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Sample records for aberrant epigenetic regulation

  1. Aberrant epigenetic regulators control expansion of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Farnaz; Ponnusamy, Kanagaraju; Quagliano-Lo Coco, Isabell; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Grez, Manuel; Henschler, Reinhard; Wichmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Transcription is a tightly regulated process ensuring the proper expression of numerous genes regulating all aspects of cellular behavior. Transcription factors regulate multiple genes including other transcription factors that together control a highly complex gene network. The transcriptional machinery can be “hijacked” by oncogenic transcription factors, thereby leading to malignant cell transformation. Oncogenic transcription factors manipulate a variety of epigenetic control mechanisms to fulfill gene regulatory and cell transforming functions. These factors assemble epigenetic regulators at target gene promoter sequences, thereby disturbing physiological gene expression patterns. Retroviral vector technology and the availability of “healthy” human hematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells enable the generation of pre-leukemic cell models for the analysis of aberrant human hematopoietic progenitor cell expansion mediated by leukemogenic transcription factors. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the mechanism by which leukemogenic gene products control human hematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cell expansion by disrupting the normal epigenetic program. PMID:24348510

  2. Aberrant epigenetic regulation in clear cell sarcoma of the kidney featuring distinct DNA hypermethylation and EZH2 overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Caroline; O'Sullivan, Maureen J.; Mengelbier, Linda Holmquist; Gisselsson, David

    2016-01-01

    The global methylation profile and the mutational status of 633 specific epigenetic regulators were analyzed in the pediatric tumor clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK). Methylation array analyses of 30 CCSKs revealed CCSK tumor DNA to be globally hypermethylated compared to Wilms tumor, normal fetal kidney, and adult kidney. The aberrant methylation pattern of CCSKs was associated with activation of genes involved in embryonic processes and with silencing of genes linked to normal kidney function. No epigenetic regulator was recurrently mutated in our cohort, but a mutation in the key epigenetic regulator EZH2 was discovered in one case. EZH2 mRNA was significantly higher in CCSK compared to Wilms tumor and normal kidney, and the EZH2 protein was strongly expressed in more than 90 % of CCSK tumor cells in 9/9 tumors analyzed. This was in striking contrast to the lack of EZH2 protein expression in Wilms tumor stromal elements, indicating that EZH2 could be explored further as a diagnostic marker and a potential drug target for CCSK. PMID:26848979

  3. Aberration in epigenetic gene regulation in hippocampal neurogenesis by developmental exposure to manganese chloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyun; Shiraki, Ayako; Itahashi, Megu; Akane, Hirotoshi; Abe, Hajime; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    We have shown that maternal manganese (Mn) exposure caused sustained disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis of mouse offspring. To clarify the effects of maternal Mn exposure on epigenetic gene regulation contributing to the sustained disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis, we treated pregnant ICR mice with MnCl₂ in diet from gestational day 10 through day 21 after delivery on weaning and searched epigenetically downregulated genes by global promoter methylation analysis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of male offspring on postnatal day (PND) 21 and PND 77. By CpG promoter microarray analysis on PND 21 following 800-ppm Mn exposure, sustained promoter hypermethylation and transcript downregulation through PND 77 were confirmed with Mid1, Atp1a3, and Nr2f1, whereas Pvalb showed a transient hypermethylation only on weaning. The numbers of Pvalb⁺ and ATP1a3⁺ neurons suggestive of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons, Mid1⁺ cells suggestive of late-stage granule cell lineage and GABAergic interneurons, and COUP-TF1⁺ cells suggestive of early-stage granule cell lineage were all reduced on PND 21, and reductions were sustained on PND 77 except for no change in Pvalb⁺ cells. Mid1⁺ cells showed asymmetric distribution with right-side predominance, and Mn exposure abolished it by promoter hypermethylation of the right side. These findings indicate epigenetic mechanisms as mediators, through which Mn exposure modulates neurogenesis involving both granule cell lineage and GABAergic interneurons with long-lasting and stable repercussions. Disruption of asymmetric cellular distribution of Mid1 suggests that higher brain functions specialized in the left or right side of the brain were affected.

  4. Epigenetic aberrations and therapeutic implications in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Atsushi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ito, Motokazu; Motomura, Kazuya; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Jun

    2010-06-01

    Almost all cancer cells have multiple epigenetic abnormalities, which combine with genetic changes to affect many cellular processes, including cell proliferation and invasion, by silencing tumor-suppressor genes. In this review, we focus on the epigenetic mechanisms of DNA hypomethylation and CpG island hypermethylation in gliomas. Aberrant hypermethylation in promoter CpG islands has been recognized as a key mechanism involved in the silencing of cancer-associated genes and occurs at genes with diverse functions related to tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Such promoter hypermethylation can modulate the sensitivity of glioblastomas to drugs and radiotherapy. As an example, the methylation of the O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is a specific predictive biomarker of tumor responsiveness to chemotherapy with alkylating agents. Further, we reviewed reports on pyrosequencing - a simple technique for the accurate and quantitative analysis of DNA methylation. We believe that the quantification of MGMT methylation by pyrosequencing might enable the selection of patients who are most likely to benefit from chemotherapy. Finally, we also evaluated the potential of de novo NY-ESO-1, the most immunogenic cancer/testis antigen (CTA) discovered thus far, as an immunotherapy target. The use of potent epigenetics-based therapy for cancer cells might restore the abnormally regulated epigenomes to a more normal state through epigenetic reprogramming. Thus, epigenetic therapy may be a promising and potent treatment for human neoplasia.

  5. Epigenetic aberrations and targeted epigenetic therapy of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ronghua; Casson, Alan G

    2008-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is one of the ten most frequent malignancies worldwide, characterized by a striking geographic variation in incidence. In North America and Europe, there has recently been a marked change in the epidemiology of this disease, where incidence rates for primary esophageal adenocarcinoma have increased in excess of any other human solid tumor. Although the reasons for this are largely unknown, several molecular genetic alterations have been associated with esophageal tumor progression. In recent years, epigenetic aberrations have been increasingly recognized as an important alternative mechanism of carcinogenesis and it is anticipated that substantial progress in the treatment of esophageal malignancy will likely only be made with a clearer understanding of esophageal tumor biology. Whereas genetic mutations, deletions, or allelic losses are fixed and irreversible, epigenetic abnormalities can potentially be corrected without interfering with the fundamental sequence of the target gene. Our current understanding of epigenetics in esophageal cancer, and the potential for targeted epigenetic therapy, will be the subject of this review.

  6. Identification of Proteins Related to Epigenetic Regulation in the Malignant Transformation of Aberrant Karyotypic Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Yang, Yixuan; Zeng, Sicong; Tan, Yueqiu; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) tend to develop genomic alterations and progress to a malignant state during long-term in vitro culture. This raises concerns of the clinical safety in using cultured hESCs. However, transformed hESCs might serve as an excellent model to determine the process of embryonic stem cell transition. In this study, ITRAQ-based tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify normal and aberrant karyotypic hESCs proteins from simple to more complex karyotypic abnormalities. We identified and quantified 2583 proteins, and found that the expression levels of 316 proteins that represented at least 23 functional molecular groups were significantly different in both normal and abnormal hESCs. Dysregulated protein expression in epigenetic regulation was further verified in six pairs of hESC lines in early and late passage. In summary, this study is the first large-scale quantitative proteomic analysis of the malignant transformation of aberrant karyotypic hESCs. The data generated should serve as a useful reference of stem cell-derived tumor progression. Increased expression of both HDAC2 and CTNNB1 are detected as early as the pre-neoplastic stage, and might serve as prognostic markers in the malignant transformation of hESCs. PMID:24465727

  7. [Epigenetic regulation in spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Song, Ning

    2014-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a process consisting of spermatogonial proliferation, spermatocytic meiosis, and spermiogenesis, and is also considered to be a process in which heterochromatins gradually aggregate and finally reach a highly condensed formation in the sperm head. Recent studies show that epigenetic regulation plays a key role in spermatogenesis. This review discusses the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in spermatogenesis in three aspects, DNA methylation, histone modification, and noncoding RNAs. These factors are essential for spermatogenesis, fertilization, and embryogenesis by mutual regulation as well as by gene expression regulation, transposon activation, sex chromosome inactivation, and genome imprinting. PMID:24908726

  8. Epigenetic regulation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Lavebratt, C; Almgren, M; Ekström, T J

    2012-06-01

    The availability to the DNA strand and the activity of the transcription machinery is crucial for the cell to use the information in the DNA. The epigenetic mechanisms DNA methylation, modification of histone tails, other chromatin-modifying processes and interference by small RNAs regulate the cell-type-specific DNA expression. Epigenetic marks can be more or less plastic perpetuating responses to various molecular signals and environmental stimuli, but in addition apparently stochastic epigenetic marks have been found. There is substantial evidence from animal and man demonstrating that both transient and more long-term epigenetic mechanisms have a role in the regulation of the molecular events governing adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. Intrauterine exposure such as poor maternal nutrition has consistently been demonstrated to contribute to a particular epigenotype and thereby developmental metabolic priming of the exposed offspring in animal and man. Epigenetic modifications can be passed not only from one cell generation to the next, but metabolic disease-related epigenotypes have been proposed to also be transmitted germ-line. Future more comprehensive knowledge on epigenetic regulation will complement genome sequence data for the understanding of the complex etiology of obesity and related disorder.

  9. Detection of epigenetic aberrations in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujing

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Hepatocarcinogenesis is a complex, multistep process. It is now recognized that HCC is a both genetic and epigenetic disease; genetic and epigenetic components cooperate at all stages of hepatocarcinogenesis. Epigenetic changes involve aberrant DNA methylation, posttranslational histone modifications and aberrant expression of microRNAs all of which can affect the expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and other tumor-related genes and alter the pathways in cancer development. Several risk factors for HCC, including hepatitis B and C virus infections and exposure to the chemical carcinogen aflatoxin B1 have been found to influence epigenetic changes. Their interactions could play an important role in the initiation and progression of HCC. Discovery and detection of biomarkers for epigenetic changes is a promising area for early diagnosis and risk prediction of HCC.

  10. Epigenetic regulation of cystatins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivenbark, Ashley G; Coleman, William B

    2009-01-01

    Cystatins function as cysteine protease inhibitors, are expressed in numerous cell types, and regulate a number of physiological processes. Four cystatins have been extensively studied: cystatin A, cystatin B, cystatin C, and cystatin M. Aberrant regulation of cystatins occurs in a number of diseases, including cancer and certain neurodegenerative disorders. Recent advances in the understanding of cystatin function suggest that these proteins may regulate promotion or suppression of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Cancer is a disease of abnormal gene expression and cancer cells exhibit aberrant epigenetic events (such as DNA methylation), leading to gene silencing. Cystatins are epigenetically silenced through DNA methylation-dependent mechanisms in several forms of cancer, including breast, pancreatic, brain, and lung. These findings suggest that DNA methylation-dependent epigenetic mechanisms may play an important role in the loss of cystatin gene expression and protein function during neoplastic transformation and/or tumor progression. This review summarizes the biological processes in which cystatins function, focuses on the neoplastic events that involve aberrant regulation of cystatins, and discusses the possible epigenetic regulation of cystatins in cancer.

  11. Epigenetic regulation in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    hypoxia in epigenetic regulation. PMID:25949794

  12. Epigenetic regulation of persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guang; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Persistent or chronic pain is tightly associated with various environmental changes and linked to abnormal gene expression within cells processing nociceptive signaling. Epigenetic regulation governs gene expression in response to environmental cues. Recent animal model and clinical studies indicate that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the development/maintenance of persistent pain and, possibly the transition of acute pain to chronic pain, thus shedding light in a direction for development of new therapeutics for persistent pain. PMID:24948399

  13. Epigenetic regulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Catherine; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Ross, Owen A

    2016-10-01

    Recent efforts have shed new light on the epigenetic mechanisms driving gene expression alterations associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. Changes in gene expression are a well-established cause of PD, and epigenetic mechanisms likely play a pivotal role in regulation. Studies in families with PD harboring duplications and triplications of the SNCA gene have demonstrated that gene dosage is associated with increased expression of both SNCA mRNA and protein, and correlates with a fulminant disease course. Furthermore, it is postulated that even subtle changes in SNCA expression caused by common variation is associated with disease risk. Of note, genome-wide association studies have identified over 30 loci associated with PD with most signals located in non-coding regions of the genome, thus likely influencing transcript expression levels. In health, epigenetic mechanisms tightly regulate gene expression, turning genes on and off to balance homeostasis and this, in part, explains why two cells with the same DNA sequence will have different RNA expression profiles. Understanding this phenomenon will be crucial to our interpretation of the selective vulnerability observed in neurodegeneration and specifically dopaminergic neurons in the PD brain. In this review, we discuss epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, involved in regulating the expression of genes relevant to PD, RNA-based mechanisms, as well as the effect of toxins and potential epigenetic-based treatments for PD.

  14. Epigenetic regulation and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dian J

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure has become a huge public health problem. The treatment options for heart failure, however, are considerably limited. The significant disparity between the scope of a prominent health problem and the restricted means of therapy propagates heart failure epidemics. Delineating novel mechanisms of heart failure is imperative. Emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic regulation may take part in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Epigenetic regulation involves DNA and histone modifications that lead to changes in DNA-based transcriptional programs without altering the DNA sequence. Although more and more mechanisms are being discovered, the best understood epigenetic modifications are achieved through covalent biochemical reactions including histone acetylation, histone methylation and DNA methylation. Connecting environmental stimuli with genomic programs, epigenetic regulation remains important in maintaining homeostases and the pathogeneses of diseases. This review summarizes the most recent developments regarding individual epigenetic modifications and their implications in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Understanding this strategically important mechanism is potentially the key for developing powerful interventions in the future.

  15. Nutritional regulation of epigenetic changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The "Nutritional Regulation of Epigenetic Changes" Symposium was held in San Diego on April 25 in conjunction with the 2012 Annual Meetings of the American Society of Nutrition. The symposium was co-chaired by Drs. Romagnoo and Ziegler. In his opening remarks, Dr. Zeigler highlighted salient aspec...

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression regulation in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gos, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are a heterogenous group of disorders that are related to alterations in nervous system function. The genetic background of neurological diseases is heterogenous and may include chromosomal aberrations, specific gene mutations and epigenetic defects. This review is aimed at presenting of selected diseases that are associated with different epigenetic alterations. The imprinting defects on chromosome 15 are the cause of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes that both are characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay and specific behavioral phenotype. Besides the imprinting defect, these diseases can also be caused by deletion of chromosome 15 or uniparental disomy. Aberrant epigenetic regulation is also specific for Fragile X syndrome that is caused by expansion of CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene that leads to global methylation of the promoter region and repression of FMR1 transcription. A number of neurological diseases, mainly associated with intellectual impairment, may be caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in epigenetic regulation. The number of such diseases is rapidly growing thanks to the implementation of genomic sequencing for the identification of their molecular causes. One of the best known diseases linked to defects in epigenetic modifiers is Rett syndrome caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene or its variant - Rett-like syndrome caused by a mutation in CDKL5 or FOXG1 genes. As the epigenetic signature is potentially reversible, much attention is focused on possible therapies with drugs that influence DNA or histone modifications. This is especially important in the case of neurological disorders in which epigenetic changes are observed as the effect of the disease.

