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Sample records for aberrant cell signaling

  1. Stem cells and aberrant signaling of molecular systems in skin aging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yan; Xuan, Min; Leung, Victor Y L; Cheng, Biao

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the body's largest organ and it is able to self-repair throughout an individual's life. With advanced age, skin is prone to degenerate in response to damage. Although cosmetic surgery has been widely adopted to rejuvinate skin, we are far from a clear understanding of the mechanisms responsible for skin aging. Recently, adult skin-resident stem/progenitor cells, growth arrest, senescence or apoptotic death and dysfunction caused by alterations in key signaling genes, such as Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK, PI3K/Akt-kinases, Wnt, p21 and p53, have been shown to play a vital role in skin regeneration. Simultaneously, enhanced telomere attrition, hormone exhaustion, oxidative stress, genetic events and ultraviolet radiation exposure that result in severe DNA damage, genomic instability and epigenetic mutations also contribute to skin aging. Therefore, cell replacement and targeting of the molecular systems found in skin hold great promise for controlling or even curing skin aging.

  2. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eun Jee; Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah; Cho, Jin Won; Lee, Joon H.

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  3. The Endocrine Dyscrasia that Accompanies Menopause and Andropause Induces Aberrant Cell Cycle Signaling that Triggers Cell Cycle Reentry of Post-mitotic Neurons, Neurodysfunction, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Craig S.; Bowen, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are the physiological factors that regulate neurogenesis during embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. These hormones support the formation of brain structures such as dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture of information (memories). Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories in animals (e.g. infantile amnesia). In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Since sex hormones control when and how neurons proliferate and differentiate, the endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause is a key signaling event that impacts neurogenesis and the acquisition, processing, storage and recall of memories. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in endocrine signaling with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle with neurite retraction that leads to neuron dysfunction and death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the ratio of LH:sex steroids as driving aberrant mitotic events mediated by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor, amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ, and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and

  4. Progenitor/stem cells give rise to liver cancer due to aberrant TGF-β and IL-6 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yi; Kitisin, Krit; Jogunoori, Wilma; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Mueller, Susette C.; Ressom, Habtom W.; Rashid, Asif; He, Aiwu Ruth; Mendelson, Jonathan S.; Jessup, John M.; Shetty, Kirti; Zasloff, Michael; Mishra, Bibhuti; Reddy, E. P.; Johnson, Lynt; Mishra, Lopa

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are critical for the initiation, propagation, and treatment resistance of multiple cancers. Yet functional interactions between specific signaling pathways in solid organ “cancer stem cells,” such as those of the liver, remain elusive. We report that in regenerating human liver, two to four cells per 30,000–50,000 cells express stem cell proteins Stat3, Oct4, and Nanog, along with the prodifferentiation proteins TGF-β-receptor type II (TBRII) and embryonic liver fodrin (ELF). Examination of human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) reveals cells that label with stem cell markers that have unexpectedly lost TBRII and ELF. elf+/− mice spontaneously develop HCC; expression analysis of these tumors highlighted the marked activation of the genes involved in the IL-6 signaling pathway, including IL-6 and Stat3, suggesting that HCC could arise from an IL-6-driven transformed stem cell with inactivated TGF-β signaling. Similarly, suppression of IL-6 signaling, through the generation of mouse knockouts involving a positive regulator of IL-6, Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor-heavy chain-4 (ITIH4), resulted in reduction in HCC in elf+/− mice. This study reveals an unexpected functional link between IL-6, a major stem cell signaling pathway, and the TGF-β signaling pathway in the modulation of mammalian HCC, a lethal cancer of the foregut. These experiments suggest an important therapeutic role for targeting IL-6 in HCCs lacking a functional TGF-β pathway. PMID:18263735

  5. Hyaluronan suppresses prostate tumor cell proliferation through diminished expression of N-cadherin and aberrant growth factor receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Goodrich, Nathaniel P.; McAtee, Caitlin O.; Haferbier, Katie; Oakley, Gregory G.; Wahl, James K.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2011-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production has been functionally implicated in prostate tumorigenesis and metastasis. We previously used prostate tumor cells overexpressing the HA synthesizing enzyme HAS3 or the clinically relevant hyaluronidase Hyal1 to show that excess HA production suppresses tumor growth, while HA turnover accelerates spontaneous metastasis from the prostate. Here, we examined pathways responsible for effects of HAS3 and Hyal1 on tumor cell phenotype. Detailed characterization of cell cycle progression revealed that expression of Hyal1 accelerated cell cycle re-entry following synchronization, whereas HAS3 alone delayed entry. Hyal1 expressing cells exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to sustain ERK phosphorylation upon stimulation by growth factors, and in their expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. In contrast, HAS3 expressing cells showed prolonged ERK phosphorylation and increased expression of both p21 and p27, in asynchronous and synchronized cultures. Changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins were accompanied by HA-induced suppression of N-cadherin, while E-cadherin expression and {beta}-catenin expression and distribution remained unchanged. Our results are consistent with a model in which excess HA synthesis suppresses cell proliferation by promoting homotypic E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion, consequently signaling to elevate cell cycle inhibitor expression and suppress G1- to S-phase transition.

  6. ZIP7-mediated intracellular zinc transport contributes to aberrant growth factor signaling in antihormone-resistant breast cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kathryn M; Vichova, Petra; Jordan, Nicola; Hiscox, Stephen; Hendley, Rhiannon; Nicholson, Robert I

    2008-10-01

    Antiestrogens such as tamoxifen are the mainstay of treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. However, their effectiveness is limited by the development of endocrine resistance, allowing tumor regrowth and progression. Importantly, in vitro MCF7 cell models of acquired tamoxifen resistance (TamR cells) display an aggressive, invasive phenotype in which activation of epithelial growth factor receptor/IGF-I receptor/Src signaling plays a critical role. In this study, we report that TamR cells have increased levels of zinc and zinc transporter, ZIP7 [solute carrier family 39 (zinc transporter) member 7, also known as SLC39A7], resulting in an enhanced response to exogenous zinc, which is manifested as a greatly increased growth factor receptor activation, leading to increased growth and invasion. Removal of ZIP7, using small interfering RNA, destroys this activation of epithelial growth factor receptor/IGF-I receptor/Src signaling by reducing intracellular zinc levels. Similarly, it also blocks the activation of HER2, -3, and -4. These data suggest that intracellular zinc levels may be a critical factor in determining growth factor responses and that the targeting of zinc transporters may have novel therapeutic implications. We show that ZIP7 is a critical component in the redistribution of zinc from intracellular stores to the cytoplasm and, as such, is essential for the zinc-induced inhibition of phosphatases, which leads to activation of growth factor receptors. Removal of ZIP7 therefore offers a means through which zinc-induced activation of growth factor receptors may be effectively suppressed and provides a mechanism of targeting multiple growth factor pathways, increasing tumor kill, and preventing further development of resistance in breast cancer.

  7. The role of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 as a negative regulator for aberrant expansion of CD8alpha+ dendritic cell subset.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Jun; Ozaki, Akemi; Hanada, Toshikatsu; Chinen, Takatoshi; Abe, Ryo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kubo, Masato

    2005-09-01

    The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 is a negative regulator in multiple cytokine-related aspects to maintain immunological homeostasis. Here, we studied a role of SOCS1 on dendritic cell (DC) maturation in the mice lacking either TCRalpha chain or CD28 in SOCS1-deficient background, and found that the SOCS1 could restore acute phase of inflammatory response in SOCS1-deficient mice. The CD11c+ CD8- DC population in freshly isolated splenic DCs from normal mice highly expressed SOCS1. However, in SOCS1-deficient environment, the proportion of CD8alpha+ DCs (CD8 DCs) noticeably increased without affecting the cell number of conventional and plasmacytoid DC populations. This population revealed the CD11cdull CD8alpha+ CD11b- CD45RA- B220- phenotype, which is a minor population in normal mice. Localization of the abnormal CD8 DCs in splenic microenvironments was mainly restricted to deep within red pulp. The CD8 DCs secrete a large amount of IFN-gamma, IL-12 and B lymphocyte stimulator/B cell activation factor of the tumor necrosis factor family in response to LPS and CpG stimulation. This is responsible for the development of DC-mediated systemic autoimmunity in the old age of SOCS1-deficient mice. Moreover, the CD8 DC subsets expressed more indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and IL-10, and hence inhibit the allogeneic proliferative T cell response and antigen-induced Th1 responses. Therefore, SOCS1 expression during DC maturation plays a role in surveillance in controlling the aberrant expansion of abnormal DC subset to maintain homeostasis of immune system.

  8. The endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause induces aberrant cell cycle signaling that triggers re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle, neurodysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive disease.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Sex hormones are physiological factors that promote neurogenesis during embryonic and fetal development. During childhood and adulthood these hormones support the maintenance of brain structure and function via neurogenesis and the formation of dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture, processing and retrieval of information (memories). Not surprisingly, changes in these reproductive hormones that occur with menopause and during andropause are strongly correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of adult neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories while decreasing neurogenesis after memory formation during infancy mitigated forgetting. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in sex hormone signaling associated with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle that leads to neurite retraction, neuron dysfunction and neuron death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, gonadotropins such as luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the LH:sex steroid ratio as driving aberrant mitotic events. These include the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor; amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ; and

  9. Aberrantly expressed miR-582-3p maintains lung cancer stem cell-like traits by activating Wnt/β-catenin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lishan; Cai, Junchao; Chen, Baixue; Wu, Shanshan; Li, Rong; Xu, Xiaonan; Yang, Yi; Guan, Hongyu; Zhu, Xun; Zhang, Le; Yuan, Jie; Wu, Jueheng; Li, Mengfeng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumorigenesis, tumour recurrence and therapy resistance and Wnt signalling is essential for the development of the biological traits of CSCs. In non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), unlike in colon cancer, mutations in β-catenin and APC genes are uncommon; thus, the mechanism underlying the constitutive activation of Wnt signalling in NSCLC remains unclear. Here we report that miR-582-3p expression correlates with the overall- and recurrence-free-survival of NSCLC patients, and miR-582-3p has an activating effect on Wnt/β-catenin signalling. miR-582-3p overexpression simultaneously targets multiple negative regulators of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, namely, AXIN2, DKK3 and SFRP1. Consequently, miR-582-3p promotes CSC traits of NSCLC cells in vitro and tumorigenesis and tumour recurrence in vivo. Antagonizing miR-582-3p potently inhibits tumour initiation and progression in xenografted animal models. These findings suggest that miR-582-3p mediates the constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling, likely serving as a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:26468775

  10. Analysis of miRNA profiles identified miR-196a as a crucial mediator of aberrant PI3K/AKT signaling in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Ilaria; D'Angelo, Daniela; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Santos, Mafalda; Scrima, Marianna; Malanga, Donatella; De Marco, Carmela; Ravo, Maria; Weisz, Alessandro; Laudanna, Carmelo; Ceccarelli, Michele; Falco, Geppino; Rizzuto, Antonia; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2016-11-17

    Hyperactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway is observed in most human cancer including lung carcinomas. Here we have investigated the role of miRNAs as downstream targets of activated PI3K/AKT signaling in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). To this aim, miRNA profiling was performed in human lung epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) expressing active AKT1 (BEAS-AKT1-E17K), active PI3KCA (BEAS-PIK3CA-E545K) or with silenced PTEN (BEAS-shPTEN).Twenty-four differentially expressed miRNAs common to BEAS-AKT1-E17K, BEAS-PIK3CA-E545K and BEAS-shPTEN cells were identified through this analysis, with miR-196a being the most consistently up-regulated miRNA. Interestingly, miR-196a was significantly overexpressed also in human NSCLC-derived cell lines (n=11) and primary lung cancer samples (n=28).By manipulating the expression of miR-196a in BEAS-2B and NCI-H460 cells, we obtained compelling evidence that this miRNA acts downstream the PI3K/AKT pathway, mediating some of the proliferative, pro-migratory and tumorigenic activity that this pathway exerts in lung epithelial cells, possibly through the regulation of FoxO1, CDKN1B (hereafter p27) and HOXA9.

  11. Pancreatic tumor cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 promotes endothelial cell migration and aberrant neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Maity, Gargi; Mehta, Smita; Haque, Inamul; Dhar, Kakali; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Banerjee, Snigdha

    2014-05-16

    The complex signaling networks between cancer cells and adjacent endothelial cells make it challenging to unravel how cancer cells send extracellular messages to promote aberrant vascularization or tumor angiogenesis. Here, in vitro and in vivo models show that pancreatic cancer cell generated unique microenvironments can underlie endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, we find that pancreatic cancer cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 matricellular protein rewires the microenvironment to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. This event can be overcome by Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) antibody treatment. Collectively, these studies identify a novel CCN1 signaling program in pancreatic cancer cells which activates SHh through autocrine-paracrine circuits to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis and suggests that CCN1 signaling of pancreatic cancer cells is vital for the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. Thus CCN1 signaling could be an ideal target for tumor vascular disruption in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Aberrantly expressed LGR4 empowers Wnt signaling in multiple myeloma by hijacking osteoblast-derived R-spondins

    PubMed Central

    van Andel, Harmen; Ren, Zemin; Koopmans, Iris; Joosten, Sander P. J.; Kocemba, Kinga A.; de Lau, Wim; Kersten, Marie José; de Bruin, Alexander M.; Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Clevers, Hans; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T.

    2017-01-01

    The unrestrained growth of tumor cells is generally attributed to mutations in essential growth control genes, but tumor cells are also affected by, or even addicted to, signals from the microenvironment. As therapeutic targets, these extrinsic signals may be equally significant as mutated oncogenes. In multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell malignancy, most tumors display hallmarks of active Wnt signaling but lack activating Wnt-pathway mutations, suggesting activation by autocrine Wnt ligands and/or paracrine Wnts emanating from the bone marrow (BM) niche. Here, we report a pivotal role for the R-spondin/leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (LGR4) axis in driving aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MM. We show that LGR4 is expressed by MM plasma cells, but not by normal plasma cells or B cells. This aberrant LGR4 expression is driven by IL-6/STAT3 signaling and allows MM cells to hijack R-spondins produced by (pre)osteoblasts in the BM niche, resulting in Wnt (co)receptor stabilization and a dramatically increased sensitivity to auto- and paracrine Wnts. Our study identifies aberrant R-spondin/LGR4 signaling with consequent deregulation of Wnt (co)receptor turnover as a driver of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MM cells. These results advocate targeting of the LGR4/R-spondin interaction as a therapeutic strategy in MM. PMID:28028233

  13. Aberrantly expressed LGR4 empowers Wnt signaling in multiple myeloma by hijacking osteoblast-derived R-spondins.

    PubMed

    van Andel, Harmen; Ren, Zemin; Koopmans, Iris; Joosten, Sander P J; Kocemba, Kinga A; de Lau, Wim; Kersten, Marie José; de Bruin, Alexander M; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Clevers, Hans; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T

    2017-01-10

    The unrestrained growth of tumor cells is generally attributed to mutations in essential growth control genes, but tumor cells are also affected by, or even addicted to, signals from the microenvironment. As therapeutic targets, these extrinsic signals may be equally significant as mutated oncogenes. In multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell malignancy, most tumors display hallmarks of active Wnt signaling but lack activating Wnt-pathway mutations, suggesting activation by autocrine Wnt ligands and/or paracrine Wnts emanating from the bone marrow (BM) niche. Here, we report a pivotal role for the R-spondin/leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (LGR4) axis in driving aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MM. We show that LGR4 is expressed by MM plasma cells, but not by normal plasma cells or B cells. This aberrant LGR4 expression is driven by IL-6/STAT3 signaling and allows MM cells to hijack R-spondins produced by (pre)osteoblasts in the BM niche, resulting in Wnt (co)receptor stabilization and a dramatically increased sensitivity to auto- and paracrine Wnts. Our study identifies aberrant R-spondin/LGR4 signaling with consequent deregulation of Wnt (co)receptor turnover as a driver of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MM cells. These results advocate targeting of the LGR4/R-spondin interaction as a therapeutic strategy in MM.

  14. MORPHOLOGICAL ABERRATION OF ARTHROBACTER GLOBIFORMIS CELLS DUE TO BIOTIN DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    CHAN, E C

    1964-03-01

    Chan, E. C. S. (University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada). Morphological aberration of Arthrobacter globiformis cells due to biotin deficiency. J. Bacteriol. 87:641-651. 1964.-Morphological aberration of Arthrobacter globiformis strain 425 was shown to occur during growth in a chemically defined medium without added biotin. Such aberrant cells could revert back to normal coccoid forms upon inoculation into fresh medium supplemented with the vitamin. This abnormal cellular development occurred even when there was good growth (turbidity) or increase in total cell mass. Light photomicrographs of negative and cell-wall stains of the organism at different times of the morphological growth cycle are presented in support of these observations. The relationship between cellular aberration and the biochemical role of biotin is briefly discussed.

  15. Hypotaurine evokes a malignant phenotype in glioma through aberrant hypoxic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nesvick, Cody L.; Feldman, Michael J.; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Liu, Huailei; Chu, Huiying; Yang, Fengxu; Tang, Ling; Tian, Jing; Zhao, Shiguang; Li, Guohui; Heiss, John D.; Liu, Yang; Zhuang, Zhengping; Xu, Guowang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics has shown significant potential in identifying small molecules specific to tumor phenotypes. In this study we analyzed resected tissue metabolites using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and found that tissue hypotaurine levels strongly and positively correlated with glioma grade. In vitro studies were conducted to show that hypotaurine activates hypoxia signaling through the competitive inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-2. This leads to the activation of hypoxia signaling as well as to the enhancement of glioma cell proliferation and invasion. In contrast, taurine, the oxidation metabolite of hypotaurine, decreased intracellular hypotaurine and resulted in glioma cell growth arrest. Lastly, a glioblastoma xenograft mice model was supplemented with taurine feed and exhibited impaired tumor growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that hypotaurine is an aberrantly produced oncometabolite, mediating tumor molecular pathophysiology and progression. The hypotaurine metabolic pathway may provide a potentially new target for glioblastoma diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26934654

  16. Modulation of aberrant CDK5 signaling rescues impaired neurogenesis in models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Crews, L; Patrick, C; Adame, A; Rockenstein, E; Masliah, E

    2011-02-10

    Recent studies show that in Alzheimer's disease (AD), alterations in neurogenesis contribute to the neurodegenerative process. Neurodegeneration in AD has been associated with aberrant signaling through the cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK5) pathway via its activators p35/p25; however, the role of CDK5 in the mechanisms of defective adult neurogenesis in AD is unknown. First, to study AD-like abnormal activation of CDK5 signaling in an in vitro model of neurogenesis, neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) were infected with a viral vector expressing p35, and exposed to amyloid-β protein (Aβ(1-42)). These conditions resulted in impaired maturation and neurite outgrowth in vitro, and these effects were reversed by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of CDK5. Similarly, neurogenesis was impaired in a transgenic mouse model of AD that expresses high levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP), and this effect was reversed in transgenic mice crossed with a CDK5 heterozygous-deficient mouse line. A similar rescue effect was observed in APP transgenic mice treated with Roscovitine, a pharmacological inhibitor of CDK5. Taken together, these data suggest that the CDK5 signaling pathway has a critical role in maintaining the integrity of NPCs and neuronal maturation in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, potential therapeutic approaches could focus on modulating the aberrant activity of CDK5 to target the neurogenic and neurodegenerative alterations in AD.

  17. Mast cell desensitization inhibits calcium flux and aberrantly remodels actin

    PubMed Central

    Ang, W.X. Gladys; Church, Alison M.; Kulis, Mike; Choi, Hae Woong; Burks, A. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Rush desensitization (DS) is a widely used and effective clinical strategy for the rapid inhibition of IgE-mediated anaphylactic responses. However, the cellular targets and underlying mechanisms behind this process remain unclear. Recent studies have implicated mast cells (MCs) as the primary target cells for DS. Here, we developed a murine model of passive anaphylaxis with demonstrated MC involvement and an in vitro assay to evaluate the effect of DS on MCs. In contrast with previous reports, we determined that functional IgE remains on the cell surface of desensitized MCs following DS. Despite notable reductions in MC degranulation following DS, the high-affinity IgE receptor FcεRI was still capable of transducing signals in desensitized MCs. Additionally, we found that displacement of the actin cytoskeleton and its continued association with FcεRI impede the capacity of desensitized MCs to evoke the calcium response that is essential for MC degranulation. Together, these findings suggest that reduced degranulation responses in desensitized MCs arise from aberrant actin remodeling, providing insights that may lead to improvement of DS treatments for anaphylactic responses. PMID:27669462

  18. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  19. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  20. Involvement of aberrant calcium signalling in herpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Rebekah A; Hanani, Menachem

    2016-03-01

    Alpha-herpesviruses, herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV), are pathogens of the peripheral nervous system. After primary infection, these viruses establish latency within sensory ganglia, while retaining the ability to reactivate. Reactivation of VZV results in herpes zoster, a condition characterized by skin lesions that leads to post-herpetic neuralgia. Recurrent reactivations of HSV, which cause mucocutaneous lesions, may also result in neuralgia. During reactivation of alpha-herpesviruses, satellite glial cells (SGCs), which surround neurons in sensory ganglia, become infected with the replicating virus. SGCs are known to contribute to neuropathic pain in a variety of animal pain models. Here we investigated how infection of short-term cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia with HSV-1 affects communication between SGCs and neurons, and how this altered communication may increase neuronal excitability, thus contributing to herpetic neuralgia. Mechanical stimulation of single neurons or SGCs resulted in intercellular calcium waves, which were larger in cultures infected with HSV-1. Two differences were observed between control and HSV-1 infected cultures that could account for this augmentation. Firstly, HSV-1 infection induced cell fusion among SGCs and neurons, which would facilitate the spread of calcium signals over farther distances. Secondly, using calcium imaging and intracellular electrical recordings, we found that neurons in the HSV-1 infected cultures exhibited augmented influx of calcium upon depolarization. These virally induced changes may not only cause more neurons in the sensory ganglia to fire action potentials, but may also increase neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic terminals in the spinal cord. They are therefore likely to be contributing factors to herpetic neuralgia.

  1. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Affected by Promoter Hypermethylation Induces Aberrant Gli2 Expression in Spina Bifida.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Li; Chang, Shao-Yan; Shangguan, Shao-Fang; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Li-Hua; Zou, Ji-Zhen; Xiao, Ping; Li, Rui; Bao, Yi-Hua; Qiu, Z-Y; Zhang, Ting

    2016-10-01

    GLI2 is a key mediator of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway and plays an important role in neural tube development during vertebrate embryogenesis; however, the role of gli2 in human folate-related neural tube defects remains unclear. In this study, we compared methylation status and polymorphisms of gli2 between spina bifida patients and a control group to explore the underlying mechanisms related to folate deficiency in spina bifida. No single nucleotide polymorphism was found to be significantly different between the two groups, although gli2 methylation levels were significantly increased in spina bifida samples, accompanied by aberrant GLI2 expression. Moreover, a prominent negative correlation was found between the folate level in brain tissue and the gli2 methylation status (r = -0.41, P = 0.014), and gli2 hypermethylation increased the risk of spina bifida with an odds ratio of 12.45 (95 % confidence interval: 2.71-57.22, P = 0.001). In addition, we established a cell model to illustrate the effect of gli2 expression and the accessibility of chromatin affected by methylation. High gli2 and gli1 mRNA expression was detected in 5-Aza-treated cells, while gli2 hypermethylation resulted in chromatin inaccessibility and a reduced association with nuclear proteins containing transcriptional factors. More meaningful to the pathway, the effect gene of the Shh pathway, gli1, was found to have a reduced level of expression along with a decreased expression of gli2 in our cell model. Aberrant high methylation resulted in the low expression of gli2 in spina bifida, which was affected by the change in chromatin status and the capacity of transcription factor binding.

  2. [Aluminum induces chromosome aberrations in wheat root meristem cells].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, N V; Synzynys, B I; Koz'min, G V

    2001-12-01

    The yield and pattern of chromosome structure aberrations in wheat seedlings treated with aluminum nitrate and aluminum sulfate at various concentrations have been determined by the anaphase method. Aluminum has a genotoxic effect causing genome, chromatid, and chromosome aberrations in apical root meristem cells. The relationship between the total yield of structural mutations and the aluminum concentration follows a bell-shaped curve. The mutagenic activity of aluminum nitrate peaks at 10(-3) mg/ml, which is twice as high as the permissible concentration limit (PCL) of aluminum in potable water. The maximum of the mutagenic activity of aluminum sulfate is observed at 5 x 10(-4) mg/ml, i.e., one PCL. Tap water boiled for 2 h in an aluminum vessel has virtually no genotoxic effect on wheat cells.

  3. Pixantrone induces cell death through mitotic perturbations and subsequent aberrant cell divisions

    PubMed Central

    Beeharry, Neil; Di Rora, Andrea Ghelli Luserna; Smith, Mitchell R; Yen, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Pixantrone is a novel aza-anthracenedione active against aggressive lymphoma and is being evaluated for use against various hematologic and solid tumors. The drug is an analog of mitoxantrone, but displays less cardiotoxicity than mitoxantrone or the more commonly used doxorubicin. Although pixantrone is purported to inhibit topoisomerase II activity and intercalate with DNA, exact mechanisms of how it induces cell death remain obscure. Here we evaluated the effect of pixantrone on a panel of solid tumor cell lines to understand its mechanism of cell killing. Initial experiments with pixantrone showed an apparent discrepancy between its anti-proliferative effects in MTS assays (short-term) compared with clonogenic assays (long-term). Using live cell videomicroscopy to track the fates of cells, we found that cells treated with pixantrone underwent multiple rounds of aberrant cell division before eventually dying after approximately 5 d post-treatment. Cells underwent abnormal mitosis in which chromosome segregation was impaired, generating chromatin bridges between cells or within cells containing micronuclei. While pixantrone-treated cells did not display γH2AX foci, a marker of DNA damage, in the main nuclei, such foci were often detected in the micronuclei. Using DNA content analysis, we found that pixantrone concentrations that induced cell death in a clonogenic assay did not impede cell cycle progression, further supporting the lack of canonical DNA damage signaling. These findings suggest pixantrone induces a latent type of DNA damage that impairs the fidelity of mitosis, without triggering DNA damage response or mitotic checkpoint activation, but is lethal after successive rounds of aberrant division. PMID:26177126

  4. Oxidative stress and aberrant signaling in aging and cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Dröge, Wulf; Schipper, Hyman M

    2007-01-01

    Brain aging is associated with a progressive imbalance between antioxidant defenses and intracellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as exemplified by increases in products of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and DNA oxidation. Oxidative conditions cause not only structural damage but also changes in the set points of redox-sensitive signaling processes including the insulin receptor signaling pathway. In the absence of insulin, the otherwise low insulin receptor signaling is strongly enhanced by oxidative conditions. Autophagic proteolysis and sirtuin activity, in turn, are downregulated by the insulin signaling pathway, and impaired autophagic activity has been associated with neurodegeneration. In genetic studies, impairment of insulin receptor signaling causes spectacular lifespan extension in nematodes, fruit flies, and mice. The predicted effects of age-related oxidative stress on sirtuins and autophagic activity and the corresponding effects of antioxidants remain to be tested experimentally. However, several correlates of aging have been shown to be ameliorated by antioxidants. Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA and the electron transport chain, perturbations in brain iron and calcium homeostasis, and changes in plasma cysteine homeostasis may altogether represent causes and consequences of increased oxidative stress. Aging and cognitive decline thus appear to involve changes at multiple nodes within a complex regulatory network. PMID:17517043

  5. Investigation of an Aberrant Cell Voltage During the Filling of a Large Lithium Thionyl Chloride Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Quinzio, Michael V.

    1997-01-01

    The investigation of an aberrant cell voltage during the filling of a large lithium thionyl chloride cell summary is at: an aberrant voltage trace was noted during the review of cell filling data; incident was traced to an interruption during filling; experimentation suggested oxidizable sites within the carbon electrode were responsible for the drop in voltage; the voltage anomaly could be reproduced by interrupting the filling of similar cells; and anomalous voltage dip was not due to a short.

  6. Application of oncoproteomics to aberrant signalling networks in changing the treatment paradigm in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    López Villar, Elena; Wang, Xiangdong; Madero, Luis; Cho, William C

    2015-01-01

    Oncoproteomics is an important innovation in the early diagnosis, management and development of personalized treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). As inherent factors are not completely known - e.g. age or family history, radiation exposure, benzene chemical exposure, certain viral exposures such as infection with the human T-cell lymphoma/leukaemia virus-1, as well as some inherited syndromes may raise the risk of ALL - each ALL patient may modify the susceptibility of therapy. Indeed, we consider these unknown inherent factors could be explained via coupling cytogenetics plus proteomics, especially when proteins are the ones which play function within cells. Innovative proteomics to ALL therapy may help to understand the mechanism of drug resistance and toxicities, which in turn will provide some leads to improve ALL management. Most important of these are shotgun proteomic strategies to unravel ALL aberrant signalling networks. Some shotgun proteomic innovations and bioinformatic tools for ALL therapies will be discussed. As network proteins are distinctive characteristics for ALL patients, unrevealed by cytogenetics, those network proteins are currently an important source of novel therapeutic targets that emerge from shotgun proteomics. Indeed, ALL evolution can be studied for each individual patient via oncoproteomics.

  7. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer. PMID:27355964

  8. Aberrant JAK/STAT Signaling Suppresses TFF1 and TFF2 through Epigenetic Silencing of GATA6 in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Shyong; Wei, Kuo-Liang; Chou, Jian-Liang; Lu, Chung-Kuang; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Jora M. J.; Deng, Yi-Fang; Hsu, Wan-Ting; Wang, Hui-Min David; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Li, Chin; Chan, Michael W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer. In this study, we examined the role of STAT3 in the expression and methylation of its targets in gastric cancer patients. Results from RNA sequencing identified an inverse correlation between the expression of STAT3 and GATA6 in 23 pairs of gastric cancer patient samples. We discovered that the expression of GATA6 is epigenetically silenced through promoter methylation in gastric cancer cell lines. Interestingly, the inhibition of STAT3 using a novel STAT3 inhibitor restored the expression of GATA6 and its targets, trefoil factors 1 and 2 (TFF1/2). Moreover, disruption of STAT3 binding to GATA6 promoter by small hairpin RNA restored GATA6 expression in AGS cells. A clinically significant correlation was also observed between the expression of GATA6 and TFF1/2 among tissue samples from 60 gastric cancer patients. Finally, bisulfite pyrosequencing revealed GATA6 methylation in 65% (39/60) of the patients, and those with higher GATA6 methylation tended to have shorter overall survival. In conclusion, we demonstrated that aberrant JAK/STAT signaling suppresses TFF1/2 partially through the epigenetic silencing of GATA6. Therapeutic intervention of STAT3 in reversing the epigenetic status of GATA6 could benefit the treatment of gastric cancer and is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27598141

  9. Loss of tumor suppressor Merlin results in aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Erhong; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Bailey, Sarah K.; Metge, Brandon J.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the tumor suppressor Merlin is compromised in nervous system malignancies due to genomic aberrations. We demonstrated for the first time, that in breast cancer, Merlin protein expression is lost due to proteasome-mediated elimination. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissues from patients with metastatic breast cancer revealed characteristically reduced Merlin expression. Importantly, we identified a functional role for Merlin in impeding breast tumor xenograft growth and reducing invasive characteristics. We sought to determine a possible mechanism by which Merlin accomplishes this reduction in malignant activity. We observed that breast and pancreatic cancer cells with loss of Merlin show an aberrant increase in the activity of β-catenin concomitant with nuclear localization of β-catenin. We discovered that Merlin physically interacts with β-catenin, alters the sub-cellular localization of β-catenin, and significantly reduces the protein levels of β-catenin by targeting it for degradation through the upregulation of Axin1. Consequently, restoration of Merlin inhibited β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. We also present evidence that loss of Merlin sensitizes tumor cells to inhibition by compounds that target β-catenin-mediated activity. Thus, this study provides compelling evidence that Merlin reduces the malignant activity of pancreatic and breast cancer, in part by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Given the potent role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in breast and pancreatic cancer and the flurry of activity to test β-catenin inhibitors in the clinic, our findings are opportune and provide evidence for Merlin in restraining aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26908451

  10. Aberrant FGF signaling, independent of ectopic hedgehog signaling, initiates preaxial polydactyly in Dorking chickens.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, Cortney M; Harfe, Brian D

    2009-10-01

    The formation of supernumerary digits, or polydactyly, is a common congenital malformation. Although mutations in a number of genes have been linked to polydactyly, the molecular etiology for a third of human disorders with polydactyly remains unknown. To increase our understanding of the potential causes for polydactyly, we characterized a spontaneous chicken mutant, known as Dorking. The hindlimbs of Dorkings form a preaxial supernumerary digit. During the early stages of limb development, ectopic expression of several genes, including Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Fibroblast Growth Factor 4 (Fgf4), was found in Dorking hindlimbs. In addition to ectopic gene expression, a decrease in cell death in the anterior of the developing Dorking hindlimb was observed. Further molecular investigation revealed that ectopic Fgf4 expression was initiated and maintained independent of ectopic Shh. Additionally, inhibition of Fgf signaling but not hedgehog signaling was capable of restoring the normal anterior domain of cell death in Dorking hindlimbs. Our data indicates that in Dorking chickens, preaxial polydactyly is initiated independent of Shh.

  11. Aberrant genomic imprinting in rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Akihisa; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Wolf, Don P

    2006-03-01

    Genomic imprinting involves modification of a gene or a chromosomal region that results in the differential expression of parental alleles. Disruption or inappropriate expression of imprinted genes is associated with several clinically significant syndromes and tumorigenesis in humans. Additionally, abnormal imprinting occurs in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in clonally derived animals. Imprinted gene expression patterns in primate ESCs are largely unknown, despite the clinical potential of the latter in the cell-based treatment of human disease. Because of the possible implications of abnormal gene expression to cell or tissue replacement therapies involving ESCs, we examined allele specific expression of four imprinted genes in the rhesus macaque. Genomic and complementary DNA from embryos and ESC lines containing useful single nucleotide polymorphisms were subjected to polymerase chain reaction-based amplification and sequence analysis. In blastocysts, NDN expression was variable indicating abnormal or incomplete imprinting whereas IGF2 and SNRPN were expressed exclusively from the paternal allele and H19 from the maternal allele as expected. In ESCs, both NDN and SNRPN were expressed from the paternal allele while IGF2 and H19 showed loss of imprinting and biallelic expression. In differentiated ESC progeny, these expression patterns were maintained. The implications of aberrant imprinted gene expression to ESC differentiation in vitro and on ESC-derived cell function in vivo after transplantation are unknown.

  12. Engineering Cell-Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Daniel F.; Natividad, Robert J.; Asthagiri, Anand R.

    2014-01-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cells (cell surface engineering and synthetic gene circuits) to modulate juxtacrine cell-cell signaling. In addition, significant progress has been made in elucidating design rules and strategies to modulate juxtacrine signaling based on quantitative, engineering analysis of the mechanical and regulatory role of juxtacrine signals in the context of other cues and physical constraints in the microenvironment. These advances in engineering juxtacrine signaling lay a strong foundation for an integrative approach to utilizing synthetic cells, advanced ‘chassis’ and predictive modeling to engineer the form and function of living tissues. PMID:23856592

  13. Engineering cell-cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Blagovic, Katarina; Gong, Emily S; Milano, Daniel F; Natividad, Robert J; Asthagiri, Anand R

    2013-10-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cells (cell surface engineering and synthetic gene circuits) to modulate juxtacrine cell-cell signaling. In addition, significant progress has been made in elucidating design rules and strategies to modulate juxtacrine signaling on the basis of quantitative, engineering analysis of the mechanical and regulatory role of juxtacrine signals in the context of other cues and physical constraints in the microenvironment. These advances in engineering juxtacrine signaling lay a strong foundation for an integrative approach to utilize synthetic cells, advanced 'chassis' and predictive modeling to engineer the form and function of living tissues.

  14. Aberrantly Expressed OTX Homeobox Genes Deregulate B-Cell Differentiation in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.

    2015-01-01

    In Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) we recently reported that deregulated homeobox gene MSX1 mediates repression of the B-cell specific transcription factor ZHX2. In this study we investigated regulation of MSX1 in this B-cell malignancy. Accordingly, we analyzed expression and function of OTX homeobox genes which activate MSX1 transcription during embryonal development in the neural plate border region. Our data demonstrate that OTX1 and OTX2 are aberrantly expressed in both HL patients and cell lines. Moreover, both OTX loci are targeted by genomic gains in overexpressing cell lines. Comparative expression profiling and subsequent pathway modulations in HL cell lines indicated that aberrantly enhanced FGF2-signalling activates the expression of OTX2. Downstream analyses of OTX2 demonstrated transcriptional activation of genes encoding transcription factors MSX1, FOXC1 and ZHX1. Interestingly, examination of the physiological expression profile of ZHX1 in normal hematopoietic cells revealed elevated levels in T-cells and reduced expression in B-cells, indicating a discriminatory role in lymphopoiesis. Furthermore, two OTX-negative HL cell lines overexpressed ZHX1 in correlation with genomic amplification of its locus at chromosomal band 8q24, supporting the oncogenic potential of this gene in HL. Taken together, our data demonstrate that deregulated homeobox genes MSX1 and OTX2 respectively impact transcriptional inhibition of (B-cell specific) ZHX2 and activation of (T-cell specific) ZHX1. Thus, we show how reactivation of a specific embryonal gene regulatory network promotes disturbed B-cell differentiation in HL. PMID:26406991

  15. The haematopoietic specific signal transducer Vav1 is aberrantly expressed in lung cancer and plays a role in tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazer, Galit; Idelchuk, Yulia; Schapira, Vered; Pikarsky, Eli; Katzav, Shulamit

    2009-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The spectrum of aberrations affecting signalling pathways in lung cancer pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Physiological expression of Vav1 is restricted to the haematopoietic system, where its best-known function is as a GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange factor for Rho/RacGTPases, an activity strictly controlled by tyrosine phosphorylation downstream of cell surface receptors. Here we find Vav1 expression in 42% of 78 lung cancer cell lines analysed. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of primary human lung cancer tissue samples revealed Vav1 expression in 26/59 malignant samples, including adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. Stronger Vav1 staining was associated with larger tumour size. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Vav1 in lung cancer cells reduced proliferation in agar and tumour growth in nude mice, while control siRNA had no effect, suggesting that Vav1 plays a critical role in the tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells. Vav1 is tyrosine-phosphorylated in lung cancer cells following activation by the growth factors EGF and TGFalpha, suggesting its participation in signalling events in these cells. Depletion of Vav1 reduced Rac-GTP activation and decreased expression of TGFalpha, an autocrine growth factor. These data suggest that Vav1 plays a role in the neoplastic process in lung cancer, identifying it as a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer therapy.

  16. Enhanced expression of ADCY1 underlies aberrant neuronal signalling and behaviour in a syndromic autism model

    PubMed Central

    Sethna, Ferzin; Feng, Wei; Ding, Qi; Robison, Alfred J.; Feng, Yue; Wang, Hongbing

    2017-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by the loss of functional FMRP, is a leading cause of autism. Neurons lacking FMRP show aberrant mRNA translation and intracellular signalling. Here, we identify that, in Fmr1 knockout neurons, type 1 adenylyl cyclase (Adcy1) mRNA translation is enhanced, leading to excessive production of ADCY1 protein and insensitivity to neuronal stimulation. Genetic reduction of Adcy1 normalizes the aberrant ERK1/2- and PI3K-mediated signalling, attenuates excessive protein synthesis and corrects dendritic spine abnormality in Fmr1 knockout mice. Genetic reduction of Adcy1 also ameliorates autism-related symptoms including repetitive behaviour, defective social interaction and audiogenic seizures. Moreover, peripheral administration of NB001, an experimental compound that preferentially suppresses ADCY1 activity over other ADCY subtypes, attenuates the behavioural abnormalities in Fmr1 knockout mice. These results demonstrate a connection between the elevated Adcy1 translation and abnormal ERK1/2 signalling and behavioural symptoms in FXS. PMID:28218269

  17. Aberrant activation of Sonic hedgehog signaling in chronic cholecystitis and gallbladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Xu, Xiaoping; Xu, Angao; Liu, Cuiping; Liang, Fenfen; Xue, Minmin; Bai, Lan

    2014-03-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been extensively studied and is implicated in various inflammatory diseases and malignant tumors. We summarized the clinicopathological features and performed immunohistochemistry assays to examine expression of Shh signaling proteins in 10 normal mucosa, 32 gallbladder carcinoma (GBC), and 95 chronic cholecystitis (CC) specimens. The CC specimens were classified into three groups according to degree of inflammation. Compared with normal mucosa, CC, and GBC specimens exhibited increased expression of Shh. The immunoreactive score of Shh in the GBC group was higher than that in the mild to moderate CC groups but lower than that in the severe CC group (P < .05). Expression of Patched (Ptch) and Gli1 gradually increased from non-malignant cholecystitis to malignant tumors. Compared with CC specimens, GBC specimens showed higher cytoplasmic and membranous expression for Ptch (P < .05). Gli1 staining showed cytoplasmic expression of Gli1 in both CC (60% for mild, 77% for moderate, and 84% for severe) and GBC specimens (97%). Nuclear expression of Gli1 was detected in 16% of severe CC specimens with moderate to poor atypical hyperplasia, and in 62.5% of GBC specimens. Shh expression strongly correlated with expression of Ptch and Gli1. Furthermore, patients with strongly positive Gli1 staining had significantly lower survival rates than those with weakly positive staining. Our data indicate that the Shh signaling pathway is aberrantly activated in CC and GBC, and altered Shh signaling may be involved in the course of development from CC to gallbladder carcinogenesis.

  18. The Distribution of Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Predicted by a Generalized Time-Dependent Model of Radiation-Induced Formation of Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    New experimental data show how chromosomal aberrations for low- and high-LET radiation are dependent on DSB repair deficiencies in wild-type, AT and NBS cells. We simulated the development of chromosomal aberrations in these cells lines in a stochastic track-structure-dependent model, in which different cells have different kinetics of DSB repair. We updated a previously formulated model of chromosomal aberrations, which was based on a stochastic Monte Carlo approach, to consider the time-dependence of DSB rejoining. The previous version of the model had an assumption that all DSBs would rejoin, and therefore we called it a time-independent model. The chromosomal-aberrations model takes into account the DNA and track structure for low- and high-LET radiations, and provides an explanation and prediction of the statistics of rare and more complex aberrations. We compared the program-simulated kinetics of DSB rejoining to the experimentally-derived bimodal exponential curves of the DSB kinetics. We scored the formation of translocations, dicentrics, acentric and centric rings, deletions, and inversions. The fraction of DSBs participating in aberrations was studied in relation to the rejoining time. Comparisons of simulated dose dependence for simple aberrations to the experimental dose-dependence for HF19, AT and NBS cells will be made.

  19. Aberrant amino acid signaling promotes growth and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinomas through Rab1A-dependent activation of mTORC1 by Rab1A

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Mei-Yin; Rao, Hui-Lan; Wang, Hui-Yun; Zheng, X.F. Steven

    2015-01-01

    mTORC1 is a master regulator of cell growth and proliferation, and an established anticancer drug target. Aberrant mTORC1 signaling is common in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Rab1A is a newly identified mTORC1 activator that mediates an alternative amino acid (AA) signaling branch to Rag GTPases. Because liver is a physiological hub for nutrient sensing and metabolic homeostasis, we investigated the possible role of Rab1A in HCC. We found that Rab1A is frequently overexpressed in HCC, which enhances hyperactive AA-mTORC1 signaling, promoting malignant growth and metastasis of HCC in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, aberrant Rab1A expression is closely associated with poor prognosis. Strikingly, aberrant Rab1A overexpression leads to increased rapamycin sensitivity, indicating that inappropriate activation of AA signaling is a cancer-driving event in HCC. Our findings further suggest that Rab1A is a valuable biomarker for prognosis and personalized mTORC1-targeted therapy in liver cancer. PMID:26308575

  20. Phytochemicals attenuating aberrant activation of ß-catenin in cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytochemicals are a rich source of chemoprevention agents but their effects on modulating the Wnt/ß-catenin signaling pathway have remained largely uninvestigated. Aberrantly activated Wnt signaling can result in the abnormal stabilization of ß-catenin, a key causative step in a broad spectrum of c...

  1. Identification of aberrant gene expression associated with aberrant promoter methylation in primordial germ cells between E13 and E16 rat F3 generation vinclozolin lineage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Transgenerational epigenetics (TGE) are currently considered important in disease, but the mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood. TGE abnormalities expected to cause disease are likely to be initiated during development and to be mediated by aberrant gene expression associated with aberrant promoter methylation that is heritable between generations. However, because methylation is removed and then re-established during development, it is not easy to identify promoter methylation abnormalities by comparing normal lineages with those expected to exhibit TGE abnormalities. Methods This study applied the recently proposed principal component analysis (PCA)-based unsupervised feature extraction to previously reported and publically available gene expression/promoter methylation profiles of rat primordial germ cells, between E13 and E16 of the F3 generation vinclozolin lineage that are expected to exhibit TGE abnormalities, to identify multiple genes that exhibited aberrant gene expression/promoter methylation during development. Results The biological feasibility of the identified genes were tested via enrichment analyses of various biological concepts including pathway analysis, gene ontology terms and protein-protein interactions. All validations suggested superiority of the proposed method over three conventional and popular supervised methods that employed t test, limma and significance analysis of microarrays, respectively. The identified genes were globally related to tumors, the prostate, kidney, testis and the immune system and were previously reported to be related to various diseases caused by TGE. Conclusions Among the genes reported by PCA-based unsupervised feature extraction, we propose that chemokine signaling pathways and leucine rich repeat proteins are key factors that initiate transgenerational epigenetic-mediated diseases, because multiple genes included in these two categories were identified in this study. PMID:26677731

  2. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    FISH, mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromere probes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. High-LET induced damages are mostly a single track effect. Unrejoined chromosome breaks (incomplete exchanges) and complex type aberrations were higher for high-LET. Biosignatures may depend on the method the samples are collected. Recent mBAND analysis has revealed more information about the nature of intra-chromosome exchanges. Whether space flight/microgravity affects radiation-induced chromosome aberration frequencies is still an open question.

  3. Aberrant Salience Is Related to Reduced Reinforcement Learning Signals and Elevated Dopamine Synthesis Capacity in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Rebecca; Deserno, Lorenz; Gleich, Tobias; Katthagen, Teresa; Pankow, Anne; Behr, Joachim; Buchert, Ralph; Roiser, Jonathan P; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2015-07-15

    The striatum is known to play a key role in reinforcement learning, specifically in the encoding of teaching signals such as reward prediction errors (RPEs). It has been proposed that aberrant salience attribution is associated with impaired coding of RPE and heightened dopamine turnover in the striatum, and might be linked to the development of psychotic symptoms. However, the relationship of aberrant salience attribution, RPE coding, and dopamine synthesis capacity has not been directly investigated. Here we assessed the association between a behavioral measure of aberrant salience attribution, the salience attribution test, to neural correlates of RPEs measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging while healthy participants (n = 58) performed an instrumental learning task. A subset of participants (n = 27) also underwent positron emission tomography with the radiotracer [(18)F]fluoro-l-DOPA to quantify striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis capacity. Individual variability in aberrant salience measures related negatively to ventral striatal and prefrontal RPE signals and in an exploratory analysis was found to be positively associated with ventral striatal presynaptic dopamine levels. These data provide the first evidence for a specific link between the constructs of aberrant salience attribution, reduced RPE processing, and potentially increased presynaptic dopamine function.

  4. Immunohistochemical expression of aberrant Notch-1 signaling in vitiligo: an implication for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Seleit, Iman; Bakry, Ola Ahmed; Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Dawoud, Noha Mohammed

    2014-06-01

    The etiopathogenetic mechanisms leading to pigment loss in vitiligo are not fully understood. Notch signaling is required for development and maintenance of melanocyte lineage and acts as a key component among keratinocyte-melanocyte interactions. The current study aimed to investigate the possible role of Notch signaling and its effect on the whole melanocyte lineage in vitiligo and correlating it with the different clinicopathologic parameters. Using immunohistochemical technique, Notch-1 expression was evaluated in 50 lesional and 20 perilesional biopsies of patients with vitiligo in comparison with 20 normal skin biopsies as a control group. Lesional biopsies were stained with human melanoma black-45 and tyrosinase-related protein-2 to demonstrate the melanocyte lineage. Membranous and/or nuclear expression of Notch-1 was in favor of control and perilesional skin, whereas cytoplasmic expression appeared only in vitiliginous lesions (P < .05). Membranous and/or nuclear expression of Notch-1 was significantly associated with epidermal human melanoma black-45 positivity (P = .01) and percentage of expression in both epidermis (P = .02) and hair follicles (P = .03) of lesional skin. Cytoplasmic pattern of Notch-1 expression in epidermis was significantly found in lesions with white hair (P = .04) and in cases with marked keratinocyte vacuolization (P = .03). Segmental and acrofacial vitiligo were associated with mild to moderate Notch-1 intensity, whereas generalized vitiligo was associated with strong intensity of expression (P = .02). In conclusion, Notch-1 signaling is inactivated in vitiligo with consequent loss of epidermal and/or follicular active melanocytes. Aberrant Notch signaling in vitiliginous white hair and acral and segmental vitiligo may be the cause of their treatment resistance.

  5. Aberrant expression of Sonic hedgehog signaling in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoping; Su, Juan; Li, Ran; Wang, Yadong; Zeng, Di; Wu, Baoping

    2016-04-01

    The SHH signaling pathway is critical for gastrointestinal development and organic patterning, and dysregulation of SHH pathway molecules has been detected in multiple gastrointestinal neoplasms. This study investigated the role of the SHH signaling pathway in PJS. Expression of SHH, PTCH, and GLI1 was examined by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry in 20 normal tissues and 75 colorectal lesions (25 PJPs, 25 adenomas, and 25 adenocarcinomas). Expression of SHH, PTCH, and GLI1 mRNA was higher in PJPs than in normal tissue (P < .05) and gradually increased along the PJP-adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence (P < .05). Immunostaining indicated that SHH expression was present in 60% of PJPs, 72% of adenomas, and 84% of carcinomas, whereas 68% of PJPs, 72% of adenomas, and 88% of carcinomas exhibited cytoplasmic expression of PTCH. Moreover, high GLI1 expression was detected in 56% of PJPs, 64% of adenomas, and 80% of carcinomas; and high nuclear expression of GLI1 was observed in 8 adenomas with atypia and 15 carcinomas. Increased SHH, PTCH, and GLI1 protein correlated positively with tumor grade (P = .012, P = .003, and P = .007, respectively), tumor depth (P = .024, P = .007, and P = .01), and lymph node metastasis (P = .05, P = .015, and P = .005). This study identified aberrant expression of SHH pathway molecules in PJS, and the findings may supply a novel mechanism for the development of PJ polyps.

  6. Aberrant Signaling through the HER2-ERK1/2 Pathway is Predictive of Reduced Disease-Free and Overall Survival in Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scrima, Marianna; Zito Marino, Federica; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Marinaro, Cinzia; La Mantia, Elvira; Rocco, Gaetano; De Marco, Carmela; Malanga, Donatella; De Rosa, Nicla; Rizzuto, Antonia; Botti, Gerardo; Franco, Renato; Zoppoli, Pietro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Background: Purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of the Extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK)-1/2 pathway to oncogenic signaling elicited by the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and to assess the prognostic value of these oncoproteins in NSCLC patients. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine expression and activation of HER2 and ERK1/2 (detected by phosphorylation of Y1248 and T202/Y204, respectively) using Tissue Micro Arrays (TMA) containing matched normal and neoplastic tissues from 132 NSCLC patients. Survival analysis was carried out using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to evaluate the prognostic value of pERK1/2, pHER2 and a combination thereof with clinical-pathological parameters such as age, lymph node status (N), size (T), stage (TNM) and grade. Results: We found that HER2 was overexpressed in 33/120 (27%) and activated in 41/114 (36%) cases; ERK1/2 was activated in 44/102 (43%) cases. A direct association was found between pERK1/2 and pHER2 (23/41; p=0.038). In addition, patients positive for pERK1/2 and for both pHER2 and pERK1/2 showed significantly worse overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) compared with negative patients. Univariate and multivariate analysis of patients' survival revealed that positivity for pHER2-pERK1/2 and for pERK1/2 alone were independent prognostic factors of poor survival in NSCLC patients. In particular, this association was significantly important for DFS in stage I+II patients. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that activated ERK1/2 and/or the combined activation of HER2 and ERK1/2 are good indicators of poor prognosis in NSCLC patients, not only in unselected patients but also in early stage disease. PMID:28243327

  7. Aberrant Signaling through the HER2-ERK1/2 Pathway is Predictive of Reduced Disease-Free and Overall Survival in Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Patients.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Marianna; Zito Marino, Federica; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Marinaro, Cinzia; La Mantia, Elvira; Rocco, Gaetano; De Marco, Carmela; Malanga, Donatella; De Rosa, Nicla; Rizzuto, Antonia; Botti, Gerardo; Franco, Renato; Zoppoli, Pietro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Background: Purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of the Extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK)-1/2 pathway to oncogenic signaling elicited by the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and to assess the prognostic value of these oncoproteins in NSCLC patients. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine expression and activation of HER2 and ERK1/2 (detected by phosphorylation of Y1248 and T202/Y204, respectively) using Tissue Micro Arrays (TMA) containing matched normal and neoplastic tissues from 132 NSCLC patients. Survival analysis was carried out using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to evaluate the prognostic value of pERK1/2, pHER2 and a combination thereof with clinical-pathological parameters such as age, lymph node status (N), size (T), stage (TNM) and grade. Results: We found that HER2 was overexpressed in 33/120 (27%) and activated in 41/114 (36%) cases; ERK1/2 was activated in 44/102 (43%) cases. A direct association was found between pERK1/2 and pHER2 (23/41; p=0.038). In addition, patients positive for pERK1/2 and for both pHER2 and pERK1/2 showed significantly worse overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) compared with negative patients. Univariate and multivariate analysis of patients' survival revealed that positivity for pHER2-pERK1/2 and for pERK1/2 alone were independent prognostic factors of poor survival in NSCLC patients. In particular, this association was significantly important for DFS in stage I+II patients. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that activated ERK1/2 and/or the combined activation of HER2 and ERK1/2 are good indicators of poor prognosis in NSCLC patients, not only in unselected patients but also in early stage disease.

  8. Cell-secreted signals shape lymphoma identity.

    PubMed

    Gloghini, Annunziata; Bongarzone, Italia

    2015-10-01

    Sequencing data show that both specific genes and a number of signaling pathways are recurrently mutated in various types of lymphoma. DNA sequencing analyses of lymphoma have identified several aberrations that might affect the interaction between malignant cells and the tumor microenvironment. Microenvironmental functions are essential to lymphoma; they provide survival and proliferation signals and license immune evasion. It is plausible that interventions that aim to destroy tumor-microenvironment interactions may improve responses to therapeutics. Accordingly, the identification of extrinsic factors and their downstream intracellular signaling targets has led to much progress in understanding tumor-microenvironment interactions. Lymphoma cells are differently influenced by cells' interactions with components of their microenvironment; these cell extrinsic factors include soluble and immobilized factors, the extracellular matrix, and signals presented by neighboring cells. Soluble factors, which are often cell-secreted autocrine and paracrine factors, comprise a significant fraction of targetable molecules. To begin to understand how intercellular communication is conducted in lymphoma, a first order of study is deciphering the soluble factors secreted by malignant cells and microenvironmental cells. These soluble factors are shed into the interstitial fluid in lymphoma and can be conveniently explored using mass spectrometry. Protein components can be detected and quantified, thus enabling the routine navigation of the soluble part of the microenvironment. Elucidating functional and signaling states affords a new paradigm for understanding cancer biology and devising new therapies. This review summarizes knowledge in this field and discusses the utility of studying tumor-secreted factors.

  9. A Review: Molecular Aberrations within Hippo Signaling in Bone and Soft-Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Deel, Michael D.; Li, Jenny J.; Crose, Lisa E. S.; Linardic, Corinne M.

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved developmental network vital for the regulation of organ size, tissue homeostasis, repair and regeneration, and cell fate. The Hippo pathway has also been shown to have tumor suppressor properties. Hippo transduction involves a series of kinases and scaffolding proteins that are intricately connected to proteins in developmental cascades and in the tissue microenvironment. This network governs the downstream Hippo transcriptional co-activators, YAP and TAZ, which bind to and activate the output of TEADs, as well as other transcription factors responsible for cellular proliferation, self-renewal, differentiation, and survival. Surprisingly, there are few oncogenic mutations within the core components of the Hippo pathway. Instead, dysregulated Hippo signaling is a versatile accomplice to commonly mutated cancer pathways. For example, YAP and TAZ can be activated by oncogenic signaling from other pathways, or serve as co-activators for classical oncogenes. Emerging evidence suggests that Hippo signaling couples cell density and cytoskeletal structural changes to morphogenic signals and conveys a mesenchymal phenotype. While much of Hippo biology has been described in epithelial cell systems, it is clear that dysregulated Hippo signaling also contributes to malignancies of mesenchymal origin. This review will summarize the known molecular alterations within the Hippo pathway in sarcomas and highlight how several pharmacologic compounds have shown activity in modulating Hippo components, providing proof-of-principle that Hippo signaling may be harnessed for therapeutic application in sarcomas. PMID:26389076

  10. Epigenetic silencing of the NR4A3 tumor suppressor, by aberrant JAK/STAT signaling, predicts prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chung-Min; Chang, Liang-Yu; Lin, Shu-Hui; Chou, Jian-Liang; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Zeng, Li-Han; Chuang, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Dittner, Claudia; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Jora M. J.; Huang, Yao-Ting; Ng, Enders K. W.; Cheng, Alfred S. L.; Wu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Jiayuh; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chan, Michael W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    While aberrant JAK/STAT signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer (GC), its effects on epigenetic alterations of its transcriptional targets remains unclear. In this study, by expression microarrays coupled with bioinformatic analyses, we identified a putative STAT3 target gene, NR4A3 that was downregulated in MKN28 GC daughter cells overexpressing a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant (S16), as compared to an empty vector control (C9). Bisulphite pyrosequencing and demethylation treatment showed that NR4A3 was epigenetically silenced by promoter DNA methylation in S16 and other GC cell lines including AGS cells, showing constitutive activation of STAT3. Subsequent experiments revealed that NR4A3 promoter binding by STAT3 might repress its transcription. Long-term depletion of STAT3 derepressed NR4A3 expression, by promoter demethylation, in AGS GC cells. NR4A3 re-expression in GC cell lines sensitized the cells to cisplatin, and inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, in an animal model. Clinically, GC patients with high NR4A3 methylation, or lower NR4A3 protein expression, had significantly shorter overall survival. Intriguingly, STAT3 activation significantly associated only with NR4A3 methylation in low-stage patient samples. Taken together, aberrant JAK/STAT3 signaling epigenetically silences a potential tumor suppressor, NR4A3, in gastric cancer, plausibly representing a reliable biomarker for gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:27528092

  11. Epigenetic silencing of the NR4A3 tumor suppressor, by aberrant JAK/STAT signaling, predicts prognosis in gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chung-Min; Chang, Liang-Yu; Lin, Shu-Hui; Chou, Jian-Liang; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Zeng, Li-Han; Chuang, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Dittner, Claudia; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Jora M. J.; Huang, Yao-Ting; Ng, Enders K. W.; Cheng, Alfred S. L.; Wu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Jiayuh; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chan, Michael W. Y.

