamily and present evidence that this protein is a cognate response regulator of the histidine kinase PleC. The purified kinase domain of PleC, like that of DivJ, can serve as an efficient phosphodonor to DivK and as a phospho-DivK phosphatase. Based on these and earlier genetic results we propose that PleC and DivK are members of a signal transduction pathway that couples motility and stalk formation to completion of a late cell division cycle event. Gene disruption experiments and the filamentous phenotype of the conditional divK341 mutant reveal that DivK also functions in an essential signal transduction pathway required for cell division, apparently in response to another histidine kinase. We suggest that phosphotransfer mediated by these two-component signal transduction systems may represent a general mechanism regulating cell differentiation and cell division in response to successive cell cycle checkpoints. Images PMID:7664732

  9. Cell division licensing in the multi-chromosomal Vibrio cholerae bacterium.

    PubMed

    Galli, Elisa; Poidevin, Mickaël; Le Bars, Romain; Desfontaines, Jean-Michel; Muresan, Leila; Paly, Evelyne; Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Barre, François-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Cell division must be coordinated with chromosome replication and segregation to ensure the faithful transmission of genetic information during proliferation. In most bacteria, assembly of the division apparatus, the divisome, starts with the polymerization of a tubulin homologue, FtsZ, into a ring-like structure at mid-cell, the Z-ring(1). It typically occurs at half of the cell cycle when most of the replication and segregation cycle of the unique chromosome they generally harbour is achieved(2). The chromosome itself participates in the regulation of cell division, at least in part because it serves as a scaffold to position FtsZ polymerization antagonists(3). However, about 10% of bacteria have more than one chromosome(4), which raises questions about the way they license cell division(3). For instance, the genome of Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera, is divided between a 3 Mbp replicon that originates from the chromosome of its mono-chromosomal ancestor, Chr1, and a 1 Mbp plasmid-derived replicon, Chr2 (ref. 5). Here, we show that Chr2 harbours binding motifs for an inhibitor of Z-ring formation, which helps accurately position the V. cholerae divisome at mid-cell and postpones its assembly to the very end of the cell cycle. PMID:27562255

  10. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool. PMID:27198673

  11. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transmigrates at Epithelial Cell-Cell Junctions, Exploiting Sites of Cell Division and Senescent Cell Extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Golovkine, Guillaume; Faudry, Eric; Bouillot, Stéphanie; Elsen, Sylvie; Attrée, Ina; Huber, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    To achieve systemic infection, bacterial pathogens must overcome the critical and challenging step of transmigration across epithelial barriers. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an agent which causes nosocomial infections. Despite extensive study, details on the mechanisms used by this bacterium to transmigrate across epithelial tissues, as well as the entry sites it uses, remain speculative. Here, using real-time microscopy and a model epithelial barrier, we show that P. aeruginosa employs a paracellular transmigration route, taking advantage of altered cell-cell junctions at sites of cell division or when senescent cells are expelled from the cell layer. Once a bacterium transmigrates, it is followed by a cohort of bacteria using the same entry point. The basal compartment is then invaded radially from the initial penetration site. Effective transmigration and propagation require type 4 pili, the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) and a flagellum, although flagellum-deficient bacteria can occasionally invade the basal compartment from wounded areas. In the basal compartment, the bacteria inject the T3SS toxins into host cells, disrupting the cytoskeleton and focal contacts to allow their progression under the cells. Thus, P. aeruginosa exploits intrinsic host cell processes to breach the epithelium and invade the subcellular compartment. PMID:26727615

  13. Asymmetric Distribution of Histones during Drosophila Male Germline Stem Cell Asymmetric Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Vuong; Feng, Lijuan; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that epigenetic changes are inheritable. However, except for DNA methylation, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance. Many types of stem cells undergo asymmetric cell division to generate a self-renewed stem cell and a daughter cell committed for differentiation. Still, whether and how stem cells retain their epigenetic memory remain questions to be elucidated. During the asymmetric division of Drosophila male germline stem cell (GSC), our recent studies revealed that the preexisting histone 3 (H3) are selectively segregated to the GSC, whereas newly synthesized H3 deposited during DNA replication are enriched in the differentiating daughter cell. We propose a two-step model to explain this asymmetric histone distribution. First, prior to mitosis, preexisting histones and newly synthesized histones are differentially distributed at two sets of sister chromatids. Next, during mitosis, the set of sister chromatids that mainly consist of preexisting histones are segregated to GSCs, while the other set of sister chromatids enriched with newly synthesized histones are partitioned to the daughter cell committed for differentiation. In this review, we apply current knowledge about epigenetic inheritance and asymmetric cell division to inform our discussion of potential molecular mechanisms and the cellular basis underlying this asymmetric histone distribution pattern. We will also discuss whether this phenomenon contributes to the maintenance of stem cell identity and resetting chromatin structure in the other daughter cell for differentiation. PMID:23681658

  14. A time-course study on effects of aluminium on mitotic cell division in Allium sativum.

    PubMed

    Roy, A K; Sharma, A; Talukder, G

    1989-12-01

    Cytotoxic effects of aluminium sulphate on root-tip cells of Allium sativum during a time-course study and during recovery were observed. The endpoints considered were mitotic index and frequencies of aberrant cells and micronuclei induced. Chronic exposure induced mitotic depression and abnormal cells to a degree directly proportional to the concentration used and the period of treatment up to 24 h. A reduction of the early higher level of toxicity was noticed following 48 h of treatment and subsequent recovery in aluminium-free nutrient media in experiments carried out with lower concentrations. PMID:2586548

  15. Aberrant markers expression in T- and B-lymphoid and myeloid leukemia cells of different differentiation stages.

    PubMed

    Babusíková, O; Koníková, E; Kusenda, J; Koubek, K

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to ascertain if in T acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) of different differentiation stages the coexistence of aberrant markers correlate with the degree of leukemic blasts maturation. We evaluated the results of surface and intracellular markers in 42 T-ALL, 86 B-ALL and 71 AML cases. A large panel of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against T-cell, B-cell, myeloid cell and non-lineage specific structures has been used. Patients had dual-color flow cytometric immunophenotyping performed by FACStar flow cytometer. The correct immunological diagnosis of followed new cases before any treatment has been performed and simultaneously the presence of atypical/aberrant phenotypes has been studied and correlated with leukemia cells differentiation stage. A great deal of T-ALL and AML, in opposite to B-ALL cases, revealed a high proportion of atypical phenotypes (55, 75 and 36%, respectively), which are absent in nonleukemic cells. We found out that these atypical phenotypes were present in T-ALL, AML (not clearly in B-ALL) through all differentiation stages and so we obtained an evidence that they might represent an abnormal/atypical rather than an immature phenotype, as it was postulated till now by several authors. PMID:10665842

  16. Cell division of cycle of Bacillus subtilis: evidence of variability in period D.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, M; Rickert, M; Pierucci, O

    1980-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis the deoxyribonucleic acid content and the extent of cell division during inhibition of chromosome replication increased as a function of the average cell mass, independent of the growth rate. At each growth rate, mass, deoxyribonucleic acid, and residual division varied in different cultures. The variation is consistent with a large variability in the D period. At growth rates higher than 1.5 doublings per h at 37 degrees C, the change in D accounts for the growth rate dependence of the mass and deoxyribonucleic acid content. PMID:6768710

  17. Suppression of Adiponectin by Aberrantly Glycosylated IgA1 in Glomerular Mesangial Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tatsuyuki; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Masashi; Takiue, Keiichi; Morinaga, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Ayu; Kikumoto, Yoko; Kitamura, Shinji; Maeshima, Yohei; Makino, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) may be associated with the mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1. To identify mediators affected by aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in cultured human mesangial cells (HMCs), we generated enzymatically modified desialylated and degalactosylated (deSial/deGal) IgA1. The state of deglycosylated IgA1 was confirmed by lectin binding to Helix aspersa (HAA) and Sambucus nigra (SNA). In the cytokine array analysis, 52 proteins were upregulated and 34 were downregulated in HMCs after stimulation with deSial/deGal IgA1. Among them, the secretion of adiponectin was suppressed in HMCs after stimulation with deSial/deGal IgA1. HMCs expressed mRNAs for adiponectin and its type 1 receptor, but not the type 2 receptor. Moreover, we revealed a downregulation of adiponectin expression in the glomeruli of renal biopsy specimens from patients with IgAN compared to those with lupus nephritis. We also demonstrated that aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 was deposited in the mesangium of patients with IgAN by dual staining of HAA and IgA. Moreover, the urinary HAA/SNA ratio of lectin binding was significantly higher in IgAN compared to other kidney diseases. Since adiponectin has anti-inflammatory effects, including the inhibition of adhesion molecules and cytokines, these data suggest that the local suppression of this adipokine by aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 could be involved in the regulation of glomerular inflammation and sclerosis in IgAN. PMID:22457806

  18. Asymmetric partitioning of transfected DNA during mammalian cell division

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Le, Nhung; Denoth-Lippuner, Annina; Barral, Yves; Kroschewski, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Foreign DNA molecules and chromosomal fragments are generally eliminated from proliferating cells, but we know little about how mammalian cells prevent their propagation. Here, we show that dividing human and canine cells partition transfected plasmid DNA asymmetrically, preferentially into the daughter cell harboring the young centrosome. Independently of how they entered the cell, most plasmids clustered in the cytoplasm. Unlike polystyrene beads of similar size, these clusters remained relatively immobile and physically associated to endoplasmic reticulum-derived membranes, as revealed by live cell and electron microscopy imaging. At entry of mitosis, most clusters localized near the centrosomes. As the two centrosomes split to assemble the bipolar spindle, predominantly the old centrosome migrated away, biasing the partition of the plasmid cluster toward the young centrosome. Down-regulation of the centrosomal proteins Ninein and adenomatous polyposis coli abolished this bias. Thus, we suggest that DNA clustering, cluster immobilization through association to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, initial proximity between the cluster and centrosomes, and subsequent differential behavior of the two centrosomes together bias the partition of plasmid DNA during mitosis. This process leads to their progressive elimination from the proliferating population and might apply to any kind of foreign DNA molecule in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the functional difference of the centrosomes might also promote the asymmetric partitioning of other cellular components in other mammalian and possibly stem cells. PMID:27298340

  19. Imaging the division process in living tissue culture cells

    PubMed Central

    Khodjakov, Alexey; Rieder, Conly L.

    2008-01-01

    We detail some of the pitfalls encountered when following live cultured somatic cells by light microscopy during mitosis. Principle difficulties in this methodology arise from the necessity to compromise between maintaining the health of the cell while achieving the appropriate temporal and spatial resolutions required for the study. Although the quality of the data collected from fixed cells is restricted only by the quality of the imaging system and the optical properties of the specimen, the major limiting factor when viewing live cells is radiation damage induced during illumination. We discuss practical considerations for minimizing this damage, and for maintaining the general health of the cell, while it is being followed by multi-mode or multi-dimensional light microscopy. PMID:16343936

  20. Bacillus thuringiensis peptidoglycan hydrolase SleB171 involved in daughter cell separation during cell division.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Hu, Penggao; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Whole-genome analyses have revealed a putative cell wall hydrolase gene (sleB171) that constitutes an operon with two other genes (ypeBandyhcN) of unknown function inBacillus thuringiensisBMB171. The putative SleB171 protein consists of 259 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 28.3 kDa. Gene disruption ofsleB171in the BMB171 genome causes the formation of long cell chains during the vegetative growth phase and delays spore formation and spore release, although it has no significant effect on cell growth and the ultimate release of the spores. The inseparable vegetative cells were nearly restored through the complementation ofsleB171expression. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed thatsleB171is mainly active in the vegetative growth phase, with a maximum activity at the early stationary growth phase. Western blot analysis also confirmed thatsleB171is preferentially expressed during the vegetative growth phase. These results demonstrated that SleB171 plays an essential role in the daughter cell separation during cell division. PMID:26922318

  1. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi . E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-10-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells.

  2. The GoLoco motif: heralding a new tango between G protein signaling and cell division.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2002-04-01

    The Galpha and Gbetagamma components of heterotrimeric G proteins, typically associated with cell-surface receptor signaling, also partake in the macromolecular interactions that underlie cell polarity and cell division. Proteins with Galpha-binding GoLoco motifs, such as Drosophila melanogaster Pins (for Partner of Inscuteable) and its mammalian counterpart LGN, participate in multi-protein complexes that maintain cellular asymmetry and orderly segregation of chromosomal content and daughter cell bodies. The GoLoco motif was recently identified as a selective Galpha-binding partner: the GoLoco-Galpha interaction can displace Gbetagamma and inhibit guanine nucleotide release from the bound Galpha subunit. Recent x-ray crystallographic studies suggest ways in which GoLoco-motif peptides may modulate heterotrimeric G protein signaling. Such peptides could be exploited to help dissect the signals that underpin cell polarity and cell division processes. PMID:14993354

  3. A NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase coordinates metabolism with cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Beaufay, François; Coppine, Jérôme; Mayard, Aurélie; Laloux, Géraldine; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2015-01-01

    Coupling cell cycle with nutrient availability is a crucial process for all living cells. But how bacteria control cell division according to metabolic supplies remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism that coordinates central metabolism with cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This mechanism involves the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase GdhZ and the oxidoreductase-like KidO. While enzymatically active GdhZ directly interferes with FtsZ polymerization by stimulating its GTPase activity, KidO bound to NADH destabilizes lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments. Both GdhZ and KidO share the same regulatory network to concomitantly stimulate the rapid disassembly of the Z-ring, necessary for the subsequent release of progeny cells. Thus, this mechanism illustrates how proteins initially dedicated to metabolism coordinate cell cycle progression with nutrient availability. PMID:25953831

  4. Division genes in Escherichia coli are expressed coordinately to cell septum requirements by gearbox promoters.

    PubMed

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Pla, J; Vicente, M

    1990-11-01

    The cell division ftsQAZ cluster and the ftsZ-dependent bolA morphogene of Escherichia coli are found to be driven by gearboxes, a distinct class of promoters characterized by showing an activity that is inversely dependent on growth rate. These promoters contain specific sequences upstream from the mRNA start point, and their -10 region is essential for the inverse growth rate dependence. Gearbox promoters are essential for driving ftsQAZ and bolA gene expression so that the encoded products are synthesized at constant amounts per cell independently of cell size. This mode of regulation would be expected for the expression of proteins that either play a regulatory role in cell division or form a stoichiometric component of the septum, a structure that, independently of cell size and growth rate, is produced once per cell cycle. PMID:1698623

  5. Cancer Stem Cell Division: When the Rules of Asymmetry Are Broken

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Subhas; Kong, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric division of stem cells is a highly conserved and tightly regulated process by which a single stem cell produces two daughter cells and simultaneously directs the differential fate of both: one retains its stem cell identity while the other becomes specialized and loses stem cell properties. Coordinating these events requires control over numerous intra- and extracellular biological processes and signaling networks. In the initial stages, critical events include the compartmentalization of fate determining proteins within the mother cell and their subsequent passage to the appropriate daughter cell. Disturbance of these events results in an altered dynamic of self-renewing and differentiation within the cell population, which is highly relevant to the growth and progression of cancer. Other critical events include proper asymmetric spindle assembly, extrinsic regulation through micro-environmental cues, and noncanonical signaling networks that impact cell division and fate determination. In this review, we discuss mechanisms that maintain the delicate balance of asymmetric cell division in normal tissues and describe the current understanding how some of these mechanisms are deregulated in cancer. The universe is asymmetric and I am persuaded that life, as it is known to us, is a direct result of the asymmetry of the universe or of its indirect consequences. The universe is asymmetric. –Louis Pasteur PMID:25382732

  6. Real-time prediction of cell division timing in developing zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Kozawa, Satoshi; Akanuma, Takashi; Sato, Tetsuo; Sato, Yasuomi D; Ikeda, Kazushi; Sato, Thomas N

    2016-01-01

    Combination of live-imaging and live-manipulation of developing embryos in vivo provides a useful tool to study developmental processes. Identification and selection of target cells for an in vivo live-manipulation are generally performed by experience- and knowledge-based decision-making of the observer. Computer-assisted live-prediction method would be an additional approach to facilitate the identification and selection of the appropriate target cells. Herein we report such a method using developing zebrafish embryos. We choose V2 neural progenitor cells in developing zebrafish embryo as their successive shape changes can be visualized in real-time in vivo. We developed a relatively simple mathematical method of describing cellular geometry of V2 cells to predict cell division-timing based on their successively changing shapes in vivo. Using quantitatively measured 4D live-imaging data, features of V2 cell-shape at each time point prior to division were extracted and a statistical model capturing the successive changes of the V2 cell-shape was developed. By applying sequential Bayesian inference method to the model, we successfully predicted division-timing of randomly selected individual V2 cells while the cell behavior was being live-imaged. This system could assist pre-selecting target cells desirable for real-time manipulation-thus, presenting a new opportunity for in vivo experimental systems. PMID:27597656

  7. Real-time prediction of cell division timing in developing zebrafish embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kozawa, Satoshi; Akanuma, Takashi; Sato, Tetsuo; Sato, Yasuomi D.; Ikeda, Kazushi; Sato, Thomas N.

    2016-01-01

    Combination of live-imaging and live-manipulation of developing embryos in vivo provides a useful tool to study developmental processes. Identification and selection of target cells for an in vivo live-manipulation are generally performed by experience- and knowledge-based decision-making of the observer. Computer-assisted live-prediction method would be an additional approach to facilitate the identification and selection of the appropriate target cells. Herein we report such a method using developing zebrafish embryos. We choose V2 neural progenitor cells in developing zebrafish embryo as their successive shape changes can be visualized in real-time in vivo. We developed a relatively simple mathematical method of describing cellular geometry of V2 cells to predict cell division-timing based on their successively changing shapes in vivo. Using quantitatively measured 4D live-imaging data, features of V2 cell-shape at each time point prior to division were extracted and a statistical model capturing the successive changes of the V2 cell-shape was developed. By applying sequential Bayesian inference method to the model, we successfully predicted division-timing of randomly selected individual V2 cells while the cell behavior was being live-imaged. This system could assist pre-selecting target cells desirable for real-time manipulation–thus, presenting a new opportunity for in vivo experimental systems. PMID:27597656

  8. mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  9. G2 phase arrest prevents bristle progenitor self-renewal and synchronizes cell division with cell fate differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ayeni, Joseph O; Audibert, Agnès; Fichelson, Pierre; Srayko, Martin; Gho, Michel; Campbell, Shelagh D

    2016-04-01

    Developmentally regulated cell cycle arrest is a fundamental feature of neurogenesis, whose significance is poorly understood. DuringDrosophilasensory organ (SO) development, primary progenitor (pI) cells arrest in G2 phase for precisely defined periods. Upon re-entering the cell cycle in response to developmental signals, these G2-arrested precursor cells divide and generate specialized neuronal and non-neuronal cells. To study how G2 phase arrest affects SO lineage specification, we forced pI cells to divide prematurely. This produced SOs with normal neuronal lineages but supernumerary non-neuronal cell types because prematurely dividing pI cells generate a secondary pI cell that produces a complete SO and an external precursor cell that undergoes amplification divisions. pI cells are therefore able to undergo self-renewal before transit to a terminal mode of division. Regulation of G2 phase arrest thus serves a dual role in SO development: preventing progenitor self-renewal and synchronizing cell division with developmental signals. Cell cycle arrest in G2 phase temporally coordinates the precursor cell proliferation potential with terminal cell fate determination to ensure formation of organs with a normal set of sensory cells. PMID:26893341

  10. Contribution of the FtsQ Transmembrane Segment to Localization to the Cell Division Site▿

    PubMed Central

    Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; Robichon, Carine; Haan, Gert Jan; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Koningstein, Gregory; van Bloois, Edwin; Beckwith, Jon; Luirink, Joen

    2007-01-01

    The Escherichia coli cell division protein FtsQ is a central component of the divisome. FtsQ is a bitopic membrane protein with a large C-terminal periplasmic domain. In this work we investigated the role of the transmembrane segment (TMS) that anchors FtsQ in the cytoplasmic membrane. A set of TMS mutants was made and analyzed for the ability to complement an ftsQ mutant. Study of the various steps involved in FtsQ biogenesis revealed that one mutant (L29/32R;V38P) failed to functionally insert into the membrane, whereas another mutant (L29/32R) was correctly assembled and interacted with FtsB and FtsL but failed to localize efficiently to the cell division site. Our results indicate that the FtsQ TMS plays a role in FtsQ localization to the division site. PMID:17693520

  11. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria. PMID:27418514

  12. [Identification of chromosomal aberration in esophageal cancer cells by mixed BAC DNA probes of chromosome arms and regions].