  17. Epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics of asthma and allergic disease is a field that has expanded greatly in the last decade. Previously thought only in terms of cell differentiation, it is now evident the epigenetics regulate many processes. With T cell activation, commitment toward an allergic phenotype is tightly regulated by DNA methylation and histone modifications at the Th2 locus control region. When normal epigenetic control is disturbed, either experimentally or by environmental exposures, Th1/Th2 balance can be affected. Epigenetic marks are not only transferred to daughter cells with cell replication but they can also be inherited through generations. In animal models, with constant environmental pressure, epigenetically determined phenotypes are amplified through generations and can last up to 2 generations after the environment is back to normal. In this review on the epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic diseases we review basic epigenetic mechanisms and discuss the epigenetic control of Th2 cells. We then cover the transgenerational inheritance model of epigenetic traits and discuss how this could relate the amplification of asthma and allergic disease prevalence and severity through the last decades. Finally, we discuss recent epigenetic association studies for allergic phenotypes and related environmental risk factors as well as potential underlying mechanisms for these associations. PMID:24932182

  18. Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy As a Model for Epigenetic Regulation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Himeda, Charis L.; Jones, Takako I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Aberrant epigenetic regulation is an integral aspect of many diseases and complex disorders. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a progressive myopathy that afflicts individuals of all ages, is caused by disrupted genetic and epigenetic regulation of a macrosatellite repeat. FSHD provides a powerful model to investigate disease-relevant epigenetic modifiers and general mechanisms of epigenetic regulation that govern gene expression. Recent Advances: In the context of a genetically permissive allele, the one aspect of FSHD that is consistent across all known cases is the aberrant epigenetic state of the disease locus. In addition, certain mutations in the chromatin regulator SMCHD1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge-domain protein 1) are sufficient to cause FSHD2 and enhance disease severity in FSHD1. Thus, there are multiple pathways to generate the epigenetic dysregulation required for FSHD. Critical Issues: Why do some individuals with the genetic requirements for FSHD develop disease pathology, while others remain asymptomatic? Similarly, disease progression is highly variable among individuals. What are the relative contributions of genetic background and environmental factors in determining disease manifestation, progression, and severity in FSHD? What is the interplay between epigenetic factors regulating the disease locus and which, if any, are viable therapeutic targets? Future Directions: Epigenetic regulation represents a potentially powerful therapeutic target for FSHD. Determining the epigenetic signatures that are predictive of disease severity and identifying the spectrum of disease modifiers in FSHD are vital to the development of effective therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1463–1482. PMID:25336259

  19. Novel aberrant genetic and epigenetic events in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Mari Paz; Jones, Jonathan; Rodríguez-Lozano, F J; Moraleda, Jose M; Martinez, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    It is generally accepted that Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by a deficiency in frataxin expression, a mitochondrial protein involved in iron homeostasis, which mainly affects the brain, dorsal root ganglia of the spinal cord, heart and in certain cases the pancreas. However, there is little knowledge as to other possible genes that may be affected in this disorder, and which can contribute to its complexity. In the current study we compared human periodontal ligament cells gene expression of healthy individuals and FRDA patients. The expression of active-caspase 3, as well as other apoptosis-related genes, was increased in the FRDA cells. Furthermore, iron-sulphur cluster genes, as well as oxidative stress-related genes were overexpressed in FRDA. Moreover, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neuregulin 1 and miR-132 were all upregulated. These three genes are capable of regulating the expression of each other. Interestingly, when the cells from FRDA patients were co-cultured in the presence of idebenone and deferiprone, caspase expression decreased while antioxidant gene expression, as well as frataxin expression, increased. Regarding epigenetic mechanisms, the frataxin gene was hypermethylated, compared to the healthy counterparts, in the upstream GAA repetitive region. Of the three DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 but not DNMT3׳s gene expression was higher in FRDA cells. In conclusion, our data show that FRDA cells present altered expression of genes related to cell cycle, oxidative stress and iron homeostasis which may be implicated in the increased apoptotic levels. Also, the altered expression is in a certain degree normalized in the presence of idebenone and deferiprone. PMID:25929520

  20. Aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of imprinted microRNA-127 and Rtl1 in cloned mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Xiangshun; Zhang Dingxiao; Ko, Yoeung-Gyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2009-02-06

    The microRNA (miRNA) genes mir-127 and mir-136 are located near two CpG islands in the imprinted mouse retrotransposon-like gene Rtl1, a key gene involved in placenta formation. These miRNAs appear to be involved in regulating the imprinting of Rtl1. To obtain insights into the epigenetic reprogramming of cloned embryos, we compared the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in fertilized mouse embryos, parthenotes, androgenotes and cloned embryos developing in vitro. We also examined the DNA methylation status of the promoter regions of Rtl1 and mir-127 in these embryos. Our data showed that mir-127 and mir-136 were highly expressed in parthenotes, but rarely expressed in androgenotes. Interestingly, the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in parthenotes were almost twice that seen in the fertilized embryos, but were much lower in the cloned embryos. The Rtl1 promoter region was hyper-methylated in blastocyst stage parthenotes (75.0%), moderately methylated (32.4%) in the fertilized embryos and methylated to a much lower extent ({approx}10%) in the cloned embryos. Conversely, the promoter region of mir-127 was hypo-methylated in parthenogenetically activated embryos (0.4%), moderately methylated (30.0%) in fertilized embryos and heavily methylated in cloned blastocysts (63-70%). These data support a role for mir-127 and mir-136 in the epigenetic reprogramming of the Rtl1 imprinting process. Analysis of the aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of mir-127 and Rtl1 in cloned embryos may help to explain the nuclear reprogramming procedures that occur in donor cells following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT)

  1. Epigenetic regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Kirsten F; McGee, Sean L

    2016-07-01

    Normal skeletal muscle metabolism is essential for whole body metabolic homoeostasis and disruptions in muscle metabolism are associated with a number of chronic diseases. Transcriptional control of metabolic enzyme expression is a major regulatory mechanism for muscle metabolic processes. Substantial evidence is emerging that highlights the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in this process. This review will examine the importance of epigenetics in the regulation of muscle metabolism, with a particular emphasis on DNA methylation and histone acetylation as epigenetic control points. The emerging cross-talk between metabolism and epigenetics in the context of health and disease will also be examined. The concept of inheritance of skeletal muscle metabolic phenotypes will be discussed, in addition to emerging epigenetic therapies that could be used to alter muscle metabolism in chronic disease states. PMID:27215678

  2. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  3. Epigenetic regulation of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lingli; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain arising from peripheral inflammation and tissue or nerve injury is a common clinical symptom. Although intensive research on the neurobiological mechanisms of chronic pain has been carried out during previous decades, this disorder is still poorly managed by current drugs such as opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Inflammation-, tissue injury-, and/or nerve injury-induced changes in gene expression in sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), spinal cord dorsal horn, and pain-associated brain regions are thought to participate in chronic pain genesis; however, how these changes occur is still elusive. Epigenetic modifications including DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications control gene expression. Recent studies have shown that peripheral noxious stimulation changes DNA methylation and histone modifications and that these changes may be related to the induction of pain hypersensitivity under chronic pain conditions. This review summarizes the current knowledge and progress in epigenetic research in chronic pain and discusses the potential role of epigenetic modifications as therapeutic antinociceptive targets in this disorder. PMID:25942533

  4. Epigenetic regulation of estrogen-dependent memory

    PubMed Central

    Fortress, Ashley M.; Frick, Karyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal memory formation is highly regulated by post-translational histone modifications and DNA methylation. Accordingly, these epigenetic processes play a major role in the effects of modulatory factors, such as sex steroid hormones, on hippocampal memory. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that the ability of the potent estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance hippocampal-dependent novel object recognition memory in ovariectomized female mice requires ERK-dependent histone H3 acetylation and DNA methylation in the dorsal hippocampus. Although these data provide valuable insight into the chromatin modifications that mediate the memory-enhancing effects of E2, epigenetic regulation of gene expression is enormously complex. Therefore, more research is needed to fully understand how E2 and other hormones employ epigenetic alterations to shape behavior. This review discusses the epigenetic alterations shown thus far to regulate hippocampal memory, briefly reviews the effects of E2 on hippocampal function, and describes in detail our work on epigenetic regulation of estrogenic memory enhancement. PMID:24878494

  5. Transposable element origins of epigenetic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Lisch, Damon; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2011-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are massively abundant and unstable in all plant genomes, but are mostly silent because of epigenetic suppression. Because all known epigenetic pathways act on all TEs, it is likely that the specialized epigenetic regulation of regular host genes (RHGs) was co-opted from this ubiquitous need for the silencing of TEs and viruses. With their internally repetitive and rearranging structures, and the acquisition of fragments of RHGs, the expression of TEs commonly makes antisense RNAs for both TE genes and RHGs. These antisense RNAs, particularly from heterochromatic reservoirs of 'zombie' TEs that are rearranged to form variously internally repetitive structures, may be advantageous because their induction will help rapidly suppress active TEs of the same family. RHG fragments within rapidly rearranging TEs may also provide the raw material for the ongoing generation of miRNA genes. TE gene expression is regulated by both environmental and developmental signals, and insertions can place nearby RHGs under the regulation (both standard and epigenetic) of the TE. The ubiquity of TEs, their frequent preferential association with RHGs, and their ability to be programmed by epigenetic signals all indicate that RGHs have nearly unlimited access to novel regulatory cassettes to assist plant adaptation. PMID:21444239

  6. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    SciTech Connect

    Beerman, Isabel

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  7. Epigenetic repression of ribosomal RNA transcription by ROCK-dependent aberrant cytoskeletal organization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tse-Hsiang; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    It is known that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis is regulated by cellular energy and proliferation status. In this study, we investigated rRNA gene transcription in response to cytoskeletal stress. Our data revealed that the cell shape constrained by isotropic but not elongated micropatterns in HeLa cells led to a significant reduction in rRNA transcription dependent on ROCK. Expression of a dominant-active form of ROCK also repressed rRNA transcription. Isotropic constraint and ROCK over-activation led to different types of aberrant F-actin organization, but their suppression effects on rRNA transcription were similarly reversed by inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) or overexpression of a dominant negative form of Nesprin, which shields the signal transmitted from actin filament to the nuclear interior. We further showed that the binding of HDAC1 to the active fraction of rDNA genes is increased by ROCK over-activation, thus reducing H3K9/14 acetylation and suppressing transcription. Our results demonstrate an epigenetic control of active rDNA genes that represses rRNA transcription in response to the cytoskeletal stress. PMID:27350000

  8. Targeting Aberrant Epigenetic Networks Mediated by PRMT1 and KDM4C in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ngai; Fung, Tsz Kan; Zeisig, Bernd B.; Holmes, Katie; Rane, Jayant K.; Mowen, Kerri A.; Finn, Michael G.; Lenhard, Boris; Chan, Li Chong; So, Chi Wai Eric

    2016-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional deregulation plays a major role in acute myeloid leukemia, and therefore identification of epigenetic modifying enzymes essential for the maintenance of oncogenic transcription programs holds the key to better understanding of the biology and designing effective therapeutic strategies for the disease. Here we provide experimental evidence for the functional involvement and therapeutic potential of targeting PRMT1, an H4R3 methyltransferase, in various MLL and non-MLL leukemias. PRMT1 is necessary but not sufficient for leukemic transformation, which requires co-recruitment of KDM4C, an H3K9 demethylase, by chimeric transcription factors to mediate epigenetic reprogramming. Pharmacological inhibition of KDM4C/PRMT1 suppresses transcription and transformation ability of MLL fusions and MOZ-TIF2, revealing a tractable aberrant epigenetic circuitry mediated by KDM4C and PRMT1 in acute leukemia. PMID:26766589

  9. [Sex inversion and epigenetic regulation in Vertebrates].

    PubMed

    Trukhina, A V; Lukina, N A; Nekrasova, A A; Smirnov, A F

    2015-03-01

    This review discusses issues related to the regulation of sex determination and differentiation in various groups of Vertebrates. Special attention was paid to factors of external and internal control for various genetic systems of sex determination, as well as to the epigenetic control of this process. Opportunities for sex inversion in various animals were also discussed.

  10. Epigenetic Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shilpa; Gurudutta, Gangenahalli

    2016-05-30

    Hematopoietic stem cells are endowed with a distinct potential to bolster self-renewal and to generate progeny that differentiate into mature cells of myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Both hematopoietic stem cells and mature cells have the same genome, but their gene expression is controlled by an additional layer of epigenetics such as DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications, enabling each cell-type to acquire various forms and functions. Until recently, several studies have largely focussed on the transcription factors andniche factors for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which hematopoietic cells replicate and differentiate. Several lines of emerging evidence suggest that epigenetic modifications eventually result in a defined chromatin structure and an "individual" gene expression pattern, which play an essential role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Distinct epigenetic marks decide which sets of genes may be expressed and which genes are kept silent. Epigenetic mechanisms are interdependent and ensure lifelong production of blood and bone marrow, thereby contributing to stem cell homeostasis. The epigenetic analysis of hematopoiesis raises the exciting possibility that chromatin structure is dynamic enough for regulated expression of genes. Though controlled chromatin accessibility plays an essential role in maintaining blood homeostasis; mutations in chromatin impacts on the regulation of genes critical to the development of leukemia. In this review, we explored the contribution of epigenetic machinery which has implications for the ramification of molecular details of hematopoietic self-renewal for normal development and underlying events that potentially co-operate to induce leukemia.

  11. [The alchemy--epigenetic regulation of pluripotency].

    PubMed

    Bem, Joanna; Grabowska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) self renew their population, also they are pluripotent which means they can differentiate into any given cell type. In specific culture conditions they remain undifferentiated. On the cellular level pluripotency is determined by many transcription factors, e.g. Sox2, Nanog, Klf4, Oct4. Epigenetic regulation is also crucial for both self renewal and pluripotency. This review focuses on epigenetic mechanisms, among them DNA methylation, posttranslational histone modifications, ATP dependent chromatin remodeling and miRNAs interactions. These mechanisms affect embryonic stem cells functions keeping them poised for differentiation. PMID:24044279

  12. [The alchemy--epigenetic regulation of pluripotency].

    PubMed

    Bem, Joanna; Grabowska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) self renew their population, also they are pluripotent which means they can differentiate into any given cell type. In specific culture conditions they remain undifferentiated. On the cellular level pluripotency is determined by many transcription factors, e.g. Sox2, Nanog, Klf4, Oct4. Epigenetic regulation is also crucial for both self renewal and pluripotency. This review focuses on epigenetic mechanisms, among them DNA methylation, posttranslational histone modifications, ATP dependent chromatin remodeling and miRNAs interactions. These mechanisms affect embryonic stem cells functions keeping them poised for differentiation.

  13. Epigenetic Mechanisms Regulating Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Campo, Flor M.; Riancho, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) have emerged in the last few years as one of the most promising therapeutic cell sources and, in particular, as an important tool for regenerative medicine of skeletal tissues. Although they present a more restricted potency than Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, the use of hMCS in regenerative medicine avoids many of the drawbacks characteristic of ES cells or induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenge in using these cells lies into developing precise protocols for directing cellular differentiation to generate a specific cell lineage. In order to achieve this goal, it is of the upmost importance to be able to control de process of fate decision and lineage commitment. This process requires the coordinate regulation of different molecular layers at transcriptional, posttranscriptional and translational levels. At the transcriptional level, switching on and off different sets of genes is achieved not only through transcriptional regulators, but also through their interplay with epigenetic modifiers. It is now well known that epigenetic changes take place in an orderly way through development and are critical in the determination of lineage-specific differentiation. More importantly, alteration of these epigenetic changes would, in many cases, lead to disease generation and even tumour formation. Therefore, it is crucial to elucidate how epigenetic factors, through their interplay with transcriptional regulators, control lineage commitment in hMSCs. PMID:27019612

  14. DNA methyltransferases and epigenetic regulation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Satish; Curtis, Patrick D

    2016-09-01

    Epigenetics is a change in gene expression that is heritable without a change in DNA sequence itself. This phenomenon is well studied in eukaryotes, particularly in humans for its role in cellular differentiation, X chromosome inactivation and diseases like cancer. However, comparatively little is known about epigenetic regulation in bacteria. Bacterial epigenetics is mainly present in the form of DNA methylation where DNA methyltransferases add methyl groups to nucleotides. This review focuses on two methyltransferases well characterized for their roles in gene regulation: Dam and CcrM. Dam methyltransferase in Escherichia coli is important for expression of certain genes such as the pap operon, as well as other cellular processes like DNA replication initiation and DNA repair. In Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria, the methyltransferase CcrM is cell cycle regulated and is involved in the cell-cycle-dependent regulation of several genes. The diversity of regulatory targets as well as regulatory mechanisms suggests that gene regulation by methylation could be a widespread and potent method of regulation in bacteria. PMID:27476077

  15. Crosstalk among Epigenetic Pathways Regulates Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Emily M; McQuate, Andrea L; Zhao, Xinyu

    2012-01-01

    The process of neurogenesis includes neural stem cell proliferation, fate specification, young neuron migration, neuronal maturation, and functional integration into existing circuits. Although neurogenesis occurs largely during embryonic development, low levels but functionally important neurogenesis persists in restricted regions of the postnatal brain, including the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. This review will cover both embryonic and adult neurogenesis with an emphasis on the latter. Of the many endogenous mediators of postnatal neurogenesis, epigenetic pathways, such as mediators of DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling systems, and non-coding RNA modulators, appear to play an integral role. Mounting evidence shows that such epigenetic factors form regulatory networks, which govern each step of postnatal neurogenesis. In this review, we explore the emerging roles of epigenetic mechanisms particularly microRNAs, element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF), polycomb proteins, and methyl-CpG bindings proteins, in regulating the entire process of postnatal and adult neurogenesis. We further summarize recent data regarding how the crosstalk among these different epigenetic proteins forms the critical regulatory network that regulates neuronal development. We finally discuss how crosstalk between these pathways may serve to translate environmental cues into control of the neurogenic process. PMID:22586361

  16. Epigenetic regulation of rice flowering and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jinlei; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Current understanding of the epigenetic regulator roles in plant growth and development has largely derived from studies in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the most important food crops in the world and has more recently becoming a monocotyledonous model plant in functional genomics research. During the past few years, an increasing number of studies have reported the impact of DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and histone modifications on transcription regulation, flowering time control, and reproduction in rice. Here, we review these studies to provide an updated complete view about chromatin modifiers characterized in rice and in particular on their roles in epigenetic regulation of flowering time, reproduction, and seed development. PMID:25674094

  17. Epigenetic Aberrations Are Not Specific to Transcription Factor-Mediated Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, Ulf; Wu, Guangming; Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Schöler, Hans Robert; Tapia, Natalia

    2016-01-12

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to pluripotency using different methods. In comparison with pluripotent cells obtained through somatic nuclear transfer, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exhibit a higher number of epigenetic errors. Furthermore, most of these abnormalities have been described to be intrinsic to the iPSC technology. Here, we investigate whether the aberrant epigenetic patterns detected in iPSCs are specific to transcription factor-mediated reprogramming. We used germline stem cells (GSCs), which are the only adult cell type that can be converted into pluripotent cells (gPSCs) under defined culture conditions, and compared GSC-derived iPSCs and gPSCs at the transcriptional and epigenetic level. Our results show that both reprogramming methods generate indistinguishable states of pluripotency. GSC-derived iPSCs and gPSCs retained similar levels of donor cell-type memory and exhibited comparable numbers of reprogramming errors. Therefore, our study demonstrates that the epigenetic abnormalities detected in iPSCs are not specific to transcription factor-mediated reprogramming. PMID:26711876

  18. Epigenetic Regulation in Neural Crest Development

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Na; Strobl-Mazzulla, Pablo H.; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    The neural crest is a migratory and multipotent cell population that plays a crucial many aspects of embryonic development. In all vertebrate embryos, these cells emerge from the dorsal neural tube then migrate long distances to different regions of the body, where they contribute to formation of many cell types and structures. These include much of the peripheral nervous system, craniofacial skeleton, smooth muscle, and pigmentation of the skin. The best-studied regulatory events guiding neural crest development are mediated by transcription factors and signaling molecules. In recent years, however, growing evidence supports an important role for epigenetic regulation as an additional mechanism for controlling the timing and level of gene expression at different stages of neural crest development. Here, we summarize the process of neural crest formation, with focus on the role of epigenetic regulation in neural crest specification, migration, and differentiation as well as in neural crest related birth defects and diseases. PMID:25446277

  19. Increased epigenetic alterations at the promoters of transcriptional regulators following inadequate maternal gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tomoko; Yamada, Takahiro; Abe, Kosei; Okamura, Kohji; Kamura, Hiromi; Akaishi, Rina; Minakami, Hisanori; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hata, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are thought to serve as a memory of exposure to in utero environments. However, few human studies have investigated the associations between maternal nutritional conditions during pregnancy and epigenetic alterations in offspring. In this study, we report genome-wide methylation profiles for 33 postpartum placentas from pregnancies of normal and foetal growth restriction with various extents of maternal gestational weight gain. Epigenetic alterations accumulate in the placenta under adverse in utero environments, as shown by application of Smirnov-Grubbs’ outlier test. Moreover, hypermethylation occurs frequently at the promoter regions of transcriptional regulator genes, including polycomb targets and zinc-finger genes, as shown by annotations of the genomic and functional features of loci with altered DNA methylation. Aberrant epigenetic modifications at such developmental regulator loci, if occurring in foetuses as well, will elevate the risk of developing various diseases, including metabolic and mental disorders, later in life. PMID:26415774

  20. Epigenetic and developmental regulation in plant polyploids.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingxin; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Polyploidy or whole-genome duplication occurs in some animals and many flowering plants, including many important crops such as wheat, cotton and oilseed rape. The prevalence of polyploidy in the plant kingdom suggests it as an important evolutionary feature for plant speciation and crop domestication. Studies of natural and synthetic polyploids have revealed rapid and dynamic changes in genomic structure and gene expression after polyploid formation. Growing evidence suggests that epigenetic modifications can alter homoeologous gene expression and reprogram gene expression networks, which allows polyploids to establish new cytotypes, grow vigorously and promote adaptation in local environments. Sequence and gene expression changes in polyploids have been well documented and reviewed elsewhere. This review is focused on developmental regulation and epigenetic changes including DNA methylation and histone modifications in polyploids.