    2016-08-01

    While aberrant JAK/STAT signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer (GC), its effects on epigenetic alterations of its transcriptional targets remains unclear. In this study, by expression microarrays coupled with bioinformatic analyses, we identified a putative STAT3 target gene, NR4A3 that was downregulated in MKN28 GC daughter cells overexpressing a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant (S16), as compared to an empty vector control (C9). Bisulphite pyrosequencing and demethylation treatment showed that NR4A3 was epigenetically silenced by promoter DNA methylation in S16 and other GC cell lines including AGS cells, showing constitutive activation of STAT3. Subsequent experiments revealed that NR4A3 promoter binding by STAT3 might repress its transcription. Long-term depletion of STAT3 derepressed NR4A3 expression, by promoter demethylation, in AGS GC cells. NR4A3 re-expression in GC cell lines sensitized the cells to cisplatin, and inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, in an animal model. Clinically, GC patients with high NR4A3 methylation, or lower NR4A3 protein expression, had significantly shorter overall survival. Intriguingly, STAT3 activation significantly associated only with NR4A3 methylation in low-stage patient samples. Taken together, aberrant JAK/STAT3 signaling epigenetically silences a potential tumor suppressor, NR4A3, in gastric cancer, plausibly representing a reliable biomarker for gastric cancer prognosis.

  12. Aberrant regulation of choline metabolism by mitochondrial electron transport system inhibition in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Ahmet T.; Jain, Mohit R.

    2009-01-01

    Anomalous choline metabolic patterns have been consistently observed in vivo using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) analysis of patients with neurodegenerative diseases and tissues from cancer patient. It remains unclear; however, what signaling events may have triggered these choline metabolic aberrancies. This study investigates how changes in choline and phospholipid metabolism are regulated by distinct changes in the mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS). We used specific inhibitors to down regulate the function of individual protein complexes in the ETS of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Interestingly, we found that dramatic elevation in the levels of phosphatidylcholine metabolites could be induced by the inhibition of individual ETS complexes, similar to in vivo observations. Such interferences produced divergent metabolic patterns, which were distinguishable via principal component analysis of the cellular metabolomes. Functional impairments in ETS components have been reported in several central nervous system (CNS) diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, it remains largely unknown how the suppression of individual ETS complex function could lead to specific dysfunction in different cell types, resulting in distinct disease phenotypes. Our results suggest that the inhibition of each of the five ETS complexes might differentially regulate phospholipase activities within choline metabolic pathways in neuronal cells, which could contribute to the overall understanding of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:19774105

  13. Chromosome aberrations and cell death by ionizing radiation: Evolution of a biophysical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Carante, Mario P.

    2016-11-01

    The manuscript summarizes and discusses the various versions of a radiation damage biophysical model, implemented as a Monte Carlo simulation code, originally developed for chromosome aberrations and subsequently extended to cell death. This extended version has been called BIANCA (BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations). According to the basic assumptions, complex double-strand breaks (called ;Cluster Lesions;, or CLs) produce independent chromosome free-ends, mis-rejoining within a threshold distance d (or un-rejoining) leads to chromosome aberrations, and ;lethal aberrations; (i.e., dicentrics plus rings plus large deletions) lead to clonogenic cell death. The mean number of CLs per Gy and per cell is an adjustable parameter. While in BIANCA the threshold distance d was the second parameter, in a subsequent version, called BIANCA II, d has been fixed as the mean distance between two adjacent interphase chromosome territories, and a new parameter, f, has been introduced to represent the chromosome free-end un-rejoining probability. Simulated dose-response curves for chromosome aberrations and cell survival obtained by the various model versions were compared with literature experimental data. Such comparisons provided indications on some open questions, including the role of energy deposition clustering at the nm and the μm level, the probability for a chromosome free-end to remain un-rejoined, and the relationship between chromosome aberrations and cell death. Although both BIANCA and BIANCA II provided cell survival curves in general agreement with human and hamster fibroblast survival data, BIANCA II allowed for a better reproduction of dicentrics, rings and deletions considered separately. Furthermore, the approach adopted in BIANCA II for d is more consistent with estimates reported in the literature. After testing against aberration and survival data, BIANCA II was applied to investigate the depth-dependence of the radiation

  14. Aberrant Expression Profile of Long Noncoding RNA in Human Sinonasal Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ling-zhao; Sun, Jing-wu; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to identify aberrantly expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) profile of sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma (SSCC) and explore their potential functions. Methods. We investigated lncRNA and mRNA expression in SSCC and paired adjacent noncancerous tissues obtained from 6 patients with microarrays. Gene ontology (GO) analysis and pathway analysis were utilized to investigate the gene function. Gene signal-network and lncRNA-mRNA network were depicted. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was utilized to validate 5 lncRNAs in a second set of paired SSCC and adjacent noncancerous tissues obtained from 22 additional patients. Results. We identified significantly differentially expressed lncRNAs (n = 3146) and mRNAs (n = 2208) in SSCC relative to noncancerous tissues. The GO annotation indicated that there are some core gene products that may be attributed to the progress of SSCC. The pathway analysis identified many pathways associated with cancer. The results of lncRNA-mRNA network and gene signal-network implied some core lncRNAs/mRNAs might play important roles in SSCC pathogenesis. The results of qRT-PCR showed that all of the 5 lncRNAs were differentially expressed and consistent with the microarray results. Conclusion. Our study is the first screening and analysis of lncRNAs expression profile in SSCC and may offer new insights into pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:28044124

  15. The fate of cells with chromosome aberrations after total-body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, F.; Ganser, A.; Fliedner, T.M.; Arnold, R.; Kubanek, B.

    1983-03-01

    Cytogenetic studies were done on bone marrow cells and peripheral lymphocytes of four patients (three with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, one with aplastic anemia) at various intervals up to 861 days after total-body X irradiation (TBI) at doses between 4.5 and 10 Gy (450-1000 rad) followed by syngeneic or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Whereas no radiation-induced aberrations could be found in the bone marrow, apart from a transient finding in the patient with the lowest radiation dose, aberrant metaphases were seen in the peripheral lymphocytes of three patients in the range from 2.5 to 46% even at 861 days after the exposure. There were no demonstrable aberrations related to TBI in the only patient developing graft-versus-host disease. The dicentric yield as determined in the aberrant metaphases with 46 centromeres ranged between 3.4 +/- 1.3 and 4.9 +/- 0.4. In one patient it was demonstrated by BUdR-labeling that after 10 Gy (1000 rad) TBI the surviving and heavily damaged lymphocytes can go into cell cycle and reach at least the third mitosis. The percentage of aberrant cells diminished by about 25% at each mitotic division.

  16. Potential signal to accommodation from the Stiles–Crawford effect and ocular monochromatic aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Lawrence R.; Kruger, Philip B.; Rucker, Frances J.; Swanson, William H.; Schmidt, Nathan; Hardy, Caitlin; Rutman, Hadassa; Borgovan, Theodore; Burke, Sean; Badar, Mustanser; Shah, Raj

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if cues within the blurred retinal image due to the Stiles–Crawford (SC) effect and the eye’s monochromatic aberrations can drive accommodation with a small pupil (3 mm) that is typical of bright photopic conditions. The foveal, psychophysical SC function (17 min arc) and ocular monochromatic aberrations were measured in 21 visually normal adults. The retinal image of a 10.2 min arc disc was simulated for spherical defocus levels of −1 D, 0 D and +1 D in each of four conditions consisting of combinations of the presence or absence of the individual SC function and monochromatic aberrations with a 3 mm pupil. Accommodation was recorded in eleven participants as each viewed the simulations through a 0.75-mm pinhole. The SC effect alone did not provide a significant cue to accommodation. Monochromatic aberrations provided a statistically significant but rather small cue to monocular accommodation. PMID:20835401

  17. Aberrant STAT5 and PI3K/mTOR pathway signaling occurs in human CRLF2-rearranged B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tasian, Sarah K.; Doral, Michelle Y.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Wood, Brent L.; Chen, I-Ming; Harvey, Richard C.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2012-01-01

    Adults and children with high-risk CRLF2-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) respond poorly to current cytotoxic chemotherapy and suffer unacceptably high rates of relapse, supporting the need to use alternative therapies. CRLF2 encodes the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor, which activates cell signaling in normal lymphocytes on binding its ligand, TSLP. We hypothesized that aberrant cell signaling occurs in CRLF2-rearranged ALL and can be targeted by signal transduction inhibitors of this pathway. In a large number of primary CRLF2-rearranged ALL samples, we observed increased basal levels of pJAK2, pSTAT5, and pS6. We thus characterized the biochemical sequelae of CRLF2 and JAK alterations in CRLF2-rearranged ALL primary patient samples via analysis of TSLP-mediated signal transduction. TSLP stimulation of these leukemias further induced robust JAK/STAT and PI3K/mTOR pathway signaling. JAK inhibition abrogated phosphorylation of JAK/STAT and, surprisingly, of PI3K/mTOR pathway members, suggesting an interconnection between these signaling networks and providing a rationale for testing JAK inhibitors in clinical trials. The PI3K/mTOR pathway inhibitors rapamycin, PI103, and PP242 also inhibited activated signal transduction and translational machinery proteins of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, suggesting that signal transduction inhibitors targeting this pathway also may have therapeutic relevance for patients with CRLF2-rearranged ALL and merit further preclinical testing. PMID:22685175

  18. Macula densa cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Bell, P Darwin; Lapointe, Jean Yves; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2003-01-01

    Macula densa cells are renal sensor elements that detect changes in distal tubular fluid composition and transmit signals to the glomerular vascular elements. This tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism plays an important role in regulating glomerular filtration rate and blood flow. Macula densa cells detect changes in luminal sodium chloride concentration through a complex series of ion transport-related intracellular events. NaCl entry via a Na:K:2Cl cotransporter and Cl exit through a basolateral channel lead to cell depolarization and increases in cytosolic calcium. Na/H exchange (NHE2) results in cell alkalization, whereas intracellular [Na] is regulated by an apically located H(Na)-K ATPase and not by the traditional basolateral Na:K ATPase. Communication from macula densa cells to the glomerular vascular elements involves ATP release across the macula densa basolateral membrane through a maxi-anion channel. The adaptation of multi-photon microscopy is providing new insights into macula densa-glomerular signaling.

  19. Implementation of the near-field signal redundancy phase-aberration correction algorithm on two-dimensional arrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Robinson, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Near-field signal-redundancy (NFSR) algorithms for phase-aberration correction have been proposed and experimentally tested for linear and phased one-dimensional arrays. In this paper the performance of an all-row-plus-two-column, two-dimensional algorithm has been analyzed and tested with simulated data sets. This algorithm applies the NFSR algorithm for one-dimensional arrays to all the rows as well as the first and last columns of the array. The results from the two column measurements are used to derive a linear term for each row measurement result. These linear terms then are incorporated into the row results to obtain a two-dimensional phase aberration profile. The ambiguity phase aberration profile, which is the difference between the true and the derived phase aberration profiles, of this algorithm is not linear. Two methods, a trial-and-error method and a diagonal-measurement method, are proposed to linearize the ambiguity profile. The performance of these algorithms is analyzed and tested with simulated data sets.

  20. Frequency of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Types of Cells After Proton and Fe Ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Bowler, Deborah

    2016-07-01

    DNA damages induced by space radiation, consisting of protons and high-LET charged particles, can be complex in nature, which are often left unrepaired and cause chromosomal aberrations. Increased level of genomic instability is attributed to tumorigenesis and increased cancer risks. To investigate genomic instability induced by charged particles, human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblasts, and human mammary epithelial cells, as well as mouse bone marrow stem cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 strains were exposed to high energy protons and Fe ions. Metaphase chromosome spreads at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and, chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole chromosome-specific probes for human cells. With proton irradiation, levels of chromosome aberrations decreased by about 50% in both lymphocytes and epithelial cells after multiple cell divisions, compared to initial chromosome aberrations at 48 hours post irradiation in both cell types. With Fe ion irradiation, however, the frequency of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes after multiple cell divisions was significantly lower than that in epithelial cells at comparable cell divisions, while their initial chromosome aberrations were at similar levels. Similar to the human cells, after Fe ion irradiation, the frequency of late chromosome aberrations was similar to that of the early damages for radio-sensitive CBA cells, but different for radio-resistant C57 cells. Our results suggest that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values are dependent not only on radiation sources, but also on cell types and cell divisions.

  1. Influence of DMSO on Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays induced chromosome aberrations in V79 Chinese hamster cells.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Adayapalam T; Palitti, Fabrizio; Hill, Mark A; Stevens, David L; Ahnström, Gunnar

    2010-09-10

    Ultrasoft X-rays have been shown to be very efficient in inducing chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. The present study was aimed to evaluate the modifying effects of DMSO (a potent scavenger of free radicals) on the frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by soft X-rays. Confluent held G1 Chinese hamster cells (V79) were irradiated with Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays in the presence and absence of 1M DMSO and frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the first division cells were determined. DMSO reduced the frequencies of exchange types of aberrations (dicentrics and centric rings) by a factor of 2.1-3.5. The results indicate that free radicals induced by ultrasoft X-rays contribute to a great extent to the induction of chromosome aberrations. The possible implications of these results in interpreting the mechanisms involved in the high efficiency of ultrasoft X-rays in the induction of chromosome aberrations are discussed.

  2. Abnormalities of T cell signaling in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease resulting from a loss of tolerance to multiple self antigens, and characterized by autoantibody production and inflammatory cell infiltration in target organs, such as the kidneys and brain. T cells are critical players in SLE pathophysiology as they regulate B cell responses and also infiltrate target tissues, leading to tissue damage. Abnormal signaling events link to defective gene transcription and altered cytokine production, contributing to the aberrant phenotype of T cells in SLE. Study of signaling and gene transcription abnormalities in SLE T cells has led to the identification of novel targets for therapy. PMID:21457530

  3. Analysis of the rice mutant dwarf and gladius leaf 1. Aberrant katanin-mediated microtubule organization causes up-regulation of gibberellin biosynthetic genes independently of gibberellin signaling.

    PubMed

    Komorisono, Masahiko; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Aichi, Ikuko; Hasegawa, Yasuko; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kitano, Hidemi; Matsuoka, Makoto; Sazuka, Takashi

    2005-08-01

    Molecular genetic studies of plant dwarf mutants have indicated that gibberellin (GA) and brassinosteroid (BR) are two major factors that determine plant height; dwarf mutants that are caused by other defects are relatively rare, especially in monocot species. Here, we report a rice (Oryza sativa) dwarf mutant, dwarf and gladius leaf 1 (dgl1), which exhibits only minimal response to GA and BR. In addition to the dwarf phenotype, dgl1 produces leaves with abnormally rounded tip regions. Positional cloning of DGL1 revealed that it encodes a 60-kD microtubule-severing katanin-like protein. The protein was found to be important in cell elongation and division, based on the observed cell phenotypes. GA biosynthetic genes are up-regulated in dgl1, but the expression of BR biosynthetic genes is not enhanced. The enhanced expression of GA biosynthetic genes in dgl1 is not caused by inappropriate GA signaling because the expression of these genes was repressed by GA3 treatment, and degradation of the rice DELLA protein SLR1 was triggered by GA3 in this mutant. Instead, aberrant microtubule organization caused by the loss of the microtubule-severing function of DGL1 may result in enhanced expression of GA biosynthetic genes in that enhanced expression was also observed in a BR-deficient mutant with aberrant microtubule organization. These results suggest that the function of DGL1 is important for cell and organ elongation in rice, and aberrant DGL1-mediated microtubule organization causes up-regulation of gibberellin biosynthetic genes independently of gibberellin signaling.

  4. Notch Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Baeten, J T; Lilly, B

    2017-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved pathway involved in cell fate determination in embryonic development and also functions in the regulation of physiological processes in several systems. It plays an especially important role in vascular development and physiology by influencing angiogenesis, vessel patterning, arterial/venous specification, and vascular smooth muscle biology. Aberrant or dysregulated Notch signaling is the cause of or a contributing factor to many vascular disorders, including inherited vascular diseases, such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, associated with degeneration of the smooth muscle layer in cerebral arteries. Like most signaling pathways, the Notch signaling axis is influenced by complex interactions with mediators of other signaling pathways. This complexity is also compounded by different members of the Notch family having both overlapping and unique functions. Thus, it is vital to fully understand the roles and interactions of each Notch family member in order to effectively and specifically target their exact contributions to vascular disease. In this chapter, we will review the Notch signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells as it relates to vascular development and human disease.

  5. Comparative studies on radiation-induced micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Keshava, C.; Ong., T. |; Nath, J.

    1994-12-31

    Induction of micronuclei (MN) and structural chromosomal aberrations (SCA) by physical agents extensively in a variety of cell lines for genotoxicity assessment. However, comparative data on the relationship between these two cytogenetic endpoints are limited. This study compares MN and SCA formation in V79 Chinese hamster lung cells treated with X-rays and UV radiation. Four replicate cultures of exponentially growing cells were exposed to four doses of X-rays (100 to 800 rad). For two replicate cultures, cytochalasin B (3 {mu}g/ml) was added and cells harvested 16 h later for MN and cell cycle kinetics assessments. For the remaining two replicate cultures, colcemid (0.025{mu}g/ml) was added 16 h post-treatment and harvested 2 h later for SCA and mitotic index (MI) analysis. This experiment was duplicated using four doses of UV radiation (100 to 800 {mu}joules x 10{sup 2}/cm{sup 2}). In the x-ray experiment, a dose-related decrease in the % of binucleated (BN) cells and MI was noted. Also, there was a clear dose-related increase in micronucleated binucleate (MNBN) and aberrant cells. Similar dose-response, but with lower frequencies, was observed in the UV radiation treatment. These data suggest that there is a good relationship between chromosome damage as measured by the % of MNBN and aberrant cells and cytotoxicity as measured by the % of BN cells and MI in these assays.

  6. Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia-Telangiectasia Cells Exposed to Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Ito, H.; Liu, C.; Shigematsu, N.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Although cells derived from Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients are known to exhibit abnormal responses to ionizing radiations, its underlying mechanism still remains unclear. Previously, the authors reported that at the same gamma-irradiation dose AT cells show higher frequencies of misrepair and deletions compared to normal human fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/m), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/m) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/m) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/m and then decreased at 440 keV/m. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/m there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for AT cells when it was compared at 185 keV/m but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types

  7. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals aberrant MAPK and Wnt signaling pathways associated with early parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Enkemann, Steven A; Liang, Ping; Hersmus, Remko; Zanazzi, Claudia; Huang, Junjiu; Wu, Chao; Chen, Zhisheng; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Keefe, David L; Liu, Lin

    2010-12-01

    Mammalian parthenogenesis could not survive but aborted during mid-gestation, presumably because of lack of paternal gene expression. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the failure of parthenogenesis at early stages of development, we performed global gene expression profiling and functional analysis of parthenogenetic blastocysts in comparison with those of blastocysts from normally fertilized embryos. Parthenogenetic blastocysts exhibited changes in the expression of 749 genes, of which 214 had lower expression and 535 showed higher expressions than fertilized embryos using a minimal 1.8-fold change as a cutoff. Genes important for placenta development were decreased in their expression in parthenote blastocysts. Some maternally expressed genes were up-regulated and paternal-related genes were down-regulated. Moreover, aberrantly increased Wnt signaling and reduced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling were associated with early parthenogenesis. The protein level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) was low in parthenogenetic blastocysts compared with that of fertilized blastocysts 120 h after fertilization. 6-Bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, a specific glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitor, significantly decreased embryo hatching. The expression of several imprinted genes was altered in parthenote blastocysts. Gene expression also linked reduced expression of Xist to activation of X chromosome. Our findings suggest that failed X inactivation, aberrant imprinting, decreased ERK/MAPK signaling and possibly elevated Wnt signaling, and reduced expression of genes for placental development collectively may contribute to abnormal placenta formation and failed fetal development in parthenogenetic embryos.

  8. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. Induction of chromosome aberrations and mitotic arrest by cytomegalovirus in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    AbuBakar, S.; Au, W.W.; Legator, M.S.; Albrecht, T.

    1988-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is potentially an effective but often overlooked genotoxic agent in humans. We report here evidence that indicates that infection by CMV can induce chromosome alterations and mitotic inhibition. The frequency of chromosome aberrations induced was dependent on the input multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) for human lung fibroblasts (LU), but not for human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) when both cell types were infected at the GO phase of the cell cycle. The aberrations induced by CMV were mostly chromatid breaks and chromosome pulverizations that resembled prematurely condensed S-phase chromatin. Pulverized chromosomes were not observed in LU cells infected with virus stocks that had been rendered nonlytic by UV-irradiation at 24,000 ergs/mm2 or from infection of human lymphocytes. In LU cells infected with UV-irradiated CMV, the frequency of aberrations induced was inversely dependent on the extent of the exposure of the CMV stock to the UV-light. In permissive CMV infection of proliferating LU cells at 24 hr after subculture, a high percentage (greater than 40%) of the metaphase cells were arrested at their first metaphase and displayed severely condensed chromosomes when harvested 48 hr later. A significant increase (p less than 0.05) in the chromosome aberration frequency was also observed. Our study shows that CMV infection is genotoxic to host cells. The types and extent of damage are dependent on the viral genome expression and on the cell cycle stage of the cells at the time of infection. The possible mechanisms for induction of chromosome damage by CMV are discussed.

  10. High-LET Radiation Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia Telangiectasia Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Ito, Hisao; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uno, Takashi

    We investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/micron), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/micron) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/micron) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exchanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/micron and then decreased at 440 keV/micron. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/micron there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for normal fibroblast cells when it was compared at 185 keV/micron, but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types between normal and AT fibroblast appeared different probably due to difference in the ATM gene function.

  11. Induction of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of asbestotic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fatma, N.; Khan, S.G.; Aslam, M.; Rahman, Q. )

    1992-04-01

    In the present study, cytogenetic effects of Indian chrysotile asbestos in rat bone marrow cells after 290 days of intratracheal inoculation, when it develops massive pulmonary fibrosis, were investigated. The pulmonary fibrosis was confirmed by both histopathological studies and increased collagen content in the lung of the treated animals. In the asbestotic rats a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations was recorded and a decrease in mitotic index of bone marrow cells. The types of chromosomal aberrations in these cells were chromatid gaps and breaks. The results indicate the significant cytogenetic changes in the bone marrow cells of asbestotic rats and also suggest that these changes directly or indirectly may be one of the biological events involved in eliciting the asbestos-mediated toxic responses.

  12. Cell culture-induced aberrant methylation of the imprinted IG DMR in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Saferali, Aabida; Grundberg, Elin; Berlivet, Soizik; Beauchemin, Hugues; Morcos, Lisanne; Polychronakos, Constantin; Pastinen, Tomi; Graham, Jinko; McNeney, Brad; Naumova, Anna K

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns are often poorly conserved through cell culturing. To determine the effect of cell immortalization and culture on DNA methylation profiles, we analyzed methylation in the differentially methylated regions (DMR) of five imprinted domains: the intergenic (IG) DMR on chromosome 14q32; potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily, member 1, (KCNQ1); small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN), mesoderm specific transcript homolog (MEST); and H19 in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). In the IG DMR we found an aberrant methylation pattern that was consistent through all the cell lines tested and significantly different from that of noncultured peripheral blood cells. Using a generalized linear mixed model to compare methylation profiles, we show that recently derived LCLs significantly differ from the CEPH LCLs. This implies a gradual cell-culture related deterioration of DNA methylation in the IG DMR with at least two steps that may be identified: loss of methylation at CG sites 1 and 8; and loss of allelic differences in DNA methylation. The IG DMR methylation profile also confirms the high level of clonality of the CEPH LCLs. We conclude that non-transformed primary cells may be less susceptible to epigenetic anomalies and therefore may provide a more accurate reflection of gene expression in vivo.

  13. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  14. TET1 Depletion Induces Aberrant CpG Methylation in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Harada, Taku; Aoki, Hironori; Maruyama, Reo; Toyota, Mutsumi; Sasaki, Yasushi; Sugai, Tamotsu; Tokino, Takashi; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is commonly observed in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels and TET1 expression are both reduced in CRC, while epigenetic silencing of TET1 is reportedly associated with the CpG island methylator phenotype. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the relationship between loss of TET1 and aberrant DNA methylation in CRC. Stable TET1 knockdown clones were established using Colo320DM cells, which express high levels of TET1, and HCT116 cells, which express TET1 at a level similar to that in normal colonic tissue. Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip assays revealed increased levels of 5-methylcytosine at more than 10,000 CpG sites in TET1-depleted Colo320DM cells. Changes in DNA methylation were observed at various positions within the genome, including promoters, gene bodies and intergenic regions, and the altered methylation affected expression of a subset of genes. By contrast, TET1 knockdown did not significantly affect DNA methylation in HCT116 cells. However, TET1 depletion was associated with attenuated effects of 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine on gene expression profiles in both cell lines. These results suggest that loss of TET1 may induce aberrant DNA methylation and may attenuate the effect of 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine in CRC cells. PMID:27977763

  15. The distribution and significance of aberrant ganglion cells in the facial nerve trunk of the cat.

    PubMed

    Satomi, H; Takahashi, K

    1986-01-01

    The distribution and peripheral connections of aberrant ganglion cells in the facial nerve trunk of the cat were studied by means of Klüver-Barrera staining and retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). By the Klüver-Barrera staining, aberrant ganglion cells were observed in the facial nerve trunk between the geniculate ganglion and the junction of the auricular branch of the vagus with the facial nerve trunk, although the number varied considerably with each animal. These cells were generally medium-sized and of round or oval shape, with densely stained Nissl substance, the features of which were essentially similar to those of the geniculate ganglion. In cases where HRP injections were made into the anterior wall of the auricle, several HRP-labeled cells were found ipsilaterally in the facial nerve trunk in addition to cell labeling of the geniculate ganglion. The present study in the cat demonstrated that at least some of the aberrant ganglion cells scattered in the facial nerve trunk are parental to the axons to the auricle, subserving the cutaneous sensory function.

  16. Deciphering causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions in NCI-60 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer cells harbor a large number of molecular alterations such as mutations, amplifications and deletions on DNA sequences and epigenetic changes on DNA methylations. These aberrations may dysregulate gene expressions, which in turn drive the malignancy of tumors. Deciphering the causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms of clinical phenotypes. Results In this work, we proposed a computational method to reconstruct association modules containing driver aberrations, passenger mRNA or microRNA expressions, and putative regulators that mediate the effects from drivers to passengers. By applying the module-finding algorithm to the integrated datasets of NCI-60 cancer cell lines, we found that gene expressions were driven by diverse molecular aberrations including chromosomal segments' copy number variations, gene mutations and DNA methylations, microRNA expressions, and the expressions of transcription factors. In-silico validation indicated that passenger genes were enriched with the regulator binding motifs, functional categories or pathways where the drivers were involved, and co-citations with the driver/regulator genes. Moreover, 6 of 11 predicted MYB targets were down-regulated in an MYB-siRNA treated leukemia cell line. In addition, microRNA expressions were driven by distinct mechanisms from mRNA expressions. Conclusions The results provide rich mechanistic information regarding molecular aberrations and gene expressions in cancer genomes. This kind of integrative analysis will become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in the era of personalized medicine. PMID:22051105

  17. LOXL2 induces aberrant acinar morphogenesis via ErbB2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is a matrix-remodeling enzyme that has been shown to play a key role in invasion and metastasis of breast carcinoma cells. However, very little is known about its role in normal tissue homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effects of LOXL2 expression in normal mammary epithelial cells to gain insight into how LOXL2 mediates cancer progression. Methods LOXL2 was expressed in MCF10A normal human mammary epithelial cells. The 3D acinar morphogenesis of these cells was assessed, as well as the ability of the cells to form branching structures on extracellular matrix (ECM)-coated surfaces. Transwell-invasion assays were used to assess the invasive properties of the cells. Clinically relevant inhibitors of ErbB2, lapatinib and Herceptin (traztuzumab), were used to investigate the role of ErbB2 signaling in this model. A retrospective study on a previously published breast cancer patient dataset was carried out by using Disease Specific Genomic Analysis (DSGA) to investigate the correlation of LOXL2 mRNA expression level with metastasis and survival of ErbB2-positive breast cancer patients. Results Fluorescence staining of the acini revealed increased proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and disrupted polarity, leading to abnormal lumen formation in response to LOXL2 expression in MCF10A cells. When plated onto ECM, the LOXL2-expressing cells formed branching structures and displayed increased invasion. We noted that LOXL2 induced ErbB2 activation through reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and ErbB2 inhibition by using Herceptin or lapatinib abrogated the effects of LOXL2 on MCF10A cells. Finally, we found LOXL2 expression to be correlated with decreased overall survival and metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients with ErbB2-positive tumors. Conclusions These findings suggest that LOXL2 expression in normal epithelial cells can induce abnormal changes that resemble oncogenic transformation and cancer progression

  18. Simulation of the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Chromosome Aberrations in Irradiated Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Wu, Honglu; Blattnig, Steve; George, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations is an important consequence of ionizing radiation. To simulate DNA double-strand breaks and the formation of chromosome aberrations, we have recently merged the codes RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) and NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image). The program RITRACKS is a stochastic code developed to simulate detailed event-by-event radiation track structure: [1] This code is used to calculate the dose in voxels of 20 nm, in a volume containing simulated chromosomes, [2] The number of tracks in the volume is calculated for each simulation by sampling a Poisson distribution, with the distribution parameter obtained from the irradiation dose, ion type and energy. The program NASARTI generates the chromosomes present in a cell nucleus by random walks of 20 nm, corresponding to the size of the dose voxels, [3] The generated chromosomes are located within domains which may intertwine, and [4] Each segment of the random walks corresponds to approx. 2,000 DNA base pairs. NASARTI uses pre-calculated dose at each voxel to calculate the probability of DNA damage at each random walk segment. Using the location of double-strand breaks, possible rejoining between damaged segments is evaluated. This yields various types of chromosomes aberrations, including deletions, inversions, exchanges, etc. By performing the calculations using various types of radiations, it will be possible to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for several types of chromosome aberrations.

  19. Aberrant LPL Expression, Driven by STAT3, Mediates Free Fatty Acid Metabolism in CLL Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rozovski, Uri; Grgurevic, Srdana; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Harris, David M.; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Ji Yuan; Jain, Preetesh; Wierda, William; Burger, Jan; O’Brien, Susan; Jain, Nitin; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J.; Estrov, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    While reviewing chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) bone marrow slides we identified cytoplasmic lipid vacuoles in CLL cells but not in normal B cells. Because lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which catalyzes hydrolysis of triglycerides into free fatty acids (FFAs), is aberrantly expressed in CLL, we investigated whether LPL regulates the oxidative metabolic capacity of CLL cells. We found that unlike normal B cells, CLL cells metabolize FFAs. Because STAT3 is constitutively activated in CLL cells and because we identified putative STAT3 binding sites in the LPL promoter, we sought to determine whether STAT3 drives the aberrant expression of LPL. Transfection of luciferase reporter gene constructs driven by LPL promoter fragments into MM1 cells revealed that STAT3 activates the LPL promoter. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) confirmed that STAT3 binds to the LPL promoter. Furthermore, transfection of CLL cells with STAT3-shRNA downregulated LPL transcripts and protein levels, confirming that STAT3 activates the LPL gene. Finally, transfection of CLL cells with LPL-siRNAs decreased the capacity of CLL cells to oxidize FFAs and reduced cell viability. PMID:25733697

  20. Identification of Targetable HER2 Aberrations in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Yanik, Megan; Tillman, Brittny N.; Scott, Megan V.; Foltin, Susan K.; Mann, Jacqueline E.; Michmerhuizen, Nicole L.; Ludwig, Megan L.; Sandelski, Morgan M.; Komarck, Christine M.; Carey, Thomas E.; Prince, Mark E.P.; Bradford, Carol R.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Spector, Matthew E.; Brenner, J. Chad

    2016-01-01

    Importance HER2 is an important drug target in breast cancer, where anti-HER2 therapy has been shown to lead to improvements in disease recurrence and overall survival. HER2 status in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not been well studied. Identification of HER2 positive tumors and characterization of response to HER2 therapy could lead to targeted treatment options in HNSCC. Objective To identify HER2 aberrations in HNSCCs and investigate potential for HER2 targeted therapy in HNSCCs. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective case series of patients with laryngeal and oral cavity SCC enrolled in the University of MichiganSPORE. Publically available sequencing data(TCGA) was reviewed to identify additional mutations and overexpression in HER2 in HNSCC. Established HNSCC cell lines were used for follow-up in vitro analysis. Interventions Using targeted, amplicon-based sequencing with the Oncomine Cancer Panel, we assessed the copy number and mutation status of commonly altered genes in HNSCCs. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on tissue microarrays of HNSCCs to assess expression of HER2. Western blotting for HNSCC cell line HER2 expression, and cell survival assays after treatment with HER2 inhibitors were performed. Main Outcomes and Measures Prevalence of HER2 genetic aberrations and HER2 overexpression in laryngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Prevalence of HER2 aberrations in HNSCC in TCGA. HER2 protein expression in HNSCC cell lines. Response of HNSCC cell lines to targeted HER2 inhibitors. Results Forty-two laryngeal SCC samples were screened by targeted sequencing, of which 4 were positive for HER2 amplification. Two samples identified with sequencing showed HER2 overexpression on immunohistochemistry. Two of 94 oral cavity SCC samples were positive for HER2 on immunohistochemistry. Analysis of 288 patients from publicly available HNSCC sequencing data revealed 9 amplifications in HER2. Protein expression

  1. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further

  2. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the techniques used to analyze the damage done to chromosome from ion radiation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromereprobes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. There is some comparison of the different results from the various techniques. The results of the study are summarized.

  3. Gene Targets in Prostate Tumor Cells that Mediate Aberrant Growth and Invasiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Craig A. Hauser , Ph.D. Gabriele Foos, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Burnham Institute La Jolla, California 92037 REPORT DATE: February 2005 TYPE...NUMBERS Gene Targets in Prostate Tumor Cells that Mediate DAMD17-02-1-0019 Aberrant Growth and Invasiveness 6. AUTHOR(S) Craig A. Hauser , Ph.D. Gabriele...REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Foos G, Hauser CA (2004) The role of Ets transcription factors in mediating cellular transformation. In: Handbook of Experimental

  4. RBE of Energetic Iron Ions for the Induction of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Hada, Megumi; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Numerous published studies have reported the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) values for chromosome aberrations induced by charged particles of different LET. The RBE for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo has been suggested to show a similar relationship as the quality factor for cancer induction. Therefore, increased chromosome aberrations in the astronauts' white blood cells post long-duration missions are used to determine the biological doses from exposures to space radiation. However, the RBE value is known to be very different for different types of cancer. Previously, we reported that, even though the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions, the RBE was significantly reduced after multiple cell divisions post irradiation. To test the hypothesis that RBE values for chromosome aberrations are cell type dependent, and different between early and late damages, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, and human mammary epithelial cells in vitro to various charged particles. Chromosome aberrations were quantified using the samples collected at first mitosis post irradiation for initial damages, and the samples collected after multiple generations for the remaining or late arising aberrations. Results of the study suggested that the effectiveness of high-LET charged particles for late chromosome aberrations may be cell type dependent, even though the RBE values are similar for early damages.

  5. Aberrant reward processing in Parkinson's disease is associated with dopamine cell loss.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Esther; Helmich, Rick C; Janssen, Marcel J R; Oyen, Wim J G; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Cools, Roshan

    2012-02-15

    Dopamine has been implicated in reward-related impulsivity, but the exact relationship between dopamine, reward and impulsivity in humans remains unknown. We address this question in Parkinson's disease (PD), which is characterized by severe dopamine depletion. PD is associated primarily with motor and cognitive inflexibility, but can also be accompanied by reward-related impulsivity. This paradoxical symptom of PD has often been attributed to dopaminergic overstimulation by antiparkinson medication, which is necessary to relieve the motor and cognitive inflexibility. However, factors other than medication may also contribute to aberrant impact of reward. Here we assess whether cognitive inflexibility and aberrant reward impact in PD are two sides of the same coin, namely dopamine cell loss. To measure dopamine cell loss, we employed (123)I-FP-CIT Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) in 32 PD patients (10 never-medicated patients and 22 patients after withdrawal of all medication for >12h) and related the values to behavior on a rewarded task-switching paradigm. Dopamine cell loss was associated not only with cognitive inflexibility (under low reward), but also with aberrant impact of reward. These effects could not be attributed to medication use. Relative to controls (n=26), aberrant reward processing in PD was particularly expressed as reduced capacity to maintain (i.e., repeat) the current task-set under high reward. Our findings demonstrate that factors intrinsically related to PD may underlie the paradoxical symptoms of inflexibility and reward-related impulsivity in PD. The present results concur with observations that low baseline dopamine states predispose to drug and other addictions.

  6. Aberrant DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vizoso, Miguel; Puig, Marta; Carmona, F.Javier; Maqueda, María; Velásquez, Adriana; Gómez, Antonio; Labernadie, Anna; Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Rigat-Brugarolas, Luis G.; Trepat, Xavier; Ramírez, Josep; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, Enrique; Reguart, Noemí; Perera, Alexandre; Esteller, Manel; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes through altered DNA methylation have been implicated in critical aspects of tumor progression, and have been extensively studied in a variety of cancer types. In contrast, our current knowledge of the aberrant genomic DNA methylation in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) or other stromal cells that act as critical coconspirators of tumor progression is very scarce. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling on lung TAFs and paired control fibroblasts (CFs) from non-small cell lung cancer patients using the HumanMethylation450 microarray. We found widespread DNA hypomethylation concomitant with focal gain of DNA methylation in TAFs compared to CFs. The aberrant DNA methylation landscape of TAFs had a global impact on gene expression and a selective impact on the TGF-β pathway. The latter included promoter hypermethylation-associated SMAD3 silencing, which was associated with hyperresponsiveness to exogenous TGF-β1 in terms of contractility and extracellular matrix deposition. In turn, activation of CFs with exogenous TGF-β1 partially mimicked the epigenetic alterations observed in TAFs, suggesting that TGF-β1 may be necessary but not sufficient to elicit such alterations. Moreover, integrated pathway-enrichment analyses of the DNA methylation alterations revealed that a fraction of TAFs may be bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Finally, survival analyses using DNA methylation and gene expression datasets identified aberrant DNA methylation on the EDARADD promoter sequence as a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Our findings shed light on the unique origin and molecular alterations underlying the aberrant phenotype of lung TAFs, and identify a stromal biomarker with potential clinical relevance. PMID:26449251

  7. Dependence of Early and Late Chromosomal Aberrations on Radiation Quality and Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Krieger, Stephanie; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Goss, Rosalin; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to radiation induces different types of DNA damage, increases mutation and chromosome aberration rates, and increases cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo. The susceptibility of cells to radiation depends on genetic background and growth condition of cells, as well as types of radiation. Mammalian cells of different tissue types and with different genetic background are known to have different survival rate and different mutation rate after cytogenetic insults. Genomic instability, induced by various genetic, metabolic, and environmental factors including radiation, is the driving force of tumorigenesis. Accurate measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is important for estimating radiation-related risks. To further understand genomic instability induced by charged particles and their RBE, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblast AG1522, human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10), and bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH(CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mice to high energy protons and Fe ions. Normal human fibroblasts AG1522 have apparently normal DNA damage response and repair mechanisms, while mammary epithelial cells (M10) are deficient in the repair of DNA DSBs. Mouse strain CBA is radio-sensitive while C57 is radio-resistant. Metaphase chromosomes at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and chromosome aberrations were analyzed as RBE for different cell lines exposed to different radiations at various time points up to one month post irradiation.

  8. Chromosomal aberrations induced by the restriction endonucleases EcoR I, Pst I, Sal I and Bam HI in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Z; Dong, W F

    1987-09-01

    4 widely used cohesive end-producing restriction endonucleases (REs), EcoR I, Pst I, Sal I and Bam HI were tested in CHO cells for their aberration-inducing effects. It was demonstrated that all these REs significantly increased the frequencies of aberrant cells, the aberration frequencies per cell and the aberration frequencies per chromosome. The effects of REs on chromosomal aberrations are similar to ionizing radiation, but more minutes and interchange figures are observed. Polyploid cells are more susceptible to RE treatment, an interesting finding which may be explained by the mechanisms leading to the formation of polyploid cells.

  9. Induction of chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells after heavy ion exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, S.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Scholz, M.; Kraft, G.

    The induction of chromosome aberrations by heavy charged particles was studied in V79 Chinese hamster cells over a wide range of energies (3-100 MeV/u) and LET (20-16000 keV/μm). For comparison, X-ray experiments were performed. Our data indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the response of cells to particle and x-ray irradiation. For the same level of cell survival the amount of damaged cells which can be observed is smaller in heavy ion (11.4 MeV/u Ar) irradiated samples. The highest yield of damaged cells is found 8 to 12 hours after particle irradiation and 4 hours after x-irradiation. Differences in the amount of damaged cells are attributed to cell cycle perturbations which interfere with the expression of damage. After heavy ion exposure the amount of cells reaching mitosis (mitotic index) decreases drastically and not all damaged cells reach mitosis within 48 hours after exposure. A portion of cells die in interphase. Cell cycle delays induced by x-ray irradiation are less pronounced and all cells reach the first post-irradiation mitosis within 24 hours after irradiation. Additionally, the damage produced by charged particles seems to be more severe. The disintegration of chromosomes was only observed after high LET radiation: an indication of the high and local energy deposition in the particle track. Only cross sections for the induction of chromosome aberrations in mitotic cells were reported in this paper because of the problems arising from the drastic cell cycle perturbations. In this case, cells were irradiated in mitosis and assayed immediately.

  10. Cell Polarity Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenbiao

    2009-01-01

    Cell polarization is intimately linked to plant development, growth, and responses to the environment. Major advances have been made in our understanding of the signaling pathways and networks that regulate cell polarity in plants owing to recent studies on several model systems, e.g., tip growth in pollen tubes, cell morphogenesis in the leaf epidermis, and polar localization of PINs. From these studies we have learned that plant cells use conserved mechanisms such as Rho family GTPases to integrate both plant-specific and conserved polarity cues and to coordinate the cytoskeketon dynamics/reorganization and vesicular trafficking required for polarity establishment and maintenance. This review focuses upon signaling mechanisms for cell polarity formation in Arabidopsis, with an emphasis on Rho GTPase signaling in polarized cell growth and how these mechanisms compare with those for cell polarity signaling in yeast and animal systems. PMID:18837672

  11. Induction by inorganic metal salts of sister chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations in human and Syrian hamster cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Larramendy, M.L.; Popescu, N.C.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosome aberration induction were determined for several inorganic metal salts. Arsenic, nickel, and beryllium salts at concentrations effective in causing transformation of Syrian hamster cells (HEC) induced SCE and chromosome aberrations of HEC and human lymphocytes, whereas sodium tungstate, a non-transforming chemical, neither induced SCE nor chromosome aberrations. Normal human and hamster cells exhibited equal sensitivity to SCE induction; nontoxic concentrations of sodium arsenite, beryllium sulfate, and nickel sulfate caused an increase of 8-10 SCE/cell over control values. Sodium arsenite, a trivalent arsenic, and sodium arsenate, a pentavalent arsenic, produced increases in SCE but the former was effective at lower concentrations. Both arsenic salts were less efficient in inducing SCE in human whole blood than in purified lymphocyte cultures. Sodium arsenite, sodium arsenate, nickel sulfate, and beryllium sulfate also caused damage consisting primarily of chromatid type of aberrations. In HEC, with doses most effective in SCE induction , all four metals produced aberrations in 16-21% of cells. In human lymphocytes, 34 and 30% of the cells had chromosome damage after sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate, respectively, whereas beryllium sulfate or nickel sulfate caused damage in about 10% of the cells. The induction of SCE and chromosomal aberrations by metals reemphasizes the sensitivity of cytological assays and their importance for detecting genetic damage caused by carcinogens.

  12. Chromosome aberrations and rogue cells in lymphocytes of Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Lazutka, J R

    1996-03-09

    A cytogenetic analysis was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from 183 Chernobyl clean-up workers and 27 control individuals. Increased frequencies of chromosome aberrations were associated with exposure to radiation at Chernobyl, alcohol abuse and a history of recent influenza infection. However, only approximately 20% of Chernobyl clean-up workers had an increased frequency of dicentric and ring chromosomes. At the same time, an increased frequency of acentric fragments in lymphocytes of clean-up workers was characteristic. The use of multivitamins as dietary supplement significantly decreased the frequency of chromosome aberrations, especially of chromatid breaks. Rogue cells were found in lymphocytes of 28 clean-up workers and 3 control individuals. The appearance of rogue cells was associated with a recent history of acute respiratory disease (presumably caused by adenoviral infection) and, probably, alcohol abuse. Dicentric chromosomes in rogue cells were distributed according to a negative binomial distribution. Occurrence of rogue cells due to a perturbation of cell cycle control and abnormal apoptosis is suggested.

  13. Sigma1 Targeting to Suppress Aberrant Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jeffrey D; Longen, Charles G; Oyer, Halley M; Chen, Nan; Maher, Christina M; Salvino, Joseph M; Kania, Blase; Anderson, Kelsey N; Ostrander, William F; Knudsen, Karen E; Kim, Felix J

    2017-02-24

    Suppression of androgen receptor (AR) activity in prostate cancer by androgen depletion or direct AR antagonist treatment, although initially effective, leads to incurable castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) via compensatory mechanisms including resurgence of AR and AR splice variant (ARV) signaling. Emerging evidence suggests that Sigma1 (also known as sigma-1 receptor) is a unique chaperone or scaffolding protein that contributes to cellular protein homeostasis. We reported previously that some Sigma1-selective small molecules can be used to pharmacologically modulate protein homeostasis pathways. We hypothesized that these Sigma1 mediated responses could be exploited to suppress AR protein levels and activity. Here we demonstrate that treatment with a small molecule Sigma1 inhibitor prevented 5α- dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-mediated nuclear translocation of AR and induced proteasomal degradation of AR and ARV, suppressing the transcriptional activity and protein levels of both full-length and splice-variant AR. Consistent with these data, RNAi knockdown of Sigma1 resulted in decreased AR levels and transcriptional activity. Furthermore, Sigma1 physically associated with ARV7 and ARv567es as well as full-length AR. Treatment of mice xenografted with ARV-driven CPRC tumors with a drug-like small molecule Sigma1 inhibitor significantly inhibited tumor growth associated with elimination of AR and ARV7 in responsive tumors. Together, our data show that Sigma1 modulators can be used to suppress AR/ARV-driven prostate cancer cells via regulation of pharmacologically responsive Sigma1-AR/ARV interactions both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  15. Anaphase aberrations: a measure of genotoxicity in mutagen-treated fish cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kocan, R.M.; Landolt, M.L.; Sabo, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    Rainbow trout gonad cells (RTG-2) were cultured for various lengths of time in the presence of several classes of known mutagenic chemicals and several related compounds that possessed no known mutagenic/carcinogenic activity. During the course of exposure the cells were examined for the presence of abnormalities in the chromosome arrangement of anaphase figures during mitosis. Untreated and solvent-treated (dimethylsulfoxide-treated) cells exhibited a background abnormality rate of 12% with only minor chromosomal defects being observed. This was also true for those cells exposed to naphthol and anthracene, two chemicals with no proven mutagenic or carcinogenic activity. Conversely, significant increases in the frequency of anaphase aberrations were produced in cells treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, benzo(a)pyrene, 9-aminoacridine and mitomycin-C. These abnormalities were also far more complex and extensive than those observed in the control and nonmutagen-treated cells. Many species of fish have extremely small and numerous chromosomes, making resolution of chromosome defects such as sister chromatid exchange and deletions more difficult than in most mammalian diploid cells, which generally have larger and fewer chromosomes. Examination of cells during anaphase eliminates the need to observe each chromosome separately as well as the need to produce well-spread metaphase chromosomes. Since the sensitivity of anaphase aberrations to known mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds appears to be quite high in trout cells and since hundreds of suitable cells are available for analysis, this may be an appropriate alternative or addition to some of the more standard chromosome macrolesion tests developed in mammalian systems.

  16. Signal Relay During Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Rericha, Erin; Ott, Edward; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We developed a signal relay model to quantify the effect of intercellular communication in presence of an external signal, during the motion of groups of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. A key parameter is the ratio of amplitude of the cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) a signaling chemical secreted from individual cells versus the external cAMP field, which defines a time scale. Another time scale is set by the degradation rate of the cAMP. In our simulations, the competition between these two time scales results rich dynamics including uniform motion, as well as streaming and clustering instabilities. The simulations are compared to experiments for a wide range of different external signal strengths for both cells that secrete cAMP and a mutant which cannot relay cAMP. Under different strength of external linear cAMP gradient, the wild type cells form streams and exhibit clustering due to the intercellular signaling through individual cAMP secretion. In contrast, cells lacking signal relay move relatively straight. We find that the model captures both independent motion and the formation of aggregates when cells relay the signal.

  17. Targeting Signaling Pathways in Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Li

    2017-01-01

    The Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways are inherent signaling pathways in normal embryogenesis, development, and hemostasis. However, dysfunctions of these pathways are evident in multiple tumor types and malignancies. Specifically, aberrant activation of these pathways is implicated in modulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small subset of cancer cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation into heterogeneous tumor cells. The CSCs are accountable for tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. In this review, we focus on roles of Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways in CSCs' stemness and functions and summarize therapeutic studies targeting these pathways to eliminate CSCs and improve overall cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:28356914

  18. Blunted sympathoinhibitory responses in obesity-related hypertension are due to aberrant central but not peripheral signalling mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    How, Jackie M Y; Wardak, Suhail A; Ameer, Shaik I; Davey, Rachel A; Sartor, Daniela M

    2014-01-01

    The gut hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) acts at subdiaphragmatic vagal afferents to induce renal and splanchnic sympathoinhibition and vasodilatation, via reflex inhibition of a subclass of cardiovascular-controlling neurons in the rostroventrolateral medulla (RVLM). These sympathoinhibitory and vasodilator responses are blunted in obese, hypertensive rats and our aim in the present study was to determine whether this is attributable to (i) altered sensitivity of presympathetic vasomotor RVLM neurons, and (ii) aberrant peripheral or central signalling mechanisms. Using a diet-induced obesity model, male Sprague–Dawley rats exhibited either an obesity-prone (OP) or obesity-resistant (OR) phenotype when placed on a medium high fat diet for 13–15 weeks; control animals were placed on a low fat diet. OP animals had elevated resting arterial pressure compared to OR/control animals (P < 0.05). Barosensitivity of RVLM neurons was significantly attenuated in OP animals (P < 0.05), suggesting altered baroreflex gain. CCK induced inhibitory responses in RVLM neurons of OR/control animals but not OP animals. Subdiaphragmatic vagal nerve responsiveness to CCK and CCK1 receptor mRNA expression in nodose ganglia did not differ between the groups, but CCK induced significantly less Fos-like immunoreactivity in both the nucleus of the solitary tract and the caudal ventrolateral medulla of OP animals compared to controls (P < 0.05). These results suggest that blunted sympathoinhibitory and vasodilator responses in obesity-related hypertension are due to alterations in RVLM neuronal responses, resulting from aberrant central but not peripheral signalling mechanisms. In obesity, blunted sympathoinhibitory mechanisms may lead to increased regional vascular resistance and contribute to the development of hypertension. PMID:24492842

  19. Cytotoxicity and anaphase aberrations induced by mineral fibres in cultured human mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pelin, K; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, K; Vallas, M; Vanhala, E; Linnainmaa, K

    1992-09-01

    The in vitro cytotoxicity of two amphibole asbestos fibres (amosite and crocidolite), a serpentine asbestos (chrysotile), a non-asbestos fibrous aluminosilicate (erionite) and three different size fractions of both glass wool and rock wool fibres were assessed in an immortalized human mesothelial cell line, MeT-5A. We also investigated the induction of anaphase aberrations by the asbestos and erionite fibres. On a comparison by weight, amosite, crocidolite and chrysotile showed similar toxic effects (2-5 mug/cm(2) of the asbestos fibres caused 50% of cells to die) but erionite was less toxic (10-20 mug/cm(2) was needed for the same effect). When the doses were converted to the number of fibres/cm(2) of culture area, amosite was shown to be about 10 times more cytotoxic than crocidolite and chrysotile. Crocidolite and chrysotile showed similar cytotoxicity, and erionite was again less toxic. Of the man-made mineral fibres (MMMF), thin glass wool was the most cytotoxic (50% cell death for 10-20 mug/cm(2)), followed (in descending order of cytotoxicity) by thin rock wool, coarse glass wool, milled rock wool, milled glass wool and coarse rock wool. In general, the MMMF samples were less toxic than the asbestos and erionite samples. All three asbestos types studied induced anaphase aberrations at high (near toxic) doses. A statistically significant increase in the number of aberrant anaphases was observed in cultures treated with crocidolite or chrysotile at 5 mug/cm(2). The increase was caused by lagging chromatids, chromosomes or chromosome fragments.

  20. Analysis of Heavy Ion-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblast Cells Using In Situ Hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 0 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Unrejoined chromosomal breaks and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, indicating the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track. 2

  1. Hedgehog Signaling in the Maintenance of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Catherine R.; Szczepny, Anette; Watkins, D. Neil; Cain, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a rare population of cells with the capacity to self-renew and give rise to heterogeneous cell lineages within a tumour. Whilst the mechanisms underlying the regulation of CSCs are poorly defined, key developmental signaling pathways required for normal stem and progenitor functions have been strongly implicated. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is an evolutionarily-conserved pathway essential for self-renewal and cell fate determination. Aberrant Hh signaling is associated with the development and progression of various types of cancer and is implicated in multiple aspects of tumourigenesis, including the maintenance of CSCs. Here, we discuss the mounting evidence suggestive of Hh-driven CSCs in the context of haematological malignancies and solid tumours and the novel strategies that hold the potential to block many aspects of the transformation attributed to the CSC phenotype, including chemotherapeutic resistance, relapse and metastasis. PMID:26270676

  2. Restriction-endonuclease-induced DNA double-strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bryant, P E; Johnston, P J

    1993-05-01

    Restriction endonucleases (RE) can be used to mimic and model the clastogenic effects of ionising radiation. With the development of improved techniques for cell poration: electroporation and recently streptolysin O (SLO), it has become possible more confidently to study the relationships between DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) of various types (e.g. blunt or cohesive-ended) and the frequencies of induced metaphase chromosomal aberrations or micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked cells. Although RE-induced dsb do not mimic the chemical end-structure of radiation-induced dsb (i.e. the 'dirty' ends of radiation-induced dsb), it has become clear that cohesive-ended dsb, which are thought to be the major type of dsb induced by radiation, are much less clastogenic than blunt-ended dsb. It has also been possible, with the aid of electroporation or SLO to measure the kinetics of dsb in cells as a function of time after treatment. These experiments have shown that some RE (e.g. Pvu II) are extremely stable inside CHO cells and at high concentrations persist and induce dsb over a period of many hours following treatment. Cutting of DNA by RE is thought to be at specific recognition sequences (as in free DNA) although the frequencies of sites in native chromatin available to RE is not yet known. DNA condensation and methylation are both factors limiting the numbers of available cutting sites. Relatively little is known about the kinetics of incision or repair of RE-induced dsb in cells. Direct ligation may be a method used by cells to rejoin the bulk of RE-induced dsb, since inhibitors such as araA, araC and aphidicolin appear not prevent rejoining, although these inhibitors have been found to lead to enhanced frequencies of chromosomal aberrations. 3-Aminobenzimide, the poly-ADP ribose polymerase inhibitor is the only agent that has so far been shown to inhibit rejoining of RE-induced dsb. Data from the radiosensitive xrs5 cell line, where chromosomal aberration frequencies are

  3. Apoptotic cell signaling in cancer progression and therapy†

    PubMed Central

    Plati, Jessica; Bucur, Octavian; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cell suicide program that plays an essential role in the development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis by eliminating unnecessary or harmful cells. Impairment of this native defense mechanism promotes aberrant cellular proliferation and the accumulation of genetic defects, ultimately resulting in tumorigenesis, and frequently confers drug resistance to cancer cells. The regulation of apoptosis at several levels is essential to maintain the delicate balance between cellular survival and death signaling that is required to prevent disease. Complex networks of signaling pathways act to promote or inhibit apoptosis in response to various cues. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Various upstream signaling pathways can modulate apoptosis by converging on, and thereby altering the activity of, common central control points within the apoptotic signaling pathways, which involve the BCL-2 family proteins, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). This review highlights the role of these fundamental regulators of apoptosis in the context of both normal apoptotic signaling mechanisms and dysregulated apoptotic pathways that can render cancer cells resistant to cell death. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the activity of BCL-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for the targeted induction of apoptosis are briefly discussed. PMID:21340093

  4. Apoptotic cell signaling in cancer progression and therapy.

    PubMed

    Plati, Jessica; Bucur, Octavian; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2011-04-01

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cell suicide program that plays an essential role in the development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis by eliminating unnecessary or harmful cells. Impairment of this native defense mechanism promotes aberrant cellular proliferation and the accumulation of genetic defects, ultimately resulting in tumorigenesis, and frequently confers drug resistance to cancer cells. The regulation of apoptosis at several levels is essential to maintain the delicate balance between cellular survival and death signaling that is required to prevent disease. Complex networks of signaling pathways act to promote or inhibit apoptosis in response to various cues. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Various upstream signaling pathways can modulate apoptosis by converging on, and thereby altering the activity of, common central control points within the apoptotic signaling pathways, which involve the BCL-2 family proteins, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). This review highlights the role of these fundamental regulators of apoptosis in the context of both normal apoptotic signaling mechanisms and dysregulated apoptotic pathways that can render cancer cells resistant to cell death. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the activity of BCL-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for the targeted induction of apoptosis are briefly discussed.