    PubMed

    Jiajie, Hao; Chunli, Wang; Wenyue, Gu; Xiaoyu, Cheng; Yu, Zhang; Xin, Xu; Yan, Cai; Mingrong, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal aberration is an important genetic feature of malignant tumor cells. This study aimed to clarify whether BAC DNA could be used to identify chromosome region and arm alterations. For each chromosome region, five to ten 1 Mb BAC DNA clones were selected to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the particular region. All of the mixed clones from regions which could cover the whole chromosome arm were then mixed to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the arms. Mixed BAC DNA probes of arms and regions were labeled by degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and Nick translation techniques, respectively. The specificities of these probes were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the metaphase chromosomes of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes. FISH with arm-specific mixed BAC DNA probes showed that chromosomal rearrangements and involved chromosome arms were confirmed in several esophageal cancer cells. By using region-specific mixed probes, the breakpoint on 1q from the derivative chromosome t(1q;7q) was identified in 1q32-q41 in esophageal KYSE140 cells. In conclusion, we established an effective labeling method for 1 Mb BAC DNA mixed clone probes, and chromosome arm and region rearrangements could be identified in several esophageal cancer cells by using these probes. Our study provides a more precise method for identification of chromosomal aberration by M-FISH, and the established method may also be applied to the karyotype analysis of hematological malignancies and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24929514

  13. Hematopoietic expression of oncogenic BRAF promotes aberrant growth of monocyte-lineage cells resistant to PLX4720

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Tamihiro; Dankort, David; Kang, Jing; Giblett, Susan; Pritchard, Catrin A.; McMahon, Martin; Leavitt, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mutational activation of BRAF leading to expression of the BRAFV600E oncoprotein was recently identified in a high percentage of specific hematopoietic neoplasms in monocyte/histiocyte and mature B-cell lineages. Although BRAFV600E is a driver oncoprotein and pharmacological target in solid tumors such as melanoma, lung and thyroid cancer, it remains unknown whether BRAFV600E is an appropriate therapeutic target in hematopoietic neoplasms. To address this critical question, we generated a mouse model expressing inducible BRAFV600E in the hematopoietic system, and evaluated the efficacy of pathway-targeted therapeutics against primary hematopoietic cells. In this model, BRAFV600E expression conferred cytokine-independent growth to monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors leading to aberrant in vivo and in vitro monocyte/macrophage expansion. Furthermore, transplantation of BRAFV600E-expressing bone marrow cells promoted an in vivo pathology most notable for monocytosis in hematopoietic tissues and visceral organs. In vitro analysis revealed that MEK inhibition, but not RAF inhibition, effectively suppressed cytokine-independent clonal growth of monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors. However, combined RAF and PI3K inhibition effectively inhibited cytokine-independent colony formation, suggesting autocrine PI3K pathway activation. Taken together, these results provide evidence that constitutively activated BRAFV600E drives aberrant proliferation of monocyte-lineage cells. This study supports the development of pathway-targeted therapeutics in the treatment of BRAFV600E-expressing hematopoietic neoplasms in the monocyte/histiocyte lineage. PMID:24152792

  14. Cell Division by Longitudinal Scission in the Insect Endosymbiont Spiroplasma poulsonii

    PubMed Central

    Maclachlan, Catherine; Clerc-Rosset, Stéphanie; Knott, Graham W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spiroplasma bacteria are highly motile bacteria with no cell wall and a helical morphology. This clade includes many vertically transmitted insect endosymbionts, including Spiroplasma poulsonii, a natural endosymbiont of Drosophila melanogaster. S. poulsonii bacteria are mainly found in the hemolymph of infected female flies and exhibit efficient vertical transmission from mother to offspring. As is the case for many facultative endosymbionts, S. poulsonii can manipulate the reproduction of its host; in particular, S. poulsonii induces male killing in Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we analyze the morphology of S. poulsonii obtained from the hemolymph of infected Drosophila. This endosymbiont was not only found as long helical filaments, as previously described, but was also found in a Y-shaped form. The use of electron microscopy, immunogold staining of the FtsZ protein, and antibiotic treatment unambiguously linked the Y shape of S. poulsonii to cell division. Observation of the Y shape in another Spiroplasma, S. citri, and anecdotic observations from the literature suggest that cell division by longitudinal scission might be prevalent in the Spiroplasma clade. Our study is the first to report the Y-shape mode of cell division in an endosymbiotic bacterium and adds Spiroplasma to the so far limited group of bacteria known to utilize this cell division mode. PMID:27460796

  15. Brahmarasayana protects against Ethyl methanesulfonate or Methyl methanesulfonate induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine has given great emphasis to the promotion of health. Rasayana is one of the eight branches of Ayurveda which refers to rejuvenant therapy. It has been reported that rasayanas have immuno-modulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions, however, the genotoxic potential and modulation of DNA repair of many rasayanas have not been evaluated. Methods The present study assessed the role of Brahmarasayana (BR) on Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-and Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced genotoxicity and DNA repair in in vivo mouse test system. The mice were orally fed with BR (5 g or 8 mg / day) for two months and 24 h later EMS or MMS was given intraperitoneally. The genotoxicity was analyzed by chromosomal aberrations, sperm count, and sperm abnormalities. Results The results have revealed that BR did not induce significant chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control animals (p >0.05). On the other hand, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by EMS (240 mg / kg body weight) or MMS (125 mg / kg body weight) were significantly higher (p<0.05) to that of the control group. The treatment of BR for 60 days and single dose of EMS or MMS on day 61, resulted in significant (p <0.05) reduction in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in comparison to EMS or MMS treatment alone, indicating a protective effect of BR. Constitutive base excision repair capacity was also increased in BR treated animals. Conclusion The effect of BR, as it relates to antioxidant activity was not evident in liver tissue however rasayana treatment was observed to increase constitutive DNA base excision repair and reduce clastogenicity. Whilst, the molecular mechanisms of such repair need further exploration, this is the first report to demonstrate these effects and provides further evidence for the role of brahmarasayana in the possible improvement of quality of life. PMID:22853637

  16. Icariside II, a natural mTOR inhibitor, disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis via suppressing mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis in sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Geng, Ya-di; An, Fa-Liang; Xia, Yuan-Zheng; Guo, Chao; Luo, Jian-Guang; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Guo, Qing-Long; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2016-05-10

    The aberrant energy homeostasis that characterized by high rate of energy production (glycolysis) and energy consumption (mRNA translation) is associated with the development of cancer. As mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of aberrant energy homeostasis, it is an attractive target for anti-tumor intervention. The flavonoid compound Icariside II (IS) is a natural mTOR inhibitor derived from Epimedium. Koreanum. Herein, we evaluate the effect of IS on aberrant energy homeostasis. The reduction of glycolysis and mRNA translation in U2OS (osteosarcoma), S180 (fibrosarcoma) and SW1535 (chondrosarcoma) cells observed in our study, indicate that, IS inhibits aberrant energy homeostasis. This inhibition is found to be due to suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) axis through blocking the assembly of mTORC1. Furthermore, IS inhibits the cap-dependent translation of c-myc through mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis which links the relationship between mRNA translation and glycolysis. Inhibition of aberrant energy homeostasis by IS, contributes to its in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferation activity. These data indicate that IS disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis of sarcoma cells through suppression of mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis, providing a novel mechanism of IS to inhibit cell proliferation in sarcoma cells. PMID:27056897

  17. Analysis of Cell Division and Elongation Underlying the Developmental Acceleration of Root Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Beemster, Gerrit T.S.; Baskin, Tobias I.

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the relation between cell division and expansion in the regulation of organ growth rate, we used Arabidopsis thaliana primary roots grown vertically at 20°C with an elongation rate that increased steadily during the first 14 d after germination. We measured spatial profiles of longitudinal velocity and cell length and calculated parameters of cell expansion and division, including rates of local cell production (cells mm−1 h−1) and cell division (cells cell−1 h−1). Data were obtained for the root cortex and also for the two types of epidermal cell, trichoblasts and atrichoblasts. Accelerating root elongation was caused by an increasingly longer growth zone, while maximal strain rates remained unchanged. The enlargement of the growth zone and, hence, the accelerating root elongation rate, were accompanied by a nearly proportionally increased cell production. This increased production was caused by increasingly numerous dividing cells, whereas their rates of division remained approximately constant. Additionally, the spatial profile of cell division rate was essentially constant. The meristem was longer than generally assumed, extending well into the region where cells elongated rapidly. In the two epidermal cell types, meristem length and cell division rate were both very similar to that of cortical cells, and differences in cell length between the two epidermal cell types originated at the apex of the meristem. These results highlight the importance of controlling the number of dividing cells, both to generate tissues with different cell lengths and to regulate the rate of organ enlargement. PMID:9536070

  18. Morphological analysis of nuclear separation and cell division during the life cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Woldringh, C L

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative electron microscope observations were performed on Escherichia coli B/r after balanced growth with doubling times (tau) of 32 and 60 min. The experimental approach allowed the timing of morphological events during the cell cycle by classifying serially sectioned cells according to length. Visible separation of the nucleoplasm was found to coincide with the time of termination of chromosome replication as predicted by the Cooper-Helmstetter model. The duration of the process of constrictive cell division (10 min) appeared to be independent of the growth rate for tau equals 60 min or less but to increase with increase doubling time in more slowly growing cells. Physiological division, i.e., compartmentalization prior to physical separation of the cells, was only observed to occur in the last minute of the cell cycle. The morphological results indicate that cell elongation continues during the division process in cells with tau equals 32 min, but fails to continue in cells with tau equals 60 min. Images PMID:1107308

  19. Loss of growth homeostasis by genetic decoupling of cell division from biomass growth: implication for size control mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Hannah; Barkai, Naama

    2014-01-01

    Growing cells adjust their division time with biomass accumulation to maintain growth homeostasis. Size control mechanisms, such as the size checkpoint, provide an inherent coupling of growth and division by gating certain cell cycle transitions based on cell size. We describe genetic manipulations that decouple cell division from cell size, leading to the loss of growth homeostasis, with cells becoming progressively smaller or progressively larger until arresting. This was achieved by modulating glucose influx independently of external glucose. Division rate followed glucose influx, while volume growth was largely defined by external glucose. Therefore, the coordination of size and division observed in wild-type cells reflects tuning of two parallel processes, which is only refined by an inherent feedback-dependent coupling. We present a class of size control models explaining the observed breakdowns of growth homeostasis. PMID:25538138

  20. A Diguanylate Cyclase Acts as a Cell Division Inhibitor in a Two-Step Response to Reductive and Envelope Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell division arrest is a universal checkpoint in response to environmental assaults that generate cellular stress. In bacteria, the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling network is one of several signal transduction systems that regulate key processes in response to extra-/intracellular stimuli. Here, we find that the diguanylate cyclase YfiN acts as a bifunctional protein that produces c-di-GMP in response to reductive stress and then dynamically relocates to the division site to arrest cell division in response to envelope stress in Escherichia coli. YfiN localizes to the Z ring by interacting with early division proteins and stalls cell division by preventing the initiation of septal peptidoglycan synthesis. These studies reveal a new role for a diguanylate cyclase in responding to environmental change, as well as a novel mechanism for arresting cell division. PMID:27507823

  1. FORMATION OF INTRACYTOPLASMIC MEMBRANE SYSTEM OF MYCOBACTERIA RELATED TO CELL DIVISION

    PubMed Central

    Imaeda, Tamotsu; Ogura, Mituo

    1963-01-01

    Imaeda, Tamotsu (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Caracas, Venezuela) and Mitua Ogura. Formation of intracytoplasmic membrane system of mycobacteria related to cell division. J. Bacteriol. 85:150–163. 1963.—Mycobacterium leprae, M. lepraemurium, and a Mycobacterium sp. were observed with an electron microscope. In these bacilli, the three-dimensional structure of the intracytoplasmic membrane system consists of tubular infoldings of the invaginated plasma membrane. The moderately dense substance, presumably representing the cell-wall precursor, is found in the membranous system, especially in the rapid growth phase of mycobacteria. This system always shows an intimate relationship with cell division. A low-density zone, probably corresponding to the low-density substance which coats the cell wall, appears in the connecting regions of the system and in the longitudinal portion of the cell wall. These zones extend centripetally, and the separation of the cell wall occurs after the two zones meet. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the intracytoplasmic membrane system may produce cell-wall material during cell division of mycobacteria. Images PMID:13956365

  2. Spatial coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Männik, Jaan; Bailey, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    To successfully propagate, cells need to coordinate chromosomal replication and segregation with cell division to prevent formation of DNA-less cells and cells with damaged DNA. Here, we review molecular systems in Escherichia coli that are known to be involved in positioning the divisome and chromosome relative to each other. Interestingly, this well-studied micro-organism has several partially redundant mechanisms to achieve this task; none of which are essential. Some of these systems determine the localization of the divisome relative to chromosomes such as SlmA-dependent nucleoid occlusion, some localize the chromosome relative to the divisome such as DNA translocation by FtsK, and some are likely to act on both systems such as the Min system and newly described Ter linkage. Moreover, there is evidence that E. coli harbors other divisome-chromosome coordination systems in addition to those known. The review also discusses the minimal requirements of coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins needed for cell viability. Arguments are presented that cells can propagate without any dedicated coordination between their chromosomes and cell division machinery at the expense of lowered fitness. PMID:25926826

  3. Spatial coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaan; Bailey, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully propagate, cells need to coordinate chromosomal replication and segregation with cell division to prevent formation of DNA-less cells and cells with damaged DNA. Here, we review molecular systems in Escherichia coli that are known to be involved in positioning the divisome and chromosome relative to each other. Interestingly, this well-studied micro-organism has several partially redundant mechanisms to achieve this task; none of which are essential. Some of these systems determine the localization of the divisome relative to chromosomes such as SlmA-dependent nucleoid occlusion, some localize the chromosome relative to the divisome such as DNA translocation by FtsK, and some are likely to act on both systems such as the Min system and newly described Ter linkage. Moreover, there is evidence that E. coli harbors other divisome-chromosome coordination systems in addition to those known. The review also discusses the minimal requirements of coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins needed for cell viability. Arguments are presented that cells can propagate without any dedicated coordination between their chromosomes and cell division machinery at the expense of lowered fitness. PMID:25926826

  4. Mammalian Par3 regulates progenitor cell asymmetric division via Notch signaling in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Bultje, Ronald S.; Castaneda-Castellanos, David R.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Shi, Song-Hai

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division of radial glial progenitors produces neurons while allowing self-renewal; however, little is known about the mechanism that generates asymmetry in daughter cell fate specification. Here we found that mammalian partition defective protein 3 (mPar3), a key cell polarity determinant, exhibits dynamic distribution in radial glial progenitors. While it is enriched at the lateral membrane domain in the ventricular endfeet during interphase, mPar3 becomes dispersed and shows asymmetric localization as cell cycle progresses. Either removal or ectopic expression of mPar3 prevents radial glial progenitors from dividing asymmetrically yet generates different outcomes in daughter cell fate specification. Furthermore, the expression level of mPar3 affects Notch signaling, and manipulations of Notch signaling or Numb expression suppress mPar3 regulation of radial glial cell division and daughter cell fate specification. These results reveal a critical molecular pathway underlying asymmetric cell division of radial glial progenitors in the mammalian neocortex. PMID:19640478

  5. Gibberellin reactivates and maintains ovary-wall cell division causing fruit set in parthenocarpic Citrus species.

    PubMed

    Mesejo, Carlos; Yuste, Roberto; Reig, Carmina; Martínez-Fuentes, Amparo; Iglesias, Domingo J; Muñoz-Fambuena, Natalia; Bermejo, Almudena; Germanà, M Antonietta; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Agustí, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Citrus is a wide genus in which most of the cultivated species and cultivars are natural parthenocarpic mutants or hybrids (i.e. orange, mandarin, tangerine, grapefruit). The autonomous increase in GA1 ovary concentration during anthesis was suggested as being the stimulus responsible for parthenocarpy in Citrus regardless of the species. To determine the exact GA-role in parthenocarpic fruit set, the following hypothesis was tested: GA triggers and maintains cell division in ovary walls causing fruit set. Obligate and facultative parthenocarpic Citrus species were used as a model system because obligate parthenocarpic Citrus sp (i.e. Citrus unshiu) have higher GA levels and better natural parthenocarpic fruit set compared to other facultative parthenocarpic Citrus (i.e. Citrus clementina). The autonomous activation of GA synthesis in C. unshiu ovary preceded cell division and CYCA1.1 up-regulation (a G2-stage cell cycle regulator) at anthesis setting a high proportion of fruits, whereas C. clementina lacked this GA-biosynthesis and CYCA1.1 up-regulation failing in fruit set. In situ hybridization experiments revealed a tissue-specific expression of GA20ox2 only in the dividing tissues of the pericarp. Furthermore, CYCA1.1 expression correlated endogenous GA1 content with GA3 treatment, which stimulated cell division and ovary growth, mostly in C. clementina. Instead, paclobutrazol (GA biosynthesis inhibitor) negated cell division and reduced fruit set. Results suggest that in parthenocarpic citrus the specific GA synthesis in the ovary walls at anthesis triggers cell division and, thus, the necessary ovary growth rate to set fruit. PMID:27095396

  6. Reflections from a Computer Simulations Program on Cell Division in Selected Kenyan Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndirangu, Mwangi; Kiboss, Joel K.; Wekesa, Eric W.

    2005-01-01

    The application of computer technology in education is a relatively new approach that is trying to justify inclusion in the Kenyan school curriculum. Being abstract, with a dynamic nature that does not manifest itself visibly, the process of cell division has posed difficulties for teachers. Consequently, a computer simulation program, using…

  7. Practical Synthesis of PC190723, An Inhibitor of the Bacterial Cell Division Protein FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Sorto, Nohemy A.; Olmstead, Marilyn M.; Shaw, Jared T.

    2010-01-01

    A high-yielding and practical synthesis of the bacterial cell division inhibitor PC190723 is described. The synthesis is completed in a longest linear sequence of five steps from commercially available starting materials and can be readily executed on a multi-gram scale. PMID:21033691

  8. Exploring Middle School Students' Conceptions of the Relationship between Genetic Inheritance and Cell Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Michelle; DeBarger, Angela Haydel; Montgomery, Beronda L.; Zhou, Xuechun; Tate, Erika

    2012-01-01

    This study examines students' understanding of the normative connections between key concepts of cell division, including both mitosis and meiosis, and underlying biological principles that are critical for an in-depth understanding of genetic inheritance. Using a structural equation modeling method, we examine middle school students'…

  9. Do Online Labs Work? An Assessment of an Online Lab on Cell Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Sharon L.

    2006-01-01

    Some studies show students successfully learning science through online courses. This study compared students doing an online and in-class lab exercise on cell division. Online students performed slightly but significantly better on a follow-up content quiz, however, about half those expressed a strong preference for in-class lab work.

  10. FtsZ-less prokaryotic cell division as well as FtsZ- and dynamin-less chloroplast and non-photosynthetic plastid division

    PubMed Central

    Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Nakamura, Mami; Uzuka, Akihiro; Era, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplast division machinery is a mixture of a stromal FtsZ-based complex descended from a cyanobacterial ancestor of chloroplasts and a cytosolic dynamin-related protein (DRP) 5B-based complex derived from the eukaryotic host. Molecular genetic studies have shown that each component of the division machinery is normally essential for normal chloroplast division. However, several exceptions have been found. In the absence of the FtsZ ring, non-photosynthetic plastids are able to proliferate, likely by elongation and budding. Depletion of DRP5B impairs, but does not stop chloroplast division. Chloroplasts in glaucophytes, which possesses a peptidoglycan (PG) layer, divide without DRP5B. Certain parasitic eukaryotes possess non-photosynthetic plastids of secondary endosymbiotic origin, but neither FtsZ nor DRP5B is encoded in their genomes. Elucidation of the FtsZ- and/or DRP5B-less chloroplast division mechanism will lead to a better understanding of the function and evolution of the chloroplast division machinery and the finding of the as-yet-unknown mechanism that is likely involved in chloroplast division. Recent studies have shown that FtsZ was lost from a variety of prokaryotes, many of which lost PG by regressive evolution. In addition, even some of the FtsZ-bearing bacteria are able to divide when FtsZ and PG are depleted experimentally. In some cases, alternative mechanisms for cell division, such as budding by an increase of the cell surface-to-volume ratio, are proposed. Although PG is believed to have been lost from chloroplasts other than in glaucophytes, there is some indirect evidence for the existence of PG in chloroplasts. Such information is also useful for understanding how non-photosynthetic plastids are able to divide in FtsZ-depleted cells and the reason for the retention of FtsZ in chloroplast division. Here we summarize information to facilitate analyses of FtsZ- and/or DRP5B-less chloroplast and non-photosynthetic plastid division. PMID

  11. Onset of hepatocarcinogen-specific cell proliferation and cell cycle aberration during the early stage of repeated hepatocarcinogen administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masayuki; Abe, Hajime; Mizukami, Sayaka; Tanaka, Takeshi; Itahashi, Megu; Onda, Nobuhiko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    We have previously reported that a 28-day treatment of carcinogens evoking target cell proliferation activates G1 /S checkpoint function and apoptosis, as well as induction of aberrant ubiquitin D (Ubd) expression, suggesting disruptive spindle checkpoint function, in rats. The present study aimed to determine the onset time of rat liver cells to undergo carcinogen-specific cell cycle aberration and proliferation. Animals were treated orally with a hepatocarcinogenic dose of methyleugenol or thioacetamide for 3, 7 or 28 days. For comparison, some animals were subjected to partial hepatectomy or treated with noncarcinogenic hepatotoxicants (acetaminophen, α-naphthyl isothiocyanate or promethazine). Carcinogen-specific liver cell kinetics appeared at day 28 as evident by increases of cell proliferation, p21(Cip1+) cells, phosphorylated-Mdm2(+) cells and cleaved caspase 3(+) cells, and upregulation of DNA damage-related genes. Hepatocarcinogens also downregulated Rbl2 and upregulated Cdkn1a and Mdm2, and decreased Ubd(+) cells co-expressing phosphorylated-histone H3 (p-Histone H3) and p-Histone H3(+) cell ratio within the Ki-67(+) proliferating population. These results suggest that it takes 28 days to induce hepatocarcinogen-specific early withdrawal of proliferating cells from M phase due to disruptive spindle checkpoint function as evidenced by reduction of Ubd(+) cells staying at M phase. Disruption of G1 /S checkpoint function reflected by downregulation of Rbl2 as well as upregulation of Mdm2 suggestive of sequestration of retinoblastoma protein is responsible for the facilitation of carcinogen-induced cell proliferation at day 28. Accumulation of DNA damage probably in association with facilitation of p53 degradation by activation of Mdm2 may be a prerequisite for aberrant p21(Cip1) activation, which is responsible for apoptosis. PMID:26011634

  12. An intrinsically disordered linker plays a critical role in bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Buske, P J; Mittal, Anuradha; Pappu, Rohit V; Levin, Petra Anne

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, animals, fungi, and many single celled eukaryotes, division is initiated by the formation of a ring of cytoskeletal protein at the nascent division site. In bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ serves as the foundation for the cytokinetic ring. A conserved feature of FtsZ is an intrinsically disordered peptide known as the C-terminal linker. Chimeric experiments suggest the linker acts as a flexible boom allowing FtsZ to associate with the membrane through a conserved C-terminal domain and also modulates interactions both between FtsZ subunits and between FtsZ and modulatory proteins in the cytoplasm. PMID:25305578

  13. An intrinsically disordered linker plays a critical role in bacterial cell division

    PubMed Central

    Buske, P. J.; Mittal, Anuradha; Pappu, Rohit V.; Levin, Petra Anne

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria, animals, fungi, and many single celled eukaryotes, division is initiated by the formation of a ring of cytoskeletal protein at the nascent division site. In bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ serves as the foundation for the cytokinetic ring. A conserved feature of FtsZ is an intrinsically disordered peptide known as the C-terminal linker. Chimeric experiments suggest the linker acts as a flexible boom allowing FtsZ to associate with the membrane through a conserved C-terminal domain and also modulates interactions both between FtsZ subunits and between FtsZ and modulatory proteins in the cytoplasm. PMID:25305578

  14. Microgravity effects during fertilization, cell division, development, and calcium metabolism in sea urchins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Heide

    1996-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to explore the role of microgravity during fertilization, early development, cytoskeletal organization, and skeletal calcium deposition in a model development system: the sea urchin eggs and embryos. While pursuing these objectives, we have also helped to develop, test, and fly the Aquatic Research Facility (ARF) system. Cells were fixed at preselected time points to preserve the structures and organelles of interest with regards to cell biology events during development. The protocols used for the analysis of the results had been developed during the earlier part of this research and were applied for post-flight analysis using light and (immuno)fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The structures of interest are: microtubules during fertilization, cell division, and cilia movement; microfilaments during cell surface restructuring and cell division; centrosomes and centrioles during cell division, cell differentiation, and cilia formation and movement; membranes, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and chromosomes at all stages of development; and calcium deposits during spicule formation in late-stage embryos. In addition to further explore aspects important or living in space, several aspects of this research are also aimed at understanding diseases that affect humans on Earth which may be accelerated in space.