  1. Epigenetic and developmental regulation in plant polyploids

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qingxin; Chen, Z. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy or whole-genome duplication occurs in some animals and many flowering plants, including many important crops such as wheat, cotton and oilseed rape. The prevalence of polyploidy in the plant kingdom suggests it as an important evolutionary feature for plant speciation and crop domestication. Studies of natural and synthetic polyploids have revealed rapid and dynamic changes in genomic structure and gene expression after polyploid formation. Growing evidence suggests that epigenetic modifications can alter homoeologous gene expression and reprogram gene expression networks, which allows polyploids to establish new cytotypes, grow vigorously and adapt in local environments. Sequence and gene expression changes in polyploids have been well documented and reviewed elsewhere. This review is focused on developmental regulation and epigenetic changes including DNA methylation and histone modifications in polyploids. PMID:25765928

  2. Epigenetics in the hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chun Yew; Morison, Jessica; Dawson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of genomic and epigenomic data has identified abnormal regulation of epigenetic processes as a prominent theme in hematologic malignancies. Recurrent somatic alterations in myeloid malignancies of key proteins involved in DNA methylation, post-translational histone modification and chromatin remodeling have highlighted the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the initiation and maintenance of various malignancies. The rational use of targeted epigenetic therapies requires a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms of malignant transformation driven by aberrant epigenetic regulators. In this review we provide an overview of the major protagonists in epigenetic regulation, their aberrant role in myeloid malignancies, prognostic significance and potential for therapeutic targeting. PMID:25472952

  3. Genetic variation and the evolution of epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Furrow, Robert E; Feldman, Marcus W

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetic variation has been observed in a range of organisms, leading to questions of the adaptive significance of this variation. In this study, we present a model to explore the ecological and genetic conditions that select for epigenetic regulation. We find that the rate of temporal environmental change is a key factor controlling the features of this evolution. When the environment fluctuates rapidly between states with different phenotypic optima, epigenetic regulation may evolve but we expect to observe low transgenerational inheritance of epigenetic states, whereas when this fluctuation occurs over longer time scales, regulation may evolve to generate epigenetic states that are inherited faithfully for many generations. In all cases, the underlying genetic variation at the epigenetically regulated locus is a crucial factor determining the range of conditions that allow for evolution of epigenetic mechanisms.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoiesis by DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Aniket V; Athans, Brett; Iben, James R; Johnson, Kristin; Russanova, Valya; Castranova, Daniel; Pham, Van N; Butler, Matthew G; Williams-Simons, Lisa; Nichols, James T; Bresciani, Erica; Feldman, Bejamin; Kimmel, Charles B; Liu, Paul P; Weinstein, Brant M

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, cell type-specific transcription factors promote cell identities, while epigenetic modifications are thought to contribute to maintain these cell fates. Our understanding of how genetic and epigenetic modes of regulation work together to establish and maintain cellular identity is still limited, however. Here, we show that DNA methyltransferase 3bb.1 (dnmt3bb.1) is essential for maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) fate as part of an early Notch-runx1-cmyb HSPC specification pathway in the zebrafish. Dnmt3bb.1 is expressed in HSPC downstream from Notch1 and runx1, and loss of Dnmt3bb.1 activity leads to reduced cmyb locus methylation, reduced cmyb expression, and gradual reduction in HSPCs. Ectopic overexpression of dnmt3bb.1 in non-hematopoietic cells is sufficient to methylate the cmyb locus, promote cmyb expression, and promote hematopoietic development. Our results reveal an epigenetic mechanism supporting the maintenance of hematopoietic cell fate via DNA methylation-mediated perdurance of a key transcription factor in HSPCs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11813.001 PMID:26814702

  5. Epigenetic regulation of aortic remodeling in hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Nithya; Pushpakumar, Sathnur Basappa; Givvimani, Srikanth; Kundu, Sourav; Metreveli, Naira; James, Dexter; Bratcher, Adrienne P.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is prevalent in patients with hypertension and is an independent risk factor for aortic pathologies. HHcy is known to cause an imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), leading to the accumulation of collagen in the aorta and resulting in stiffness and development of hypertension. Although the exact mechanism of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling is unclear, emerging evidence implicates epigenetic regulation involving DNA methylation. Our purpose was to investigate whether 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Aza), a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) inhibitor, reduces high blood pressure (BP) by regulating aortic ECM remodeling in HHcy. Wild-type and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS)+/− HHcy mice were treated with Aza (0.5 mg/kg body weight). In HHcy mice, Aza treatment normalized the plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level and BP. Thoracic and abdominal aorta ultrasound revealed a reduction in the resistive index and wall-to-lumen ratio. Vascular response to phenylephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside improved after Aza in HHcy mice. Histology showed a marked reduction in collagen deposition in the aorta. Aza treatment decreased the expression of DNMT1, MMP9, TIMP1, and S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) and upregulated methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). We conclude that reduction of DNA methylation by Aza in HHcy reduces adverse aortic remodeling to mitigate hypertension.—Narayanan, N., Pushpakumar, S. B., Givvimani, S., Kundu, S., Metreveli, N., James, D., Bratcher, A. P., Tyagi, S. C. Epigenetic regulation of aortic remodeling in hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:24739303

  6. Influence of Toxicologically Relevant Metals on Human Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Won, Hye-Rim; Kim, Kyeong Hwan; Seong, Yun Jeong; Kwon, So Hee

    2015-01-01

    Environmental toxicants such as toxic metals can alter epigenetic regulatory features such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and non-coding RNA expression. Heavy metals influence gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms and by directly binding to various metal response elements in the target gene promoters. Given the role of epigenetic alterations in regulating genes, there is potential for the integration of toxic metal-induced epigenetic alterations as informative factors in the risk assessment process. Here, we focus on recent advances in understanding epigenetic changes, gene expression, and biological effects induced by toxic metals. PMID:25874027

  7. Epigenetic regulation of ANKRD18B in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Bin; Han, Fei; Jiang, Xiao; Yin, Li; Chen, Hong-Qiang; Li, Yong-Hong; Liu, Yong; Cao, Jia; Liu, Jin-Yi

    2015-04-01

    The identification of the key genetic and epigenetic changes underlying lung carcinogenesis would aid effective early diagnosis and targeted therapies for lung cancer. In this study, we screened a novel hypermethylated gene ankyrin repeat domain 18B (ANKRD18B), to determine whether it is regulated by DNA methylation and clarify its biological and clinical implications in lung cancer. Methylation status and expression level were analyzed by methylation-specific PCR, bisulfite genomic sequencing, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We detected ANKRD18B hypermethylation in 52 of 98 (53.1%) primary lung cancer tissues and in nine of 10 (90%) cell lines, whereas no methylation was seen in 10 normal lung tissue samples. ANKRD18B methylation was more frequently observed in patients with poor differentiation (P < 0.05). Notably, 62 pairs of samples from patients whose tumor tissue showed hypermethylation of ANKRD18B exhibited the same aberrant methylation in 72.7% and 69.7% of their corresponding plasma and sputum samples, respectively; whereas no hypermethylation of ANKRD18B was detected in the sputum and plasma from patients whose tumor sample lacked this alteration. In addition, ANKRD18B mRNA expression was significantly decreased or silenced in lung cancer tissues and cell lines associated with hypermethylation of the ANKRD18B region. Demethylation agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine significantly increased ANKRD18B mRNA expression in lung cancer cell lines. Furthermore, overexpression of ANKRD18B suppressed lung cancer cell growth. These results suggest that the expression of ANKRD18B is regulated by CpG island hypermethylation in lung cancer. Our findings confirm the importance of the identification of new markers of epigenetic dysregulation in cancer.

  8. Epigenetic regulation of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jiewen; Wang, Tianya; Ni, Zhongfu

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is one of the most important microelement required for plant growth and development because of its unique property of catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions. Iron deficiency impairs fundamental processes which could lead to a decrease in chlorophyll production and pollen fertility, thus influencing crop productivity and quality. However, iron in excess is toxic to the cell and is harmful to the plant. To exactly control the iron content in all tissues, plants have evolved many strategies to regulate iron homeostasis, which refers to 2 successive steps: iron uptake at the root surface, and iron distribution in vivo. In the last decades, a number of transporters and regulatory factors involved in this process have been isolated and identified. To cope with the complicated flexible environmental conditions, plants apply diverse mechanisms to regulate the expression and activity of these components. One of the most important mechanisms is epigenetic regulation of iron homeostasis. This review has been presented to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of histone modifications in iron homeostasis and possible future course of the field. PMID:26313698

  9. Epigenetic regulation of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jiewen; Wang, Tianya; Ni, Zhongfu

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is one of the most important microelement required for plant growth and development because of its unique property of catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions. Iron deficiency impairs fundamental processes which could lead to a decrease in chlorophyll production and pollen fertility, thus influencing crop productivity and quality. However, iron in excess is toxic to the cell and is harmful to the plant. To exactly control the iron content in all tissues, plants have evolved many strategies to regulate iron homeostasis, which refers to 2 successive steps: iron uptake at the root surface, and iron distribution in vivo. In the last decades, a number of transporters and regulatory factors involved in this process have been isolated and identified. To cope with the complicated flexible environmental conditions, plants apply diverse mechanisms to regulate the expression and activity of these components. One of the most important mechanisms is epigenetic regulation of iron homeostasis. This review has been presented to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of histone modifications in iron homeostasis and possible future course of the field.

  10. Epigenetic regulation and therapeutic approaches in cancer.

    PubMed

    Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2008-01-01

    The interdependency between genetic and epigenetic regulatory processes renders cancer therapeutics and translational clinic possible, even though they remain difficult tasks considering all the evidence supporting a central role of progenitor-stem cells as a causative source of cellular transformation. In contrast to genetic alterations, epigenetic processes are potentially reversible allowing a better action of complementary therapeutic compounds. Here I would first describe the plethora of interconnected epigenetic processes and targets to then discuss several therapeutic strategies on the basis of different compounds. I conclude that the advent of new and specific epigenetic target drugs will certainly contribute to better treatments and to the development of predictive protocols in a next future.

  11. Obesity: epigenetic regulation – recent observations.

    PubMed

    Remely, Marlene; de la Garza, Ana Laura; Magnet, Ulrich; Aumueller, Eva; Haslberger, Alexander G

    2015-06-01

    Genetic and environmental factors, especially nutrition and lifestyle, have been discussed in the literature for their relevance to epidemic obesity. Gene-environment interactions may need to be understood for an improved understanding of the causes of obesity, and epigenetic mechanisms are of special importance. Consequences of epigenetic mechanisms seem to be particularly important during certain periods of life: prenatal, postnatal and intergenerational, transgenerational inheritance are discussed with relevance to obesity. This review focuses on nutrients, diet and habits influencing intergenerational, transgenerational, prenatal and postnatal epigenetics; on evidence of epigenetic modifiers in adulthood; and on animal models for the study of obesity.

  12. Epigenetic regulation in pluripotent stem cells: a key to breaking the epigenetic barrier.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akira; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation and reprogramming of cells are accompanied by drastic changes in the epigenetic profiles of cells. Waddington's classical model clearly describes how differentiating cells acquire their cell identity as the developmental potential of an individual cell population declines towards the terminally differentiated state. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells as well as of somatic cell nuclear transfer provided evidence that the process of differentiation can be reversed. The identity of somatic cells is strictly protected by an epigenetic barrier, and these cells acquire pluripotency by breaking the epigenetic barrier by reprogramming factors such as Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, Myc and LIN28. This review covers the current understanding of the spatio-temporal regulation of epigenetics in pluripotent and differentiated cells, and discusses how cells determine their identity and overcome the epigenetic barrier during the reprogramming process.

  13. Epigenetic regulation in pluripotent stem cells: a key to breaking the epigenetic barrier.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akira; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation and reprogramming of cells are accompanied by drastic changes in the epigenetic profiles of cells. Waddington's classical model clearly describes how differentiating cells acquire their cell identity as the developmental potential of an individual cell population declines towards the terminally differentiated state. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells as well as of somatic cell nuclear transfer provided evidence that the process of differentiation can be reversed. The identity of somatic cells is strictly protected by an epigenetic barrier, and these cells acquire pluripotency by breaking the epigenetic barrier by reprogramming factors such as Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, Myc and LIN28. This review covers the current understanding of the spatio-temporal regulation of epigenetics in pluripotent and differentiated cells, and discusses how cells determine their identity and overcome the epigenetic barrier during the reprogramming process. PMID:23166402

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of HYAL-1 Hyaluronidase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lokeshwar, Vinata B.; Gomez, Pablo; Kramer, Mario; Knapp, Judith; McCornack, Melissa A.; Lopez, Luis E.; Fregien, Nevis; Dhir, Neetika; Scherer, Steve; Klumpp, David J.; Manoharan, Murugesan; Soloway, Mark S.; Lokeshwar, Bal L.

    2008-01-01

    HYAL-1 (hyaluronoglucosaminidase-1) belongs to the hyaluronidase family of enzymes that degrade hyaluronic acid. HYAL-1 is a marker for cancer diagnosis and a molecular determinant of tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis. The regulation of HYAL-1 expression is unknown. Real time reverse transcription-PCR using 11 bladder and prostate cancer cells and 69 bladder tissues showed that HYAL-1 mRNA levels are elevated 10–30-fold in cells/tissues that express high hyaluronidase activity. Although multiple transcription start sites (TSS) for HYAL-1 mRNA were detected in various tissues, the major TSS in many tissues, including bladder and prostate, was at nucleotide 27274 in the cosmid clone LUCA13 (AC002455). By analyzing the 1532 base sequence 5′ to this TSS, using cloning and luciferase reporter assays, we identified a TACAAA sequence at position -31 and the minimal promoter region between nucleotides -93 and -38. Mutational analysis identified that nucleotides -73 to -50 (which include overlapping binding consensus sites for SP1, Egr-1, and AP-2), bases C-71 and C-59, and an NFκB-binding site (at position -15) are necessary for promoter activity. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay identified that Egr-1, AP-2, and NFκB bind to the promoter in HYAL-1-expressing cells, whereas SP1 binds to the promoter in non-HYAL-1-expressing cells. 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment, bisulfite DNA sequencing, and methylation-specific PCR revealed that HYAL-1 expression is regulated by methylation at C-71 and C-59; both Cs are part of the SP1/Egr-1-binding sites. Thus, HYAL-1 expression is epigenetically regulated by the binding of different transcription factors to the methylated and unmethylated HYAL-1 promoter. PMID:18718911

  15. Growth rate of late passage sarcoma cells is independent of epigenetic events but dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Becerikli, Mustafa; Jacobsen, Frank; Rittig, Andrea; Köhne, Wiebke; Nambiar, Sandeep; Mirmohammadsadegh, Alireza; Stricker, Ingo; Tannapfel, Andrea; Wieczorek, Stefan; Epplen, Joerg Thomas; Tilkorn, Daniel; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2013-07-15

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are characterized by co-participation of several epigenetic and genetic events during tumorigenesis. Having bypassed cellular senescence barriers during oncogenic transformation, the factors further affecting growth rate of STS cells remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of gene silencing (DNA promoter methylation of LINE-1, PTEN), genetic aberrations (karyotype, KRAS and BRAF mutations) as well as their contribution to the proliferation rate and migratory potential that underlies “initial” and “final” passage sarcoma cells. Three different cell lines were used, SW982 (synovial sarcoma), U2197 (malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) and HT1080 (fibrosarcoma). Increased proliferative potential of final passage STS cells was not associated with significant differences in methylation (LINE-1, PTEN) and mutation status (KRAS, BRAF), but it was dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that these fairly differentiated/advanced cancer cell lines have still the potential to gain an additional spontaneous growth benefit without external influences and that maintenance of increased proliferative potential towards longevity of STS cells (having crossed senescence barriers) may be independent of overt epigenetic alterations. -- Highlights: Increased proliferative potential of late passage STS cells was: • Not associated with epigenetic changes (methylation changes at LINE-1, PTEN). • Not associated with mutation status of KRAS, BRAF. • Dependent on presence/absence of chromosomal aberrations.