  5. Immunological control of cell cycle aberrations for the avoidance of oncogenesis: the case of tetraploidy.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-05-01

    Tetraploid cells--cells that contain twice the normal amount of DNA--are more prone to neoplastic transformation than their normal, diploid counterparts since they are genomically unstable and frequently undergo asymmetric, multipolar cell divisions. Similar to many other genomic aberrations, tetraploidization is normally avoided by multiple, nonredundant cell-intrinsic mechanisms that are tied to cell cycle checkpoints. Unexpectedly, tetraploidization is also under the control of a cell-extrinsic mechanism determined by the immune system. Indeed, oncogene- or carcinogen-induced cancers developing in immunodeficient mice contain cells with a higher DNA content than similar tumors growing in immunocompetent hosts. Moreover, cancer cell lines that have been rendered tetraploid in vitro grow normally in immunodeficient mice, yet almost fail to generate tumors in immunocompetent animals. One of the mechanisms whereby the immune system recognizes tetraploid cells originates from tetraploidy causing an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response that culminates in the exposure of the ER protein calreticulin on the cell surface. Hence, tetraploidy exemplifies a potentially oncogenic alteration that is repressed by a combination of cell-autonomous mechanisms and immunosurveillance. Oncogenesis and tumor progression require the simultaneous failure of both such control systems.

  6. Proton and Fe Ion-Induced Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Lu, Tao; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Kadhim, Munira

    2016-01-01

    An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. To investigate GI induced by charged particles, we exposed human lymphocytes, human fibroblast cells, and human mammary epithelial cells to high energy protons and Fe ions. In addition, we also investigated GI in bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH (CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mice, by analyzing cell survival and chromosome aberrations in the cells after multiple cell divisions. Results analyzed so far from the experiments indicated different sensitivities to charged particles between CBA/CaH (CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mouse strains, suggesting that there are two main types of response to irradiation: 1) responses associated with survival of damaged cells and 2) responses associated with the induction of non-clonal chromosomal instability in the surviving progeny of stem cells. Previously, we reported that the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions. Our results with different cell types demonstrated different RBE values between different cell types and between early and late chromosomal damages. This study also attempts to offer an explanation for the varying RBE values for different cancer types.

  7. Aberrant Expression of MICO1 and MICO1OS in Deceased Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Calves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan-Nan; Yang, Wen-Zhi; Xu, Da; Li, Dong-Jie; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Wei-Na; Li, Shi-Jie

    2017-04-06

    Incomplete reprogramming of a donor nucleus following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) results in aberrant expression of developmentally important genes, and is the primary source of the phenotypic abnormalities observed in cloned animals. Expression of non-coding RNAs in the murine Dlk1-Dio3 imprinted domain was previously shown to correlate with the pluripotency of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells. In this study, we examined the transcription of the bovine orthologs from this locus, MICO1 (Maternal intergenic circadian oscillating 1) and MICO1OS (MICO1 opposite strand), in tissues from artificially inseminated and SCNT calves that died during the perinatal period. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), a T-to-C transition, was used to analyze the allelic transcription of MICO1. Our results indicate monoallelic expression of the MICO1 C allele among the six analyzed tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and brain) of artificially inseminated calves, indicating that this gene locus may be imprinted in bovine. Conversely, we observed variable allelic transcription of MICO1 in SCNT calves. We asked if DNA methylation regulated the monoallelic expression of MICO1 and MICO1OS by evaluating the methylation levels of six regions within or around this locus in tissues with normal or aberrant MICO1 transcription; all of the samples from either artificially inseminated or SCNT calves exhibited hypermethylation, implying that DNA methylation may not be involved in regulating its monoallelic expression. Furthermore, three imprinted genes (GTL2, MEG9, and DIO3) nearby MICO1 showed monoallelic expression in SCNT calves with aberrant MICO1 transcription, indicating that not all of the genes in the bovine DLK1-DIO3 domain are mis-regulated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Interphase cytogenetics of multicentric renal cell tumours confirm associations of specific aberrations with defined cytomorphologies

    PubMed Central

    Amo-Takyi, B K; Mittermayer, C; Günther, K; Handt, S

    2000-01-01

    To demonstrate associations of certain chromosomal aberrations with defined renal cell tumour (RCT) subtypes, we analysed 239 tumour nephrectomy cases for specimens with multicentric tumours. Chromosomal in situ hybridization was then performed on 15 cases with 34 foci (16 conventional renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), and 18 papillary RCTs (11 carcinomas and seven adenomas) for specific chromosomal aberrations, using α-satellite probes for chromosomes 3, 7 or 17. Particular preference was given to cases which had separate foci with different cytomorphologies. Furthermore, we compared aberrations in relation to tumour size, stage, grade and between different foci in a specimen. Thirty-four cases had multiple tumours. Forty-seven per cent of the multicentric tumours were conventional RCCs and 53% papillary RCTs (against 83% solitary conventional RCCs and 5% solitary papillary RCTs). Three conventional RCCs sized 8 mm (G3), 13 cm (pT2, G2) and 15 cm (pT3b, G3), respectively, revealed monosomy 3, and 13 were disomic. Seventeen papillary RCTs (11 carcinomas and six adenomas) displayed trisomy 17, irrespective of size or grade. Four papillary carcinomas and six papillary adenomas had trisomy 7, and the rest (seven papillary carcinomas and one papillary adenoma) revealed disomy 7. In conclusion, papillary RCTs were tendentially multicentric. Although specific for conventional RCCs heedless of size, monosomy 3 was only observed in high-grade and/or advanced tumours. Trisomy 17 was only detectable in papillary RCTs irrespective of tumour state, showing increased copies with tumour growth. Papillary RCTs also appeared to lose some copies of chromosome 7 with tumour progress, possibly reflecting malignancy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10780519

  9. Aberrant germinal center formation, follicular T-helper cells, and germinal center B-cells were involved in chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Shao, Liang; Lie, Albert K W; Zhang, You; Wong, Cheuk-Hong; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2015-09-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is an important complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To define the roles of T-cells and B-cells in cGVHD, a murine minor histocompatibility complex-mismatched HSCT model was used. Depletion of donor splenocyte CD4(+) T-cells and B220(+) B-cells alleviated cGVHD. Allogeneic recipients had significantly increased splenic germinal centers (GCs), with significant increases in follicular T-helper (Tfh) cells and GC B-cells. There were increased expressions in Tfh cells of inducible T-cell co-stimulator (ICOS), interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-17, and in GC B-cells of B-cell activating factor receptor and ICOS ligand. Depletion of donor splenocyte CD4(+) T-cells abrogated aberrant GC formation and suppressed Tfh cells and GC B-cells. Interestingly, depletion of donor splenocyte B200(+) B-cells also suppressed Tfh cells in addition to GC B-cells. These results suggested that in cGVHD, both Tfh and GC B-cells were involved, and their developments were mutually dependent. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus was effective in suppressing cGVHD, Tfh cells, and GC B-cells, either as a prophylaxis or when cGVHD had established. These results implied that therapeutic targeting of both T-cells and B-cells in cGVHD might be effective. Signaling via mTOR may be another useful target in cGVHD.

  10. M-BAND Study of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells: Radiation Quality and Dose Rate Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is its ability to identify both inter- (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra- (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome) chromosome aberrations simultaneously. To study the detailed rearrangement of low- and high-LET radiation induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) in vitro, we performed a series of experiments with Cs-137 gamma rays of both low and high dose rates, neutrons of low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions of high dose rate, with chromosome 3 painted with multi-binding colors. We also compared the chromosome aberrations in both 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures. Results of these experiments revealed the highest chromosome aberration frequencies after low dose rate neutron exposures. However, detailed analysis of the radiation induced inversions revealed that all three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intra-chromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by inter-chromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges. The location of the breaks involved in chromosome exchanges was analyzed along the painted chromosome. The breakpoint distribution was found to be randomly localized on chromosome 3 after neutron or Fe ion exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering breakpoints was observed after -ray exposure. Our comparison of chromosome aberration yields between 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures indicated a significant difference for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures. These experimental results indicated that the track structure of the radiation and the cellular/chromosome structure can both affect radiation-induced chromosome

  11. RBE of Energetic Iron Ions for the Induction of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Hada, Megumi; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Numerous published studies have reported the RBE values for chromosome chromosomes induced by charged particles of different LET. The RBE for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo showed a similar relationship as the quality factor for cancer induction. Consequently, increased chromosome aberrations in the astronauts' white blood cells post long-duration missions are used to determine the biological doses from exposures to space radiation. The RBE value is known to be very different for different types of cancer. Previously, we reported that the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions. After multiple cell divisions post irradiation, the RBE was significantly smaller. To test the hypothesis that the RBE values for chromosome aberrations are different between early and late damages and also different between different cell types, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, and human fibroblast cells and human mammary epithelial cells in vitro to 600 MeV/u Fe ions. Post irradiation, the cells were collected at first mitosis, or cultured for multiple generations for collections of remaining or late arising chromosome aberrations. The chromosome aberrations were quantified using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome specific probes. This study attempts to offer an explanation for the varying RBE values for different cancer types.

  12. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling pathway impedes cancer cell proliferation by promotion of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoli; Deng, Libin; Chen, Qi; Wang, Yao; Xu, Rong; Shi, Chao; Shao, Jia; Hu, Guohui; Gao, Meng; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen; Lu, Quqin

    2015-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence implicate that aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is involved in a variety of human cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying how cancer cells respond to Hh inhibition remain to be elucidated. In this study, we found that blockade of Hh signaling suppresses cell proliferation in human cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed that differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in human cancer cells are enriched in autophagy pathway in response to the inhibition of Hh signaling. Interestingly, inhibition of Hh signaling induced autophagy, whereas activation of Hh signaling by ligand treatments prevented the induction of autophagy. In addition, inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) partially suppressed cytotoxicity induced by inhibition of Hh signaling. Finally, in autophagy deficient cells, cytotoxic effect triggered by inhibition of Hh signaling was partially reversed, indicating the modulation of autophagy by Hh signaling is autophagy-specific. These results suggest that inhibition of Hh signaling impedes cancer cell proliferation in part through induction of autophagy.

  13. The effect of track structure on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in murine cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Cella, L.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Saito, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure chromosome aberrations in C3H 10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts using FISH painting at the first mitosis following exposure to 30 keV/microm hydrogen or neon ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cells in plateau-phase were irradiated with 0.86 MeV protons at the TTT-3 Tandem accelerator in Naples (Italy), or with 400 MeV/n Ne ions at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (Japan). Colcemid-blocked cells were harvested at the first mitosis following exposure, and chromosome spreads were hybridized in situ with a fluorescein-labelled composite mouse DNA probe specific for chromosomes 2 and 8. RESULTS: Protons were more efficient than neon ions at the same LET in the induction of chromosome interchanges and breaks. Yields of complex exchanges were similar for both particles at the same dose, but protons produced mostly insertions, while with Ne exposure non-reciprocal exchanges were the most frequent complex-type exchange. CONCLUSIONS: Charged particles with the same LET produce different yields of chromosome aberrations, and some observed differences can be explained based on the available track-structure models.

  14. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    PubMed

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  15. Immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis: the role of aberrant expression of non-coding RNAs in T cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, N-S; Koo, M; Yu, C-L; Lu, M-C

    2017-03-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), are RNA molecules that do not translate into protein. Both miRNAs and lncRNAs are known to regulate gene expression and to play an essential role in T cell differentiation and function. Both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a representative disease of inflammatory arthritis, are characterized by a complex dysfunction in the innate and adaptive immunity. T cells play a central role in cell-mediated immune response and multiple defects in T cells from patients with SLE and RA have been observed. Abnormality in T cell signalling, cytokine and chemokine production, T cell activation and apoptosis, T cell differentiation and DNA methylation that are associated closely with the aberrant expression of a number of miRNAs and lncRNAs have been implicated in the immunopathogenesis of SLE and RA. This review aims to provide an overview of the current state of research on the abnormal expression of miRNAs and lncRNAs in T cells and their roles in the immunopathogenesis of SLE and RA. In addition, by comparing the differences in aberrant expression of miRNAs and lncRNAs in T cells between patients with SLE and RA, controversial areas are highlighted that warrant further investigation.

  16. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  17. Anaphase aberrations: a measure of genotoxicity in mutagen-treated fish cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kocan, R.M.; Landolt, M.L.; Sabo, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    Rainbow trout gonad cells (RTG-2) were cultured for various lengths of time in the presence of several classes of known mutagenic chemicals and several related compounds that possessed no known mutagenic/carcinogenic activity. During the course of exposure the cells were examined for the presence of abnormalities in the chromosome arrangement of anaphase figures during mitosis. Untreated and solvent-treated (dimethylsulfoxide-treated) cells exhibited a background abnormality rate of 12% with only minor chromosomal defects being observed. This was also true for those cells exposed to naphthol and anthracene, two chemicals with no proven mutagenic or carcinogenic activity. Conversely, significant increases in the frequency of anaphase aberrations were produced in cells treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, benzo(a)pyrene, 9-aminoacridine and mitomycin-C. These abnormalities were also far more complex and extensive than those observed in the control and nonmutagen-treated cells. Many species of fish have extremely small and numerous chromosomes, making resolution of chromosome defects such as sister chromatid exchange and deletions more difficult than in most mammalian diploid cells, which generally have larger and fewer chromosomes. Examination of cells during anaphase eliminates the need to observed each chromosome separately as well as the need to produce well-spread metaphase chromosomes. (JMT)

  18. Retinoic-acid-orphan-receptor-C inhibition suppresses Th17 cells and induces thymic aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Guntermann, Christine; Piaia, Alessandro; Hamel, Marie-Laure; Theil, Diethilde; Rubic-Schneider, Tina; del Rio-Espinola, Alberto; Dong, Linda; Billich, Andreas; Kaupmann, Klemens; Dawson, Janet; Hoegenauer, Klemens; Orain, David; Hintermann, Samuel; Stringer, Rowan; Patel, Dhavalkumar D.; Doelemeyer, Arno; Deurinck, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Retinoic-acid-orphan-receptor-C (RORC) is a master regulator of Th17 cells, which are pathogenic in several autoimmune diseases. Genetic Rorc deficiency in mice, while preventing autoimmunity, causes early lethality due to metastatic thymic T cell lymphomas. We sought to determine whether pharmacological RORC inhibition could be an effective and safe therapy for autoimmune diseases by evaluating its effects on Th17 cell functions and intrathymic T cell development. RORC inhibitors effectively inhibited Th17 differentiation and IL-17A production, and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. In vitro, RORC inhibitors induced apoptosis, as well as Bcl2l1 and BCL2L1 mRNA downregulation, in mouse and nonhuman primate thymocytes, respectively. Chronic, 13-week RORC inhibitor treatment in rats caused progressive thymic alterations in all analyzed rats similar to those in Rorc-deficient mice prior to T cell lymphoma development. One rat developed thymic cortical hyperplasia with neoplastic features, including increased mitosis and reduced IKAROS expression, albeit without skewed T cell clonality. In summary, pharmacological inhibition of RORC not only blocks Th17 cell development and related cytokine production, but also recapitulates thymic aberrations seen in Rorc-deficient mice. While RORC inhibition may offer an effective therapeutic principle for Th17-mediated diseases, T cell lymphoma with chronic therapy remains an apparent risk. PMID:28289717

  19. Combination Targeted Therapy to Disrupt Aberrant Oncogenic Signaling and Reverse Epigenetic Dysfunction in IDH2- and TET2-Mutant Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shih, Alan H; Meydan, Cem; Shank, Kaitlyn; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E; Ward, Patrick S; Intlekofer, Andrew; Nazir, Abbas; Stein, Eytan; Knapp, Kristina; Glass, Jacob; Travins, Jeremy; Straley, Kim; Gliser, Camelia; Mason, Chris; Yen, Katharine; Thompson, Craig B; Melnick, Ari; Levine, Ross L

    2017-02-13

    Genomic studies in acute myeloid leukemias (AML) have identified mutations which drive altered DNA methylation, including TET2 and IDH2. Here we show that models of AMLs resulting from TET2 or IDH2 mutations combined with FLT3ITD mutations are sensitive to 5-Azacytidine or to the IDH2 inhibitor AG-221, respectively. 5-Azacytidine and AG-221 treatment induced an attenuation of aberrant DNA methylation and transcriptional output, and resulted in a reduction in leukemic blasts consistent with anti-leukemic activity. These therapeutic benefits were associated with restoration of leukemic cell differentiation, and the normalization of hematopoiesis was derived from mutant cells. By contrast, combining AG-221 or 5-Azacytidine with FLT3 inhibition resulted in a reduction in mutant allele burden, progressive recovery of normal hematopoiesis from non-mutant stem-progenitor cells, and reversal of dysregulated DNA methylation and transcriptional output. Together, our studies suggest combined targeting of signaling and epigenetic pathways can increase therapeutic response in AML.

  20. Chromosomal aberrations and delays in cell progression induced by x-rays in Tradescantia clone 02 meristems

    SciTech Connect

    Geard, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    In root meristems of Tradescantia clone 02 (developed by Sparrow and his colleagues for mutation studies), X-rays interfere with the progression of cells through the cell cycle and induce chromosomal aberrations in a dose-dependent manner consistent with linear-quadratic kinetics. Sequential mitotic cell accumulations after irradiation indicate that sensitivity to aberrration induction is probably greatest in cells from late S to early G2, with chromatid interchanges the most frequent aberration type and all aberrations consistent with intiation from the interaction between two lesions. The ratio of the coefficients in the linear (..cap alpha..) and the quadratic (..beta..) terms (..cap alpha../..beta..) is equal to the dose average of specific energy produced by individual particles in the site where interaction takes place. The ratio ..cap alpha../..beta.. for chromosomal aberrations is similar to that previously found for X-ray-induced mutation in Tradescantia stamen hairs, supporting the proposal that radiation-induced mutational events are due to chromosomal aberrations with interaction distances of about 1 ..mu..m. Abrahmson and co-workers have noted that both ..cap alpha../..beta.. ratios appear to be related to nuclear target size and are similar for chromosomal and mutational endpoints in the same organism. These findings support this concept; however, it is apparent that any situation which diminishes yield at high doses (e.g., mitotic delay) will primarily affect the ..beta.. component, resulting in low assessments of interaction site diameters.

  1. Slit-Robo Repulsive Signaling Extrudes Tumorigenic Cells from Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Vaughen, John; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2016-12-19

    Cells dynamically interact throughout animal development to coordinate growth and deter disease. For example, cell-cell competition weeds out aberrant cells to enforce homeostasis. In Drosophila, tumorigenic cells mutant for the cell polarity gene scribble (scrib) are actively eliminated from epithelia when surrounded by wild-type cells. While scrib cell elimination depends critically on JNK signaling, JNK-dependent cell death cannot sufficiently explain scrib cell extirpation. Thus, how JNK executed cell elimination remained elusive. Here, we show that repulsive Slit-Robo2-Ena signaling exerts an extrusive force downstream of JNK to eliminate scrib cells from epithelia by disrupting E-cadherin. While loss of Slit-Robo2-Ena in scrib cells potentiates scrib tumor formation within the epithelium, Robo2-Ena hyperactivation surprisingly triggers luminal scrib tumor growth following excess extrusion. This extrusive signaling is amplified by a positive feedback loop between Slit-Robo2-Ena and JNK. Our observations provide a potential causal mechanism for Slit-Robo dysregulation in numerous human cancers.

  2. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  3. Notch signaling regulates gastric antral LGR5 stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Demitrack, Elise S; Gifford, Gail B; Keeley, Theresa M; Carulli, Alexis J; VanDussen, Kelli L; Thomas, Dafydd; Giordano, Thomas J; Liu, Zhenyi; Kopan, Raphael; Samuelson, Linda C

    2015-10-14

    The major signaling pathways regulating gastric stem cells are unknown. Here we report that Notch signaling is essential for homeostasis of LGR5(+) antral stem cells. Pathway inhibition reduced proliferation of gastric stem and progenitor cells, while activation increased proliferation. Notch dysregulation also altered differentiation, with inhibition inducing mucous and endocrine cell differentiation while activation reduced differentiation. Analysis of gastric organoids demonstrated that Notch signaling was intrinsic to the epithelium and regulated growth. Furthermore, in vivo Notch manipulation affected the efficiency of organoid initiation from glands and single Lgr5-GFP stem cells, suggesting regulation of stem cell function. Strikingly, constitutive Notch activation in LGR5(+) stem cells induced tissue expansion via antral gland fission. Lineage tracing using a multi-colored reporter demonstrated that Notch-activated stem cells rapidly generate monoclonal glands, suggesting a competitive advantage over unmanipulated stem cells. Notch activation was associated with increased mTOR signaling, and mTORC1 inhibition normalized NICD-induced increases in proliferation and gland fission. Chronic Notch activation induced undifferentiated, hyper-proliferative polyps, suggesting that aberrant activation of Notch in gastric stem cells may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis.

  4. Aberrant TGFβ/SMAD4 signaling contributes to epigenetic silencing of a putative tumor suppressor, RunX1T1 in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chen, Tze-Ho; Yang, Hui-Wen; Chou, Jian-Liang; Chen, Lin-Yu; Yeh, Chia-Ming; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Lin, Ru-Inn; Su, Her-Young; Chen, Gary C W; Deatherage, Daniel E; Huang, Yi-Wen; Yan, Pearlly S; Lin, Huey-Jen; Nephew, Kenneth P; Huang, Tim H-M; Lai, Hung-Cheng; Chan, Michael W Y

    2011-06-01

    Aberrant TGFβ signaling pathway may alter the expression of down-stream targets and promotes ovarian carcinogenesis. However, the mechanism of this impairment is not fully understood. Our previous study has identified RunX1T1 as a putative SMAD4 target in an immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cell line, IOSE. In this study, we report that transcription of RunX1T1 was confirmed to be positively regulated by SMAD4 in IOSE cells and epigenetically silenced in a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines by promoter hypermethylation and histone methylation at H3 lysine 9. SMAD4 depletion increased repressive histone modifications of RunX1T1 promoter without affecting promoter methylation in IOSE cells. Epigenetic treatment can restore RunX1T1 expression by reversing its epigenetic status in MCP3 ovarian cancer cells. When transiently treated with a demethylating agent, the expression of RunX1T1 was partially restored in MCP3 cells, but gradual re-silencing through promoter re-methylation was observed after the treatment. Interestingly, SMAD4 knockdown accelerated this re-silencing process, suggesting that normal TGF-beta signaling is essential for the maintenance of RunX1T1 expression. In vivo analysis confirmed that hypermethylation of RunX1T1 was detected in 35.7% (34/95) of ovarian tumors with high clinical stages (P=0.035) and in 83% (5/6) of primary ovarian cancer-initiating cells. Additionally, concurrent methylation of RunX1T1 and another SMAD4 target, FBXO32 which was previously found to be hypermethylated in ovarian cancer was observed in this same sample cohort (P< 0.05). Restoration of RunX1T1 inhibited cancer cell growth. Taken together, dysregulated TGFβ/SMAD4 signaling may lead to epigenetic silencing of a putative tumor suppressor, RunX1T1, during ovarian carcinogenesis.

  5. Constitutive activation of neuronal Src causes aberrant dendritic morphogenesis in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Takenori; Morone, Nobuhiro; Yuasa, Shigeki; Nada, Shigeyuki; Okada, Masato

    2007-02-01

    Src family tyrosine kinases are essential for neural development, but their in vivo functions remain elusive because of functional compensation among family members. To elucidate the roles of individual Src family members in vivo, we generated transgenic mice expressing the neuronal form of c-Src (n-Src), Fyn, and their constitutively active forms in cerebellar Purkinje cells using the L7 promoter. The expression of the constitutively active n-Src retarded the postnatal development of Purkinje cells and disrupted dendritic morphogenesis, whereas the wild-type n-Src had only moderate effects. Neither wild-type nor constitutively active Fyn over-expression significantly affected Purkinje-cell morphology. The aberrant Purkinje cells in n-Src transgenic mice retained multiple dendritic shafts extending in non-polarized directions and were located heterotopically in the molecular layer. Ultrastructural observation of the dendritic shafts revealed that the microtubules of n-Src transgenic mice were more densely and irregularly arranged, and had structural deformities. In primary culture, Purkinje cells from n-Src transgenic mice developed abnormally thick dendritic shafts and large growth-cone-like structures with poorly extended dendrites, which could be rescued by treatment with a selective inhibitor of Src family kinases, PP2. These results suggest that n-Src activity regulates the dendritic morphogenesis of Purkinje cells through affecting microtubule organization.

  6. Linking Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus via aberrant insulin signaling and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Mohammad A; Priyamvada, Shubha; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Jabir, Nasimudeen R; Tabrez, Shams; Greig, Nigel H

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are two progressive and devastating health disorders afflicting millions of people worldwide. The probability and incidence of both have increased considerably in recent years consequent to increased longevity and population growth. Progressively more links are being continuously found between inflammation and central nervous system disorders like AD, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, traumatic brain injury and even cancers of the nervous tissue. The depth of the relationship depends on the timing and extent of anti- or pro-inflammatory gene expression. Inflammation has also been implicated in T2DM. Misfolding and fibrillization (of tissue specific and/or non-specific proteins) are features common to both AD and T2DM and are induced by as well as contribute to inflammation and stress (oxidative/ glycation). This review appraises the roles of inflammation and abnormalities in the insulin signaling system as important shared features of T2DM and AD. The capacity of anti-cholinesterases in reducing the level of certain common inflammatory markers in particular if they may provide therapeutic potential to mitigate awry mechanisms leading to AD.

  7. Cytoskeleton in Mast Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Mast cell activation mediated by the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) is a key event in allergic response and inflammation. Other receptors on mast cells, as c-Kit for stem cell factor and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) synergistically enhance the FcεRI-mediated release of inflammatory mediators. Activation of various signaling pathways in mast cells results in changes in cell morphology, adhesion to substrate, exocytosis, and migration. Reorganization of cytoskeleton is pivotal in all these processes. Cytoskeletal proteins also play an important role in initial stages of FcεRI and other surface receptors induced triggering. Highly dynamic microtubules formed by αβ-tubulin dimers as well as microfilaments build up from polymerized actin are affected in activated cells by kinases/phosphatases, Rho GTPases and changes in concentration of cytosolic Ca2+. Also important are nucleation proteins; the γ-tubulin complexes in case of microtubules or Arp 2/3 complex with its nucleation promoting factors and formins in case of microfilaments. The dynamic nature of microtubules and microfilaments in activated cells depends on many associated/regulatory proteins. Changes in rigidity of activated mast cells reflect changes in intermediate filaments build up from vimentin. This review offers a critical appraisal of current knowledge on the role of cytoskeleton in mast cells signaling. PMID:22654883

  8. The aberrancy of immunophenotype and immunoglobulin status as indicators of prognosis in B cell diffuse large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Spier, C. M.; Grogan, T. M.; Lippman, S. M.; Slymen, D. J.; Rybski, J. A.; Miller, T. P.

    1988-01-01

    To assess the prognostic significance of the immunophenotype in diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL), 105 DLCL patients were studied between 1978 and 1987 using a panel of 40 monoclonal antibodies applied to frozen tissue. Eighty-three patients were found to have B cell phenotypes, and 20 patients had T cell phenotypes. Focusing on markers relevant to clinical outcome among B cell LCL showed that lack of expression of the pan B antigens Leu14 and Leu16 were correlated with decreased survival (Leu14, P = 0.01; Leu16, P = 0.06; log-rank). HLA-DR activity also showed that lack of expression of this antigen correlated with poor survival (P = 0.004, log-rank). Kappa light chain immunoglobulin lack of expression showed predictive value for decreased survival as well (P = 0.005, log-rank). Multivariate analyses of known clinically important variables and the immune phenotypes confirm that the loss of HLA-DR and B cell aberrancy are independent factors predicting a poor clinical outcome. Losing some B activation/kappa antigens appears to be a broad biologic phenomenon linking surface antigen lack of expression with decreased survival. This suggests that aberrancy of immunophenotype and immunoglobulin status are key predictors of survival in B-LCL. PMID:3140668

  9. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: Aberrant cellular division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, T.K.; Derby, M.; Martin, D.F.; Wright, S.D.; Dao, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells.

  10. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations.

  11. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism Promotes Prostate Cancer: Role in Cell Survival under Hypoxia and Extracellular Vesicles Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Gagan; Schlaepfer, Isabel R.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the leading malignancy among men in United States. Recent studies have focused on the identification of novel metabolic characteristics of PCa, aimed at devising better preventive and therapeutic approaches. PCa cells have revealed unique metabolic features such as higher expression of several enzymes associated with de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid up-take and β-oxidation. This aberrant lipid metabolism has been reported to be important for PCa growth, hormone-refractory progression and treatment resistance. Furthermore, PCa cells effectively use lipid metabolism under adverse environmental conditions for their survival advantage. Specifically, hypoxic cancer cells accumulate higher amount of lipids through a combination of metabolic alterations including high glutamine and fatty acid uptake, as well as decreased fatty acid oxidation. These stored lipids serve to protect cancer cells from oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and play important roles in fueling cancer cell proliferation following re-oxygenation. Lastly, cellular lipids have also been implicated in extracellular vesicle biogenesis, which play a vital role in intercellular communication. Overall, the new understanding of lipid metabolism in recent years has offered several novel targets to better target and manage clinical PCa. PMID:27384557

  12. Aberrant Transforming Growth Factor-β Activation Recruits Mesenchymal Stem Cells During Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Xie, Liang; Tintani, Francis; Xie, Hui; Li, Changjun; Cui, Zhuang; Wan, Mei; Zu, Xiongbing; Qi, Lin; Cao, Xu

    2017-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the overgrowth of prostate tissues with high prevalence in older men. BPH pathogenesis is not completely understood, but it is believed to be a result of de novo overgrowth of prostatic stroma. In this study, we show that aberrant activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mobilizes mesenchymal/stromal stem cells (MSCs) in circulating blood, which are recruited for the prostatic stromal hyperplasia. Elevated levels of active TGF-β were observed in both a phenylephrine-induced prostatic hyperplasia mouse model and human BPH tissues. Nestin lineage tracing revealed that 39.6% ± 6.3% of fibroblasts and 73.3% ± 4.2% smooth muscle cells were derived from nestin(+) cells in Nestin-Cre, Rosa26-YFP(flox/+) mice. Nestin(+) MSCs were increased in the prostatic hyperplasia mice. Our parabiosis experiment demonstrate that nestin(+) MSCs were mobilized and recruited to the prostatic stroma of wild-type mice and gave rise to the fibroblasts. Moreover, injection of a TGF-β neutralizing antibody (1D11) inhibits mobilization of MSCs, their recruitment to the prostatic stroma and hyperplasia. Importantly, knockout of TβRII in nestin(+) cell lineage ameliorated stromal hyperplasia. Thus, elevated levels of TGF-β-induced mobilization and recruitment of MSCs to the reactive stroma resulting in overgrowth of prostate tissues in BPH and, thus, inhibition of TGF-β activity could be a potential therapy for BPH. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:394-404.

  13. Disruption of Rest Leads to the Early Onset of Cataracts with the Aberrant Terminal Differentiation of Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Hitomi; Ogino, Hajime; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    REST (RE1-silencing transcription factor, also called Nrsf) is involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of neuronal stem/progenitor cells in vitro by preventing precocious expression of neuronal genes. REST expression was then decreased in developing neurons to down-regulate neuronal genes which allow their maturation. However, the function of REST during neurogenesis in vivo remains to be elucidated because of the early embryonic lethal phenotype of conventional Rest knockout mice. In order to investigate the role of REST in ocular tissues, we generated and examined the mice evoking genetic ablation to Rest specifically to neural tissues including ocular tissue. We used a Sox1-Cre allele to excise the floxed Rest gene in the early neural tissues including the lens and retinal primordia. The resulting Rest conditional knockout (CKO) and co cntrol mice were used in comparative morphological, histological, and gene expression analyses. Rest CKO mice had an abnormal lens morphology after birth. The proliferation of lens epithelial cells was likely to be slightly reduced, and vacuoles formed without a visible increase in apoptotic cells. Although the aberrant expression of late onset cataract marker proteins was not detected, the expression of Notch signaling-related genes including a previously identified REST-target gene was up-regulated around birth, and this was followed by the down-regulated expression of lens fiber regulators such as c-Maf and Prox1. Rest CKO induces a unique cataract phenotype just after birth. Augmented Notch signaling and the down-regulated expression of lens fiber regulator genes may be responsible for this phenotype. Our results highlight the significance of REST function in lens fiber formation, which is necessary for maintaining an intact lens structure. PMID:27631609

  14. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations at Fluences of Less Than One HZE Particle per Cell Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J.; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high energy and charge (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells where irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with O (77 keV/ (long-s)m), Si (99 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (175 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (195 keV/ (long-s)m) or Fe (240 keV/ (long-s)m) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Non-linear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and non-linear dose response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblast irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by non-linear models motivated by a non-targeted effect (NTE). Best fits for the dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a NTE model for O and a linear response model fit best for Si and Fe particles. Additional evidence for NTE were found in low dose experiments measuring gamma-H2AX foci, a marker of double strand breaks (DSB), and split-dose experiments with human fibroblasts. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  15. Induction of chromosomal aberrations at fluences of less than one HZE particle per cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2014-10-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high-LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high-energy charged (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells were irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with oxygen (77 keV/μm), silicon (99 keV/μm) or Fe (175 keV/μm), Fe (195 keV/μm) or Fe (240 keV/μm) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Nonlinear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and nonlinear dose-response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblasts irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by nonlinear models motivated by a nontargeted effect (NTE). The best fits for dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a linear response model for all particles. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low-particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high-LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  16. Aberrant cell cycle reentry in human and experimental inclusion body myositis and polymyositis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Bumsup; Kumar, Pravir; Lee, Han-Kyu; Zeng, Ling; Walsh, Kenneth; Fu, Qinghao; Barakat, Amey; Querfurth, Henry W.

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion body myositis (IBM), a degenerative and inflammatory disorder of skeletal muscle, and Alzheimer's disease share protein derangements and attrition of postmitotic cells. Overexpression of cyclins and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and evidence for DNA replication is reported in Alzheimer's disease brain, possibly contributing to neuronal death. It is unknown whether aberrant cell cycle reentry also occurs in IBM. We examined cell cycle markers in IBM compared with normal control, polymyositis (PM) and non-inflammatory dystrophy sample sets. Next, we tested for evidence of reentry and DNA synthesis in C2C12 myotubes induced to express β-amyloid (Aβ42). We observed increased levels of Ki-67, PCNA and cyclins E/D1 in IBM compared with normals and non-inflammatory conditions. Interestingly, PM samples displayed similar increases. Satellite cell markers did not correlate with Ki-67-affected myofiber nuclei. DNA synthesis and cell cycle markers were induced in Aβ-bearing myotubes. Cell cycle marker and cyclin protein expressions were also induced in an experimental allergic myositis-like model of PM in mice. Levels of p21 (Cip1/WAF1), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, were decreased in affected myotubes. However, overexpression of p21 did not rescue cells from Aβ-induced toxicity. This is the first report of cell cycle reentry in human myositis. The absence of rescue and evidence for reentry in separate models of myodegeneration and inflammation suggest that new DNA synthesis may be a reactive response to either or both stressors. PMID:24556217

  17. Differential sensitivity of a mouse myeloid leukemia cell line and normal mouse bone marrow cells to X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Aardema, M.J.; Au, W.W.; Hand, R.E. Jr.; Preston, R.J.

    1985-11-01

    Cell line ML-1 was established from a myelogenous leukemia of an RFM mouse. The ML-1 cells and in vitro normal mouse bone marrow cells were analyzed to determine if there was a differential sensitivity to X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in G1 cells and/or differences in postirradiation cell cycle progression. Cells identified as being in G1 at the time of irradiation by their staining pattern after replication in 5-bromodeoxyuridine were analyzed for all types of chromosomal aberrations following X-ray doses of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 Gy. ML-1 cells showed a greater sensitivity to the induction of both chromosome-type aberrations and chromatid-type aberrations compared to normal mouse bone marrow cells, which only contained chromosome-type aberrations. The presence of chromatid-type aberrations in the ML-1 cells and not normal bone marrow cells suggested a differential progression through the cell cycle for the two cell types after irradiation. Mitotic index and flow cytometric analyses were performed and showed that both cell types have a delay in progression from G2 into mitosis, but only the normal mouse bone marrow cells have a delay in progression from G1 into S, as well as delayed progression through the S phase following X-irradiation. These results indicate that the ML-1 leukemia cells have an increased radiosensitivity. These same characteristics have been observed in ataxia telangiectasia cells and may well represent a general feature of cells with increased radiosensitivity.

  18. Guttiferone K suppresses cell motility and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma by restoring aberrantly reduced profilin 1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Hua; Xie, Chanlu; Lee, C.Soon; Fahey, Paul; Dong, Qihan; Xu, Hongxi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy and the 5-year survival rate of advanced HCC is < 10%. Guttiferone K (GUTK) isolated from the Garcinia genus inhibited HCC cells migration and invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo without apparent toxicity. Proteomic analysis revealed that actin-binding protein profilin 1 (PFN1) was markedly increased in the presence of GUTK. Over-expression of PFN1 mimicked the effect of GUTK on HCC cell motility and metastasis. The effect of GUTK on cell motility was diminished when PFN1 was over-expressed or silenced. Over-expression of PFN1 or incubation with GUTK decreased F-actin levels and the expression of proteins involved in actin nucleation, branching and polymerization. Moreover, a reduction of PFN1 protein levels was common in advanced human HCC and associated with poor survival rate. In conclusion, GUTK effectively suppresses the motility and metastasis of HCC cells mainly by restoration of aberrantly reduced PFN1 protein expression. PMID:27494863

  19. Aberrant T cell immunity triggered by human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and human Metapneumovirus infection.

    PubMed

    González, Andrea E; Lay, Margarita K; Jara, Evelyn L; Espinoza, Janyra A; Gómez, Roberto S; Soto, Jorge; Rivera, Claudia A; Abarca, Katia; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-12-02

    Human Respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are the two major etiological viral agents of lower respiratory tract diseases, affecting mainly infants, young children and the elderly. Although the infection of both viruses trigger an antiviral immune response that mediate viral clearance and disease resolution in immunocompetent individuals, the promotion of long-term immunity appears to be deficient and reinfection are common throughout life. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that hRSV and hMPV, can induce aberrant T cell responses, which leads to exacerbated lung inflammation and poor T and B cell memory immunity. The modulation of immune response exerted by both viruses include different strategies such as, impairment of immunological synapse mediated by viral proteins or soluble factors, and the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines by epithelial cells, among others. All these viral strategies contribute to the alteration of the adaptive immunity in order to increase the susceptibility to reinfections. In this review, we discuss current research related to the mechanisms underlying the impairment of T and B cell immune responses induced by hRSV and hMPV infection. In addition, we described the role each virulence factor involved in immune modulation caused by these viruses.

  20. Estimating the number of hematopoietic or lymphoid stem cells giving rise to clonal chromosome aberrations in blood T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M; Kodama, Y; Ohtaki, K; Itoh, M; Awa, A A; Cologne, J; Kusunoki, Y; Nakamura, N

    2004-03-01

    Quantifying the proliferative capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells in humans is important for bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. Obtaining appropriate data is difficult, however, because the experimental tools are limited. We hypothesized that tracking clonal descendants originating from hematopoietic stem cells would be possible if we used clonal chromosome aberrations as unique tags of individual hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. Using FISH, we screened 500 blood T lymphocytes from each of 513 atomic bomb survivors and detected 96 clones composed of at least three cells with identical aberrations. The number of clones was inversely related to their population size, which we interpreted to mean that the progenitor cells were heterogeneous in the number of progeny that they could produce. The absolute number of progenitor cells contributing to the formation of the observed clones was estimated as about two in an unexposed individual. Further, scrutiny of ten clones revealed that lymphocyte clones could originate roughly equally from hematopoietic stem cells or from mature T lymphocytes, thereby suggesting that the estimated two progenitor cells are shared as one hematopoietic stem cell and one mature T cell. Our model predicts that one out of ten people bears a non- aberrant clone comprising >10% of the total lymphocytes, which indicates that clonal expansions are common and probably are not health-threatening.

  1. COPD and squamous cell lung cancer: aberrant inflammation and immunity is the common link.

    PubMed

    Bozinovski, Steven; Vlahos, Ross; Anthony, Desiree; McQualter, Jonathan; Anderson, Gary; Irving, Louis; Steinfort, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Cigarette smoking has reached epidemic proportions within many regions of the world and remains the highest risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. Squamous cell lung cancer is commonly detected in heavy smokers, where the risk of developing lung cancer is not solely defined by tobacco consumption. Although therapies that target common driver mutations in adenocarcinomas are showing some promise, they are proving ineffective in smoking-related squamous cell lung cancer. Since COPD is characterized by an excessive inflammatory and oxidative stress response, this review details how aberrant innate, adaptive and systemic inflammatory processes can contribute to lung cancer susceptibility in COPD. Activated leukocytes release increasing levels of proteases and free radicals as COPD progresses and tertiary lymphoid aggregates accumulate with increasing severity. Reactive oxygen species promote formation of reactive carbonyls that are not only tumourigenic through initiating DNA damage, but can directly alter the function of regulatory proteins involved in host immunity and tumour suppressor functions. Systemic inflammation is also markedly increased during infective exacerbations in COPD and the interplay between tumour-promoting serum amyloid A (SAA) and IL-17A is discussed. SAA is also an endogenous allosteric modifier of FPR2 expressed on immune and epithelial cells, and the therapeutic potential of targeting this receptor is proposed as a novel strategy for COPD-lung cancer overlap.

  2. Protein expression profile of celiac disease patient with aberrant T cell by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    De Re, Valli; Simula, Maria Paola; Caggiari, Laura; Ortz, Nicoletta; Spina, Michele; Da Ponte, Alessandro; De Appolonia, Leandro; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Cannizzaro, Renato

    2007-08-01

    One complication of celiac disease (CD) is refractory CD. These patients frequently show aberrant intraepithelial T cell clones and an increasing risk of evolution into enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL). There is debate in the literature whether these cases are actually a smoldering lymphoma from the outset. The mechanism inducing T cell proliferation and prognosis remains unknown. Recently, alemtuzumab has been proposed as a promising new approach to treat these patients. Only few single cases have been tested presently, nevertheless, in all of them a clinical improvement has been observed, while intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) effectively targeted by alemtuzumab are still a debated issue. Using 2D-DIGE, we found hyperexpressed proteins specifically associated with aberrant T cell in a patient with CD by comparing the protein expression with that of patients with CD and polyclonal T cell or with that of control subjects (patients with polyclonal T cell and no CD). Proteins with a higher expression in duodenal biopsy of the patient with aberrant T cell were identified as IgM, apolipoprotein C-III, and Charcot-Leyden crystal proteins. These preliminary data allow hypothesizing different clinical effects of alemtuzumab in patients with CD, since besides the probable effect of alemtuzumab on T cell, it could effect inflammatory-associated CD52(+) IgM(+)B cell and eosinophils cells, known to produce IgM and Charcot-Leyden crystal proteins, which we demonstrated to be altered in this patient. Results also emphasize the possible association of apolipoprotein with aberrant T cell proliferation.

  3. Mechanisms underlying aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 mucin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Brockhausen, I; Yang, J M; Burchell, J; Whitehouse, C; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J

    1995-10-15

    The product of the MUC1 gene, the polymorphic epithelial mucin (PEM) is aberrantly glycosylated in breast and other carcinomas, resulting in exposure of normally cryptic peptide epitopes. PEM expressed by breast cancer cells contains more sialylated O-glycans and has a lower GlcNAc content than that expressed by normal cells. The exposure of peptide epitopes is thus thought to be due to the sugar side chains being shorter on the tumour-associated mucin. To investigate possible mechanisms underlying the different pattern of glycosylation in breast cancer cells, we analysed the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of O-glycan chains of mucins in normal and cancerous mammary epithelial cells. An immortalized mammary epithelial cells line originating from normal human milk. MTSV1-7, and three human breast cancer cell lines, BT20, MCF-7 and T47D, were studied. Glycosyltransferase activities assembling, elongating and terminating O-glycan core-1 [Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha-R] and core-2 [GlcNac beta 1-6 (Gal beta 1-3) GalNAc alpha-R] were present in the normal mammary cell line. Many of the glycosyltransferase activities were also expressed at variable levels in breast cancer cells. However, a sialyltransferase activity (CMP-sialic acid Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha 3-sialyltransferase) was increased several fold in all three cancer cell lines. Moreover, mammary cancer cell lines BT20 and T47D have lost the ability to synthesize core-2, as shown by the lack of UDP-GlcNAc: Gal beta 1-3GalNAc (GlcNAc to GalNAc) beta 6-GlcNAc-transferase activity, which corresponded to the absence of the mRNA transcript. However, MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressed this enzyme. Thus, the mechanism for the exposure of peptide epitopes in BT20 and T47D cells is proposed to be the loss of core-2 branching leading to shorter, sialylated O-glycan chains. A different mechanism is proposed for MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  4. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to High and Low LET Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Wilkins, R.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2006-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, high energy neutron at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) or Cs-137-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center. After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The results of the mBAND study showed a higher ratio of inversion involved with interchromosomal exchange in heavy ions compared to -ray irradiation. Analysis of chromosome aberrations using mBAND has the potential to provide useful information on human cell response to space-like radiation.

  5. New Modeling Approaches to Investigate Cell Signaling in Radiation Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem L.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation damages individual cells and tissues leading to harmful biological effects. Among many radiation-induced lesions, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are considered the key precursors of most early and late effects [1] leading to direct mutation or aberrant signal transduction processes. In response to damage, a flow of information is communicated to cells not directly hit by the radiation through signal transduction pathways [2]. Non-targeted effects (NTE), which includes bystander effects and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells and tissues, may be particularly important for space radiation risk assessment [1], because astronauts are exposed to a low fluence of heavy ions and only a small fraction of cells are traversed by an ion. NTE may also have important consequences clinical radiotherapy [3]. In the recent years, new simulation tools and modeling approaches have become available to study the tissue response to radiation. The simulation of signal transduction pathways require many elements such as detailed track structure calculations, a tissue or cell culture model, knowledge of biochemical pathways and Brownian Dynamics (BD) propagators of the signaling molecules in their micro-environment. Recently, the Monte-Carlo simulation code of radiation track structure RITRACKS was used for micro and nano-dosimetry calculations [4]. RITRACKS will be used to calculate the fraction of cells traversed by an ion and delta-rays and the energy deposited in cells in a tissue model. RITRACKS also simulates the formation of chemical species by the radiolysis of water [5], notably the .OH radical. This molecule is implicated in DNA damage and in the activation of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF), a signaling molecule involved in NTE. BD algorithms for a particle near a membrane comprising receptors were also developed and will be used to simulate trajectories of signaling molecules in the micro-environment and characterize autocrine

  6. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  7. Hedgehog signaling pathway is inactive in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chatel, Guillaume; Ganeff, Corine; Boussif, Naima; Delacroix, Laurence; Briquet, Alexandra; Nolens, Gregory; Winkler, Rosita

    2007-12-15

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in human development. Abnormal activation of this pathway has been observed in several types of human cancers, such as the upper gastro-intestinal tract cancers. However, activation of the Hh pathway in colorectal cancers is controversial. We analyzed the expression of the main key members of the Hh pathway in 7 colon cancer cell lines in order to discover whether the pathway is constitutively active in these cells. We estimated the expression of SHH, IHH, PTCH, SMO, GLI1, GLI2, GLI3, SUFU and HHIP genes by RT-PCR. Moreover, Hh ligand, Gli3 and Sufu protein levels were quantified by western blotting. None of the cell lines expressed the complete set of Hh pathway members. The ligands were absent from Colo320 and HCT116 cells, Smo from Colo205, HT29 and WiDr. GLI1 gene was not expressed in SW480 cells nor were GLI2/GLI3 in Colo205 or Caco-2 cells. Furthermore the repressive form of Gli3, characteristic of an inactive pathway, was detected in SW480 and Colo320 cells. Finally treatment of colon cancer cells with cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor of the Hh pathway, did not downregulate PTCH and GLI1 genes expression in the colorectal cells, whereas it did so in PANC1 control cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the aberrant activation of the Hh signaling pathway is not common in colorectal cancer cell lines.

  8. Cytogenetic profiles in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a study in highly purified aberrant plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Rasillo, Ana; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Sayagués, José Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Bárcena, Paloma; Sanchez, María Luz; Gutiérrez, Norma C; San Miguel, Jesus F; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Cytogenetic studies in clonal plasma cell disorders have mainly been done in whole bone marrow or CD138(+) microbead-enriched plasma cells and suggest that recurrent immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations - e.g. t(4;14) -are primary oncogenetic events. The aim of this study was to determine cytogenetic patterns of highly purified aberrant plasma cells (median purity ≥ 98%) in different clonal plasma cell disorders. We analyzed aberrant plasma cells from 208 patients with multiple myeloma (n=148) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=60) for the presence of del(13q14), del(17p13) and t(14q32) using multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene arrangements were analyzed and complementarity determining region 3 was sequenced in a subset of patients and combined multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunofluorescent protein staining analyses were performed in selected cases to confirm clonality and cytogenetic findings. At diagnosis, 96% of cases with multiple myeloma versus 77% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases showed at least one cytogenetic alteration and/or hyperdiploidy. The cytogenetic heterogeneity of individual cases reflected coexistence of cytogenetically-defined aberrant plasma cell clones, and led to the assumption that karyotypic alterations were acquired stepwise. Cases of multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance frequently showed different but related cytogenetic profiles when other cytogenetic alterations such as deletions/gains of the immunoglobulin heavy chain or the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 were additionally considered. Interestingly, in 24% of multiple myeloma versus 62% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients with an immunoglobulin heavy chain translocation, aberrant plasma cells with and without t(14q32) coexisted in the same patient. Our data suggest that

  9. Cytogenetic profiles in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a study in highly purified aberrant plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Rasillo, Ana; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Sayagués, José Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Bárcena, Paloma; Sanchez, María Luz; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in clonal plasma cell disorders have mainly been done in whole bone marrow or CD138+ microbead-enriched plasma cells and suggest that recurrent immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations - e.g. t(4;14) -are primary oncogenetic events. The aim of this study was to determine cytogenetic patterns of highly purified aberrant plasma cells (median purity ≥98%) in different clonal plasma cell disorders. We analyzed aberrant plasma cells from 208 patients with multiple myeloma (n=148) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=60) for the presence of del(13q14), del(17p13) and t(14q32) using multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene arrangements were analyzed and complementarity determining region 3 was sequenced in a subset of patients and combined multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunofluorescent protein staining analyses were performed in selected cases to confirm clonality and cytogenetic findings. At diagnosis, 96% of cases with multiple myeloma versus 77% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases showed at least one cytogenetic alteration and/or hyperdiploidy. The cytogenetic heterogeneity of individual cases reflected coexistence of cytogenetically-defined aberrant plasma cell clones, and led to the assumption that karyotypic alterations were acquired stepwise. Cases of multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance frequently showed different but related cytogenetic profiles when other cytogenetic alterations such as deletions/gains of the immunoglobulin heavy chain or the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 were additionally considered. Interestingly, in 24% of multiple myeloma versus 62% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients with an immunoglobulin heavy chain translocation, aberrant plasma cells with and without t(14q32) coexisted in the same patient. Our data suggest that

  10. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Mark; Hankla, Allen

    1996-01-01

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

  11. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, M.; Hankla, A.

    1996-07-09

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90{degree} such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system. 5 figs.

  12. Aberrant phenotype in human endothelial cells of diabetic origin: implications for saphenous vein graft failure?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Anna C; Gohil, Jai; Hudson, Laura; Connolly, Kyle; Warburton, Philip; Suman, Rakesh; O'Toole, Peter; O'Regan, David J; Turner, Neil A; Riches, Kirsten; Porter, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) confers increased risk of endothelial dysfunction, coronary heart disease, and vulnerability to vein graft failure after bypass grafting, despite glycaemic control. This study explored the concept that endothelial cells (EC) cultured from T2DM and nondiabetic (ND) patients are phenotypically and functionally distinct. Cultured human saphenous vein- (SV-) EC were compared between T2DM and ND patients in parallel. Proliferation, migration, and in vitro angiogenesis assays were performed; western blotting was used to quantify phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, and eNOS. The ability of diabetic stimuli (hyperglycaemia, TNF-α, and palmitate) to modulate angiogenic potential of ND-EC was also explored. T2DM-EC displayed reduced migration (~30%) and angiogenesis (~40%) compared with ND-EC and a modest, nonsignificant trend to reduced proliferation. Significant inhibition of Akt and eNOS, but not ERK phosphorylation, was observed in T2DM cells. Hyperglycaemia did not modify ND-EC function, but TNF-α and palmitate significantly reduced angiogenic capacity (by 27% and 43%, resp.), effects mimicked by Akt inhibition. Aberrancies of EC function may help to explain the increased risk of SV graft failure in T2DM patients. This study highlights the importance of other potentially contributing factors in addition to hyperglycaemia that may inflict injury and long-term dysfunction to the homeostatic capacity of the endothelium.

  13. Growth rate of late passage sarcoma cells is independent of epigenetic events but dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Becerikli, Mustafa; Jacobsen, Frank; Rittig, Andrea; Köhne, Wiebke; Nambiar, Sandeep; Mirmohammadsadegh, Alireza; Stricker, Ingo; Tannapfel, Andrea; Wieczorek, Stefan; Epplen, Joerg Thomas; Tilkorn, Daniel; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2013-07-15

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are characterized by co-participation of several epigenetic and genetic events during tumorigenesis. Having bypassed cellular senescence barriers during oncogenic transformation, the factors further affecting growth rate of STS cells remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of gene silencing (DNA promoter methylation of LINE-1, PTEN), genetic aberrations (karyotype, KRAS and BRAF mutations) as well as their contribution to the proliferation rate and migratory potential that underlies “initial” and “final” passage sarcoma cells. Three different cell lines were used, SW982 (synovial sarcoma), U2197 (malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) and HT1080 (fibrosarcoma). Increased proliferative potential of final passage STS cells was not associated with significant differences in methylation (LINE-1, PTEN) and mutation status (KRAS, BRAF), but it was dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that these fairly differentiated/advanced cancer cell lines have still the potential to gain an additional spontaneous growth benefit without external influences and that maintenance of increased proliferative potential towards longevity of STS cells (having crossed senescence barriers) may be independent of overt epigenetic alterations. -- Highlights: Increased proliferative potential of late passage STS cells was: • Not associated with epigenetic changes (methylation changes at LINE-1, PTEN). • Not associated with mutation status of KRAS, BRAF. • Dependent on presence/absence of chromosomal aberrations.

  14. High- and low-LET Radiation-induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured in 3-dimensional Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2008-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts who participate in extended ISS missions and will be an even greater concern for future manned lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D in vitro cellular environment can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultured at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected in the first cell cycle after irradiation using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference in the

  15. Polyethylene glycol, unique among laxatives, suppresses aberrant crypt foci, by elimination of cells

    PubMed Central

    Taché, Sylviane; Parnaud, Géraldine; Van Beek, Erik; Corpet, Denis E.

    2006-01-01

    Background Polyethylene glycol (PEG), an osmotic laxative, is a very potent inhibitor of colon cancer in rats. In a search for mechanisms, we tested the hypothesis that fecal bulking and moisture decreases colon carcinogenesis. We also looked for PEG effects on crypt cells in vivo. Methods Fischer 344 rats (N=272) were given an injection of the colon carcinogen azoxymethane. They were then randomized to a standard AIN76 diet containing one of 19 laxative agents (5% w/w in most cases): PEG 8000 and other PEG-like compounds, carboxymethylcellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone, sodium polyacrylate, calcium polycarbophil, karaya gum, psyllium, mannitol, sorbitol, lactulose, propylene glycol, magnesium hydroxide, sodium phosphate, bisacodyl, docusate, and paraffin oil. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and fecal values were measured blindly after a 30-day treatment. Proliferation, apoptosis, and the removal of cells from crypts were studied in control and PEG-fed rats by various methods, including TUNEL and fluorescein dextran labeling. Results PEG 8000 reduced nine-fold the number of ACF in rats (p<0.001). The other PEGs and magnesium-hydroxide modestly suppressed ACF, but not the other laxatives. ACF number did not correlate with fecal weight or moisture. PEG doubled the apoptotic bodies per crypt (p<0.05), increased proliferation by 25–50% (p<0.05) and strikingly increased (>40-fold) a fecal marker of epitheliolysis in the gut (p<0.001). PEG normalized the percentage of fluorescein dextran labeled cells on the top of ACF (p<0.001). Conclusions Among laxatives, only PEG afforded potent chemoprevention. PEG protection was not due to increased fecal bulking, but likely to the elimination of cells from precancerous lesions. PMID:16716974

  16. M-Band Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Induced By Low- and High-Let Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Gersey, B.; Saganti, P. B.; Wilkins, R.; Gonda, S. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Energetic primary and secondary particles pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in the induction of various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer. Most of these biological endpoints are closely correlated to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insult. In this study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma rays, 1 GeV/nucleon Fe ions and secondary neutrons whose spectrum is similar to that measured inside the Space Station. Chromosomes were condensed using a premature chromosome condensation technique and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with the multi-color banding (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of both interchromosomal (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Results of the study confirmed the observation of higher incidence of inversions for high-LET irradiation. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed in the low-LET irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosome aberrations, but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosome aberrations. In contrast, Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both the inter- and intrachromosome exchanges.

  17. Gender differences in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations in rodent germ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, Ilse-Dore; Carere, Angelo; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2007-05-15

    Germ cell mutagenicity testing provides experimental data to quantify genetic risk for exposed human populations. The majority of tests are performed with exposure of males, and female data are relatively rare. The reason for this paucity lies in the differences between male and female germ cell biology. Male germ cells are produced throughout reproductive life and all developmental stages can be ascertained by appropriate breeding schemes. In contrast, the female germ cell pool is limited, meiosis begins during embryogenesis and oocytes are arrested over long periods of time until maturation processes start for small numbers of oocytes during the oestrus cycle in mature females. The literature data are reviewed to point out possible gender differences of germ cells to exogenous agents such as chemicals or ionizing radiation. From the limited information, it can be concluded that male germ cells are more sensitive than female germ cells to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations. However, exceptions are described which shed doubt on the extrapolation of experimental data from male rodents to the genetic risk of the human population. Furthermore, the female genome may be more sensitive to mutation induction during peri-conceptional stages compared to the male genome of the zygote. With few exceptions, germ cell experiments have been carried out under high acute exposure to optimize the effects and to compensate for the limited sample size in animal experiments. Human exposure to environmental agents, on the other hand, is usually chronic and involves low doses. Under these conditions, gender differences may become apparent that have not been studied so far. Additionally, data are reviewed that suggest a false impression of safety when responses are negative under high acute exposure of male rodents while a mutational response is induced by low chronic exposure. The classical (morphological) germ cell mutation tests are not performed anymore

  18. Aberrant epithelial morphology and persistent epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in a mouse model of renal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Zachary S.; McClatchey, Andrea I.