  15. miR-430 regulates oriented cell division during neural tube development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Takacs, Carter M; Giraldez, Antonio J

    2016-01-15

    MicroRNAs have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression. Originally shown to regulate developmental timing, microRNAs have since been implicated in a wide range of cellular functions including cell identity, migration and signaling. miRNA-430, the earliest expressed microRNA during zebrafish embryogenesis, is required to undergo morphogenesis and has previously been shown to regulate maternal mRNA clearance, Nodal signaling, and germ cell migration. The functions of miR-430 in brain morphogenesis, however, remain unclear. Herein we find that miR-430 instructs oriented cell divisions in the neural rod required for neural midline formation. Loss of miR-430 function results in mitotic spindle misorientation in the neural rod, failed neuroepithelial integration after cell division, and ectopic cell accumulation in the dorsal neural tube. We propose that miR-430, independently of canonical apicobasal and planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways, coordinates the stereotypical cell divisions that instruct neural tube morphogenesis. PMID:26658217

  16. Biomarker for Space Radiation Risk: Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2007-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Over the years, we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast, epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world. We have also studied chromosome aberrations in astronaut s peripheral blood lymphocytes before and after space flight. Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell. We will summarize the results of the investigations, and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure.

  17. The Min system as a general cell geometry detection mechanism: branch lengths in Y-shaped Escherichia coli cells affect Min oscillation patterns and division dynamics.

    PubMed

    Varma, Archana; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Young, Kevin D

    2008-03-01

    In Escherichia coli, division site placement is regulated by the dynamic behavior of the MinCDE proteins, which oscillate from pole to pole and confine septation to the centers of normal rod-shaped cells. Some current mathematical models explain these oscillations by considering interactions among the Min proteins without recourse to additional localization signals. So far, such models have been applied only to regularly shaped bacteria, but here we test these models further by employing aberrantly shaped E. coli cells as miniature reactors. The locations of MinCDE proteins fused to derivatives of green fluorescent protein were monitored in branched cells with at least three conspicuous poles. MinCDE most often moved from one branch to another in an invariant order, following a nonreversing clockwise or counterclockwise direction over the time periods observed. In cells with two short branches or nubs, the proteins oscillated symmetrically from one end to the other. The locations of FtsZ rings were consistent with a broad MinC-free zone near the branch junctions, and Min rings exhibited the surprising behavior of moving quickly from one possible position to another. Using a reaction-diffusion model that reproduces the observed MinCD oscillations in rod-shaped and round E. coli, we predict that the oscillation patterns in branched cells are a natural response of Min behavior in cellular geometries having different relative branch lengths. The results provide further evidence that Min protein oscillations act as a general cell geometry detection mechanism that can locate poles even in branched cells. PMID:18178745

  18. JAGN1 deficiency causes aberrant myeloid cell homeostasis and congenital neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Boztug, Kaan; Järvinen, Päivi M.; Salzer, Elisabeth; Racek, Tomas; Mönch, Sebastian; Garncarz, Wojciech; Gertz, E. Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Haslam, Stuart M.; Schieck, Lena; Puchałka, Jacek; Diestelhorst, Jana; Appaswamy, Giridharan; Lescoeur, Brigitte; Giambruno, Roberto; Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Elling, Ulrich; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Conde, Cecilia Domínguez; Albert, Michael H.; Welte, Karl; Brandes, Gudrun; Sherkat, Roya; van der Werff ten Bosch, Jutte; Rezaei, Nima; Etzioni, Amos; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Penninger, Josef M.; Bennett, Keiryn L.; von Blume, Julia; Dell, Anne; Donadieu, Jean; Klein, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of patients with severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) may shed light on the delicate balance of factors controlling differentiation, maintenance, and decay of neutrophils. We identify 9 distinct homozygous mutations in the gene encoding Jagunal homolog 1 (JAGN1) in 14 SCN patients. JAGN1-mutant granulocytes are characterized by ultrastructural defects, paucity of granules, aberrant N-glycosylation of multiple proteins, and increased apoptosis. JAGN1 participates in the secretory pathway and is required for granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor-mediated signaling. JAGN1 emerges as a factor necessary in differentiation and survival of neutrophils. PMID:25129144

  19. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles S.; Henry, Jonathan T.; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E.; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple (≈1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a simple physical principle governing these complex biological processes: a single temperature-dependent scale of cellular time governs the stochastic dynamics of growth and division in balanced growth conditions. PMID:25349411

  20. Accurate Cell Division in Bacteria: How Does a Bacterium Know Where its Middle Is?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Martin; Rutenberg, Andrew

    2004-03-01

    I will discuss the physical principles lying behind the acquisition of accurate positional information in bacteria. A good application of these ideas is to the rod-shaped bacterium E. coli which divides precisely at its cellular midplane. This positioning is controlled by the Min system of proteins. These proteins coherently oscillate from end to end of the bacterium. I will present a reaction-diffusion model that describes the diffusion of the Min proteins, and their binding/unbinding from the cell membrane. The system possesses an instability that spontaneously generates the Min oscillations, which control accurate placement of the midcell division site. I will then discuss the role of fluctuations in protein dynamics, and investigate whether fluctuations set optimal protein concentration levels. Finally I will examine cell division in a different bacteria, B. subtilis. where different physical principles are used to regulate accurate cell division. See: Howard, Rutenberg, de Vet: Dynamic compartmentalization of bacteria: accurate division in E. coli. Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 278102 (2001). Howard, Rutenberg: Pattern formation inside bacteria: fluctuations due to the low copy number of proteins. Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 128102 (2003). Howard: A mechanism for polar protein localization in bacteria. J. Mol. Biol. 335 655-663 (2004).

  1. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles S; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-11-11

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple (≈ 1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a simple physical principle governing these complex biological processes: a single temperature-dependent scale of cellular time governs the stochastic dynamics of growth and division in balanced growth conditions. PMID:25349411

  2. Cell division in Escherichia coli BS-12 is hypersensitive to deoxyribonucleic acid damage by ultraviolet light.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, B A; Mottershead, R P; Green, M H

    1977-01-01

    Escherichia coli BS-12 uvrA lon is hypersensitive to ultraviolet light. On minimal agar plates at densities in excess of about 10(7) bacteria per plate, as few as one or two photoreversible pyrimidine dimers in the entire genome are sufficient to cause inhibition of cell division. Most of the resulting filaments are unable to divide or form a viable colony. Inhibition of cell division appears to be a rapid consequence of replication of deoxyribonucleic acid containing a pyrimidine dimer. Photoreversibility of the inhibition of cell division persists indefinitely, indicating that the continued presence of the pyrimidine dimers (or the continued generation of daughter strand gaps) is necessary to maintain the division-inhibited state. In view of the kinetics for the production of filamentation by ultraviolet light and the extremely low average inducing fluence (0.03 J/m2), it is concluded that the initiating signal is not the same as that causing other inducible phenomena such as prophage induction or Weigle reactivation. PMID:400790

  3. Curing of yeast [PSI+] prion by guanidine inactivation of Hsp104 does not require cell division.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue-Xuan; Greene, Lois E; Masison, Daniel C; Eisenberg, Evan

    2005-09-01

    Propagation of the yeast prion [PSI+], a self-replicating aggregated form of Sup35p, requires Hsp104. One model to explain this phenomenon proposes that, in the absence of Hsp104, Sup35p aggregates enlarge but fail to replicate thus becoming diluted out as the yeast divide. To test this model, we used live imaging of Sup35p-GFP to follow the changes that occur in [PSI+] cells after the addition of guanidine to inactivate Hsp104. After guanidine addition there was initially an increase in aggregation of Sup35p-GFP; but then, before the yeast divided, the aggregates began to dissolve, and after approximately 6 h the Sup35-GFP looked identical to the Sup35-GFP in [psi+] cells. Although plating studies showed that the yeast were still [PSI+], this reduction in aggregation suggested that curing of [PSI+] by inactivation of Hsp104 might be independent of cell division. This was tested by measuring the rate of curing of [PSI+] cells in both dividing and nondividing cells. Cell division was inhibited by adding either alpha factor or farnesol. Remarkably, with both of these methods, we found that the rate of curing was not significantly affected by cell division. Thus, cell division is not a determining factor for curing [PSI+] by inactivating Hsp104 with guanidine. Rather, curing apparently occurs because Sup35-GFP polymers slowly depolymerize in the absence of Hsp104 activity. Hsp104 then counteracts this curing possibly by catalyzing formation of new polymers. PMID:16123122

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid-derived Semaphorin3B orients neuroepithelial cell divisions in the apicobasal axis.

    PubMed

    Arbeille, Elise; Reynaud, Florie; Sanyas, Isabelle; Bozon, Muriel; Kindbeiter, Karine; Causeret, Frédéric; Pierani, Alessandra; Falk, Julien; Moret, Frédéric; Castellani, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    The spatial orientation of cell divisions is fundamental for tissue architecture and homeostasis. Here we analysed neuroepithelial progenitors in the developing mouse spinal cord to determine whether extracellular signals orient the mitotic spindle. We report that Semaphorin3B (Sema3B) released from the floor plate and the nascent choroid plexus in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) controls progenitor division orientation. Delivery of exogenous Sema3B to neural progenitors after neural tube opening in living embryos promotes planar orientation of their division. Preventing progenitor access to cues present in the CSF by genetically engineered canal obstruction affects the proportion of planar and oblique divisions. Sema3B knockout phenocopies the loss of progenitor access to the CSF. Sema3B binds to the apical surface of mitotic progenitors and exerts its effect via Neuropilin receptors, GSK3 activation and subsequent inhibition of the microtubule stabilizer CRMP2. Thus, extrinsic control mediated by the Semaphorin signalling orients progenitor divisions in neurogenic zones. PMID:25721514

  5. The inhibition of CHO-K1-BH4 cell proliferation and induction of chromosomal aberrations by brevetoxins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sayer, A N; Hu, Q; Bourdelais, A J; Baden, D G; Gibson, J E

    2006-07-01

    Brevetoxins (PbTxs) are highly potent trans-syn polyether neurotoxins produced during blooms of several species of marine dinoflagellates, most notably Karenia brevis. These neurotoxins act on voltage-sensitive sodium channels prolonging the active state. During red tides, the commercial fishing and tourism industries experience millions of dollars of lost revenue. Human consumption of shellfish contaminated with PbTxs results in neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). Additionally, blooms of K. brevis are potentially responsible for adverse human health effects such as respiratory irritation and airway constriction in coastal residents. There is little information regarding the full range of potential toxic effects caused by PbTxs. Recent evidence suggests that PbTxs are genotoxic substances. The purpose of this study was to determine if PbTxs could induce chromosomal aberrations and inhibit cellular proliferation in CHO-K1-BH4 cells, and if so, could the damage be negated or reduced by the PbTx antagonist brevenal. Results from the chromosomal aberrations assay demonstrated that PbTxs are potent inducers of CHO-K1-BH4 chromosome damage. Results from the inhibition of cellular proliferation assays demonstrated that PbTxs inhibit the ability of CHO-K1-BH4 cells to proliferate, an effect which can be reduced with brevenal. PMID:16487644

  6. PAX8 is transcribed aberrantly in cervical tumors and derived cell lines due to complex gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    López-Urrutia, Eduardo; Pedroza-Torres, Abraham; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; De Leon, David Cantu; Morales-González, Fermín; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Mendez, Jorge; García-Castillo, Verónica; Bautista-Isidro, Osvaldo; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor PAX8, a member of the paired box-containing gene family with an important role in embryogenesis of the kidney, thyroid gland and nervous system, has been described as a biomarker in tumors of the thyroid, parathyroid, kidney and thymus. The PAX8 gene gives rise to four isoforms, through alternative mRNA splicing, but the splicing pattern in tumors is not yet established. Cervical cancer has a positive expression of PAX8; however, there is no available data determining which PAX8 isoform or isoforms are present in cervical cancer tissues as well as in cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines. Instead of a differential pattern of splicing isoforms, we found numerous previously unreported PAX8 aberrant transcripts ranging from 378 to 542 bases and present in both cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines and tumor samples. This is the first report of PAX8 aberrant transcript production in cervical cancer. Reported PAX8 isoforms possess differential transactivation properties; therefore, besides being a helpful marker for detection of cancer, PAX8 isoforms can plausibly exert differential regulation properties during carcinogenesis. PMID:27175788

  7. The inhibition of CHO-K1-BH4 cell proliferation and induction of chromosomal aberrations by brevetoxins in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, A.N.; Hu, Q.; Bourdelais, A.J.; Baden, D.G.; Gibson, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Brevetoxins (PbTxs) are highly potent trans-syn polyether neurotoxins produced during blooms of several species of marine dinoflagellates, most notably Karenia brevis. These neurotoxins act on voltage-sensitive sodium channels prolonging the active state. During red tides, the commercial fishing and tourism industries experience millions of dollars of lost revenue. Human consumption of shellfish contaminated with PbTxs results in neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). Additionally, blooms of K. brevis are potentially responsible for adverse human health effects such as respiratory irritation and airway constriction in coastal residents. There is little information regarding the full range of potential toxic effects caused by PbTxs. Recent evidence suggests that PbTxs are genotoxic substances. The purpose of this study was to determine if PbTxs could induce chromosomal aberrations and inhibit cellular proliferation in CHO-K1-BH4 cells, and if so, could the damage be negated or reduced by the PbTx antagonist brevenal. Results from the chromosomal aberrations assay demonstrated that PbTxs are potent inducers of CHO-K1-BH4 chromosome damage. Results from the inhibition of cellular proliferation assays demonstrated that PbTxs inhibit the ability of CHO-K1-BH4 cells to proliferate, an effect which can be reduced with brevenal. PMID:16487644

  8. Ultrastructure and Membrane Traffic During Cell Division in the Marine Pennate Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Atsuko; De Martino, Alessandra; Amato, Alberto; Montsant, Anton; Mathieu, Benjamin; Rostaing, Philippe; Tirichine, Leila; Bowler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The marine pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has become a model for diatom biology, due to its ease of culture and accessibility to reverse genetics approaches. While several features underlying the molecular mechanisms of cell division have been described, morphological analyses are less advanced than they are in other diatoms. We therefore examined cell ultrastructure changes prior to and during cytokinesis. Following chloroplast division, cleavage furrows are formed at both longitudinal ends of the cell and are accompanied by significant vesicle transport. Although neither spindle nor microtubules were observed, the nucleus appeared to be split by the furrow after duplication of the Golgi apparatus. Finally, centripetal cytokinesis was completed by fusion of the furrows. Additionally, F-actin formed a ring structure and its diameter became smaller, accompanying the ingrowing furrows. To further analyse vesicular transport during cytokinesis, we generated transgenic cells expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusions with putative diatom orthologs of small GTPase Sec4 and t-SNARE protein SyntaxinA. Time-lapse observations revealed that SyntaxinA-YFP localization expands from both cell tips toward the center, whereas Sec4-YFP was found in the Golgi and subsequently relocalizes to the future division plane. This work provides fundamental new information about cell replication processes in P. tricornutum. PMID:26386358

  9. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eun Jee; Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah; Cho, Jin Won; Lee, Joon H.

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  10. Shared clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aberrant mast cells and leukemic myeloid blasts detected by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based whole-genome scanning.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Shao, Lina; Bixby, Dale L; Ross, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of aberrant mast cells within extracutaneous sites. In a subset of SM cases, a second associated hematologic non-mast cell disease (AHNMD) is also present, usually of myeloid origin. Polymerase chain reaction and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization studies have provided evidence that, in at least some cases, the aberrant mast cells are related clonally to the neoplastic cells of the AHNMD. In this work, a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-A) was used to characterize the cytogenetics of the aberrant mast cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and concomitant mast cell leukemia associated with a KIT D816A mutation. The results demonstrate the presence of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the mast cells and myeloid blasts, as well as additional abnormalities within mast cells (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) not detectable by routine karyotypic analysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of SNP-A whole-genome scanning to the detection of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the two components of a case of SM-AHNMD. The findings provide additional evidence of a frequent clonal link between aberrant mast cells and cells of myeloid AHNMDs, and also highlight the importance of direct sequencing for identifying uncommon activating KIT mutations. PMID:26865278

  11. Cell segmentation for division rate estimation in computerized video time-lapse microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weijun; Wang, Xiaoxu; Metaxas, Dimitris; Mathew, Robin; White, Eileen

    2007-02-01

    The automated estimation of cell division rate plays an important role in the evaluation of a gene function in high throughput biomedical research. Using Computerized Video Time-Lapse (CVTL) microcopy , it is possible to follow a large number of cells in their physiological conditions for several generations. However analysis of this large volume data is complicated due to cell to cell contacts in a high density population. We approach this problem by segmenting out cells or cell clusters through a learning method. The feature of a pixel is represented by the intensity and gradient information in a small surrounding sub-window. Curve evolution techniques are used to accurately find the cell or cell cluster boundary. With the assumption that the average cell size is the same in each frame, we can use the cell area to estimate the cell division rate. Our segmentation results are compared to manually-defined ground truth. Both recall and precision measures for segmentation accuracy are above 95%.

  12. Potato snakin-1 gene silencing affects cell division, primary metabolism, and cell wall composition.

    PubMed

    Nahirñak, Vanesa; Almasia, Natalia Inés; Fernandez, Paula Virginia; Hopp, Horacio Esteban; Estevez, José Manuel; Carrari, Fernando; Vazquez-Rovere, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Snakin-1 (SN1) is an antimicrobial cysteine-rich peptide isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum) that was classified as a member of the Snakin/Gibberellic Acid Stimulated in Arabidopsis protein family. In this work, a transgenic approach was used to study the role of SN1 in planta. Even when overexpressing SN1, potato lines did not show remarkable morphological differences from the wild type; SN1 silencing resulted in reduced height, which was accompanied by an overall reduction in leaf size and severe alterations of leaf shape. Analysis of the adaxial epidermis of mature leaves revealed that silenced lines had 70% to 90% increases in mean cell size with respect to wild-type leaves. Consequently, the number of epidermal cells was significantly reduced in these lines. Confocal microscopy analysis after agroinfiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed that SN1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein was localized in plasma membrane, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed that SN1 self-interacted in vivo. We further focused our study on leaf metabolism by applying a combination of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and spectrophotometric techniques. These targeted analyses allowed a detailed examination of the changes occurring in 46 intermediate compounds from primary metabolic pathways and in seven cell wall constituents. We demonstrated that SN1 silencing affects cell division, leaf primary metabolism, and cell wall composition in potato plants, suggesting that SN1 has additional roles in growth and development beyond its previously assigned role in plant defense. PMID:22080603

  13. Diurnal rhythm in the cell-division frequency of prochloron (prochlorophyta) in nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, R. A.; Cheng, L.; Matta, J.

    1983-01-01

    Frequencies of cell division stages in suspensions of Prochloron cells, expressed at regular intervals throughout a natural day-night cycle from several colonies of four species of host didemnid, are given. The proportion of dividing cells of Prochloron living symbiotically in colonies of a didemnid, Diplosoma virens, rises from about 4% during the night (20.00-04.00 hrs.) to about 13% in the morning (0,.00-12.00 hrs.), and then falls again in the afternoon. Similiar, though less pronounced, changes were observed among Prochloron cells in two other symbiotic didemnids, Lissoclinum patella and L. voeltzkowi.