  16. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    PubMed

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  17. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E.; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  18. Conference Scene: Epigenetic regulation: from mechanism to intervention.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha

    2012-10-01

    The Medical Research Council Clinical Sciences Centre Symposium on Epigenetic Regulation: From Mechanism to Intervention in London, UK, which was held on 20-22 June 2012, attracted 305 participants from around the globe and included 37 speakers and 85 selected poster presentations. The organizing committee, led by Niall Dillon of the Medical Research Council Clinical Sciences Centre (London, UK), consisted of several distinguished researchers in the fields of epigenetics and chromatin organization from across the UK. The meeting covered a diverse range of topics and brought together scientists carrying out fundamental research on epigenetic mechanisms and also researchers who are exploring the role of epigenetics in human diseases and its clinical applications. In addition, the meeting highlighted some emerging aspects in the rapidly evolving field of epigenetics.

  19. Epigenetics: Beyond Chromatin Modifications and Complex Genetic Regulation1

    PubMed Central

    Eichten, Steven R.; Schmitz, Robert J.; Springer, Nathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin modifications and epigenetics may play important roles in many plant processes, including developmental regulation, responses to environmental stimuli, and local adaptation. Chromatin modifications describe biochemical changes to chromatin state, such as alterations in the specific type or placement of histones, modifications of DNA or histones, or changes in the specific proteins or RNAs that associate with a genomic region. The term epigenetic is often used to describe a variety of unexpected patterns of gene regulation or inheritance. Here, we specifically define epigenetics to include the key aspects of heritability (stable transmission of gene expression states through mitotic or meiotic cell divisions) and independence from DNA sequence changes. We argue against generically equating chromatin and epigenetics; although many examples of epigenetics involve chromatin changes, those chromatin changes are not always heritable or may be influenced by genetic changes. Careful use of the terms chromatin modifications and epigenetics can help separate the biochemical mechanisms of regulation from the inheritance patterns of altered chromatin states. Here, we also highlight examples in which chromatin modifications and epigenetics affect important plant processes. PMID:24872382

  20. Epigenetic Gene Regulation in the Adult Mammalian Brain: Multiple roles in Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Farah D.

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) is one of numerous gene products necessary for long-term memory formation and dysregulation of bdnf has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive and mental disorders. Recent work indicates that epigenetic-regulatory mechanisms including the markings of histone proteins and associated DNA remain labile throughout the lifespan and represent an attractive molecular process contributing to gene regulation in the brain. In this review, important information will be discussed on epigenetics as a set of newly identified dynamic transcriptional mechanisms serving to regulate gene expression changes in the adult brain with particular emphasis on bdnf transcriptional readout in learning and memory formation. This review will also highlight evidence for the role of epigenetics in aberrant bdnf gene regulation in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction associated with seizure disorders, Rett syndrome, Schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Such research offers novel concepts for understanding epigenetic transcriptional mechanisms subserving adult cognition and mental health, and furthermore promises novel avenues for therapeutic approach in the clinic. PMID:21419233

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of Oxidative Stress in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiping; Han, Ziping; Ji, Xunming; Luo, Yumin

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of stroke rises with life expectancy. However, except for the use of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator, the translation of new therapies for acute stroke from animal models into humans has been relatively unsuccessful. Oxidative DNA and protein damage following stroke is typically associated with cell death. Cause-effect relationships between reactive oxygen species and epigenetic modifications have been established in aging, cancer, acute pancreatitis, and fatty liver disease. In addition, epigenetic regulatory mechanisms during stroke recovery have been reviewed, with focuses mainly on neural apoptosis, necrosis, and neuroplasticity. However, oxidative stress-induced epigenetic regulation in vascular neural networks following stroke has not been sufficiently explored. Improved understanding of the epigenetic regulatory network upon oxidative stress may provide effective antioxidant approaches for treating stroke. In this review, we summarize the epigenetic events, including DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNAs, that result from oxidative stress following experimental stroke in animal and cell models, and the ways in which epigenetic changes and their crosstalk influence the redox state in neurons, glia, and vascular endothelial cells, helping us to understand the foregone and vicious epigenetic regulation of oxidative stress in the vascular neural network following stroke. PMID:27330844

  2. Epigenetic Regulation of Adaptive NK Cell Diversification.

    PubMed

    Tesi, Bianca; Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2016-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were previously considered to represent short-lived, innate lymphocytes. However, mouse models have revealed expansion and persistence of differentiated NK cell subsets in response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, paralleling antigen-specific T cell differentiation. Congruently, analyses of humans have uncovered CMV-associated NK cell subsets characterized by epigenetic diversification processes that lead to altered target cell specificities and functional capacities. Here, focusing on responses to viruses, we review similarities and differences between mouse and human adaptive NK cells, identifying molecular analogies that may be key to transcriptional reprogramming and functional alterations. We discuss possible molecular mechanisms underlying epigenetic diversification and hypothesize that processes driving epigenetic diversification may represent a more widespread mechanism for fine-tuning and optimization of cellular immunity.

  3. Epigenetics, cellular memory and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, Steven; Greally, John M

    2016-07-25

    The field described as 'epigenetics' has captured the imagination of scientists and the lay public. Advances in our understanding of chromatin and gene regulatory mechanisms have had impact on drug development, fueling excitement in the lay public about the prospects of applying this knowledge to address health issues. However, when describing these scientific advances as 'epigenetic', we encounter the problem that this term means different things to different people, starting within the scientific community and amplified in the popular press. To help researchers understand some of the misconceptions in the field and to communicate the science accurately to each other and the lay audience, here we review the basis for many of the assumptions made about what are currently referred to as epigenetic processes. PMID:27458904

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of Virulence Gene Expression in Parasitic Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Duraisingh, Manoj T; Horn, David

    2016-05-11

    Protozoan parasites colonize numerous metazoan hosts and insect vectors through their life cycles, with the need to respond quickly and reversibly while encountering diverse and often hostile ecological niches. To succeed, parasites must also persist within individuals until transmission between hosts is achieved. Several parasitic protozoa cause a huge burden of disease in humans and livestock, and here we focus on the parasites that cause malaria and African trypanosomiasis. Efforts to understand how these pathogens adapt to survive in varied host environments, cause disease, and transmit between hosts have revealed a wealth of epigenetic phenomena. Epigenetic switching mechanisms appear to be ideally suited for the regulation of clonal antigenic variation underlying successful parasitism. We review the molecular players and complex mechanistic layers that mediate the epigenetic regulation of virulence gene expression. Understanding epigenetic processes will aid the development of antiparasitic therapeutics. PMID:27173931

  5. Aberrant JAK/STAT Signaling Suppresses TFF1 and TFF2 through Epigenetic Silencing of GATA6 in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Shyong; Wei, Kuo-Liang; Chou, Jian-Liang; Lu, Chung-Kuang; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Jora M. J.; Deng, Yi-Fang; Hsu, Wan-Ting; Wang, Hui-Min David; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Li, Chin; Chan, Michael W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer. In this study, we examined the role of STAT3 in the expression and methylation of its targets in gastric cancer patients. Results from RNA sequencing identified an inverse correlation between the expression of STAT3 and GATA6 in 23 pairs of gastric cancer patient samples. We discovered that the expression of GATA6 is epigenetically silenced through promoter methylation in gastric cancer cell lines. Interestingly, the inhibition of STAT3 using a novel STAT3 inhibitor restored the expression of GATA6 and its targets, trefoil factors 1 and 2 (TFF1/2). Moreover, disruption of STAT3 binding to GATA6 promoter by small hairpin RNA restored GATA6 expression in AGS cells. A clinically significant correlation was also observed between the expression of GATA6 and TFF1/2 among tissue samples from 60 gastric cancer patients. Finally, bisulfite pyrosequencing revealed GATA6 methylation in 65% (39/60) of the patients, and those with higher GATA6 methylation tended to have shorter overall survival. In conclusion, we demonstrated that aberrant JAK/STAT signaling suppresses TFF1/2 partially through the epigenetic silencing of GATA6. Therapeutic intervention of STAT3 in reversing the epigenetic status of GATA6 could benefit the treatment of gastric cancer and is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27598141

  6. Aberrant JAK/STAT Signaling Suppresses TFF1 and TFF2 through Epigenetic Silencing of GATA6 in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Shyong; Wei, Kuo-Liang; Chou, Jian-Liang; Lu, Chung-Kuang; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Jora M J; Deng, Yi-Fang; Hsu, Wan-Ting; Wang, Hui-Min David; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Li, Chin; Chan, Michael W Y

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer. In this study, we examined the role of STAT3 in the expression and methylation of its targets in gastric cancer patients. Results from RNA sequencing identified an inverse correlation between the expression of STAT3 and GATA6 in 23 pairs of gastric cancer patient samples. We discovered that the expression of GATA6 is epigenetically silenced through promoter methylation in gastric cancer cell lines. Interestingly, the inhibition of STAT3 using a novel STAT3 inhibitor restored the expression of GATA6 and its targets, trefoil factors 1 and 2 (TFF1/2). Moreover, disruption of STAT3 binding to GATA6 promoter by small hairpin RNA restored GATA6 expression in AGS cells. A clinically significant correlation was also observed between the expression of GATA6 and TFF1/2 among tissue samples from 60 gastric cancer patients. Finally, bisulfite pyrosequencing revealed GATA6 methylation in 65% (39/60) of the patients, and those with higher GATA6 methylation tended to have shorter overall survival. In conclusion, we demonstrated that aberrant JAK/STAT signaling suppresses TFF1/2 partially through the epigenetic silencing of GATA6. Therapeutic intervention of STAT3 in reversing the epigenetic status of GATA6 could benefit the treatment of gastric cancer and is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27598141

  7. Epigenetic regulator RBP2 is critical for breast cancer progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian; Liu, Zongzhi; Cheung, William K.C.; Zhao, Minghui; Chen, Sophia Y.; Chan, Siew Wee; Booth, Carmen J.; Nguyen, Don X.; Yan, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Metastasis is a major clinical challenge for cancer treatment. Emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic aberrations contribute significantly to tumor formation and progression. However, the drivers and roles of such epigenetic changes in tumor metastasis are still poorly understood. Using bioinformatic analysis of human breast cancer gene expression datasets, we identified histone demethylase RBP2 as a putative mediator of metastatic progression. By using both human breast cancer cells and genetically engineered mice, we demonstrated that RBP2 is critical for breast cancer metastasis to the lung in multiple in vivo models. Mechanistically, RBP2 promotes metastasis as a pleiotropic positive regulator of many metastasis genes. In addition, RBP2 loss suppresses tumor formation in the MMTV-neu transgenic mice. These results suggest that therapeutically targeting RBP2 is a potential strategy to inhibit tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:24582965

  8. Environmental and nutritional effects on the epigenetic regulation of genes.

    PubMed

    Feil, Robert

    2006-08-30

    Major efforts have been directed towards the identification of genetic mutations, their use as biomarkers, and the understanding of their consequences on human health and well-being. There is an emerging interest, however, in the possibility that environmentally-induced changes at levels other than the genetic information could have long-lasting consequences as well. This review summarises our current knowledge of how the environment, nutrition, and ageing affect the way mammalian genes are organised and transcribed, without changes in the underlying DNA sequence. Admittedly, the link between environment and epigenetics remains largely to be explored. However, recent studies indicate that environmental factors and diet can perturb the way genes are controlled by DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications. Unexpectedly, and not unlike genetic mutations, aberrant epigenetic alterations and their phenotypic effects can sometimes be passed on to the next generation.

  9. Molecular targets of epigenetic regulation and effectors of environmental influences

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Supratim; Cui Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2010-06-15

    The true understanding of what we currently define as epigenetics evolved over time as our knowledge on DNA methylation and chromatin modifications and their effects on gene expression increased. The current explosion of research on epigenetics and the increasing documentation of the effects of various environmental factors on DNA methylation, chromatin modification, as well as on the expression of small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have expanded the scope of research on the etiology of various diseases including cancer. The current review briefly discusses the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic regulation and expands the discussion with examples on the role of environment, such as the immediate environment during development, in inducing epigenetic changes and modulating gene expression.

  10. Epigenetic regulation of stemness maintenance in the neurogenic niches

    PubMed Central

    Montalbán-Loro, Raquel; Domingo-Muelas, Ana; Bizy, Alexandra; Ferrón, Sacri R

    2015-01-01

    In the adult mouse brain, the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are two zones that contain neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity to give rise to neurons and glia during the entire life of the animal. Spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression in the NSCs population is established and maintained by the coordinated interaction between transcription factors and epigenetic regulators which control stem cell fate. Epigenetic mechanisms are heritable alterations in genome function that do not involve changes in DNA sequence itself but that modulate gene expression, acting as mediators between the environment and the genome. At the molecular level, those epigenetic mechanisms comprise chemical modifications of DNA such as methylation, hydroxymethylation and histone modifications needed for the maintenance of NSC identity. Genomic imprinting is another normal epigenetic process leading to parental-specific expression of a gene, known to be implicated in the control of gene dosage in the neurogenic niches. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from NSCs by expression of defined transcription factors, provide key insights into fundamental principles of stem cell biology. Epigenetic modifications can also occur during reprogramming of NSCs to pluripotency and a better understanding of this process will help to elucidate the mechanisms required for stem cell maintenance. This review takes advantage of recent studies from the epigenetic field to report knowledge regarding the mechanisms of stemness maintenance of neural stem cells in the neurogenic niches. PMID:26029342

  11. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of intestinal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Kuemmerle, John F

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease affects those individuals with polygenic risk factors. The identified risk loci indicate that the genetic architecture of Crohn's disease involves both innate and adaptive immunity and the response to the intestinal environment including the microbiome. Genetic risk alone, however, predicts only 25% of disease, indicating that other factors, including the intestinal environment, can shape the epigenome and also confer heritable risk to patients. Patients with Crohn's disease can have purely inflammatory disease, penetrating disease or fibrostenosis. Analysis of the genetic risk combined with epigenetic marks of Crohn's disease and other disease associated with organ fibrosis reveals common events are affecting the genes and pathways key to development of fibrosis. This review will focus on what is known about the mechanisms by which genetic and epigenetic risk factors determine development of fibrosis in Crohn's disease and contrast that with other fibrotic conditions. PMID:27536359

  12. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of intestinal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease affects those individuals with polygenic risk factors. The identified risk loci indicate that the genetic architecture of Crohn’s disease involves both innate and adaptive immunity and the response to the intestinal environment including the microbiome. Genetic risk alone, however, predicts only 25% of disease, indicating that other factors, including the intestinal environment, can shape the epigenome and also confer heritable risk to patients. Patients with Crohn’s disease can have purely inflammatory disease, penetrating disease or fibrostenosis. Analysis of the genetic risk combined with epigenetic marks of Crohn’s disease and other disease associated with organ fibrosis reveals common events are affecting the genes and pathways key to development of fibrosis. This review will focus on what is known about the mechanisms by which genetic and epigenetic risk factors determine development of fibrosis in Crohn’s disease and contrast that with other fibrotic conditions. PMID:27536359

  13. Epigenetic regulators and their impact on therapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Friederike; Levine, Ross L.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies of hematologic malignancies have identified a spectrum of recurrent somatic alterations that contribute to acute myeloid leukemia initiation and maintenance, and which confer sensitivities to molecularly targeted therapies. The majority of these genetic events are small, site-specific alterations in DNA sequence. In more than two thirds of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia mutations epigenetic modifiers are detected. Epigenetic modifiers encompass a large group of proteins that modify DNA at cytosine residues or cause post-translational histone modifications such as methylations or acetylations. Altered functions of these epigenetic modifiers disturb the physiological balance between gene activation and gene repression and contribute to aberrant gene expression regulation found in acute myeloid leukemia. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic modifiers mutated in acute myeloid leukemia, their clinical relevance and how a deeper understanding of their biological function has led to the discovery of new specific targets, some of which are currently tested in mechanism-based clinical trials. PMID:26928248

  14. Epigenetic Gene Regulation in Stem Cells and Correlation to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Lesley A.; Crea, Francesco; Farrar, W. L.