    2009-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has frequently been implicated in hyperproliferative diseases of renal tubule epithelia. We have shown that the NF2 tumor suppressor Merlin inhibits EGFR internalization and signaling in a cell contact–dependent manner. Interestingly, despite the paucity of recurring mutations in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC), homozygous mutation of the NF2 gene is found in ≈2% of RCC patient samples in the Sanger COSMIC database. To examine the roles of Merlin and EGFR in kidney tumorigenesis, we generated mice with a targeted deletion of Nf2 in the proximal convoluted epithelium using a Villin-Cre transgene. All of these mice developed intratubular neoplasia by 3 months, which progressed to invasive carcinoma by 6–10 months. Kidneys from these mice demonstrated marked hyperproliferation and a concomitant increase in label-retaining putative progenitor cells. Early lumen-filling lesions in this model exhibited hyperactivation of EGFR signaling, altered solubility of adherens junctions components, and loss of epithelial polarity. Renal cortical epithelial cells derived from either early or late lesions were dependent on EGF for in vitro proliferation and were arrested by pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR or re-expression of Nf2. These cells formed malignant tumors upon s.c. injection into immunocompromised mice before in vitro passage. Treatment of Vil-Cre;Nf2lox/lox mice with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib halted the proliferation of tumor cells. These studies give added credence to the role of EGFR signaling and perhaps Nf2 deficiency in RCC and describe a rare and valuable mouse model for exploring the molecular basis of this disease. PMID:19487675

  19. New insights into pre-BCR and BCR signalling with relevance to B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Robert C

    2013-08-01

    The B cell receptor (BCR) and its precursor (pre-BCR) control B cell homeostasis, differentiation and function. Moreover, aberrant pre-BCR and BCR signalling have a central role in B cell neoplasia; for example, enhanced positive signalling or disrupted negative signalling downstream of the pre-BCR promotes B cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia. The emerging distinctions between tonic and chronic active BCR signalling have contributed to the identification of oncogenic targets downstream of BCR signalling in mature B cell neoplasms. Indeed, the encouraging results of several ongoing clinical trials that target the activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ-isoform (PI3Kδ), Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) or spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) downstream of the BCR highlight the therapeutic potential of inhibiting BCR signalling.

  20. Aberrant α-Adrenergic Hypertrophic Response in Cardiomyocytes from Human Induced Pluripotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Földes, Gabor; Matsa, Elena; Kriston-Vizi, János; Leja, Thomas; Amisten, Stefan; Kolker, Ljudmila; Kodagoda, Thusharika; Dolatshad, Nazanin F.; Mioulane, Maxime; Vauchez, Karine; Arányi, Tamás; Ketteler, Robin; Schneider, Michael D.; Denning, Chris; Harding, Sian E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CMs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-CMs) represent new models for drug discovery. Although hypertrophy is a high-priority target, we found that hiPSC-CMs were systematically unresponsive to hypertrophic signals such as the α-adrenoceptor (αAR) agonist phenylephrine (PE) compared to hESC-CMs. We investigated signaling at multiple levels to understand the underlying mechanism of this differential responsiveness. The expression of the normal α1AR gene, ADRA1A, was reversibly silenced during differentiation, accompanied by ADRA1B upregulation in either cell type. ADRA1B signaling was intact in hESC-CMs, but not in hiPSC-CMs. We observed an increased tonic activity of inhibitory kinase pathways in hiPSC-CMs, and inhibition of antihypertrophic kinases revealed hypertrophic increases. There is tonic suppression of cell growth in hiPSC-CMs, but not hESC-CMs, limiting their use in investigation of hypertrophic signaling. These data raise questions regarding the hiPSC-CM as a valid model for certain aspects of cardiac disease. PMID:25418732

  1. Diesel exhaust particles induce aberrant alveolar epithelial directed cell movement by disruption of polarity mechanisms.

    PubMed

    LaGier, Adriana J; Manzo, Nicholas D; Dye, Janice A

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following injury requires efficient and directed alveolar epithelial cell migration, this study's goal was to understand the mechanisms underlying alveolar epithelial cells response to DEP, particularly when exposure is accompanied with comorbid lung injury. Separate mechanistic steps of directed migration were investigated in confluent murine LA-4 cells exposed to noncytotoxic concentrations (0-100 μg/cm(2)) of either automobile-emitted diesel exhaust particles (DEP(A)) or carbon black (CB) particles. A scratch wound model ascertained how DEP(A) exposure affected directional cell migration and BCECF ratio fluorimetry-monitored intracellular pH (pHi). Cells were immunostained with giantin to assess cell polarity, and with paxillin to assess focal cell adhesions. Cells were immunoblotted for ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) to assess cytoskeletal anchoring. Data demonstrate herein that exposure of LA-4 cells to DEP(A) (but not CB) resulted in delayed directional cell migration, impaired de-adhesion of the trailing edge cell processes, disrupted regulation of pHi, and altered Golgi polarity of leading edge cells, along with modified focal adhesions and reduced ERM levels, indicative of decreased cytoskeletal anchoring. The ability of DEP(A) to disrupt directed cell migration at multiple levels suggests that signaling pathways such as ERM/Rho are critical for transduction of ion transport signals into cytoskeletal arrangement responses. These results provide insights into the mechanisms by which chronic exposure to traffic-based emissions may result in decrements in lung capacity.

  2. The aberrant expression and localization of DNA methyltransferase 3B in endometriotic stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Matthew T.; Kakinuma, Toshiyuki; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Monsivais, Diana; Navarro, Antonia; Malpani, Saurabh S.; Ono, Masanori; Bulun, Serdar E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To define the expression and function of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) in response to decidualizing stimuli in endometriotic cells compared with healthy endometrial stroma. Design Basic science. Setting University research center. Patients Premenopausal women with or without endometriosis. Interventions Primary cultures of stromal cells from healthy endometrium (E-IUM) or endometriomas (E-OSIS) were subjected to in vitro decidualization (IVD) using 1 µM medroxyprogesterone acetate, 35 nM 17β-estradiol, and 0.05 mM 8-Br-cAMP. Main Outcome Measure(s) DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B expression in E-IUM and E-OSIS were assessed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. DNMT3B recruitment to the promoters of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) and estrogen receptor α (ESR1) was examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation Results IVD treatment reduced DNMT3B mRNA (74%) and protein levels (81%) only in E-IUM. DNMT1 and DNMT3A were unchanged in both cell types. Significantly more DNMT3B bound to the SF-1 promoter in E-IUM compared with E-OSIS, and IVD treatment reduced binding in E-IUM to levels similar to those in E-OSIS. DNMT3B enrichment across three ESR1 promoters was reduced in E-IUM after IVD, although the more distal promoter showed increased DNMT3B enrichment in E-OSIS after IVD. Conclusions The inability to downregulate DNMT3B expression in E-OSIS may contribute to an aberrant epigenetic fingerprint that misdirects gene expression in endometriosis and contributes to its altered response to steroid hormones. PMID:26239024

  3. Spindle checkpoint protein Bub1 corrects mitotic aberrancy induced by human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, M; Sugimoto, K; Tamayose, K; Ando, M; Tanaka, Y; Oshimi, K

    2006-06-22

    Bub1 is a component of the mitotic spindle checkpoint apparatus. Abnormality of this apparatus is known to cause multinuclei formation, a hallmark of chromosomal instability (CIN). A549, aneuploid cell line, aberrantly passed through the mitotic phase and became multinuclei morphology in the presence of nocodazole. Time-lapse videomicroscopy showed unreported bizarre morphology, which we named 'mitotic lobulation' in A549 cells just before the exit from mitosis and multinuclei formation. External expression of wild-type Bub1-EGFP clearly suppressed the multinuclei formation by retaining A549 cells at the mitotic phase during 48 h of time-lapse observation. This suppressive effect on mitotic aberrancy should not be mere restoration of normal Bub1 function, because A549 cells express proper amount of Bub1, which distributed cytoplasm during interphase and concentrated at kinetochore in metaphase. Furthermore, external expression of wild-type Bub1-EGFP suppressed multinuclei formation induced by Tax both in A549 and HeLa cells. Tax is known to induce mitotic abnormality by binding and inactivating Mad1. These observations, therefore, suggest functional redundancy between Bub1 and other mitotic checkpoint protein(s) and a possibility of correction of mitotic aberrancy by external Bub1 expression.

  4. Induction of chromosomal aberrations by the fuel additive methylcyclopentadienyl-manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Blakey, D.H.; Bayley, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    Methylcyclopentadienyl-manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) is a fuel additive used throughout Canada as replacement for lead-based antiknock compounds in gasoline and as an anti-smoking compound in other fuels. Because of the widespread use of MMT in Canadian gasoline, it is important to determine whether MMT is a safe alternative to alkyllead as a fuel additive. Although environmental exposure to MMT is unlikely because it is almost completely consumed during combustion and any MMT exhaust emissions would be degraded rapidly, human contact can occur occupationally through accidental exposure, or incidentally while refuelling gasoline-powered engines. In order to determine the intrinsic mutagenicity of MMT, an in vitro chromosomal aberration assay was performed using Chinese hamster ovary cells. In the presence of metabolic activation, MMT was a potent inducer of structural chromosomal aberrations. There was significant (p{le}0.0114), reproducible increase in chromosomal aberrations at concentrations as low as 0.02 {mu}l/ml (0.12 mM). Without metabolic activation, MMT failed to induce a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations following either a 3 hr (p = 0.412) or continuous (p = 0.178) exposure. In order to determine whether the intrinsic mutagenicity identified in vitro is expressed in vivo, a mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay will be performed. In addition, the mutagenicity of MMT combustion byproducts will be evaluated.

  5. Regulation of interferon gamma signaling by suppressors of cytokine signaling and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Joseph; Ahmed, Chulbul M; Wilson, Tenisha D; Johnson, Howard M

    2013-12-18

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS1(-/-)) mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFNγ signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFNγ signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFNγ signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function.

  6. Regulation of Interferon Gamma Signaling by Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Joseph; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Wilson, Tenisha D.; Johnson, Howard M.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS1−/−) mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFNγ signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFNγ signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFNγ signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function. PMID:24391643

  7. Planar Cell Polarity Signaling in the Drosophila Eye

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling regulates the establishment of polarity within the plane of an epithelium and allows cells to obtain directional information. Its results are as diverse as the determination of cell fates, the generation of asymmetric but highly aligned structures (e.g., stereocilia in the human ear or hairs on a fly wing), or the directional migration of cells during convergent extension during vertebrate gastrulation. Aberrant PCP establishment can lead to human birth defects or kidney disease. PCP signaling is governed by the noncanonical Wnt or Fz/PCP pathway. Traditionally, PCP establishment has been best studied in Drosophila, mainly due to the versatility of the fly as a genetic model system. In Drosophila, PCP is essential for the orientation of wing and abdominal hairs, the orientation of the division axis of sensory organ precursors, and the polarization of ommatidia in the eye, the latter requiring a highly coordinated movement of groups of photoreceptor cells during the process of ommatidial rotation. Here, I review our current understanding of PCP signaling in the Drosophila eye and allude to parallels in vertebrates. PMID:20959167

  8. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to Space-like Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells and lymphocytes were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) or Cs-137 gamma radiation source at the Baylor College (Houston, TX). After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The possible relationship between the frequency of inter- and intra-chromosomal exchanges and the track structure of radiation is discussed. The work was supported by the NASA Space Radiation Health Program.

  9. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  10. Aberrant synaptic input to retinal ganglion cells varies with morphology in a mouse model of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Christopher W; Toychiev, Abduqodir H; Ivanova, Elena; Sagdullaev, Botir T

    2014-01-01

    Retinal degeneration describes a group of disorders which lead to progressive photoreceptor cell death, resulting in blindness. As this occurs, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) begin to develop oscillatory physiological activity. Here, we studied the morphological and physiological properties of RGCs in rd1 mice, aged 30–60 days, to determine how this aberrant activity correlates with morphology. Patch-clamp recordings of excitatory and inhibitory currents were performed, then dendritic structures were visualized by infusion of fluorescent dye. Only RGCs with oscillatory activity were selected for further analysis. Oscillatory frequency and power were calculated using power spectral density analysis of recorded currents. Dendritic arbor stratification, total length, and area were measured from confocal microscope image stacks. These measurements were used to sort RGCs by cluster analysis using Ward’s method. This resulted in a total of 10 clusters, with monostratified and bistratified cells having 5 clusters each. Both populations exhibited correlations between arbor stratification and aberrant inhibitory input, while excitatory input did not vary with arbor distribution. These findings illustrate the relationship between aberrant activity and RGC morphology at early stages of retinal degeneration. PMID:25099614

  11. Ultraviolet light-induced chromosomal aberrations in cultured cells from Cockayne syndrome and complementation group C xeroderma pigmentosum patients: lack of correlation with cancer susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Seguin, L.R.; Tarone, R.E.; Liao, K.H.; Robbins, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Both Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are inherited diseases with defective repair of damage induced in DNA by UV. Patients with XP, but not those with CS, have an increased susceptibility to formation of sunlight-induced skin tumors. We determined the frequency of UV-induced chromosomal aberrations in cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines from five CS patients and three complementation-group-C XP patients to determine whether such aberrations were abnormally increased only in the XP cells. We found that CS cells had the same abnormally increased number of induced aberrations as the XP cells, indicating that the number of UV-induced aberrations in XP group C cells does not account for the susceptibility of these XP patients to sunlight-induced skin cancer.

  12. Aberrant Circulating Th17 Cells in Patients with B-Cell Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ting; Yu, Shuang; Liu, Yan; Yin, Congcong; Ye, Jingjing; Liu, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHLs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasm in which 90% are B-cell lymphomas and 10% T-cell lymphomas. Although T-helper 17 (Th17) cells have been implicated to be essential in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, its role in B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (B-NHL) remains unknown. In this study, we observed a significantly decreased frequency of Th17 cells in peripheral blood from B-NHL patients compared with healthy individuals, accompanied with increased Th1 cells. IL-17AF plasma levels were remarkably decreased in B-NHL patients, accompanied with undetectable IL-17FF and unchangeable IL-17AA. Moreover, Th17 and Th1 cells became normalized after one or two cycles of chemotherapy. Interestingly, in B-NHL, circulating Th17 cells frequencies were significantly higher in relapsed patients than those in untreated patients or normal individuals. Meanwhile, there was no statistical difference regarding the frequencies of Th1 cells between relapsed and untreated patients. Taken these data together, circulating Th17 subset immune response may be associated with the response of patients to treatment and with different stages of disease. PMID:26812681

  13. Aberrant Circulating Th17 Cells in Patients with B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting; Yu, Shuang; Liu, Yan; Yin, Congcong; Ye, Jingjing; Liu, Zhi; Ma, Daoxin; Ji, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasm in which 90% are B-cell lymphomas and 10% T-cell lymphomas. Although T-helper 17 (Th17) cells have been implicated to be essential in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, its role in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) remains unknown. In this study, we observed a significantly decreased frequency of Th17 cells in peripheral blood from B-NHL patients compared with healthy individuals, accompanied with increased Th1 cells. IL-17AF plasma levels were remarkably decreased in B-NHL patients, accompanied with undetectable IL-17FF and unchangeable IL-17AA. Moreover, Th17 and Th1 cells became normalized after one or two cycles of chemotherapy. Interestingly, in B-NHL, circulating Th17 cells frequencies were significantly higher in relapsed patients than those in untreated patients or normal individuals. Meanwhile, there was no statistical difference regarding the frequencies of Th1 cells between relapsed and untreated patients. Taken these data together, circulating Th17 subset immune response may be associated with the response of patients to treatment and with different stages of disease.

  14. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Mark A; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR-peptide-MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool.

  15. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Mark A.; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR–peptide–MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool. PMID:26697013

  16. Aberrant histone modification in CD19+ B cells of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Keshu; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Yanyan; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Shengsheng; Yang, Jingke; Zhou, Hu; Liu, Xinjian; Wei, Xudong; Song, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the alterations in histone methylation and acetylation in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Global histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4/H3K9 methylation were detected by the EpiQuik™ global histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4/H3K9 methylation assay kits. The mRNA expression of selected chromatin modifier genes was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Our results found that the global histone H3/H4 hypoacetylation in the CD19+ B cells of patients with CLL (P=0.028 and P=0.03, respectively) and the global histone H3K9 methylation in patients with CLL were significantly increased compared with controls (P=0.02), while there was no significant difference in the global histone H3K4 methylation between the two groups. The level of SIRT1 and EZH2 mRNA expression was upregulated in patients with CLL (P=0.03 and P=0.02, respectively), which increased significantly with progression from Binet stage A to stage C (P=0.015 and P=0.01, respectively) and Rai good to high risk stage (P=0.007 and P=0.008, respectively). The level of HDAC1 and HDAC7 mRNA expression was significantly increased (P=0.02 and P=0.008, respectively) and HDAC2 and P300 mRNA expression was reduced in patients with CLL (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively). In conclusion, it is observed that the aberrant histone modification plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CLL. PMID:28260932

  17. Aberrant overexpression of ADAR1 promotes gastric cancer progression by activating mTOR/p70S6K signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Ning; Yu, Shijun; Ye, Xiaojuan; Yang, Dong; Li, Yandong; Gao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    ADAR1, one of adenosine deaminases acting on RNA, modulates RNA transcripts through converting adenosine (A) to inosine (I) by deamination. Emerging evidence has implicated that ADAR1 plays an important role in a few of human cancers, however, its expression and physiological significance in gastric cancer remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that ADAR1 was frequently overexpressed in gastric cancer samples by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. In a gastric cancer tissue microarray, ADAR1 staining was closely correlated with tumor stage (P < 0.001) and N classification (P < 0.001). Functional analysis indicated that ADAR1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation and migration in vitro, whereas ADAR1 knockdown resulted in an opposite phenotypes. Furthermore, ADAR1 knockdown also inhibited tumorigenicity and lung metastasis potential of gastric cancer cells in nude mice models. Mechanistically, ADAR1 expression had a significant effect on phosphorylation level of mTOR, p70S kinase, and S6 ribosomal protein, implying its involvement in the regulation of mTOR signaling pathway. We conclude that ADAR1 contributes to gastric cancer development and progression via activating mTOR/p70S6K/S6 ribosomal protein signaling axis. Our findings suggest that ADAR1 may be a valuable biomarker for GC diagnosis and prognosis and may represent a new novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:27863387

  18. Defective quorum sensing of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells: evidence of collective behavior of leukemic populations as semi-autonomous aberrant ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapan J; Dao, Su; Darie, Costel C; Clarkson, Bayard D

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a generic term used to describe cell-cell communication and collective decision making by bacterial and social insects to regulate the expression of specific genes in controlling cell density and other properties of the populations in response to nutrient supply or changes in the environment. QS mechanisms also have a role in higher organisms in maintaining homeostasis, regulation of the immune system and collective behavior of cancer cell populations. In the present study, we used a p190BCR-ABL driven pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL3) cell line derived from the pleural fluid of a terminally ill patient with ALL to test the QS hypothesis in leukemia. ALL3 cells don’t grow at low density (LD) in liquid media but grow progressively faster at increasingly high cell densities (HD) in contrast to other established leukemic cell lines that grow well at very low starting cell densities. The ALL3 cells at LD are poised to grow but shortly die without additional stimulation. Supernates of ALL3 cells (HDSN) and some other primary cells grown at HD stimulate the growth of the LD ALL3 cells without which they won’t survive. To get further insight into the activation processes we performed microarray analysis of the LD ALL3 cells after stimulation with ALL3 HDSN at days 1, 3, and 6. This screen identified several candidate genes, and we linked them to signaling networks and their functions. We observed that genes involved in lipid, cholesterol, fatty acid metabolism, and B cell activation are most up- or down-regulated upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells using HDSN. We also discuss other pathways that are differentially expressed upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells. Our findings suggest that the Ph+ ALL population achieves dominance by functioning as a collective aberrant ecosystem subject to defective quorum-sensing regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27429840

  19. Comparison of cell repair mechanisms by means of chromosomal aberration induced by proton and gamma irradiation - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, A.; Czerski, K.; Kaczmarski, M.; Lewocki, M.; Masojć, B.; Łukowiak, A.

    2015-03-01

    DNA damage of peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to gamma and proton irradiation is studied by means of chromosome aberrations to validate the efficiency of the repair mechanisms of individual cells. A new method based on an observed deviation from the Poisson statistics of the chromosome aberration number is applied for estimation of a repair factor ( RF) defined as a ratio between originally damaged cells to the amount of finally observed aberrations. The repair factors are evaluated by studying the variance of individual damage factors in a collective of healthy persons at a given dose as well as by using the chi-square analysis for the dose-effect curves. The blood samples from fifteen donors have been irradiated by Co60 gamma rays and from nine persons by 150 MeV protons with different doses up to 2 Gy. A standard extraction of lymphocyte has been used whereby dicentrics, acentrics and rings have been scored under a microscope. The RF values determined for the proton radiation are slightly larger than for gamma rays, indicating that up to 70% DNA double strand breaks can be repaired.

  20. Xenotransplantation elicits salient tumorigenicity of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells via aberrant AKT activation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takanashi, Tomoka; Nasu, Kentaro; Tamai, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Mai; Satoh, Ikuro; Ine, Shoji; Sasaki, Osamu; Satoh, Kennichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    The transplantation of human cancer cells into immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(null) (NOG) mice often causes highly malignant cell populations like cancer stem cells to emerge. Here, by serial transplantation in NOG mice, we established two highly tumorigenic adult T-cell leukemia-derived cell lines, ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8. When transplanted s.c., these cells formed tumors significantly earlier and from fewer initial cells than their parental lines ST1 and TL-Om1. We found that protein kinase B (AKT) signaling was upregulated in ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8 cells, and that this upregulation was due to the decreased expression of a negative regulator, INPP5D. Furthermore, the introduction of a constitutively active AKT mutant expression vector into ST1 cells augmented the tumorigenicity of the cells, whereas treatment with the AKT inhibitor MK-2206 attenuated the progression of tumors induced by ST1-N6 cells. Collectively, our results reveal that the AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in the malignancy of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells.

  1. CDO, an Hh-coreceptor, mediates lung cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity through Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Leem, Young-Eun; Ha, Hye-Lim; Bae, Ju-Hyeon; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays essential roles in various developmental processes, and its aberrant regulation results in genetic disorders or malignancies in various tissues. Hyperactivation of Hh signaling is associated with lung cancer development, and there have been extensive efforts to investigate how to control Hh signaling pathway and regulate cancer cell proliferation. In this study we investigated a role of CDO, an Hh co-receptor, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Inhibition of Hh signaling by SANT-1 or siCDO in lung cancer cells reduced proliferation and tumorigenicity, along with the decrease in the expression of the Hh components. Histological analysis with NSCLC mouse tissue demonstrated that CDO was expressed in advanced grade of the cancer, and precisely co-localized with GLI1. These data suggest that CDO is required for proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells via Hh signaling.

  2. CDO, an Hh-Coreceptor, Mediates Lung Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumorigenicity through Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Leem, Young-Eun; Ha, Hye-Lim; Bae, Ju-Hyeon; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays essential roles in various developmental processes, and its aberrant regulation results in genetic disorders or malignancies in various tissues. Hyperactivation of Hh signaling is associated with lung cancer development, and there have been extensive efforts to investigate how to control Hh signaling pathway and regulate cancer cell proliferation. In this study we investigated a role of CDO, an Hh co-receptor, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Inhibition of Hh signaling by SANT-1 or siCDO in lung cancer cells reduced proliferation and tumorigenicity, along with the decrease in the expression of the Hh components. Histological analysis with NSCLC mouse tissue demonstrated that CDO was expressed in advanced grade of the cancer, and precisely co-localized with GLI1. These data suggest that CDO is required for proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells via Hh signaling. PMID:25369201

  3. Redox modification of cell signaling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dan; Oka, Shin-ichi; Brady, Christopher D; Haendeler, Judith; Eaton, Philip; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2012-03-01

    Oxidative stress is presumed to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cardiovascular disease. However, oxidants are also generated in healthy cells, and increasing evidence suggests that they can act as signaling molecules. The intracellular reduction-oxidation (redox) status is tightly regulated by oxidant and antioxidant systems. Imbalance between them causes oxidative or reductive stress which triggers cellular damage or aberrant signaling, leading to dysregulation. In this review, we will briefly summarize the aspects of ROS generation and neutralization mechanisms in the cardiovascular system. ROS can regulate cell signaling through oxidation and reduction of specific amino acids within proteins. Structural changes during post-translational modification allow modification of protein activity which can result in altered cellular function. We will focus on the molecular basis of redox protein modification and how this regulatory mechanism affects signal transduction in the cardiovascular system. Finally, we will discuss some techniques applied to monitoring redox status and identifying redox-sensitive proteins in the heart. This article is part of a Special Section entitled "Post-translational Modification."

  4. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  5. Hedgehog signaling maintains a tumor stem cell compartment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Craig D; Wang, Qiuju; Gesell, Gregory S; Corcoran-Schwartz, Ian M; Jones, Evan; Kim, Jynho; Devereux, Wendy L; Rhodes, Jonathan T; Huff, Carol A; Beachy, Philip A; Watkins, D Neil; Matsui, William

    2007-03-06

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that malignant growth depends on a subset of tumor cells with stem cell-like properties of self-renewal. Because hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates progenitor cell fate in normal development and homeostasis, aberrant pathway activation might be involved in the maintenance of such a population in cancer. Indeed, mutational activation of the Hh pathway is associated with medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma; pathway activity is also critical for growth of other tumors lacking such mutations, although the mechanism of pathway activation is poorly understood. Here we study the role and mechanism of Hh pathway activation in multiple myeloma (MM), a malignancy with a well defined stem cell compartment. In this model, rare malignant progenitors capable of clonal expansion resemble B cells, whereas the much larger tumor cell population manifests a differentiated plasma cell phenotype that pathologically defines the disease. We show that the subset of MM cells that manifests Hh pathway activity is markedly concentrated within the tumor stem cell compartment. The Hh ligand promotes expansion of MM stem cells without differentiation, whereas the Hh pathway blockade, while having little or no effect on malignant plasma cell growth, markedly inhibits clonal expansion accompanied by terminal differentiation of purified MM stem cells. These data reveal that Hh pathway activation is heterogeneous across the spectrum of MM tumor stem cells and their more differentiated progeny. The potential existence of similar relationships in other adult cancers may have important biologic and clinical implications for the study of aberrant Hh signaling.

  6. Aberrant promoter CpG methylation as a molecular marker for disease monitoring in natural killer cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Siu, Lisa L P; Chan, John K C; Wong, Kit F; Choy, Carolyn; Kwong, Yok L

    2003-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell lymphomas lack suitable clonal markers for tumour cell detection, making the monitoring of minimal residual lymphoma difficult. Aberrant promoter CpG methylation occurs frequently in NK cell lymphomas. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of aberrant methylation as a surrogate tumour marker. Twenty-five primary tumours and 105 serial biopsies taken at various time points after treatment were examined using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) for a panel of genes, comprising p73, p16, hMLH1, RARbeta and p15, previously shown to be methylated in NK cell lymphomas. All samples underwent independent morphological examination, supplemented by immunostaining for CD56 and in-situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr-virus-encoded RNA. Primary tumours showed the frequent methylation of the genes p73 (92%), p16 (71%), hMLH1 (61%), RARbeta (56%) and p15 (48%). MSP results in serial post-treatment biopsies were correlated with clinicopathological findings. Results were concordant in 89 follow-up samples (18 samples, histology positive/MSP positive; 71 samples, histology negative/MSP negative) and discordant in 16. Fifteen samples were histology negative/MSP positive, and tumour involvement was subsequently confirmed (positive re-biopsies or relapses at the same sites), indicating that MSP was more sensitive for minimal lymphoma detection. One sample was histology positive/MSP negative; a subsequent histological review and continuous clinical remission of the patient did not support tumour involvement. Our findings suggest that MSP for aberrantly methylated genes is a potentially valuable molecular marker for detecting either residual or relapsed disease in NK cell lymphoma patients.

  7. Effects of X-irradiation on cell-cycle progression, induction of chromosomal aberrations and cell killing in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, H; Latt, S A; Lalande, M E; Little, J B

    1985-01-01

    Survival, cumulative labeling indices, chromosomal aberrations and cell-cycle distribution by flow microfluorometry (FMF) were studied in fibroblasts from normal and three ataxia telangiectasia (AT) families after X-irradiation during density-inhibition of growth and immediate release by subculture to low density. Homozygotic AT (proband) fibroblasts were very hypersensitive to cell killing by X-irradiation (D0 = 40-45 rad). Fibroblasts from AT heterozygotes (parents) were minimally hypersensitive, with D0's (100-110 rad) slightly lower than those for normal fibroblasts (D0 = 120-140 rad). There were three different response groups for a G1 phase block induced by 400 rad of X-rays: (1) minimal or no G1 block was observed in AT homozygote cell strains; (2) 10-20% of the cells were blocked in G1 in normal cell strains; and (3) 50% or more of the cells were blocked in AT heterozygote strains. FMF profiles and cumulative labeling indices showed that homozygotic AT cells irradiated in plateau phase moved into the S-phase following subculture with no additional delay over non-irradiated controls. Homozygotic AT cells showed not only a 4-5 times higher frequency of X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations than normal strains, but approximately 30% of these were of the chromatid-type. There were no differences in the frequency or type of X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations between normal and heterozygotic AT cells.

  8. Modeling cell response to low doses of photon irradiation: Part 2--application to radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Micaela; Testa, Etienne; Komova, Olga V; Nasonova, Elena A; Mel'nikova, Larisa A; Shmakova, Nina L; Beuve, Michaël

    2016-03-01

    The biological phenomena observed at low doses of ionizing radiation (adaptive response, bystander effects, genomic instability, etc.) are still not well understood. While at high irradiation doses, cellular death may be directly linked to DNA damage, at low doses, other cellular structures may be involved in what are known as non-(DNA)-targeted effects. Mitochondria, in particular, may play a crucial role through their participation in a signaling network involving oxygen/nitrogen radical species. According to the size of the implicated organelles, the fluctuations in the energy deposited into these target structures may impact considerably the response of cells to low doses of ionizing irradiation. Based on a recent simulation of these fluctuations, a theoretical framework was established to have further insight into cell responses to low doses of photon irradiation, namely the triggering of radioresistance mechanisms by energy deposition into specific targets. Three versions of a model are considered depending on the target size and on the number of targets that need to be activated by energy deposition to trigger radioresistance mechanisms. These model versions are applied to the fraction of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations measured at low doses in human carcinoma cells (CAL51). For this cell line, it was found in the present study that the mechanisms of radioresistance could not be triggered by the activation of a single small target (nanometric size, 100 nm), but could instead be triggered by the activation of a large target (micrometric, 10 μm) or by the activation of a great number of small targets. The mitochondria network, viewed either as a large target or as a set of small units, might be concerned by these low-dose effects.

  9. Stem cell and lung cancer development: blaming the Wnt, Hh and Notch signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    García Campelo, María Rosario; Alonso Curbera, Guillermo; Aparicio Gallego, Guadalupe; Grande Pulido, Enrique; Antón Aparicio, Luis Miguel

    2011-02-01

    Primary lung cancer may arise from the central (bronchial) or peripheral (bronchiolo-alveolar) compartments. However the origins of the different histological types of primary lung cancer are not well understood. Stem cells are believed to be crucial players in tumour development and there is much interest in identifying those compartments that harbour stem cells involved in lung cancer. Although the role of stem cells in carcinogenesis is not well characterised, emerging evidence is providing new insights into this process. Numerous studies have indicated that lung cancer is not a result of a sudden transforming event but a multistep process in which a sequence of molecular changes result in genetic and morphological aberrations. The exact sequence of molecular events involved in lung carcinogenesis is not yet well understood, therefore deeper knowledge of the aberrant stem cell fate signalling pathway could be crucial in the development of new drugs against the advanced setting.

  10. Wnt Signaling in Cell Motility and Invasion: Drawing Parallels between Development and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sedgwick, Alanna E.; D’Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2016-01-01

    The importance of canonical and non-canonical Wnt signal transduction cascades in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis is well recognized. The aberrant activation of these pathways in the adult leads to abnormal cellular behaviors, and tumor progression is frequently a consequence. Here we discuss recent findings and analogies between Wnt signaling in developmental processes and tumor progression, with a particular focus on cell motility and matrix invasion and highlight the roles of the ARF (ADP-Ribosylation Factor) and Rho-family small GTP-binding proteins. Wnt-regulated signal transduction from cell surface receptors, signaling endosomes and/or extracellular vesicles has the potential to profoundly influence cell movement, matrix degradation and paracrine signaling in both development and disease. PMID:27589803

  11. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi . E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-10-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells.

  12. Aberrant production of extracellular matrix proteins and dysfunction in kidney endothelial cells with a short duration of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Grutzmacher, Cathy; Park, SunYoung; Zhao, Yun; Morrison, Margaret E.; Sheibani, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In the United States, microvascular complications during diabetic nephropathy contribute to high morbidity and mortality rates. However, the cell-autonomous impact of diabetes on kidney endothelial cell function requires further investigation. Male Akita/+ [autosomal dominant mutation in the insulin II gene (Ins2)] mice reproducibly develop diabetes by 4 wk of age. Here, we examined the impact a short duration of diabetes had on kidney endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells were prepared from nondiabetic and diabetic mice (4 wk of diabetes) to delineate the early changes in endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice following 4 wk of diabetes demonstrated aberrant expression of extracellular matrix proteins including decreased osteopontin and increased fibronectin expression which correlated with increased α5-integrin expression. These changes were associated with the attenuation of migration and capillary morphogenesis. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice had decreased VEGF levels but increased levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) and NO, suggesting uncoupling of VEGF-mediated NO production. Knocking down eNOS expression in Akita/+ kidney endothelial cells increased VEGF expression, endothelial cell migration, and capillary morphogenesis. Furthermore, attenuation of sprouting angiogenesis of aortas from Akita/+ mice with 8 wk of diabetes was restored in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. These studies demonstrate that aberrant endothelial cell function with a short duration of diabetes may set the stage for vascular dysfunction and rarefaction at later stages of diabetes. PMID:23077100

  13. Trichoplein and Aurora A block aberrant primary cilia assembly in proliferating cells.

    PubMed

    Inoko, Akihito; Matsuyama, Makoto; Goto, Hidemasa; Ohmuro-Matsuyama, Yuki; Hayashi, Yuko; Enomoto, Masato; Ibi, Miho; Urano, Takeshi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kiyono, Tohru; Izawa, Ichiro; Inagaki, Masaki

    2012-04-30

    The primary cilium is an antenna-like organelle that modulates differentiation, sensory functions, and signal transduction. After cilia are disassembled at the G0/G1 transition, formation of cilia is strictly inhibited in proliferating cells. However, the mechanisms of this inhibition are unknown. In this paper, we show that trichoplein disappeared from the basal body in quiescent cells, whereas it localized to mother and daughter centrioles in proliferating cells. Exogenous expression of trichoplein inhibited primary cilia assembly in serum-starved cells, whereas ribonucleic acid interference-mediated depletion induced primary cilia assembly upon cultivation with serum. Trichoplein controlled Aurora A (AurA) activation at the centrioles predominantly in G1 phase. In vitro analyses confirmed that trichoplein bound and activated AurA directly. Using trichoplein mutants, we demonstrate that the suppression of primary cilia assembly by trichoplein required its ability not only to localize to centrioles but also to bind and activate AurA. Trichoplein or AurA knockdown also induced G0/G1 arrest, but this phenotype was reversed when cilia formation was prevented by simultaneous knockdown of IFT-20. These data suggest that the trichoplein-AurA pathway is required for G1 progression through a key role in the continuous suppression of primary cilia assembly.

  14. Brahmarasayana protects against Ethyl methanesulfonate or Methyl methanesulfonate induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine has given great emphasis to the promotion of health. Rasayana is one of the eight branches of Ayurveda which refers to rejuvenant therapy. It has been reported that rasayanas have immuno-modulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions, however, the genotoxic potential and modulation of DNA repair of many rasayanas have not been evaluated. Methods The present study assessed the role of Brahmarasayana (BR) on Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-and Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced genotoxicity and DNA repair in in vivo mouse test system. The mice were orally fed with BR (5 g or 8 mg / day) for two months and 24 h later EMS or MMS was given intraperitoneally. The genotoxicity was analyzed by chromosomal aberrations, sperm count, and sperm abnormalities. Results The results have revealed that BR did not induce significant chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control animals (p >0.05). On the other hand, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by EMS (240 mg / kg body weight) or MMS (125 mg / kg body weight) were significantly higher (p<0.05) to that of the control group. The treatment of BR for 60 days and single dose of EMS or MMS on day 61, resulted in significant (p <0.05) reduction in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in comparison to EMS or MMS treatment alone, indicating a protective effect of BR. Constitutive base excision repair capacity was also increased in BR treated animals. Conclusion The effect of BR, as it relates to antioxidant activity was not evident in liver tissue however rasayana treatment was observed to increase constitutive DNA base excision repair and reduce clastogenicity. Whilst, the molecular mechanisms of such repair need further exploration, this is the first report to demonstrate these effects and provides further evidence for the role of brahmarasayana in the possible improvement of quality of life. PMID:22853637

  15. Hematopoietic expression of oncogenic BRAF promotes aberrant growth of monocyte-lineage cells resistant to PLX4720

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Tamihiro; Dankort, David; Kang, Jing; Giblett, Susan; Pritchard, Catrin A.; McMahon, Martin; Leavitt, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mutational activation of BRAF leading to expression of the BRAFV600E oncoprotein was recently identified in a high percentage of specific hematopoietic neoplasms in monocyte/histiocyte and mature B-cell lineages. Although BRAFV600E is a driver oncoprotein and pharmacological target in solid tumors such as melanoma, lung and thyroid cancer, it remains unknown whether BRAFV600E is an appropriate therapeutic target in hematopoietic neoplasms. To address this critical question, we generated a mouse model expressing inducible BRAFV600E in the hematopoietic system, and evaluated the efficacy of pathway-targeted therapeutics against primary hematopoietic cells. In this model, BRAFV600E expression conferred cytokine-independent growth to monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors leading to aberrant in vivo and in vitro monocyte/macrophage expansion. Furthermore, transplantation of BRAFV600E-expressing bone marrow cells promoted an in vivo pathology most notable for monocytosis in hematopoietic tissues and visceral organs. In vitro analysis revealed that MEK inhibition, but not RAF inhibition, effectively suppressed cytokine-independent clonal growth of monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors. However, combined RAF and PI3K inhibition effectively inhibited cytokine-independent colony formation, suggesting autocrine PI3K pathway activation. Taken together, these results provide evidence that constitutively activated BRAFV600E drives aberrant proliferation of monocyte-lineage cells. This study supports the development of pathway-targeted therapeutics in the treatment of BRAFV600E-expressing hematopoietic neoplasms in the monocyte/histiocyte lineage. PMID:24152792

  16. Effect of mobile phone station on micronucleus frequency and chromosomal aberrations in human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, M S; Yildirim, A; Zamani, A G; Okudan, N

    2010-01-01

    The use of mobile telephones has rapidly increased worldwide as well as the number of mobile phone base stations that lead to rise low level radiofrequency emissions which may in turn have possible harm for human health. The national radiation protection board has published the known effects of radio waves exposure on humans living close to mobile phone base stations. However, several studies have claimed that the base station has detrimental effects on different tissues. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone base stations on the micronucleus (MN) frequency and chromosomal aberrations on blood in people who were living around mobile phone base stations and healthy controls. Frequency of MN and chromosomal aberrations in study and control groups was 8.96 +/- 3.51 and 6.97 +/- 1.52 (p: 0.16); 0.36 +/- 0.31 and 0.75 +/- 0.61 (p: 0.07), respectively. Our results show that there was not a significant difference of MN frequency and chromosomal aberrations between the two study groups. The results claim that cellular phones and their base stations do not produce important carcinogenic changes.

  17. Icariside II, a natural mTOR inhibitor, disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis via suppressing mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis in sarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Geng, Ya-di; An, Fa-liang; Xia, Yuan-zheng; Guo, Chao; Luo, Jian-guang; Zhang, Lu-yong; Guo, Qing-long; Kong, Ling-yi

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant energy homeostasis that characterized by high rate of energy production (glycolysis) and energy consumption (mRNA translation) is associated with the development of cancer. As mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of aberrant energy homeostasis, it is an attractive target for anti-tumor intervention. The flavonoid compound Icariside II (IS) is a natural mTOR inhibitor derived from Epimedium. Koreanum. Herein, we evaluate the effect of IS on aberrant energy homeostasis. The reduction of glycolysis and mRNA translation in U2OS (osteosarcoma), S180 (fibrosarcoma) and SW1535 (chondrosarcoma) cells observed in our study, indicate that, IS inhibits aberrant energy homeostasis. This inhibition is found to be due to suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) axis through blocking the assembly of mTORC1. Furthermore, IS inhibits the cap-dependent translation of c-myc through mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis which links the relationship between mRNA translation and glycolysis. Inhibition of aberrant energy homeostasis by IS, contributes to its in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferation activity. These data indicate that IS disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis of sarcoma cells through suppression of mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis, providing a novel mechanism of IS to inhibit cell proliferation in sarcoma cells. PMID:27056897

  18. Targeting prostate cancer based on signal transduction and cell cycle pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John T.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Terrian, David M.; Chappell, William H.; Stivala, Franca; Libra, Massimo; Martelli, Alberto M.; Steelman, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of death in men despite increased capacity to diagnose at earlier stages. After prostate cancer has become hormone independent, which often occurs after hormonal ablation therapies, it is difficult to effectively treat. Prostate cancer may arise from mutations and dysregulation of various genes involved in regulation signal transduction (e.g., PTEN, Akt, etc.,) and the cell cycle (e.g., p53, p21Cip1, p27Kip1, Rb, etc.,). This review focuses on the aberrant interactions of signal transduction and cell cycle genes products and how they can contribute to prostate cancer and alter therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:18594202

  19. Aberrant expression of circulating Th17, Th1 and Tc1 cells in patients with active and inactive ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaogang; Du, Lutao; Xu, Xiaofei; Yang, Yongmei; Wang, Haiyan; Qu, Ailin; Qu, Xun; Wang, Chuanxin

    2013-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel disease, yet its etiology and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. The aberrant expression of T lymphocytes plays an essential role in the progression of UC. This study aimed to evaluate the expression profile of circulating Th17, Th1 and Tc1 cells in patients with active and inactive UC. Our results revealed that the percentage of circulating Th17 cells (CD3+CD8-IL-17+) was significantly increased in patients with active UC when compared with the percentage in patients with inactive UC, Crohn's disease (CD) and healthy controls. The percentages of circulating Th1 (CD3+CD8-IFN-γ+) and Tc1 (CD3+CD8+IFN-γ+) cells were also higher in patients with active UC when compared with the percentages in patients with inactive UC and normal controls, although levels were lower than that in CD. Further analysis showed that Th17 cells were positively correlated with Th1 cells, but not with Tc1 cells. Notably, the three cells had a positive correlation with disease activity, extent of disease, detection of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and c-reactive protein in active UC. Moreover, plasma IL-17 was higher in patients with active UC, and a similar trend applied to the mRNA levels of RORγt and T-bet in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The levels of p-STAT3 and p-STAT5 in PBMCs, as well as the ratio of p-STAT3/p-STAT5, were also elevated in active UC patients. Taken together, our findings revealed that elevated circulating Th17, Th1 and Tc1 cells and the aberrant activation of the STAT pathway may be implicated in the progression of UC. These findings may provide preliminary experimental clues for the development of new therapies for UC.

  20. A Novel, Non-canonical Splice Variant of the Ikaros Gene Is Aberrantly Expressed in B-cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mancarelli, Maria Michela; Verzella, Daniela; Fischietti, Mariafausta; Di Tommaso, Ambra; Maccarone, Rita; Plebani, Sara; Di Ianni, Mauro; Gulino, Alberto; Alesse, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    The Ikaros gene encodes a Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor involved in hematopoiesis regulation. Ikaros has been established as one of the most clinically relevant tumor suppressors in several hematological malignancies. In fact, expression of dominant negative Ikaros isoforms is associated with adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, acute myeloid leukemia and adult and juvenile chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we report the isolation of a novel, non-canonical Ikaros splice variant, called Ikaros 11 (Ik11). Ik11 is structurally related to known dominant negative Ikaros isoforms, due to the lack of a functional DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, Ik11 is the first Ikaros splice variant missing the transcriptional activation domain. Indeed, we demonstrated that Ik11 works as a dominant negative protein, being able to dimerize with Ikaros DNA-binding isoforms and inhibit their functions, at least in part by retaining them in the cytoplasm. Notably, we demonstrated that Ik11 is the first dominant negative Ikaros isoform to be aberrantly expressed in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Aberrant expression of Ik11 interferes with both proliferation and apoptotic pathways, providing a mechanism for Ik11 involvement in tumor pathogenesis. Thus, Ik11 could represent a novel marker for B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:23874502

  1. In vitro migratory aberrancies of mesenchymal stem cells derived from multiple myeloma patients only partially modulated by bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinxin; Yang, Jiao; Tang, Yu; Li, Junxia; Zhu, Yan; Lu, Hua; Fei, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicated that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) derived from multiple myeloma (MM) patients were different from those of normal subjects in a variety of aspects. However, it is largely unknown whether BM-MSCs derived from MM patients display any aberrant chemotactic migration. To this aim, we compared the chemotactic migration of BM-MSCs derived from MM patients with those from normal subjects. Our results showed that BM-MSCs derived from MM patients migrated more vigorously to myeloma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitor bortezomib was showed to suppress chemotactic migration of BM-MSCs whatever their origins. However, although the chemotactic migration of BM-MSCs derived from MM patients to myeloma cell line was more significantly suppressed by bortezomib treatment, migration to SDF-1 or FBS of BM-MSCs was less compromised. Both SDF-1 and TNF-α enhanced phosphorylation of iκ-Bα in BM-MSCs. Although bortezomib significantly inhibited the iκ-Bα phosphorylation by SDF-1, it had little effect on iκ-Bα phosphorylation by TNF-α. Collectively, our results suggested that aberrant chemotactic migration of BM-MSCs derived from MM patients and the possible migration-regulatory role of bortezomib treatment. PMID:25400750

  2. Chromatic aberration-corrected tilt series transmission electron microscopy of nanoparticles in a whole mount macrophage cell.

    PubMed

    Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Jinschek, Joerg R; Boothroyd, Chris B; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; de Jonge, Niels

    2013-08-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with electron tomography is widely used to obtain nanometer scale three-dimensional (3D) structural information about biological samples. However, studies of whole eukaryotic cells are limited in resolution and/or contrast on account of the effect of chromatic aberration of the TEM objective lens on electrons that have been scattered inelastically in the specimen. As a result, 3D information is usually obtained from sections and not from whole cells. Here, we use chromatic aberration-corrected TEM to record bright-field TEM images of nanoparticles in a whole mount macrophage cell. Tilt series of images are used to generate electron tomograms, which are analyzed to assess the spatial resolution that can be achieved for different vertical positions in the specimen. The uptake of gold nanoparticles coated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is studied. The LDL is found to assemble in clusters. The clusters contain nanoparticles taken up on different days, which are joined without mixing their nanoparticle cargo.

  3. Gene mutations, chromosome aberrations and survivability after X-ray irradiation of Chinese hamster cell culture under conditions of cysteamine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Yesilova, T.V.; Feoktistova, T.P.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental results were reported to the determination of protective action of cysteamine on the yield of genetic mutations, chromosome aberrations and cell kill during reproduction, evidently due to damage of genetic structures. The experiments were performed on transplanted fibroblast cells of Chinese hamsters, clone 431 in which 80% of the cells had pseudodiloidy. A dose-modifying factor of 2 was established for chromosome aberrations and cell inactivation and a factor of 2.8 for the gene mutations. The data obtained led to a conclusion that there are general protective mechanisms which include the reaction of cysteamine on the radiation-chemical level and possible effect on the reparative processes.

  4. CD34⁺/CD38⁻ acute myelogenous leukemia cells aberrantly express Aurora kinase A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Nishioka, Chie; Nobumoto, Atsuya; Udaka, Keiko; Yokoyama, Akihito

    2013-12-01

    We previously showed that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is aberrantly expressed in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells when compared to bone marrow mononuclear cells isolated from healthy volunteers. We have also shown that CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells, one of compartments enriched for leukemia stem cells in most leukemia subgroups, were relatively resistant to cytarabine-mediated growth inhibition when compared to their CD34(+) /CD38(+) counterparts. Our study attempted to identify therapeutic targets in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells and found that CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells isolated from patients (n = 26) expressed larger amounts of AURKA than their CD34(+) /CD38(+) counterparts and CD34(+) normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells isolated from healthy volunteers (n = 6), as measured by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Blockade of AURKA by the specific inhibitor MLN8237 or a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AURKA significantly inhibited proliferation, impaired self-renewal capability and induced apoptosis of CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells, in association with modulation of levels of Bcl-2 family member proteins. Importantly, inhibition of AURKA in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells by MLN8237 or an shRNA significantly impaired engraftment of these cells in severely immunocompromised mice and appeared to prolong their survival. These results suggest that AURKA is a promising molecular target to eliminate chemotherapy-resistant CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells.

  5. Aberrant Glycosylation as Biomarker for Cancer: Focus on CD43

    PubMed Central

    de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Fiume, Giuseppe; Borrelli, Antonella; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Scala, Iris; Buonaguro, Franco Maria; Quinto, Ileana; Scala, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is a posttranslational modification of proteins playing a major role in cell signalling, immune recognition, and cell-cell interaction because of their glycan branches conferring structure variability and binding specificity to lectin ligands. Aberrant expression of glycan structures as well as occurrence of truncated structures, precursors, or novel structures of glycan may affect ligand-receptor interactions and thus interfere with regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Indeed, aberrant glycosylation represents a hallmark of cancer, reflecting cancer-specific changes in glycan biosynthesis pathways such as the altered expression of glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Most studies have been carried out to identify changes in serum glycan structures. In most cancers, fucosylation and sialylation are significantly modified. Thus, aberrations in glycan structures can be used as targets to improve existing serum cancer biomarkers. The ability to distinguish differences in the glycosylation of proteins between cancer and control patients emphasizes glycobiology as a promising field for potential biomarker identification. In this review, we discuss the aberrant protein glycosylation associated with human cancer and the identification of protein glycoforms as cancer biomarkers. In particular, we will focus on the aberrant CD43 glycosylation as cancer biomarker and the potential to exploit the UN1 monoclonal antibody (UN1 mAb) to identify aberrant CD43 glycoforms. PMID:24689054

  6. Xanthohumol inhibits the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway and suppresses cell growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sławińska-Brych, Adrianna; Zdzisińska, Barbara; Dmoszyńska-Graniczka, Magdalena; Jeleniewicz, Witold; Kurzepa, Jacek; Gagoś, Mariusz; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2016-05-16

    Aberrant activation of the Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathway has been frequently observed in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and its important role in cancer progression and malignant transformation has been documented. Hence, the ERK1/2 kinase cascade becomes a potential molecular target in cancer treatment. Xanthohumol (XN, a prenylated chalcone derived from hope cones) is known to possess a broad spectrum of chemopreventive and anticancer activities. In our studies, the MTT and BrdU assays revealed that XN demonstrated greater antiproliferative activity against A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells than against the lung adenocarcinoma H1563 cell line. We observed that XN was able to suppress the activities of ERK1/2 and p90RSK kinases, followed by inhibition of phosphorylation and activation of the CREB protein. Additionally, the XN treatment of the cancer cells caused upregulation of key cell cycle regulators p53 and p21 as well as downregulation of cyclin D1. As a result, the cytotoxic effect of XN was attributed to the cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and induction of apoptosis indicated by increased caspase-3 activity. Thus, XN might be a promising anticancer drug candidate against lung carcinomas.

  7. Biomarker for Space Radiation Risk: Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2007-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Over the years, we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast, epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world. We have also studied chromosome aberrations in astronaut s peripheral blood lymphocytes before and after space flight. Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell. We will summarize the results of the investigations, and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure.

  8. Regulation of angiogenesis via Notch signaling in breast cancer and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiqiang; Wang, Guangdi; Guo, Shanchun

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer angiogenesis is elicited and regulated by a number of factors including the Notch signaling. Notch receptors and ligands are expressed in breast cancer cells as well as in the stromal compartment and have been implicated in carcinogenesis. Signals exchanged between neighboring cells through the Notch pathway can amplify and consolidate molecular differences, which eventually dictate cell fates. Notch signaling and its crosstalk with many signaling pathways play an important role in breast cancer cell growth, migration, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis, as well as cancer stem cell (CSC) self-renewal. Therefore, significant attention has been paid in recent years toward the development of clinically useful antagonists of Notch signaling. Better understanding of the structure, function and regulation of Notch intracellular signaling pathways, as well as its complex crosstalk with other oncogenic signals in breast cancer cells will be essential to ensure rational design and application of new combinatory therapeutic strategies. Novel opportunities have emerged from the discovery of Notch crosstalk with inflammatory and angiogenic cytokines and their links to CSCs. Combinatory treatments with drugs designed to prevent Notch oncogenic signal crosstalk may be advantageous over λ secretase inhibitors (GSIs) alone. In this review, we focus on the more recent advancements in our knowledge of aberrant Notch signaling contributing to breast cancer angiogenesis, as well as its crosstalk with other factors contributing to angiogenesis and CSCs.

  9. TGF-β-Smad3 signaling in emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis: an epigenetic aberration of normal development?

    PubMed

    Warburton, David; Shi, Wei; Xu, Bing

    2013-01-15

    It is well accepted that TGF-β signaling has critical functional roles in lung development, injury, and repair. We showed previously that null mutation of Smad3, a critical node in the TGF-β pathway, protects mice against fibrosis induced by bleomycin. However, more recently we noticed that abnormal alveolarization also occurs in Smad3-deficient mice and that this is followed by progressive emphysema-like alveolar wall destruction mediated by MMP9. We now know that Smad3 cooperates with c-Jun to synergistically regulate a protein deacetylase SIRT1, by binding to an AP-1 site in the SIRT1 promoter. Consistently, Smad3 knockout lung at postnatal day 28 had reduced SIRT1 expression, which in turn resulted in increased histone acetylation at the binding sites of the transcription factors AP-1, NF-κB, and Pea3 on the MMP9 promoter, as well as increased acetylation of NF-κB. Thus, upon TGF-β activation, phosphorylated Smad3 can be translocated into the nucleus with Smad4, whereat Smad3 in turn collaborates with c-Jun to activate SIRT1 transcription. SIRT1 can deacetylate NF-κB at lysine 30, as well as histones adjacent to the transcription factor AP-1, NF-κB, and Pea3 binding sites of the MMP9 promoter, thereby suppressing MMP9 transcription, hence fixing MMP9 in the OFF mode. Conversely, when Smad3 is missing, this regulatory pathway is inactivated so that MMP9 is epigenetically turned ON. We postulate that these developmental epigenetic mechanisms by which Smad3 regulates MMP9 transcription cell autonomously may be important in modulating both emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis and that this could explain why both pathologies can appear within the same lung specimen.

  10. Aberrant apoptotic machinery confers melanoma dual resistance to BRAFV600E inhibitor and immune effector cells: immunosensitization by a histone deacetylase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Jazirehi, Ali R; Nazarian, Ramin; Torres-Collado, Antoni Xavier; Economou, James S

    2014-01-01

    BRAFV600E-inhibitors (BRAFi; e.g., vemurafenib) and modern immune-based therapies such as PD-1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 checkpoints blockade and adoptive cell transfer (ACT) have significantly improved the care of melanoma patients. Having these two effective (BRAFi and immunotherapy) therapies raises the question whether there is a rational biological basis for using them in combination. We developed an in vitro model to determine whether tumor resistance mechanisms to a small molecule inhibitor of a driver oncogene, and to cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)- and natural killer (NK) cell-delivered apoptotic death signals were exclusive or intersecting. We generated melanoma sublines resistant to BRAFi vemurafenib and to CTL recognizing the MART-1 melanoma antigen. Vemurafenib-resistant (VemR) sublines were cross-resistant to MART CTL and NK cells indicating that a common apoptotic pathway governing tumor response to both modalities was disrupted. Pretreatment of VemR melanomas with a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) restored sensitivity to MART CTL and NK apoptosis by skewing the apoptotic gene programs towards a proapoptotic phenotype. Our in vitro findings suggest that during the course of acquisition of BRAFi resistance, melanomas develop cross-resistance to CTL- and NK-killing. Further, aberrant apoptotic pathways, amenable by an FDA-approved chromatin remodeling drug, regulate tumor resistance mechanisms to immune effector cells. These results may provide rational molecular basis for further investigations to combine these therapies clinically. PMID:24660121

  11. PAX8 is transcribed aberrantly in cervical tumors and derived cell lines due to complex gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    López-Urrutia, Eduardo; Pedroza-Torres, Abraham; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; De Leon, David Cantu; Morales-González, Fermín; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Mendez, Jorge; García-Castillo, Verónica; Bautista-Isidro, Osvaldo; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor PAX8, a member of the paired box-containing gene family with an important role in embryogenesis of the kidney, thyroid gland and nervous system, has been described as a biomarker in tumors of the thyroid, parathyroid, kidney and thymus. The PAX8 gene gives rise to four isoforms, through alternative mRNA splicing, but the splicing pattern in tumors is not yet established. Cervical cancer has a positive expression of PAX8; however, there is no available data determining which PAX8 isoform or isoforms are present in cervical cancer tissues as well as in cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines. Instead of a differential pattern of splicing isoforms, we found numerous previously unreported PAX8 aberrant transcripts ranging from 378 to 542 bases and present in both cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines and tumor samples. This is the first report of PAX8 aberrant transcript production in cervical cancer. Reported PAX8 isoforms possess differential transactivation properties; therefore, besides being a helpful marker for detection of cancer, PAX8 isoforms can plausibly exert differential regulation properties during carcinogenesis.

  12. Shared clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aberrant mast cells and leukemic myeloid blasts detected by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based whole-genome scanning.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Shao, Lina; Bixby, Dale L; Ross, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of aberrant mast cells within extracutaneous sites. In a subset of SM cases, a second associated hematologic non-mast cell disease (AHNMD) is also present, usually of myeloid origin. Polymerase chain reaction and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization studies have provided evidence that, in at least some cases, the aberrant mast cells are related clonally to the neoplastic cells of the AHNMD. In this work, a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-A) was used to characterize the cytogenetics of the aberrant mast cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and concomitant mast cell leukemia associated with a KIT D816A mutation. The results demonstrate the presence of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the mast cells and myeloid blasts, as well as additional abnormalities within mast cells (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) not detectable by routine karyotypic analysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of SNP-A whole-genome scanning to the detection of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the two components of a case of SM-AHNMD. The findings provide additional evidence of a frequent clonal link between aberrant mast cells and cells of myeloid AHNMDs, and also highlight the importance of direct sequencing for identifying uncommon activating KIT mutations.