  14. A distributed cell division counter reveals growth dynamics in the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Myhrvold, Cameron; Kotula, Jonathan W.; Hicks, Wade M.; Conway, Nicholas J.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial population growth is typically measured when cells can be directly observed, or when death is rare. However, neither of these conditions hold for the mammalian gut microbiota, and, therefore, standard approaches cannot accurately measure the growth dynamics of this community. Here we introduce a new method (distributed cell division counting, DCDC) that uses the accurate segregation at cell division of genetically encoded fluorescent particles to measure microbial growth rates. Using DCDC, we can measure the growth rate of Escherichia coli for >10 consecutive generations. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that DCDC is robust to error across a wide range of temperatures and conditions, including in the mammalian gut. Furthermore, our experimental observations inform a mathematical model of the population dynamics of the gut microbiota. DCDC can enable the study of microbial growth during infection, gut dysbiosis, antibiotic therapy or other situations relevant to human health. PMID:26615910

  15. Illumination of growth, division and secretion by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Siegrist, M. Sloan; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Fox, Douglas M.; Lim, Shion An; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the essential interface between a bacterium and its surroundings. Composed primarily of molecules that are not directly genetically encoded, this highly dynamic structure accommodates the basic cellular processes of growth and division as well as the transport of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular milieu. In this review, we describe aspects of bacterial growth, division and secretion that have recently been uncovered by metabolic labeling of the cell envelope. Metabolite derivatives can be used to label a variety of macromolecules, from proteins to non-genetically-encoded glycans and lipids. The embedded metabolite enables precise tracking in time and space, and the versatility of newer chemoselective detection methods offers the ability to execute multiple experiments concurrently. In addition to reviewing the discoveries enabled by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell envelope, we also discuss the potential of these techniques for translational applications. Finally, we offer some guidelines for implementing this emerging technology. PMID:25725012

  16. Drosophila Mitochondrial Genetics: Evolution of Heteroplasmy through Germ Line Cell Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Solignac, Michel; Génermont, Jean; Monnerot, Monique; Mounolou, Jean-Claude

    1987-01-01

    The mitochondrial genotype of all F1 female offspring (426 individuals) of a single Drosophila mauritiana female, heteroplasmic for two types of mtDNA (a short and a long genome), was established. All descendants were heteroplasmic. The earliest eggs laid by this female show the cytoplasmic genetic structure of ovariole stem cells at the end of development. Cohorts of females from the eggs laid day after day by this female, throughout the 31 days of its life, provide information on the evolution of the mitochondrial genotypes in the course of successive divisions of stem cells. An increase of the percentage of long DNA in offspring was observed as the female aged. Moreover, the variance of the genotypes increases as rounds of stem cell division progress. These results are supported by observations based on the adults issued from the early and late eggs, for three additional heteroplasmic females. PMID:17246410

  17. Bistability of a coupled Aurora B kinase-phosphatase system in cell division.

    PubMed

    Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Segura-Peña, Dario; Godzi, Maxim; Calderon, Abram; Ballister, Edward R; Stamatov, Rumen; Mayo, Alyssa M; Peterson, Laura; Black, Ben E; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Lampson, Michael A; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L

    2016-01-01

    Aurora B kinase, a key regulator of cell division, localizes to specific cellular locations, but the regulatory mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of substrates located remotely from kinase enrichment sites are unclear. Here, we provide evidence that this activity at a distance depends on both sites of high kinase concentration and the bistability of a coupled kinase-phosphatase system. We reconstitute this bistable behavior and hysteresis using purified components to reveal co-existence of distinct high and low Aurora B activity states, sustained by a two-component kinase autoactivation mechanism. Furthermore, we demonstrate these non-linear regimes in live cells using a FRET-based phosphorylation sensor, and provide a mechanistic theoretical model for spatial regulation of Aurora B phosphorylation. We propose that bistability of an Aurora B-phosphatase system underlies formation of spatial phosphorylation patterns, which are generated and spread from sites of kinase autoactivation, thereby regulating cell division. PMID:26765564

  18. Association of epigenetic alterations in the human C7orf24 gene with the aberrant gene expression in malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yuji; Hattori, Akira; Yoshiki, Tatsuhiro; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2013-10-01

    Human chromosome 7 open reading frame 24 (C7orf24)/γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase has been suggested to be a potential diagnostic marker for several cancers, including carcinomas in the bladder urothelium, breast and endometrial epithelium. We here investigated the epigenetic regulation of the human C7orf24 promoter in normal diploid ARPE-19 and IMR-90 cells and in the MCF-7 and HeLa cancer cell lines to understand the transcriptional basis for the malignant-associated high expression of C7orf24. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that histone modifications associated with active chromatin were enriched in the proximal region but not in the distal region of the C7orf24 promoter in HeLa and MCF-7 cells. In contrast, elevated levels of histone modifications leading to transcriptional repression and accumulation of heterochromatin proteins in the C7orf24 promoter were observed in the ARPE-19 and IMR-90 cells, compared to the levels in HeLa and MCF-7 cancer cells. In parallel, the CpG island of the C7orf24 promoter was methylated to a greater extent in the normal cells than in the cancer cells. These results suggest that the transcriptional silencing of the C7orf24 gene in the non-malignant cells is elicited through heterochromatin formation in its promoter region; aberrant expression of C7orf24 associated with malignant alterations results from changes in chromatin dynamics. PMID:23853312

  19. Physical association between a novel plasma-membrane structure and centrosome orients cell division

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Takefumi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    In the last mitotic division of the epidermal lineage in the ascidian embryo, the cells divide stereotypically along the anterior-posterior axis. During interphase, we found that a unique membrane structure invaginates from the posterior to the centre of the cell, in a microtubule-dependent manner. The invagination projects toward centrioles on the apical side of the nucleus and associates with one of them. Further, a cilium forms on the posterior side of the cell and its basal body remains associated with the invagination. A laser ablation experiment suggests that the invagination is under tensile force and promotes the posterior positioning of the centrosome. Finally, we showed that the orientation of the invaginations is coupled with the polarized dynamics of centrosome movements and the orientation of cell division. Based on these findings, we propose a model whereby this novel membrane structure orchestrates centrosome positioning and thus the orientation of cell division axis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16550.001 PMID:27502556

  20. Cell Division Mode Change Mediates the Regulation of Cerebellar Granule Neurogenesis Controlled by the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong; Wang, Minglei; Wang, Jia; Huang, Xingxu; Yang, Ru; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Summary Symmetric and asymmetric divisions are important for self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells during neurogenesis. Although cerebellar granule neurogenesis is controlled by sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, whether and how this process is mediated by regulation of cell division modes have not been determined. Here, using time-lapse imaging and cell culture from neuronal progenitor-specific and differentiated neuron-specific reporter mouse lines (Math1-GFP and Dcx-DsRed) and Patched+/− mice in which SHH signaling is activated, we find evidence for the existence of symmetric and asymmetric divisions that are closely associated with progenitor proliferation and differentiation. While activation of the SHH pathway enhances symmetric progenitor cell divisions, blockade of the SHH pathway reverses the cell division mode change in Math1-GFP;Dcx-DsRed;Patched+/− mice by promoting asymmetric divisions or terminal neuronal symmetric divisions. Thus, cell division mode change mediates the regulation of cerebellar granule neurogenesis controlled by SHH signaling. PMID:26527387

  1. SepG coordinates sporulation-specific cell division and nucleoid organization in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Willemse, Joost; Claessen, Dennis; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cell division is a highly complex process that requires tight coordination between septum formation and chromosome replication and segregation. In bacteria that divide by binary fission a single septum is formed at mid-cell, a process that is coordinated by the conserved cell division scaffold protein FtsZ. In contrast, during sporulation-specific cell division in streptomycetes, up to a hundred rings of FtsZ (Z rings) are produced almost simultaneously, dividing the multinucleoid aerial hyphae into long chains of unigenomic spores. This involves the active recruitment of FtsZ by the SsgB protein, and at the same time requires sophisticated systems to regulate chromosome dynamics. Here, we show that SepG is required for the onset of sporulation and acts by ensuring that SsgB is localized to future septum sites. Förster resonance energy transfer imaging suggests direct interaction between SepG and SsgB. The beta-lactamase reporter system showed that SepG is a transmembrane protein with its central domain oriented towards the cytoplasm. Without SepG, SsgB fails to localize properly, consistent with a crucial role for SepG in the membrane localization of the SsgB-FtsZ complex. While SsgB remains associated with FtsZ, SepG re-localizes to the (pre)spore periphery. Expanded doughnut-shaped nucleoids are formed in sepG null mutants, suggesting that SepG is required for nucleoid compaction. Taken together, our work shows that SepG, encoded by one of the last genes in the conserved dcw cluster of cell division and cell-wall-related genes in Gram-positive bacteria whose function was still largely unresolved,coordinates septum synthesis and chromosome organization in Streptomyces. PMID:27053678

  2. SepG coordinates sporulation-specific cell division and nucleoid organization in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Willemse, Joost; Claessen, Dennis; van Wezel, Gilles P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell division is a highly complex process that requires tight coordination between septum formation and chromosome replication and segregation. In bacteria that divide by binary fission a single septum is formed at mid-cell, a process that is coordinated by the conserved cell division scaffold protein FtsZ. In contrast, during sporulation-specific cell division in streptomycetes, up to a hundred rings of FtsZ (Z rings) are produced almost simultaneously, dividing the multinucleoid aerial hyphae into long chains of unigenomic spores. This involves the active recruitment of FtsZ by the SsgB protein, and at the same time requires sophisticated systems to regulate chromosome dynamics. Here, we show that SepG is required for the onset of sporulation and acts by ensuring that SsgB is localized to future septum sites. Förster resonance energy transfer imaging suggests direct interaction between SepG and SsgB. The beta-lactamase reporter system showed that SepG is a transmembrane protein with its central domain oriented towards the cytoplasm. Without SepG, SsgB fails to localize properly, consistent with a crucial role for SepG in the membrane localization of the SsgB–FtsZ complex. While SsgB remains associated with FtsZ, SepG re-localizes to the (pre)spore periphery. Expanded doughnut-shaped nucleoids are formed in sepG null mutants, suggesting that SepG is required for nucleoid compaction. Taken together, our work shows that SepG, encoded by one of the last genes in the conserved dcw cluster of cell division and cell-wall-related genes in Gram-positive bacteria whose function was still largely unresolved, coordinates septum synthesis and chromosome organization in Streptomyces. PMID:27053678

  3. Centrosome aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells driven by cooperative interactions between p16INK4a deficiency and telomere-dependent genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Daniel; Feijoo, Purificación; Bernal, Aina; Ercilla, Amaia; Agell, Neus; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all human cancers display chromosome instability (CIN), a condition in which chromosomes are gained or lost at a high rate. CIN occurs early in cancer development where it may undermine the advance of the neoplastic disease. With the aim of establishing the mechanisms underlying CIN in cancer, we investigated possible links between telomere-dysfunction and centrosome defects, which were seen to coincide in early in breast carcinogenesis using human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). In this study, we show that TP53 proficient vHMECs cells develop centrosome aberrations when telomere-dysfunction genotoxic stress is produced in the presence of a defective p16INK4a setting and in parallel with an activation of the DNA damage checkpoint response. These aberrations consist of the accumulation of centrosomes in polyploid vHMECs, plus centriole overduplication in both diploid and polyploid cells, thus reflecting that distinct mechanisms underlie the generation of centrosome aberrations in vHMECs. Transduction of vHMEC with hTERT, which rescued the telomere dysfunction phenotype and consequently reduced DNA damage checkpoint activation, led to a progressive reduction of centrosome aberrations with cell culture, both in diploid and in polyploid vHMECs. Radiation-induced DNA damage also raised centrosome aberrations in vHMEC-hTERT. Collectively, our results, using vHMECs define a model where p16INK4a deficiency along with short dysfunctional telomeres cooperatively engenders centrosome abnormalities before p53 function is compromised. PMID:26318587

  4. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  5. Localization of Cell Division Protein FtsQ by Immunofluorescence Microscopy in Dividing and Nondividing Cells of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Buddelmeijer, Nienke; Aarsman, Mirjam E. G.; Kolk, Arend H. J.; Vicente, Miguel; Nanninga, Nanne

    1998-01-01

    The localization of cell division protein FtsQ in Escherichia coli wild-type cells was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy with specific monoclonal antibodies. FtsQ could be localized to the division site in constricting cells. FtsQ could also localize to the division site in ftsQ1(Ts) cells grown at the permissive temperature. A hybrid protein in which the cytoplasmic domain and the transmembrane domain were derived from the γ form of penicillin-binding protein 1B and the periplasmic domain was derived from FtsQ was also able to localize to the division site. This result indicates that the periplasmic domain of FtsQ determines the localization of FtsQ, as has also been concluded by others for the periplasmic domain of FtsN. Noncentral FtsQ foci were found in the area of the cell where the nucleoid resides and were therefore assumed to represent sites where the FtsQ protein is synthesized and simultaneously inserted into the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:9829918

  6. Benzene-Induced Aberrant miRNA Expression Profile in Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Haiyan; Zhang, Juan; Tan, Kehong; Sun, Rongli; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-01-01

    Benzene is a common environmental pollutant that causes hematological alterations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may play a role in benzene-induced hematotoxicity. In this study, C57BL/6 mice showed significant hematotoxicity after exposure to 150 mg/kg benzene for 4 weeks. Benzene exposure decreased not only the number of cells in peripheral blood but also hematopoietic progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Meanwhile, RNA from Lin− cells sorted from the bone marrow was applied to aberrant miRNA expression profile using Illumina sequencing. We found that 5 miRNAs were overexpressed and 45 miRNAs were downregulated in the benzene exposure group. Sequencing results were confirmed through qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we also identified five miRNAs which significantly altered in Lin−c-Kit+ cells obtained from benzene-exposed mice, including mmu-miR-34a-5p; mmu-miR-342-3p; mmu-miR-100-5p; mmu-miR-181a-5p; and mmu-miR-196b-5p. In summary, we successfully established a classical animal model to induce significant hematotoxicity by benzene injection. Benzene exposure may cause severe hematotoxicity not only to blood cells in peripheral circulation but also to hematopoietic cells in bone marrow. Benzene exposure also alters miRNA expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells. This study suggests that benzene induces alteration in hematopoiesis and hematopoiesis-associated miRNAs. PMID:26569237

  7. Individuality and universality in the growth-division laws of single E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Kennard, Andrew S; Osella, Matteo; Javer, Avelino; Grilli, Jacopo; Nghe, Philippe; Tans, Sander J; Cicuta, Pietro; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The mean size of exponentially dividing Escherichia coli cells in different nutrient conditions is known to depend on the mean growth rate only. However, the joint fluctuations relating cell size, doubling time, and individual growth rate are only starting to be characterized. Recent studies in bacteria reported a universal trend where the spread in both size and doubling times is a linear function of the population means of these variables. Here we combine experiments and theory and use scaling concepts to elucidate the constraints posed by the second observation on the division control mechanism and on the joint fluctuations of sizes and doubling times. We found that scaling relations based on the means collapse both size and doubling-time distributions across different conditions and explain how the shape of their joint fluctuations deviates from the means. Our data on these joint fluctuations highlight the importance of cell individuality: Single cells do not follow the dependence observed for the means between size and either growth rate or inverse doubling time. Our calculations show that these results emerge from a broad class of division control mechanisms requiring a certain scaling form of the "division hazard rate function," which defines the probability rate of dividing as a function of measurable parameters. This "model free" approach gives a rationale for the universal body-size distributions observed in microbial ecosystems across many microbial species, presumably dividing with multiple mechanisms. Additionally, our experiments show a crossover between fast and slow growth in the relation between individual-cell growth rate and division time, which can be understood in terms of different regimes of genome replication control. PMID:26871102

  8. Individuality and universality in the growth-division laws of single E. coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennard, Andrew S.; Osella, Matteo; Javer, Avelino; Grilli, Jacopo; Nghe, Philippe; Tans, Sander J.; Cicuta, Pietro; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The mean size of exponentially dividing Escherichia coli cells in different nutrient conditions is known to depend on the mean growth rate only. However, the joint fluctuations relating cell size, doubling time, and individual growth rate are only starting to be characterized. Recent studies in bacteria reported a universal trend where the spread in both size and doubling times is a linear function of the population means of these variables. Here we combine experiments and theory and use scaling concepts to elucidate the constraints posed by the second observation on the division control mechanism and on the joint fluctuations of sizes and doubling times. We found that scaling relations based on the means collapse both size and doubling-time distributions across different conditions and explain how the shape of their joint fluctuations deviates from the means. Our data on these joint fluctuations highlight the importance of cell individuality: Single cells do not follow the dependence observed for the means between size and either growth rate or inverse doubling time. Our calculations show that these results emerge from a broad class of division control mechanisms requiring a certain scaling form of the "division hazard rate function," which defines the probability rate of dividing as a function of measurable parameters. This "model free" approach gives a rationale for the universal body-size distributions observed in microbial ecosystems across many microbial species, presumably dividing with multiple mechanisms. Additionally, our experiments show a crossover between fast and slow growth in the relation between individual-cell growth rate and division time, which can be understood in terms of different regimes of genome replication control.

  9. Flat leaf formation realized by cell-division control and mutual recessive gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Tachikawa, Masashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    Most of the land plants generally have dorsoventrally flat leaves, maximizing the surface area of both upper (adaxial) side and lower (abaxial) side. The former is specialized for light capturing for photosynthesis and the latter is specialized for gas exchange. From findings of molecular genetics, it has been considered that the coupled dynamics between tissue morphogenesis and gene regulation for cell identity is responsible for making flat leaves. The hypothesis claims that a flat leaf is generated under two assumptions, (i) two mutually recessive groups of genes specify adaxial and abaxial sides of a leaf, (ii) cell divisions are induced at the limited region in the leaf margin where both of two groups are expressed. We examined the plausibility and possibility of this hypothesis from the dynamical point of view. We studied a mathematical model where two processes are coupled, tissue morphogenesis induced by cell division and deformation, and dynamics of gene regulations. From the analysis of the model we found that the classically believed hypothesis is not sufficient to generate flat leaves with high probability. We examined several different modifications and revision of the model. Then we found that a simple additional rule of polarized cell division facilitates flat leaf formation. The result of our analysis gives prediction of possible mechanism, which can be easily verified in experiments. PMID:27287339

  10. Localization of cytokinesis factors to the future cell division site by microtubule-dependent transport

    PubMed Central

    Atilgan, Erdinc; Burgess, David; Chang, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Summary The mechanism by which spindle microtubules (MTs) determine the site of cell division in animal cells is still highly controversial. Putative cytokinesis “signals” have been proposed to be positioned by spindle MTs at equatorial cortical regions to increase cortical contractility, and/or at polar regions to decrease contractility (Rappaport 1986; von Dassow 2009). Given the relative paucity of MTs at the future division site, it has not been clear how MTs localize cytokinesis factors there. Here, we test cytokinesis models using computational and experimental approaches. We present a simple lattice-based model in which signal-kinesin complexes move by transient plus-end directed movements on MTs interspersed with occasions of uniform diffusion in the cytoplasm. In simulations, complexes distribute themselves initially at the spindle midzone and then move on astral MTs to accumulate with time at the equatorial cortex. Simulations accurately predict cleavage patterns of cells with different geometries and MT arrangements and elucidate several experimental observations that have defied easy explanation by previous models. We verify this model with experiments on indented sea urchin zygotes showing that cells often divide perpendicular to the spindle at sites distinct from the indentations. These studies support an equatorial stimulation model and provide a simple mechanism explaining how cytokinesis factors localize to the future division site. PMID:23001894

  11. Cell division interference in newly fertilized ovules induces stenospermocarpy in cross-pollinated citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Mesejo, Carlos; Muñoz-Fambuena, Natalia; Reig, Carmina; Martínez-Fuentes, Amparo; Agustí, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Seedlessness is a highly desirable characteristic in fresh fruits. However, post-fertilization seed abortion of cross-pollinated citrus fruit is uncommon. The factors regulating stenospermocarpy in citrus are unknown. In this research, we induced stenospermocarpy interfering in newly fertilized ovule cell division. The research also elucidates the most sensitive stage for ovule/seed abortion in citrus. Experiments were conducted with 'Afourer' mandarin that cross-pollinates with several cultivars and species. Cross-pollinated fruitlets were treated with maleic hydrazide (MH), a systemic growth regulator that specifically interferes in cell division. MH reduced ovule growth rate, the number of cell layers in nucella and inhibited embryo sac expansion; moreover, the treatment increased callose accumulation in nucella and surrounding the embryo sac. Fruits developed an early-aborted seed type with an immature, soft and edible seed coat. Seed number (-80%) and seed weight (-46%) were reduced in mature fruits. MH also hampered cell division in ovary walls, mesocarp and endocarp, thus reducing daily fruitlet growth and increasing fruit abscission. Stenospermocarpy could only be induced for a short period of time in the progamic phase of fertilization, specifically, when ovules are ready to be fertilized (7 days after anthesis) to early stages of embryo sac development (14 days after anthesis). PMID:25017163

  12. Nuclear aberrations in hair follicle cells of patients receiving cyclophosphamide. A possible in vivo assay for human exposure to genotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, M T; Tackaberry, L E; Hardy, M H; Noseworthy, J H

    1990-01-01

    The toxic effect of cyclophosphamide on the proliferative cell population of hair follicles plucked from the human scalp was examined by the in vivo nuclear aberration assay. Patients participating in an independent clinical trial received oral low dose cyclophosphamide, intravenous high dose cyclophosphamide or oral placebo treatment. The percent of cells with nuclear aberrations (indicating apoptosis, a special form of cell death) and the percent of mitotic cells, in the hair matrix, were calculated for each patient before treatment and at several time points following cyclophosphamide or placebo treatment. The mean percentages of nuclear aberrations in both the treated Low dose and High dose cyclophosphamide patients were significantly higher than those for the pre-treatment and Placebo patients. The nuclear aberrations in hair follicle cells increased from pre-treatment (and Placebo) to treated Low dose and finally to treated High dose patients. The average percentage for pre-treatment samples from all patients was 0.06 +/- 0.03 SE. For 1 week and 1 month samples from Low dose patients it was 0.35 +/- 0.08 SE, and for combined 2,3 and 4 day samples from High dose patients it was 1.08 +/- 0.12 SE. Cyclophosphamide also had a significant effect on mitosis. A decrease in mitotic activity was observed at 1 month following the initial low dose cyclophosphamide treatment and at 24 +/- 2 h following each of the first two high dose cyclophosphamide treatments. The observed increase in nuclear aberrations following low dose as well as high dose cyclophosphamide suggests that it is feasible to use the nuclear aberration assay for in vivo human genotoxicity testing, using proliferating hair follicle cells. PMID:2190540

  13. Interphase Molecular Cytogenetic Detection Rates of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia-Specific Aberrations Are Higher in Cultivated Cells Than in Blood or Bone Marrow Smears.