    2009-01-01

    Through the classic study of genetics, much has been learned about the regulation and progression of human disease. Specifically, cancer has been defined as a disease driven by genetic alterations, including mutations in tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes, as well as chromosomal abnormalities. However, the study of normal human development has identified that in addition to classical genetics, regulation of gene expression is also modified by ‘epigenetic’ alterations including chromatin remodeling and histone variants, DNA methylation, the regulation of polycomb group proteins and the epigenetic function of non-coding RNA. These changes are modifications inherited both during meiosis and mitosis, yet they do not result in alterations of the actual DNA sequence. A number of biological questions are directly influenced by epigenetics, such as how does a cell know when to divide, differentiate or remain quiescent, and more importantly, what happens when these pathways become altered? Do these alterations lead to the development and/or progression of cancer? This review will focus on summarizing the limited current literature involving epigenetic alterations in the context of human cancer stems cells (CSCs). The extent to which epigenetic changes define cell fate, identity, and phenotype are still under intense investigation, and many questions remain largely unanswered. Before discussing epigenetic gene silencing in CSCs, the different classifications of stem cells and their properties will be introduced. This will be followed by an introduction to the different epigenetic mechanisms Finally, there will be a discussion of the current knowledge of epigenetic modifications in stem cells, specifically what is known from rodent systems and established cancer cell lines, and how they are leading us to understand human stem cells. PMID:19443100

  15. Epigenetic regulators as promising therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gallipoli, Paolo; Giotopoulos, George; Huntly, Brian J P

    2015-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most prevalent acute leukemia in adults, is an aggressive hematological malignancy arising in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. With the exception of a few specific AML subtypes, the mainstays of treatment have not significantly changed over the last 20 years, and are still based on standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. As a result, clinical outcome remains poor for the majority of patients, with overall long-term survival in the region of 20-30%. Recent successes in characterizing the genetic landscape of AML have highlighted that, despite its heterogeneity, many cases of AML carry recurrent mutations in genes encoding epigenetic regulators. Transcriptional dysregulation and altered epigenetic function have therefore emerged as exciting areas in AML research and it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic dysfunction is central to leukemogenesis in AML. This has subsequently paved the way for the development of epigenetically targeted therapies. In this review, we will discuss the most recent advances in our understanding of the role of epigenetic dysregulation in AML pathobiology. We will particularly focus on those altered epigenetic programs that have been shown to be central to the development and maintenance of AML in preclinical models. We will discuss the recent development of therapeutics specifically targeting these key epigenetic programs in AML, describe their mechanism of action and present their current clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the opportunities presented by epigenetically targeted therapy in AML and will highlight future challenges ahead for the AML community, to ensure that these novel therapeutics are optimally translated into clinical practice and result in clinical improvement for AML patients.

  16. Epigenetic regulation in human melanoma: past and future

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debina; Leung, Euphemia Y; Baguley, Bruce C; Finlay, Graeme J; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E

    2015-01-01

    The development and progression of melanoma have been attributed to independent or combined genetic and epigenetic events. There has been remarkable progress in understanding melanoma pathogenesis in terms of genetic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed a complex involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of gene expression, including methylation, chromatin modification and remodeling, and the diverse activities of non-coding RNAs. The roles of gene methylation and miRNAs have been relatively well studied in melanoma, but other studies have shown that changes in chromatin status and in the differential expression of long non-coding RNAs can lead to altered regulation of key genes. Taken together, they affect the functioning of signaling pathways that influence each other, intersect, and form networks in which local perturbations disturb the activity of the whole system. Here, we focus on how epigenetic events intertwine with these pathways and contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of melanoma. PMID:25587943

  17. Epigenetic regulation in human melanoma: past and future.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debina; Leung, Euphemia Y; Baguley, Bruce C; Finlay, Graeme J; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E

    2015-01-01

    The development and progression of melanoma have been attributed to independent or combined genetic and epigenetic events. There has been remarkable progress in understanding melanoma pathogenesis in terms of genetic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed a complex involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of gene expression, including methylation, chromatin modification and remodeling, and the diverse activities of non-coding RNAs. The roles of gene methylation and miRNAs have been relatively well studied in melanoma, but other studies have shown that changes in chromatin status and in the differential expression of long non-coding RNAs can lead to altered regulation of key genes. Taken together, they affect the functioning of signaling pathways that influence each other, intersect, and form networks in which local perturbations disturb the activity of the whole system. Here, we focus on how epigenetic events intertwine with these pathways and contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of melanoma.

  18. Glutathione and cellular redox control in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibañez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Seco-Cervera, Marta; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-10-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the mitotically/meiotically heritable changes in gene expression that are not due to changes in the primary DNA sequence. Over recent years, growing evidence has suggested a link between redox metabolism and the control of epigenetic mechanisms. The effect of the redox control, oxidative stress, and glutathione (GSH) on the epigenetic mechanisms occur at different levels affecting DNA methylation, miRNAs expression, and histone post-translational modifications (PTMs). Furthermore, a number of redox PTMs are being described, so enriching the histone code. Pioneer works showed how oxidized GSH inhibits the activity of S-adenosyl methionine synthetase, MAT1A, a key enzyme involved in the synthesis of S-adenosyl methionine (SAM), which is used by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone methyltransferases (HMTs). Alteration in NAD /NADH ratio affects the activity of class III histone deacetylases (HDACs) and poly-ADP ribosyltransferases (PARPs). Furthermore, the iron redox state of the catalytic center of key enzymes influences the activity of HDACs and the activity of Tet methylcytosine dioxygenases (DNA demetylases) and JmjC histone demethylases. In this communication, we will show the intricate mechanisms that participate in the redox control of the epigenetic mechanisms. We specially focus our work in the characterization of new PTMs in histones, such as histone carbonylation and glutathionylation. Demonstrating how GSH influences the epigenetic mechanisms beyond a mere regulation of SAM levels. The mechanisms described in this communication place GSH and redox control in the landscape of the epigenetic regulation. The results shown underscore the relevant role that oxidative stress and GSH play as key factors in epigenetics, opening a new window for understating the underlying mechanisms that control cell differentiation, proliferation, development, and disease. PMID:26461333

  19. Clinical implications of epigenetic regulation in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Wendy; Saranath, Dhananjaya

    2015-12-01

    Oral cancer is a high incidence cancer which is of major public health concern in India being the most common cancer in males and fifth most common cancer in females in India, contributing to 26% of the global oral cancer burden. The major risk factors of oral cancer are tobacco, alcohol and high risk Human Papilloma Virus type 16/18. However, only 3-12% of the high risk individuals with dysplasia develop oral cancer. Thus, individual genomic variants representing the genomic constitution and epigenetic alterations play a critical role in the development of oral cancer. Extensive epigenetic studies on the molecular lesions including oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, genes associated with apoptosis, DNA damage repair have been reported. The current review highlights epigenetic regulation with a focus on molecular biomarkers and epidrug therapy in oral cancer. Epigenetic regulation by hypermethylation, histone modifications and specific microRNAs are often associated with early events and advanced stages in oral cancer, and thus indicate epidrug therapy for intervention. The presence of epigenetic marks in oral lesions, cancers and tumor associated mucosa emphasizes indications as biomarkers and epidrugs with therapeutic potential for better patient management. PMID:26421863

  20. Epigenetic Regulation of Germ Cells— Remember or Forget?

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lijuan; Chen, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Unlike somatic cells, germ cells retain the potential to reproduce an entire new organism upon fertilization. In order to accomplish the process of fertilization, germ cells undergo an extreme cellular differentiation process known as gametogenesis in order to produce morphologically and functionally distinct oocyte and sperm. In addition to changes in genetic content changes from diploid to haploid, epigenetic mechanisms that modify chromatin state without altering primary DNA sequences have profound influence on germ cell differentiation and moreover, the transgenerational effect. In this review, we will go over the most recent discoveries on epigenetic regulations in germline differentiation and transgenerational inheritance across different metazoan species. PMID:25930104

  1. PIAS1 Regulates Breast Tumorigenesis through Selective Epigenetic Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Tahk, Samuel; Yee, Kathleen M.; Yang, Randy; Yang, Yonghui; Mackie, Ryan; Hsu, Cary; Chernishof, Vasili; O'Brien, Neil; Jin, Yusheng; Fan, Guoping; Lane, Timothy F.; Rao, Jianyu; Slamon, Dennis; Shuai, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing by histone modifications and DNA methylation is essential for cancer development. The molecular mechanism that promotes selective epigenetic changes during tumorigenesis is not understood. We report here that the PIAS1 SUMO ligase is involved in the progression of breast tumorigenesis. Elevated PIAS1 expression was observed in breast tumor samples. PIAS1 knockdown in breast cancer cells reduced the subpopulation of tumor-initiating cells, and inhibited breast tumor growth in vivo. PIAS1 acts by delineating histone modifications and DNA methylation to silence the expression of a subset of clinically relevant genes, including breast cancer DNA methylation signature genes such as cyclin D2 and estrogen receptor, and breast tumor suppressor WNT5A. Our studies identify a novel epigenetic mechanism that regulates breast tumorigenesis through selective gene silencing. PMID:24586797

  2. Epigenetic Regulation of Myocardial Homeostasis, Self-Regeneration and Senescence.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Marco; Papini, Gaia; Ciofini, Enrica; Barile, Lucio; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The adult myocardium has limited capacity to preserve, renew or rejuvenate itself. The local microenvironment may induce epigenetic changes affecting the survival, proliferation, function and senescence of cardiac cells at rest and following the exposure to different stressors. The cellular response to microenvironment is characterized by the release of ions, oxygen free radicals, auto/paracrine factors and RNAs that drive the magnitude of gene reprogramming through the interaction with specific promoters. The epigenetic alterations may act at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level and change cardiac physiological traits. The abnormal DNA methylation underlies the progressive decay of contractile function and the angiogenic ability; while, the histone acetylation promotes the survival, function and proliferation of cardiac cells in the presence of ischemic microenvironment. At least, the expression and secretion of microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs may regulate the threshold to stress tolerance of adult cardiac cells and induce the matrix turnover as well. Natural or synthetic active compounds effectively modulate the epigenetic state of cardiac cells. Plant foods contain many active compounds with epigenetic properties and might assume a clinical significance as natural cardiac regenerators or rejuvenators. Our review describes novel epigenetic mechanisms that underpin myocardial remodeling, repair/ regeneration or senescence in order to support the development of most effective and reproducible rescue therapy of adult heart. PMID:26122032

  3. Epigenetic regulation of EFEMP1 in prostate cancer: biological relevance and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Mafalda; Costa, Vera L; Costa, Natália R; Ramalho-Carvalho, João; Baptista, Tiago; Ribeiro, Franclim R; Paulo, Paula; Teixeira, Manuel R; Oliveira, Jorge; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Lind, Guro E; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are common in prostate cancer (PCa) and seem to contribute decisively to its initiation and progression. Moreover, aberrant promoter methylation is a promising biomarker for non-invasive screening. Herein, we sought to characterize EFEMP1 as biomarker for PCa, unveiling its biological relevance in prostate carcinogenesis. Microarray analyses of treated PCa cell lines and primary tissues enabled the selection of differentially methylated genes, among which EFEMP1 was further validated by MSP and bisulfite sequencing. Assessment of biomarker performance was accomplished by qMSP. Expression analysis of EFEMP1 and characterization of histone marks were performed in tissue samples and cancer cell lines to determine the impact of epigenetic mechanisms on EFEMP1 transcriptional regulation. Phenotypic assays, using transfected cell lines, permitted the evaluation of EFEMP1’s role in PCa development. EFEMP1 methylation assay discriminated PCa from normal prostate tissue (NPT; P < 0.001, Kruskall–Wallis test) and renal and bladder cancers (96% sensitivity and 98% specificity). EFEMP1 transcription levels inversely correlated with promoter methylation and histone deacetylation, suggesting that both epigenetic mechanisms are involved in gene regulation. Phenotypic assays showed that EFEMP1 de novo expression reduces malignant phenotype of PCa cells. EFEMP1 promoter methylation is prevalent in PCa and accurately discriminates PCa from non-cancerous prostate tissues and other urological neoplasms. This epigenetic alteration occurs early in prostate carcinogenesis and, in association with histone deacetylation, progressively leads to gene down-regulation, fostering cell proliferation, invasion and evasion of apoptosis. PMID:25211630

  4. Exploiting epigenetic vulnerabilities for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mair, Barbara; Kubicek, Stefan; Nijman, Sebastian M B

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetic deregulation is a hallmark of cancer, and there has been increasing interest in therapeutics that target chromatin-modifying enzymes and other epigenetic regulators. The rationale for applying epigenetic drugs to treat cancer is twofold. First, epigenetic changes are reversible, and drugs could therefore be used to restore the normal (healthy) epigenetic landscape. However, it is unclear whether drugs can faithfully restore the precancerous epigenetic state. Second, chromatin regulators are often mutated in cancer, making them attractive drug targets. However, in most instances it is unknown whether cancer cells are addicted to these mutated chromatin proteins, or whether their mutation merely results in epigenetic instability conducive to the selection of secondary aberrations. An alternative incentive for targeting chromatin regulators is the exploitation of cancer-specific vulnerabilities, including synthetic lethality, caused by epigenetic deregulation. We review evidence for the hypothesis that mechanisms other than oncogene addiction are a basis for the application of epigenetic drugs, and propose future research directions.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of milk production in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kuljeet; Erdman, Richard A; Swanson, Kara M; Molenaar, Adrian J; Maqbool, Nauman J; Wheeler, Thomas T; Arias, Juan A; Quinn-Walsh, Erin C; Stelwagen, Kerst

    2010-03-01

    It is well established that milk production of the dairy cow is a function of mammary epithelial cell (MEC) number and activity and that these factors can be influenced by diverse environmental influences and management practises (nutrition, milk frequency, photoperiod, udder health, hormonal and local effectors). Thus, understanding how the mammary gland is able to respond to these environmental cues provides a huge potential to enhance milk production of the dairy cow. In recent years our understanding of molecular events within the MEC underlying bovine lactation has been advanced through mammary microarray studies and will be further advanced through the recent availability of the bovine genome sequence. In addition, the potential of epigenetic regulation (non-sequence inheritable chemical changes in chromatin, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, which affect gene expression) to manipulate mammary function is emerging. We propose that a substantial proportion of unexplained phenotypic variation in the dairy cow is due to epigenetic regulation. Heritability of epigenetic marks also highlights the potential to modify lactation performance of offspring. Understanding the response of the MEC (cell signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms) to external stimuli will be an important prerequisite to devising new technologies for maximising their activity and, hence, milk production in the dairy cow.

  6. Epigenetic regulation of open chromatin in pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    The recent progress in pluripotent stem cell research has opened new avenues of disease modeling, drug screening, and transplantation of patient-specific tissues unimaginable until a decade ago. The central mechanism underlying pluripotency is epigenetic gene regulation; the majority of cell signaling pathways, both extracellular and cytoplasmic, alter, eventually, the epigenetic status of their target genes during the process of activating or suppressing the genes to acquire or maintain pluripotency. It has long been thought that the chromatin of pluripotent stem cells is open globally to enable the timely activation of essentially all genes in the genome during differentiation into multiple lineages. The current article reviews descriptive observations and the epigenetic machinery relevant to what is supposed to be globally open chromatin in pluripotent stem cells, including microscopic appearance, permissive gene transcription, chromatin remodeling complexes, histone modifications, DNA methylation, noncoding RNAs, dynamic movement of chromatin proteins, nucleosome accessibility and positioning, and long-range chromosomal interactions. Detailed analyses of each element, however, have revealed that the globally open chromatin hypothesis is not necessarily supported by some of the critical experimental evidence, such as genomewide nucleosome accessibility and nucleosome positioning. Greater understanding of epigenetic gene regulation is expected to determine the true nature of the so-called globally open chromatin in pluripotent stem cells.

  7. Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Juan; Xie, Shui-Xiang; Chen, Ya-Tang; Xue, Jing-Ling; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal malignancies in the world. Several signaling pathways, including the wingless/int-1 (Wnt) signaling pathway, have been shown to be commonly activated in HCC. The Wnt signaling pathway can be triggered via both catenin β1 (CTNNB1)-dependent (also known as “canonical”) and CTNNB1-independent (often referred to as “non-canonical”) pathways. Specifically, the canonical Wnt pathway is one of those most frequently reported in HCC. Aberrant regulation from three complexes (the cell-surface receptor complex, the cytoplasmic destruction complex and the nuclear CTNNB1/T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor transcriptional complex) are all involved in HCC. Although the non-canonical Wnt pathway is rarely reported, two main non-canonical pathways, Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway and Wnt/Ca2+ pathway, participate in the regulation of hepatocarcinogenesis. Interestingly, the canonical Wnt pathway is antagonized by non-canonical Wnt signaling in HCC. Moreover, other signaling cascades have also been demonstrated to regulate the Wnt pathway through crosstalk in HCC pathogenesis. This review provides a perspective on the emerging evidence that the aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a critical mechanism for the development of HCC. Furthermore, crosstalk between different signaling pathways might be conducive to the development of novel molecular targets of HCC. PMID:27672271

  8. Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Juan; Xie, Shui-Xiang; Chen, Ya-Tang; Xue, Jing-Ling; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhu, Fan

    2016-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal malignancies in the world. Several signaling pathways, including the wingless/int-1 (Wnt) signaling pathway, have been shown to be commonly activated in HCC. The Wnt signaling pathway can be triggered via both catenin β1 (CTNNB1)-dependent (also known as "canonical") and CTNNB1-independent (often referred to as "non-canonical") pathways. Specifically, the canonical Wnt pathway is one of those most frequently reported in HCC. Aberrant regulation from three complexes (the cell-surface receptor complex, the cytoplasmic destruction complex and the nuclear CTNNB1/T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor transcriptional complex) are all involved in HCC. Although the non-canonical Wnt pathway is rarely reported, two main non-canonical pathways, Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway and Wnt/Ca(2+) pathway, participate in the regulation of hepatocarcinogenesis. Interestingly, the canonical Wnt pathway is antagonized by non-canonical Wnt signaling in HCC. Moreover, other signaling cascades have also been demonstrated to regulate the Wnt pathway through crosstalk in HCC pathogenesis. This review provides a perspective on the emerging evidence that the aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a critical mechanism for the development of HCC. Furthermore, crosstalk between different signaling pathways might be conducive to the development of novel molecular targets of HCC. PMID:27672271

  9. Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Juan; Xie, Shui-Xiang; Chen, Ya-Tang; Xue, Jing-Ling; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal malignancies in the world. Several signaling pathways, including the wingless/int-1 (Wnt) signaling pathway, have been shown to be commonly activated in HCC. The Wnt signaling pathway can be triggered via both catenin β1 (CTNNB1)-dependent (also known as “canonical”) and CTNNB1-independent (often referred to as “non-canonical”) pathways. Specifically, the canonical Wnt pathway is one of those most frequently reported in HCC. Aberrant regulation from three complexes (the cell-surface receptor complex, the cytoplasmic destruction complex and the nuclear CTNNB1/T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor transcriptional complex) are all involved in HCC. Although the non-canonical Wnt pathway is rarely reported, two main non-canonical pathways, Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway and Wnt/Ca2+ pathway, participate in the regulation of hepatocarcinogenesis. Interestingly, the canonical Wnt pathway is antagonized by non-canonical Wnt signaling in HCC. Moreover, other signaling cascades have also been demonstrated to regulate the Wnt pathway through crosstalk in HCC pathogenesis. This review provides a perspective on the emerging evidence that the aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a critical mechanism for the development of HCC. Furthermore, crosstalk between different signaling pathways might be conducive to the development of novel molecular targets of HCC.