  13. Aberrant activation of canonical Notch1 signaling in the mouse uterus decreases progesterone receptor by hypermethylation and leads to infertility

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ren-Wei; Strug, Michael R.; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Miele, Lucio; Fazleabas, Asgerally T.

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian reproduction, implantation is one of the most critical events. Failure of implantation and the subsequent decidualization contribute to more than 75% of pregnancy losses in women. Our laboratory has previously reported that inhibition of Notch signaling results in impaired decidualization in both women and a transgenic mouse model. In this study, we generated a Notch gain-of-function transgenic mouse by conditionally overexpressing the Notch1 intracellular domain (N1ICD) in the reproductive tract driven by a progesterone receptor (Pgr) -Cre. We show that the overexpression of N1ICD in the uterus results in complete infertility as a consequence of multiple developmental and physiological defects, including the absence of uterine glands and dysregulation of progesterone and estrogen signaling by a Recombination Signal Binding Protein Jκ-dependent signaling mechanism. We further show that the inhibition of progesterone signaling is caused by hypermethylation of its receptor Pgr by Notch1 overexpression through the transcription factor PU.1 and DNA methyltransferase 3b (Dnmt3b). We have generated a mouse model to study the consequence of increased Notch signaling in female reproduction and provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that Notch signaling can regulate epigenetic modification of the Pgr. PMID:26858409

  14. Rho1-Wnd signaling regulates loss-of-cell polarity-induced cell invasion in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Chen, Y; Zhang, S; Xu, W; Shao, Y; Yang, Y; Li, W; Li, M; Xue, L

    2016-02-18

    Both cell polarity and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity are essential to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis, and disruption of either is commonly seen in cancer progression. Despite the established connection between loss-of-cell polarity and JNK activation, much less is known about the molecular mechanism by which aberrant cell polarity induces JNK-mediated cell migration and tumor invasion. Here we show results from a genetic screen using an in vivo invasion model via knocking down cell polarity gene in Drosophila wing discs, and identify Rho1-Wnd signaling as an important molecular link that mediates loss-of-cell polarity-triggered JNK activation and cell invasion. We show that Wallenda (Wnd), a protein kinase of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family, by forming a complex with the GTPase Rho1, is both necessary and sufficient for Rho1-induced JNK-dependent cell invasion, MMP1 activation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, Wnd promotes cell proliferation and tissue growth through wingless production when apoptosis is inhibited by p35. Finally, Wnd shows oncogenic cooperation with Ras(V12) to trigger tumor growth in eye discs and causes invasion into the ventral nerve cord. Together, our data not only provides a novel mechanistic insight on how cell polarity loss contributes to cell invasion, but also highlights the value of the Drosophila model system to explore human cancer biology.

  15. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jennifer R.; Wang, Jenny Yingzi

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) and G protein subunit Gαq in the maintenance of cancer stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia. This review will discuss how GPCRs and G proteins regulate stem cells with a focus on cancer stem cells, as well as their implications for the development of novel targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27187360

  16. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jennifer R; Wang, Jenny Yingzi

    2016-05-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) and G protein subunit Gαq in the maintenance of cancer stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia. This review will discuss how GPCRs and G proteins regulate stem cells with a focus on cancer stem cells, as well as their implications for the development of novel targeted cancer therapies.

  17. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  18. N-Acetylglucosamine Functions in Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, James B.

    2012-01-01

    The amino sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is well known for the important structural roles that it plays at the cell surface. It is a key component of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan, fungal cell wall chitin, and the extracellular matrix of animal cells. Interestingly, recent studies have also identified new roles for GlcNAc in cell signaling. For example, GlcNAc stimulates the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to undergo changes in morphogenesis and expression of virulence genes. Pathogenic E. coli responds to GlcNAc by altering the expression of fimbriae and CURLI fibers that promote biofilm formation and GlcNAc stimulates soil bacteria to undergo changes in morphogenesis and production of antibiotics. Studies with animal cells have revealed that GlcNAc influences cell signaling through the posttranslational modification of proteins by glycosylation. O-linked attachment of GlcNAc to Ser and Thr residues regulates a variety of intracellular proteins, including transcription factors such as NFκB, c-myc, and p53. In addition, the specificity of Notch family receptors for different ligands is altered by GlcNAc attachment to fucose residues in the extracellular domain. GlcNAc also impacts signal transduction by altering the degree of branching of N-linked glycans, which influences cell surface signaling proteins. These emerging roles of GlcNAc as an activator and mediator of cellular signaling in fungi, animals, and bacteria will be the focus of this paper. PMID:23350039

  19. Benzene-Induced Aberrant miRNA Expression Profile in Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haiyan; Zhang, Juan; Tan, Kehong; Sun, Rongli; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-11-12

    Benzene is a common environmental pollutant that causes hematological alterations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may play a role in benzene-induced hematotoxicity. In this study, C57BL/6 mice showed significant hematotoxicity after exposure to 150 mg/kg benzene for 4 weeks. Benzene exposure decreased not only the number of cells in peripheral blood but also hematopoietic progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Meanwhile, RNA from Lin(-) cells sorted from the bone marrow was applied to aberrant miRNA expression profile using Illumina sequencing. We found that 5 miRNAs were overexpressed and 45 miRNAs were downregulated in the benzene exposure group. Sequencing results were confirmed through qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we also identified five miRNAs which significantly altered in Lin(-)c-Kit⁺ cells obtained from benzene-exposed mice, including mmu-miR-34a-5p; mmu-miR-342-3p; mmu-miR-100-5p; mmu-miR-181a-5p; and mmu-miR-196b-5p. In summary, we successfully established a classical animal model to induce significant hematotoxicity by benzene injection. Benzene exposure may cause severe hematotoxicity not only to blood cells in peripheral circulation but also to hematopoietic cells in bone marrow. Benzene exposure also alters miRNA expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells. This study suggests that benzene induces alteration in hematopoiesis and hematopoiesis-associated miRNAs.

  20. Reduction of aberrant NF-κB signalling ameliorates Rett syndrome phenotypes in Mecp2-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Noriyuki; MacDonald, Jessica L.; Ye, Julia; Molyneaux, Bradley J.; Azim, Eiman; Macklis, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the transcriptional regulator Mecp2 cause the severe X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). In this study, we investigate genes that function downstream of MeCP2 in cerebral cortex circuitry, and identify upregulation of Irak1, a central component of the NF-κB pathway. We show that overexpression of Irak1 mimics the reduced dendritic complexity of Mecp2-null cortical callosal projection neurons (CPN), and that NF-κB signalling is upregulated in the cortex with Mecp2 loss-of-function. Strikingly, we find that genetically reducing NF-κB signalling in Mecp2-null mice not only ameliorates CPN dendritic complexity but also substantially extends their normally shortened lifespan, indicating broader roles for NF-κB signalling in RTT pathogenesis. These results provide new insight into both the fundamental neurobiology of RTT, and potential therapeutic strategies via NF-κB pathway modulation. PMID:26821816

  1. Cullin-4 regulates Wingless and JNK signaling-mediated cell death in the Drosophila eye

    PubMed Central

    Tare, Meghana; Sarkar, Ankita; Bedi, Shimpi; Kango-Singh, Madhuri; Singh, Amit

    2016-01-01

    In all multicellular organisms, the fundamental processes of cell proliferation and cell death are crucial for growth regulation during organogenesis. Strict regulation of cell death is important to maintain tissue homeostasis by affecting processes like regulation of cell number, and elimination of unwanted/unfit cells. The developing Drosophila eye is a versatile model to study patterning and growth, where complex signaling pathways regulate growth and cell survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of these processes is not fully understood. In a gain-of-function screen, we found that misexpression of cullin-4 (cul-4), an ubiquitin ligase, can rescue reduced eye mutant phenotypes. Previously, cul-4 has been shown to regulate chromatin remodeling, cell cycle and cell division. Genetic characterization of cul-4 in the developing eye revealed that loss-of-function of cul-4 exhibits a reduced eye phenotype. Analysis of twin-spots showed that in comparison with their wild-type counterparts, the cul-4 loss-of-function clones fail to survive. Here we show that cul-4 clones are eliminated by induction of cell death due to activation of caspases. Aberrant activation of signaling pathways is known to trigger cell death in the developing eye. We found that Wingless (Wg) and c-Jun-amino-terminal-(NH2)-Kinase (JNK) signaling are ectopically induced in cul-4 mutant clones, and these signals co-localize with the dying cells. Modulating levels of Wg and JNK signaling by using agonists and antagonists of these pathways demonstrated that activation of Wg and JNK signaling enhances cul-4 mutant phenotype, whereas downregulation of Wg and JNK signaling rescues the cul-4 mutant phenotypes of reduced eye. Here we present evidences to demonstrate that cul-4 is involved in restricting Wg signaling and downregulation of JNK signaling-mediated cell death during early eye development. Overall, our studies provide insights into a novel role of cul-4 in promoting cell

  2. Nuclear aberrations in hair follicle cells of patients receiving cyclophosphamide. A possible in vivo assay for human exposure to genotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, M T; Tackaberry, L E; Hardy, M H; Noseworthy, J H

    1990-01-01

    The toxic effect of cyclophosphamide on the proliferative cell population of hair follicles plucked from the human scalp was examined by the in vivo nuclear aberration assay. Patients participating in an independent clinical trial received oral low dose cyclophosphamide, intravenous high dose cyclophosphamide or oral placebo treatment. The percent of cells with nuclear aberrations (indicating apoptosis, a special form of cell death) and the percent of mitotic cells, in the hair matrix, were calculated for each patient before treatment and at several time points following cyclophosphamide or placebo treatment. The mean percentages of nuclear aberrations in both the treated Low dose and High dose cyclophosphamide patients were significantly higher than those for the pre-treatment and Placebo patients. The nuclear aberrations in hair follicle cells increased from pre-treatment (and Placebo) to treated Low dose and finally to treated High dose patients. The average percentage for pre-treatment samples from all patients was 0.06 +/- 0.03 SE. For 1 week and 1 month samples from Low dose patients it was 0.35 +/- 0.08 SE, and for combined 2,3 and 4 day samples from High dose patients it was 1.08 +/- 0.12 SE. Cyclophosphamide also had a significant effect on mitosis. A decrease in mitotic activity was observed at 1 month following the initial low dose cyclophosphamide treatment and at 24 +/- 2 h following each of the first two high dose cyclophosphamide treatments. The observed increase in nuclear aberrations following low dose as well as high dose cyclophosphamide suggests that it is feasible to use the nuclear aberration assay for in vivo human genotoxicity testing, using proliferating hair follicle cells.

  3. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  4. Signal propagation in stem-cell niches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2009-09-01

    Stem cells, maintaining tissue homeostasis, are nurtured in microscopic niches formed of so-called environmental cells. The kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of stem cells in such niches depend on their interaction with the messenger proteins secreted by environmental cells. We propose a generic mean-field kinetic model of the propagation of such signals. To motivate our study, we briefly describe a stem-cell niche in the Drosophila ovary. Our model is however applicable to other niches as well. In particular, it helps one to understand the necessary conditions for the niche function. For example, the model predicts that in the case of the Drosophila ovary each germline stem cell should have in the external membrane at least 700 receptors interacting with the signaling Dpp and Gpp proteins emanating from the cap cells.

  5. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence

    PubMed Central

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L.; Campbell, Clyde A.; García-Moreno, Diana; Cid, Natasha Del; Kim, Albert D.; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNFα activates the Notch and NF-κB signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNFα, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  6. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  7. Lack of Muc1-regulated beta-catenin stability results in aberrant expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells from the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Tze Wei; Bradley, Judy M.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells that inhibit T cell activity and contribute to the immune suppression characteristic of most tumors. We discovered that bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells from the Muc1 knockout (KO) mice differentiated into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs in vitro under GM-CSF and IL-4 signaling. MUC1 is a tumor-associated mucin and its cytoplasmic tail (MUC1-CT) can regulate beta-catenin to promote oncogenesis. Given the importance of beta-catenin in hematopoiesis, we hypothesized that the MUC1 regulation of beta-catenin is important for MDSC development. Our current study shows that the aberrant development of BM progenitors into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs is dependent on the down regulation of beta-catenin levels that occurs in the absence of Muc1. In light of this, KO mice showed enhanced EL4 tumor growth and were able to better tolerate allogeneic BM185 tumor growth, with an accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells in the blood and tumor draining lymph nodes. WT mice were able to similarly tolerate allogeneic tumor growth when they were injected with CD11b+Gr1+ cells from tumor-bearing KO mice, suggesting that tolerance of allogeneic tumors is dependent on MDSC-mediated immune suppression. This further delineates the ability of Muc1 to control MDSC development which could directly impact tumorigenesis. Knowledge of the biology by which Muc1 regulates the development of myeloid progenitors into MDSCs would also be very useful in enhancing the efficacy of cancer vaccines in the face of tumor immune suppression. PMID:19351842

  8. Anti-carcinogenic properties of omeprazole against human colon cancer cells and azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-01-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor, a widely used drug to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal refluxdisease. We have evaluated colon cancer chemopreventive properties of omeprazole using azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in male F344 rats and analyzed cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cells. Five-week-old male F344 rats were fed a control or experimental diet containing two doses of omeprazole (200 and 400 ppm). After one week, all animals were s.c. injected with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for two weeks). Rats continued on experimental diets for seven more weeks before being sacrificed. Colons were histopathologically evaluated for ACF. Human colon cancer HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells treated with omeprazole were evaluated for different markers associated with proliferation and apoptotic markers using Western blot technique. Rats fed with 200 and 400 ppm of omeprazole significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation (~30%, P<0.001) and showed significant suppression of multi-crypt foci (~30-50%, P<0.05-0.001). Omeprazole produced significant dose-response effects on inhibition of multi-crypt foci (≥4). Omeprazole treatment in human colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells resulted in induction of p21waf1/cip1 and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and survivin in a dose-dependent manner. Anticancer properties observed in colon cancer cell lines suggest that omeprazole may induce key signaling molecules of antiproliferation and inhibition of anti-apoptotic proteins.

  9. Elevated TIM3+ hematopoietic stem cells in untreated myelodysplastic syndrome displayed aberrant differentiation, overproliferation and decreased apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jing-lian; Li, Li-juan; Fu, Rong; Wang, Hua-quan; Jiang, Hui-juan; Yue, Lan-zhu; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Hui; Ruan, Er-bao; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guo-jin; Wang, Xiao-ming; Wu, Yu-hong; Liu, Hong; Song, Jia; Guan, Jing; Xing, Li-min; Shao, Zong-hong

    2014-06-01

    TIM3, as a negative regulator of anti-tumor immunity, is highly expressed on LSCs, but not on normal HSCs. TIM3 on HSCs in MDS patients has not been clarified. Here, both the percentage of TIM3 on HSCs and the MFI of TIM3+ HSCs were higher in untreated MDS than control and were closed to AML, and excessive TIM3+ HSCs was closely related to clinical parameters: WPSS score, karyotype analysis, morphologic blasts, the number of cytopenia involving hematopoietic lineages, anemia and granulocytopenia. TIM3+ HSCs expressed lower CD11b, TpoR, EpoR, G-CSFR and Annexin V, and higher CD71 and GATA2. TIM3+ HSCs displayed aberrant differentiation, overproliferation and decreased apoptosis. TIM3 might be a promising marker for identifying malignant clone cells in MDS and a candidate for targeted therapy.

  10. Aberrant calcium signaling by transglutaminase-mediated posttranslational modification of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Kozo; Terauchi, Akiko; Nakamura, Kyoko; Higo, Takayasu; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Nagisa; Hisatsune, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takeshi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2014-09-23

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the endoplasmic reticulum mediates calcium signaling that impinges on intracellular processes. IP3Rs are allosteric proteins comprising four subunits that form an ion channel activated by binding of IP3 at a distance. Defective allostery in IP3R is considered crucial to cellular dysfunction, but the specific mechanism remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that a pleiotropic enzyme transglutaminase type 2 targets the allosteric coupling domain of IP3R type 1 (IP3R1) and negatively regulates IP3R1-mediated calcium signaling and autophagy by locking the subunit configurations. The control point of this regulation is the covalent posttranslational modification of the Gln2746 residue that transglutaminase type 2 tethers to the adjacent subunit. Modification of Gln2746 and IP3R1 function was observed in Huntington disease models, suggesting a pathological role of this modification in the neurodegenerative disease. Our study reveals that cellular signaling is regulated by a new mode of posttranslational modification that chronically and enzymatically blocks allosteric changes in the ligand-gated channels that relate to disease states.

  11. Studies of aberrant phyllotaxy1 Mutants of Maize Indicate Complex Interactions between Auxin and Cytokinin Signaling in the Shoot Apical Meristem1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeong-ha; Johnston, Robyn; Yang, Yan; Gallavotti, Andrea; Kojima, Mikiko; Travençolo, Bruno A.N.; Costa, Luciano da F.; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Jackson, David

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fascinating aspects of plant morphology is the regular geometric arrangement of leaves and flowers, called phyllotaxy. The shoot apical meristem (SAM) determines these patterns, which vary depending on species and developmental stage. Auxin acts as an instructive signal in leaf initiation, and its transport has been implicated in phyllotaxy regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Altered phyllotactic patterns are observed in a maize (Zea mays) mutant, aberrant phyllotaxy1 (abph1, also known as abphyl1), and ABPH1 encodes a cytokinin-inducible type A response regulator, suggesting that cytokinin signals are also involved in the mechanism by which phyllotactic patterns are established. Therefore, we investigated the interaction between auxin and cytokinin signaling in phyllotaxy. Treatment of maize shoots with a polar auxin transport inhibitor, 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, strongly reduced ABPH1 expression, suggesting that auxin or its polar transport is required for ABPH1 expression. Immunolocalization of the PINFORMED1 (PIN1) polar auxin transporter revealed that PIN1 expression marks leaf primordia in maize, similarly to Arabidopsis. Interestingly, maize PIN1 expression at the incipient leaf primordium was greatly reduced in abph1 mutants. Consistently, auxin levels were reduced in abph1, and the maize PIN1 homolog was induced not only by auxin but also by cytokinin treatments. Our results indicate distinct roles for ABPH1 as a negative regulator of SAM size and a positive regulator of PIN1 expression. These studies highlight a complex interaction between auxin and cytokinin signaling in the specification of phyllotactic patterns and suggest an alternative model for the generation of altered phyllotactic patterns in abph1 mutants. We propose that reduced auxin levels and PIN1 expression in abph1 mutant SAMs delay leaf initiation, contributing to the enlarged SAM and altered phyllotaxy of these mutants. PMID:19321707

  12. Studies of aberrant phyllotaxy1 mutants of maize indicate complex interactions between auxin and cytokinin signaling in the shoot apical meristem.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong-ha; Johnston, Robyn; Yang, Yan; Gallavotti, Andrea; Kojima, Mikiko; Travençolo, Bruno A N; Costa, Luciano da F; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Jackson, David

    2009-05-01

    One of the most fascinating aspects of plant morphology is the regular geometric arrangement of leaves and flowers, called phyllotaxy. The shoot apical meristem (SAM) determines these patterns, which vary depending on species and developmental stage. Auxin acts as an instructive signal in leaf initiation, and its transport has been implicated in phyllotaxy regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Altered phyllotactic patterns are observed in a maize (Zea mays) mutant, aberrant phyllotaxy1 (abph1, also known as abphyl1), and ABPH1 encodes a cytokinin-inducible type A response regulator, suggesting that cytokinin signals are also involved in the mechanism by which phyllotactic patterns are established. Therefore, we investigated the interaction between auxin and cytokinin signaling in phyllotaxy. Treatment of maize shoots with a polar auxin transport inhibitor, 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, strongly reduced ABPH1 expression, suggesting that auxin or its polar transport is required for ABPH1 expression. Immunolocalization of the PINFORMED1 (PIN1) polar auxin transporter revealed that PIN1 expression marks leaf primordia in maize, similarly to Arabidopsis. Interestingly, maize PIN1 expression at the incipient leaf primordium was greatly reduced in abph1 mutants. Consistently, auxin levels were reduced in abph1, and the maize PIN1 homolog was induced not only by auxin but also by cytokinin treatments. Our results indicate distinct roles for ABPH1 as a negative regulator of SAM size and a positive regulator of PIN1 expression. These studies highlight a complex interaction between auxin and cytokinin signaling in the specification of phyllotactic patterns and suggest an alternative model for the generation of altered phyllotactic patterns in abph1 mutants. We propose that reduced auxin levels and PIN1 expression in abph1 mutant SAMs delay leaf initiation, contributing to the enlarged SAM and altered phyllotaxy of these mutants.

  13. Acetylcholinesterase-independent protective effects of huperzine A against iron overload-induced oxidative damage and aberrant iron metabolism signaling in rat cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ling-xue; Huang, Xiao-tian; Chen, Yu-ting; Tang, Xi-can; Zhang, Hai-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Iron dyshomeostasis is one of the primary causes of neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Huperzine A (HupA), a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and a nutraceutical in the United Sates. Here, we investigated the protective effects of HupA against iron overload-induced injury in neurons. Methods: Rat cortical neurons were treated with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC), and cell viability was assessed with MTT assays. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assays were performed to assess mitochondrial function. The labile iron pool (LIP) level, cytosolic-aconitase (c-aconitase) activity and iron uptake protein expression were measured to determine iron metabolism changes. The modified Ellman's method was used to evaluate AChE activity. Results: HupA significantly attenuated the iron overload-induced decrease in neuronal cell viability. This neuroprotective effect of HupA occurred concurrently with a decrease in ROS and an increase in ATP. Moreover, HupA treatment significantly blocked the upregulation of the LIP level and other aberrant iron metabolism changes induced by iron overload. Additionally, another specific AChE inhibitor, donepezil (Don), at a concentration that caused AChE inhibition equivalent to that of HupA negatively, influenced the aberrant changes in ROS, ATP or LIP that were induced by excessive iron. Conclusion: We provide the first demonstration of the protective effects of HupA against iron overload-induced neuronal damage. This beneficial role of HupA may be attributed to its attenuation of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction and elevation of LIP, and these effects are not associated with its AChE-inhibiting effect. PMID:27498774

  14. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis.

  15. Albumin Redhill (-1 Arg, 320 Ala yields Thr): A glycoprotein variant of human serum albumin whose precursor has an aberrant signal peptidase cleavage site

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, S.O.; Myles, T.; Peach, R.J.; George, P.M. ); Donaldson, D. )

    1990-01-01

    Albumin Redhill is an electrophoretically slow genetic variant of human serum albumin that does not bind {sup 63}Ni{sup 2+} and has a molecular mass 2.5 kDa higher than normal albumin. Its inability to bind Ni{sup 2+} was explained by the finding of an additional residue of Arg at position -1. This did not explain the molecular basis of the genetic variation or the increase in apparent molecular mass. Fractionation of tryptic digests on concanavalin A-Sepharose followed by peptide mapping of the bound and unbound fractions and sequence analysis of the glycopeptides identified a mutation of 320 Ala {yields} Thr. This introduces as Asn-Tyr-Thr oligosaccharide attachment sequence centered on Asn-318 and explains the increase in molecular mass. This, however, did not satisfactorily explain the presence of the additional Arg residue at position -1. DNA sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified genomic DNA encoding the prepro sequence of albumin indicated an additional mutation of -2 Arg {yields} Cys. The authors propose that the new Phe-Cys-Arg sequence in the propeptide is an aberrant signal peptidase cleavage site and that the signal peptidase cleaves the propeptide of albumin Redhill in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum before it reaches the Golgi vesicles, the site of the diarginyl-specific proalbumin convertase.

  16. New Twists in Drosophila Cell Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-04-08

    The discovery of a handful of conserved signaling pathways that dictate most aspects of embryonic and post-embryonic development of multicellular organisms has generated a universal view of animal development (Perrimon, N., Pitsouli, C., and Shilo, B. Z. (2012)Cold Spring Harb. Perspect. Biol.4, a005975). Although we have at hand most of the "hardware" elements that mediate cell communication events that dictate cell fate choices, we are still far from a comprehensive mechanistic understanding of these processes. One of the next challenges entails an analysis of developmental signaling pathways from the cell biology perspective. Where in the cell does signaling take place, and how do general cellular machineries and structures contribute to the regulation of developmental signaling? Another challenge is to examine these signaling pathways from a quantitative perspective, rather than as crude on/off switches. This requires more precise measurements, and incorporation of the time element to generate a dynamic sequence instead of frozen snapshots of the process. The quantitative outlook also brings up the issue of precision, and the unknown mechanisms that buffer variability in signaling between embryos, to produce a robust and reproducible output. Although these issues are universal to all multicellular organisms, they can be effectively tackled in theDrosophilamodel, by a combination of genetic manipulations, biochemical analyses, and a variety of imaging techniques. This review will present some of the recent advances that were accomplished by utilizing the versatility of theDrosophilasystem.

  17. Single-cell transcriptional analysis of normal, aberrant, and malignant hematopoiesis in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Elaine G.; Lobbardi, Riadh; Jain, Esha; Tang, Qin; Moore, John C.; Cortes, Mauricio; Molodtsov, Aleksey; Kasheta, Melissa; Luo, Christina C.; Garcia, Amaris J.; Mylvaganam, Ravi; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Ceol, Craig J.; North, Trista E.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoiesis culminates in the production of functionally heterogeneous blood cell types. In zebrafish, the lack of cell surface antibodies has compelled researchers to use fluorescent transgenic reporter lines to label specific blood cell fractions. However, these approaches are limited by the availability of transgenic lines and fluorescent protein combinations that can be distinguished. Here, we have transcriptionally profiled single hematopoietic cells from zebrafish to define erythroid, myeloid, B, and T cell lineages. We also used our approach to identify hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and a novel NK-lysin 4+ cell type, representing a putative cytotoxic T/NK cell. Our platform also quantified hematopoietic defects in rag2E450fs mutant fish and showed that these fish have reduced T cells with a subsequent expansion of NK-lysin 4+ cells and myeloid cells. These data suggest compensatory regulation of the innate immune system in rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish. Finally, analysis of Myc-induced T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed that cells are arrested at the CD4+/CD8+ cortical thymocyte stage and that a subset of leukemia cells inappropriately reexpress stem cell genes, including bmi1 and cmyb. In total, our experiments provide new tools and biological insights into single-cell heterogeneity found in zebrafish blood and leukemia. PMID:27139488

  18. The spatial structure of cell signaling systems

    PubMed Central

    Nussinov, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    The spatial structure of the cell is highly organized at all levels: from small complexes and assemblies, to local nano- and micro-clusters, to global, micrometer scales across and between cells. We suggest that this multiscale spatial cell organization also organizes signaling and coordinates cellular behavior. We propose a new view of the spatial structure of cell signaling systems. This new view describes cell signaling in terms of dynamic allosteric interactions within and among distinct, spatially organized transient clusters. The clusters vary over time and space and are on length scales from nanometers to micrometers. When considered across these length-scales, primary factors in the spatial organization are cell membrane domains and the actin cytoskeleton, both also highly dynamic. A key challenge is to understand the interplay across these multiple scales, link it to the physicochemical basis of the conformational behavior of single molecules, and ultimately relate it to cellular function. Overall, our premise is that at these scales, cell signaling should be thought of not primarily as a sequence of diffusion-controlled molecular collisions, but instead transient, allostery-driven cluster re-forming interactions. PMID:23913102

  19. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  20. Deregulation of Cell Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giancotti, Filippo G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations disrupt the regulatory circuits that govern cell function, enabling tumor cells to undergo de-regulated mitogenesis, to resist to proapoptotic insults, and to invade through tissue boundaries. Cancer cell biology has played a crucial role in elucidating the signaling mechanisms by which oncogenic mutations sustain these malignant behaviors and thereby in identifying rational targets for cancer drugs. The efficacy of such targeted therapies illustrate the power of a reductionist approach to the study of cancer. PMID:24561200

  1. Phosphatidic acid-mediated activation and translocation to the cell surface of sialidase NEU3, promoting signaling for cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kohta; Hosono, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Hata, Keiko; Shiozaki, Momo; Bassi, Rosaria; Prinetti, Alessandro; Sonnino, Sandro; Nitta, Kazuo; Miyagi, Taeko

    2015-05-01

    The plasma membrane-associated sialidase NEU3 plays crucial roles in regulation of transmembrane signaling, and its aberrant up-regulation in various cancers contributes to malignancy. However, it remains uncertain how NEU3 is naturally activated and locates to plasma membranes, because of its Triton X-100 requirement for the sialidase activity in vitro and its often changing subcellular location. Among phospholipids examined, we demonstrate that phosphatidic acid (PA) elevates its sialidase activity 4 to 5 times at 50 μM in vitro at neutral pH and promotes translocation to the cell surface and cell migration through Ras-signaling in HeLa and COS-1 cells. NEU3 was found to interact selectively with PA as assessed by phospholipid array, liposome coprecipitation, and ELISA assays and to colocalize with phospholipase D (PLD) 1 in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) or serum stimulation. Studies using tagged NEU3 fragments with point mutations identified PA- and calmodulin (CaM)-binding sites around the N terminus and confirmed its participation in translocation and catalytic activity. EGF induced PLD1 activation concomitantly with enhanced NEU3 translocation to the cell surface, as assessed by confocal microscopy. These results suggest that interactions of NEU3 with PA produced by PLD1 are important for regulation of transmembrane signaling, this aberrant acceleration probably promoting malignancy in cancers.

  2. Cell signalling mechanisms for insect stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Davies, Shireen A; Cabrero, Pablo; Overend, Gayle; Aitchison, Lorraine; Sebastian, Sujith; Terhzaz, Selim; Dow, Julian A T

    2014-01-01

    Insects successfully occupy most environmental niches and this success depends on surviving a broad range of environmental stressors including temperature, desiccation, xenobiotic, osmotic and infection stress. Epithelial tissues play key roles as barriers between the external and internal environments and therefore maintain homeostasis and organismal tolerance to multiple stressors. As such, the crucial role of epithelia in organismal stress tolerance cannot be underestimated. At a molecular level, multiple cell-specific signalling pathways including cyclic cAMP, cyclic cGMP and calcium modulate tissue, and hence, organismal responses to stress. Thus, epithelial cell-specific signal transduction can be usefully studied to determine the molecular mechanisms of organismal stress tolerance in vivo. This review will explore cell signalling modulation of stress tolerance in insects by focusing on cell signalling in a fluid transporting epithelium--the Malpighian tubule. Manipulation of specific genes and signalling pathways in only defined tubule cell types can influence the survival outcome in response to multiple environmental stressors including desiccation, immune, salt (ionic) and oxidative stress, suggesting that studies in the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster may reveal novel pathways required for stress tolerance.

  3. Demonstration of an aberrant mast-cell population with clonal markers in a subset of patients with "idiopathic" anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem; Scott, Linda M; Kocabas, Can N; Kushnir-Sukhov, Nataliya; Brittain, Erica; Noel, Pierre; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2007-10-01

    Idiopathic anaphylaxis remains a perplexing disorder in which existing prophylactic therapy is inadequate. In this prospective study, we sought to determine whether patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis might have evidence for a clonal disorder of mast cells related to mastocytosis and for which novel targeted therapies might be considered. We report 12 patients with "idiopathic" anaphylaxis who did not exhibit either urticaria pigmentosa or the characteristic bone marrow biopsy finding of multifocal mast-cell aggregates observed in systemic mastocytosis. Of these 12 patients, 5 had evidence of 1 or more minor criteria for mastocytosis. C-KIT mutational analysis was positive for the 816D>V activating mutation in 3 of 3 patients in CD25(+) bone marrow cells where the analysis was performed. These results demonstrate the presence of an aberrant mast-cell population carrying clonal markers in a subset of patients diagnosed with "idiopathic" anaphylaxis, who may respond to inhibitors targeting mutated C-KIT. This intramural clinical trial was conducted in 2003 and 2004 and was registered at (http://clinicalcenter.nih.gov) with a study number 03-I-0010. Since the study is now closed, it is no longer available online.

  4. Gprk2 adjusts Fog signaling to organize cell movements in Drosophila gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Naoyuki; Yu, Fengwei; Hirose, Susumu

    2013-10-01

    Gastrulation of Drosophila melanogaster proceeds through sequential cell movements: ventral mesodermal (VM) cells are induced by secreted Fog protein to constrict their apical surfaces to form the ventral furrow, and subsequently lateral mesodermal (LM) cells involute toward the furrow. How these cell movements are organized remains elusive. Here, we observed that LM cells extended apical protrusions and then underwent accelerated involution movement, confirming that VM and LM cells display distinct cell morphologies and movements. In a mutant for the GPCR kinase Gprk2, apical constriction was expanded to all mesodermal cells and the involution movement was abolished. In addition, the mesodermal cells halted apical constriction prematurely in accordance with the aberrant accumulation of Myosin II. Epistasis analyses revealed that the Gprk2 mutant phenotypes were dependent on the fog gene. Overexpression of Gprk2 suppressed the effects of excess Cta, a downstream component of Fog signaling. Based on these findings, we propose that Gprk2 attenuates and tunes Fog-Cta signaling to prevent apical constriction in LM cells and to support appropriate apical constriction in VM cells. Thus, the two distinct cell movements in mesoderm invagination are not predetermined, but rather are organized by the adjustment of cell signaling.

  5. Profiling Signaling Polarity in Chemotactic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Wei; Jacobs, Jon M.; Qian, Weijun; Moore, Ronald J.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2007-05-15

    While directional movement requires morphological polarization characterized by formation of a leading pseudopodium at the front and a trailing rear at the back, little is known about how protein networks are spatially integrated to regulate this process. Here, we utilize a unique pseudopodial purification system and quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics to map the spatial relationship of 3509 proteins and 228 distinct sites of phosphorylation in polarized cells. Networks of signaling proteins, metabolic pathways, actin regulatory proteins, and kinase-substrate cascades were found to partition to different poles of the cell including components of the Ras/ERK pathway. Also, several novel proteins were found to be differentially phosphorylated at the front or rear of polarized cells and to localize to distinct subcellular structures. Our findings provide insight into the spatial organization of signaling networks that control cell movement and provide a comprehensive profile of proteins and their sites of phosphorylation that control cell polarization.

  6. mTOR links oncogenic signaling to tumor cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yecies, Jessica L; Manning, Brendan D

    2011-03-01

    As a key regulator of cell growth and proliferation, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) has been the subject of intense investigation for its role in tumor development and progression. This research has revealed a signaling network of oncogenes and tumor suppressors lying upstream of mTORC1, and oncogenic perturbations to this network result in the aberrant activation of this kinase complex in the majority of human cancers. However, the molecular events downstream of mTORC1 contributing to tumor cell growth and proliferation are just coming to light. In addition to its better-known functions in promoting protein synthesis and suppressing autophagy, mTORC1 has emerged as a key regulator of cellular metabolism. Recent studies have found that mTORC1 activation is sufficient to stimulate an increase in glucose uptake, glycolysis, and de novo lipid biosynthesis, which are considered metabolic hallmarks of cancer, as well as the pentose phosphate pathway. Here, we focus on the molecular mechanisms of metabolic regulation by mTORC1 and the potential consequences for anabolic tumor growth and therapeutic strategies.

  7. Aberrant let7a/HMGA2 signaling activity with unique clinical phenotype in JAK2-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; You, Jie-Yu; Lung, Jrhau; Huang, Cih-En; Chen, Yi-Yang; Leu, Yu-Wei; Ho, Hsing-Ying; Li, Chian-Pei; Lu, Chang-Hsien; Lee, Kuan-Der; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Gau, Jyh-Pyng

    2017-03-01

    High mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) is an architectural transcription factor that is negatively regulated by let-7 microRNA through binding to it's 3'-untranslated region. Transgenic mice expressing Hmga2 with a truncation of its 3'-untranslated region has been shown to exhibit a myeloproliferative phenotype. To decipher the let-7-HMGA2 axis in myeloproliferative neoplasms, we employed an in vitro model supplemented with clinical correlation. Ba/F3 cells with inducible JAK2V617F expression (Ton.JAK2.V617F cells) showed upregulation of HMGA2 with concurrent let-7a repression. Ton.JAK2.V617F cells treated with a let-7a inhibitor exhibited further escalation of Hmga2 expression, while a let-7a mimic diminished the Hmga2 transcript level. Hmga2 overexpression conferred JAK2-mutated cells with a survival advantage through inhibited apoptosis. A pan-JAK inhibitor, INC424, increased the expression of let-7a, downregulated the level of Hmga2, and led to increased apoptosis in Ton.JAK2.V617F cells in a dose-dependent manner. In samples from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, there was a modest inverse correlation between the expression levels of let-7a and HMGA2 Overexpression of HMGA2 was detected in 29 (19.2%) of the cases, and it was more commonly seen in patients with essential thrombocythemia than in those with polycythemia vera (26.9% vs 12.7%, P=0.044). Patients with upregulated HMGA2 showed an increased propensity for developing major thrombotic events, and they were more likely to harbor one of the 3 driver myeloproliferative neoplasm mutations in JAK2, MPL and CALR Our findings suggest that, in a subset of myeloproliferative neoplasm patients, the let-7-HMGA2 axis plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of the disease that leads to unique clinical phenotypes.

  8. QUANTITATION OF ABERRANT INTERLOCUS T-CELL RECEPTOR REARRANGEMENTS IN MOUSE THYMOCYTES AND THE EFFECT OF THE HERBICIDE 2,4- DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitation of aberrant interlocus T-cell receptor rearrangements in mouse thymocytes and the effect of the herbicide 2,4- Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    Small studies in human populations have suggested a correlation between the frequency of errors in antigen receptor gene a...

  9. Aberrant PGE₂ metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE₂. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE₂, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE₂ metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue.

  10. Endothelial cells' biophysical, biochemical, and chromosomal aberrancies in high-glucose condition within the diabetic range.

    PubMed

    Rezabakhsh, Aysa; Nabat, Elahe; Yousefi, Mina; Montazersaheb, Soheila; Cheraghi, Omid; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Fathi, Farzaneh; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Garjani, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    To date, many studies have been conducted to find out the underlying mechanisms of hyperglycemia-induced complications in diabetes mellitus, attributed to the cellular pathologies of different cells-especially endothelial cells. However, there are still many ambiguities and unresolved issues to be clarified. Here, we investigated the alteration in biophysical and biochemical properties in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to a high-glucose concentration (30mM), comparable to glucose content in type 2 diabetes mellitus, over a course of 120 hours. In addition to a reduction in the rate of cell viability and induction of oxidative stress orchestrated by the high-glucose condition, the dynamic of the fatty acid profile-including polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and saturated fatty acids-was also altered in favor of saturated fatty acids. Genetic imbalances were also detected at chromosomal level in the cells exposed to the abnormal concentration of glucose after 120 hours. Moreover, the number of tip cells (CD31(+) /CD34(+) ) and in vitro tubulogenesis capability negatively diminished in comparison to parallel control groups. We found that diabetic hyperglycemia was associated with a decrease in the cell-cell tight junction and upregulation in vascular endothelial cadherin and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 molecules after 72 and 120 hours of exposure to the abnormal glucose concentration, which resulted in a profound reduction in transendothelial electrical resistance. The surface plasmon resonance analysis of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells immobilized on gold-coated sensor chips confirmed the loosening of the cell to cell intercellular junction as well as stable attachment of each cell to the basal surface. Our findings highlighted the disturbing effects of a diabetic hyperglycemia on either biochemical or biophysical properties of endothelial cells.

  11. Enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells during methamphetamine induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-W.; Ping, Y.-H.; Yen, J.-C.; Chang, C.-Y.; Wang, S.-F.; Yeh, C.-L.; Chi, C.-W.; Lee, H.-C. . E-mail: hclee2@ym.edu.tw

    2007-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an abused drug that may cause psychiatric and neurotoxic damage, including degeneration of monoaminergic terminals and apoptosis of non-monoaminergic cells in Brain. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these METH-induced neurotoxic effects remain to be clarified. In this study, we performed a time course assessment to investigate the effects of METH on intracellular oxidative stress and mitochondrial alterations in a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We characterized that METH induces a temporal sequence of several cellular events including, firstly, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential within 1 h of the METH treatment, secondly, an extensive decline in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 8 h of the treatment, thirdly, an increase in mitochondrial mass after the drug treatment for 24 h, and finally, a decrease in mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial proteins per mitochondrion as well as the occurrence of apoptosis after 48 h of the treatment. Importantly, vitamin E attenuated the METH-induced increases in intracellular ROS level and mitochondrial mass, and prevented METH-induced cell death. Our observations suggest that enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis may play critical roles in METH-induced neurotoxic effects.

  12. Targeting extracellular ROS signaling of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2014-04-01

    Expression of membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX1) represents a characteristic feature of malignant cells. NOX1-derived extracellular superoxide anions are the basis for autocrine stimulation of proliferation, but also drive the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathways. This may cause the elimination of transformed cells. Tumor cells express membrane-associated catalase that efficiently protects the cells against apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Membrane-associated superoxide dismutase (SOD) plays a co-modulatory protective role that is functionally interrelated with the protective effect mediated by catalase. Due to the co-localization of NOX1, catalase and SOD on the outer membrane of tumor cells, specific inhibition of membrane-associated SOD causes superoxide anion-dependent inhibition of catalase. This establishes a strong apoptotic signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite pathway. In parallel, it causes a drastic decrease in the concentration of proliferation-stimulating H2O2. Knowledge of the biochemical network on the surface of tumor cells should, therefore, allow development of specific novel strategies for tumor therapy, based on the specific features of tumor cell-specific extracellular ROS interactions.

  13. Identification of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, R.I.

    1998-04-21

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS) between 25 and 35 kD, which is secreted by fibroblastic primary avian tendon cells in culture, and causes the cells to self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. It effects an increase of procollagen production in avian tendon cell cultures of ten fold while proliferation rates are decreased. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use. 2 figs.

  14. Identification of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS) between 25 and 35 kD, which is secreted by fibroblastic primary avian tendon cells in culture, and causes the cells to self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. It effects an increase of procollagen production in avian tendon cell cultures of ten fold while proliferation rates are decreased. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use.

  15. In Vitro Chromosome Aberrations Study in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    24, 1996 Experimental Start Date: Experimental Termination Date: Study Coŕpletion Date: 10.0 Test System: Exponentially growing CHO-K1 cells...by a decline in cell growth , or by achieving the highest possible concentration (i.e., 100.0%). If possible, the high dose was selected to give at...8.0) was detected in the toxicity test cultures at doses selected for clastogenic testing. 13.2 Toxicity Test: Exponentially growing cells seeded

  16. Skew aberration: a form of polarization aberration.

    PubMed

    Yun, Garam; Crabtree, Karlton; Chipman, Russell A

    2011-10-15

    We define a new class of aberration, skew aberration, which is a component of polarization aberration. Skew aberration is an intrinsic rotation of polarization states due to the geometric transformation of local coordinates, independent of coatings and interface polarization. Skew aberration in a radially symmetric system has the form of a circular retardance tilt plus coma aberration. Skew aberration causes undesired polarization distribution in the exit pupil. We demonstrate statistics on skew aberration of 2383 optical systems described in Code V's U.S. patent library [Code V Version 10.3 (Synopsys, 2011), pp. 22-24]; the mean skew aberration is 0.89° and the standard deviation is 1.37°. The maximum skew aberration found is 17.45° and the minimum is -11.33°. U.S. patent 2,896,506, which has ±7.01° of skew aberration, is analyzed in detail. Skew aberration should be of concern in microlithography optics and other high NA and large field of view optical systems.

  17. An aberrant nuclear localization of E-cadherin is a potent inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin-elicited promotion of the cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Su, Y-J; Chang, Y-W; Lin, W-H; Liang, C-L; Lee, J-L

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that Wnt signaling contributes to reprogramming and maintenance of cancer stem cell (CSC) states activated by loss of membranous E-cadherin expression. However, E-cadherin's exact role in Wnt/β-catenin-mediated promotion of the CSC phenotype remains unclear. Recently, a significant positive correlation has been observed between the expression of nuclear (an aberrant nuclear localization) E-cadherin and β-catenin in gastric and colorectal carcinomas. Here we conducted a series of in-vitro and in-vivo studies to show that the β-catenin/TCF4 interaction was abolished by E-cadherin and was correlated with its nuclear localization, and consequently decreased β-catenin/TCF4 transcriptional activity. Nuclear E-cadherin was a negative regulator of Wnt/β-Catenin-elicited promotion of the CSC phenotype. Using immunohistochemistry on lung cancer tissue microarrays, we found that changes in subcellular location of E-cadherin may be described by tumor grade and stage, suggesting cellular redistribution during lung tumorigenesis. Furthermore, nuclear E-cadherin expression was more significantly inversely correlated with CD133 (a lung CSC marker) expression (P<0.005) than total E-cadherin expression (P<0.05), suggesting that lung cancer as defined by nuclear E-cadherinLow/nuclear β-cateninHigh/CD133High biomarkers has superior prognostic value over total E-cadherinLow/nuclear β-cateninHigh/CD133High. PMID:26075748

  18. Aberrant Cosmc genes result in Tn antigen expression in human colorectal carcinoma cell line HT-29

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Du, Zhenzhen; Sun, Xuhong; Shi, Chuanqin; Zhang, Huaixiang; Hu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Tn antigen, which arises from mutation in the Cosmc gene is one of the most common tumor associated carbohydrate antigens. Cosmc resides in X24 encoded by a single gene and functions as a specific molecular chaperone for T-synthase. While the Tn antigen cannot be detected in normal cells, Cosmc mutations inactivate T-synthase and consequently result in Tn antigen expression within certain cancers. In addition to this Cosmc mutation-induced expression, the Tn antigen is also expressed in such cell lines as Jurkat T, LSC and LS174T. Whether the Cosmc mutation is present in the colon cancer cell line HT-29 is still unclear. Here, we isolate HT-29-Tn+ cells from HT-29 cells derived from a female colon cancer patient. These HT-29-Tn+ cells show a loss of the Cosmc gene coding sequence (CDS) leading to an absence of T-synthase activity and Tn antigen expression. Additionally, almost no methylation of Cosmc CpG islands was detected in HT-29-Tn+ as well as in HT-29-Tn- and Tn- tumor cells from male patients. In contrast, the methylation frequency of CpG island of Cosmc in normal female cells was ~50%. Only one active allele of Cosmc existed in HT-29-Tn+ and HT-29-Tn- cells as based upon detection of SNP sites. These results indicate that Tn antigens expression and T-synthase inactivity in HT-29-Tn+ cells can be related to the absence of CDS in Cosmc active alleles, while an inactive allele deletion of Cosmc in HT-29 cells has no influence on Cosmc function. PMID:26045765

  19. Aberrant expression of p-STAT3 in peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells related to hepatocellular carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Xin, Wenbin; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Fengmei; Gao, Meilan; Yuan, Lingling; Xu, Xiaoyan; Hu, Xuemei; Zhao, Mingdong

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancer types worldwide. The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein is a member of the STAT transcription factor family. Oncogenesis, invasion, and metastasis of HCC are associated with activation of STAT3. However, whether aberrant expression of phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) in peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cells relates to HCC pathogenesis remains unclear. In this study, the expression of p-STAT3 in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6 and IL-10 in the human hepatoma cell line Huh7 co-cultured with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) of healthy volunteers were measured. The correlations between p-STAT3 and IFN-γ/IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 were then analyzed. Results showed that the p-STAT3 level is higher in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood of HCC patients, and in PBMCs co-cultured with Huh7 cells compared to controls. The cytokine (IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) levels were increased and the IFN-γ level was decreased in the serum of HCC patients and in supernatants of PBMCs co-cultured with Huh7 cells. Correlation analyses demonstrated that the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio and the IFN-γ level negatively correlate to the p-STAT3 level in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in samples from patients and in cells cultured in vitro. By contrast, the levels of IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 positively correlated to the p-STAT3 level. This study indicated that the expression of p-STAT3 is upregulated in peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of HCC patients, and which may result in abnormal immune surveillance and thereby, contribute to HCC pathogenesis.

  20. Mutation of a single lytic transglycosylase causes aberrant septation and inhibits cell separation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Cloud, Karen A; Dillard, Joseph P

    2004-11-01

    The function of lytic peptidoglycan transglycosylases is poorly understood. Single lytic transglycosylase mutants of Escherichia coli have no growth phenotype. By contrast, mutation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae ltgC inhibited cell separation without affecting peptidoglycan monomer production. Thus, LtgC has a dedicated function in gonococcal cell division.

  1. Designer cell signal processing circuits for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Robert W; Wang, Baojun

    2015-12-25

    Microorganisms are able to respond effectively to diverse signals from their environment and internal metabolism owing to their inherent sophisticated information processing capacity. A central aim of synthetic biology is to control and reprogramme the signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realise repurposed, beneficial applications ranging from disease diagnosis and environmental sensing to chemical bioproduction. To date most examples of synthetic biological signal processing have been built based on digital information flow, though analogue computing is being developed to cope with more complex operations and larger sets of variables. Great progress has been made in expanding the categories of characterised biological components that can be used for cellular signal manipulation, thereby allowing synthetic biologists to more rationally programme increasingly complex behaviours into living cells. Here we present a current overview of the components and strategies that exist for designer cell signal processing and decision making, discuss how these have been implemented in prototype systems for therapeutic, environmental, and industrial biotechnological applications, and examine emerging challenges in this promising field.

  2. Designer cell signal processing circuits for biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert W.; Wang, Baojun

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to respond effectively to diverse signals from their environment and internal metabolism owing to their inherent sophisticated information processing capacity. A central aim of synthetic biology is to control and reprogramme the signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realise repurposed, beneficial applications ranging from disease diagnosis and environmental sensing to chemical bioproduction. To date most examples of synthetic biological signal processing have been built based on digital information flow, though analogue computing is being developed to cope with more complex operations and larger sets of variables. Great progress has been made in expanding the categories of characterised biological components that can be used for cellular signal manipulation, thereby allowing synthetic biologists to more rationally programme increasingly complex behaviours into living cells. Here we present a current overview of the components and strategies that exist for designer cell signal processing and decision making, discuss how these have been implemented in prototype systems for therapeutic, environmental, and industrial biotechnological applications, and examine emerging challenges in this promising field. PMID:25579192

  3. Musashi signaling in stem cells and cancer.

    PubMed

    Fox, Raymond G; Park, Frederick D; Koechlein, Claire S; Kritzik, Marcie; Reya, Tannishtha

    2015-01-01

    How a single cell gives rise to an entire organism is one of biology's greatest mysteries. Within this process, stem cells play a key role by serving as seed cells capable of both self-renewal to sustain themselves as well as differentiation to generate the full diversity of mature cells and functional tissues. Understanding how this balance between self-renewal and differentiation is achieved is crucial to defining not only the underpinnings of normal development but also how its subversion can lead to cancer. Musashi, a family of RNA binding proteins discovered originally in Drosophila and named after the iconic samurai, Miyamoto Musashi, has emerged as a key signal that confers and protects the stem cell state across organisms. Here we explore the role of this signal in stem cells and how its reactivation can be a critical element in oncogenesis. Relative to long-established developmental signals such as Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch, our understanding of Musashi remains in its infancy; yet all evidence suggests that Musashi will emerge as an equally powerful paradigm for regulating development and cancer and may be destined to have a great impact on biology and medicine.

  4. Cell signaling and cytotoxicity by peroxynitrite.

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Orazio; Palomba, Letizia; Guidarelli, Andrea; Tommasini, Ilaria; Cerioni, Liana; Sestili, Piero

    2002-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen species are now considered to play an important role in various pathologies. Although the pathological significance of these molecules, peroxynitrite in particular, has long been attributed to their abilities to react with any component of the cells, including lipids, proteins, and DNA, a paradigm shift has recently been occurring whereby reactive nitrogen species are appreciated as signaling molecules. The question therefore arises as to whether nitrosative stress is indeed the result of a random (stochastic) process of cell damage, as it has traditionally been viewed, or rather is a consequence of the specific activation of a cascade of signaling events. The above considerations have provided the bases for the research work performed in our laboratory, and the results obtained are illustrated in the present article. In particular, our results indicate that some effects of peroxynitrite are not directly mediated by the oxidant; rather, it appears that peroxynitrite triggers a signaling pathway that finally leads to cytotoxicity. PMID:12426139

  5. High-level DNA amplifications are common genetic aberrations in B-cell neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, C. A.; Döhner, H.; Joos, S.; Trümper, L. H.; Baudis, M.; Barth, T. F.; Ott, G.; Möller, P.; Lichter, P.; Bentz, M.

    1997-01-01

    Gene amplification is one of the molecular mechanisms resulting in the up-regulation of gene expression. In non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, such gene amplifications have been identified rarely. Using comparative genomic hybridization, a technique that has proven to be very sensitive for the detection of high-level DNA amplifications, we analyzed 108 cases of B-cell neoplasms (42 chronic B-cell leukemias, 5 mantle cell lymphomas, and 61 aggressive B-cell lymphomas). Twenty-four high-level amplifications were identified in 13% of the patients and mapped to 15 different genomic regions. Regions most frequently amplified were bands Xq26-28, 2p23-24, and 2p14-16 as well as 18q21 (three times each). Amplification of several proto-oncogenes and a cell cycle control gene (N-MYC (two cases), BCL2, CCND2, and GLI) located within the amplified regions was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization to interphase nuclei of tumor cells. These data demonstrate that gene amplifications in B-cell neoplasms are much more frequent than previously assumed. The identification of highly amplified DNA regions and genes included in the amplicons provides important information for further analyses of genetic events involved in lymphomagenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250147

  6. Aberrant spindle dynamics and cytokinesis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells that lack glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Adrian J; Forde-Thomas, Josephine E; Williams, Hazel; Samereier, Matthias; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell division requires the co-ordinated assembly and disassembly of the mitotic spindle, accurate chromosome segregation and temporal control of cytokinesis to generate two daughter cells. While the absolute details of these processes differ between organisms, there are evolutionarily conserved core components common to all eukaryotic cells, whose identification will reveal the key processes that control cell division. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is a major protein kinase found throughout the eukaryotes and regulates many processes, including cell differentiation, growth, motility and apoptosis. In animals, GSK-3 associates with mitotic spindles and its inhibition causes mis-regulation of chromosome segregation. Two suppressor screens in yeast point to a more general effect of GSK-3 on cell division, however the direct role of GSK-3 in control of mitosis has not been explored outside the animal kingdom. Here we report that the Dictyostelium discoideum GSK-3 orthologue, GskA, associates with the mitotic spindle during cell division, as seen for its mammalian counterparts. Dictyostelium possesses only a single GSK-3 gene that can be deleted to eliminate all GSK-3 activity. We found that gskA-null mutants failed to elongate their mitotic spindle and were unable to divide in shaking culture, but have no chromosome segregation defect. These results suggest further conservation for the role of GSK-3 in the regulation of spindle dynamics during mitosis, but also reveal differences in the mechanisms ensuring accurate chromosome segregation.

  7. Chloroplast signaling within, between and beyond cells

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Burch-Smith, Tessa M.

    2015-01-01

    The most conspicuous function of plastids is the oxygenic photosynthesis of chloroplasts, yet plastids are super-factories that produce a plethora of compounds that are indispensable for proper plant physiology and development. Given their origins as free-living prokaryotes, it is not surprising that plastids possess their own genomes whose expression is essential to plastid function. This semi-autonomous character of plastids requires the existence of sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that provide reliable communication between them and other cellular compartments. Such intracellular signaling is necessary for coordinating whole-cell responses to constantly varying environmental cues and cellular metabolic needs. This is achieved by plastids acting as receivers and transmitters of specific signals that coordinate expression of the nuclear and plastid genomes according to particular needs. In this review we will consider the so-called retrograde signaling occurring between plastids and nuclei, and between plastids and other organelles. Another important role of the plastid we will discuss is the involvement of plastid signaling in biotic and abiotic stress that, in addition to influencing retrograde signaling, has direct effects on several cellular compartments including the cell wall. We will also review recent evidence pointing to an intriguing function of chloroplasts in regulating intercellular symplasmic transport. Finally, we consider an intriguing yet less widely known aspect of plant biology, chloroplast signaling from the perspective of the entire plant. Thus, accumulating evidence highlights that chloroplasts, with their complex signaling pathways, provide a mechanism for exquisite regulation of plant development, metabolism and responses to the environment. As chloroplast processes are targeted for engineering for improved productivity the effect of such modifications on chloroplast signaling will have to be carefully considered in order to avoid

  8. Transplacental exposure to inorganic arsenic at a hepatocarcinogenic dose induces fetal gene expression changes in mice indicative of aberrant estrogen signaling and disrupted steroid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Xie Yaxiong; Cooper, Ryan; Ducharme, Danica M.K.; Tennant, Raymond; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2007-05-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic in utero in C3H mice produces hepatocellular carcinoma in male offspring when they reach adulthood. To help define the molecular events associated with the fetal onset of arsenic hepatocarcinogenesis, pregnant C3H mice were given drinking water containing 0 (control) or 85 ppm arsenic from day 8 to 18 of gestation. At the end of the arsenic exposure period, male fetal livers were removed and RNA isolated for microarray analysis using 22K oligo chips. Arsenic exposure in utero produced significant (p < 0.001) alterations in expression of 187 genes, with approximately 25% of aberrantly expressed genes related to either estrogen signaling or steroid metabolism. Real-time RT-PCR on selected genes confirmed these changes. Various genes controlled by estrogen, including X-inactive-specific transcript, anterior gradient-2, trefoil factor-1, CRP-ductin, ghrelin, and small proline-rich protein-2A, were dramatically over-expressed. Estrogen-regulated genes including cytokeratin 1-19 and Cyp2a4 were over-expressed, although Cyp3a25 was suppressed. Several genes involved with steroid metabolism also showed remarkable expression changes, including increased expression of 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-7 (HSD17{beta}7; involved in estradiol production) and decreased expression of HSD17{beta}5 (involved in testosterone production). The expression of key genes important in methionine metabolism, such as methionine adenosyltransferase-1a, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and thioether S-methyltransferase, were suppressed. Thus, exposure of mouse fetus to inorganic arsenic during a critical period in development significantly alters the expression of various genes encoding estrogen signaling and steroid or methionine metabolism. These alterations could disrupt genetic programming at the very early life stage, which could impact tumor formation much later in adulthood.