    PubMed

    Alhourani, Eyad; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Harutyunyan, Tigran; Glaser, Anita; Schlie, Cordula; Pohle, Beate; Liehr, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Banding cytogenetics is still the gold standard in many fields of leukemia diagnostics. However, in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), GTG-banding results are hampered by a low mitotic rate of the corresponding malignant lymphatic cells. Thus, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) for the detection of specific cytogenetic aberrations is done nowadays as a supplement to or even instead of banding cytogenetics in many diagnostic laboratories. These iFISH studies can be performed on native blood or bone marrow smears or in nuclei after cultivation and stimulation by a suitable mitogen. As there are only few comparative studies with partially conflicting results for the detection rates of aberrations in cultivated and native cells, this question was studied in 38 CLL cases with known aberrations in 11q22.2, 11q22.3, 12, 13q14.3, 14q32.33, 17p13.1, or 18q21.32. The obtained results implicate that iFISH directly applied on smears is in general less efficient for the detection of CLL-specific genetic abnormalities than for cultivated cells. This also shows that applied cell culture conditions are well suited for malignant CLL cells. Thus, to detect malignant aberrant cells in CLL, cell cultivation and cytogenetic workup should be performed and the obtained material should be subjected to banding cytogenetics and iFISH. PMID:27315825

  14. aPKCλ controls epidermal homeostasis and stem cell fate through regulation of division orientation

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Michaela T.; Scott, Jeanie; Zielinski, Julia G.; Vorhagen, Susanne; Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A.; Blanpain, Cédric

    2013-01-01

    The atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) is a key regulator of polarity and cell fate in lower organisms. However, whether mammalian aPKCs control stem cells and fate in vivo is not known. Here we show that loss of aPKCλ in a self-renewing epithelium, the epidermis, disturbed tissue homeostasis, differentiation, and stem cell dynamics, causing progressive changes in this tissue. This was accompanied by a gradual loss of quiescent hair follicle bulge stem cells and a temporary increase in proliferating progenitors. Lineage tracing analysis showed that loss of aPKCλ altered the fate of lower bulge/hair germ stem cells. This ultimately led to loss of proliferative potential, stem cell exhaustion, alopecia, and premature aging. Inactivation of aPKCλ produced more asymmetric divisions in different compartments, including the bulge. Thus, aPKCλ is crucial for homeostasis of self-renewing stratifying epithelia, and for the regulation of cell fate, differentiation, and maintenance of epidermal bulge stem cells likely through its role in balancing symmetric and asymmetric division. PMID:24019538

  15. aPKCλ controls epidermal homeostasis and stem cell fate through regulation of division orientation.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Michaela T; Scott, Jeanie; Zielinski, Julia G; Vorhagen, Susanne; Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A; Blanpain, Cédric; Leitges, Michael; Niessen, Carien M

    2013-09-16

    The atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) is a key regulator of polarity and cell fate in lower organisms. However, whether mammalian aPKCs control stem cells and fate in vivo is not known. Here we show that loss of aPKCλ in a self-renewing epithelium, the epidermis, disturbed tissue homeostasis, differentiation, and stem cell dynamics, causing progressive changes in this tissue. This was accompanied by a gradual loss of quiescent hair follicle bulge stem cells and a temporary increase in proliferating progenitors. Lineage tracing analysis showed that loss of aPKCλ altered the fate of lower bulge/hair germ stem cells. This ultimately led to loss of proliferative potential, stem cell exhaustion, alopecia, and premature aging. Inactivation of aPKCλ produced more asymmetric divisions in different compartments, including the bulge. Thus, aPKCλ is crucial for homeostasis of self-renewing stratifying epithelia, and for the regulation of cell fate, differentiation, and maintenance of epidermal bulge stem cells likely through its role in balancing symmetric and asymmetric division. PMID:24019538

  16. Peptidoglycan Synthesis Machinery in Agrobacterium tumefaciens During Unipolar Growth and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Todd A.; Anderson-Furgeson, James; Zupan, John R.; Zik, Justin J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The synthesis of peptidoglycan (PG) in bacteria is a crucial process controlling cell shape and vitality. In contrast to bacteria such as Escherichia coli that grow by dispersed lateral insertion of PG, little is known of the processes that direct polar PG synthesis in other bacteria such as the Rhizobiales. To better understand polar growth in the Rhizobiales Agrobacterium tumefaciens, we first surveyed its genome to identify homologs of (~70) well-known PG synthesis components. Since most of the canonical cell elongation components are absent from A. tumefaciens, we made fluorescent protein fusions to other putative PG synthesis components to assay their subcellular localization patterns. The cell division scaffolds FtsZ and FtsA, PBP1a, and a Rhizobiales- and Rhodobacterales-specific l,d-transpeptidase (LDT) all associate with the elongating cell pole. All four proteins also localize to the septum during cell division. Examination of the dimensions of growing cells revealed that new cell compartments gradually increase in width as they grow in length. This increase in cell width is coincident with an expanded region of LDT-mediated PG synthesis activity, as measured directly through incorporation of exogenous d-amino acids. Thus, unipolar growth in the Rhizobiales is surprisingly dynamic and represents a significant departure from the canonical growth mechanism of E. coli and other well-studied bacilli. PMID:24865559

  17. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  18. Going vertical: functional role and working principles of the protein Inscuteable in asymmetric cell divisions.

    PubMed

    Culurgioni, Simone; Mapelli, Marina

    2013-11-01

    Coordinating mitotic spindle dynamics with cortical polarity is essential for stem cell asymmetric divisions. Over the years, the protein Inscuteable (Insc) has emerged as a key element determining the spindle orientation in asymmetric mitoses. Its overexpression increases differentiative divisions in systems as diverse as mouse keratinocytes and radial glial cells. To date, the molecular explanation to account for this phenotype envisioned Insc as an adaptor molecule bridging between the polarity proteins Par3:Par6:aPKC and the spindle pulling machines assembled on NuMA:LGN:Gαi. However, recent biochemical and structural data revealed that Insc and NuMA are competitive interactors of LGN, challenging the simplistic idea of a single apical macromolecular complex, and demanding a revision of the actual working principles of Insc. PMID:23516018

  19. Automatic detection of cell divisions (mitosis) in live-imaging microscopy images using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Shkolyar, Anat; Gefen, Amit; Benayahu, Dafna; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-08-01

    We propose a semi-automated pipeline for the detection of possible cell divisions in live-imaging microscopy and the classification of these mitosis candidates using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). We use time-lapse images of NIH3T3 scratch assay cultures, extract patches around bright candidate regions that then undergo segmentation and binarization, followed by a classification of the binary patches into either containing or not containing cell division. The classification is performed by training a Convolutional Neural Network on a specially constructed database. We show strong results of AUC = 0.91 and F-score = 0.89, competitive with state-of-the-art methods in this field. PMID:26736369

  20. Influence of the circadian rhythm in cell division on radiation-induced mitotic delay in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, N.H.

    1982-01-01

    Mitotic delay is described as a classical response to radiation; however, circadian rhythmicity in cell division in vivo has not been considered by many authors. The present study investigated the relation between fluctuations reported as mitotic delay and recovery in vivo and circadian oscillations in mitotic index in mouse corneal epithelium. One aspect involved single doses (approximately 600 rad) given to mice at different circadian stages. The normal circadian rhythm in cell division was never obliterated. Inhibition of mitosis was evident but unpredictable, ranging from 6 to 15 hr after irradiation. Recovery was evident only during the daily increase in mitotic index of controls. The classical interpretation of recovery from mitotic delay may be in an in vitro phenomenon not reflecting in vivo responses, which are apparently strongly circadian stage dependent. The second portion of the study demonstrated a dose-response effect on length of mitotic delay and, to a lesser extent, degree of recovery.

  1. Interplay of migratory and division forces as a generic mechanism for stem cell patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannezo, Edouard; Coucke, Alice; Joanny, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    In many adult tissues, stem cells and differentiated cells are not homogeneously distributed: stem cells are arranged in periodic "niches," and differentiated cells are constantly produced and migrate out of these niches. In this article, we provide a general theoretical framework to study mixtures of dividing and actively migrating particles, which we apply to biological tissues. We show in particular that the interplay between the stresses arising from active cell migration and stem cell division give rise to robust stem cell patterns. The instability of the tissue leads to spatial patterns which are either steady or oscillating in time. The wavelength of the instability has an order of magnitude consistent with the biological observations. We also discuss the implications of these results for future in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  2. Effect of Water Stress on Cortical Cell Division Rates within the Apical Meristem of Primary Roots of Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, M. M.; Silk, W. K.; Burman, P.

    1997-01-01

    We characterized the effect of water stress on cell division rates within the meristem of the primary root of maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings. As usual in growth kinematics, cell number density is found by counting the number of cells per small unit length of the root; growth velocity is the rate of displacement of a cellular particle found at a given distance from the apex; and the cell flux, representing the rate at which cells are moving past a spatial point, is defined as the product of velocity and cell number density. The local cell division rate is estimated by summing the derivative of cell density with respect to time, and the derivative of the cell flux with respect to distance. Relatively long (2-h) intervals were required for time-lapse photography to resolve growth velocity within the meristem. Water stress caused meristematic cells to be longer and reduced the rates of cell division, per unit length of tissue and per cell, throughout most of the meristem. Peak cell division rate was 8.2 cells mm-1 h-1 (0.10 cells cell-1 h-1) at 0.8 mm from the apex for cells under water stress, compared with 13 cells mm-1 h-1 (0.14 cells cell-1 h-1) at 1.0 mm for controls. PMID:12223725

  3. Timing of Tissue-specific Cell Division Requires a Differential Onset of Zygotic Transcription during Metazoan Embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming-Kin; Guan, Daogang; Ng, Kaoru Hon Chun; Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; An, Xiaomeng; Li, Runsheng; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying

    2016-06-10

    Metazoan development demands not only precise cell fate differentiation but also accurate timing of cell division to ensure proper development. How cell divisions are temporally coordinated during development is poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis provides an excellent opportunity to study this coordination due to its invariant development and widespread division asynchronies. One of the most pronounced asynchronies is a significant delay of cell division in two endoderm progenitor cells, Ea and Ep, hereafter referred to as E2, relative to its cousins that mainly develop into mesoderm organs and tissues. To unravel the genetic control over the endoderm-specific E2 division timing, a total of 822 essential and conserved genes were knocked down using RNAi followed by quantification of cell cycle lengths using in toto imaging of C. elegans embryogenesis and automated lineage. Intriguingly, knockdown of numerous genes encoding the components of general transcription pathway or its regulatory factors leads to a significant reduction in the E2 cell cycle length but an increase in cell cycle length of the remaining cells, indicating a differential requirement of transcription for division timing between the two. Analysis of lineage-specific RNA-seq data demonstrates an earlier onset of transcription in endoderm than in other germ layers, the timing of which coincides with the birth of E2, supporting the notion that the endoderm-specific delay in E2 division timing demands robust zygotic transcription. The reduction in E2 cell cycle length is frequently associated with cell migration defect and gastrulation failure. The results suggest that a tissue-specific transcriptional activation is required to coordinate fate differentiation, division timing, and cell migration to ensure proper development. PMID:27056332

  4. Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 regulates cell division activity during early tomato fruit development

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Maaike; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Schimmel, Bernardus C. J.; Stultiens, Catharina L. M.; de Groot, Peter F. M.; Powers, Stephen J.; Tikunov, Yury M.; Bovy, Arnoud G.; Mariani, Celestina; Vriezen, Wim H.; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    The transformation of the ovary into a fruit after successful completion of pollination and fertilization has been associated with many changes at transcriptomic level. These changes are part of a dynamic and complex regulatory network that is controlled by phytohormones, with a major role for auxin. One of the auxin-related genes differentially expressed upon fruit set and early fruit development in tomato is Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 (SlARF9). Here, the functional analysis of this ARF is described. SlARF9 expression was found to be auxin-responsive and SlARF9 mRNA levels were high in the ovules, placenta, and pericarp of pollinated ovaries, but also in other plant tissues with high cell division activity, such as the axillary meristems and root meristems. Transgenic plants with increased SlARF9 mRNA levels formed fruits that were smaller than wild-type fruits because of reduced cell division activity, whereas transgenic lines in which SlARF9 mRNA levels were reduced showed the opposite phenotype. The expression analysis, together with the phenotype of the transgenic lines, suggests that, in tomato, ARF9 negatively controls cell division during early fruit development. PMID:25883382

  5. Role of eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manuse, Sylvie; Fleurie, Aurore; Zucchini, Laure; Lesterlin, Christian; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess a repertoire of versatile protein kinases modulating diverse aspects of their physiology by phosphorylating proteins on various amino acids including histidine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, serine, threonine and tyrosine. One class of membrane serine/threonine protein kinases possesses a catalytic domain sharing a common fold with eukaryotic protein kinases and an extracellular mosaic domain found in bacteria only, named PASTA for 'Penicillin binding proteins And Serine/Threonine kinase Associated'. Over the last decade, evidence has been accumulating that these protein kinases are involved in cell division, morphogenesis and developmental processes in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. However, observations differ from one species to another suggesting that a general mechanism of activation of their kinase activity is unlikely and that species-specific regulation of cell division is at play. In this review, we survey the latest research on the structural aspects and the cellular functions of bacterial serine/threonine kinases with PASTA motifs to illustrate the diversity of the regulatory mechanisms controlling bacterial cell division and morphogenesis. PMID:26429880

  6. Structural characterization of the cell division cycle in Strigomonas culicis, an endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatid.

    PubMed

    Brum, Felipe Lopes; Catta-Preta, Carolina Moura Costa; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Elias, Maria Carolina; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado

    2014-02-01

    Strigomonas culicis (previously referred to as Blastocrithidia culicis) is a monoxenic trypanosomatid harboring a symbiotic bacterium, which maintains an obligatory relationship with the host protozoan. Investigations of the cell cycle in symbiont harboring trypanosomatids suggest that the bacterium divides in coordination with other host cell structures, particularly the nucleus. In this study we used light and electron microscopy followed by three-dimensional reconstruction to characterize the symbiont division during the cell cycle of S. culicis. We observed that during this process, the symbiotic bacterium presents different forms and is found at different positions in relationship to the host cell structures. At the G1/S phase of the protozoan cell cycle, the endosymbiont exhibits a constricted form that appears to elongate, resulting in the bacterium division, which occurs before kinetoplast and nucleus segregation. During cytokinesis, the symbionts are positioned close to each nucleus to ensure that each daughter cell will inherit a single copy of the bacterium. These observations indicated that the association of the bacterium with the protozoan nucleus coordinates the cell cycle in both organisms. PMID:24397934

  7. Morphological adaptation and inhibition of cell division during stationary phase in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Wortinger, M A; Quardokus, E M; Brun, Y V

    1998-08-01

    During exponential growth, each cell cycle of the alpha-purple bacterium Caulobacter crescentus gives rise to two different cell types: a motile swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. When cultures of C. crescentus are grown for extended periods in complex (PYE) medium, cells undergo dramatic morphological changes and display increased resistance to stress. After cultures enter stationary phase, most cells are arrested at the predivisional stage. For the first 6-8 days after inoculation, the colony-forming units (cfu) steadily decrease from 10(9) cfu ml(-1) to a minimum of 3x10(7) cfu ml(-1) after which cells gradually adopt an elongated helical morphology. For days 9-12, the cfu of the culture increase and stabilize around 2 x 10(8) cfu ml(-1). The viable cells have an elongated helical morphology with no constrictions and an average length of 20 microm, which is 15-20 times longer than exponentially growing cells. The level of the cell division initiation protein FtsZ decreases during the first week in stationary phase and remains at a low constant level consistent with the lack of cell division. When resuspended in fresh medium, the elongated cells return to normal size and morphology within 12 h. Cells that have returned from stationary phase proceed through the same developmental changes when they are again grown for an extended period and have not acquired a heritable growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) compared with overnight cultures. We conclude that the changes observed in prolonged cultures are the result of entry into a new developmental pathway and are not due to mutation. PMID:9767565

  8. Daptomycin-mediated reorganization of membrane architecture causes mislocalization of essential cell division proteins.

    PubMed

    Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Nicolas; Silverman, Jared A

    2012-09-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic used clinically for the treatment of certain types of Gram-positive infections, including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Details of the mechanism of action of daptomycin continue to be elucidated, particularly the question of whether daptomycin acts on the cell membrane, the cell wall, or both. Here, we use fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize the interaction of daptomycin with the model Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We show that the first observable cellular effects are the formation of membrane distortions (patches of membrane) that precede cell death by more than 30 min. Membrane patches are able to recruit the essential cell division protein DivIVA. Recruitment of DivIVA correlates with membrane defects and changes in cell morphology, suggesting a localized alteration in the activity of enzymes involved in cell wall synthesis that could account for previously described effects of daptomycin on cell wall morphology and septation. Membrane defects colocalize with fluorescently labeled daptomycin, DivIVA, and fluorescent reporters of peptidoglycan biogenesis (Bocillin FL and BODIPY FL-vancomycin), suggesting that daptomycin plays a direct role in these events. Our results support a mechanism for daptomycin with a primary effect on cell membranes that in turn redirects the localization of proteins involved in cell division and cell wall synthesis, causing dramatic cell wall and membrane defects, which may ultimately lead to a breach in the cell membrane and cell death. These results help resolve the longstanding questions regarding the mechanism of action of this important class of antibiotics. PMID:22661688

  9. Daptomycin-Mediated Reorganization of Membrane Architecture Causes Mislocalization of Essential Cell Division Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pogliano, Nicolas; Silverman, Jared A.

    2012-01-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic used clinically for the treatment of certain types of Gram-positive infections, including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Details of the mechanism of action of daptomycin continue to be elucidated, particularly the question of whether daptomycin acts on the cell membrane, the cell wall, or both. Here, we use fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize the interaction of daptomycin with the model Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We show that the first observable cellular effects are the formation of membrane distortions (patches of membrane) that precede cell death by more than 30 min. Membrane patches are able to recruit the essential cell division protein DivIVA. Recruitment of DivIVA correlates with membrane defects and changes in cell morphology, suggesting a localized alteration in the activity of enzymes involved in cell wall synthesis that could account for previously described effects of daptomycin on cell wall morphology and septation. Membrane defects colocalize with fluorescently labeled daptomycin, DivIVA, and fluorescent reporters of peptidoglycan biogenesis (Bocillin FL and BODIPY FL-vancomycin), suggesting that daptomycin plays a direct role in these events. Our results support a mechanism for daptomycin with a primary effect on cell membranes that in turn redirects the localization of proteins involved in cell division and cell wall synthesis, causing dramatic cell wall and membrane defects, which may ultimately lead to a breach in the cell membrane and cell death. These results help resolve the longstanding questions regarding the mechanism of action of this important class of antibiotics. PMID:22661688

  10. Rapid Capture Next-Generation Sequencing in Clinical Diagnostics of Kinase Pathway Aberrations in B-Cell Precursor ALL.

    PubMed

    Stadt, Udo Zur; Escherich, Gabriele; Indenbirken, Daniela; Alawi, Malik; Adao, Manuela; Horstmann, Martin A

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive next-generation sequencing (NGS) applications have recently identified various recurrent kinase and cytokine receptor rearrangements in Ph-like B-cell precursor (BCP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) amenable to tyrosin kinase inhibitor treatment. For rapid diagnostics of kinase pathway aberrations in minimal residual disease (MRD) high-risk BCP-ALL, we developed a PCR-independent NGS custom enrichment capture panel targeting recurrent genomic alterations, which allows for the identification of unknown 5' fusion partner genes and precise mapping of variable genomic breakpoints. Using a standardized bioinformatics algorithm, we identified kinase and cytokine receptor rearrangements in the majority of ALL patients with high burden of postinduction MRD and enrichment of IKZF1 mutation or deletion (IKZF1(del) ). PMID:27007619

  11. Single-cell transcriptional analysis of normal, aberrant, and malignant hematopoiesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Moore, Finola E; Garcia, Elaine G; Lobbardi, Riadh; Jain, Esha; Tang, Qin; Moore, John C; Cortes, Mauricio; Molodtsov, Aleksey; Kasheta, Melissa; Luo, Christina C; Garcia, Amaris J; Mylvaganam, Ravi; Yoder, Jeffrey A; Blackburn, Jessica S; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Ceol, Craig J; North, Trista E; Langenau, David M

    2016-05-30

    Hematopoiesis culminates in the production of functionally heterogeneous blood cell types. In zebrafish, the lack of cell surface antibodies has compelled researchers to use fluorescent transgenic reporter lines to label specific blood cell fractions. However, these approaches are limited by the availability of transgenic lines and fluorescent protein combinations that can be distinguished. Here, we have transcriptionally profiled single hematopoietic cells from zebrafish to define erythroid, myeloid, B, and T cell lineages. We also used our approach to identify hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and a novel NK-lysin 4(+) cell type, representing a putative cytotoxic T/NK cell. Our platform also quantified hematopoietic defects in rag2(E450fs) mutant fish and showed that these fish have reduced T cells with a subsequent expansion of NK-lysin 4(+) cells and myeloid cells. These data suggest compensatory regulation of the innate immune system in rag2(E450fs) mutant zebrafish. Finally, analysis of Myc-induced T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed that cells are arrested at the CD4(+)/CD8(+) cortical thymocyte stage and that a subset of leukemia cells inappropriately reexpress stem cell genes, including bmi1 and cmyb In total, our experiments provide new tools and biological insights into single-cell heterogeneity found in zebrafish blood and leukemia. PMID:27139488

  12. Egg yolk proteins suppress azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci formation and cell proliferation in the colon of rats.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Asano, Takayuki; Takenoshita, Shingo; Nozawa, Yuuya; Arihara, Keizo; Itoh, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Dietary proteins can influence colonic carcinogenesis; some proteins have a promotional effect, whereas others exhibit a preventive effect. Dietary egg yolk proteins have been reported to suppress the expression of colon tumors in rats. In this study, we investigated the effect of consumption egg yolk proteins on cell proliferation in a rat model of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer. We hypothesize, based on the literature of egg yolk protein actions, that they protect against colon tumor development. Therefore, male F344 rats were fed a purified AIN-93G diet containing either 20% casein (control) or 20% egg yolk proteins for 5 weeks. After 1 week on the experimental diet, the rats were administered weekly subcutaneous injections of saline or AOM for 2 weeks to induce aberrant crypt foci. Rats were administered an intraperitoneal injection of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine 1 hour before being euthanized for examination of DNA synthesis in the colonic mucosa. The contents of the cecum were analyzed for the presence of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). In the AOM-injected rats, the yolk protein diet suppressed aberrant crypt foci formation and reduced the proliferative 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeling index in the proximal colon when compared with the control diet. A significant increase in cecal SCFAs was observed in the rats that were fed egg yolk proteins. These results indicate that dietary egg yolk proteins have a preventive effect on AOM-induced large bowel carcinogenesis in rats; it exerts this effect by altering cell proliferation through SCFA production. This study suggests that the consumption of egg yolk proteins might be protective against colon carcinogenesis. PMID:19185779

  13. ERα propelled aberrant global DNA hypermethylation by activating the DNMT1 gene to enhance anticancer drug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jinghuan; Ding, Haijian; Zhang, Xin A.; Shao, Lipei; Yang, Nan; Cheng, He; Sun, Luan; Zhu, Dongliang; Yang, Yin; Li, Andi; Han, Xiao; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced aberrant DNA methylation is the first identified epigenetic marker involved in chemotherapy resistance. Understanding how the aberrant DNA methylation is acquired would impact cancer treatment in theory and practice. In this study we systematically investigated whether and how ERα propelled aberrant global DNA hypermethylation in the context of breast cancer drug resistance. Our data demonstrated that anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) augmented ERα binding to the DNMT1 and DNMT3b promoters to activate DNMT1 and DNMT3b genes, enhancing the PTX resistance of breast cancer cells. In support of these observations, estrogen enhanced multi-drug resistance of breast cancer cells by up-regulation of DNMT1 and DNMT3b genes. Nevertheless, the aberrant global DNA hypermethylation was dominantly induced by ERα-activated-DNMT1, since DNMT1 over-expression significantly increased global DNA methylation and DNMT1 knockdown reversed the ERα-induced global DNA methylation. Altering DNMT3b expression had no detectable effect on global DNA methylation. Consistently, the expression level of DNMT1 was positively correlated with ERα in 78 breast cancer tissue samples shown by our immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis and negatively correlated with relapse-free survival (RFS) and distance metastasis-free survival (DMFS) of ERα-positive breast cancer patients. This study provides a new perspective for understanding the mechanism underlying drug-resistance-facilitating aberrant DNA methylation in breast cancer and other estrogen dependent tumors. PMID:26980709

  14. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF AXIAL FIBRILS, OUTER ENVELOPE, AND CELL DIVISION OF CERTAIN ORAL SPIROCHETES

    PubMed Central

    Listgarten, M. A.; Socransky, S. S.