  10. Epigenetic regulation of bud dormancy events in perennial plants

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Gabino; Leida, Carmen; Conejero, Ana; Badenes, María Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Release of bud dormancy in perennial plants resembles vernalization in Arabidopsis thaliana and cereals. In both cases, a certain period of chilling is required for accomplishing the reproductive phase, and several transcription factors with the MADS-box domain perform a central regulatory role in these processes. The expression of DORMANCY-ASSOCIATED MADS-box (DAM)-related genes has been found to be up-regulated in dormant buds of numerous plant species, such as poplar, raspberry, leafy spurge, blackcurrant, Japanese apricot, and peach. Moreover, functional evidence suggests the involvement of DAM genes in the regulation of seasonal dormancy in peach. Recent findings highlight the presence of genome-wide epigenetic modifications related to dormancy events, and more specifically the epigenetic regulation of DAM-related genes in a similar way to FLOWERING LOCUS C, a key integrator of vernalization effectors on flowering initiation in Arabidopsis. We revise the most relevant molecular and genomic contributions in the field of bud dormancy, and discuss the increasing evidence for chromatin modification involvement in the epigenetic regulation of seasonal dormancy cycles in perennial plants. PMID:24917873

  11. Altered expression of MGMT in high-grade gliomas results from the combined effect of epigenetic and genetic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Ramalho-Carvalho, João; Pires, Malini; Lisboa, Susana; Graça, Inês; Rocha, Patrícia; Barros-Silva, João Diogo; Savva-Bordalo, Joana; Maurício, Joaquina; Resende, Mário; Teixeira, Manuel R; Honavar, Mrinalini; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    MGMT downregulation in high-grade gliomas (HGG) has been mostly attributed to aberrant promoter methylation and is associated with increased sensitivity to alkylating agent-based chemotherapy. However, HGG harboring 10q deletions also benefit from treatment with alkylating agents. Because the MGMT gene is mapped at 10q26, we hypothesized that both epigenetic and genetic alterations might affect its expression and predict response to chemotherapy. To test this hypothesis, promoter methylation and mRNA levels of MGMT were determined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) or methylation-specific multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively, in a retrospective series of 61 HGG. MGMT/chromosome 10 copy number variations were determined by FISH or MS-MLPA analysis. Molecular findings were correlated with clinical parameters to assess their predictive value. Overall, MGMT methylation ratios assessed by qMSP and MS-MLPA were inversely correlated with mRNA expression levels (best coefficient value obtained with MS-MLPA). By FISH analysis in 68.3% of the cases there was loss of 10q26.1 and in 15% of the cases polysomy was demonstrated; the latter displayed the highest levels of transcript. When genetic and epigenetic data were combined, cases with MGMT promoter methylation and MGMT loss depicted the lowest transcript levels, although an impact in response to alkylating agent chemotherapy was not apparent. Cooperation between epigenetic (promoter methylation) and genetic (monosomy, locus deletion) changes affecting MGMT in HGG is required for effective MGMT silencing. Hence, evaluation of copy number alterations might add relevant prognostic and predictive information concerning response to alkylating agent-based chemotherapy.

  12. Epigenetic and metabolic regulation of breast cancer stem cells*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui-xin; Li, Xiao-li; Dong, Chen-fang

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer has a relatively high mortality rate in women due to recurrence and metastasis. Increasing evidence has identified a rare population of cells with stem cell-like properties in breast cancer. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the capacity for self-renewal and differentiation, contribute significantly to tumor progression, recurrence, drug resistance and metastasis. Clarifying the mechanisms regulating breast CSCs has important implications for our understanding of breast cancer progression and therapeutics. A strong connection has been found between breast CSCs and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, recent studies suggest that the maintenance of the breast CSC phenotype is associated with epigenetic and metabolic regulation. In this review, we focus on recent discoveries about the connection between EMT and CSC, and advances made in understanding the roles and mechanisms of epigenetic and metabolic reprogramming in controlling breast CSC properties. PMID:25559951

  13. Epigenetic Regulation of Enteric Neurotransmission by Gut Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Savidge, Tor C

    2015-01-01

    The Human Microbiome Project defined microbial community interactions with the human host, and provided important molecular insight into how epigenetic factors can influence intestinal ecosystems. Given physiological context, changes in gut microbial community structure are increasingly found to associate with alterations in enteric neurotransmission and disease. At present, it is not known whether shifts in microbial community dynamics represent cause or consequence of disease pathogenesis. The discovery of bacterial-derived neurotransmitters suggests further studies are needed to establish their role in enteric neuropathy. This mini-review highlights recent advances in bacterial communications to the autonomic nervous system and discusses emerging epigenetic data showing that diet, probiotic and antibiotic use may regulate enteric neurotransmission through modulation of microbial communities. A particular emphasis is placed on bacterial metabolite regulation of enteric nervous system function in the intestine. PMID:26778967

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of Enteric Neurotransmission by Gut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    The Human Microbiome Project defined microbial community interactions with the human host, and provided important molecular insight into how epigenetic factors can influence intestinal ecosystems. Given physiological context, changes in gut microbial community structure are increasingly found to associate with alterations in enteric neurotransmission and disease. At present, it is not known whether shifts in microbial community dynamics represent cause or consequence of disease pathogenesis. The discovery of bacterial-derived neurotransmitters suggests further studies are needed to establish their role in enteric neuropathy. This mini-review highlights recent advances in bacterial communications to the autonomic nervous system and discusses emerging epigenetic data showing that diet, probiotic and antibiotic use may regulate enteric neurotransmission through modulation of microbial communities. A particular emphasis is placed on bacterial metabolite regulation of enteric nervous system function in the intestine. PMID:26778967

  15. Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Remodeling and Its Impacts in Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghayor, Chafik; Weber, Franz E.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics describes mechanisms which control gene expression and cellular processes without changing the DNA sequence. The main mechanisms in epigenetics are DNA methylation in CpG-rich promoters, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). DNA methylation modifies the function of the DNA and correlates with gene silencing. Histone modifications including acetylation/deacetylation and phosphorylation act in diverse biological processes such as transcriptional activation/inactivation and DNA repair. Non-coding RNAs play a large part in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in addition to their roles at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Osteoporosis is the most common skeletal disorder, characterized by compromised bone strength and bone micro-architectural deterioration that predisposes the bones to an increased risk of fracture. It is most often caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not sufficiently compensated by a corresponding increase in bone formation. Nowadays it is well accepted that osteoporosis is a multifactorial disorder and there are genetic risk factors for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Here we review emerging evidence that epigenetics contributes to the machinery that can alter DNA structure, gene expression, and cellular differentiation during physiological and pathological bone remodeling. PMID:27598138

  16. Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Remodeling and Its Impacts in Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ghayor, Chafik; Weber, Franz E

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics describes mechanisms which control gene expression and cellular processes without changing the DNA sequence. The main mechanisms in epigenetics are DNA methylation in CpG-rich promoters, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). DNA methylation modifies the function of the DNA and correlates with gene silencing. Histone modifications including acetylation/deacetylation and phosphorylation act in diverse biological processes such as transcriptional activation/inactivation and DNA repair. Non-coding RNAs play a large part in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in addition to their roles at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Osteoporosis is the most common skeletal disorder, characterized by compromised bone strength and bone micro-architectural deterioration that predisposes the bones to an increased risk of fracture. It is most often caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not sufficiently compensated by a corresponding increase in bone formation. Nowadays it is well accepted that osteoporosis is a multifactorial disorder and there are genetic risk factors for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Here we review emerging evidence that epigenetics contributes to the machinery that can alter DNA structure, gene expression, and cellular differentiation during physiological and pathological bone remodeling. PMID:27598138

  17. Regulation of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Subunit through Epigenetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kayla A.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome-shortening is characteristic of normal cells, and is known as the end replication problem. Telomerase is the enzyme responsible for extending the ends of the chromosomes in de novo synthesis, and occurs in germ cells as well as most malignant cancers. There are three subunits of telomerase: human telomerase RNA (hTERC), human telomerase associated protein (hTEP1), or dyskerin, and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). hTERC and hTEP1 are constitutively expressed, so the enzymatic activity of telomerase is dependent on the transcription of hTERT. DNA methylation, histone methylation, and histone acetylation are basic epigenetic regulations involved in the expression of hTERT. Non-coding RNA can also serve as a form of epigenetic control of hTERT. This epigenetic-based regulation of hTERT is important in providing a mechanism for reversibility of hTERT control in various biological states. These include embryonic down-regulation of hTERT contributing to aging and the upregulation of hTERT playing a critical role in over 90% of cancers. Normal human somatic cells have a non-methylated/hypomethylated CpG island within the hTERT promoter region, while telomerase-positive cells paradoxically have at least a partially methylated promoter region that is opposite to the normal roles of DNA methylation. Histone acetylation of H3K9 within the promoter region is associated with an open chromatin state such that transcription machinery has the space to form. Histone methylation of hTERT has varied control of the gene, however. Mono- and dimethylation of H3K9 within the promoter region indicate silent euchromatin, while a trimethylated H3K9 enhances gene transcription. Non-coding RNAs can target epigenetic-modifying enzymes, as well as transcription factors involved in the control of hTERT. An epigenetics diet that can affect the epigenome of cancer cells is a recent fascination that has received much attention. By combining portions of this diet with

  18. Epigenetics: Principles and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as heritable changes in gene expression that are, unlike mutations, not attributable to alterations in the sequence of DNA. The predominant epigenetic mechanisms are DNA methylation, modifications to chromatin, loss of imprinting and non-coding RNA. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression appears to have long-term effects and wide-ranging effects on health. Diet and environmental exposures may potentially alter the level and scope of epigenetic regulation, thus interesting developments in the study of epigenetics might explain correlations that researchers have found between lifestyle and risk of disease. Aberrant epigenetic patterns have been linked to a number of digestive diseases including Barrett's esophagus, cirrhosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and numerous gastrointestinal malignancies. In fact, many exciting discoveries about epigenetics in general have been made by studying diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and hepatobiliary tree. Epigenetic modifications of DNA in cancer and precancerous lesions offer hope and the promise of novel biomarkers for early cancer detection, prediction, prognosis, and response to treatment. Furthermore, reversal of epigenetic changes represents a potential target of novel therapeutic strategies and medication design. In the future, it is anticipated that innovative diagnostic tests, treatment regimens, and even lifestyle modifications will be based on epigenetic mechanisms and be incorporated into the practice of medicine. PMID:21734376

  19. RNA-directed epigenetic regulation of DNA rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-09-20

    Ciliated protozoa undergo extensive DNA rearrangements, including DNA elimination, chromosome breakage and DNA unscrambling, when the germline micronucleus produces the new macronucleus during sexual reproduction. It has long been known that many of these events are epigenetically controlled by DNA sequences of the parental macronuclear genome. Recent studies in some model ciliates have revealed that these epigenetic regulations are mediated by non-coding RNAs. DNA elimination in Paramecium and Tetrahymena is regulated by small RNAs that are produced and operated by an RNAi (RNA interference)-related mechanism. It has been proposed that the small RNAs from the micronuclear genome can be used to identify eliminated DNAs by whole-genome comparison of the parental macronucleus and the micronucleus. In contrast, DNA unscrambling in Oxytricha is guided by long non-coding RNAs that are produced from the somatic parental macronuclear genome. These RNAs are proposed to act as templates for the direct unscrambling events that occur in the developing macronucleus. The possible evolutionary benefits of these RNA-directed epigenetic regulations of DNA rearrangement in ciliates are discussed in the present chapter. PMID:20822488

  20. Epigenetic regulation of HIV, AIDS, and AIDS-related malignancies.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Although epigenetics is not a new field, its implications for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) research have not been explored fully. To develop therapeutic and preventive approaches against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and AIDS, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of interaction between the virus and the host, involvement of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, characterization of viral reservoirs, and factors influencing the latency of the virus. Both methylation of viral genes and histone modifications contribute to initiating and maintaining latency and, depending on the context, triggering viral gene repression or expression. This chapter discusses progress made at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), recommendations from the International AIDS Society Scientific Working Group on HIV Cure, and underlying epigenetic regulation. A number of epigenetic inhibitors have shown potential in treating AIDS-related malignancies. Epigenetic drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and their implications for the eradication of HIV/AIDS and AIDS-related malignancies also are discussed.Past and current progress in developing treatments and understanding the molecular mechanisms of AIDS and HIV infection has greatly improved patient survival. However, increased survival has been coupled with the development of cancer at higher rates than those observed among the HIV/AIDS-negative population. During the early days of the AIDS epidemic, the most frequent AIDS-defining malignancies were Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Now, with increased survival as the result of widespread use in the developed world of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), non-AIDS defining cancers (i.e., anal, skin, and lung cancers, and Hodgkin disease) are on the increase in HIV-infected populations. The current status of AIDS-related malignancies also is discussed.

  1. Concise Review: Epigenetic Regulation of Myogenesis in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Brun, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is initiated by satellite cells, a population of adult stem cells that reside in the muscle tissue. The ability of satellite cells to self-renew and to differentiate into the muscle lineage is under transcriptional and epigenetic control. Satellite cells are characterized by an open and permissive chromatin state. The transcription factor Pax7 is necessary for satellite cell function. Pax7 is a nodal factor regulating the expression of genes associated with satellite cell growth and proliferation, while preventing differentiation. Pax7 recruits chromatin modifiers to DNA to induce expression of specific target genes involved in myogenic commitment following asymmetric division of muscle stem cells. Emerging evidence suggests that replacement of canonical histones with histone variants is an important regulatory mechanism controlling the ability of satellite cells and myoblasts to differentiate. Differentiation into the muscle lineage is associated with a global gene repression characterized by a decrease in histone acetylation with an increase in repressive histone marks. However, genes important for differentiation are upregulated by the specific action of histone acetyltransferases and other chromatin modifiers, in combination with several transcription factors, including MyoD and Mef2. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors enhances muscle regeneration and is considered as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of muscular dystrophy. This review describes the recent findings on epigenetic regulation in satellite stem cells and committed myoblasts. The potential of epigenetic drugs, such as HDAC inhibitors, as well as their molecular mechanism of action in muscle cells, will be addressed. Significance This review summarizes recent findings concerning the epigenetic regulation of satellite cells in skeletal muscle. PMID:26798058

  2. Epigenetic regulation of cardiac myofibril gene expression during heart development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weian; Liu, Lingjuan; Pan, Bo; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Jing; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Tian, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac gene expression regulation is controlled not only by genetic factors but also by environmental, i.e., epigenetic factors. Several environmental toxic effects such as oxidative stress and ischemia can result in abnormal myofibril gene expression during heart development. Troponin, one of the regulatory myofibril proteins in the heart, is a well-known model in study of cardiac gene regulation during the development. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated that fetal form troponin I (ssTnI) expression in the heart is partially regulated by hormones, such as thyroid hormone. In the present study, we have explored the epigenetic role of histone modification in the regulation of ssTnI expression. Mouse hearts were collected at different time of heart development, i.e., embryonic day 15.5, postnatal day 1, day 7, day 14 and day 21. Levels of histone H3 acetylation (acH3) and histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me(3)) were detected using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in slow upstream regulatory element (SURE) domain (TnI slow upstream regulatory element), 300-bp proximal upstream domain and the first intron of ssTnI gene, which are recognized as critical regions for ssTnI regulation. We found that the levels of acH3 on the SURE region were gradually decreased, corresponding to a similar decrease of ssTnI expression in the heart, whereas the levels of H3K9me(3) in the first intron of ssTnI gene were gradually increased. Our results indicate that both histone acetylation and methylation are involved in the epigenetic regulation of ssTnI expression in the heart during the development, which are the targets for environmental factors.

  3. Epigenetic regulation of LSD1 during mammary carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yadi; Zhou, Binhua P

    2014-01-01

    Inheritable epigenetic regulation is integral to the dynamic control of gene expression under different stimuli for cellular homeostasis and disease progression. Histone methylation is a common and important type of chromatin modification. LSD1, the first known histone lysine-specific demethylase, operates as a key component of several corepressor complexes during development and in disease states. In this review, we focus on the regulation of LSD1 in mammary carcinogenesis. LSD1 plays a role in promoting mammary tumor metastasis and proliferation and in maintaining mammary cancer stem cells. Therefore, LSD1 represents a viable therapeutic target for effective treatment of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:27308339

  4. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Abhishek, Sinha; Palamadai Krishnan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems. PMID:27054112

  5. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Abhishek, Sinha; Palamadai Krishnan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems.

  6. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Sinha; Palamadai Krishnan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems. PMID:27054112

  7. Persistence of Furan-Induced Epigenetic Aberrations in the Livers of F344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Conti, Aline; Kobets, Tetyana; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Burnett, Sarah D.; Han, Tao; Fuscoe, James C.; Beland, Frederick A.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Pogribny, Igor P.