  9. Transplacental exposure to inorganic arsenic at a hepatocarcinogenic dose induces fetal gene expression changes in mice indicative of aberrant estrogen signaling and disrupted steroid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Xie, Yaxiong; Cooper, Ryan; Ducharme, Danica M K; Tennant, Raymond; Diwan, Bhalchandra A; Waalkes, Michael P

    2007-05-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic in utero in C3H mice produces hepatocellular carcinoma in male offspring when they reach adulthood. To help define the molecular events associated with the fetal onset of arsenic hepatocarcinogenesis, pregnant C3H mice were given drinking water containing 0 (control) or 85 ppm arsenic from day 8 to 18 of gestation. At the end of the arsenic exposure period, male fetal livers were removed and RNA isolated for microarray analysis using 22K oligo chips. Arsenic exposure in utero produced significant (p<0.001) alterations in expression of 187 genes, with approximately 25% of aberrantly expressed genes related to either estrogen signaling or steroid metabolism. Real-time RT-PCR on selected genes confirmed these changes. Various genes controlled by estrogen, including X-inactive-specific transcript, anterior gradient-2, trefoil factor-1, CRP-ductin, ghrelin, and small proline-rich protein-2A, were dramatically over-expressed. Estrogen-regulated genes including cytokeratin 1-19 and Cyp2a4 were over-expressed, although Cyp3a25 was suppressed. Several genes involved with steroid metabolism also showed remarkable expression changes, including increased expression of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-7 (HSD17beta7; involved in estradiol production) and decreased expression of HSD17beta5 (involved in testosterone production). The expression of key genes important in methionine metabolism, such as methionine adenosyltransferase-1a, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and thioether S-methyltransferase, were suppressed. Thus, exposure of mouse fetus to inorganic arsenic during a critical period in development significantly alters the expression of various genes encoding estrogen signaling and steroid or methionine metabolism. These alterations could disrupt genetic programming at the very early life stage, which could impact tumor formation much later in adulthood.

  10. Influence of retinol on carcinogen-induced sister chromatid exchangers and chromosome aberrations in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, S.; Batt, T.; Huang, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of retinol (Rol) on sister chromatid exchangers (SCE) in V79 cells induced by six indirect and two direct carcinogens, and on chromosome aberration (CA) in V79 cells induced by four indirect carcinogens were studied. The indirect carcinogens used were aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB), cyclophosphamide (CPP), benzo(a)anthracene (BA), benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benz(a)anthracene (DMBA), and 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). The two direct carcinogens were ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Rol effectively inhibited SCE and CA induced by AFB and CPP in a dose-dependent manner, but it had no effect on SCE induced by BA, BP, DMBA, MCA, EMS, and MNNG. To the contrary, Rol had an enhancing effect on CA induced by BP and DMBA. The possibility that Rol exerts its anticarcinogenic effects by inhibiting certain forms of the cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes required for activation of precarcinogens, such as AFB and CPP but not those enzymes required by BA, BP, DMBA, and MCA, is discussed.

  11. Cigarette smoke extract induces aberrant cytochrome-c oxidase subunit II methylation and apoptosis in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Chen, Ping; Peng, Hong; Zhang, Hongliang; Chen, Yan; Cai, Shan; Lu, Qianjin; Guan, Chaxiang

    2015-03-01

    Cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the mechanisms responsible for endothelial apoptosis remain poorly understood. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate whether DNA methylation is involved in smoking-induced endothelial apoptosis. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) at a range of concentrations (0-10%). HUVECs were also incubated with a demethylating reagent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidinem (AZA), with and without CSE. Apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay and flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide staining. We found that CSE treatment significantly increased HUVEC apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot revealed that CSE treatment decreased cytochrome-c oxidase subunit II (COX II) mRNA and protein levels and decreased COX activity. Methylation-specific PCR and direct bisulfite sequencing revealed positive COX II gene methylation. AZA administration partly increased mRNA and protein expressions of COX II, and COX activity decreased by CSE and attenuated the toxic effects of CSE. Our results showed that CSE induced aberrant COX II methylation and apoptosis in HUVECs.

  12. Subgroup J avian leukosis virus infection of chicken dendritic cells induces apoptosis via the aberrant expression of microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Dai, Manman; Zhang, Xu; Cao, Weisheng; Liao, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus that causes immunosuppression and enhances susceptibility to secondary infection. The innate immune system is the first line of defense in preventing bacterial and viral infections, and dendritic cells (DCs) play important roles in innate immunity. Because bone marrow is an organ that is susceptible to ALV-J, the virus may influence the generation of bone marrow-derived DCs. In this study, DCs cultured in vitro were used to investigate the effects of ALV infection. The results revealed that ALV-J could infect these cells during the early stages of differentiation, and infection of DCs with ALV-J resulted in apoptosis. miRNA sequencing data of uninfected and infected DCs revealed 122 differentially expressed miRNAs, with 115 demonstrating upregulation after ALV-J infection and the other 7 showing significant downregulation. The miRNAs that exhibited the highest levels of upregulation may suppress nutrient processing and metabolic function. These results indicated that ALV-J infection of chicken DCs could induce apoptosis via aberrant microRNA expression. These results provide a solid foundation for the further study of epigenetic influences on ALV-J-induced immunosuppression.

  13. HSP90 is essential for Jak-STAT signaling in classical Hodgkin lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schoof, Nils; von Bonin, Frederike; Trümper, Lorenz; Kube, Dieter

    2009-07-16

    In classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) chemotherapeutic regimens are associated with stagnant rates of secondary malignancies requiring the development of new therapeutic strategies. We and others have shown that permanently activated Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) molecules are essential for cHL cells. Recently an overexpression of heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in cHL cells has been shown and inhibition of HSP90 seems to affect cHL cell survival. Here we analysed the effects of HSP90 inhibition by geldanamycin derivative 17-AAG or RNA interference (RNAi) on aberrant Jak-STAT signaling in cHL cells. Treatment of cHL cell lines with 17-AAG led to reduced cell proliferation and a complete inhibition of STAT1, -3, -5 and -6 tyrosine phosphorylation probably as a result of reduced protein expression of Janus kinases (Jaks). RNAi-mediated inhibition of HSP90 showed similar effects on Jak-STAT signaling in L428 cHL cells. These results suggest a central role of HSP90 in permanently activated Jak-STAT signaling in cHL cells. Therapeutics targeting HSP90 may be a promising strategy in cHL and other cancer entities associated with deregulated Jak-STAT pathway activation.

  14. Chemokine Oligomerization in Cell Signaling and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Sharp, Joshua S.; Handel, Tracy M.; Prestegard, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins best known for their role in controlling the migration of diverse cells, particularly leukocytes. Upon binding to their G-protein-coupled receptors on the leukocytes, chemokines stimulate the signaling events that cause cytoskeletal rearrangements involved in cell movement, and migration of the cells along chemokine gradients. Depending on the cell type, chemokines also induce many other types of cellular responses including those related to defense mechanisms, cell proliferation, survival, and development. Historically, most research efforts have focused on the interaction of chemokines with their receptors, where monomeric forms of the ligands are the functionally relevant state. More recently, however, the importance of chemokine interactions with cell surface glycosaminoglycans has come to light, and in most cases appears to involve oligomeric chemokine structures. This review summarizes existing knowledge relating to the structure and function of chemokine oligomers, and emerging methodology for determining structures of complex chemokine assemblies in the future. PMID:23663982

  15. Neural compensation for the eye's optical aberrations.

    PubMed

    Artal, Pablo; Chen, Li; Fernández, Enrique J; Singer, Ben; Manzanera, Silvestre; Williams, David R

    2004-04-16

    A fundamental problem facing sensory systems is to recover useful information about the external world from signals that are corrupted by the sensory process itself. Retinal images in the human eye are affected by optical aberrations that cannot be corrected with ordinary spectacles or contact lenses, and the specific pattern of these aberrations is different in every eye. Though these aberrations always blur the retinal image, our subjective impression is that the visual world is sharp and clear, suggesting that the brain might compensate for their subjective influence. The recent introduction of adaptive optics to control the eye's aberrations now makes it possible to directly test this idea. If the brain compensates for the eye's aberrations, vision should be clearest with the eye's own aberrations rather than with unfamiliar ones. We asked subjects to view a stimulus through an adaptive optics system that either recreated their own aberrations or a rotated version of them. For all five subjects tested, the stimulus seen with the subject's own aberrations was always sharper than when seen through the rotated version. This supports the hypothesis that the neural visual system is adapted to the eye's aberrations, thereby removing somehow the effects of blur generated by the sensory apparatus from visual experience. This result could have important implications for methods to correct higher order aberrations with customized refractive surgery because some benefits of optimizing the correction optically might be undone by the nervous system's compensation for the old aberrations.

  16. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  17. Aberrant expression of the neuronal transcription factor FOXP2 in neoplastic plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew J; Lyne, Linden; Brown, Philip J; Launchbury, Rosalind J; Bignone, Paola; Chi, Jianxiang; Roncador, Giovanna; Lawrie, Charles H; Gatter, Kevin C; Kusec, Rajko; Banham, Alison H

    2010-04-01

    FOXP2 mutation causes a severe inherited speech and language defect, while the related transcription factors FOXP1, FOXP3 and FOXP4 are implicated in cancer. FOXP2 mRNA and protein expression were characterised in normal human tissues, haematological cell lines and multiple myeloma (MM) patients' samples. FOXP2 mRNA and protein were absent in mononuclear cells from different anatomical sites, lineages and stages of differentiation. However, FOXP2 mRNA and protein was detected in several lymphoma (8/20) and all MM-derived cell lines (n = 4). FOXP2 mRNA was expressed in bone marrow samples from 96% of MM patients (24/25), 66.7% of patients with the pre-neoplastic plasma cell proliferation monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (6/9), but not in reactive plasma cells. The frequency of FOXP2 protein expression in CD138(+) plasma cells was significantly higher in MGUS (P = 0.0005; mean 46.4%) and MM patients (P < or = 0.0001; mean 57.3%) than in reactive marrows (mean 2.5%). FOXP2 (>10% nuclear positivity) was detectable in 90.2% of MM (55/61) and 90.9% of MGUS (10/11) patients, showing more frequent expression than CD56 and labelling 75% of CD56-negative MM (9/12). FOXP2 represents the first transcription factor whose expression consistently differentiates normal and abnormal plasma cells and FOXP2 target genes are implicated in MM pathogenesis.

  18. Multiple Drug Treatments That Increase cAMP Signaling Restore Long-Term Memory and Aberrant Signaling in Fragile X Syndrome Models

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Catherine H.; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Bell, Aaron J.; Hinchey, Joseph; Rosenfelt, Cory; Gertner, Michael J.; Campbell, Sean R.; Emerson, Danielle; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Ferrick, Neal J.; Chambers, Daniel B.; Langer, Steven; Sust, Steven; Malik, Aatika; Terlizzi, Allison M.; Liebelt, David A.; Ferreiro, David; Sharma, Ali; Koenigsberg, Eric; Choi, Richard J.; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E.; Featherstone, Robert E.; Siegel, Steven J.; Zukin, R. Suzanne; McDonald, Thomas V.; Bolduc, Francois V.; Jongens, Thomas A.; McBride, Sean M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X is the most common monogenic disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Additionally, many patients are afflicted with executive dysfunction, ADHD, seizure disorder and sleep disturbances. Fragile X is caused by loss of FMRP expression, which is encoded by the FMR1 gene. Both the fly and mouse models of fragile X are also based on having no functional protein expression of their respective FMR1 homologs. The fly model displays well defined cognitive impairments and structural brain defects and the mouse model, although having subtle behavioral defects, has robust electrophysiological phenotypes and provides a tool to do extensive biochemical analysis of select brain regions. Decreased cAMP signaling has been observed in samples from the fly and mouse models of fragile X as well as in samples derived from human patients. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that strategies that increase cAMP signaling can rescue short term memory in the fly model and restore DHPG induced mGluR mediated long term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus to proper levels in the mouse model (McBride et al., 2005; Choi et al., 2011, 2015). Here, we demonstrate that the same three strategies used previously with the potential to be used clinically, lithium treatment, PDE-4 inhibitor treatment or mGluR antagonist treatment can rescue long term memory in the fly model and alter the cAMP signaling pathway in the hippocampus of the mouse model. PMID:27445731

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Stimulation Induces Aberrant Expression of a Proliferation-Inducing Ligand by Tonsillar Germinal Center B Cells in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Muto, Masahiro; Manfroi, Benoit; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Joh, Kensuke; Nagai, Masaaki; Wakai, Sachiko; Righini, Christian; Maiguma, Masayuki; Izui, Shozo; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Huard, Bertrand; Suzuki, Yusuke

    2017-04-01

    The TNF family member a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL; also known as TNFSF13), produced by myeloid cells, participates in the generation and survival of antibody-producing plasma cells. We studied the potential role of APRIL in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). We found that a significant proportion of germinal centers (GCs) in tonsils of patients with IgAN contained cells aberrantly producing APRIL, contributing to an overall upregulation of tonsillar APRIL expression compared with that in tonsils of control patients with tonsillitis. In IgAN GC, antigen-experienced IgD(-)CD38(+/-)CD19(+) B cells expressing a switched IgG/IgA B cell receptor produced APRIL. Notably, these GC B cells expressed mRNA encoding the common cleavable APRIL-α but also, the less frequent APRIL-δ/ζ mRNA, which encodes a protein that lacks a furin cleavage site and is, thus, the uncleavable membrane-bound form. Significant correlation between TLR9 and APRIL expression levels existed in tonsils from patients with IgAN. In vitro, repeated TLR9 stimulation induced APRIL expression in tonsillar B cells from control patients with tonsillitis. Clinically, aberrant APRIL expression in tonsillar GC correlated with greater proteinuria, and patients with IgAN and aberrant APRIL overexpression in tonsillar GC responded well to tonsillectomy, with parallel decreases in serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1. Taken together, our data indicate that antibody disorders in IgAN associate with TLR9-induced aberrant expression of APRIL in tonsillar GC B cells.

  20. Aberrant Expression of proPTPRN2 in Cancer Cells Confers Resistance to Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Alexey V; Nair, Binoj C; Wei, Yongkun; Aziz, Kathryn E; Evdokimova, Valentina; Hung, Mien-Chie; Chen, Junjie

    2015-05-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor PTPRN2 is expressed predominantly in endocrine and neuronal cells, where it functions in exocytosis. We found that its immature isoform proPTPRN2 is overexpressed in various cancers, including breast cancer. High proPTPRN2 expression was associated strongly with lymph node-positive breast cancer and poor clinical outcome. Loss of proPTPRN2 in breast cancer cells promoted apoptosis and blocked tumor formation in mice, whereas enforced expression of proPTPRN2 in nontransformed human mammary epithelial cells exerted a converse effect. Mechanistic investigations suggested that ProPTPRN2 elicited these effects through direct interaction with TRAF2, a hub scaffold protein for multiple kinase cascades, including ones that activate NF-κB. Overall, our results suggest PTPRN2 as a novel candidate biomarker and therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  1. Painting analysis of chromosome aberrations induced by energetic heavy ions in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation genetic mutations and cancer induction Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults Over the years we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell We will summarize the results of the investigations and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure

  2. FBXW7-mutated colorectal cancer cells exhibit aberrant expression of phosphorylated-p53 at Serine-15

    PubMed Central

    Normatova, Makhliyo; Babaei-Jadidi, Roya; Tomlinson, Ian; Nateri, Abdolrahman S.

    2015-01-01

    FBXW7 mutations occur in a variety of human cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). Elucidating its mechanism of action has become crucial for cancer therapy; however, it is also complicated by the fact that FBXW7 can influence many pathways due to its role as an E3-ubiquitin ligase in proteasome degradation. FBXW7 and TP53 are tumour suppressors intensively implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Deletion mutations in these two genes in animal models mark the progression from adenoma to carcinoma. Although still largely unknown, the last defense mechanism against CRC at the molecular level could be through a synergistic effect of the two genes. The underlying mechanism requires further investigation. In our laboratory, we have used a phospho-kinase profiler array to illustrate a potential molecular link between FBXW7 and p53 in CRC cells. In vitro and in vivo assessments demonstrated aberrant induction of phosphorylated p53 at Serine 15 [phospho-p53(Ser15)] in human FBXW7-deficient CRC cells as compared to their FBXW7-wild-type counterparts. FBXW7 loss in HCT116 cells promoted resistance to oxaliplatin. Immunoblotting data further confirmed that reduction of phospho-p53(Ser15) may contribute to the decreased efficacy of therapy in FBXW7-mutated CRC cells. The findings may suggest the applicability of phospho-p53(Ser15) as an indicative marker of FBXW7-mutations. Phospho-p53(Ser15) regulation by FBXW7 E3-ligase activity could provide important clues for understanding FBXW7 behavior in tumour progression and grounds for its clinical applicability thereafter. PMID:25860929

  3. Intratubular Germ Cell Neoplasia of the Testis, Bilateral Testicular Cancer, and Aberrant Histologies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pranav; Dhillon, Jasreman; Sexton, Wade J

    2015-08-01

    Intratubular germ cell neoplasia (ITGCN) is a precursor lesion for testicular germ cell tumors, most of which are early stage. ITGCN is also associated with testicular cancer or ITGCN in the contralateral testis, leading to a risk of bilateral testicular malignancy. Testicular biopsy detects most cases, and orchiectomy is the treatment of choice in patients with unilateral ITGCN. Low-dose radiation therapy is recommended in patients with bilateral ITGCN or ITGCN in the solitary testis, but the long-term risks of infertility and hypogonadism need to be discussed with the patient. Rare histologies of primary testicular cancer are also discussed.

  4. Role of PSMA in Aberrant Cell Cycle Progression in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    tested whether PSMA associates with the core APC complex. We observed that in both PC3-PSMA and MDCK-PSMA cells Cdc 27 co-immunoprecipitated with P...c), 34 (d), and 45 (e) show aneuploi dy. Micronucleus formation (e, arrow and f) and abnormal metaphase (g) in HCT-PSMA cells at passage 45 are...vantage in vivo when grown in the presence of high salt. We tested whether high dietary sodium promotes tumor growth in in vivo xenografts of PC3

  5. Targeting aberrant expression of Notch-1 in ALDH(+) cancer stem cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pal, Deeksha; Kolluru, Venkatesh; Chandrasekaran, Balaji; Baby, Becca V; Aman, Masarath; Suman, Suman; Sirimulla, Suman; Sanders, Mary Ann; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2017-03-01

    We have previously reported that high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzyme activity in breast cancer cells results in breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) properties by upregualting Notch-1 and epithelial mesenchymal markers. This results in chemoresistance in breast cancer. Here, we examined the functional and clinical significance of ALDH expression by measuring the ALDH levels in breast cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry. There was a significantly higher ALDH expression in higher grade breast cancer tumor tissues (Grade- II and III) versus normal breast tissues. Injection of BCSC (ALDH(+) and CD44(+) /CD22(-) ) cells resulted in aggressive tumor growth in athymic mice versus ALDH(-) cells. The ALDH(+) and CD44(+) /CD22(-) tumors grow rapidly and are larger than ALDH(-) tumors which were slow growing and smaller. Molecularly, ALDH(+) tumors expressed higher expression of Notch-1 and EMT markers than ALDH(-) tumors. Oral administration of the naturally occurring Psoralidin (Pso, 25 mg/kg of body weight) significantly inhibited the growth in ALDH(+) and ALDH(-) tumors as well. Psoralidin inhibited Notch-1 mediated EMT activation in ALDH(+) and ALDH(-) tumors-this confirms our in vitro findings. Our results suggest that Notch-1 could be an attractive target and inhibition of Notch-1 by Psoralidin may prevent pathogenesis of breast cancer as well as metastasis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Aberrant EphB/ephrin-B expression in experimental gastric lesions and tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Shintaro; Saeki, Noritaka; Ogawa, Kazushige

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the expression profiles of EphB receptor and ephrin-B ligand can be used as markers for dysplastic/oncogenic transformation in gastric mucosa. METHODS: The protein expression and localization of EphB and ephrin-B in normal, ulcerated regenerating, and dysplastic gastric mucosa were examined in a rat experimental model by immunolabeling, and mRNA expression was assessed in four human gastric carcinoma cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Ephrin-B- and EphB-expressing regions were divided along the pit-gland axis in normal gastric units. EphB2 was transiently upregulated in the experimental ulcer, and its expression domain extended to gastric pits and/or the luminal surface where ephrin-B-expressing pit cells reside. EphB2, B3, and B4 and ephrin-B1 were coexpressed in the experimental gastric dysplasia, and more than one ligand-receptor pair was highly expressed in each of the gastric carcinoma cell lines. CONCLUSION: Robust and stable coexpression of EphB and ephrin-B is a feature common to experimentally induced gastric dysplasia and human gastric carcinoma cell lines as compared to normal gastric and ulcerated regenerating epithelia. Thus, EphB/ephrin-B may be a useful marker combination for dysplastic/oncogenic transformation in gastric cancer. PMID:25593460

  7. M-BAND analysis of chromosome aberration induced by Fe-ions in human epithelial cells cultured in 3-dimensional matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied lowand high-LET radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D cellular environment in vitro can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137 Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultured at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference of the chromosome aberration yield between 2D and 3D cell cultures for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures

  8. M-BAND Analysis of Chromosome Aberration Induced by Fe-Ions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured in 3-Dimensional Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2008-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D cellular environment in vitro can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelia cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultued at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference of the chromosome aberration yield between 2D and 3D cell cultures for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures

  9. Salinomycin inhibits Wnt signaling and selectively induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Desheng; Choi, Michael Y; Yu, Jian; Castro, Januario E; Kipps, Thomas J; Carson, Dennis A

    2011-08-09

    Salinomycin, an antibiotic potassium ionophore, has been reported recently to act as a selective breast cancer stem cell inhibitor, but the biochemical basis for its anticancer effects is not clear. The Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway plays a central role in stem cell development, and its aberrant activation can cause cancer. In this study, we identified salinomycin as a potent inhibitor of the Wnt signaling cascade. In Wnt-transfected HEK293 cells, salinomycin blocked the phosphorylation of the Wnt coreceptor lipoprotein receptor related protein 6 (LRP6) and induced its degradation. Nigericin, another potassium ionophore with activity against cancer stem cells, exerted similar effects. In otherwise unmanipulated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with constitutive Wnt activation nanomolar concentrations of salinomycin down-regulated the expression of Wnt target genes such as LEF1, cyclin D1, and fibronectin, depressed LRP6 levels, and limited cell survival. Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes resisted salinomycin toxicity. These results indicate that ionic changes induced by salinomycin and related drugs inhibit proximal Wnt signaling by interfering with LPR6 phosphorylation, and thus impair the survival of cells that depend on Wnt signaling at the plasma membrane.

  10. Cell signalling is the music of life.

    PubMed

    Hancock, J T

    2008-01-01

    Cell signalling is an immensely important topic in biological and biomedical sciences, and one which has an ever-increasing literature. As more and more is known about it, and more components are discovered, it is getting harder and harder to visualise how it all might work to create an holistic mechanism in the cell. To achieve a better understanding of a complex issue such as this, it is often useful to use an analogy which is familiar to the researcher to encourage better understanding. In this essay it is suggested that music, and the instruments used to produce it, can be used as such an analogy. Various elements and issues in cell signalling are discussed and musical comparisons are made. Clearly, the true understanding of cell signalling will come from systems biology and mathematical modelling, but it is proposed that this analogy might prove useful. The phrasing used may be considered a little loose and flamboyant for a scientific topic of such importance, but it is hoped that the discussion will not only be interesting but might also be useful in fostering debate and facilitating teaching in this area of molecular biology.

  11. Genotoxic effects of the alkaloids harman and harmine assessed by comet assay and chromosome aberration test in mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boeira, J M; da Silva, J; Erdtmann, B; Henriques, J A

    2001-12-01

    Harman and harmine are beta-carboline alkaloids which are present in plants widely used in medical practice, in beverages used for religious purposes in Brazil, as well as in tobacco smoke and over cooked food. In view of the controversial results observed in the literature about the mutagenic effects of these alkaloids, we studied their cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts in vitro using single-cell gel assay, Comet assay, either in the presence or in absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system (S9-mix), and by the chromosome aberration test without S9-mix. Harmine was more cytotoxic than harman. Both harman and harmine increased aberrant cell frequency and induced DNA damage by the Comet assay. These results suggest that harman and harmine are genotoxic in V79 cells, probably as a consequence of their ability to induce DNA strand breaks.

  12. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun; Bartish, Margarita; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Georgiou, Konstantinos; Børglum, Anders D; Gatti, Richard A; Törngren, Therese; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang

    2015-02-17

    Breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) has a multitude of functions that contribute to genome integrity and tumor suppression. Its participation in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during homologous recombination (HR) is well recognized, whereas its involvement in the second major DSB repair pathway, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), remains controversial. Here we have studied the role of BRCA1 in the repair of DSBs in switch (S) regions during immunoglobulin class switch recombination, a physiological, deletion/recombination process that relies on the classical NHEJ machinery. A shift to the use of microhomology-based, alternative end-joining (A-EJ) and increased frequencies of intra-S region deletions as well as insertions of inverted S sequences were observed at the recombination junctions amplified from BRCA1-deficient human B cells. Furthermore, increased use of long microhomologies was found at recombination junctions derived from E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RNF168-deficient, Fanconi anemia group J protein (FACJ, BRIP1)-deficient, or DNA endonuclease RBBP8 (CtIP)-compromised cells, whereas an increased frequency of S-region inversions was observed in breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein (BRCA2)-deficient cells. Thus, BRCA1, together with its interaction partners, seems to play an important role in repairing DSBs generated during class switch recombination by promoting the classical NHEJ pathway. This may not only provide a general mechanism underlying BRCA1's function in maintaining genome stability and tumor suppression but may also point to a previously unrecognized role of BRCA1 in B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  13. Aberrant production of tenascin-C in globoid cell leukodystrophy alters psychosine-induced microglial functions.

    PubMed

    Claycomb, Kumiko I; Winokur, Paige N; Johnson, Kasey M; Nicaise, Alexandra M; Giampetruzzi, Anthony W; Sacino, Anthony V; Snyder, Evan Y; Barbarese, Elisa; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Crocker, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD), or Krabbe disease, is a rare and often fatal demyelinating disease caused by mutations in the galactocerebrosidase (galc) gene that result in accumulation of galactosylsphingosine (psychosine). We recently reported that the extracellular matrix (ECM) protease, matrix metalloproteinase-3, is elevated in GLD and that it regulates psychosine-induced microglial activation. Here, we examined central nervous system ECM component expression in human GLD patients and in the twitcher mouse model of GLD using immunohistochemistry. The influence of ECM proteins on primary murine microglial responses to psychosine was evaluated using ECM proteins as substrates and analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunocytochemistry, and ELISA. Functional analysis of microglial cytotoxicity was performed on oligodendrocytes in coculture, and cell death was measured by lactose dehydrogenase assay. Tenascin-C (TnC) was expressed at higher levels in human GLD and in twitcher mice versus controls. Microglial responses to psychosine were enhanced by TnC, as determined by an increase in globoid-like cell formation, matrix metalloproteinase-3 mRNA expression, and higher toxicity toward oligodendrocytes in culture. These findings were consistent with a shift toward the M1 microglial phenotype in TnC-grown microglia. Thus, elevated TnC expression in GLD modified microglial responses to psychosine. These data offer a novel perspective and enhance understanding of the microglial contribution to GLD pathogenesis.

  14. Aberrant microRNA Expression Likely Controls RAS Oncogene Activation During Malignant Transformation of Human Prostate Epithelial and Stem Cells by Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Ngalame, Ntube N. O.; Tokar, Erik J.; Person, Rachel J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs), a human carcinogen, potentially targets the prostate. iAs malignantly transforms the RWPE-1 human prostate epithelial line to CAsE-PE cells, and a derivative normal stem cell (SC) line, WPE-stem, to As-Cancer SC (As-CSC) line. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are noncoding but exert negative control on expression by degradation or translational repression of target mRNAs. Aberrant miRNA expression is important in carcinogenesis. A miRNA array of CAsE-PE and As-CSC revealed common altered expression in both for pathways concerning oncogenesis, miRNA biogenesis, cell signaling, proliferation, and tumor metastasis and invasion. The KRAS oncogene is overexpressed in CAsE-PE cells but not by mutation or promoter hypomethylation, and is intensely overexpressed in As-CSC cells. In both transformants, decreased miRNAs targeting KRAS and RAS superfamily members occurred. Reduced miR-134, miR-373, miR-155, miR-138, miR-205, miR-181d, miR-181c, and let-7 in CAsE-PE cells correlated with increased target RAS oncogenes, RAN, RAB27A, RAB22A mRNAs, and KRAS protein. Reduced miR-143, miR-34c-5p, and miR-205 in As-CSC correlated with increased target RAN mRNA, and KRAS, NRAS, and RRAS proteins. The RAS/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathways control cell survival, differentiation, and proliferation, and when dysregulated promote a cancer phenotype. iAs transformation increased expression of activated ERK kinase in both transformants and altered components of the PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway including decreased PTEN and increases in BCL2, BCL-XL, and VEGF in the absence of AKT activation. Thus, dysregulated miRNA expression may be linked to RAS activation in both transformants. PMID:24431212

  15. Disruption of miR-29 Leads to Aberrant Differentiation of Smooth Muscle Cells Selectively Associated with Distal Lung Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Leah; Costinean, Stefan; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Zhihua; Madden, Lindsey; Kuang, Pingping; Huang, Jingshu; Weisman, Alexandra; Hata, Akiko; Croce, Carlo M; Lü, Jining

    2015-05-01

    Differentiation of lung vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) is tightly regulated during development or in response to challenges in a vessel specific manner. Aberrant vSMCs specifically associated with distal pulmonary arteries have been implicated in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases, such as pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a progressive and fatal disease, with no effective treatment. Therefore, it is highly relevant to understand the underlying mechanisms of lung vSMC differentiation. miRNAs are known to play critical roles in vSMC maturation and function of systemic vessels; however, little is known regarding the role of miRNAs in lung vSMCs. Here, we report that miR-29 family members are the most abundant miRNAs in adult mouse lungs. Moreover, high levels of miR-29 expression are selectively associated with vSMCs of distal vessels in both mouse and human lungs. Furthermore, we have shown that disruption of miR-29 in vivo leads to immature/synthetic vSMC phenotype specifically associated with distal lung vasculature, at least partially due to the derepression of KLF4, components of the PDGF pathway and ECM-related genes associated with synthetic phenotype. Moreover, we found that expression of FBXO32 in vSMCs is significantly upregulated in the distal vasculature of miR-29 null lungs. This indicates a potential important role of miR-29 in smooth muscle cell function by regulating FBXO32 and SMC protein degradation. These results are strongly supported by findings of a cell autonomous role of endogenous miR-29 in promoting SMC differentiation in vitro. Together, our findings suggested a vessel specific role of miR-29 in vSMC differentiation and function by targeting several key negative regulators.

  16. Ligand-Independent Canonical Wnt Activity in Canine Mammary Tumor Cell Lines Associated with Aberrant LEF1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    van Wolferen, Monique E.; Rao, Nagesha A. S.; Grizelj, Juraj; Vince, Silvijo; Hellmen, Eva; Mol, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Pet dogs very frequently develop spontaneous mammary tumors and have been suggested as a good model organism for breast cancer research. In order to obtain an insight into underlying signaling mechanisms during canine mammary tumorigenesis, in this study we assessed the incidence and the mechanism of canonical Wnt activation in a panel of 12 canine mammary tumor cell lines. We show that a subset of canine mammary cell lines exhibit a moderate canonical Wnt activity that is dependent on Wnt ligands, similar to what has been described in human breast cancer cell lines. In addition, three of the tested canine mammary cell lines have a high canonical Wnt activity that is not responsive to inhibitors of Wnt ligand secretion. Tumor cell lines with highly active canonical Wnt signaling often carry mutations in key members of the Wnt signaling cascade. These cell lines, however, carry no mutations in the coding regions of intracellular Wnt pathway components (APC, β-catenin, GSK3β, CK1α and Axin1) and have a functional β-catenin destruction complex. Interestingly, however, the cell lines with high canonical Wnt activity specifically overexpress LEF1 mRNA and the knock-down of LEF1 significantly inhibits TCF-reporter activity. In addition, LEF1 is overexpressed in a subset of canine mammary carcinomas, implicating LEF1 in ligand-independent activation of canonical Wnt signaling in canine mammary tumors. We conclude that canonical Wnt activation may be a frequent event in canine mammary tumors both through Wnt ligand-dependent and novel ligand–independent mechanisms. PMID:24887235

  17. Separating strain from composition in unit cell parameter maps obtained from aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, T.; Remmele, T.; Korytov, M.; Markurt, T.; Albrecht, M.; Duff, A.; Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Chèze, C.

    2014-01-21

    Based on the evaluation of lattice parameter maps in aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy images, we propose a simple method that allows quantifying the composition and disorder of a semiconductor alloy at the unit cell scale with high accuracy. This is realized by considering, next to the out-of-plane, also the in-plane lattice parameter component allowing to separate the chemical composition from the strain field. Considering only the out-of-plane lattice parameter component not only yields large deviations from the true local alloy content but also carries the risk of identifying false ordering phenomena like formations of chains or platelets. Our method is demonstrated on image simulations of relaxed supercells, as well as on experimental images of an In{sub 0.20}Ga{sub 0.80}N quantum well. Principally, our approach is applicable to all epitaxially strained compounds in the form of quantum wells, free standing islands, quantum dots, or wires.

  18. Calcium signaling in plant cells in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E.

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2 + concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca2 + signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in eighties, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2 + changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumably specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2 + ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravis ensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane

  19. Investigation of DNA-damage and Chromosomal Aberrations in Blood Cells under the Influence of New Silver-based Antiviral Complex

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Evgenii; Silnikov, Vladimir; Gapeyev, Andrew; Plotnikov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The problem of infectious diseases and drug resistance is becoming increasingly important worldwide. Silver is extensively used as an anti-infective agent, but it has significant toxic side effects. In this regard, it is topical to develop new silver compounds with high biological activity and low toxicity. This work is aimed to study DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations in blood cells under the influence of new silver-based compound of general formula C6H19Ag2N4LiO6S2, with antiviral activity. Methods: The comet assay was applied for the genotoxic affects assessment on mice blood leukocytes. DNA damage was determined bases on the percentage of DNA in a comet tail (tail DNA), under the influence of silver complex in different concentrations. Genotoxic effect of the tested substance on the somatic cells was determined by chromosomal aberration test of bone marrow cells of mice. Results: In the course of the experiments, no essential changes in the level of DNA damage in the cells were found, even at highest concentrations. The administration of the substance in doses up to 2.5 g/kg in mice did not cause any increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberration in bone marrow cells. Conclusion: Taking into account known silver drug genotoxic properties, the use of a given complexed silver compound has possible great advantages for potential applications in the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:27123420

  20. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  1. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-09-03

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC.

  2. High resolution SNP array genomic profiling of peripheral T cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified, identifies a subgroup with chromosomal aberrations affecting the REL locus.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Gesk, Stefan; Scholtysik, René; Kreuz, Markus; Bug, Stefanie; Vater, Inga; Döring, Claudia; Cogliatti, Sergio; Parrens, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Kwiecinska, Anna; Porwit, Anna; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Hoefler, Gerald; Küppers, Ralf; Siebert, Reiner; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about genomic aberrations in peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL NOS). We studied 47 PTCL NOS by 250k GeneChip single nucleotide polymorphism arrays and detected genomic imbalances in 22 of the cases. Recurrent gains and losses were identified, including gains of chromosome regions 1q32-43, 2p15-16, 7, 8q24, 11q14-25, 17q11-21 and 21q11-21 (> or = 5 cases each) as well as losses of chromosome regions 1p35-36, 5q33, 6p22, 6q16, 6q21-22, 8p21-23, 9p21, 10p11-12, 10q11-22, 10q25-26, 13q14, 15q24, 16q22, 16q24, 17p11, 17p13 and Xp22 (> or = 4 cases each). Genomic imbalances affected several regions containing members of nuclear factor-kappaB signalling and genes involved in cell cycle control. Gains of 2p15-16 were confirmed in each of three cases analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and were associated with breakpoints at the REL locus in two of these cases. Three additional cases with gains of the REL locus were detected by FISH among 18 further PTCL NOS. Five of 27 PTCL NOS investigated showed nuclear expression of the REL protein by immunohistochemistry, partly associated with genomic gains of the REL locus. Therefore, in a subgroup of PTCL NOS gains/rearrangements of REL and expression of REL protein may be of pathogenetic relevance.

  3. Natural killer (NK) cell deficit in coronary artery disease: no aberrations in phenotype but sustained reduction of NK cells is associated with low-grade inflammation.

    PubMed

    Backteman, K; Ernerudh, J; Jonasson, L

    2014-01-01

    Although reduced natural killer (NK) cell levels have been reported consistently in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), the clinical significance and persistence of this immune perturbation is not clarified. In this study we characterized the NK cell deficit further by determining (i) differentiation surface markers and cytokine profile of NK cell subsets and (ii) ability to reconstitute NK cell levels over time. Flow cytometry was used to analyse NK cell subsets and the intracellular cytokine profile in 31 patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (non-STEMI), 34 patients with stable angina (SA) and 37 healthy controls. In blood collected prior to coronary angiography, the proportions of NK cells were reduced significantly in non-STEMI and SA patients compared with controls, whereas NK cell subset analyses or cytokine profile measurements did not reveal any differences across groups. During a 12-month follow-up, the proportions of NK cells increased, although not in all patients. Failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with several components of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, interleukin (IL)-6 levels remained high in patients with sustained NK cell deficit, whereas a decline in IL-6 (P < 0·001) was seen in patients with a pronounced increase in NK cells. In conclusion, we found no evidence that reduction of NK cells in CAD patients was associated with aberrations in NK cell phenotype at any clinical stage of the disease. Conversely, failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with a persistent low-grade inflammation, suggesting a protective role of NK cells in CAD.

  4. The Interconnectedness of Cancer Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2011-01-01

    The elegance of fundamental and applied research activities have begun to reveal a myriad of spatial and temporal alterations in downstream signaling networks affected by cell surface receptor stimulation including G protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases. Interconnected biochemical pathways serve to integrate and distribute the signaling information throughout the cell by orchestration of complex biochemical circuits consisting of protein interactions and covalent modification processes. It is clear that scientific literature summarizing results from both fundamental and applied scientific research activities has served to provide a broad foundational biologic database that has been instrumental in advancing our continued understanding of underlying cancer biology. This article reflects on historical advances and the role of innovation in the competitive world of grant-sponsored research. PMID:22241964

  5. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells after Irradiation with Filtered and Unfiltered Beams of 1 Gev/amu Iron Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P.; Williams, A.; Nagasawa, H.; Peng, Y.; Chatterjee, A.; Bedford, J.

    To determine whether shielding materials that might be utilized for radiation protection of astronauts would affect the RBE of HZE particles such as those of concern for deep space missions we irradiated non cycling G0 monolayer cultures of contact inhibited normal human fibroblasts with 1 Gev amu iron ions with and without filtration with various thicknesses of Aluminum Al or polyethylene CH 2 and then measured the frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations dicentrics and excess fragments in the first post-irradiation mitosis Irradiations were carried out at the NRSL facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory For doses ranging up to 4 to 6 Gy the dose response for the total of these aberrations per cell was not significantly affected by beam filtrations up to 5 4 cm Al or up to 11 cm polyethylene relative to the unfiltered beam Neither was the dose response significantly different for unfiltered beams of 300 or 600 Mev amu iron ions relative to the 1 Gev amu iron ions The studies with 1 Gev amu iron ions were repeated four different times over a period of four years in each case with coded samples so the individual scoring aberrations would not know the irradiation conditions employed Comparison of the same effects in parallel experiments using 137 Cs gamma-rays allowed us to estimate that the RBE for aberration induction by these HZE iron ions for these acute high dose-rate exposures was approximately

  6. Cell Signalling Through Covalent Modification and Allostery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Louise N.

    Phosphorylation plays essential roles in nearly every aspect of cell life. Protein kinases catalyze the transfer of the γ-phosphate of ATP to a serine, threonine or tyrosine residue in protein substrates. This covalent modification allows activation or inhibition of enzyme activity, creates recognition sites for other proteins and promotes order/disorder or disorder/order transitions. These properties regulate ­signalling pathways and cellular processes that mediate metabolism, transcription, cell cycle progression, differentiation, cytoskeleton arrangement and cell movement, apoptosis, intercellular communication, and neuronal and immunological functions. In this lecture I shall review the structural consequences of protein phosphorylation using our work on glycogen phosphorylase and the cell cycle cyclin dependent protein kinases as illustrations. Regulation of protein phosphorylation may be disrupted in the diseased state and protein kinases have become high profile targets for drug development. To date there are 11 compounds that have been approved for clinical use in the treatment of cancer.

  7. Cell Death Signaling and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents. PMID:22655227

  8. Cell death signaling and anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents.

  9. Deficient for endoplasmic reticulum calcium sensors Stim1 and Stim2 affects aberrant antibody affinity maturation in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuhua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Han, Yue; Luan, Chao; Hu, Yu; Hao, Zhimin; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Antigen specific B cells undergo a process termed affinity maturation in the germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs where B cells with high affinity receptors are selected to mature into antibody-producing cells or to the memory B cell pool. It is known that B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling plays pivotal role in this selection process. Calcium influx is an essential component of BCR signaling. The current report is to determine the effect of calcium influx on antibody affinity maturation. In our studies, mice deficient for both endoplasmic reticulum calciumsensor Stim1 and Stim2 was immunized with T-cell dependent and independent antigens. Antibody affinity was measured by ELISA. We demonstrated that Stim1 &Stim2 deficient B cells exhibit accelerated pace of affinity maturation compared to wild type controls while the overall antibody production was not dramatically impaired to T-independent antigen immunization. In conclusion, calcium influx plays an important role in antibody affinity maturation in humoral immune responses. The knowledge can be used in manipulate humoral immune response for the design of effective vaccines. PMID:27572320

  10. Telomeres, A Busy Platform for Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gardano, Laura; Pucci, Fabio; Christian, Larissa; Le Bihan, Thierry; Harrington, Lea

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres are the terminal structures at the ends of linear chromosomes that represent a solution to the end replication problem. Specific binding of the six-protein subunit complex shelterin to telomeric, repetitive TTAGGG DNA sequences contributes to the stable architecture and maintenance of telomeres. Proteins involved in the DNA damage response are also localized at telomeres, and play a role in the surveillance and maintenance of telomere integrity. The enzyme responsible for telomere extension is telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein with reverse transcriptase activity. In the absence of telomerase, telomeres shorten to a length threshold that triggers the DNA damage response and replicative senescence. Here, we will summarize the latest findings concerning vertebrate telomere structure and epigenetics, and we present data regarding the impact of short telomeres upon cell signaling. In particular, in murine embryonic stem cells lacking telomerase, we found that distribution of cytosolic/nuclear β-catenin, a key component of the Wnt signaling pathway, changes when telomeres become critically short. We discuss implications and future perspectives of the effect of epigenetic modifications and/or conformational changes of telomeres on cell metabolism and signaling networks. Such an analysis may unveil potential therapeutic targets for pathologies like cancer, where the integrity of telomeres is altered. PMID:23772418

  11. Aberrant expression of the hematopoietic-restricted minor histocompatibility antigen LRH-1 on solid tumors results in efficient cytotoxic T cell-mediated lysis.

    PubMed

    Overes, Ingrid M; Levenga, T Henriëtte; Vos, Johanna C M; van Horssen-Zoetbrood, Agnes; van der Voort, Robbert; De Mulder, Pieter H; de Witte, Theo M; Dolstra, Harry

    2009-03-01

    CD8(+) T cells recognizing minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) on solid tumor cells may mediate effective graft-versus-tumor (GVT) reactivity after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Previously, we identified LRH-1 as a hematopoietic-restricted MiHA encoded by the P2X5 gene. Here, we report that LRH-1 is aberrantly expressed on solid tumor cells. P2X5 mRNA expression is demonstrated in a significant portion of solid tumor cell lines, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC), melanoma, colorectal carcinoma, brain cancer and breast cancer. Importantly, P2X5 gene expression was also detected in a subset of primary solid tumor specimens derived from RCC, brain cancer and breast cancer patients. Furthermore, P2X5 expressing solid tumor cells can be effectively targeted by LRH-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes under inflammatory conditions. The expression of HLA-B7 and CD54 on tumor cells increases upon cytokine stimulation resulting in improved T cell activation as observed by higher levels of degranulation and enhanced tumor cell lysis. Overall, hematopoietic-restricted MiHA LRH-1 is aberrantly expressed on solid tumor cells and may be used as target in GVT-specific immunotherapy after SCT.

  12. Current and future targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancers with aberrant EGF receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kanthala, Shanthi; Pallerla, Sandeep; Jois, Seetharama

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the EGF receptors (EGFRs) is abnormally high in many types of cancer, including 25% of lung cancers. Successful treatments target mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, almost all patients develop resistance to this treatment, and acquired resistance to first-generation TKI has prompted the clinical development of a second generation of EGFR TKI. Because of the development of resistance to treatment of TKIs, there is a need to collect genomic information about EGFR levels in non-small-cell lung cancer patients. Herein, we focus on current molecular targets that have therapies available as well as other targets for which therapies will be available in the near future. PMID:25757687

  13. Aberrant Schwann cell lipid metabolism linked to mitochondrial deficits leads to axon degeneration and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Viader, Andreu; Sasaki, Yo; Kim, Sungsu; Strickland, Amy; Workman, Cayce S; Yang, Kui; Gross, Richard W; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2013-03-06

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common cause of peripheral neuropathy. Much effort has been devoted to examining the role played by neuronal/axonal mitochondria, but how mitochondrial deficits in peripheral nerve glia (Schwann cells [SCs]) contribute to peripheral nerve diseases remains unclear. Here, we investigate a mouse model of peripheral neuropathy secondary to SC mitochondrial dysfunction (Tfam-SCKOs). We show that disruption of SC mitochondria activates a maladaptive integrated stress response (ISR) through the actions of heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI) kinase, and causes a shift in lipid metabolism away from fatty acid synthesis toward oxidation. These alterations in SC lipid metabolism result in depletion of important myelin lipid components as well as in accumulation of acylcarnitines (ACs), an intermediate of fatty acid β-oxidation. Importantly, we show that ACs are released from SCs and induce axonal degeneration. A maladaptive ISR as well as altered SC lipid metabolism are thus underlying pathological mechanisms in mitochondria-related peripheral neuropathies.

  14. The Wnt gatekeeper SFRP4 modulates EMT, cell migration and downstream Wnt signalling in serous ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ford, Caroline E; Jary, Eve; Ma, Sean Si Qian; Nixdorf, Sheri; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A; Ward, Robyn L

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant Wnt signalling is implicated in numerous human cancers, and understanding the effects of modulation of pathway members may lead to the development of novel therapeutics. Expression of secreted frizzled related protein 4 (SFRP4), an extracellular modulator of the Wnt signalling pathway, is progressively lost in more aggressive ovarian cancer phenotypes. Here we show that recombinant SFRP4 (rSFRP4) treatment of a serous ovarian cancer cell line results in inhibition of β-catenin dependent Wnt signalling as measured by TOP/FOP Wnt reporter assay and decreased transcription of Wnt target genes, Axin2, CyclinD1 and Myc. In addition, rSFRP4 treatment significantly increased the ability of ovarian cancer cells to adhere to collagen and fibronectin, and decreased their ability to migrate across an inflicted wound. We conclude that these changes in cell behaviour may be mediated via mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET), as rSFRP4 treatment also resulted in increased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin, and reduced expression of Vimentin and Twist. Combined, these results indicate that modulation of a single upstream gatekeeper of Wnt signalling can have effects on downstream Wnt signalling and ovarian cancer cell behaviour, as mediated through epithelial to mesenchymal plasticity (EMP). This raises the possibility that SFRP4 may be used both diagnostically and therapeutically in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  15. Cytogenetic aberrations in primary cell cultures of the ovarian surface epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chuaire-Noack, Lilian; Rondón-Lagos, Sandra; Ramírez-Corredor, Amparo; Ibáñez-Pinilla, Milcíades; Ramírez-Clavijo, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    Our objective was to determine the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in primary cultures of ovarian surface epithelial cells in women of different ages with no history of cancer. Throughout conventional cytogenetic techniques, we analyzed chromosome spreads of cultured ovarian epithelial cells from 10 donors who were 50 or more years old (B) and 16 controls between 20 and 49 years old (A), belonging to the mestizo population in Bogota DC, Colombia. Of the 26 cultures that were analyzed in passage 1, 61.5% had an abnormal chromosome complement (62.5% in A, and 60% in B). Abnormalities included polyploidies, endoduplications and monosomies. Deletions in chromosomes 3 and 11 were found in just one metaphase. None of the samples showed weaknesses or breakpoints. After transforming and applying the exact student's t-test for variance heterogeneity, we found significant differences in the frequency of metaphases, that were higher in A than in B (p=0.05), and in the frequency of polyploidies, which were higher in B than in A (p=0.044). Through the application of the Mann-Whitney test, we determined that the frequency of endoduplications was higher in A than in B (p=0.126), without reaching significant differences. There were no significant differences in the frequency of monosomies. The level of significance was set at p < or = 0.05. Taking into account that polyploidization is a marker of chromosomal instability and that the risk of cancer arising from the ovarian surface epithelium augments substantially after menopause, the increase in the frequency of age-associated polyploidies could be used as a predictor of ovarian cancer in women from an ethnically homogeneous population as the mestizo one in Bogota DC.

  16. Stem Cells, Redox Signaling, and Stem Cell Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Functional stem cell decline has been postulated to result in loss of maintenance of tissue homeostasis leading to organismal decline and diseases of aging. Recent Advances: Recent findings implicate redox metabolism in the control of stem cell pool and stem cell aging. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are better known for their damaging properties to DNA, proteins and lipids, recent findings suggest that ROS may also be an integral physiological mediator of cellular signaling in primary cells. Critical Issues: Here we review recent published work on major signaling pathways and transcription factors that are regulated by ROS and mediate ROS regulation of stem cell fate. We will specifically focus on how alterations in this regulation may be implicated in disease and particularly in diseases of stem cell aging. In general, based on the work described here we propose a model in which ROS function as stem cell rheostat. Future Directions: Future work in elucidating how ROS control stem cell cycling, apoptotic machinery, and lineage determination should shed light on mechanisms whereby ROS may control stem cell aging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1902–1916. PMID:24383555

  17. Signatures of post-zygotic structural genetic aberrations in the cells of histologically normal breast tissue that can predispose to sporadic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Lars A.; Rasi, Chiara; Pekar, Gyula; Davies, Hanna; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin; Kruczak, Anna; Mandava, Geeta; Pasupulati, Saichand; Hacker, Julia; Prakash, K. Reddy; Dasari, Ravi Chandra; Lau, Joey; Penagos-Tafurt, Nelly; Olofsson, Helena M.; Hallberg, Gunilla; Skotnicki, Piotr; Mituś, Jerzy; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Jankowski, Michal; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Ryś, Janusz; Tot, Tibor; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer (SBC) is a common disease without robust means of early risk prediction in the population. We studied 282 females with SBC, focusing on copy number aberrations in cancer-free breast tissue (uninvolved margin, UM) outside the primary tumor (PT). In total, 1162 UMs (1–14 per breast) were studied. Comparative analysis between UM(s), PT(s), and blood/skin from the same patient as a control is the core of the study design. We identified 108 patients with at least one aberrant UM, representing 38.3% of cases. Gains in gene copy number were the principal type of mutations in microscopically normal breast cells, suggesting that oncogenic activation of genes via increased gene copy number is a predominant mechanism for initiation of SBC pathogenesis. The gain of ERBB2, with overexpression of HER2 protein, was the most common aberration in normal cells. Five additional growth factor receptor genes (EGFR, FGFR1, IGF1R, LIFR, and NGFR) also showed recurrent gains, and these were occasionally present in combination with the gain of ERBB2. All the aberrations found in the normal breast cells were previously described in cancer literature, suggesting their causative, driving role in pathogenesis of SBC. We demonstrate that analysis of normal cells from cancer patients leads to identification of signatures that may increase risk of SBC and our results could influence the choice of surgical intervention to remove all predisposing cells. Early detection of copy number gains suggesting a predisposition toward cancer development, long before detectable tumors are formed, is a key to the anticipated shift into a preventive paradigm of personalized medicine for breast cancer. PMID:26430163

  18. Signatures of post-zygotic structural genetic aberrations in the cells of histologically normal breast tissue that can predispose to sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Lars A; Rasi, Chiara; Pekar, Gyula; Davies, Hanna; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin; Kruczak, Anna; Mandava, Geeta; Pasupulati, Saichand; Hacker, Julia; Prakash, K Reddy; Dasari, Ravi Chandra; Lau, Joey; Penagos-Tafurt, Nelly; Olofsson, Helena M; Hallberg, Gunilla; Skotnicki, Piotr; Mituś, Jerzy; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Jankowski, Michal; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Ryś, Janusz; Tot, Tibor; Dumanski, Jan P

    2015-10-01

    Sporadic breast cancer (SBC) is a common disease without robust means of early risk prediction in the population. We studied 282 females with SBC, focusing on copy number aberrations in cancer-free breast tissue (uninvolved margin, UM) outside the primary tumor (PT). In total, 1162 UMs (1-14 per breast) were studied. Comparative analysis between UM(s), PT(s), and blood/skin from the same patient as a control is the core of the study design. We identified 108 patients with at least one aberrant UM, representing 38.3% of cases. Gains in gene copy number were the principal type of mutations in microscopically normal breast cells, suggesting that oncogenic activation of genes via increased gene copy number is a predominant mechanism for initiation of SBC pathogenesis. The gain of ERBB2, with overexpression of HER2 protein, was the most common aberration in normal cells. Five additional growth factor receptor genes (EGFR, FGFR1, IGF1R, LIFR, and NGFR) also showed recurrent gains, and these were occasionally present in combination with the gain of ERBB2. All the aberrations found in the normal breast cells were previously described in cancer literature, suggesting their causative, driving role in pathogenesis of SBC. We demonstrate that analysis of normal cells from cancer patients leads to identification of signatures that may increase risk of SBC and our results could influence the choice of surgical intervention to remove all predisposing cells. Early detection of copy number gains suggesting a predisposition toward cancer development, long before detectable tumors are formed, is a key to the anticipated shift into a preventive paradigm of personalized medicine for breast cancer.

  19. Contribution of TCR signaling strength to CD8+ T cell peripheral tolerance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Smith, Trevor R F; Verdeil, Gregory; Marquardt, Kristi; Sherman, Linda A

    2014-10-01

    Peripheral tolerance mechanisms are in place to prevent T cells from mediating aberrant immune responses directed against self and environmental Ags. Mechanisms involved in the induction of peripheral tolerance include T cell-intrinsic pathways, such as anergy or deletion, or exogenous tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells. We have previously shown that the density of peptide-MHC class I recognized by the TCR determines whether CD8(+) T cells undergo anergy or deletion. Specifically, using a TCR-transgenic CD8(+) T cell model, we demonstrated that persistent peripheral exposure to low- or high-dose peptides in the absence of inflammatory signals resulted in clonal deletion or anergy of the T cell, respectively. In this study, by altering the affinity of the peptide-MHC tolerogen for TCR, we have confirmed that this mechanism is dependent on the level of TCR signaling that the CD8(+) T cell receives. Using altered peptide ligands (APLs) displaying high TCR affinities, we show that increasing the TCR signaling favors anergy induction. Conversely, using APLs displaying a decreased TCR affinity tilted our system in the direction of deletional tolerance. We demonstrate how differential peripheral CD8(+) T cell tolerance mechanisms are controlled by both the potency and density of MHC class I-peptide tolerogen.

  20. Determination of genotoxic effects of copper sulphate and cobalt chloride in Allium cepa root cells by chromosome aberration and comet assays.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Ciğerci, Ibrahim Hakki; Konuk, Muhsin; Fidan, A Fatih; Terzi, Hakan

    2009-05-01

    We used the anaphase-telophase chromosome aberration and comet (Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis, SCGE) assays to evaluate the genotoxic effects of copper sulphate (CS) and cobalt chloride (CC) chemicals prepared in two concentrations (EC(50), 2xEC(50)), using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) as a positive control and untreated cells as a negative control. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC(50) values for CS and CC are 1.5 and 5.5 ppm, respectively. Mitotic index (MI) decreased in all concentrations tested of CS and CC compared to the control at each exposure time. The bridge, stickiness, vagrant chromosomes, fragments, c-anaphase and multipolarity chromosome aberrations were observed in anaphase-telophase cells. The total chromosome aberrations were more frequent with an increasing in the exposure time and the concentrations of both chemicals. The genotoxicity of CS and CC in Allium cepa root cells was analyzed using a mild alkaline comet assay at pH 12.3, which allows the detection of single strand breaks. In all the concentrations, CS and CC induced a significant increase (P<0.05) in DNA damage. No significant difference was found between positive control (300+/-5.81) and 3 ppm CS (280+/-4.61). The methods used are applicable for biological monitoring of environmental pollutants.

  1. Crystal Structures of Proto-oncogene Kinase Pim1: A Target of Aberrant Somatic Hypermutations in Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Abhinav; Mandiyan, Valsan; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Zhang, Chao; Rice, Julie; Tsai, James; Artis, Dean R.; Ibrahim, Prabha; Bremer, Ryan

    2010-07-19

    Pim1, a serine/threonine kinase, is involved in several biological functions including cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. While pim1 has been shown to be involved in several hematopoietic cancers, it was also recently identified as a target of aberrant somatic hypermutation in diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL), the most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The crystal structures of Pim1 in apo form and bound with AMPPNP have been solved and several unique features of Pim1 were identified, including the presence of an extra {beta}-hairpin in the N-terminal lobe and an unusual conformation of the hinge connecting the two lobes of the enzyme. While the apo Pim1 structure is nearly identical with that reported recently, the structure of AMPPNP bound to Pim1 is significantly different. Pim1 is unique among protein kinases due to the presence of a proline residue at position 123 that precludes the formation of the canonical second hydrogen bond between the hinge backbone and the adenine moiety of ATP. One crystal structure reported here shows that changing P123 to methionine, a common residue that offers the backbone hydrogen bond to ATP, does not restore the ATP binding pocket of Pim1 to that of a typical kinase. These unique structural features in Pim1 result in novel binding modes of AMP and a known kinase inhibitor scaffold, as shown by co-crystallography. In addition, the kinase activities of five Pim1 mutants identified in DLCL patients have been determined. In each case, the observed effects on kinase activity are consistent with the predicted consequences of the mutation on the Pim1 structure. Finally, 70 co-crystal structures of low molecular mass, low-affinity compounds with Pim1 have been solved in order to identify novel chemical classes as potential Pim1 inhibitors. Based on the structural information, opportunities for optimization of one specific example are discussed.

  2. Role of aberrant striatal dopamine D1 receptor/cAMP/protein kinase A/DARPP32 signaling in the paradoxical calming effect of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Francesco; Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Federici, Mauro; Carta, Manolo; Errico, Francesco; Magara, Salvatore; Martella, Giuseppina; Nisticò, Robert; Centonze, Diego; Pisani, Antonio; Gu, Howard H; Mercuri, Nicola B; Usiello, Alessandro

    2010-08-18

    drugs in DAT-CI mutants depends on selective aberrant phasic activation of D(1)R/cAMP/PKA/DARPP32 signaling in response to increased striatal extracellular dopamine levels.