    1964-01-01

    Listgarten, M. A. (Harvard School of Dental Medicine and Forsyth Dental Center, Boston, Mass.), and S. S. Socransky. Electron microscopy of axial fibrils, outer envelope, and cell division of certain oral spirochetes. J. Bacteriol. 88:1087–1103. 1964.—The ultrastructure of axial fibrils and outer envelopes of a number of oral spirochetes was studied in thin sections and by negative contrast. The axial fibrils measured 150 to 200 A in diameter. Only one end of each fibril was inserted subterminally into the protoplasmic cylinder by means of a 400 A wide disc. The free ends of fibrils inserted near one end of the cylinder extended toward, and overlapped in close apposition, the free ends of fibrils inserted at the other end. In thin sections, some axial fibrils showed a substructure, suggestive of a dense central core. The outer envelopes of most spirochetes appeared to consist of 80 A wide polygonal structural subunits. However, in one large spirochete, the outer envelope demonstrated a “pin-striped” pattern. Cell division in a pure culture of Treponema microdentium was studied by negative contrast. Results suggested that this organism divides by transverse fission, the outer envelope being last to divide. During the course of division, new axial fibrils appeared to originate on either side of the point of constriction of the protoplasmic cylinder. Flagellalike extensions which were found in rapidly dividing organisms were due to protruding axial fibrils, and appeared to be the result of cell division. Some evidence is presented to support the concept of a homologous origin for axial fibrils and flagella. Images PMID:14219024

  15. Gα modulates salt-induced cellular senescence and cell division in rice and maize

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Daisuke; Colaneri, Alejandro; Jones, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The plant G-protein network, comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ core subunits, regulates development, senses sugar, and mediates biotic and abiotic stress responses. Here, we report G-protein signalling in the salt stress response using two crop models, rice and maize. Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding genes encoding the Gα subunit attenuate growth inhibition and cellular senescence caused by sodium chloride (NaCl). Gα null mutations conferred reduced leaf senescence, chlorophyll degradation, and cytoplasm electrolyte leakage under NaCl stress. Sodium accumulated in both wild-type and Gα-mutant shoots to the same levels, suggesting that Gα signalling controls cell death in leaves rather than sodium exclusion in roots. Growth inhibition is probably initiated by osmotic change around root cells, because KCl and MgSO4 also suppressed seedling growth equally as well as NaCl. NaCl lowered rates of cell division and elongation in the wild-type leaf sheath to the level of the Gα-null mutants; however there was no NaCl-induced decrease in cell division in the Gα mutant, implying that the osmotic phase of salt stress suppresses cell proliferation through the inhibition of Gα-coupled signalling. These results reveal two distinct functions of Gα in NaCl stress in these grasses: attenuation of leaf senescence caused by sodium toxicity in leaves, and cell cycle regulation by osmotic/ionic stress. PMID:25227951

  16. Characterization of DicB by partially masking its potent inhibitory activity of cell division.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaoyuan; Pei, Hairun; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wei, Qiang; Zhu, Jia; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-07-01

    DicB, a protein encoded by the Kim (Qin) prophage in Escherichia coli, inhibits cell division through interaction with MinC. Thus far, characterization of DicB has been severely hampered owing to its potent activity which ceases cell division and leads to cell death. In this work, through fusing maltose-binding protein to the N-terminus of DicB (MBP-DicB), we successfully expressed and purified recombinant DicB that enabled in vitro analysis for the first time. More importantly, taking advantage of the reduced inhibitory activity of MBP-DicB, we were able to study its effects on cell growth and morphology. Inhibition of cell growth by MBP-DicB was systematically evaluated using various DicB constructs, and their corresponding effects on cell morphology were also investigated. Our results revealed that the N-terminal segment of DicB plays an essential functional role, in contrast to its C-terminal tail. The N-terminus of DicB is of critical importance as even the first amino acid (following the initial Met) could not be removed, although it could be mutated. This study provides the first glimpse of the molecular determinants underlying DicB's function. PMID:27466443

  17. Arv1 promotes cell division by recruiting IQGAP1 and myosin to the cleavage furrow.

    PubMed

    Sundvold, Hilde; Sundvold-Gjerstad, Vibeke; Malerød-Fjeld, Helle; Haglund, Kaisa; Stenmark, Harald; Malerød, Lene

    2016-03-01

    Cell division is strictly regulated by a diversity of proteins and lipids to ensure proper duplication and segregation of genetic material and organelles. Here we report a novel role of the putative lipid transporter ACAT-related protein required for viability 1 (Arv1) during telophase. We observed that the subcellular localization of Arv1 changes according to cell cycle progression and that Arv1 is recruited to the cleavage furrow in early telophase by epithelial protein lost in neoplasm (EPLIN). At the cleavage furrow Arv1 recruits myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9) and myosin light chain 9 (MYL9) by interacting with IQ-motif-containing GTPase-activating protein (IQGAP1). Consequently the lack of Arv1 delayed telophase-progression, and a strongly increased incidence of furrow regression and formation of multinuclear cells was observed both in human cells in culture and in follicle epithelial cells of egg chambers of Drosophila melanogaster in vivo. Interestingly, the cholesterol-status at the cleavage furrow did not affect the recruitment of either IQGAP1, MYH9 or MYL. These results identify a novel function for Arv1 in regulation of cell division through promotion of the contractile actomyosin ring, which is independent of its lipid transporter activity. PMID:27104745

  18. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M C; Brum, Felipe L; da Silva, Camila C; Zuma, Aline A; Elias, Maria C; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number. PMID:26082757

  19. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M. C.; Brum, Felipe L.; da Silva, Camila C.; Zuma, Aline A.; Elias, Maria C.; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number. PMID:26082757

  20. Characterization of DicB by partially masking its potent inhibitory activity of cell division

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaoyuan; Pei, Hairun; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wei, Qiang; Zhu, Jia; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    DicB, a protein encoded by the Kim (Qin) prophage in Escherichia coli, inhibits cell division through interaction with MinC. Thus far, characterization of DicB has been severely hampered owing to its potent activity which ceases cell division and leads to cell death. In this work, through fusing maltose-binding protein to the N-terminus of DicB (MBP–DicB), we successfully expressed and purified recombinant DicB that enabled in vitro analysis for the first time. More importantly, taking advantage of the reduced inhibitory activity of MBP–DicB, we were able to study its effects on cell growth and morphology. Inhibition of cell growth by MBP–DicB was systematically evaluated using various DicB constructs, and their corresponding effects on cell morphology were also investigated. Our results revealed that the N-terminal segment of DicB plays an essential functional role, in contrast to its C-terminal tail. The N-terminus of DicB is of critical importance as even the first amino acid (following the initial Met) could not be removed, although it could be mutated. This study provides the first glimpse of the molecular determinants underlying DicB's function. PMID:27466443

  1. LocZ Is a New Cell Division Protein Involved in Proper Septum Placement in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Holečková, Nela; Molle, Virginie; Buriánková, Karolína; Benada, Oldřich; Kofroňová, Olga; Ulrych, Aleš; Branny, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT How bacteria control proper septum placement at midcell, to guarantee the generation of identical daughter cells, is still largely unknown. Although different systems involved in the selection of the division site have been described in selected species, these do not appear to be widely conserved. Here, we report that LocZ (Spr0334), a newly identified cell division protein, is involved in proper septum placement in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We show that locZ is not essential but that its deletion results in cell division defects and shape deformation, causing cells to divide asymmetrically and generate unequally sized, occasionally anucleated, daughter cells. LocZ has a unique localization profile. It arrives early at midcell, before FtsZ and FtsA, and leaves the septum early, apparently moving along with the equatorial rings that mark the future division sites. Consistently, cells lacking LocZ also show misplacement of the Z-ring, suggesting that it could act as a positive regulator to determine septum placement. LocZ was identified as a substrate of the Ser/Thr protein kinase StkP, which regulates cell division in S. pneumoniae. Interestingly, homologues of LocZ are found only in streptococci, lactococci, and enterococci, indicating that this close phylogenetically related group of bacteria evolved a specific solution to spatially regulate cell division. PMID:25550321

  2. HOW is required for stem cell maintenance in the Drosophila testis and for the onset of transit-amplifying divisions.

    PubMed

    Monk, Adrian C; Siddall, Nicole A; Volk, Talila; Fraser, Barbara; Quinn, Leonie M; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Hime, Gary R

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms by which germline stem cells (GSCs) in the Drosophila testis undergo asymmetric division to regenerate a stem cell as well as a daughter (gonialblast) that will only undergo a further four mitotic divisions prior to entering premeiotic S phase and differentiating into a cyst of spermatocytes are not fully resolved. Here we demonstrate that the HOW RNA-binding protein is required for maintenance of CycB and therefore mitotic progression in GSCs and gonialblasts as well as determining the timing of the spermatogonial divisions. HOW is normally expressed in a complementary pattern to Bam in the germline and bam mRNA is bound by HOW in vivo. Ectopic expression of the HOW(L) isoform is associated with a delay in accumulation of Bam to the level required for differentiation, resulting in extra mitotic divisions. Spatiotemporal regulation of HOW expression is therefore required to specify the four spermatogonial transit-amplifying divisions. PMID:20362539

  3. Chromosome aberration and micronucleus frequencies in Allium cepa cells exposed to petroleum polluted water--a case study.

    PubMed

    Leme, Daniela Morais; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2008-01-31

    In the present study, we applied Chromosome Aberration (CA) and Micronucleus (MN) tests to Allium cepa root cells, in order to evaluate the water quality of Guaecá river. This river, located in the city of São Sebastião, SP, Brazil, had been affected by an oil pipeline leak. Chemical analyses of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPHs) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also carried out in water samples, collected in July 2005 (dry season) and February 2006 (rainy season) in 4 different river sites. The largest CA and MN incidence in the meristematic cells of A. cepa was observed after exposure to water sample collected during the dry season, at the spring of the river, where the oil leak has arisen. The F(1) cells from roots exposed to such sample (non-merismatic region) were also analyzed for the incidence of MN, showing a larger frequency of irregularities, indicating a possible development of CA into MN. Lastly, our study reveals a direct correlation between water chemical analyses (contamination by TPHs and PAHs) and both genotoxic and mutagenic effects observed in exposed A. cepa cells. PMID:18068420

  4. Aberrant Activation of Notch Signaling Inhibits PROX1 Activity to Enhance the Malignant Behavior of Thyroid Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dongwon; Ramu, Swapnika; Park, Eunkyung; Jung, Eunson; Yang, Sara; Jung, Wonhyeuk; Choi, Inho; Lee, Sunju; Kim, Kyu Eui; Seong, Young Jin; Hong, Mingu; Daghlian, George; Kim, Daniel; Shin, Eugene; Seo, Jung In; Khatchadourian, Vicken; Zou, Mengchen; Li, Wei; De Filippo, Roger; Kokorowski, Paul; Chang, Andy; Kim, Steve; Bertoni, Ana; Furlanetto, Tania Weber; Shin, Sung; Li, Meng; Chen, Yibu; Wong, Alex; Koh, Chester; Geliebter, Jan; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2016-02-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common endocrine malignancies associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although multiple studies have contributed to a better understanding of the genetic alterations underlying this frequently arising disease, the downstream molecular effectors that impact PTC pathogenesis remain to be further defined. Here, we report that the regulator of cell fate specification, PROX1, becomes inactivated in PTC through mRNA downregulation and cytoplasmic mislocalization. Expression studies in clinical specimens revealed that aberrantly activated NOTCH signaling promoted PROX1 downregulation and that cytoplasmic mislocalization significantly altered PROX1 protein stability. Importantly, restoration of PROX1 activity in thyroid carcinoma cells revealed that PROX1 not only enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling but also regulated several genes known to be associated with PTC, including thyroid cancer protein (TC)-1, SERPINA1, and FABP4. Furthermore, PROX1 reexpression suppressed the malignant phenotypes of thyroid carcinoma cells, such as proliferation, motility, adhesion, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, and polyploidy. Moreover, animal xenograft studies demonstrated that restoration of PROX1 severely impeded tumor formation and suppressed the invasiveness and the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio of PTC cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that NOTCH-induced PROX1 inactivation significantly promotes the malignant behavior of thyroid carcinoma and suggest that PROX1 reactivation may represent a potential therapeutic strategy to attenuate disease progression. PMID:26609053

  5. Regulation of cell division and expansion by sugar and auxin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth and development are modulated by concerted actions of a variety of signaling molecules. In recent years, evidence has emerged on the roles of sugar and auxin signals network in diverse aspects of plant growth and development. Here, based on recent progress of genetic analyses and gene expression profiling studies, we summarize the functional similarities, diversities, and their interactions of sugar and auxin signals in regulating two major processes of plant development: cell division and cell expansion. We focus on roles of sugar and auxin signaling in both vegetative and reproductive tissues including developing seed. PMID:23755057

  6. Behavior of centrosomes during fertilization and cell division in mouse oocytes and in sea urchin eggs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Heide; Schatten, Gerald; Balczon, Ron; Simerly, Calvin; Mazia, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of centrosomes during the stages of fertilization and cell division in mouse oocytes and in sea urchin eggs was monitored in an immunofluorescence microscope, using autoimmune centrosomal antiserum derived from a patient with scleroderma to label the centrosomal material. These observations showed that centrosomes reproduce during the interphase and aggregate and separate during cell mitosis. Results supported the hypothesis of Mazia (1984), who proposed that centrosomes are 'flexible bodies'. It was also found that, while the sea urchin centrosomes are paternally inherited as was initially proposed by Bovery (1904), the mouse centrosomes are of maternal origin.

  7. Asymmetric stem-cell division ensures sustained keratinocyte hyperproliferation in psoriatic skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    JIA, HAI-YAN; SHI, YING; LUO, LONG-FEI; JIANG, GUAN; ZHOU, QIONG; XU, SHI-ZHENG; LEI, TIE-CHI

    2016-01-01

    Excessive expansion of the transit-amplifying (TA) cell compartment is a distinct morphological characteristic of psoriatic epidermal hyperplasia. In order to examine the activation of basal stem cells and how they replenish such an enlarged compartment of TA cells in psoriatic epidermis, we utilized a BrdU labeling method to monitor mitotic stem cells in a mouse model of psoriasiform dermatitis, which was induced by imiquimod. Our results showed that perpendicular and parallel cell division characteristics of dividing stem cells existed in the inflamed epidermis. When we analyzed template-DNA strand segregation in trypsin-dissociated human psoriatic keratinocytes using BrdU pulse-chase labeling, we found that the percentage of asymmetric segregation of BrdU was significantly increased in the cell pairs of psoriatic epidermal cells compared with normal epidermal cells. Furthermore, we also examined the effects of both interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-22 cytokines on the differentiation status of cultured human keratinocytes. The results indicated that both cytokines had synergistic effects on passage-one epidermal cell sheets derived from skin explants and also on cultured keratinocytes, were involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated stem cell phenotype, and these results suggest an efficient mechanism for preventing the premature loss of basal stem-cell pools in the pro-inflammatory cytokine-enriched milieu of the psoriatic epidermis. Our findings suggest that inhibition of hyperactive stem cells represents a potential therapeutic target to combat recalcitrant epidermal hyperplasia in psoriasis. PMID:26707630

  8. Adherens junctions determine the apical position of the midbody during follicular epithelial cell division.

    PubMed

    Morais-de-Sá, Eurico; Sunkel, Claudio

    2013-08-01

    Cytokinesis is asymmetric along the apical-basal axis of epithelial cells, positioning the midbody near the apical domain. However, little is known about the mechanism and purpose of this asymmetry. We use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cell division to show that asymmetric cytokinesis does not result from intrinsic polarization of the main contractile ring components. We show that adherens junctions (AJs) maintain close contact with the apical side of the contractile ring during cytokinesis. Asymmetric distribution of AJ components within follicle cells and in the otherwise unpolarized S2 cells is sufficient to recruit the midbody, revealing that asymmetric cytokinesis is determined by apical AJs in the epithelia. We further show that ectopic midbody localization induces epithelial invaginations, shifting the position of the apical interface between daughter cells relative to the AB axis of the tissue. Thus, apical midbody localization is essential to maintain epithelial tissue architecture during proliferation. PMID:23774295

  9. Elevated ATPase activity of KaiC applies a circadian checkpoint on cell division in Synechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guogang; Yang, Qiong; Wang, Qiang; Kim, Yong-Ick; Wood, Thammajun L; Osteryoung, Katherine W; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Golden, Susan S

    2010-02-19

    A circadian clock coordinates physiology and behavior in diverse groups of living organisms. Another major cyclic cellular event, the cell cycle, is regulated by the circadian clock in the few cases where linkage of these cycles has been studied. In the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, the circadian clock gates cell division by an unknown mechanism. Using timelapse microscopy, we confirm the gating of cell division in the wild-type and demonstrate the regulation of cytokinesis by key clock components. Specifically, a state of the oscillator protein KaiC that is associated with elevated ATPase activity closes the gate by acting through a known clock output pathway to inhibit FtsZ ring formation at the division site. An activity that stimulates KaiC phosphorylation independently of the KaiA protein was also uncovered. We propose a model that separates the functions of KaiC ATPase and phosphorylation in cell division gating and other circadian behaviors. PMID:20178745

  10. Fine-scale dissection of the subdomains of polarity protein BASL in stomatal asymmetric cell division

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Bergmann, Dominique C.; Dong, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is a prerequisite for asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs) that generate cell type diversity during development of multicellular organisms. In Arabidopsis, stomatal lineage ACDs are regulated by the plant-specific protein BREAKING OF ASYMMETRY IN THE STOMATAL LINEAGE (BASL). BASL exhibits dynamic subcellular localization, accumulating initially in the nucleus, but then additionally in a highly polarized crescent at the cell cortex before division. BASL polarization requires a phosphorylation-mediated activation process, but how this is achieved remains unknown. In this study, we performed a fine-scale dissection of BASL protein subdomains and elucidated a nuclear localization sequence for nuclear import and a critical FxFP motif for cortical polarity formation, respectively. Artificially tethering BASL subdomains to the plasma membrane suggests that novel protein partner/s might exist and bind to an internal region of BASL. In addition, we suspect the existence of a protein degradation mechanism associated with the amino terminal domain of BASL that accounts for restricting its predominant expression to the stomatal lineage cells of the epidermis. Taken together, our results revealed that BASL, through its distinct subdomains, integrates multiple regulatory inputs to provide a mechanism that promotes difference during stomatal lineage ACDs. PMID:27422992

  11. Ex vivo Live Imaging of Single Cell Divisions in Mouse Neuroepithelium

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska-Nitsche, Karolina; Caspary, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    We developed a system that integrates live imaging of fluorescent markers and culturing slices of embryonic mouse neuroepithelium. We took advantage of existing mouse lines for genetic cell lineage tracing: a tamoxifen-inducible Cre line and a Cre reporter line expressing dsRed upon Cre-mediated recombination. By using a relatively low level of tamoxifen, we were able to induce recombination in a small number of cells, permitting us to follow individual cell divisions. Additionally, we observed the transcriptional response to Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling using an Olig2-eGFP transgenic line 1-3 and we monitored formation of cilia by infecting the cultured slice with virus expressing the cilia marker, Sstr3-GFP 4. In order to image the neuroepithelium, we harvested embryos at E8.5, isolated the neural tube, mounted the neural slice in proper culturing conditions into the imaging chamber and performed time-lapse confocal imaging. Our ex vivo live imaging method enables us to trace single cell divisions to assess the relative timing of primary cilia formation and Shh response in a physiologically relevant manner. This method can be easily adapted using distinct fluorescent markers and provides the field the tools with which to monitor cell behavior in situ and in real time. PMID:23666396

  12. A Millifluidic Study of Cell-to-Cell Heterogeneity in Growth-Rate and Cell-Division Capability in Populations of Isogenic Cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Damodaran, Shima P.; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  13. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  14. QUANTITATION OF ABERRANT INTERLOCUS T-CELL RECEPTOR REARRANGEMENTS IN MOUSE THYMOCYTES AND THE EFFECT OF THE HERBICIDE 2,4- DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitation of aberrant interlocus T-cell receptor rearrangements in mouse thymocytes and the effect of the herbicide 2,4- Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    Small studies in human populations have suggested a correlation between the frequency of errors in antigen receptor gene a...