    2015-01-01

    Furan is a heterocyclic organic compound produced in the chemical manufacturing industry and also found in a broad range of food products, including infant formulas and baby foods. Previous reports have indicated that the adverse biological effects of furan, including its liver tumorigenicity, may be associated with epigenetic abnormalities. In the present study, we investigated the persistence of epigenetic alterations in rat liver. Male F344 rats were treated by gavage 5 days per week with 8 mg furan/kg body weight (bw)/day for 90 days. After the last treatment, rats were divided randomly into 4 groups; 1 group of rats was sacrificed 24 h after the last treatment, whereas other groups were maintained without further furan treatment for an additional 90, 180, or 360 days. Treatment with furan for 90 days resulted in alterations in histone lysine methylation and acetylation, induction of base-excision DNA repair genes, suggesting oxidative damage to DNA, and changes in the gene expression in the livers. A majority of these furan-induced molecular changes was transient and disappeared after the cessation of furan treatment. In contrast, histone H3 lysine 9 and H3 lysine 56 showed a sustained and time-depended decrease in acetylation, which was associated with formation of heterochromatin and altered gene expression. These results indicate that furan-induced adverse effects may be mechanistically related to sustained changes in histone lysine acetylation that compromise the ability of cells to maintain and control properly the expression of genetic information. PMID:25539665

  8. Regulation of connexin signaling by the epigenetic machinery

    PubMed Central

    Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Connexins and their channels are involved in the control of all aspects of the cellular life cycle, ranging from cell growth to cell death, by mediating extracellular, intercellular and intracellular communication. These multifaceted aspects of connexin-related cellular signaling obviously require strict regulation. While connexin channel activity is mainly directed by posttranslational modifications, connexin expression as such is managed by classical cis/trans mechanisms. Over the past few years, it has become clear that connexin production is equally dictated by epigenetic actions. This paper provides an overview of the role of major determinants of the epigenome, including DNA methylation, histone acetylation and microRNA species, in connexin expression. PMID:26566120

  9. Regulation of connexin signaling by the epigenetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Connexins and their channels are involved in the control of all aspects of the cellular life cycle, ranging from cell growth to cell death, by mediating extracellular, intercellular and intracellular communication. These multifaceted aspects of connexin-related cellular signaling obviously require strict regulation. While connexin channel activity is mainly directed by posttranslational modifications, connexin expression as such is managed by classical cis/trans mechanisms. Over the past few years, it has become clear that connexin production is equally dictated by epigenetic actions. This paper provides an overview of the role of major determinants of the epigenome, including DNA methylation, histone acetylation and microRNA species, in connexin expression. PMID:26566120

  10. Epigenetic regulation in chondrocyte phenotype maintenance for cell-based cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li; Liang, Yujie; Ma, Bin; Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping

    2015-01-01

    Loss of hyaline chondrocyte phenotype during the monolayer culture in vitro is a major obstacle for cell-based articular cartilage repair. Increasing evidence implicates an important role of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype. DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs have all been shown to contribute to chondrocyte dedifferentiation and hypertrophy. Moreover, the interplay among epigenetic regulators forms a complicated epigenetic network in regulating chondrocyte dedifferentiation. This review provides a detailed overview of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair. PMID:26807163

  11. Epigenetic regulation of the RHOX homeobox gene cluster and its association with human male infertility.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Marcy E; Bleiziffer, Andreas; Tüttelmann, Frank; Gromoll, Jörg; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2014-01-01

    The X-linked RHOX cluster encodes a set of homeobox genes that are selectively expressed in the reproductive tract. Members of the RHOX cluster regulate target genes important for spermatogenesis promote male fertility in mice. Studies show that demethylating agents strongly upregulate the expression of mouse Rhox genes, suggesting that they are regulated by DNA methylation. However, whether this extends to human RHOX genes, whether DNA methylation directly regulates RHOX gene transcription and how this relates to human male infertility are unknown. To address these issues, we first defined the promoter regions of human RHOX genes and performed gain- and loss-of-function experiments to determine whether human RHOX gene transcription is regulated by DNA methylation. Our results indicated that DNA methylation is necessary and sufficient to silence human RHOX gene expression. To determine whether RHOX cluster methylation associates with male infertility, we evaluated the methylation status of RHOX genes in sperm from a large cohort of infertility patients. Linear regression analysis revealed a strong association between RHOX gene cluster hypermethylation and three independent types of semen abnormalities. Hypermethylation was restricted specifically to the RHOX cluster; we did not observe it in genes immediately adjacent to it on the X chromosome. Our results strongly suggest that human RHOX homeobox genes are under an epigenetic control mechanism that is aberrantly regulated in infertility patients. We propose that hypermethylation of the RHOX gene cluster serves as a marker for idiopathic infertility and that it is a candidate to exert a causal role in male infertility.

  12. Genetic and epigenetic aberrations occurring in colorectal tumors associated with serrated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Eiji; Fukuyo, Masaki; Ohata, Ken; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Doi, Noriteru; Mano, Yasunobu; Takane, Kiyoko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Koichi; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Junichi; Fukayama, Masashi; Akagi, Kiwamu; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    To clarify molecular alterations in serrated pathway of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed epigenetic and genetic analyses in sessile serrated adenoma/polyps (SSA/P), traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) and high‐methylation CRC. The methylation levels of six Group‐1 and 14 Group‐2 markers, established in our previous studies, were analyzed quantitatively using pyrosequencing. Subsequently, we performed targeted exon sequencing analyses of 126 candidate driver genes and examined molecular alterations that are associated with cancer development. SSA/P showed high methylation levels of both Group‐1 and Group‐2 markers, frequent BRAF mutation and occurrence in proximal colon, which were features of high‐methylation CRC. But TSA showed low‐methylation levels of Group‐1 markers, less frequent BRAF mutation and occurrence at distal colon. SSA/P, but not TSA, is thus considered to be precursor of high‐methylation CRC. High‐methylation CRC had even higher methylation levels of some genes, e.g., MLH1, than SSA/P, and significant frequency of somatic mutations in nonsynonymous mutations (p < 0.0001) and insertion/deletions (p = 0.002). MLH1‐methylated SSA/P showed lower methylation level of MLH1 compared with high‐methylation CRC, and rarely accompanied silencing of MLH1 expression. The mutation frequencies were not different between MLH1‐methylated and MLH1‐unmethylated SSA/P, suggesting that MLH1 methylation might be insufficient in SSA/P to acquire a hypermutation phenotype. Mutations of mismatch repair genes, e.g., MSH3 and MSH6, and genes in PI3K, WNT, TGF‐β and BMP signaling (but not in TP53 signaling) were significantly involved in high‐methylation CRC compared with adenoma, suggesting importance of abrogation of these genes in serrated pathway. PMID:26510091

  13. Epigenetic suppression of neprilysin regulates breast cancer invasion

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, H M; Khoury, R J; Majmudar, P R; Blaylock, T; Hawkins, K; Salama, M S; Scott, M D; Cosminsky, B; Utreja, N K; Britt, J; Conway, R E

    2016-01-01

    In women, invasive breast cancer is the second most common cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death. Therefore, identifying novel regulators of breast cancer invasion could lead to additional biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Neprilysin, a cell-surface enzyme that cleaves and inactivates a number of substrates including endothelin-1 (ET1), has been implicated in breast cancer, but whether neprilysin promotes or inhibits breast cancer cell progression and metastasis is unclear. Here, we asked whether neprilysin expression predicts and functionally regulates breast cancer cell invasion. RT–PCR and flow cytometry analysis of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines revealed decreased neprilysin expression compared with normal epithelial cells. Expression was also suppressed in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) compared with normal tissue. In addition, in vtro invasion assays demonstrated that neprilysin overexpression decreased breast cancer cell invasion, whereas neprilysin suppression augmented invasion. Furthermore, inhibiting neprilysin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells increased ET1 levels significantly, whereas overexpressing neprilysin decreased extracellular-signal related kinase (ERK) activation, indicating that neprilysin negatively regulates ET1-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. To determine whether neprilysin was epigenetically suppressed in breast cancer, we performed bisulfite conversion analysis of breast cancer cells and clinical tumor samples. We found that the neprilysin promoter was hypermethylated in breast cancer; chemical reversal of methylation in MDA-MB-231 cells reactivated neprilysin expression and inhibited cancer cell invasion. Analysis of cancer databases revealed that neprilysin methylation significantly associates with survival in stage I IDC and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer subtypes. These results demonstrate that neprilysin negatively regulates the ET axis in breast cancer

  14. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Andlauer, Till F M; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis.

  15. Epigenetic silencing of microRNA-373 plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Arai, Makoto; Wu, Shuang; Kanda, Tatsuo; Miyauchi, Hideaki; Imazeki, Fumio; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    microRNAs (miRNA) are non-coding RNAs that negatively control gene expression by cleaving or inhibiting the translation of target gene mRNAs. We used a microarray-based transcriptomic analysis to identify miRNA expression levels that changed in response to epigenetic factors. Specifically, we searched for increased expression of miRNAs prepared from colon cancer cell line DLD-1 after a 96-h treatment with 5 µM of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC). Among those identified, transient transfection of miRNA hsa-miR-373 resulted in cytostasis. In addition, bisulfate sequence analysis of the promoter regions of these miRNAs showed aberrant methylation in the cancer cells. In clinical colon samples, hsa-miR-373 was down-regulated in colon cancers (29/40, 72.5%) relative to control samples, whereas the purported oncogene RAB22A (a target gene of hsa-miR-373) was up-regulated (24/40, 60%). Using methylation-specific PCR, we also observed aberrant methylation of hsa-miR-373 in colon cancers (35/40, 87.5%) relative to controls (8/40, 20%). Based on these results, we conclude that expression of hsa-miR-373 is down-regulated by aberrant methylation in colon cancer and that this miRNA may function by regulating expression of the oncogene RAB22A.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of repetitive elements is attenuated by prolonged heat stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pecinka, Ales; Dinh, Huy Q; Baubec, Tuncay; Rosa, Marisa; Lettner, Nicole; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2010-09-01

    Epigenetic factors determine responses to internal and external stimuli in eukaryotic organisms. Whether and how environmental conditions feed back to the epigenetic landscape is more a matter of suggestion than of substantiation. Plants are suitable organisms with which to address this question due to their sessile lifestyle and diversification of epigenetic regulators. We show that several repetitive elements of Arabidopsis thaliana that are under epigenetic regulation by transcriptional gene silencing at ambient temperatures and upon short term heat exposure become activated by prolonged heat stress. Activation can occur without loss of DNA methylation and with only minor changes to histone modifications but is accompanied by loss of nucleosomes and by heterochromatin decondensation. Whereas decondensation persists, nucleosome loading and transcriptional silencing are restored upon recovery from heat stress but are delayed in mutants with impaired chromatin assembly functions. The results provide evidence that environmental conditions can override epigenetic regulation, at least transiently, which might open a window for more permanent epigenetic changes. PMID:20876829

  17. DNA Methylation and Potential for Epigenetic Regulation in Pygospio elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kesäniemi, Jenni E.; Heikkinen, Liisa; Knott, K. Emily

    2016-01-01

    Transitions in developmental mode are common evolutionarily, but how and why they occur is not understood. Developmental mode describes larval phenotypes, including morphology, ecology and behavior of larvae, which typically are generalized across different species. The polychaete worm Pygospio elegans is one of few species polymorphic in developmental mode, with multiple larval phenotypes, providing a possibility to examine the potential mechanisms allowing transitions in developmental mode. We investigated the presence of DNA methylation in P. elegans, and, since maternal provisioning is a key factor determining eventual larval phenotype, we compared patterns of DNA methylation in females during oogenesis in this species. We demonstrate that intragenic CpG site DNA methylation and many relevant genes necessary for DNA methylation occur in P. elegans. Methylation-sensitive AFLP analysis showed that gravid females with offspring differing in larval developmental mode have significantly different methylation profiles and that the females with benthic larvae and non-reproductive females from the same location also differ in their epigenetic profiles. Analysis of CpG sites in transcriptome data supported our findings of DNA methylation in this species and showed that CpG observed/expected ratios differ among females gravid with embryos destined to different developmental modes. The differences in CpG site DNA methylation patterns seen among the samples suggest a potential for epigenetic regulation of gene expression (through DNA methylation) in this species. PMID:27008314

  18. DNA Methylation and Potential for Epigenetic Regulation in Pygospio elegans.

    PubMed

    Kesäniemi, Jenni E; Heikkinen, Liisa; Knott, K Emily

    2016-01-01

    Transitions in developmental mode are common evolutionarily, but how and why they occur is not understood. Developmental mode describes larval phenotypes, including morphology, ecology and behavior of larvae, which typically are generalized across different species. The polychaete worm Pygospio elegans is one of few species polymorphic in developmental mode, with multiple larval phenotypes, providing a possibility to examine the potential mechanisms allowing transitions in developmental mode. We investigated the presence of DNA methylation in P. elegans, and, since maternal provisioning is a key factor determining eventual larval phenotype, we compared patterns of DNA methylation in females during oogenesis in this species. We demonstrate that intragenic CpG site DNA methylation and many relevant genes necessary for DNA methylation occur in P. elegans. Methylation-sensitive AFLP analysis showed that gravid females with offspring differing in larval developmental mode have significantly different methylation profiles and that the females with benthic larvae and non-reproductive females from the same location also differ in their epigenetic profiles. Analysis of CpG sites in transcriptome data supported our findings of DNA methylation in this species and showed that CpG observed/expected ratios differ among females gravid with embryos destined to different developmental modes. The differences in CpG site DNA methylation patterns seen among the samples suggest a potential for epigenetic regulation of gene expression (through DNA methylation) in this species. PMID:27008314

  19. The plasticizer BBP selectively inhibits epigenetic regulator sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Ali, Hamed I; Bedi, Yudhishtar Singh; Choudhury, Mahua

    2015-12-01

    The plasticizer benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) is a well-known endocrine disruptor. Widespread human exposure to phthalates has raised substantial public concern due to its detrimental health effects. However, molecular mechanisms of the phthalates effect require elucidation. In this study, we analyzed: 1) the binding interaction of several phthalates and persistent organic pollutants with epigenetic regulator sirtuins and 2) the effect of BBP on the sirtuins in HepG2 cells. AutoDock molecular docking analysis showed that BBP binds to Sirt1 and Sirt3 proteins similarly to the native ligands with shortest binding free energies (ΔGb) of -7.35 and -8.3 kcal/mol, respectively; and inhibition constants (Ki) of 4.07 μM and 0.82 μM, respectively. Furthermore, BBP was superimposed onto the co-crystallized ligands within the least root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of 0.96Å and 1.55Å for Sirt1 and Sirt3, respectively, and bound into the sites with a sufficient number of hydrogen bonds, implying the best fit compared to other sirtuins. In HepG2 cells, BBP significantly down-regulated Sirt1 and Sirt3 (p<0.05) gene expression at a concentration as low as 10nM; other sirtuins remained unaffected. Consistent with decreased gene expression, Sirt1 and Sirt3 protein levels were significantly decreased at 48 h (p<0.05). In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis regulators PGC-1α, NRF-1, and NRF-2, were decreased (p<0.05). SiRNA studies showed that BBP did not regulate PGC-1α via sirtuin and BBP requires sirtuin's presence to regulate NRF-1 or NRF-2. BBP significantly increased ROS production (p<0.05) and ROS may be chiefly regulated by NRF-1 and NRF-2 in HepG2 cells under Sirt1 and Sirt3 silenced condition. This is the first report to demonstrate that BBP selectively disrupts specific sirtuins in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, our study suggests that BBP can impair two vital epigenetic regulators and mitochondrial biogenesis regulators in liver cells. PMID:26520405

  20. Epigenetic regulation during fetal femur development: DNA methylation matters.

    PubMed

    de Andrés, María C; Kingham, Emmajayne; Imagawa, Kei; Gonzalez, Antonio; Roach, Helmtrud I; Wilson, David I; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are heritable changes in gene expression without changes in DNA sequence. DNA methylation has been implicated in the control of several cellular processes including differentiation, gene regulation, development, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. Methylated cytosine residues at CpG dinucleotides are commonly associated with gene repression; conversely, strategic loss of methylation during development could lead to activation of lineage-specific genes. Evidence is emerging that bone development and growth are programmed; although, interestingly, bone is constantly remodelled throughout life. Using human embryonic stem cells, human fetal bone cells (HFBCs), adult chondrocytes and STRO-1(+) marrow stromal cells from human bone marrow, we have examined a spectrum of developmental stages of femur development and the role of DNA methylation therein. Using pyrosequencing methodology we analysed the status of methylation of genes implicated in bone biology; furthermore, we correlated these methylation levels with gene expression levels using qRT-PCR and protein distribution during fetal development evaluated using immunohistochemistry. We found that during fetal femur development DNA methylation inversely correlates with expression of genes including iNOS (NOS2) and COL9A1, but not catabolic genes including MMP13 and IL1B. Furthermore, significant demethylation was evident in the osteocalcin promoter between the fetal and adult developmental stages. Increased TET1 expression and decreased expression of DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) in adult chondrocytes compared to HFBCs could contribute to the loss of methylation observed during fetal development. HFBC multipotency confirms these cells to be an ideal developmental system for investigation of DNA methylation regulation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the role of epigenetic regulation, specifically DNA methylation, in bone development, informing and opening

  1. MicroRNAs and DNA methylation as epigenetic regulators of mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chencheng; Liu, Yun; Sun, Min; Niu, Minghui; Yuan, Qingqing; Hai, Yanan; Guo, Ying; Chen, Zheng; Hou, Jingmei; Liu, Yang; He, Zuping

    2015-07-01

    Spermatogenesis is composed of three distinctive phases, which include self-renewal of spermatogonia via mitosis, spermatocytes undergoing meiosis I/II and post-meiotic development of haploid spermatids via spermiogenesis. Spermatogenesis also involves condensation of chromatin in the spermatid head before transformation of spermatids to spermatozoa. Epigenetic regulation refers to changes of heritably cellular and physiological traits not caused by modifications in the DNA sequences of the chromatin such as mutations. Major advances have been made in the epigenetic regulation of spermatogenesis. In this review, we address the roles and mechanisms of epigenetic regulators, with a focus on the role of microRNAs and DNA methylation during mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. We also highlight issues that deserve attention for further investigation on the epigenetic regulation of spermatogenesis. More importantly, a thorough understanding of the epigenetic regulation in spermatogenesis will provide insightful information into the etiology of some unexplained infertility, offering new approaches for the treatment of male infertility.