  3. Emergence of the PI3-kinase pathway as a central modulator of normal and aberrant B cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Baracho, G V; Miletic, A V; Omori, S A; Cato, M H; Rickert, R C

    2011-04-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) defines a family of lipid kinases that direct a wide range of cellular processes and cell fate decisions. Since its discovery, and that of its enzymatic antagonist PTEN, much of the focus on PI3K has been on its oncogenic potential. In recent years, studies on PI3K signaling in B lymphocytes have established the importance of this pathway in effecting B cell differentiation and associated molecular events such as V(D)J recombination and class switch recombination. Intriguing new findings also indicate that there is specificity in the PI3K pathway in B cells, including preferential expression or usage of particular PI3K isoforms and counter-regulation by the PTEN and SHIP phosphatases. The role of PI3K adaptor proteins (CD19, BCAP, and TC21) has also undergone revision to reflect both shared and unique properties. The emergence of Foxo1 as a critical PI3K regulatory target for B cell differentiation has united membrane proximal regulatory events orchestrated by PI3K/PTEN/SHIP with key transcriptional targets. Insights into the regulation and impact of PI3K signaling have been brought to bear in new treatments for B cell malignancies, and will also be an important topic of consideration for B cell-dependent autoimmune diseases.

  4. Infection, stem cells and cancer signals.

    PubMed

    Sell, S

    2011-02-01

    The association of cancer with preceding parasitic infections has been observed for over 200 years. Some such cancers arise from infection of tissue stem cells by viruses with insertion of viral oncogenes into the host DNA (mouse polyoma virus, mouse mammary tumor virus). In other cases the virus does not insert its DNA into the host cells, but rather commandeers the metabolism of the infected cells, so that the cells continue to proliferate and do not differentiate (human papilloma virus and cervical cancer). Cytoplasmic Epstein Barr virus infection is associated with a specific gene translocation (Ig/c-myc) that activates proliferation of affected cells (Burkitt lymphoma). In chronic osteomyelitis an inflammatory reaction to the infection appears to act through production of inflammatory cytokines and oxygen radical formation to induce epithelial cancers. Infection with Helicobacter pylori leads to epigenetic changes in methylation and infection by a parasite. Clonorchis sinensis also acts as a promoter of cancer of the bile ducts of the liver (cholaniocarcinoma). The common thread among these diverse pathways is that the infections act to alter tissue stem cell signaling with continued proliferation of tumor transit amplifying cells.

  5. Infection, Stem Cells and Cancer Signals

    PubMed Central

    Sell, S.

    2013-01-01

    The association of cancer with preceding parasitic infections has been observed for over 200 years. Some such cancers arise from infection of tissue stem cells by viruses with insertion of viral oncogenes into the host DNA (mouse polyoma virus, mouse mammary tumor virus). In other cases the virus does not insert its DNA into the host cells, but rather commandeers the metabolism of the infected cells, so that the cells continue to proliferate and do not differentiate (human papilloma virus and cervical cancer). Cytoplasmic Epstein Barr virus infection is associated with a specific gene translocation (Ig/c-myc) that activates proliferation of affected cells (Burkitt lymphoma). In chronic osteomyelitis an inflammatory reaction to the infection appears to act through production of inflammatory cytokines and oxygen radical formation to induce epithelial cancers. Infection with Helicobacter pylori leads to epigenetic changes in methylation and infection by a parasite. Clonorchis sinensis also acts as a promoter of cancer of the bile ducts of the liver (cholaniocarcinoma). The common thread among these diverse pathways is that the infections act to alter tissue stem cell signaling with continued proliferation of tumor transit amplifying cells. PMID:21044009

  6. GTPases in bacterial cell polarity and signalling.

    PubMed

    Bulyha, Iryna; Hot, Edina; Huntley, Stuart; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2011-12-01

    In bacteria, large G domain GTPases have well-established functions in translation, protein translocation, tRNA modification and ribosome assembly. In addition, bacteria also contain small Ras-like GTPases consisting of stand-alone G domains. Recent data have revealed that small Ras-like GTPases as well as large G domain GTPases in bacteria function in the regulation of cell polarity, signal transduction and possibly also in cell division. The small Ras-like GTPase MglA together with its cognate GAP MglB regulates cell polarity in Myxococcus xanthus, and the small Ras-like GTPase CvnD9 in Streptomyces coelicolor is involved in signal transduction. Similarly, the large GTPase FlhF together with the ATPase FlhG regulates the localization and number of flagella in polarly flagellated bacteria. Moreover, large dynamin-like GTPases in bacteria may function in cell division. Thus, the function of GTPases in bacteria may be as pervasive as in eukaryotes.

  7. Test for Chemical Induction of Chromosome Aberrations in Cultured Chinese Hamster (CHO) Cells With and Without Metabolic Activation. Test Article. Diethylene triamine trinitrate (DETN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-25

    chromatid interchanges between chromosomes leading to four-armed configurations. This could be asymmetrical with formation of a dicentric and an acentric...fragment which may be misaligned and a shortened monocentric chromosome , and where there is no sister chromatid union. Dicentric - an asymmetrical...Test for Chemical Induction of Chromosome Aberrations in Cultured Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cells With and Without Metabolic Activation Test

  8. mBAND analysis of chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells induced by gamma-rays and secondary neutrons of low dose rate.

    PubMed

    Hada, M; Gersey, B; Saganti, P B; Wilkins, R; Cucinotta, F A; Wu, H

    2010-08-14

    Human risks from chronic exposures to both low- and high-LET radiation are of intensive research interest in recent years. In the present study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma-rays at a dose rate of 17 mGy/h or secondary neutrons of 25 mGy/h. The secondary neutrons have a broad energy spectrum that simulates the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude, as well as the environment inside spacecrafts like the Russian MIR station and the International Space Station (ISS). Chromosome aberrations in the exposed cells were analyzed using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 colored bands that allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges including inversions. Comparison of present dose responses between gamma-rays and neutron irradiations for the fraction of cells with damaged chromosome 3 yielded a relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value of 26+/-4 for the secondary neutrons. Our results also revealed that secondary neutrons of low dose rate induced a higher fraction of intrachromosome exchanges than gamma-rays, but the fractions of inversions observed between these two radiation types were indistinguishable. Similar to the previous findings after acute radiation exposures, most of the inversions observed in the present study were accompanied by other aberrations. The fractions of complex type aberrations and of unrejoined chromosomal breakages were also found to be higher in the neutron-exposed cells than after gamma-rays. We further analyzed the location of the breaks involved in chromosome aberrations along chromosome 3, and observed hot spots after gamma-ray, but not neutron, exposures.

  9. Aberrant Methylation Inactivates Somatostatin and Somatostatin Receptor Type 1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Kiyoshi; Misawa, Yuki; Kondo, Haruki; Mochizuki, Daiki; Imai, Atsushi; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Uehara, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Mineta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to define somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor type 1 (SSTR1) methylation profiles for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors at diagnosis and follow up and to evaluate their prognostic significance and value as a biomarker. Methods Gene expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Promoter methylation status was determined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (Q-MSP) in HNSCC. Results Methylation was associated with transcription inhibition. SST methylation in 81% of HNSCC tumor specimens significantly correlated with tumor size (P = 0.043), stage (P = 0.008), galanin receptor type 2 (GALR2) methylation (P = 0.041), and tachykinin-1 (TAC1) (P = 0.040). SSTR1 hypermethylation in 64% of cases was correlated with tumor size (P = 0.037), stage (P = 0.037), SST methylation (P < 0.001), and expression of galanin (P = 0.03), GALR2 (P = 0.014), TAC1 (P = 0.023), and tachykinin receptor type 1 (TACR1) (P = 0.003). SST and SSTR1 promoter hypermethylation showed highly discriminating receiver operator characteristic curve profiles, which clearly distinguished HNSCC from adjacent normal mucosal tissues. Concurrent hypermethylation of galanin and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.0001). Among patients with oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, methylation of both SST and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.028). In multivariate logistic-regression analysis, concomitant methylation of galanin and SSTR1 was associated with an odds ratio for recurrence of 12.53 (95% CI, 2.62 to 59.8; P = 0.002). Conclusions CpG hypermethylation is a likely mechanism of SST and SSTR1 gene inactivation, supporting the hypothesis that SST and SSTR1 play a role in the tumorigenesis of HNSCC and that this hypermethylation may serve as an important biomarker. PMID:25734919

  10. M-BAND Analysis of Chromosome Aberration In Human Epithelial Cells exposed to Gamma-ray and Secondary Neutrons of Low Dose Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's "30L" beam line is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams at an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr or gamma-ray at 1.7cGy/hr, and assessed the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with mBAND. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results for gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate, the neutron data showed a higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. The low dose rate gamma-rays induced a lower frequency of chromosome aberrations than high dose rate gamma-rays, but the inversion spectrum was similar for the same cytotoxic effect. The distribution of damage sites on chromosome 3 for different radiation types will also be discussed.

  11. Suppression of β-catenin Signaling Pathway in Human Prostate Cancer PC3 Cells by Delphinidin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wooje; Yun, Jung-Mi

    2016-01-01

    Delphinidin possesses strong anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties. Suppression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a potential strategy for chemoprevention and therapy. As aberrant activation of the β-catenin signaling pathway contributes to prostate cancer progression, we evaluated the effect of delphinidin on this pathway in human PC3 prostate cancer cells. An MTT assay showed that treatment with delphinidin (15–180 μM, 72 hours) resulted in a dose-dependent growth inhibition of cells. Treatment with delphinidin increased the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues on β-catenin and decreased the levels of cytoplasmic β-catenin. Moreover, treatment with delphinidin inhibited the nuclear translocation of β-catenin and the expression of β-catenin target genes such as cyclin D1, c-myc, Axin-2, and T cell factor-1. Delphinidin also induced the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and the expression of adenomatous polyposis coli and Axin proteins. Our results indicate that inhibition of cell growth by delphinidin is mediated, at least in part, through modulation of the β-catenin signaling pathway. We suggest that delphinidin is a potent inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in prostate cancer cells. PMID:27390740

  12. Signal transduction and Th17 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, John J.; Steward-Tharp, Scott M.; Laurence, Arian; Watford, Wendy T.; Wei, Lai; Adamson, Adewole S.; Fan, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The paradigm of effector T helper cell differentiation into either Th1 or Th2 lineages has been notably shaken by the discovery of a third lineage of cells that selectively produce interleukin (IL)-17. Characterization of this new subset, referred to as Th17, has provided exciting new insights into immunoregulation, host defense and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, the discovery of this T cell subset has offered a fresh look at such concepts as lineage commitment and terminal differentiation. The transcriptional regulatory events and epigenetic modifications that control these processes are diverse and complex, and despite the rapid pace at which data continues to accumulate, many questions remain to be answered. Here we review our current understanding of the signaling pathways, molecular interactions and transcriptional events that lead to Th17 differentiation and effector function, as well as the epigenetic modifications that accompany them. PMID:19379825

  13. A recurrent 11q aberration pattern characterizes a subset of MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas resembling Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Wagener, Rabea; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Richter, Julia; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Adam, Patrick; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Damm-Welk, Christine; Drexler, Hans G; Hummel, Michael; Jaffe, Elaine S; Küppers, Ralf; Lefebvre, Christine; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Löffler, Markus; Macleod, Roderick A F; Nagel, Inga; Oschlies, Ilske; Rosolowski, Maciej; Russell, Robert B; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Schindler, Detlev; Schlesner, Matthias; Scholtysik, René; Schwaenen, Carsten; Spang, Rainer; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Vater, Inga; Wessendorf, Swen; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-02-20

    The genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is the t(8;14)(q24;q32) and its variants leading to activation of the MYC oncogene. It is a matter of debate whether true BL without MYC translocation exists. Here, we identified 59 lymphomas concordantly called BL by 2 gene expression classifiers among 753 B-cell lymphomas. Only 2 (3%) of these 59 molecular BL lacked a MYC translocation, which both shared a peculiar pattern of chromosome 11q aberration characterized by interstitial gains including 11q23.2-q23.3 and telomeric losses of 11q24.1-qter. We extended our analysis to 17 MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas with a similar 11q aberration and showed this aberration to be recurrently associated with morphologic and clinical features of BL. The minimal region of gain was defined by high-level amplifications in 11q23.3 and associated with overexpression of genes including PAFAH1B2 on a transcriptional and protein level. The recurrent region of loss contained a focal homozygous deletion in 11q24.2-q24.3 including the ETS1 gene, which was shown to be mutated in 4 of 16 investigated cases. These findings indicate the existence of a molecularly distinct subset of B-cell lymphomas reminiscent of BL, which is characterized by deregulation of genes in 11q.

  14. Wnt Signaling in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Krause, Mirja; Samoylenko, Anatoly; Vainio, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 90% of all kidney cancers. Due to poor diagnosis, high resistance to the systemic therapies and the fact that most RCC cases occur sporadically, current research switched its focus on studying the molecular mechanisms underlying RCC. The aim is the discovery of new effective and less toxic anti-cancer drugs and novel diagnostic markers. Besides the PI3K/Akt/mTOR, HGF/Met and VHL/hypoxia cellular signaling pathways, the involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in RCC is commonly studied. Wnt signaling and its targeted genes are known to actively participate in different biological processes during embryonic development and renal cancer. Recently, studies have shown that targeting this pathway by alternating/inhibiting its intracellular signal transduction can reduce cancer cells viability and inhibit their growth. The targets and drugs identified show promising potential to serve as novel RCC therapeutics and prognostic markers. This review aims to summarize the current status quo regarding recent research on RCC focusing on the involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and how its understanding could facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic targets, new drugs and diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:27322325

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 suppresses the apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia cells via the JNK/c-JUN signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojing; Fang, Qin; Chen, Shuya; Zhe, Nana; Chai, Qixiang; Yu, Meisheng; Zhang, Yaming; Wang, Ziming; Wang, Jishi

    2015-05-01

    There are few studies on the correlation between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found that HO-1 was aberrantly overexpressed in the majority of AML patients, especially in patients with acute monocytic leukemia (M5) and leukocytosis, and inhibited the apoptosis of HL-60 and U937 cells. Moreover, silencing HO-1 prolonged the survival of xenograft mouse models. Further studies demonstrated that HO-1 suppressed the apoptosis of AML cells through activating the JNK/c-JUN signaling pathway. These data indicate a molecular role of HO-1 in inhibiting cell apoptosis, allowing it to be a potential target for treating AML.

  16. Restrictive glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor synthesis in cwh6/gpi3 yeast cells causes aberrant biogenesis of cell wall proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, J H; Müller, W H; Lipke, P N; Klis, F M

    1997-01-01

    We previously reported that the defects in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cwh6 Calcofluor white-hypersensitive cell wall mutant are caused by a mutation in SPT14/GPI3, a gene involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis. Here we describe the effect of cwh6/spt14/gpi3 on the biogenesis of cell wall proteins. It was found that the release of precursors of cell wall proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was retarded. This was accompanied by proliferation of ER structures. The majority of the cell wall protein precursors that eventually left the ER were not covalently incorporated into the cell wall but were secreted into the growth medium. Despite the inefficient incorporation of cell wall proteins, there was no net effect on the protein level in the cell wall. It is postulated that the availability of GPI-dependent cell wall proteins determines the rate of cell wall construction and limits growth rate. PMID:9079905

  17. Signaling molecules and pathways regulating the fate of spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Zuping; Kokkinaki, Maria; Dym, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is the process that involves the division and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) into mature spermatozoa. SSCs are a subpopulation of type A spermatogonia resting on the basement membrane in the mammalian testis. Self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs are the foundation of normal spermatogenesis, and thus a better understanding of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in the SSCs is of paramount importance for the regulation of spermatogenesis and may eventually lead to novel targets for male contraception as well as for gene therapy of male infertility and testicular cancer. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms is also of great interest to a better understanding of SSC aging and for developing novel therapeutic strategies for degenerative diseases in view of the recent work demonstrating the pluripotent potential of the SSC. Progress has recently been made in elucidating the signaling molecules and pathways that determine cell fate decisions of SSCs. In this review, we first address the morphological features, phenotypic characteristics, and the potential of SSCs. And then we focus on the recent advances in defining the key signaling molecules and crucial signaling pathways regulating self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs. The association of aberrant expression of signaling molecules and cascades with abnormal spermatogenesis and testicular cancer are also discussed. Finally we point out potential future directions to pursue in research on signaling pathways of SSCs. PMID:19263492

  18. Wnt11 Signaling Promotes Proliferation, Transformation, and Migration of IEC6 Intestinal Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ouko, Lillian; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Gu, Li H.; Eisenberg, Leonard M.; Yang, Vincent W.

    2005-01-01

    Wnts are morphogens with well recognized functions during embryogenesis. Aberrant Wnt signaling has been demonstrated to be important in colorectal carcinogenesis. However, the role of Wnt in regulating normal intestinal epithelial cell proliferation is not well established. Here we determine that Wnt11 is expressed throughout the mouse intestinal tract including the epithelial cells. Conditioned media from Wnt11-secreting cells stimulated proliferation and migration of IEC6 intestinal epithelial cells. Co-culture of Wnt11-secreting cells with IEC6 cells resulted in morphological transformation of the latter as evidenced by the formation of foci, a condition also accomplished by stable transfection of IEC6 with a Wnt11-expressing construct. Treatment of IEC6 cells with Wnt11 conditioned media failed to induce nuclear translocation of β-catenin but led to increased activities of protein kinase C and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Inhibition of protein kinase C resulted in a decreased ability of Wnt11 to induce foci formation in IEC6 cells. Finally, E-cadherin was redistributed in Wnt11-treated IEC6 cells, resulting in diminished E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contact. We conclude that Wnt11 stimulates proliferation, migration, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and contact-independent growth of IEC6 cells by a β-catenin-independent mechanism. These findings may help understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate proliferation and migration of intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:15084607

  19. Impairing follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) signaling in vivo: targeted disruption of the FSH receptor leads to aberrant gametogenesis and hormonal imbalance.

    PubMed

    Dierich, A; Sairam, M R; Monaco, L; Fimia, G M; Gansmuller, A; LeMeur, M; Sassone-Corsi, P

    1998-11-10

    Pituitary gonadotropins follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone stimulate the gonads by regulating germ cell proliferation and differentiation. FSH receptors (FSH-Rs) are localized to testicular Sertoli cells and ovarian granulosa cells and are coupled to activation of the adenylyl cyclase and other signaling pathways. Activation of FSH-Rs is considered essential for folliculogenesis in the female and spermatogenesis in the male. We have generated mice lacking FSH-R by homologous recombination. FSH-R-deficient males are fertile but display small testes and partial spermatogenic failure. Thus, although FSH signaling is not essential for initiating spermatogenesis, it appears to be required for adequate viability and motility of the sperms. FSH-R-deficient females display thin uteri and small ovaries and are sterile because of a block in folliculogenesis before antral follicle formation. Although the expression of marker genes is only moderately altered in FSH-R -/- mice, drastic sex-specific changes are observed in the levels of various hormones. The anterior lobe of the pituitary gland in females is enlarged and reveals a larger number of FSH- and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-positive cells. The phenotype of FSH-R -/- mice is reminiscent of human hypergonadotropic ovarian dysgenesis and infertility.

  20. Oncogenic Kit signals on endolysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum are essential for neoplastic mast cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Yuuki; Toyoshima, Shota; Wakamatsu, Ei; Suzuki, Shunichi; Ogawa, Shuhei; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Abe, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Kit is a receptor-type tyrosine kinase found on the plasma membrane. It can transform mast cells through activating mutations. Here, we show that a mutant Kit from neoplastic mast cells from mice, Kit(D814Y), is permanently active and allows cells to proliferate autonomously. It does so by activating two signalling pathways from different intracellular compartments. Mutant Kit from the cell surface accumulates on endolysosomes through clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which requires Kit’s kinase activity. Kit(D814Y) is constitutively associated with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but the complex activates Akt only on the cytoplasmic surface of endolysosomes. It resists destruction because it is under-ubiquitinated. Kit(D814Y) also appears in the endoplasmic reticulum soon after biosynthesis, and there, can activate STAT5 aberrantly. These mechanisms of oncogenic signalling are also seen in rat and human mast cell leukemia cells. Thus, oncogenic Kit signalling occurs from different intracellular compartments, and the mutation acts by altering Kit trafficking as well as activation. PMID:25493654

  1. Iteration of ultrasound aberration correction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasoey, Svein-Erik; Angelsen, Bjoern; Varslot, Trond

    2004-05-01

    Aberration in ultrasound medical imaging is usually modeled by time-delay and amplitude variations concentrated on the transmitting/receiving array. This filter process is here denoted a TDA filter. The TDA filter is an approximation to the physical aberration process, which occurs over an extended part of the human body wall. Estimation of the TDA filter, and performing correction on transmit and receive, has proven difficult. It has yet to be shown that this method works adequately for severe aberration. Estimation of the TDA filter can be iterated by retransmitting a corrected signal and re-estimate until a convergence criterion is fulfilled (adaptive imaging). Two methods for estimating time-delay and amplitude variations in receive signals from random scatterers have been developed. One method correlates each element signal with a reference signal. The other method use eigenvalue decomposition of the receive cross-spectrum matrix, based upon a receive energy-maximizing criterion. Simulations of iterating aberration correction with a TDA filter have been investigated to study its convergence properties. A weak and strong human-body wall model generated aberration. Both emulated the human abdominal wall. Results after iteration improve aberration correction substantially, and both estimation methods converge, even for the case of strong aberration.

  2. A novel microRNA-132-sirtuin-1 axis underlies aberrant B-cell cytokine regulation in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis [corrected].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yusei; Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Misirliyan, Hétoum; Moore, Craig; Farooqi, Nasr; Solis, Mayra; Goiry, Lorna Galleguillos; de Faria Junior, Omar; Dang, Van Duc; Colman, David; Dhaunchak, Ajit Singh; Antel, Jack; Gommerman, Jennifer; Prat, Alexandre; Fillatreau, Simon; Bar-Or, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trial results demonstrating that B-cell depletion substantially reduces new relapses in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have established that B cells play a role in the pathophysiology of MS relapses. The same treatment appears not to impact antibodies directed against the central nervous system, which underscores the contribution of antibody-independent functions of B cells to disease activity. One mechanism by which B cells are now thought to contribute to MS activity is by over-activating T cells, including through aberrant expression of B cell pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, the mechanisms underlying the observed B cell cytokine dysregulation in MS remain unknown. We hypothesized that aberrant expression of particular microRNAs might be involved in the dysregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine responses of B cells of patients with MS. Through screening candidate microRNAs in activated B cells of MS patients and matched healthy subjects, we discovered that abnormally increased secretion of lymphotoxin and tumor necrosis factor α by MS B cells is associated with abnormally increased expression of miR-132. Over-expression of miR-132 in normal B cells significantly enhanced their production of lymphotoxin and tumor necrosis factor α. The over-expression of miR-132 also suppressed the miR-132 target, sirtuin-1. We confirmed that pharmacological inhibition of sirtuin-1 in normal B cells induces exaggerated lymphotoxin and tumor necrosis factor α production, while the abnormal production of these cytokines by MS B cells can be normalized by resveratrol, a sirtuin-1 activator. These results define a novel miR-132-sirtuin-1 axis that controls pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by human B cells, and demonstrate that a dysregulation of this axis underlies abnormal pro-inflammatory B cell cytokine responses in patients with MS.

  3. [Cell signaling in the epileptic hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Ferrer, I

    Cell signaling commanding death or survival in human epileptic hippocampus is difficult to trace because of the long interval between the beginning of symptoms and the sampling of damaged cerebral tissue for neuropathological examination. Intraperitoneal injection of the glutamate analogue kainic acid (KA) is a useful tool to analyze the effects of seizures and the excitotoxic damage in the rodent hippocampus. KA acts on NMDA and KA receptors, whereas it has little impact on AMPA receptors. Neurons of the hilus and CA3 neurons are primary targets of KA, although parvalbumin containing GABAergic neurons are less vulnerable than glutamatergic neurons. Immediate responses to KA are hsp 70 mRNA induction and HSP 70/72 protein expression, as well as c fos and c jun mRNA, and c Fos and c Jun protein expression in the hippocampus. Yet increased c Fos and c Jun expression is not a predictor of cell death or cell survival. In contrast, the tissular plasminogen activator (tPA) and the membrane Fas/Fas L signaling pathway probably have a role in facilitating cell death following KA injection. The involvement of other pathways remains controversial. Increased expression of the pro apoptotic Bax together with decreased Bcl 2 suggests Bax mediated apoptosis. Activation of the mitochondrial pathway includes leakage of citochrome c to the cytosol and activation of the caspase cascade leading to apoptosis. However, other studies have emphasized the limited expression of caspase 3, the main executioner of apoptosis, and the relevance of necrosis as the main form of cell death following KA excitotoxicity. Phosphorylation dependent activation of several kinases, including MAPK, p 38 and JNK/SAPK, and their substrates has been found in KA treated animals. Decreased CREBp expression is associated with cell death whereas increased ATF 2P and Elk 1P are associated with cell survival. Trophic factors probably do not play a significant role during the early stages of hippocanmpal damage but

  4. Diego and Prickle regulate Frizzled planar cell polarity signalling by competing for Dishevelled binding.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Andreas; Reynolds-Kenneally, Jessica; Das, Gishnu; Burnett, Micheal; Mlodzik, Marek

    2005-07-01

    Epithelial planar cell polarity (PCP) is evident in the cellular organization of many tissues in vertebrates and invertebrates. In mammals, PCP signalling governs convergent extension during gastrulation and the organization of a wide variety of structures, including the orientation of body hair and sensory hair cells of the inner ear. In Drosophila melanogaster, PCP is manifest in adult tissues, including ommatidial arrangement in the compound eye and hair orientation in wing cells. PCP establishment requires the conserved Frizzled/Dishevelled PCP pathway. Mutations in PCP-pathway-associated genes cause aberrant orientation of body hair or inner-ear sensory cells in mice, or misorientation of ommatidia and wing hair in D. melanogaster. Here we provide mechanistic insight into Frizzled/Dishevelled signalling regulation. We show that the ankyrin-repeat protein Diego binds directly to Dishevelled and promotes Frizzled signalling. Dishevelled can also be bound by the Frizzled PCP antagonist Prickle. Strikingly, Diego and Prickle compete with one another for Dishevelled binding, thereby modulating Frizzled/Dishevelled activity and ensuring tight control over Frizzled PCP signalling.

  5. Blockade of Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Increases Sensitivity to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Yang, Su-Qing; An, She-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Su, Jian; Xie, Zhi; Gou, Lan-Ying; Wu, Yi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been implicated in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem-like cell (CSC) maintenance; both processes can result in tumor progression and treatment resistance in several types of human cancer. Hh cooperates with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in embryogenesis. We found that the Hh signaling pathway was silenced in EGFR-TKI-sensitive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, while it was inappropriately activated in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells, accompanied by EMT induction and ABCG2 overexpression. Upregulation of Hh signaling through extrinsic SHH exposure downregulated E-cadherin expression and elevated Snail and ABCG2 expression, resulting in gefitinib tolerance (P < 0.001) in EGFR-TKI-sensitive cells. Blockade of the Hh signaling pathway using the SMO antagonist SANT-1 restored E-cadherin expression and downregulate Snail and ABCG2 in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells. A combination of SANT-1 and gefitinib markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and proliferation in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that hyperactivity of Hh signaling resulted in EGFR-TKI resistance, by EMT introduction and ABCG2 upregulation, and blockade of Hh signaling synergistically increased sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs in primary and secondary resistant NSCLC cells. E-cadherin expression may be a potential biomarker of the suitability of the combined application of an Hh inhibitor and EGFR-TKIs in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLCs. PMID:26943330

  6. Cellular distribution of cell cycle-related molecules in the renal tubules of rats treated with renal carcinogens for 28 days: relationship between cell cycle aberration and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Taniai, Eriko; Hayashi, Hitomi; Yafune, Atsunori; Watanabe, Maiko; Akane, Hirotoshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    Some renal carcinogens can induce karyomegaly, which reflects aberrant cell division in the renal tubules, from the early stages of exposure. To clarify the cell cycle-related changes during the early stages of renal carcinogenesis, we performed immunohistochemical analysis of tubular cells in male F344 rats treated with carcinogenic doses of representative renal carcinogens for 28 days. For this purpose, the karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens ochratoxin A (OTA), ferric nitrilotriacetic acid, and monuron, and the non-karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate and potassium bromate were examined. For comparison, a karyomegaly-inducing non-carcinogen, p-nitrobenzoic acid, and a non-carcinogenic non-karyomegaly-inducing renal toxicant, acetaminophen, were also examined. The outer stripe of the outer medulla (OSOM) and the cortex + OSOM were subjected to morphometric analysis of immunoreactive proximal tubular cells. Renal carcinogens, irrespective of their karyomegaly-inducing potential, increased proximal tubular cell proliferation accompanied by an increase in topoisomerase IIα-immunoreactive cells, suggesting a reflection of cell proliferation. Karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens increased nuclear Cdc2-, γH2AX-, and phosphorylated Chk2-immunoreactive cells in both areas, the former two acting in response to DNA damage and the latter one suggestive of sustained G₂. OTA, an OSOM-targeting carcinogen, could easily be distinguished from untreated controls and non-carcinogens by evaluation of molecules responding to DNA damage and G₂/M transition in the OSOM. Thus, all renal carcinogens examined facilitated proximal tubular proliferation by repeated short-term treatment. Among these, karyomegaly-inducing carcinogens may cause DNA damage and G₂ arrest in the target tubular cells.

  7. Silibinin inhibits aberrant lipid metabolism, proliferation and emergence of androgen-independence in prostate cancer cells via primarily targeting the sterol response element binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-10-30

    Prostate cancer (PCA) kills thousands of men every year, demanding additional approaches to better understand and target this malignancy. Recently, critical role of aberrant lipogenesis is highlighted in prostate carcinogenesis, offering a unique opportunity to target it to reduce PCA. Here, we evaluated efficacy and associated mechanisms of silibinin in inhibiting lipid metabolism in PCA cells. At physiologically achievable levels in human, silibinin strongly reduced lipid and cholesterol accumulation specifically in human PCA cells but not in non-neoplastic prostate epithelial PWR-1E cells. Silibinin also decreased nuclear protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 and 2 (SREBP1/2) and their target genes only in PCA cells. Mechanistically, silibinin activated AMPK, thereby increasing SREBP1 phosphorylation and inhibiting its nuclear translocation; AMPK inhibition reversed silibinin-mediated decrease in nuclear SREBP1 and lipid accumulation. Additionally, specific SREBP inhibitor fatostatin and stable overexpression of SREBP1 further confirmed the central role of SREBP1 in silibinin-mediated inhibition of PCA cell proliferation and lipid accumulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, silibinin also inhibited synthetic androgen R1881-induced lipid accumulation and completely abrogated the development of androgen-independent LNCaP cell clones via targeting SREBP1/2. Together, these mechanistic studies suggest that silibinin would be effective against PCA by targeting critical aberrant lipogenesis.

  8. Three-dimensional locations of gold-labeled proteins in a whole mount eukaryotic cell obtained with 3nm precision using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dukes, Madeline J; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Gray Jerome, W; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) maps of proteins within the context of whole cells are important for investigating cellular function. However, 3D reconstructions of whole cells are challenging to obtain using conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We describe a methodology to determine the 3D locations of proteins labeled with gold nanoparticles on whole eukaryotic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptors on COS7 cells were labeled with gold nanoparticles, and critical-point dried whole-mount cell samples were prepared. 3D focal series were obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), without tilting the specimen. The axial resolution was improved with deconvolution. The vertical locations of the nanoparticles in a whole-mount cell were determined with a precision of 3nm. From the analysis of the variation of the axial positions of the labels we concluded that the cellular surface was ruffled. To achieve sufficient stability of the sample under electron beam irradiation during the recording of the focal series, the sample was carbon coated. A quantitative method was developed to analyze the stability of the ultrastructure after electron beam irradiation using TEM. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using aberration-corrected STEM to study the 3D nanoparticle distribution in whole cells.

  9. Novel CARD11 Mutations in Human Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Lead to Aberrant NF-κB Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Stephen A.; Purdie, Karin J.; den Breems, Nicoline Y.; Dimon, Michelle; Arron, Sarah T.; McHugh, Angela T.; Xue, Dylan J.; Dayal, Jasbani H.S.; Proby, Charlotte M.; Harwood, Catherine A.; Leigh, Irene M.; South, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB signaling plays a crucial role in regulating proliferation and differentiation in the epidermis. Alterations in the NF-κB pathway can lead to skin pathologies with a significant burden to human health such as psoriasis and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing scaffold proteins are key regulators of NF-κB signaling by providing a link between membrane receptors and NF-κB transcriptional subunits. Mutations in the CARD family member, CARD14, have been identified in patients with the inflammatory skin diseases psoriasis and pityriasis rubra pilaris. Here, we describe that the gene coding for another CARD scaffold protein, CARD11, is mutated in more than 38% of 111 cSCCs, and show that novel variants outside of the coiled-coil domain lead to constitutively activated NF-κB signaling. CARD11 protein expression was detectable in normal skin and increased in all cSCCs tested. CARD11 mRNA levels were comparable with CARD14 in normal skin and CARD11 mRNA was increased in cSCC. In addition, we identified CARD11 mutations in peritumoral and sun-exposed skin, suggesting that CARD11-mediated alterations in NF-κB signaling may be an early event in the development of cSCC. PMID:26212909

  10. Chicago aberration correction work.

    PubMed

    Beck, V D

    2012-12-01

    The author describes from his personal involvement the many improvements to electron microscopy Albert Crewe and his group brought by minimizing the effects of aberrations. The Butler gun was developed to minimize aperture aberrations in a field emission electron gun. In the 1960s, Crewe anticipated using a spherical aberration corrector based on Scherzer's design. Since the tolerances could not be met mechanically, a method of moving the center of the octopoles electrically was developed by adding lower order multipole fields. Because the corrector was located about 15 cm ahead of the objective lens, combination aberrations would arise with the objective lens. This fifth order aberration would then limit the aperture of the microscope. The transformation of the off axis aberration coefficients of a round lens was developed and a means to cancel anisotropic coma was developed. A new method of generating negative spherical aberration was invented using the combination aberrations of hexapoles. Extensions of this technique to higher order aberrations were developed. An electrostatic electron mirror was invented, which allows the cancellation of primary spherical aberration and first order chromatic aberration. A reduction of chromatic aberration by two orders of magnitude was demonstrated using such a system.

  11. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Vaproic Acid Induces Cell Growth Arrest in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells via Suppressing Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guangchun; Mackey, Lily V.; Coy, David H.; Yu, Cui-Yun; Sun, Lichun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a type of malignant cancer. Notch signaling is aberrantly expressed in HCC tissues with more evidence showing that this signaling plays a critical role in HCCs. In the present study, we investigate the effects of the anti-convulsant drug valproic acid (VPA) in HCC cells and its involvement in modulating Notch signaling. We found that VPA, acting as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, induced a decrease in HDAC4 and an increase in acetylated histone 4 (AcH4) and suppressed HCC cell growth. VPA also induced down-regulation of Notch signaling via suppressing the expression of Notch1 and its target gene HES1, with an increase of tumor suppressor p21 and p63. Furthermore, Notch1 activation via overexpressing Notch1 active form ICN1 induced HCC cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, indicating Notch signaling played an oncogenic role in HCC cells. Meanwhile, VPA could reverse Notch1-induced increase of cell proliferation. Interestingly, VPA was also observed to stimulate the expression of G protein-coupled somatostatin receptor type 2 (SSTR2) that has been used in receptor-targeting therapies. This discovery supports a combination therapy of VPA with the SSTR2-targeting agents. Our in vitro assay did show that the combination of VPA and the peptide-drug conjugate camptothecin-somatostatin (CPT-SST) displayed more potent anti-proliferative effects on HCC cells than did each alone. VPA may be a potential drug candidate in the development of anti-HCC drugs via targeting Notch signaling, especially in combination with receptor-targeting cytotoxic agents. PMID:26366213

  12. Subcellular optogenetics – controlling signaling and single-cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Karunarathne, W. K. Ajith; O'Neill, Patrick R.; Gautam, Narasimhan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variation in signaling activity across a cell plays a crucial role in processes such as cell migration. Signaling activity specific to organelles within a cell also likely plays a key role in regulating cellular functions. To understand how such spatially confined signaling within a cell regulates cell behavior, tools that exert experimental control over subcellular signaling activity are required. Here, we discuss the advantages of using optogenetic approaches to achieve this control. We focus on a set of optical triggers that allow subcellular control over signaling through the activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and downstream signaling proteins, as well as those that inhibit endogenous signaling proteins. We also discuss the specific insights with regard to signaling and cell behavior that these subcellular optogenetic approaches can provide. PMID:25433038

  13. Myelomatous plasma cells display an aberrant gene expression pattern similar to that observed in normal memory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Báez, Alicia; Piruat, José I; Caballero-Velázquez, Teresa; Sánchez-Abarca, Luís I; Álvarez-Laderas, Isabel; Barbado, M Victoria; García-Guerrero, Estefanía; Millán-Uclés, África; Martín-Sánchez, Jesús; Medrano, Mayte; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Memory B cells (MBCs) remain in a quiescent state for years, expressing pro-survival and anti-apoptotic factors while repressing cell proliferation and activation genes. During their differentiation into plasma cells (PCs), their expression pattern is reversed, with a higher expression of genes related to cell proliferation and activation, and a lower expression of pro-survival genes. To determine whether myelomatous PCs (mPCs) share characteristics with normal PCs and MBCs and to identify genes involved in the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma (MM), we compared gene expression patterns in these three cell sub-types. We observed that mPCs had features intermediate between those of MBCs and normal PCs, and identified 3455 genes differentially expressed in mPCs relative to normal PCs but with a similar expression pattern to that in MBCs. Most of these genes are involved in cell death and survival, cell growth and proliferation and protein synthesis. According to our findings, mPCs have a gene expression pattern closer to a MBC than a PC with a high expression of genes involved in cell survival. These genes should be physiologically inactivated in the transit from MBC to PC, but remain overexpressed in mPCs and thus may play a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:25628947

  14. Linking the aryl hydrocarbon receptor with altered DNA methylation patterns and developmentally induced aberrant antiviral CD8+ T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Winans, Bethany; Nagari, Anusha; Chae, Minho; Post, Christina M.; Ko, Chia-I; Puga, Alvaro; Kraus, W. Lee; Lawrence, B. Paige

    2015-01-01

    Successfully fighting infection requires a properly tuned immune system. Recent epidemiological studies link exposure to pollutants that bind the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) during development with poorer immune responses later in life. Yet, how developmental triggering of AHR durably alters immune cell function remains unknown. Using a mouse model, we show that developmental activation of AHR leads to long-lasting reduction in the response of CD8+ T cells during influenza virus infection, cells critical for resolving primary infection. Combining genome-wide approaches, we demonstrate that developmental activation alters DNA methylation and gene expression patterns in isolated CD8+ T cells prior to and during infection. Altered transcriptional profiles in CD8+ T cells from developmentally exposed mice reflect changes in pathways involved in proliferation and immunoregulation, with an overall pattern that bears hallmarks of T cell exhaustion. Developmental exposure also changed DNA methylation across the genome, but differences were most pronounced following infection, where we observed inverse correlation between promoter methylation and gene expression. This points to altered regulation of DNA methylation as one mechanism by which AHR causes durable changes in T cell function. Discovering that distinct gene sets and pathways were differentially changed in developmentally exposed mice prior to and after infection further reveals that the process of CD8+ T cell activation is rendered fundamentally different by early life AHR signaling. These findings reveal a novel role for AHR in the developing immune system: regulating DNA methylation and gene expression as T cells respond to infection later in life. PMID:25810390

  15. Hormone dependency of chromosome aberrations induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene in rat bone marrow cells: site-specific increase by erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, N.; Suglyama, T.; Chattopadhyay, S.C.; Goto-Mimura, K.; Maeda, S.

    1981-08-01

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) 6 hours after iv injection of 50 mg 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA0/kg was studied in bone marrow cells of the noninbred Long-Evans rat under various hematopoietic conditions. The percentage of metaphase cells with CA was enhanced by anemia and suppressed by polycythemia. The low incidence of CA in polycythemic rats was reversed by 6 U of sheep erythropoietin (EP) injected at the time of DMBA treatment. The interchromosomal and intrachromosomal distribution of CA indicated that hematopoietic stimuli, more specifically EP, greatly enhanced DMBA-induced CA in specific chromosomal regions.

  16. Targeting stem cell signaling pathways for drug discovery: advances in the Notch and Wnt pathways.

    PubMed

    An, Songzhu Michael; Ding, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, JingYi; Li, LingSong

    2014-06-01

    Signaling pathways transduce extracellular stimuli into cells through molecular cascades to regulate cellular functions. In stem cells, a small number of pathways, notably those of TGF-β/BMP, Hedgehog, Notch, and Wnt, are responsible for the regulation of pluripotency and differentiation. During embryonic development, these pathways govern cell fate specifications as well as the formation of tissues and organs. In adulthood, their normal functions are important for tissue homeostasis and regeneration, whereas aberrations result in diseases, such as cancer and degenerative disorders. In complex biological systems, stem cell signaling pathways work in concert as a network and exhibit crosstalk, such as the negative crosstalk between Wnt and Notch. Over the past decade, genetic and genomic studies have identified a number of potential drug targets that are involved in stem cell signaling pathways. Indeed, discovery of new targets and drugs for these pathways has become one of the most active areas in both the research community and pharmaceutical industry. Remarkable progress has been made and several promising drug candidates have entered into clinical trials. This review focuses on recent advances in the discovery of novel drugs which target the Notch and Wnt pathways.

  17. Activated WNT signaling in postnatal SOX2-positive dental stem cells can drive odontoma formation.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Guilherme M; Patist, Amanda L; Healy, Chris; Pagrut, Ankita; Carreno, Gabriela; Sharpe, Paul T; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Thavaraj, Selvam; Cobourne, Martyn T; Andoniadou, Cynthia L

    2015-09-28

    In common with most mammals, humans form only two dentitions during their lifetime. Occasionally, supernumerary teeth develop in addition to the normal complement. Odontoma represent a small group of malformations containing calcified dental tissues of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin, with varying levels of organization, including tooth-like structures. The specific cell type responsible for the induction of odontoma, which retains the capacity to re-initiate de novo tooth development in postnatal tissues, is not known. Here we demonstrate that aberrant activation of WNT signaling by expression of a non-degradable form of β-catenin specifically in SOX2-positive postnatal dental epithelial stem cells is sufficient to generate odontoma containing multiple tooth-like structures complete with all dental tissue layers. Genetic lineage-tracing confirms that odontoma form in a similar manner to normal teeth, derived from both the mutation-sustaining epithelial stem cells and adjacent mesenchymal tissues. Activation of the WNT pathway in embryonic SOX2-positive progenitors results in ectopic expression of secreted signals that promote odontogenesis throughout the oral cavity. Significantly, the inductive potential of epithelial dental stem cells is retained in postnatal tissues, and up-regulation of WNT signaling specifically in these cells is sufficient to promote generation and growth of ectopic malformations faithfully resembling human odontoma.

  18. Activated WNT signaling in postnatal SOX2-positive dental stem cells can drive odontoma formation

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Guilherme M.; Patist, Amanda L.; Healy, Chris; Pagrut, Ankita; Carreno, Gabriela; Sharpe, Paul T.; Pedro Martinez-Barbera, Juan; Thavaraj, Selvam; Cobourne, Martyn T.; Andoniadou, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    In common with most mammals, humans form only two dentitions during their lifetime. Occasionally, supernumerary teeth develop in addition to the normal complement. Odontoma represent a small group of malformations containing calcified dental tissues of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin, with varying levels of organization, including tooth-like structures. The specific cell type responsible for the induction of odontoma, which retains the capacity to re-initiate de novo tooth development in postnatal tissues, is not known. Here we demonstrate that aberrant activation of WNT signaling by expression of a non-degradable form of β-catenin specifically in SOX2-positive postnatal dental epithelial stem cells is sufficient to generate odontoma containing multiple tooth-like structures complete with all dental tissue layers. Genetic lineage-tracing confirms that odontoma form in a similar manner to normal teeth, derived from both the mutation-sustaining epithelial stem cells and adjacent mesenchymal tissues. Activation of the WNT pathway in embryonic SOX2-positive progenitors results in ectopic expression of secreted signals that promote odontogenesis throughout the oral cavity. Significantly, the inductive potential of epithelial dental stem cells is retained in postnatal tissues, and up-regulation of WNT signaling specifically in these cells is sufficient to promote generation and growth of ectopic malformations faithfully resembling human odontoma. PMID:26411543

  19. Nicotine derived genotoxic effects in human primary parotid gland cells as assessed in vitro by comet assay, cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and chromosome aberrations test.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Steussloff, Gudrun; Koehler, Christian; Burghartz, Marc; Scherzed, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2014-08-01

    Genotoxic effects of nicotine were described in different human cells including salivary gland cells. Based on the high nicotine concentration in saliva of smokers or patients using therapeutic nicotine patches, the current study was performed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of nicotine in human salivary gland cells. Therefore, primary salivary gland cells from 10 patients undergoing parotid gland surgery were exposed to nicotine concentrations between 1 μM and 1000 μM for 1 h in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation. The acinar phenotype was proven by immunofluorescent staining of alpha-amylase. Genotoxic effects were evaluated using the Comet assay, the micronucleus test and the chromosome aberration test. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were determined by trypan blue exclusion test and Caspase-3 assay. Nicotine was able to induce genotoxic effects in all three assays. The chromosome aberration test was the most sensitive and increases in numerical and structural (chromatid-type and chromosome-type) aberrations were seen at ≥1 μM, whereas increases in micronuclei frequency were detected at 10 μM and DNA damage as measured in the Comet assay was noted at >100 μM. No cytotoxic damage or influence of apoptosis could be demonstrated. Nicotine as a possible risk factor for tumor initiation in salivary glands is still discussed controversially. Our results demonstrated the potential of nicotine to induce genotoxic effects in salivary gland cells. These results were observed at saliva nicotine levels similar to those found after oral or transdermal exposure to nicotine and suggest the necessity of careful monitoring of the use of nicotine in humans.

  20. Mammary stem cells and breast cancer--role of Notch signalling.

    PubMed

    Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B

    2007-06-01

    Adult stem cells are found in numerous tissues of the body and play a role in tissue development, replacement and repair. Evidence shows that breast stem cells are multipotent and can self renew, which are key characteristics of stem cells, and a single cell enriched with cell surface markers has the ability to grow a fully functional mammary gland in vivo. Many groups have extrapolated the cancer stem cell hypothesis from the haematopoietic system to solid cancers, where using in vitro culture techniques and in vivo transplant models have established evidence of cancer stem cells in colon, pancreas, prostate, brain and breast cancers. In the report we describe the evidence for breast cancer stem cells; studies consistently show that stem cell like and breast cancer initiating populations can be enriched using cell surface makers CD44+/CD24- and have upregulated genes which include Notch. Notch signalling has been highlighted as a pathway involved in the development of the breast and is frequently dysregulated in invasive breast cancer. We have investigated the role of Notch in a pre-invasive breast lesion, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and have found that aberrant activation of Notch signalling is an early event in breast cancer. High expression of Notch 1 intracellular domain (NICD) in DCIS also predicted a reduced time to recurrence 5 years after surgery. Using a non-adherent sphere culture technique we have grown DCIS mammospheres from primary DCIS tissue, where self-renewal capacity, measured by the number of mammosphere initiating cells, were increased from normal breast tissue. A gamma-secretase inhibitor, DAPT, which inhibits all four Notch receptors and a Notch 4 neutralising antibody were shown to reduce DCIS mammosphere formation, indicating that Notch signalling and other stem cell self-renewal pathways may represent novel therapeutic targets to prevent recurrence of pre-invasive and invasive breast cancer.

  1. Mechanistic roles of epithelial and immune cell signaling during the development of colitis-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Renuka; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    To date, substantial evidence has shown a significant association between inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and development of colitis-associated cancer (CAC). The incidence/prevalence of IBD is higher in western countries including the US, Australia, and the UK. Although CAC development is generally characterized by stepwise accumulation of genetic as well as epigenetic changes, precise mechanisms of how chronic inflammation leads to the development of CAC are largely unknown. Preceding intestinal inflammation is one of the major influential factors for CAC tumorigenesis. Mucosal immune responses including activation of aberrant signaling pathways both in innate and adaptive immune cells play a pivotal role in CAC. Tumor progression and metastasis are shaped by a tightly controlled tumor microenvironment which is orchestrated by several immune cells and stromal cells including macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, myeloid derived suppressor cells, T cells, and myofibroblasts. In this article, we will discuss the contributing factors of epithelial as well as immune cell signaling in initiation of CAC tumorigenesis and mucosal immune regulatory factors in the colonic tumor microenvironment. In depth understanding of these factors is necessary to develop novel anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer therapies for CAC in the near future. PMID:27110580

  2. Induction of chromosomal aberrations in mouse zygotes by acrylamide treatment of male germ cells and their correlation with dominant lethality and heritable translocations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F.; Lowe, X.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Bishop, J.

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of this research were: (1) to investigate the time course of the cytogenetic defects induced by acrylamide (AA) treatment (5 x 50 mg/kg) of male germ cells in first-cleavage zygote metaphases using PAINT/DAPI analysis, and (2) to characterize the correlation between chromosomal aberrations at first cleavage, dominant lethality, and heritable translocations. PAINT/DAPI analysis employs multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization painting plus DAPI staining to detect both stable and unstable chromosomal aberrations at first-cleavage metaphase of the zygote. High levels of chromosomally defective zygotes were detected after mating at all postmeiotic stages (20-190-fold, P < 0.001). Early spermatozoa (6.5 d post-treatment) were the most sensitive, with 76% of the zygotes carrying cytogenetic defects. A significant 10-fold increase was also detected 27.5 d post-treatment, indicating that AA had a cytogenetic effect on meiotic stages. PAINT/DAPI analysis revealed that: (1) AA-induced chromosomal breaks occurred at random, and (2) the frequencies of symmetrical and asymmetrical exchanges were similar at all mating days, except 9.5 d after AA treatment, where significantly (P < 0.02) more asymmetrical aberrations were found. 33 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. A Comprehensive Statistical Model for Cell Signaling and Protein Activity Inference

    PubMed Central

    Yörük, Erdem; Ochs, Michael F.; Geman, Donald; Younes, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Protein signaling networks play a central role in transcriptional regulation and the etiology of many diseases. Statistical methods, particularly Bayesian networks, have been widely used to model cell signaling, mostly for model organisms and with focus on uncovering connectivity rather than inferring aberrations. Extensions to mammalian systems have not yielded compelling results, due likely to greatly increased complexity and limited proteomic measurements in vivo. In this study, we propose a comprehensive statistical model that is anchored to a predefined core topology, has a limited complexity due to parameter sharing and uses micorarray data of mRNA transcripts as the only observable components of signaling. Specifically, we account for cell heterogeneity and a multi-level process, representing signaling as a Bayesian network at the cell level, modeling measurements as ensemble averages at the tissue level and incorporating patient-to-patient differences at the population level. Motivated by the goal of identifying individual protein abnormalities as potential therapeutical targets, we applied our method to the RAS-RAF network using a breast cancer study with 118 patients. We demonstrated rigorous statistical inference, established reproducibility through simulations and the ability to recover receptor status from available microarray data. PMID:20855924

  4. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  5. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-05-03

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

  6. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness. PMID:26872368

  7. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  8. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  9. Targeting EGF-receptor-signalling in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, C W M; Morgan, M A; Eckardt, A

    2007-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the use of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy to treat squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), prognosis has improved little over the past 30 years. There is a clear need for novel, more effective therapies to prevent relapse, control metastases and improve overall survival. Improved understanding of SCCHN disease biology has led to the introduction of molecularly targeted treatment strategies in these cancers. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is expressed at much higher levels in SCCHN tumours than in normal epithelial tissue, and EGFR expression correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, much effort is currently directed toward targeting aberrant EGFR activity (e.g. cell signalling) in SCCHN. This review discusses the efficacy of novel therapies targeting the EGFR (e.g. anti-EGFR antibodies and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors) that are currently tested in SCCHN patients. PMID:17224925

  10. Concerted microRNA control of Hedgehog signalling in cerebellar neuronal progenitor and tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Elisabetta; De Smaele, Enrico; Miele, Evelina; Laneve, Pietro; Po, Agnese; Pelloni, Marianna; Paganelli, Arianna; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Caffarelli, Elisa; Screpanti, Isabella; Bozzoni, Irene; Gulino, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are crucial post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and control cell differentiation and proliferation. However, little is known about their targeting of specific developmental pathways. Hedgehog (Hh) signalling controls cerebellar granule cell progenitor development and a subversion of this pathway leads to neoplastic transformation into medulloblastoma (MB). Using a miRNA high-throughput profile screening, we identify here a downregulated miRNA signature in human MBs with high Hh signalling. Specifically, we identify miR-125b and miR-326 as suppressors of the pathway activator Smoothened together with miR-324-5p, which also targets the downstream transcription factor Gli1. Downregulation of these miRNAs allows high levels of Hh-dependent gene expression leading to tumour cell proliferation. Interestingly, the downregulation of miR-324-5p is genetically determined by MB-associated deletion of chromosome 17p. We also report that whereas miRNA expression is downregulated in cerebellar neuronal progenitors, it increases alongside differentiation, thereby allowing cell maturation and growth inhibition. These findings identify a novel regulatory circuitry of the Hh signalling and suggest that misregulation of specific miRNAs, leading to its aberrant activation, sustain cancer development. PMID:18756266

  11. Regulatory T-cell depletion in the gut caused by integrin β7 deficiency exacerbates DSS colitis by evoking aberrant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H L; Zheng, Y J; Pan, Y D; Xie, C; Sun, H; Zhang, Y H; Yuan, M Y; Song, B L; Chen, J F

    2016-03-01

    Integrin α4β7 controls lymphocyte trafficking into the gut and has essential roles in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The α4β7-blocking antibody vedolizumab is approved for IBD treatment; however, high dose of vedolizumab aggravates colitis in a small percentage of patients. Herein, we show that integrin β7 deficiency results in colonic regulatory T (Treg) cell depletion and exacerbates dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis by evoking aberrant innate immunity. In DSS-treated β7-deficient mice, the loss of colonic Treg cells induces excessive macrophage infiltration in the colon via upregulation of colonic epithelial intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and increases proinflammatory cytokine expression, thereby exacerbating DSS-induced colitis. Moreover, reconstitution of the colonic Treg cell population in β7-deficient mice suppresses aberrant innate immune response in the colon and attenuates DSS colitis. Thus, integrin α4β7 is essential for suppression of DSS colitis as it regulates the colonic Treg cell population and innate immunity.

  12. Autoimmunity-inducing metals (Hg, Au and Ag) modulate mast cell signaling, function and survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Toshio; Ra, Chisei

    2011-11-01

    The three heavy metals, mercury, gold and silver commonly and specifically induce aberrant immunological responses leading to autoimmune disorders in genetically susceptible animals and humans. The disorders are characterized by autoantibody production, increases in serum IgG and IgE, polyclonal activation of B and T lymphocytes and renal immune complex deposition and glomerulonephritis. Mast cells play key roles in allergic and inflammatory reactions. A growing body of evidence suggests that mast cells are key players in innate and adaptive immunity and involved in autoimmune diseases. Mast cells are also direct targets for autoimmunity-inducing metals both in vitro and in vivo and play a role in the development of metal-induced autoimmune disorders. The three metals specifically modulate mast cell function, including degranulation and secretion of arachidonic acid metabolites and cytokines such as interleukin-4. Divergent signaling components, including mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, reactive oxygen and nitric oxide generation and Ca2+ influx are modulated by the metals. Furthermore, the metals have considerable impacts on mast cell survival, which also species seems to be involved in the development of metal-induced autoimmune disorders. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in our understanding of the impacts of the three metals on mast cell signaling, function and survival and their possible roles in the pathologies of metal-induced autoimmunity.

  13. Roles of PINK1, mTORC2, and mitochondria in preserving brain tumor-forming stem cells in a noncanonical Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Wu, Zhihao; Song, Yan; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Feroze, Abdullah H; Cheshier, Samuel H; Lu, Bingwei

    2013-12-15

    The self-renewal versus differentiation choice of Drosophila and mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs) requires Notch (N) signaling. How N regulates NSC behavior is not well understood. Here we show that canonical N signaling cooperates with a noncanonical N signaling pathway to mediate N-directed NSC regulation. In the noncanonical pathway, N interacts with PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) to influence mitochondrial function, activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2)/AKT signaling. Importantly, attenuating noncanonical N signaling preferentially impaired the maintenance of Drosophila and human cancer stem cell-like tumor-forming cells. Our results emphasize the importance of mitochondria to N and NSC biology, with important implications for diseases associated with aberrant N signaling.

  14. Aberrant transcriptional networks in step-wise neurogenesis of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Ma, Yu; Zhang, Kunshan; Gu, Junjie; Tang, Fan; Chen, Shengdi; Cao, Li; Li, Siguang; Jin, Ying

    2016-08-16

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is an episodic movement disorder with autosomal-dominant inheritance and marked variability in clinical manifestations.Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) has been identified as a causative gene of PKD, but the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of PKD still remains a mystery. The phenotypes and transcriptional patterns of the PKD disease need further clarification. Here, we report the generation and neural differentiation of iPSC lines from two familial PKD patients with c.487C>T (p. Gln163X) and c.573dupT (p. Gly192Trpfs*8) PRRT2 mutations, respectively. Notably, an extremely lower efficiency in neural conversion from PKD-iPSCs than control-iPSCs is observed by a step-wise neural differentiation method of dual inhibition of SMAD signaling. Moreover, we show the high expression level of PRRT2 throughout the human brain and the expression pattern of PRRT2 in other human tissues for the first time. To gain molecular insight into the development of the disease, we conduct global gene expression profiling of PKD cells at four different stages of neural induction and identify altered gene expression patterns, which peculiarly reflect dysregulated neural transcriptome signatures and a differentiation tendency to mesodermal development, in comparison to control-iPSCs. Additionally, functional and signaling pathway analyses indicate significantly different cell fate determination between PKD-iPSCs and control-iPSCs. Together, the establishment of PKD-specific in vitro models and the illustration of transcriptome features in PKD cells would certainly help us with better understanding of the defects in neural conversion as well as further investigations in the pathogenesis of the PKD disease.