  15. The TORMOZ Gene Encodes a Nucleolar Protein Required for Regulated Division Planes and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Megan E.; Mayer, Ulrike; Capron, Arnaud; Ngo, Quy A.; Surendrarao, Anandkumar; McClinton, Regina; Jürgens, Gerd; Sundaresan, Venkatesan

    2007-01-01

    Embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is marked by a predictable sequence of oriented cell divisions, which precede cell fate determination. We show that mutation of the TORMOZ (TOZ) gene yields embryos with aberrant cell division planes and arrested embryos that appear not to have established normal patterning. The defects in toz mutants differ from previously described mutations that affect embryonic cell division patterns. Longitudinal division planes of the proembryo are frequently replaced by transverse divisions and less frequently by oblique divisions, while divisions of the suspensor cells, which divide only transversely, appear generally unaffected. Expression patterns of selected embryo patterning genes are altered in the mutant embryos, implying that the positional cues required for their proper expression are perturbed by the misoriented divisions. The TOZ gene encodes a nucleolar protein containing WD repeats. Putative TOZ orthologs exist in other eukaryotes including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the protein is predicted to function in 18S rRNA biogenesis. We find that disruption of the Sp TOZ gene results in cell division defects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous studies in yeast and animal cells have identified nucleolar proteins that regulate the exit from M phase and cytokinesis, including factors involved in pre-rRNA processing. Our study suggests that in plant cells, nucleolar functions might interact with the processes of regulated cell divisions and influence the selection of longitudinal division planes during embryogenesis. PMID:17616738

  16. Enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells during methamphetamine induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-W.; Ping, Y.-H.; Yen, J.-C.; Chang, C.-Y.; Wang, S.-F.; Yeh, C.-L.; Chi, C.-W.; Lee, H.-C. . E-mail: hclee2@ym.edu.tw

    2007-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an abused drug that may cause psychiatric and neurotoxic damage, including degeneration of monoaminergic terminals and apoptosis of non-monoaminergic cells in Brain. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these METH-induced neurotoxic effects remain to be clarified. In this study, we performed a time course assessment to investigate the effects of METH on intracellular oxidative stress and mitochondrial alterations in a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We characterized that METH induces a temporal sequence of several cellular events including, firstly, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential within 1 h of the METH treatment, secondly, an extensive decline in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 8 h of the treatment, thirdly, an increase in mitochondrial mass after the drug treatment for 24 h, and finally, a decrease in mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial proteins per mitochondrion as well as the occurrence of apoptosis after 48 h of the treatment. Importantly, vitamin E attenuated the METH-induced increases in intracellular ROS level and mitochondrial mass, and prevented METH-induced cell death. Our observations suggest that enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis may play critical roles in METH-induced neurotoxic effects.

  17. Trichostatin A specifically improves the aberrant expression of transcription factor genes in embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kimiko; Oikawa, Mami; Kamimura, Satoshi; Ogonuki, Narumi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Although mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established in various species, the low developmental efficiency has hampered its practical applications. Treatment of SCNT-derived embryos with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can improve their development, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. To address this question, we analysed gene expression profiles of SCNT-derived 2-cell mouse embryos treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a potent HDAC inhibitor that is best used for mouse cloning. Unexpectedly, TSA had no effect on the numbers of aberrantly expressed genes or the overall gene expression pattern in the embryos. However, in-depth investigation by gene ontology and functional analyses revealed that TSA treatment specifically improved the expression of a small subset of genes encoding transcription factors and their regulatory factors, suggesting their positive involvement in de novo RNA synthesis. Indeed, introduction of one of such transcription factors, Spi-C, into the embryos at least partially mimicked the TSA-induced improvement in embryonic development by activating gene networks associated with transcriptional regulation. Thus, the effects of TSA treatment on embryonic gene expression did not seem to be stochastic, but more specific than expected, targeting genes that direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the 2-cell stage. PMID:25974394

  18. Chromosome aberration and sister chromatid exchange tests in Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro III: Results with 27 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, D.K. ); Witt, K.; Anderson, B.; Zeiger, E.; Shelby, M.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals previously tested in rodent carcinogenicity assays were tested for induction of chromosomal aberrations (ABS) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as part of a larger analysis of the correlation between results of in vitro genetic toxicity assays and carcinogenicity bioassays. Chemicals were tested up to toxic doses with and without exogenous metabolic activation. Seventeen of the chemicals tested were carcinogens; only two of these were negative for both ABS and SCE. Of the eight noncarcinogens tested, four were negative for both endpoints and four gave a positive response for at least one endpoint. Of the remaining two chemicals, one, diallylphthalate, gave an equivocal response in the bioassay and a positive response in these CHO cell cytogenetics tests. The other chemical, 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, was tested for carcinogenicity as a mixture with the 2,6-isomer; the mixture was carinogenic, but the cytogenetic test results for the 2,4-isomer were negative. Experiments with unsynchronized CHO cells demonstrated that mean SCE frequency increased with increasing culture time, and this may have been a factor in the positive results obtained for five chemicals in the SCE test under conditions of delayed harvest.

  19. Trichostatin A specifically improves the aberrant expression of transcription factor genes in embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Oikawa, Mami; Kamimura, Satoshi; Ogonuki, Narumi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Although mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established in various species, the low developmental efficiency has hampered its practical applications. Treatment of SCNT-derived embryos with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can improve their development, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. To address this question, we analysed gene expression profiles of SCNT-derived 2-cell mouse embryos treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a potent HDAC inhibitor that is best used for mouse cloning. Unexpectedly, TSA had no effect on the numbers of aberrantly expressed genes or the overall gene expression pattern in the embryos. However, in-depth investigation by gene ontology and functional analyses revealed that TSA treatment specifically improved the expression of a small subset of genes encoding transcription factors and their regulatory factors, suggesting their positive involvement in de novo RNA synthesis. Indeed, introduction of one of such transcription factors, Spi-C, into the embryos at least partially mimicked the TSA-induced improvement in embryonic development by activating gene networks associated with transcriptional regulation. Thus, the effects of TSA treatment on embryonic gene expression did not seem to be stochastic, but more specific than expected, targeting genes that direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the 2-cell stage. PMID:25974394

  20. Judging Diatoms by Their Cover: Variability in Local Elasticity of Lithodesmium undulatum Undergoing Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Karp-Boss, Lee; Gueta, Rachel; Rousso, Itay

    2014-01-01

    Unique features of diatoms are their intricate cell covers (frustules) made out of hydrated, amorphous silica. The frustule defines and maintains cell shape and protects cells against grazers and pathogens, yet it must allow for cell expansion during growth and division. Other siliceous structures have also evolved in some chain-forming species as means for holding neighboring cells together. Characterization and quantification of mechanical properties of these structures are crucial for the understanding of the relationship between form and function in diatoms, but thus far only a handful of studies have addressed this issue. We conducted micro-indentation experiments, using atomic force microscopy (AFM), to examine local variations in elastic (Young's) moduli of cells and linking structures in the marine, chain-forming diatom Lithodesmium undulatum. Using a fluorescent tracer that is incorporated into new cell wall components we tested the hypothesis that new siliceous structures differ in elastic modulus from their older counterparts. Results show that the local elastic modulus is a highly dynamic property. Elastic modulus of stained regions was significantly lower than that of unstained regions, suggesting that newly formed cell wall components are generally softer than the ones inherited from the parent cells. This study provides the first evidence of differentiation in local elastic properties in the course of the cell cycle. Hardening of newly formed regions may involve incorporation of additional, possibly organic, material but further studies are needed to elucidate the processes that regulate mechanical properties of the frustule during the cell cycle. PMID:25337801

  1. Force-balance model of suppression of multipolar division in cancer cells with extra centrosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie

    2013-03-01

    Cancer cells often possess extra centrosomes which have the potential to cause cell death due to catastrophic multipolar division. Many cancer cells, however, are able to escape multipolar mitosis by clustering the extra centrosomes to form bipolar spindles. The mechanism of centrosome clustering is therefore of great interest to the development of anti-cancer drugs because the de-clustering of extra centrosomes provides an appealing way to eliminate cancer cells while keeping healthy cells intact. We present a physical model assuming 1) dynamic centrosomal microtubules interact with chromosomes by both pushing on chromosome arms and pulling along kinetochores; 2) these microtubules interact with force generators associated with actin/adhesion structures at the cell boundary; and 3) motors act on anti-parallel microtubules from different centrosomes. We find via computer simulations that chromosomes tend to aggregate near the cell center while centrosomes can be either clustered to form bipolar spindles or scattered to form multipolar spindles, depending on the strengths of relative forces, cell shape and adhesion geometry. The model predictions agree with data from cells plated on adhesive micropatterns and from biochemically or genetically perturbed cells. Furthermore, our model is able to explain various microtubule distributions in interphase cells on patterned substrates. This work was supported by NSF

  2. Morphology and ultrastructure of Interfilum and Klebsormidium (Klebsormidiales, Streptophyta) with special reference to cell division and thallus formation

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailyuk, Tatiana; Holzinger, Andreas; Massalski, Andrzej; Karsten, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Representatives of the closely related genera, Interfilum and Klebsormidium, are characterized by unicells, dyads or packets in Interfilum and contrasting uniseriate filaments in Klebsormidium. According to the literature, these distinct thallus forms originate by different types of cell division, sporulation (cytogony) versus vegetative cell division (cytotomy), but investigations of their morphology and ultrastructure show a high degree of similarity. Cell walls of both genera are characterized by triangular spaces between cell walls of neighbouring cells and the parental wall or central space among the walls of a cell packet, exfoliations and projections of the parental wall and cap-like and H-like fragments of the cell wall. In both genera, each cell has its individual cell wall and it also has part of the common parental wall or its remnants. Therefore, vegetative cells of Interfilum and Klebsormidium probably divide by the same type of cell division (sporulation-like). Various strains representing different species of the two genera are characterized by differences in cell wall ultrastructure, particularly the level of preservation, rupture or gelatinization of the parental wall surrounding the daughter cells. The differing morphologies of representatives of various lineages result from features of the parental wall during cell separation and detachment. Cell division in three planes (usual in Interfilum and a rare event in Klebsormidium) takes place in spherical or short cylindrical cells, with the chloroplast positioned perpendicularly or obliquely to the filament (dyad) axis. The morphological differences are mainly a consequence of differing fates of the parental wall after cell division and detachment. The development of different morphologies within the two genera mostly depends on characters such as the shape of cells, texture of cell walls, mechanical interactions between cells and the influence of environmental conditions. PMID:26504365

  3. Universality in two-dimensional cellular structures evolving by cell division and disappearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miri, Mirfaez; Rivier, Nicolas

    2006-03-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional cellular networks is written in terms of coupled population equations, which describe how the population of s -sided cells is affected by cell division and disappearance. In these equations the effect of the rest of the foam on the disappearing or dividing cell is treated as a local mean field. Under not too restrictive conditions, the equilibrium distribution P(s) of cells satisfies a linear difference equation of order two or higher. The population equations are asymptotically integrable. The asymptotic integrability implies a “universal” distribution P(s)˜Cs-κzs for large values of s , which is also the Boltzmann distribution associated with the maximum entropy inference. Asymptotic integrability of the population equations is absent in a global mean-field approximation. The importance of short-range topological information to control the evolution of foams is thus confirmed.

  4. 2-(Thienothiazolylimino)-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones inhibit cell division cycle 25 A phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Huber-Villaume, Sophie; Revelant, Germain; Sibille, Estelle; Philippot, Stéphanie; Morabito, Angelica; Dunand, Sandrine; Chaimbault, Patrick; Bagrel, Denyse; Kirsch, Gilbert; Hesse, Stéphanie; Schohn, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Cell division cycle dual phosphatases (CDC25) are essential enzymes that regulate cell progression in cell cycle. Three isoforms exist as CDC25A, B and C. Over-expression of each CDC25 enzyme is found in cancers of diverse origins. Thiazolidinone derivatives have been reported to display anti-proliferative activities, bactericidal activities and to reduce inflammation process. New 2-(thienothiazolylimino)-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of CDC25 phosphatase. Among the molecules tested, compound 6 inhibited CDC25A with an IC50 estimated at 6.2±1.0μM. The binding of thiazolidinone derivative 6 onto CDC25A protein was reversible. In cellulo, compound 6 treatment led to MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell growth arrest. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such 4-thiazolidinone derivatives are characterized as CDC25 potential inhibitor. PMID:27178385

  5. Egf Signaling Directs Neoblast Repopulation by Regulating Asymmetric Cell Division in Planarians.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kai; Thi-Kim Vu, Hanh; Mohan, Ryan D; McKinney, Sean A; Seidel, Chris W; Alexander, Richard; Gotting, Kirsten; Workman, Jerry L; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2016-08-22

    A large population of proliferative stem cells (neoblasts) is required for physiological tissue homeostasis and post-injury regeneration in planarians. Recent studies indicate that survival of a few neoblasts after sublethal irradiation results in the clonal expansion of the surviving stem cells and the eventual restoration of tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. However, the precise mechanisms regulating the population dynamics of neoblasts remain largely unknown. Here, we uncovered a central role for epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling during in vivo neoblast expansion mediated by Smed-egfr-3 (egfr-3) and its putative ligand Smed-neuregulin-7 (nrg-7). Furthermore, the EGF receptor-3 protein localizes asymmetrically on the cytoplasmic membrane of neoblasts, and the ratio of asymmetric to symmetric cell divisions decreases significantly in egfr-3(RNAi) worms. Our results not only provide the first molecular evidence of asymmetric stem cell divisions in planarians, but also demonstrate that EGF signaling likely functions as an essential regulator of neoblast clonal expansion. PMID:27523733

  6. Screens for piwi suppressors in Drosophila identify dosage-dependent regulators of germline stem cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Smulders-Srinivasan, Tora K; Lin, Haifan

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila piwi gene is the founding member of the only known family of genes whose function in stem cell maintenance is highly conserved in both animal and plant kingdoms. piwi mutants fail to maintain germline stem cells in both male and female gonads. The identification of piwi-interacting genes is essential for understanding how stem cell divisions are regulated by piwi-mediated mechanisms. To search for such genes, we screened the Drosophila third chromosome ( approximately 36% of the euchromatic genome) for suppressor mutations of piwi2 and identified six strong and three weak piwi suppressor genes/sequences. These genes/sequences interact negatively with piwi in a dosage-sensitive manner. Two of the strong suppressors represent known genes--serendipity-delta and similar, both encoding transcription factors. These findings reveal that the genetic regulation of germline stem cell division involves dosage-sensitive mechanisms and that such mechanisms exist at the transcriptional level. In addition, we identified three other types of piwi interactors. The first type consists of deficiencies that dominantly interact with piwi2 to cause male sterility, implying that dosage-sensitive regulation also exists in the male germline. The other two types are deficiencies that cause lethality and female-specific lethality in a piwi2 mutant background, revealing the zygotic function of piwi in somatic development. PMID:14704180

  7. Premature differentiation and aberrant movement of pituitary cells lacking both Hes1 and Prop1

    PubMed Central

    Himes, Ashley D.; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2009-01-01

    In the pituitary, the transition from proliferating progenitor cell into differentiated hormone producing cell is carefully regulated in a time dependent and spatially restricted manner. We report that two targets of Notch signaling, Hes1 and Prop1, are needed to maintain progenitors within Rathke’s pouch and for the restriction of differentiated cells to the ventral pituitary. We observed ACTH and αGSU producing cells that had prematurely differentiated within Rathke’s pouch along with correlated ectopic expression of Mash1 only when both Prop1 and Hes1 were lost. We also discovered that downregulation of N-cadherin expression in cells as they transition from Rathke’s pouch to the anterior lobe appears to be essential for their movement. In the Prop1 mutant, cells are trapped in Rathke’s pouch and N-cadherin expression remains high. Also, Slug, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition, is absent in the dorsal anterior lobe. When Hes1 is lost in the Prop1 mutant, N-cadherin is downregulated and cells are able to exit Rathke’s pouch but have lost their migrational cues and form ectopic foci surrounding Rathke’s pouch. Our data reveal important overlapping functions of Hes1 and Prop1 in cell differentiation and movement that are critical for pituitary organogenesis. PMID:18996108

  8. Aberrant Notch signaling in glioblastoma stem cells contributes to tumor recurrence and invasion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Hao; Zhan, Ren-Ya

    2016-08-01

    Upregulation of the Notch signaling pathway in cancer stem cells and side population (SP) cells has a major role in maintenance, self-renewal and chemoresistance. The present study isolated a cancer stem cell-like SP accounting for 4.1% of a glioblastoma cell population using a Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion assay. In this glioblastoma SP, the expression of of Notch1 signaling proteins Notch1 intracellular domain and Hes‑1 was markedly upregulated. Furthermore, knockdown of Notch1 by RNA interference significantly diminished the neurosphere formation ability, self‑renewal and chemoresistance of the SP cells. In addition, the expression of the stem‑cell surface genes Oct‑4, Sox2 and Nanog in SP cells was significantly reduced and the sensitivity to the SP cells to chemotherapeutics was enhanced following Notch1 knockdown. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that upregulation of Notch1 is involved in the chemotherapy resistance and tumor recurrence of glioblastoma. Hence, the development of novel anti‑cancer drugs targeting the Notch1 signaling pathway may be a promising strategy for curing glioblastoma. PMID:27315154

  9. CCR7 Deficiency Exacerbates Injury in Acute Nephritis Due to Aberrant Localization of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Kathrin; Weber, Tobias; Pruenster, Monika; Wolf, Anna M.; Mayer, Gert

    2010-01-01

    The homing of dendritic cells and T cells to secondary lymphoid organs requires chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expression on these cells. T cells mediate the pathogenesis of experimental accelerated nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTS), including its suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the contribution of CCR7 to this disease is unknown. Here, we compared the development of NTS in CCR7-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT mice, CCR7KO mice developed more severe disease with significantly more inflammatory cells infiltrating the kidney. These cells included FoxP3+ Tregs, which were virtually absent from WT kidneys. The adoptive transfer of WT Tregs into CCR7KO mice at the time of immunization protected the recipients from disease; these cells homed to secondary lymphoid organs but not to kidneys. Conversely, adoptive transfer of CCR7KO Tregs into WT mice did not inhibit development of NTS. These data suggest that NTS can develop without CCR7 expression, but Treg-mediated disease suppression, which seems to occur in secondary lymphoid organs, requires CCR7. PMID:19917782

  10. Gene transcription is coordinated with, but not dependent on, cell divisions during C. elegans embryonic fate specification

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Gautham; Walton, Travis; Murray, John Isaac; Raj, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    Cell differentiation and proliferation are coordinated during animal development, but the link between them remains uncharacterized. To examine this relationship, we combined single-molecule RNA imaging with time-lapse microscopy to generate high-resolution measurements of transcriptional dynamics in Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. We found that globally slowing the overall development rate of the embryo by altering temperature or by mutation resulted in cell proliferation and transcription slowing, but maintaining, their relative timings, suggesting that cell division may directly control transcription. However, using mutants with specific defects in cell cycle pathways that lead to abnormal lineages, we found that the order between cell divisions and expression onset can switch, showing that expression of developmental regulators is not strictly dependent on cell division. Delaying cell divisions resulted in only slight changes in absolute expression time, suggesting that expression and proliferation are independently entrained to a separate clock-like process. These changes in relative timing can change the number of cells expressing a gene at a given time, suggesting that timing may help determine which cells adopt particular transcriptional patterns. Our results place limits on the types of mechanisms that are used during normal development to ensure that division timing and fate specification occur at appropriate times. PMID:23863485

  11. Mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh) "Sash" mutant mice display aberrant myelopoiesis leading to the accumulation of splenocytes that act as myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anastasija; Schüler, Andrea; Friedrich, Pamela; Döner, Fatma; Bopp, Tobias; Radsak, Markus; Hoffmann, Markus; Relle, Manfred; Distler, Ute; Kuharev, Jörg; Tenzer, Stefan; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Becker, Marc; Stassen, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh) "sash" mice are widely used to investigate mast cell functions. However, mutations of c-Kit also affect additional cells of hematopoietic and nonimmune origin. In this study, we demonstrate that Kit(W-sh) causes aberrant extramedullary myelopoiesis characterized by the expansion of immature lineage-negative cells, common myeloid progenitors, and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors in the spleen. A consistent feature shared by these cell types is the reduced expression of c-Kit. Populations expressing intermediate and high levels of Ly6G, a component of the myeloid differentiation Ag Gr-1, are also highly expanded in the spleen of sash mice. These cells are able to suppress T cell responses in vitro and phenotypically and functionally resemble myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). MDSC typically accumulate in tumor-bearing hosts and are able to dampen immune responses. Consequently, transfer of MDSC from naive sash mice into line 1 alveolar cell carcinoma tumor-bearing wild-type littermates leads to enhanced tumor progression. However, although it can also be observed in sash mice, accelerated growth of transplanted line 1 alveolar cell carcinoma tumors is a mast cell-independent phenomenon. Thus, the Kit(W-sh) mutation broadly affects key steps in myelopoiesis that may have an impact on mast cell research. PMID:23636054

  12. Rates of phytoplankton cell division in the field and in iron enrichment experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Banse, K. )

    1991-12-01

    Increases in chlorophyll with time for contained coastal plankton, expressed as daily division rates, are on average about as high as rates for nutrient-replete cultures at similar temperatures, when daylength is considered. In offshore areas with persistent high nutrients but low chlorophyll, division rates from increased chlorophyll and cumulative NO{sub 3} uptake in the controls of Fe enrichments are on average also high and do not suggest marked Fe deficiency. The normally observed phytoplankton growth in the controls is interpreted as due to release from grazing. Addition of Fe in the treatments leads to blooms and exhaustion of NO{sub 3}. Differences between controls and treatments in rates of chlorophyll increase and NO{sub 3} removal, however, as well as shifts in species composition toward rare species in the treatments, also indicate direct effects of Fe on phytoplankton. To clarify the issues, especially in respect to medium- and large-celled phytoplankton, the author recommended measurements of species-specific division rates.

  13. Positioning of polarity formation by extracellular signaling during asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-07-01

    Anterior-posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which ultimately generates cell diversity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a single fertilized egg cell (P0), its daughter cell (P1), and the germline precursors (P2 and P3 cells) form two exclusive domains of different PAR proteins on the membrane along the anterior-posterior axis. However, the phenomenon of polarity reversal has been observed in which the axis of asymmetric cell division of the P2 and P3 cells is formed in an opposite manner to that of the P0 and P1 cells. The extracellular signal MES-1/SRC-1 has been shown to induce polarity reversal, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, using a mathematical model, I explore the mechanism by which MES-1/SRC-1 signaling can induce polarity reversal and ultimately affect the process of polarity formation. I show that a positive correlation between SRC-1 and the on-rate of PAR-2 is the essential mechanism underlying polarity reversal, providing a mathematical basis for the orientation of cell polarity patterns. PMID:27086039

  14. Crystal structure of the Z-ring associated cell division protein ZapC from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Cristina; Kureisaite-Ciziene, Danguole; Schmitz, Florian; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Vicente, Miguel; Löwe, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cell division involves a contractile ring that organises downstream proteins at the division site and which contains the tubulin homologue FtsZ. ZapC has been discovered as a non-essential regulator of FtsZ. It localises to the septal ring and deletion of zapC leads to a mild phenotype, while overexpression inhibits cell division. Interference with cell division is facilitated by an interaction with FtsZ. Here, we present the 2.9 Å crystal structure of ZapC from Escherichia coli. ZapC forms a dimer and comprises two domains that belong to the Royal superfamily of which many members bind methylated arginines or lysines. ZapC contains an N-terminal chromo-like domain and a Tudor-like C-terminal domain. We show by ITC that ZapC binds the C-terminal tail of FtsZ. PMID:26619764

  15. Regulation of the Min Cell Division Inhibition Complex by the Rcs Phosphorelay in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Howery, Kristen E.; Clemmer, Katy M.; Şimşek, Emrah; Kim, Minsu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A key regulator of swarming in Proteus mirabilis is the Rcs phosphorelay, which represses flhDC, encoding the master flagellar regulator FlhD4C2. Mutants in rcsB, the response regulator in the Rcs phosphorelay, hyperswarm on solid agar and differentiate into swarmer cells in liquid, demonstrating that this system also influences the expression of genes central to differentiation. To gain a further understanding of RcsB-regulated genes involved in swarmer cell differentiation, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) was used to examine the RcsB regulon. Among the 133 genes identified, minC and minD, encoding cell division inhibitors, were identified as RcsB-activated genes. A third gene, minE, was shown to be part of an operon with minCD. To examine minCDE regulation, the min promoter was identified by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′-RACE), and both transcriptional lacZ fusions and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase (qRT) PCR were used to confirm that the minCDE operon was RcsB activated. Purified RcsB was capable of directly binding the minC promoter region. To determine the role of RcsB-mediated activation of minCDE in swarmer cell differentiation, a polar minC mutation was constructed. This mutant formed minicells during growth in liquid, produced shortened swarmer cells during differentiation, and exhibited decreased swarming motility. IMPORTANCE This work describes the regulation and role of the MinCDE cell division system in P. mirabilis swarming and swarmer cell elongation. Prior to this study, the mechanisms that inhibit cell division and allow swarmer cell elongation were unknown. In addition, this work outlines for the first time the RcsB regulon in P. mirabilis. Taken together, the data presented in this study begin to address how P. mirabilis elongates upon contact with a solid surface. PMID:25986901

  16. Effect of microgravity environment on cell wall regeneration, cell divisions, growth, and differentiation of plants from protoplasts (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of this project is to investigate if microgravity has any influence on growth and differentiation of protoplasts. Formation of new cell walls on rapeseed protoplasts takes place within the first 24 hours after isolation. Cell division can be observed after 2-4 days and formation of cell aggregates after 5-7 days. Therefore, it is possible during the 7 day IML-1 Mission to investigate if cell wall formation, cell division, and cell differentiation are influenced by microgravity. Protoplasts of rapeseeds and carrot will be prepared shortly before launch and injected into 0.6 ml polyethylene bags. Eight bags are placed in an aluminum block inside the ESA Type 1 container. The containers are placed at 4 C in PTCU's and transferred to orbiter mid-deck. At 4 C all cell processes are slowed down, including cell wall formation. Latest access to the shuttle will be 12 hours before launch. In orbit the containers will be transferred from the PTC box to the 22 C Biorack incubator. The installation of a 1 g centrifuge in Biorack will make it possible to distinguish between effects of near weightlessness and effects caused by cosmic radiation and other space flight factors including vibrations. Parallel control experiments will be carried out on the ground. Other aspects of the experiment are discussed.

  17. The role of a cell surface inhibitor in early signal transduction associated with the regulation of cell division and differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Enebo, D. J.; Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Serum stimulation of quiescent human fibroblast cultures resulted in a hyperphosphorylation of the nuclear retinoblastoma gene susceptibility product (RB). However, serum stimulation in the presence of 9 x 10(-8) M of a purified bovine sialoglycopeptide (SGP) cell surface inhibitor abrogated the hyperphosphorylation of the RB protein and the subsequent progression of cells through the mitotic cycle. The experimental results suggest that the SGP mediated its cell cycle arrest at a site in the cell cycle that was at the time of RB phosphorylation or somewhat upstream of the modification of this regulatory protein of cell division. Both cells serum-deprived and serum stimulated in the presence of the SGP displayed only a hypophosphorylated RB protein, consistent with the SGP-mediated cell cycle arrest point being near the G1/S interface.

  18. [Roles of aberrant endothelial progenitor cells in pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kuwana, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem connective tissue disease characterized by excessive fibrosis and microvasculopathy, along with poor vascular formation and repair. The maintenance of the postnatal vascular system requires constant remodeling through vasculogenesis, which is mediated by the de novo differentiation of mature endothelial cells from endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). However, a great deal of controversy about EPCs and their roles in postnatal vascular formation has arisen because of discrepancies in how EPCs are defined. The current consensus is that EPCs are heterogeneous cell population containing an extremely small count of "true EPCs", and pro-angiogenic hematopoietic cells (PHCs) that promotes vascular formation and repair through secretion of pro-angiogenic factors, and differentiation into endothelial cells and mural cells. In 2004, we reported a reduced number and impaired function of circulating CD34(+)CD133(+)CD309(+)CD45(dim)CD14(-) EPCs, which are now regarded as an immature subset of PHCs, in patients with SSc, and proposed a theory that defective vascular repair machinery as one of important mechanisms contributing to SSc vasculopathy. In addition, we showed that in SSc patients, circulating monocytic PHCs were increased and have enhanced angiogenic potency and differentiation potential to fibroblast-like cells. In summary, EPCs are involved in the pathogenesis of SSc by participating in two major pathological features, microvasculopathy and excessive fibrosis. Understanding the roles of EPCs in disease process of SSc may be key to dissecting its pathogenesis and to developing novel therapeutic strategies for this intractable condition. PMID:23445728

  19. High-level DNA amplifications are common genetic aberrations in B-cell neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, C. A.; Döhner, H.; Joos, S.; Trümper, L. H.; Baudis, M.; Barth, T. F.; Ott, G.; Möller, P.; Lichter, P.; Bentz, M.

    1997-01-01

    Gene amplification is one of the molecular mechanisms resulting in the up-regulation of gene expression. In non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, such gene amplifications have been identified rarely. Using comparative genomic hybridization, a technique that has proven to be very sensitive for the detection of high-level DNA amplifications, we analyzed 108 cases of B-cell neoplasms (42 chronic B-cell leukemias, 5 mantle cell lymphomas, and 61 aggressive B-cell lymphomas). Twenty-four high-level amplifications were identified in 13% of the patients and mapped to 15 different genomic regions. Regions most frequently amplified were bands Xq26-28, 2p23-24, and 2p14-16 as well as 18q21 (three times each). Amplification of several proto-oncogenes and a cell cycle control gene (N-MYC (two cases), BCL2, CCND2, and GLI) located within the amplified regions was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization to interphase nuclei of tumor cells. These data demonstrate that gene amplifications in B-cell neoplasms are much more frequent than previously assumed. The identification of highly amplified DNA regions and genes included in the amplicons provides important information for further analyses of genetic events involved in lymphomagenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250147

  20. Aberrant localization of lamin B receptor (LBR) in cellular senescence in human cells.

    PubMed

    Arai, Rumi; En, Atsuki; Ukekawa, Ryo; Miki, Kensuke; Fujii, Michihiko; Ayusawa, Dai

    2016-05-13

    5-Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analogue, induces cellular senescence in mammalian cells. BrdU induces cellular senescence probably through the regulation of chromatin because BrdU destabilizes or disrupts nucleosome positioning and decondenses heterochromatin. Since heterochromatin is tethered to the nuclear periphery through the interaction with the nuclear envelope proteins, we examined the localization of the several nuclear envelope proteins such as lamins, lamin-interacting proteins, nuclear pore complex proteins, and nuclear transport proteins in senescent cells. We have shown here that lamin B receptor (LBR) showed a change in localization in both BrdU-induced and replicative senescent cells. PMID:27059139

  1. Revised Identification of the Chromophore of a Cell Division Factor from Crown Gall Tumor Cells of Vinca rosea L*

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Henry N.

    1970-01-01

    Low-resolution mass spectrometry, UV spectra in acid, neutral, and alkaline solution, and nuclear magnetic resonance indicated that the chromophore of one member of a new class of cell division-promoting factors isolated from crown gall tumor tissues consisted of a 3,7-alkyl-2-alkylthio-6-purinone with one free proton in the ring. Glucose constitutes the sugar moiety. PMID:5274457

  2. ABA Inhibits Embryo Cell Expansion and Early Cell Division Events During Coffee (Coffea arabica ‘Rubi’) Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, E. A. Amaral; Toorop, Peter E.; Van Lammeren, André A. M.; Hilhorst, Henk W. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Coffee seed germination represents an interplay between the embryo and the surrounding endosperm. A sequence of events in both parts of the seed determines whether germination will be successful or not. Following previous studies, the aim here was to further characterize the morphology of endosperm degradation and embryo growth with respect to morphology and cell cycle, and the influence of abscisic acid on these processes. Methods Growth of cells in a fixed region of the axis was quantified from light micrographs. Cell cycle events were measured by flow cytometry and by immunocytochemistry, using antibodies against β-tubulin. Aspects of the endosperm were visualized by light and scanning electron microscopy. Key Results The embryonic axis cells grew initially by isodiametric expansion. This event coincided with reorientation and increase in abundance of microtubules and with accumulation of β-tubulin. Radicle protrusion was characterized by a shift from isodiametric expansion to elongation of radicle cells and further accumulation of β-tubulin. Early cell division events started prior to radicle protrusion. Abscisic acid decreased the abundance of microtubules and inhibited the growth of the embryo cells, the reorganization of the microtubules, DNA replication in the embryonic axis, the formation of a protuberance and the completion of germination. The endosperm cap cells had smaller and thinner cell walls than the rest of the endosperm. Cells in the endosperm cap displayed compression followed by loss of cell integrity and the appearance of a protuberance prior to radicle protrusion. Conclusions Coffee seed germination is the result of isodiametric growth of the embryo followed by elongation, at the expense of integrity of endosperm cap cells. The cell cycle, including cell division, is initiated prior to radicle protrusion. ABA inhibits expansion of the embryo, and hence subsequent events, including germination. PMID:18617534

  3. Vinca alkaloids cause aberrant ROS-mediated JNK activation, Mcl-1 downregulation, DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wei-Hsin; Luo, Sheng-Jei; Chen, Chia-Ling; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Wang, Chi-Yun; Huang, Wei-Ching; Su, Wu-Chou; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Vinca alkaloids are clinically used to inhibit the growth of malignancy by interfering with microtubule polymerization. The purpose of this study was to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying growth inhibition as well as apoptosis in vinca alkaloid-treated lung adenocarcinoma cells. Consistent with nocodazole, treatment with vinorelbine (VNR) caused mitotic prometaphase arrest in a time-dependent manner, accompanied by cell apoptosis, dependent on both dose and time. VNR sequentially induced mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) loss and caspase-dependent apoptosis following myeloid cell leukemia (Mcl) 1 downregulation. Prolonged activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was required for vinca alkaloid- and nocodazole-induced apoptosis but not cell cycle arrest. Vinca alkaloids and nocodazole caused glutathione/reactive oxygen species (ROS) imbalance, and inhibiting ROS prevented prolonged JNK activation, decreased Mcl-1 levels, MTP loss, and apoptosis. Notably, cell size and granularity were enlarged in stimulated cells; unexpectedly, many ROS-producing mitochondria were accumulated followed by aberrant JNK-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Unlike cisplatin, which causes DNA damage in each phase of the cell cycle, VNR and nocodazole induced aberrant JNK-regulated DNA damage in prometaphase; however, inhibiting ATM (ataxia telangiectasia, mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) did not reverse mitotic arrest or apoptosis. These results demonstrate an essential role of ROS in vinca alkaloid-induced aberrant JNK-mediated Mcl-1 downregulation and DNA damage followed by mitochondrial dysfunction-related apoptosis but not mitotic arrest. PMID:22285910

  4. Aberrant epigenetic regulation in clear cell sarcoma of the kidney featuring distinct DNA hypermethylation and EZH2 overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Caroline; O'Sullivan, Maureen J.; Mengelbier, Linda Holmquist; Gisselsson, David

    2016-01-01

    The global methylation profile and the mutational status of 633 specific epigenetic regulators were analyzed in the pediatric tumor clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK). Methylation array analyses of 30 CCSKs revealed CCSK tumor DNA to be globally hypermethylated compared to Wilms tumor, normal fetal kidney, and adult kidney. The aberrant methylation pattern of CCSKs was associated with activation of genes involved in embryonic processes and with silencing of genes linked to normal kidney function. No epigenetic regulator was recurrently mutated in our cohort, but a mutation in the key epigenetic regulator EZH2 was discovered in one case. EZH2 mRNA was significantly higher in CCSK compared to Wilms tumor and normal kidney, and the EZH2 protein was strongly expressed in more than 90 % of CCSK tumor cells in 9/9 tumors analyzed. This was in striking contrast to the lack of EZH2 protein expression in Wilms tumor stromal elements, indicating that EZH2 could be explored further as a diagnostic marker and a potential drug target for CCSK. PMID:26848979

  5. Influence of retinol on carcinogen-induced sister chromatid exchangers and chromosome aberrations in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, S.; Batt, T.; Huang, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of retinol (Rol) on sister chromatid exchangers (SCE) in V79 cells induced by six indirect and two direct carcinogens, and on chromosome aberration (CA) in V79 cells induced by four indirect carcinogens were studied. The indirect carcinogens used were aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB), cyclophosphamide (CPP), benzo(a)anthracene (BA), benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benz(a)anthracene (DMBA), and 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). The two direct carcinogens were ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Rol effectively inhibited SCE and CA induced by AFB and CPP in a dose-dependent manner, but it had no effect on SCE induced by BA, BP, DMBA, MCA, EMS, and MNNG. To the contrary, Rol had an enhancing effect on CA induced by BP and DMBA. The possibility that Rol exerts its anticarcinogenic effects by inhibiting certain forms of the cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes required for activation of precarcinogens, such as AFB and CPP but not those enzymes required by BA, BP, DMBA, and MCA, is discussed.

  6. Cigarette smoke extract induces aberrant cytochrome-c oxidase subunit II methylation and apoptosis in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Chen, Ping; Peng, Hong; Zhang, Hongliang; Chen, Yan; Cai, Shan; Lu, Qianjin; Guan, Chaxiang

    2015-03-01

    Cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the mechanisms responsible for endothelial apoptosis remain poorly understood. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate whether DNA methylation is involved in smoking-induced endothelial apoptosis. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) at a range of concentrations (0-10%). HUVECs were also incubated with a demethylating reagent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidinem (AZA), with and without CSE. Apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay and flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide staining. We found that CSE treatment significantly increased HUVEC apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot revealed that CSE treatment decreased cytochrome-c oxidase subunit II (COX II) mRNA and protein levels and decreased COX activity. Methylation-specific PCR and direct bisulfite sequencing revealed positive COX II gene methylation. AZA administration partly increased mRNA and protein expressions of COX II, and COX activity decreased by CSE and attenuated the toxic effects of CSE. Our results showed that CSE induced aberrant COX II methylation and apoptosis in HUVECs. PMID:25500741

  7. Subgroup J avian leukosis virus infection of chicken dendritic cells induces apoptosis via the aberrant expression of microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Di; Dai, Manman; Zhang, Xu; Cao, Weisheng; Liao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus that causes immunosuppression and enhances susceptibility to secondary infection. The innate immune system is the first line of defense in preventing bacterial and viral infections, and dendritic cells (DCs) play important roles in innate immunity. Because bone marrow is an organ that is susceptible to ALV-J, the virus may influence the generation of bone marrow-derived DCs. In this study, DCs cultured in vitro were used to investigate the effects of ALV infection. The results revealed that ALV-J could infect these cells during the early stages of differentiation, and infection of DCs with ALV-J resulted in apoptosis. miRNA sequencing data of uninfected and infected DCs revealed 122 differentially expressed miRNAs, with 115 demonstrating upregulation after ALV-J infection and the other 7 showing significant downregulation. The miRNAs that exhibited the highest levels of upregulation may suppress nutrient processing and metabolic function. These results indicated that ALV-J infection of chicken DCs could induce apoptosis via aberrant microRNA expression. These results provide a solid foundation for the further study of epigenetic influences on ALV-J-induced immunosuppression. PMID:26830017

  8. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  9. Contribution of Stochastic Partitioning at Human Embryonic Stem Cell Division to NANOG Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneity is an often unappreciated characteristic of stem cell populations yet its importance in fate determination is becoming increasingly evident. Although gene expression noise has received greater attention as a source of non-genetic heterogeneity, the effects of stochastic partitioning of cellular material during mitosis on population variability have not been researched to date. We examined self-renewing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which typically exhibit a dispersed distribution of the pluripotency marker NANOG. In conjunction with our experiments, a multiscale cell population balance equation (PBE) model was constructed accounting for transcriptional noise and stochastic partitioning at division as sources of population heterogeneity. Cultured hESCs maintained time-invariant profiles of size and NANOG expression and the data were utilized for parameter estimation. Contributions from both sources considered in this study were significant on the NANOG profile, although elimination of the gene expression noise resulted in greater changes in the dispersion of the NANOG distribution. Moreover, blocking of division by treating hESCs with nocodazole or colcemid led to a 39% increase in the average NANOG content and over 68% of the cells had higher NANOG level than the mean NANOG expression of untreated cells. Model predictions, which were in excellent agreement with these findings, revealed that stochastic partitioning accounted for 17% of the total noise in the NANOG profile of self-renewing hESCs. The computational framework developed in this study will aid in gaining a deeper understanding of how pluripotent stem/progenitor cells orchestrate processes such as gene expression and proliferation for maintaining their pluripotency or differentiating along particular lineages. Such models will be essential in designing and optimizing efficient differentiation strategies and bioprocesses for the production of therapeutically suitable stem cell progeny

  10. A general framework for modeling growth and division of mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modeling the cell-division cycle has been practiced for many years. As time has progressed, this work has gone from understanding the basic principles to addressing distinct biological problems, e.g., the nature of the restriction point, how checkpoints operate, the nonlinear dynamics of the cell cycle, the effect of localization, etc. Most models consist of coupled ordinary differential equations developed by the researchers, restricted to deal with the interactions of a limited number of molecules. In the future, cell-cycle modeling--and indeed all modeling of complex biologic processes--will increase in scope and detail. Results A framework for modeling complex cell-biologic processes is proposed here. The framework is based on two constructs: one describing the entire lifecycle of a molecule and the second describing the basic cellular machinery. Use of these constructs allows complex models to be built in a straightforward manner that fosters rigor and completeness. To demonstrate the framework, an example model of the mammalian cell cycle is presented that consists of several hundred differential equations of simple mass action kinetics. The model calculates energy usage, amino acid and nucleotide usage, membrane transport, RNA synthesis and destruction, and protein synthesis and destruction for 33 proteins to give an in-depth look at the cell cycle. Conclusions The framework presented here addresses how to develop increasingly descriptive models of complex cell-biologic processes. The example model of cellular growth and division constructed with the framework demonstrates that large structured models can be created with the framework, and these models can generate non-trivial descriptions of cellular processes. Predictions from the example model include those at both the molecular level--e.g., Wee1 spontaneously reactivates--and at the system level--e.g., pathways for timing-critical processes must shut down redundant pathways. A future effort is

  11. Contribution of stochastic partitioning at human embryonic stem cell division to NANOG heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneity is an often unappreciated characteristic of stem cell populations yet its importance in fate determination is becoming increasingly evident. Although gene expression noise has received greater attention as a source of non-genetic heterogeneity, the effects of stochastic partitioning of cellular material during mitosis on population variability have not been researched to date. We examined self-renewing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which typically exhibit a dispersed distribution of the pluripotency marker NANOG. In conjunction with our experiments, a multiscale cell population balance equation (PBE) model was constructed accounting for transcriptional noise and stochastic partitioning at division as sources of population heterogeneity. Cultured hESCs maintained time-invariant profiles of size and NANOG expression and the data were utilized for parameter estimation. Contributions from both sources considered in this study were significant on the NANOG profile, although elimination of the gene expression noise resulted in greater changes in the dispersion of the NANOG distribution. Moreover, blocking of division by treating hESCs with nocodazole or colcemid led to a 39% increase in the average NANOG content and over 68% of the cells had higher NANOG level than the mean NANOG expression of untreated cells. Model predictions, which were in excellent agreement with these findings, revealed that stochastic partitioning accounted for 17% of the total noise in the NANOG profile of self-renewing hESCs. The computational framework developed in this study will aid in gaining a deeper understanding of how pluripotent stem/progenitor cells orchestrate processes such as gene expression and proliferation for maintaining their pluripotency or differentiating along particular lineages. Such models will be essential in designing and optimizing efficient differentiation strategies and bioprocesses for the production of therapeutically suitable stem cell progeny