  15. Aberrant transcriptional networks in step-wise neurogenesis of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia-induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun; Ma, Yu; Zhang, Kunshan; Gu, Junjie; Tang, Fan; Chen, Shengdi; Cao, Li; Li, Siguang; Jin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is an episodic movement disorder with autosomal-dominant inheritance and marked variability in clinical manifestations. Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) has been identified as a causative gene of PKD, but the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of PKD still remains a mystery. The phenotypes and transcriptional patterns of the PKD disease need further clarification. Here, we report the generation and neural differentiation of iPSC lines from two familial PKD patients with c.487C>T (p. Gln163X) and c.573dupT (p. Gly192Trpfs*8) PRRT2 mutations, respectively. Notably, an extremely lower efficiency in neural conversion from PKD-iPSCs than control-iPSCs is observed by a step-wise neural differentiation method of dual inhibition of SMAD signaling. Moreover, we show the high expression level of PRRT2 throughout the human brain and the expression pattern of PRRT2 in other human tissues for the first time. To gain molecular insight into the development of the disease, we conduct global gene expression profiling of PKD cells at four different stages of neural induction and identify altered gene expression patterns, which peculiarly reflect dysregulated neural transcriptome signatures and a differentiation tendency to mesodermal development, in comparison to control-iPSCs. Additionally, functional and signaling pathway analyses indicate significantly different cell fate determination between PKD-iPSCs and control-iPSCs. Together, the establishment of PKD-specific in vitro models and the illustration of transcriptome features in PKD cells would certainly help us with better understanding of the defects in neural conversion as well as further investigations in the pathogenesis of the PKD disease. PMID:27449084

  16. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Yiu Huen; Dogruluk, Turgut; Tedeschi, Philip M.; Wardwell-Ozgo, Joanna; Lu, Hengyu; Espitia, Maribel; Nair, Nikitha; Minelli, Rosalba; Chong, Zechen; Chen, Fengju; Chang, Qing Edward; Dennison, Jennifer B.; Dogruluk, Armel; Li, Min; Ying, Haoqiang; Bertino, Joseph R.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Ittmann, Michael; Kerrigan, John; Chen, Ken; Creighton, Chad J.; Eterovic, Karina; Mills, Gordon B.; Scott, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This approach reveals oncogenic activity for rare gene aberrations in genes including NAD Kinase (NADK), which regulates NADP(H) homeostasis and cellular redox state. We further validate mutant NADK, whose expression provides gain-of-function enzymatic activity leading to a reduction in cellular reactive oxygen species and tumorigenesis, and show that depletion of wild-type NADK in PDAC cell lines attenuates cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that annotating rare aberrations can reveal important cancer signalling pathways representing additional therapeutic targets. PMID:26806015

  17. Cell signaling pathways and HIV-1 therapeutics.

    PubMed

    He, Johnny J

    2011-06-01

    Host-virus interactions permeate every aspect of both virus life cycle and host response and involve host cell macromolecular machinery and viral elements. It is these intimate interactions that mandate the outcomes of the infection and pathogenesis. It is also these intimate interactions that lay the foundation for the development of pharmaceutical interventions. HIV-1 is no exception in these regards. In the first two decades, HIV/AIDS research has led to the successful development of a number of antiviral inhibitors and the landmark formulation of the suppressive therapy. It has become apparent that this therapy does not offer a complete solution to cure and eradicate the virus. Meanwhile, this therapy has changed the overall landscape of HIV-associated neurological disorders to a more common and prevalent form so-called minor cognitive motor disorder. Thus, there is an important and continued need for new anti-HIV therapeutics. We believe that this is an excellent opportunity to compile and present the latest works being done during the last few years in this exciting field of HIV-host interactions, particularly cell signaling pathways. We hope that this special issue composed of one brief report, eight thematic reviews, and two original articles will serve to foster the exchange of new scientific ideas on HIV-host interactions and anti-HIV therapy and eventually contribute to HIV/AIDS eradication.

  18. Extracellular NAD(+): a danger signal hindering regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Adriouch, Sahil; Haag, Friedrich; Boyer, Olivier; Seman, Michel; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2012-11-01

    Endogenous danger signals released during cell damage contribute to alert the immune system. Typically, their release results in the activation and maturation of innate immune cells, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, extracellular NAD(+) stimulates immune responses by hindering regulatory T cells (Tregs), and could, therefore, represent the prototype of a new category of danger signals.

  19. Olfactory Sensory Neurons Control Dendritic Complexity of Mitral Cells via Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Tetsuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Mitral cells (MCs) of the mammalian olfactory bulb have a single primary dendrite extending into a single glomerulus, where they receive odor information from olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Molecular mechanisms for controlling dendritic arbors of MCs, which dynamically change during development, are largely unknown. Here we found that MCs displayed more complex dendritic morphologies in mouse mutants of Maml1, a crucial gene in Notch signaling. Similar phenotypes were observed by conditionally misexpressing a dominant negative form of MAML1 (dnMAML1) in MCs after their migration. Conversely, conditional misexpression of a constitutively active form of Notch reduced their dendritic complexity. Furthermore, the intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD1) was localized to nuclei of MCs. These findings suggest that Notch signaling at embryonic stages is involved in the dendritic complexity of MCs. After the embryonic misexpression of dnMAML1, many MCs aberrantly extended dendrites to more than one glomerulus at postnatal stages, suggesting that Notch signaling is essential for proper formation of olfactory circuits. Moreover, dendrites in cultured MCs were shortened by Jag1-expressing cells. Finally, blocking the activity of Notch ligands in OSNs led to an increase in dendritic complexity as well as a decrease in NICD1 signals in MCs. These results demonstrate that the dendritic complexity of MCs is controlled by their presynaptic partners, OSNs. PMID:28027303

  20. Folate deficiency and aberrant expression of cell adhesion molecule 1 are potential indicators of prognosis in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hao; Ma, Min; Ma, Rui; Zhang, Chao; Zeng, Wei; Xing, Lu Qi

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) has not yet been adequately examined. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the association between serum folate deficiency and abnormal expression of the cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) protein in the progression of LSCC. Samples were collected from 60 patients with LSCC and 30 healthy people. Radioimmunoassays and immunohistochemical staining were performed to measure serum folate levels and CADM1 protein expression, respectively. The results demonstrated that CADM1 expression in LSCC specimens was significantly lower than in adjacent normal tissues (χ2=28.229, P<0.001), which was associated with histological differentiation and clinical stage (P=0.010 and 0.020, respectively). Levels of serum folate in patients with LSCC were significantly lower than those observed in healthy individuals (P=0.002). Furthermore, TSLCl expression and serum folate levels were positively correlated in LSCC (r=0.642, P=0.001). Thus, the present study determined that decreased CADM1 protein expression and low levels of serum folate were correlated with an increased severity of LSCC. PMID:28105160

  1. Anti-MUC1 antibody inhibits EGF receptor signaling in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hisatsune, Akinori; Nakayama, Hideki; Kawasaki, Mitsuru; Horie, Ichiro; Miyata, Takeshi; Isohama, Yoichiro; Kim, Kwang Chul; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We identified changes in the expression and function of EGFR by anti-MUC1 antibody. {yields} An anti-MUC1 antibody GP1.4 decreased EGFR from cell surface by internalization. {yields} GP1.4 specifically inhibited ERK signaling triggered EGF-EGFR signaling pathway. {yields} Internalization of EGFR was dependent on the presence of MUC1 on cell surface. {yields} GP1.4 significantly inhibited EGF-dependent cancer cell proliferation and migration. -- Abstract: MUC1 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein aberrantly overexpressed in various cancer cells. High expression of MUC1 is closely associated with cancer progression and metastasis, leading to poor prognosis. We previously reported that MUC1 is internalized by the binding of the anti-MUC1 antibody, from the cell surface to the intracellular region via the macropinocytotic pathway. Since MUC1 is closely associated with ErbBs, such as EGF receptor (EGFR) in cancer cells, we examined the effect of the anti-MUC1 antibody on EGFR trafficking. Our results show that: (1) anti-MUC1 antibody GP1.4, but not another anti-MUC1 antibody C595, triggered the internalization of EGFR in pancreatic cancer cells; (2) internalization of EGFR by GP1.4 resulted in the inhibition of ERK phosphorylation by EGF stimulation, in a MUC1 dependent manner; (3) inhibition of ERK phosphorylation by GP1.4 resulted in the suppression of proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. We conclude that the internalization of EGFR by anti-MUC1 antibody GP1.4 inhibits the progression of cancer cells via the inhibition of EGFR signaling.

  2. Identification of Proteins Related to Epigenetic Regulation in the Malignant Transformation of Aberrant Karyotypic Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Yang, Yixuan; Zeng, Sicong; Tan, Yueqiu; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) tend to develop genomic alterations and progress to a malignant state during long-term in vitro culture. This raises concerns of the clinical safety in using cultured hESCs. However, transformed hESCs might serve as an excellent model to determine the process of embryonic stem cell transition. In this study, ITRAQ-based tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify normal and aberrant karyotypic hESCs proteins from simple to more complex karyotypic abnormalities. We identified and quantified 2583 proteins, and found that the expression levels of 316 proteins that represented at least 23 functional molecular groups were significantly different in both normal and abnormal hESCs. Dysregulated protein expression in epigenetic regulation was further verified in six pairs of hESC lines in early and late passage. In summary, this study is the first large-scale quantitative proteomic analysis of the malignant transformation of aberrant karyotypic hESCs. The data generated should serve as a useful reference of stem cell-derived tumor progression. Increased expression of both HDAC2 and CTNNB1 are detected as early as the pre-neoplastic stage, and might serve as prognostic markers in the malignant transformation of hESCs. PMID:24465727

  3. Apoptosis induction in colon cancer cell lines and alteration of aberrant crypt foci in rat colon by purple rice (Oryza sativa L. var. glutinosa) extracts.

    PubMed

    Wongjaikam, Suwakon; Summart, Ratasak; Chewonarin, Teera

    2014-01-01

    Crude ethanol extracts (CEE) of purple rice was fractionated to obtain hexane soluble (HSF) and ethyl acetate soluble fractions (EASF). Total antioxidant capacity was higher in CEE than the HSF and EASF. However, HSF exhibited strong antiproliferation and apoptosis induction against colon cancer cell lines, both p53 wild-type (RKO) and mutant (SW620) strains. Then, the CEE was used to determine the effects on the progression of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), a preneoplastic lesion seen in colon carcinogenesis in rats. Male Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected of 40 mg/kg body weight dimethylhydrazin (DMH) once weekly for 2 wk. After 2 wk, rats were orally administered ethanol extract at 100 and 1000 mg/kg body weight, for 4 wk. Rats fed with only the high dose of CEE had significantly decreased numbers of ACF per rat (45.56%) and crypt multiplicity (AC/focus) (16.67%) compared to rats that received DMH alone. The result also demonstrated that CEE induced apoptosis in colonic epithelium cells of rat received colon carcinogen as detected the increasing of caspase-3 activity. This finding could be concluded that purple rice extracts inhibited aberrant colonic epithelial cell progression via apoptosis induction.

  4. PGRN haploinsufficiency increased Wnt5a signaling in peripheral cells from frontotemporal lobar degeneration-progranulin mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Alquézar, Carolina; Esteras, Noemí; de la Encarnación, Ana; Alzualde, Ainhoa; Moreno, Fermín; López de Munain, Adolfo; Martín-Requero, Angeles

    2014-04-01

    Loss-of-function progranulin (PGRN) mutations have been identified as the major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 protein inclusions (FTLD-TDP). Previously, we reported cell cycle-related alterations in lymphoblasts from FTLD-TDP patients, carrying the c.709-1G>A null PGRN mutation, suggesting aberrant cell cycle activation in affected neurons. Here we report that PGRN haploinsufficiency activates the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 pathway in a Ca(2+), protein kinase C-dependent, and pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. Addition of exogenous PGRN or conditioned medium from control cells normalized the response of PGRN-deficient lymphoblasts to serum activation. Our data indicated that noncanonical Wnt5a signaling might be overactivated by PGRN deficiency. We detected increased cellular and secreted levels of Wnt5a in PGRN-deficient lymphoblasts associated with enhanced phosphorylated calmodulin kinase II. Moreover, treatment of control cells with exogenous Wingless-type 5a (Wnt5a)-activated Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), increased extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 activity and cell proliferation up to the levels found in c.709-1G>A carrier cells. PGRN knockdown SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells also show enhanced Wnt5a content and signaling. Taken together, our results revealed an important role of Wnt signaling in FTLD-TDP pathology and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Real Time Monitoring of Signaling Pathways in Biological Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cell signaling events by mediating the transport of molecules in and out of the cells . Cell surface receptors also function to...organic acceptor molecules in the plasma membrane and endocytic membranes of non -polarized MDCK cells . The EviTag-based FRET assay was designed to...02-2005 Final 27-07-2004 to 14-02-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Real Time Monitoring of Signaling Pathways in Biological Cells

  6. Overexpression of SlUPA-like induces cell enlargement, aberrant development and low stress tolerance through phytohormonal pathway in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Baolu; Hu, Zongli; Hu, Jingtao; Zhang, Yanjie; Yin, Wencheng; Zhu, Zhiguo; Feng, Ye; Chen, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    upa20 induces cell enlargement and hypertrophy development. In our research, overexpression of SlUPA-like, orthologous to upa20, severely affected the growth of vegetative and reproductive tissues. Wilted leaves curled upwardly and sterile flowers were found in transgenic lines. Through anatomical analysis, palisade and spongy tissues showed fluffy and hypertrophic development in transgenic plants. Gene expression analysis showed that GA responsive, biosynthetic and signal transduction genes (e.g. GAST1, SlGA20OXs, SlGA3OXs, SlGID1s, and SlPREs) were significantly upregulated, indicating that GA response is stimulated by overproduction of SlUPA-like. Furthermore, SlUPA-like was strongly induced by exogenous JA and wounding. Decreased expression of PI-I and induced expression of SlJAZs (including SlJAZ2, SlJAZ10 and SlJAZ11) were observed in transgenic plants, suggesting that JA response is repressed. In addition, SlUPA-like overexpressed plant exhibited more opened stoma and higher water loss than the control when treated with dehydration stress, which was related to decreased ABA biosynthesis, signal transduction and response. Particularly, abnormal developments of transgenic plants promote the plant susceptibility to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Therefore, it is deduced from these results that SlUPA-like plays vital role in regulation of plant development and stress tolerance through GA, JA and ABA pathways. PMID:27025226

  7. Overexpression of SlUPA-like induces cell enlargement, aberrant development and low stress tolerance through phytohormonal pathway in tomato.

    PubMed

    Cui, Baolu; Hu, Zongli; Hu, Jingtao; Zhang, Yanjie; Yin, Wencheng; Zhu, Zhiguo; Feng, Ye; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-30

    upa20 induces cell enlargement and hypertrophy development. In our research, overexpression of SlUPA-like, orthologous to upa20, severely affected the growth of vegetative and reproductive tissues. Wilted leaves curled upwardly and sterile flowers were found in transgenic lines. Through anatomical analysis, palisade and spongy tissues showed fluffy and hypertrophic development in transgenic plants. Gene expression analysis showed that GA responsive, biosynthetic and signal transduction genes (e.g. GAST1, SlGA20OXs, SlGA3OXs, SlGID1s, and SlPREs) were significantly upregulated, indicating that GA response is stimulated by overproduction of SlUPA-like. Furthermore, SlUPA-like was strongly induced by exogenous JA and wounding. Decreased expression of PI-I and induced expression of SlJAZs (including SlJAZ2, SlJAZ10 and SlJAZ11) were observed in transgenic plants, suggesting that JA response is repressed. In addition, SlUPA-like overexpressed plant exhibited more opened stoma and higher water loss than the control when treated with dehydration stress, which was related to decreased ABA biosynthesis, signal transduction and response. Particularly, abnormal developments of transgenic plants promote the plant susceptibility to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Therefore, it is deduced from these results that SlUPA-like plays vital role in regulation of plant development and stress tolerance through GA, JA and ABA pathways.

  8. SLIT/ROBO2 Signaling Promotes Mammary Stem Cell Senescence by Inhibiting Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Harburg, Gwyndolen; Compton, Jennifer; Liu, Wei; Iwai, Naomi; Zada, Shahrzad; Marlow, Rebecca; Strickland, Phyllis; Zeng, Yi Arial; Hinck, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Summary WNT signaling stimulates the self-renewal of many types of adult stem cells, including mammary stem cells (MaSCs), but mechanisms that limit this activity are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that SLIT2 restricts stem cell renewal by signaling through ROBO2 in a subset of basal cells to negatively regulate WNT signaling. The absence of SLIT/ROBO2 signaling leads to increased levels of nuclear β-catenin. Robo2 loss does not increase the number of stem cells; instead, stem cell renewal is enhanced in the absence of SLIT/ROBO2 signaling. This is due to repressed expression of p16INK4a, which, in turn, delays MaSC senescence. Together, our studies support a model in which SLITs restrict the expansion of MaSCs by countering the activity of WNTs and limiting self-renewal. PMID:25241737

  9. Activated Wnt signaling induces myofibroblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, contributing to pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaorui; Wang, Cong; Shi, Chaowen; Sun, Fangfang; Xu, Xiaomeng; Qian, Weiping; Nie, Shinan; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-05-01

    Acute lung injury may lead to fibrogenesis. However, no treatment is currently available. This study was conducted to determine the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a model of HCl-induced acute lung injury in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1 and its receptor CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4 have been shown to participate in mobilizing MSCs. Adenovirus carrying the CXCR4 gene was used to transfect MSCs in order to increase the engraftment numbers of MSCs at injured sites. Histological examination data demonstrated that the engraftment of MSCs did not attenuate lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. The results showed that engraftment of MSCs almost differentiated into myofibroblasts, but rarely differentiated into lung epithelial cells. Additionally, it was demonstrated that activated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in injured lung tissue regulated the myofibroblast differentiation of MSCs in vivo. The in vitro study results demonstrated that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling stimulated MSCs to express myofibroblast markers; however, this process was attenuated by Wnt antagonist DKK1. Therefore, the results demonstrated that the aberrant activation of Wnt signaling induces the myofibroblast differentiation of engrafted MSCs, thus contributing to pulmonary fibrosis following lung injury.

  10. Targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling network in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martelli, A M; Evangelisti, C; Follo, M Y; Ramazzotti, G; Fini, M; Giardino, R; Manzoli, L; McCubrey, J A; Cocco, L

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) comprise a subset of hierarchically organized, rare cancer cells with the ability to initiate cancer in xenografts of genetically modified murine models. CSCs are thought to be responsible for tumor onset, self-renewal/maintenance, mutation accumulation, and metastasis. The existence of CSCs could explain the high frequency of neoplasia relapse and resistance to all of currently available therapies, including chemotherapy. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is a key regulator of physiological cell processes which include proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, motility, metabolism, and autophagy. Nevertheless, aberrantly upregulated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling characterizes many types of cancers where it negatively influences prognosis. Several lines of evidence indicate that this signaling system plays a key role also in CSC biology. Of note, CSCs are more sensitive to pathway inhibition with small molecules when compared to healthy stem cells. This observation provides the proof-of-principle that functional differences in signaling transduction pathways between CSCs and healthy stem cells can be identified. Here, we review the evidence which links the signals deriving from the PI3K/Akt/mTOR network with CSC biology, both in hematological and solid tumors. We then highlight how therapeutic targeting of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling with small molecule inhibitors could improve cancer patient outcome, by eliminating CSCs.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of the NPM-ALK Signalling Network Reveals Important Pathways for Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; O’Hare, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large subset of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) patients harbour a somatic aberration in which anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is fused to nucleophosmin (NPM) resulting in a constitutively active signalling fusion protein, NPM-ALK. We computationally simulated the signalling network which mediates pathological cell survival and proliferation through NPM-ALK to identify therapeutically targetable nodes through which it may be possible to regain control of the tumourigenic process. The simulations reveal the predominant role of the VAV1-CDC42 (cell division control protein 42) pathway in NPM-ALK-driven cellular proliferation and of the Ras / mitogen-activated ERK kinase (MEK) / extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade in controlling cell survival. Our results also highlight the importance of a group of interleukins together with the Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) / signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling in the development of NPM-ALK derived ALCL. Depending on the activity of JAK3 and STAT3, the system may also be sensitive to activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP1), which has an inhibitory effect on cell survival and proliferation. The identification of signalling pathways active in tumourigenic processes is of fundamental importance for effective therapies. The prediction of alternative pathways that circumvent classical therapeutic targets opens the way to preventive approaches for countering the emergence of cancer resistance. PMID:27669408

  12. Plexin A1 signaling confers malignant phenotypes in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Daisuke; Watanabe, Satoshi; Kawahara, Kohichi; Maeda, Takehiko

    2016-11-04

    Aberrant changes to several signaling pathways because of genetic mutations or increased cytokine production are critical for tumor cells to become malignant. Semaphorin 3A (SEMA3A) acts as a bivalent factor that suppresses or promotes tumor development in different pathological backgrounds. Previously, we showed that SEMA3A positively regulated the proliferative and glycolytic activities of mouse-derived Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. Plexins A1-A4 (PLXNA1-PLXNA4) are SEMA3A receptors; however, it is not known which subtype is critical for oncogenic SEMA3A signaling. We used LLC cells to investigate the role of PLXNA1 in oncogenic SEMA3A signaling. Using short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown, we investigated the effects of constitutive inhibition of Plxna1 on cell proliferation, metabolic dependency, and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) sensitivity. We found that Plxna1 knockdown did not affect apoptosis but resulted in decreased cell proliferation and reductions in mRNA expression levels of proliferation-marker genes, such as Ccnd1, Pcna, and Myc. In addition, we found decreased mRNA expression levels of glycolysis-associated genes, such as Pkm2 and Ldha, and decreased lactate production. In contrast, we found no changes in the mRNA expression levels of oxidative phosphorylation-associated genes, such as Cycs, Cox5a, and Atp5g1. We found that Plxna1 knockdown conferred resistance to glucose starvation but increased cytotoxicity to oligomycin. Plxna1 or Sema3a knockdown caused an increased sensitivity to the EGFR-TKIs gefitinib and erlotinib, in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. These findings demonstrate that PLXNA1 mediates the acquisition of malignant phenotypes induced by autocrine SEMA3A signaling.

  13. Chromosome aberrations in decondensed sperm DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Factors that could influence the chromosomal aberration frequency observed at first cleavage following in vivo exposure of germ cells to chemical mutagens are discussed. The techniques of chromosome aberration analysis following sperm DNA condensation by in vitro fertilization or fusion seem to be viable research areas for providing information of human germ cell exposures. However, the potential sensitivity of the assay needs to be better understood, and factors that can influence this sensitivity require a great deal of further study using animal models.

  14. Vibration Induces BAFF Overexpression and Aberrant O-Glycosylation of IgA1 in Cultured Human Tonsillar Mononuclear Cells in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Muyao; Liu, Chan; Yan, Wenzhe; Peng, Xiaofei; He, Liyu; Liu, Hong; Liu, Fuyou

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of in vitro vibratory stimulation of human tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMCs). Methods. Fourteen IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients with chronic tonsillitis (CT) and 12 CT patients with no renal pathology were enrolled. Group A TMCs were collected after 24 hours of culture and used to determine baseline levels. TMCs in groups B, C, D, E, and F were exposed to vibratory stimulation (60 Hz) for 0 (as the control group), 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively. Results. Baseline concentrations of B-cell-activation factor (BAFF) and IgA1, BAFF mRNA expression, and aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 level were higher in the IgAN group as compared to that in the CT group, and all increased after vibratory stimulation. Baseline mRNA expressions of core β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and core β1,3GalT-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) were lower in the IgAN group; the levels decreased further after vibratory stimulation. Conclusion. In patients with IgAN, vibratory stimulation of TMCs appears to induce IgA1 secretion through activation of BAFF release and to aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 by suppressing C1GALT1 and Cosmc expression. In vitro vibratory stimulation of human TMCs mimics the vibratory simulation of palatine tonsils produced by vocal cords during phonation. PMID:27672662

  15. Karyotypic instability and centrosome aberrations in the progeny of finite life-span human mammary epithelial cells exposed to sparsely or densely ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Hiroko; Garbe, James; Stampfer, Martha R; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Kronenberg, Amy

    2008-07-01

    The human breast is sensitive to radiation carcinogenesis, and genomic instability occurs early in breast cancer development. This study tests the hypothesis that ionizing radiation elicits genomic instability in finite life-span human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and asks whether densely ionizing radiation is a more potent inducer of instability. HMEC in a non-proliferative state were exposed to X rays or 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions followed by delayed plating. Karyotypic instability and centrosome aberrations were monitored in expanded clonal isolates. Severe karyotypic instability was common in the progeny of cells that survived X-ray or iron-ion exposure. There was a lower dose threshold for severe karyotypic instability after iron-ion exposure. More than 90% of X-irradiated colonies and >60% of iron-ion-irradiated colonies showed supernumerary centrosomes at levels above the 95% upper confidence limit of the mean for unirradiated clones. A dose response was observed for centrosome aberrations for each radiation type. There was a statistically significant association between the incidence of karyotypic instability and supernumerary centrosomes for iron-ion-exposed colonies and a weaker association for X-irradiated colonies. Thus genomic instability occurs frequently in finite life-span HMEC exposed to sparsely or densely ionizing radiation and may contribute to radiation-induced breast cancer.

  16. A phosphatase-independent gain-of-function mutation in PTEN triggers aberrant cell growth in astrocytes through an autocrine IGF-1 loop.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S; Genis, L; Torres-Alemán, I

    2014-08-07

    Loss-of-function mutations in the phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome10) contribute to aberrant cell growth in part through upregulation of the mitogenic IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway. In turn, this pathway exerts a homeostatic feedback over PTEN. Using mutagenesis analysis to explore a possible impact of this mutual control on astrocyte growth, we found that truncation of the C-terminal region of PTEN (Δ51) associates with a marked increase in NFκB activity, a transcription factor overactivated in astrocyte tumors. Whereas mutations of PTEN are considered to lead to a loss-of-function, PTENΔ51, a truncation that comprises a region frequently mutated in human gliomas, displayed a neomorphic (gain-of-function) activity that was independent of its phosphatase activity. This gain-of-function of PTENΔ51 includes stimulation of IGF-1 synthesis through protein kinase A activation of the IGF-1 promoter. Increased IGF-1 originates an autocrine loop that activates Akt and NFκB. Constitutive activation of NFκB in PTENΔ51-expressing astrocytes leads to aberrant cell growth; astrocytes expressing this mutant PTEN generate colonies in vitro and tumors in vivo. Mutations converting a tumor suppressor such as PTEN into a tumor promoter through a gain-of-function involving IGF-1 production may further our understanding of the role played by this growth factor in glioma growth and help us define druggable targets for personalized therapy.

  17. Aberrant cell divisions in root meristeme of maize following exposure to X-rays low doses compared to similar effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focea, R.; Capraru, G.; Racuciu, M.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-04-01

    The response of maize to radiation exposure was investigated by two cytogenetic methods considering the importance of the geno-toxic effect for environmental and agricultural purposes. Uniform genophond seeds, freshly germinated, were exposed to relatively low radiation doses using a radiotherapy X-ray applicator from a hospital irradiation device and to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field with about 10 mT magnetic induction (generated within laboratory assembled electromagnetic coils). Radicular meristeme tissue aliquots were prevailed for cytogenetic investigation based on microscopic observations and cell counting. Microscope slides were prepared following a specific procedure (squash technique and Feulgen method based on modified Carr reactive coloration). Mitotic index as well as chromosomal aberration percentage were calculated for more than 30,000 cells taken into account. From a qualitative viewpoint, chromosomal aberrations such as interchromatidian bridges, lagging and expelled chromosomes and multipolar divisions were evidenced - no distinct situation for either ionizing radiation or electromagnetic field being identified. The main quantitative difference consisted in the increased mitotic index for electromagnetic exposure increased times compared with the diminished mitotic index in the case of low X-ray doses.

  18. Aberrations of chromosome 19 in asbestos-associated lung cancer and in asbestos-induced micronuclei of bronchial epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ruosaari, Salla T; Nymark, Penny E H; Aavikko, Mervi M; Kettunen, Eeva; Knuutila, Sakari; Hollmén, Jaakko; Norppa, Hannu; Anttila, Sisko L

    2008-05-01

    Exposure to asbestos is known to induce lung cancer, and our previous studies have suggested that specific chromosomal regions, such as 19p13, are preferentially aberrant in lung tumours of asbestos-exposed patients. Here, we further examined the association between the 19p region and exposure to asbestos using array comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in lung tumours and FISH characterization of asbestos-induced micronuclei (MN) in human bronchial epithelial BEAS 2B cells in vitro. We detected an increased number of 19p losses in the tumours of asbestos-exposed patients in comparison with tumours from non-exposed subjects with similar distribution of tumour histology in both groups (13/33; 39% versus 3/25; 12%, P = 0.04). In BEAS 2B cells, a 48 h exposure to crocidolite asbestos (2.0 microg/cm(2)) was found to induce centromere-negative MN-harbouring chromosomal fragments. Furthermore, an increased frequency of rare MN containing a 19p fragment was observed after the crocidolite treatment in comparison with untreated controls (6/6000 versus 1/10 000, P = 0.01). The results suggest that 19p has significance in asbestos-associated carcinogenesis and that asbestos may be capable of inducing specific chromosome aberrations.

  19. Salinomycin exerts anticancer effects on human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cancer stem cells via modulation of Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Ma, Wei; Mao, Jun; Yu, Xiaotang; Hou, Zhenhuan; Fan, Shujun; Song, Bo; Wang, Huan; Li, Jiazhi; Kang, Le; Liu, Pixu; Liu, Quentin; Li, Lianhong

    2015-02-25

    Breast cancer tissue contains a small population of cells that have the ability to self-renew, these cells are known as breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The Hedgehog signal transduction pathway plays a central role in stem cell development, its aberrant activation has been shown to contribute to the development of breast cancer, making this pathway an attractive therapeutic target. Salinomycin (Sal) is a novel identified cancer stem cells (CSCs) killer, however, the molecular basis for its anticancer effects is not yet clear. In the current study, Sal's ability to modulate the activity of key elements in the Hedgehog pathway was examined in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, as well as in a subpopulation of cancer stem cells identified within this cancer cell line. We show here that Sal inhibits proliferation, invasion, and migration while also inducing apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, in a subpopulation of MCF-7 cells with the CD44(+)/CD24(-) markers and high ALDH1 levels indicative of BCSCs, modulators of Hedgehog signaling Smo and Gli1 were significantly down-regulated upon treatment with Sal. These results demonstrate that Sal also inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of BCSCs, further establishing it as therapeutically relevant in the context of breast cancers and also indicating that modulation of Hedgehog signaling is one potential mechanism by which it exerts these anticancer effects.

  20. Sustained IL-6/STAT-3 Signaling in Cholangiocarcinoma Cells due to SOCS-3 Epigenetic Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Isomoto, Hajime; Mott, Justin L.; Kobayashi, Shogo; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Bronk, Steve F.; Haan, Serge; Gores, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims IL-6 mediated STAT-3 phosphorylation (activation) is aberrantly sustained in cholangiocarcinoma cells resulting in enhanced Mcl-1 expression and resistance to apoptosis. Because SOCS-3 controls the IL-6/STAT-3 signaling pathway by a classic feedback loop, the aims of this study were to examine SOCS-3 regulation in human cholangiocarcinoma. Methods SOCS-3 expression was assessed in human cholangiocarcinoma tissue and the Mz-ChA-1 and CCLP1 human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines. Results An inverse correlation was observed between phospho-STAT-3 and SOCS-3 protein expression in cholangiocarcinoma. In those cancers failing to express SOCS-3, extensive methylation of the SOCS-3 promoter was demonstrated in tumor but not in paired non-tumor tissue. Likewise, methylation of the socs-3 promoter was also identified in two cholangiocarcinoma cell lines. Treatment with a demethylating agent, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC), restored IL-6 induction of SOCS-3, terminated the phospho-STAT-3 response, and reduced cellular levels of Mcl-1. Enforced expression of SOCS-3 also reduced IL-6 induction of phospho-STAT-3 and Mcl-1. Either DAC treatment or enforced SOCS-3 expression sensitized the cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Conclusion SOCS-3 epigenetic silencing is responsible for sustained IL-6/STAT-3 signaling and enhanced Mcl-1 expression in cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:17241887

  1. Scrophularia orientalis extract induces calcium signaling and apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LANGE, INGO; MOSCHNY, JULIA; TAMANYAN, KAMILLA; KHUTSISHVILI, MANANA; ATHA, DANIEL; BORRIS, ROBERT P.; KOOMOA, DANA-LYNN

    2016-01-01

    Effective neuroblastoma (NB) treatments are still limited despite treatment options available today. Therefore, this study attempted to identify novel plant extracts that have anticancer effects. Cytotoxicity and increased intracellular calcium levels were determined using the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay and Fluo4-AM (acetoxymethyl) staining and fluorescence microscopy in NB cells in order to screen a library of plant extracts. The current study examined the anticancer effects of a dichloromethane extract from Scrophularia orientalis L. (Scrophulariaceae), a plant that has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. This extract contained highly potent agents that significantly reduced cell survival and increased calcium levels in NB cells. Further analysis revealed that cell death induced by this extract was associated with intracellular calcium release, opening of the MPTP, caspase 3- and PARP-cleavage suggesting that this extract induced aberrant calcium signaling that resulted in apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, agents from Scrophularia orientalis may have the potential to lead to new chemo therapeutic anticancer drugs. Furthermore, targeting intracellular calcium signaling may be a novel strategy to develop more effective treatments for NB. PMID:26848085

  2. Epigenetic deregulation of Ellis Van Creveld confers robust Hedgehog signaling in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryutaro; Yamagishi, Makoto; Nakano, Kazumi; Yamochi, Toshiko; Yamochi, Tadanori; Fujikawa, Dai; Nakashima, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utsunomiya, Atae; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-09-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer, global gene expression alteration, is closely associated with the development and malignant characteristics associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) as well as other cancers. Here, we show that aberrant overexpression of the Ellis Van Creveld (EVC) family is responsible for cellular Hedgehog (HH) activation, which provides the pro-survival ability of ATL cells. Using microarray, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we have demonstrated that EVC is significantly upregulated in ATL and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1)-infected cells. Epigenetic marks, including histone H3 acetylation and Lys4 trimethylation, are specifically accumulated at the EVC locus in ATL samples. The HTLV-1 Tax participates in the coordination of EVC expression in an epigenetic fashion. The treatment of shRNA targeting EVC, as well as the transcription factors for HH signaling, diminishes the HH activation and leads to apoptotic death in ATL cell lines. We also showed that a HH signaling inhibitor, GANT61, induces strong apoptosis in the established ATL cell lines and patient-derived primary ATL cells. Therefore, our data indicate that HH activation is involved in the regulation of leukemic cell survival. The epigenetically deregulated EVC appears to play an important role for HH activation. The possible use of EVC as a specific cell marker and a novel drug target for HTLV-1-infected T-cells is implicated by these findings. The HH inhibitors are suggested as drug candidates for ATL therapy. Our findings also suggest chromatin rearrangement associated with active histone markers in ATL.

  3. Synthesizing oncogenic signal-processing systems that function as both "signal counters" and "signal blockers" in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuchen; Huang, Weiren; Zhou, Dexi; Han, Yonghua; Duan, Yonggang; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Zhang, Hu; Jiang, Zhimao; Gui, Yaoting; Cai, Zhiming

    2013-07-01

    RNA-protein interaction plays a significant role in regulating eukaryotic translation. This phenomenon raises questions about the ability of artificial biological systems to take the advantage of protein-RNA interaction. Here, we designed an oncogenic signal-processing system expressing both a Renilla luciferase reporter gene controlled by RNA-protein interaction in its 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) and a Firefly luciferase normalization gene. To test the ability of the designed system, we then constructed vectors targeting the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) or the β-catenin signal. We found that the inhibition (%) of luciferase expression was correlated to the targeted protein content, allowing quantitative measurement of oncogenic signal intensity in cancer cells. The systems inhibited the expression of oncogenic signal downstream genes and induced bladder cancer cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis without affecting normal urothelial cells. Compared to traditional methods (ELISA and quantitative immunoblotting), the bio-systems provided highly accurate, consistent, and reproducible quantification of protein signals and were able to discriminate between cancerous and non-cancerous cells. In conclusion, the synthetic systems function as both "signal counters" and "signal blockers" in cancer cells. This approach provides a synthetic biology platform for oncogenic signal measurement and cancer treatment.

  4. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  5. Fibroblast growth factor signaling and inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer and their role in squamous cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Salgia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of targeted agents primarily applicable to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of adenocarcinoma histology, there is a heightened unmet need in the squamous cell carcinoma population. Targeting the angiogenic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling pathway is among the strategies being explored in squamous NSCLC; these efforts are supported by growth-promoting effects of FGF signaling in preclinical studies (including interactions with other pathways) and observations suggesting that FGF/FGFR-related aberrations may be more common in squamous versus adenocarcinoma and other histologies. A number of different anti-FGF/FGFR approaches have shown promise in preclinical studies. Clinical trials of two multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors are restricting enrollment to patients with squamous NSCLC: a phase I/II trial of nintedanib added to first-line gemcitabine/cisplatin and a phase II trial of ponatinib for previously treated advanced disease, with the latter requiring not only squamous disease but also a confirmed FGFR kinase amplification or mutation. There are several ongoing clinical trials of multitargeted agents in general NSCLC populations, including but not limited to patients with squamous disease. Other FGF/FGFR-targeted agents are in earlier clinical development. While results are awaited from these clinical investigations in squamous NSCLC and other disease settings, additional research is needed to elucidate the role of FGF/FGFR signaling in the biology of NSCLC of different histologies. PMID:24711160

  6. Excellence in cell signaling research recognized with major new award.

    PubMed

    Feller, Stephan M

    2013-03-04

    The newly installed Life Sciences Breakthrough Prize (http://www.breakthroughprizeinlifesciences.org/), which comes with more than double the financial reward of the Nobel Prize, has been awarded to several world-leaders in the field of cancer-related cell signaling and therapy research: Lewis C. Cantley (PI3 kinase), Hans Clevers (Wnt signaling), Charles L. Sawyers (signaling-targeted cancer therapy), Bert Vogelstein (colorectal cancer signaling) and Robert Weinberg (Ras & other cancer-relevant genes). They have all made remarkable contributions to our understanding of cell communication and malignancies over the last decades. Needless to say that virtually all other awardees of the 11 scientists honored in 2013 have also, in one way or another, touched upon signaling molecules, highlighting the fundamental interdisciplinarity and significance of signal transduction for living cells in general. For example, Shinya Yamanaka's exciting work was built on the four transcriptional signaling proteins, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc.

  7. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  8. The Sound of Silence: Signaling by Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Caitlin E.; Bergmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a carefully choreographed process of cellular self-destruction in the absence of inflammation. During the death process, apoptotic cells actively communicate with their environment, signaling to both their immediate neighbors as well as distant sentinels. Some of these signals direct the anti-inflammatory immune response, instructing specific subsets of phagocytes to participate in the limited and careful clearance of dying cellular debris. These immunomodulatory signals can also regulate the activation state of the engulfing phagocytes. Other signals derived from apoptotic cells contribute to tissue growth control with the common goal of maintaining tissue integrity. Derangements in these growth control signals during prolonged apoptosis can lead to excessive cell loss or proliferation. Here, we highlight some of the most intriguing signals produced by apoptotic cells during the course of normal development as well as during physiological disturbances such as atherosclerosis and cancer. PMID:26431570

  9. Pathophysiology of MDS: genomic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Motoshi

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and their apoptosis, and show a propensity to progress to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Although MDS are recognized as neoplastic diseases caused by genomic aberrations of hematopoietic cells, the details of the genetic abnormalities underlying disease development have not as yet been fully elucidated due to difficulties in analyzing chromosomal abnormalities. Recent advances in comprehensive analyses of disease genomes including whole-genome sequencing technologies have revealed the genomic abnormalities in MDS. Surprisingly, gene mutations were found in approximately 80-90% of cases with MDS, and the novel mutations discovered with these technologies included previously unknown, MDS-specific, mutations such as those of the genes in the RNA-splicing machinery. It is anticipated that these recent studies will shed new light on the pathophysiology of MDS due to genomic aberrations.

  10. Axitinib blocks Wnt/β-catenin signaling and directs asymmetric cell division in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yi; Gharbi, Naouel; Yuan, Xing; Olsen, Jan Roger; Blicher, Pernille; Dalhus, Bjørn; Brokstad, Karl A.; Lin, Biaoyang; Øyan, Anne Margrete; Zhang, Weidong; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Ke, Xisong

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations of the Wnt (wingless)/β-catenin pathway are frequently observed in major cancer types. Thus far, however, no therapeutic agent targeting Wnt/β-catenin signaling is available for clinical use. Here we demonstrate that axitinib, a clinically approved drug, strikingly blocks Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer cells, zebrafish, and Apcmin/+ mice. Notably, axitinib dramatically induces Wnt asymmetry and nonrandom DNA segregation in cancer cells by promoting nuclear β-catenin degradation independent of the GSK3β (glycogen synthase kinase3β)/APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) complex. Using a DARTS (drug affinity-responsive target stability) assay coupled to 2D-DIGE (2D difference in gel electrophoresis) and mass spectrometry, we have identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase SHPRH (SNF2, histone-linker, PHD and RING finger domain-containing helicase) as the direct target of axitinib in blocking Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treatment with axitinib stabilizes SHPRH and thereby increases the ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin. Our findings suggest a previously unreported mechanism of nuclear β-catenin regulation and indicate that axitinib, a clinically approved drug, would provide therapeutic benefits for cancer patients with aberrant nuclear β-catenin activation. PMID:27482107

  11. Cross-talk between AMPK and EGFR dependent Signaling in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, Paurush; Hülsmann, Helen; Sültmann, Holger; Kuner, Ruprecht; Fröhlich, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancers globally account for 12% of new cancer cases, 85% of these being Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Therapies like erlotinib target the key player EGFR, which is mutated in about 10% of lung adenocarcinoma. However, drug insensitivity and resistance caused by second mutations in the EGFR or aberrant bypass signaling have evolved as a major challenge in controlling these tumors. Recently, AMPK activation was proposed to sensitize NSCLC cells against erlotinib treatment. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In this work we aim to unravel the interplay between 20 proteins that were previously associated with EGFR signaling and erlotinib drug sensitivity. The inferred network shows a high level of agreement with protein-protein interactions reported in STRING and HIPPIE databases. It is further experimentally validated with protein measurements. Moreover, predictions derived from our network model fairly agree with somatic mutations and gene expression data from primary lung adenocarcinoma. Altogether our results support the role of AMPK in EGFR signaling and drug sensitivity.

  12. Prodigiosin inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and exerts anticancer activity in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Bo; Zhou, Liang; Yu, Shubin; Su, Zijie; Song, Jiaxing; Sun, Qi; Sha, Ou; Wang, Xiaomei; Jiang, Wenqi; Willert, Karl; Wei, Lei; Carson, Dennis A.; Lu, Desheng

    2016-01-01

    Prodigiosin, a natural red pigment produced by numerous bacterial species, has exhibited promising anticancer activity; however, the molecular mechanisms of action of prodigiosin on malignant cells remain unclear. Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade is associated with numerous human cancers. In this study, we identified prodigiosin as a potent inhibitor of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Prodigiosin blocked Wnt/β-catenin signaling by targeting multiple sites of this pathway, including the low-density lipoprotein-receptor-related protein (LRP) 6, Dishevelled (DVL), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β). In breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells, nanomolar concentrations of prodigiosin decreased phosphorylation of LRP6, DVL2, and GSK3β and suppressed β-catenin–stimulated Wnt target gene expression, including expression of cyclin D1. In MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts and MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic mice, administration of prodigiosin slowed tumor progression and reduced the expression of phosphorylated LRP6, phosphorylated and unphosphorylated DVL2, Ser9 phosphorylated GSK3β, active β-catenin, and cyclin D1. Through its ability to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduce cyclin D1 levels, prodigiosin could have therapeutic activity in advanced breast cancers. PMID:27799526

  13. Cross-talk between AMPK and EGFR dependent Signaling in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Praveen, Paurush; Hülsmann, Helen; Sültmann, Holger; Kuner, Ruprecht; Fröhlich, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancers globally account for 12% of new cancer cases, 85% of these being Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Therapies like erlotinib target the key player EGFR, which is mutated in about 10% of lung adenocarcinoma. However, drug insensitivity and resistance caused by second mutations in the EGFR or aberrant bypass signaling have evolved as a major challenge in controlling these tumors. Recently, AMPK activation was proposed to sensitize NSCLC cells against erlotinib treatment. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In this work we aim to unravel the interplay between 20 proteins that were previously associated with EGFR signaling and erlotinib drug sensitivity. The inferred network shows a high level of agreement with protein-protein interactions reported in STRING and HIPPIE databases. It is further experimentally validated with protein measurements. Moreover, predictions derived from our network model fairly agree with somatic mutations and gene expression data from primary lung adenocarcinoma. Altogether our results support the role of AMPK in EGFR signaling and drug sensitivity. PMID:27279498

  14. Erbin loss promotes cancer cell proliferation through feedback activation of Akt-Skp2-p27 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hao; Song, Yuhua; Wu, Yan; Guo, Ning; Ma, Yuanfang; Qian, Lu

    2015-07-31

    Erbin localizes at the basolateral membrane to regulate cell junctions and polarity in epithelial cells. Dysregulation of Erbin has been implicated in tumorigenesis, and yet it is still unclear if and how disrupted Erbin regulates the biological behavior of cancer cells. We report here that depletion of Erbin leads to cancer cell excessive proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Erbin deficiency accelerates S-phase entry by down-regulating CDK inhibitors p21 and p27 via two independent mechanisms. Mechanistically, Erbin loss promotes p27 degradation by enhancing E3 ligase Skp2 activity though augmenting Akt signaling. Interestingly, we also show that Erbin is an unstable protein when the Akt-Skp2 signaling is aberrantly activated, which can be specifically destructed by SCF-Skp2 ligase. Erbin loss facilitates cell proliferation and migration in Skp2-dependent manner. Thus, our finding illustrates a novel negative feedback loop between Erbin and Akt-Skp2 signaling. It suggests disrupted Erbin links polarity loss, hyperproliferation and tumorigenesis. - Highlights: • Erbin loss leads to cancer cell excessive proliferation in vitro and in vivo. • Erbin loss accelerates cell cycle though down-regulating p21 and p27 expression. • Erbin is a novel negative modulator of Akt1-Skp2-p27 signaling pathway. • Our study suggests that Erbin loss contributes to Skp2 oncogenic function.

  15. Modulation of Inflammatory Responses by Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Dendritic Cells: A Novel Immunotherapy Target for Autoimmunity and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Amol; Tadagavadi, Raghu K.; Swafford, Daniel; Manicassamy, Santhakumar

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway critical for several biological processes. An aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling is linked to several human diseases. Emerging studies have highlighted the regulatory role of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in normal physiological processes of parenchymal and hematopoietic cells. Recent studies have shown that the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in mucosal tolerance and suppression of chronic autoimmune pathologies. Alternatively, tumors activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway in DCs to induce immune tolerance and thereby evade antitumor immunity through suppression of effector T cell responses and promotion of regulatory T cell responses. Here, we review our work and current understanding of how Wnt/β-catenin signaling in DCs shapes the immune response in cancer and autoimmunity and discuss how Wnt/β-catenin pathway can be targeted for successful therapeutic interventions in various human diseases. PMID:27833613

  16. Signals Controlling Un-Differentiated States in Embryonic Stem and Cancer Cells: Role of the Phosphatidylinositol 3′ Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voskas, Daniel; Ling, Ling Sunny; Woodgett, James Robert

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate into cell lineages comprising the three germ layers makes them powerful tools for studying mammalian early embryonic development in vitro. The human body consists of approximately 210 different somatic cell types, the majority of which have limited proliferative capacity. However, both stem cells and cancer cells bypass this replicative barrier and undergo symmetric division indefinitely when cultured under defined conditions. Several signal transduction pathways play important roles in regulating stem cell development, and aberrant expression of components of these pathways is linked to cancer. Among signaling systems, the critical role of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) coupled to the Jak/STAT3 (signal transduction and activation of transcription-3) pathway in maintaining stem cell self-renewal has been extensively reviewed. This pathway additionally plays multiple roles in tumorigenesis. Likewise, the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) pathway has been determined to play an important role in both stem cell maintenance and tumor development. This pathway is often induced in cancer with frequent mutational activation of the catalytic subunit of PI3K or loss of a primary PI3K antagonist, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN). This review focusses on roles of the PI3K signal transduction pathway components, with emphasis on functions in stem cell maintenance and cancer. Since the PI3K pathway impinges on and collaborates with other signaling pathways in regulating stem cell development and/or cancer, aspects of the canonical Wnt, Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and TGF-β signaling pathways are also discussed. J. Cell. Physiol. 229: 1312–1322, 2014. PMID:24604594

  17. Signals controlling un-differentiated states in embryonic stem and cancer cells: role of the phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Voskas, Daniel; Ling, Ling Sunny; Woodgett, James Robert

    2014-10-01

    The capacity of embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate into cell lineages comprising the three germ layers makes them powerful tools for studying mammalian early embryonic development in vitro. The human body consists of approximately 210 different somatic cell types, the majority of which have limited proliferative capacity. However, both stem cells and cancer cells bypass this replicative barrier and undergo symmetric division indefinitely when cultured under defined conditions. Several signal transduction pathways play important roles in regulating stem cell development, and aberrant expression of components of these pathways is linked to cancer. Among signaling systems, the critical role of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) coupled to the Jak/STAT3 (signal transduction and activation of transcription-3) pathway in maintaining stem cell self-renewal has been extensively reviewed. This pathway additionally plays multiple roles in tumorigenesis. Likewise, the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) pathway has been determined to play an important role in both stem cell maintenance and tumor development. This pathway is often induced in cancer with frequent mutational activation of the catalytic subunit of PI3K or loss of a primary PI3K antagonist, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN). This review focusses on roles of the PI3K signal transduction pathway components, with emphasis on functions in stem cell maintenance and cancer. Since the PI3K pathway impinges on and collaborates with other signaling pathways in regulating stem cell development and/or cancer, aspects of the canonical Wnt, Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and TGF-β signaling pathways are also discussed.

  18. Activation of B cells by non-canonical helper signals.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Andrea; Cols, Montserrat; Puga, Irene

    2012-09-01

    Cognate interaction between T and B lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system is essential for the production of high-affinity antibodies against microbes, and for the establishment of long-term immunological memory. Growing evidence shows that--in addition to presenting antigens to T and B cells--macrophages, dendritic cells and other cells of the innate immune system provide activating signals to B cells, as well as survival signals to antibody-secreting plasma cells. Here, we discuss how these innate immune cells contribute to the induction of highly diversified and temporally sustained antibody responses, both systemically and at mucosal sites of antigen entry.

  19. Human β-Cell Proliferation and Intracellular Signaling: Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob A.; García-Ocaña, Adolfo; Vasavada, Rupangi C.; Bhushan, Anil; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    This is the third in a series of Perspectives on intracellular signaling pathways coupled to proliferation in pancreatic β-cells. We contrast the large knowledge base in rodent β-cells with the more limited human database. With the increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes and the recognition that type 2 diabetes is also due in part to a deficiency of functioning β-cells, there is great urgency to identify therapeutic approaches to expand human β-cell numbers. Therapeutic approaches might include stem cell differentiation, transdifferentiation, or expansion of cadaver islets or residual endogenous β-cells. In these Perspectives, we focus on β-cell proliferation. Past Perspectives reviewed fundamental cell cycle regulation and its upstream regulation by insulin/IGF signaling via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, glucose, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and liver kinase B1, protein kinase Cζ, calcium-calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells, epidermal growth factor/platelet-derived growth factor family members, Wnt/β-catenin, leptin, and estrogen and progesterone. Here, we emphasize Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription, Ras/Raf/extracellular signal–related kinase, cadherins and integrins, G-protein–coupled receptors, and transforming growth factor β signaling. We hope these three Perspectives will serve to introduce these pathways to new researchers and will encourage additional investigators to focus on understanding how to harness key intracellular signaling pathways for therapeutic human β-cell regeneration for diabetes. PMID:25999530

  20. Block of gap junctions eliminates aberrant activity and restores light responses during retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Toychiev, Abduqodir H; Ivanova, Elena; Yee, Christopher W; Sagdullaev, Botir T

    2013-08-28

    Retinal degeneration leads to progressive photoreceptor cell death, resulting in vision loss. Subsequently, inner retinal neurons develop aberrant synaptic activity, compounding visual impairment. In retinal ganglion cells, light responses driven by surviving photoreceptors are obscured by elevated levels of aberrant spiking activity. Here, we demonstrate in rd10 mice that targeting disruptive neuronal circuitry with a gap junction antagonist can significantly reduce excessive spiking. This treatment increases the sensitivity of the degenerated retina to light stimuli driven by residual photoreceptors. Additionally, this enhances signal transmission from inner retinal neurons to ganglion cells, potentially allowing the retinal network to preserve the fidelity of signals either from prosthetic electronic devices, or from cells optogenetically modified to transduce light. Thus, targeting maladaptive changes to the retina allows for treatments to use existing neuronal tissue to restore light sensitivity, and to augment existing strategies to replace lost photoreceptors.

  1. Only scratching the cell surface: extracellular signals in cerebrum development.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Jean M

    2013-08-01

    Numerous roles have been identified for extracellular signals such as Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs), Transforming Growth Factor-βs (TGFβs), Wingless-Int proteins (WNTs), and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) in assigning fates to cells during development of the cerebrum. However, several fundamental questions remain largely unexplored. First, how does the same extracellular signal instruct precursor cells in different locations or at different stages to adopt distinct fates? And second, how does a precursor cell integrate multiple signals to adopt a specific fate? Answers to these questions require knowing the mechanisms that underlie each cell type's competence to respond to certain extracellular signals. This brief review provides illustrative examples of potential mechanisms that begin to bridge the gap between cell surface and cell fate during cerebrum development.

  2. Microsphere cytometry to interrogate microenvironment-dependent cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Ertsås, Henriette Christie; Nolan, Garry P; LaBarge, Mark A; Lorens, James B

    2017-02-20

    Microenvironmental cues comprising surface-mediated and soluble factors control cellular signaling mechanisms underlying normal cellular responses that define homeostatic and diseased cell states. In order to measure cell signaling in single adherent cells, we developed a novel microsphere-based flow cytometry approach. Single normal or neoplastic cells were adhered to uniform microspheres that display mimetic-microenvironments comprising surface combinations of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the presence of soluble agonists/antagonists. Temporal signaling responses were measured with fluorophore-conjugated antibodies that recognize response-dependent epitopes by multiparametric flow cytometry. Using this approach we demonstrate that microenvironment-mimetic combinations of growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins generate distinct cellular signal networks that reveal unique cell signatures in normal and patient biopsy-derived neoplastic cells.

  3. Ca2+ signaling, genes and the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Machaca, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the concentration and spatial distribution of Ca2+ ions in the cytoplasm constitute a ubiquitous intracellular signaling module in cellular physiology. With the advent of Ca2+ dyes that allow direct visualization of Ca2+ transients, combined with powerful experimental tools such as electrophysiological recordings, intracellular Ca2+ transients have been implicated in practically every aspect of cellular physiology, including cellular proliferation. Ca2+ signals are associated with different phases of the cell cycle and interfering with Ca2+ signaling or downstream pathways often disrupts progression of the cell cycle. Although there exists a dependence between Ca2+ signals and the cell cycle the mechanisms involved are not well defined and given the cross-talk between Ca2+ and other signaling modules, it is difficult to assess the exact role of Ca2+ signals in cell cycle progression. Two exceptions however, include fertilization and T-cell activation, where well-defined roles for Ca2+ signals in mediating progression through specific stages of the cell cycle have been clearly established. In the case of T-cell activation Ca2+ regulates entry into the cell cycle through the induction of gene transcription. PMID:21084120

  4. Aberrant intracellular metabolism of T-DM1 confers T-DM1 resistance in HER2-positive gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbin; Wang, Wenqian; Xu, Yongping; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xiaoyan; Quan, Haitian; Lou, Liguang

    2017-04-07

    T-DM1 (Kadcyla), an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) consisting of HER2-targeted monoclonal antibody trastuzumab linked to anti-microtubule agent mertansine (DM1), has been approved for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. To date, acquired resistance arises to be a major obstacle to T-DM1 treatment, and mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we established a T-DM1-resistant N87-KR cell line from HER2-positive N87 gastric cancer cells to investigate mechanisms of acquired resistance and develop strategies for overcoming it. Although the kinetics of binding, internalization, and externalization of T-DM1 were the same in N87-KR cells and N87 cells, N87-KR was strongly resistant to T-DM1, but remained sensitive to both trastuzumab and DM1. T-DM1 failed to inhibit microtubule polymerization in N87-KR cells. Consistently, lysine-MCC-DM1, the active T-DM1 metabolite that inhibits microtubule polymerization, accumulated much lesser in N87-KR cells. Furthermore, lysosome acidification, achieved by V-ATPase, was much diminished in N87-KR cells. Notably, treatment of sensitive N87 cells with the V-ATPase-selective inhibitor Baf-A1 induced T-DM1 resistance, suggesting that aberrant V-ATPase activity decreases T-DM1 metabolism, leading to T-DM1 resistance in N87-KR cells. Interestingly, HER2-targeted ADCs containing a protease-cleavable linker, such as hertuzumab-vc-MMAE, were capable of efficiently overcoming this resistance. Our results demonstrate for the first time that a decrease in T-DM1 metabolites induced by aberrant V-ATPase activity contributes to T-DM1 resistance, which could be overcome by HER2-targeted ADC containing different linkers, including a protease-cleavable linker. Accordingly, we propose that V-ATPase activity in lysosomes is a novel biomarker for predicting T-DM1 resistance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Guard Cell Signal Transduction Network: Advances in Understanding Abscisic Acid, CO2, and Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Böhmer, Maik; Hu, Honghong; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    Stomatal pores are formed by pairs of specialized epidermal guard cells and serve as major gateways for both CO2 influx into plants from the atmosphere and transpirational water loss of plants. Because they regulate stomatal pore apertures via integration of both endogenous hormonal stimuli and environmental signals, guard cells have been highly developed as a model system to dissect the dynamics and mechanisms of plant-cell signaling. The stress hormone ABA and elevated levels of CO2 activate complex signaling pathways in guard cells that are mediated by kinases/phosphatases, secondary messengers, and ion channel regulation. Recent research in guard cells has led to a new hypothesis for how plants achieve specificity in intracellular calcium signaling: CO2 and ABA enhance (prime) the calcium sensitivity of downstream calcium-signaling mechanisms. Recent progress in identification of early stomatal signaling components are reviewed here, including ABA receptors and CO2-binding response proteins, as well as systems approaches that advance our understanding of guard cell-signaling mechanisms. PMID:20192751

  6. Metabolism strikes back: metabolic flux regulates cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cells depend on growth factor signaling to take up nutrients; however, coordination of glucose and glutamine uptake has been a mystery. In this issue of Genes & Development, Wellen and colleagues (pp. 2784–2799) show that glucose flux through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway regulates growth factor receptor glycosylation and enables glutamine consumption. This mechanism ensures that cells do not engage in anabolic metabolism when nutrients are limiting, and highlights how substrate