  2. [Epigenetics of plant vernalization regulated by non-coding RNAs].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Feng; Li, Xiao-Rong; Sun, Chuan-Bao; He, Yu-Ke

    2012-07-01

    Many higher plants must experience a period of winter cold to accomplish the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. This biological process is called vernalization. Some crops such as wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) produce seeds as edible organs, and therefore special measures of rotation and cultivation are necessary for plants to go through an early vernalization for flower differentiation and development, whereas the other crops such as Chinese cabbage (B rapa ssp. pekinenesis) and cabbage (Brassica napus L.) produce leafy heads as edible organs, and additional practice should be taken to avoid vernalization for a prolonged and fully vegetative growth. Before vernalization, flowering is repressed by the action of a gene called Flowering Locus C (FLC). This paper reviewed the function of non-coding RNAs and some proteins including VRN1, VRN2, and VIN3 in epigenetic regulation of FLC during vernalization.

  3. Dynamic Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation of Human Epidermal Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Alessia; Miccio, Annarita; Romano, Oriana; Petiti, Luca; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Bicciato, Silvio; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human skin is maintained by the differentiation and maturation of interfollicular stem and progenitors cells. We used DeepCAGE, genome-wide profiling of histone modifications and retroviral integration analysis, to map transcripts, promoters, enhancers, and super-enhancers (SEs) in prospectively isolated keratinocytes and transit-amplifying progenitors, and retrospectively defined keratinocyte stem cells. We show that >95% of the active promoters are in common and differentially regulated in progenitors and differentiated keratinocytes, while approximately half of the enhancers and SEs are stage specific and account for most of the epigenetic changes occurring during differentiation. Transcription factor (TF) motif identification and correlation with TF binding site maps allowed the identification of TF circuitries acting on enhancers and SEs during differentiation. Overall, our study provides a broad, genome-wide description of chromatin dynamics and differential enhancer and promoter usage during epithelial differentiation, and describes a novel approach to identify active regulatory elements in rare stem cell populations. PMID:27050947

  4. Transcriptional profiling of the epigenetic regulator Smchd1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Chen, Kelan; Jansz, Natasha; Blewitt, Marnie E.; Ritchie, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    Smchd1 is an epigenetic repressor with important functions in healthy cellular processes and disease. To elucidate its role in transcriptional regulation, we performed two independent genome-wide RNA-sequencing studies comparing wild-type and Smchd1 null samples in neural stem cells and lymphoma cell lines. Using an R-based analysis pipeline that accommodates observational and sample-specific weights in the linear modeling, we identify key genes dysregulated by Smchd1 deletion such as clustered protocadherins in the neural stem cells and imprinted genes in both experiments. Here we provide a detailed description of this analysis, from quality control to read mapping and differential expression analysis. These data sets are publicly available from the Gene Expression Omnibus database (accession numbers GSE64099 and GSE65747). PMID:26981392

  5. Epigenetic regulation of human adipose-derived stem cells differentiation.

    PubMed

    Daniunaite, Kristina; Serenaite, Inga; Misgirdaite, Roberta; Gordevicius, Juozas; Unguryte, Ausra; Fleury-Cappellesso, Sandrine; Bernotiene, Eiva; Jarmalaite, Sonata

    2015-12-01

    Adult stem cells have more restricted differentiation potential than embryonic stem cells (ESCs), but upon appropriate stimulation can differentiate into cells of different germ layers. Epigenetic factors, including DNA modifications, take a significant part in regulation of pluripotency and differentiation of ESCs. Less is known about the epigenetic regulation of these processes in adult stem cells. Gene expression profile and location of DNA modifications in adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and their osteogenically differentiated lineages were analyzed using Agilent microarrays. Methylation-specific PCR and restriction-based quantitative PCR were applied for 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) detection in selected loci. The level of DNA modifications in the POU5F1 locus was quantified with deep sequencing. Expression levels of selected genes were assayed by real-time PCR. ADSCs differentiation into osteogenic lineages involved marked changes in both 5mC and 5hmC profiles, but 5hmC changes were more abundant. 5mC losses and 5hmC gains were the main events observed during ADSCs differentiation, and were accompanied by increased expression of TET1 (P = 0.009). In ADSCs, POU5F1 was better expressed than NANOG or SOX2 (P ≤ 0.001). Both 5mC and 5hmC marks were present in the POU5F1 locus, but only hydroxymethylation of specific cytosine showed significant effect on the gene expression. In summary, the data of our study suggest significant involvement of changes in 5hmC profile during the differentiation of human adult stem cells.

  6. Epigenetic regulation of inflammatory gene expression in macrophages by selenium.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Vivek; Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Liao, Chang; Kaushal, Naveen; Carlson, Bradley A; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2015-02-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins by histone acetyltransferases plays a pivotal role in the expression of proinflammatory genes. Given the importance of dietary selenium in mitigating inflammation, we hypothesized that selenium supplementation may regulate inflammatory gene expression at the epigenetic level. The effect of selenium towards histone acetylation was examined in both in vitro and in vivo models of inflammation by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and immunoblotting. Our results indicated that selenium supplementation, as selenite, decreased acetylation of histone H4 at K12 and K16 in COX-2 and TNFα promoters, and of the p65 subunit of the redox sensitive transcription factor NFκB in primary and immortalized macrophages. On the other hand, selenomethionine had a much weaker effect. Selenite treatment of HIV-1-infected human monocytes also significantly decreased the acetylation of H4 at K12 and K16 on the HIV-1 promoter, supporting the down-regulation of proviral expression by selenium. A similar decrease in histone acetylation was also seen in the colonic extracts of mice treated with dextran sodium sulfate that correlated well with the levels of selenium in the diet. Bone-marrow-derived macrophages from Trsp(fl/fl)Cre(LysM) mice that lack expression of selenoproteins in macrophages confirmed the important role of selenoproteins in the inhibition of histone H4 acetylation. Our studies suggest that the ability of selenoproteins to skew the metabolism of arachidonic acid contributes, in part, to their ability to inhibit histone acetylation. In summary, our studies suggest a new role for selenoproteins in the epigenetic modulation of proinflammatory genes.

  7. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of autophagy in aging.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Louis R; Kumsta, Caroline; Sandri, Marco; Ballabio, Andrea; Hansen, Malene

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a major intracellular degradation process recognized as playing a central role in cell survival and longevity. This multistep process is extensively regulated at several levels, including post-translationally through the action of conserved longevity factors such as the nutrient sensor TOR. More recently, transcriptional regulation of autophagy genes has emerged as an important mechanism for ensuring the somatic maintenance and homeostasis necessary for a long life span. Autophagy is increased in many long-lived model organisms and contributes significantly to their longevity. In turn, conserved transcription factors, particularly the helix-loop-helix transcription factor TFEB and the forkhead transcription factor FOXO, control the expression of many autophagy-related genes and are important for life-span extension. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the contribution of these transcription factors to macroautophagy regulation in the context of aging. We also review current research on epigenetic changes, such as histone modification by the deacetylase SIRT1, that influence autophagy-related gene expression and additionally affect aging. Understanding the molecular regulation of macroautophagy in relation to aging may offer new avenues for the treatment of age-related diseases.

  8. Emerging roles of non-coding RNAs in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Xue, Yuanchao

    2016-03-01

    Recent deep sequencing surveys of mammalian genomes have unexpectedly revealed pervasive and complex transcription and identified tens of thousands of RNA transcripts that do not code for proteins. These non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) highlight the central role of RNA in gene regulation. ncRNAs are arbitrarily divided into two main groups: The first includes small RNAs, such as miRNAs, piRNAs, and endogenous siRNAs, that usually range from 20 to 30 nt, while the second group includes long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are typically more than 200 nt in length. These ncRNAs were initially thought to merely regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, but recent studies have indicated that ncRNAs, especially lncRNAs, are extensively associated with diverse chromatin remodeling complexes and target them to specific genomic loci to alter DNA methylation or histone status. These findings suggest an emerging theme of ncRNAs in epigenetic regulation. In this review, we discuss the wide spectrum of ncRNAs in the regulation of DNA methylation and chromatin state, as well as the key questions that needs to be investigated and acknowledging the elegant design of these intriguing macromolecules.

  9. Epigenetic silencing of the NR4A3 tumor suppressor, by aberrant JAK/STAT signaling, predicts prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chung-Min; Chang, Liang-Yu; Lin, Shu-Hui; Chou, Jian-Liang; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Zeng, Li-Han; Chuang, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Dittner, Claudia; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Jora M. J.; Huang, Yao-Ting; Ng, Enders K. W.; Cheng, Alfred S. L.; Wu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Jiayuh; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chan, Michael W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    While aberrant JAK/STAT signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer (GC), its effects on epigenetic alterations of its transcriptional targets remains unclear. In this study, by expression microarrays coupled with bioinformatic analyses, we identified a putative STAT3 target gene, NR4A3 that was downregulated in MKN28 GC daughter cells overexpressing a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant (S16), as compared to an empty vector control (C9). Bisulphite pyrosequencing and demethylation treatment showed that NR4A3 was epigenetically silenced by promoter DNA methylation in S16 and other GC cell lines including AGS cells, showing constitutive activation of STAT3. Subsequent experiments revealed that NR4A3 promoter binding by STAT3 might repress its transcription. Long-term depletion of STAT3 derepressed NR4A3 expression, by promoter demethylation, in AGS GC cells. NR4A3 re-expression in GC cell lines sensitized the cells to cisplatin, and inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, in an animal model. Clinically, GC patients with high NR4A3 methylation, or lower NR4A3 protein expression, had significantly shorter overall survival. Intriguingly, STAT3 activation significantly associated only with NR4A3 methylation in low-stage patient samples. Taken together, aberrant JAK/STAT3 signaling epigenetically silences a potential tumor suppressor, NR4A3, in gastric cancer, plausibly representing a reliable biomarker for gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:27528092

  10. Epigenetic silencing of the NR4A3 tumor suppressor, by aberrant JAK/STAT signaling, predicts prognosis in gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chung-Min; Chang, Liang-Yu; Lin, Shu-Hui; Chou, Jian-Liang; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Zeng, Li-Han; Chuang, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Dittner, Claudia; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Jora M. J.; Huang, Yao-Ting; Ng, Enders K. W.; Cheng, Alfred S. L.; Wu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Jiayuh; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chan, Michael W. Y.

    2016-08-01

    While aberrant JAK/STAT signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer (GC), its effects on epigenetic alterations of its transcriptional targets remains unclear. In this study, by expression microarrays coupled with bioinformatic analyses, we identified a putative STAT3 target gene, NR4A3 that was downregulated in MKN28 GC daughter cells overexpressing a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant (S16), as compared to an empty vector control (C9). Bisulphite pyrosequencing and demethylation treatment showed that NR4A3 was epigenetically silenced by promoter DNA methylation in S16 and other GC cell lines including AGS cells, showing constitutive activation of STAT3. Subsequent experiments revealed that NR4A3 promoter binding by STAT3 might repress its transcription. Long-term depletion of STAT3 derepressed NR4A3 expression, by promoter demethylation, in AGS GC cells. NR4A3 re-expression in GC cell lines sensitized the cells to cisplatin, and inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, in an animal model. Clinically, GC patients with high NR4A3 methylation, or lower NR4A3 protein expression, had significantly shorter overall survival. Intriguingly, STAT3 activation significantly associated only with NR4A3 methylation in low-stage patient samples. Taken together, aberrant JAK/STAT3 signaling epigenetically silences a potential tumor suppressor, NR4A3, in gastric cancer, plausibly representing a reliable biomarker for gastric cancer prognosis.

  11. Epigenetic silencing of the NR4A3 tumor suppressor, by aberrant JAK/STAT signaling, predicts prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chung-Min; Chang, Liang-Yu; Lin, Shu-Hui; Chou, Jian-Liang; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Zeng, Li-Han; Chuang, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Dittner, Claudia; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Jora M J; Huang, Yao-Ting; Ng, Enders K W; Cheng, Alfred S L; Wu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Jiayuh; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chan, Michael W Y

    2016-01-01

    While aberrant JAK/STAT signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer (GC), its effects on epigenetic alterations of its transcriptional targets remains unclear. In this study, by expression microarrays coupled with bioinformatic analyses, we identified a putative STAT3 target gene, NR4A3 that was downregulated in MKN28 GC daughter cells overexpressing a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant (S16), as compared to an empty vector control (C9). Bisulphite pyrosequencing and demethylation treatment showed that NR4A3 was epigenetically silenced by promoter DNA methylation in S16 and other GC cell lines including AGS cells, showing constitutive activation of STAT3. Subsequent experiments revealed that NR4A3 promoter binding by STAT3 might repress its transcription. Long-term depletion of STAT3 derepressed NR4A3 expression, by promoter demethylation, in AGS GC cells. NR4A3 re-expression in GC cell lines sensitized the cells to cisplatin, and inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, in an animal model. Clinically, GC patients with high NR4A3 methylation, or lower NR4A3 protein expression, had significantly shorter overall survival. Intriguingly, STAT3 activation significantly associated only with NR4A3 methylation in low-stage patient samples. Taken together, aberrant JAK/STAT3 signaling epigenetically silences a potential tumor suppressor, NR4A3, in gastric cancer, plausibly representing a reliable biomarker for gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:27528092

  12. Epigenetic Regulation: The Interface Between Prenatal and Early-Life Exposure and Asthma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    de Planell-Saguer, Mariangels; Lovinsky-Desir, Stephanie; Miller, Rachel L.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex disease with genetic and environmental influences and emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic regulation is also a major contributor. Here, we focus on the developing paradigm that epigenetic dysregulation in asthma and allergy may start as early as in utero following several environmental exposures. We summarize the pathways important to the allergic immune response that are epigenetically regulated, the key environmental exposures associated with epigenetic changes in asthma genes, and newly identified epigenetic bio-markers that have been linked to clinical asthma. We conclude with a brief discussion about the potential to apply newly developing technologies in epigenetics to the diagnosis and treatment of asthma and allergy. The inherent plasticity of epigenetic regulation following environmental exposures offers opportunities for prevention using environmental remediation, measuring novel biomarkers for early identification of those at risk, and applying advances in pharmaco-epigenetics to tailor medical therapies that maximize efficacy of treatment. ‘Precision Medicine’ in asthma and allergy is arriving. As the field advances this may involve an individually tailored approach to the prevention, early detection, and treatment of disease based on the knowledge of an individual’s epigenetic profile. PMID:24323745

  13. Clinical implications of epigenetic alterations in human thoracic malignancies: epigenetic alterations in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinjo, Keiko; Kondo, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Besides known genetic aberrations, epigenetic alterations have emerged as common hallmarks of many cancer types, including lung cancer. Epigenetics is a process involved in gene regulation, mediated via DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and functional noncoding RNAs, which influences the accessibility of the underlying DNA to transcriptional regulatory factors that activate or repress expression. Studies have shown that epigenetic dysregulation is associated with multiple steps during carcinogenesis. Since epigenetic therapy is now in clinical use in hematopoietic diseases and undergoing trials for lung cancer, a better understanding of epigenetic abnormalities is desired. Recent technologies for high-throughput genome-wide analyses for epigenetic modifications are promising and potent tools for understanding the global dysregulation of cancer epigenetics. In this chapter, studies of epigenetic abnormality and its clinical implication in lung cancers are discussed.

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of Inflammatory Gene Expression in Macrophages by Selenium

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vivek; Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Liao, Chang; Kaushal, Naveen; Carlson, Bradley A.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins by histone acetyltransferases plays a pivotal role in the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Given the importance of dietary selenium in mitigating inflammation, we hypothesized that selenium supplementation may regulate inflammatory gene expression at the epigenetic level. The effect of selenium towards histone acetylation was examined in both in vitro and in vivo models of inflammation by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and immunoblotting. Our results indicated that selenium supplementation, as selenite, decreased acetylation of histone H4 at K12 and K16 in COX-2 and TNF promoters, and of the p65 subunit of the redox sensitive transcription factor NFκB in primary and immortalized macrophages. On the other hand, selenomethionine had a much weaker effect. Selenite treatment of HIV-1 infected human monocytes also significantly decreased the acetylation of H4 at K12 and K16 on the HIV-1 promoter, supporting the downregulation of proviral expression by selenium. A similar decrease in histone acetylation was also seen in the colonic extracts of mice treated with dextran sodium sulfate that correlated well with the levels of selenium in the diet. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from Trspfl/flCreLysM mice that lack expression of selenoproteins in macrophages confirmed the important role of selenoproteins in the inhibition of histone H4 acetylation. Our studies suggest that the ability of selenoproteins to skew the metabolism of arachidonic acid to contribute, in part, to their ability to inhibit histone acetylation. In summary, our studies suggest a new role for selenoproteins in the epigenetic modulation of pro-inflammatory genes. PMID:25458528

  15. Epigenetic regulation in the inner ear and its potential roles in development, protection, and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Layman, Wanda S.; Zuo, Jian

    2014-01-01

    The burgeoning field of epigenetics is beginning to make a significant impact on our understanding of tissue development, maintenance, and function. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate the structure and activity of the genome in response to intracellular and environmental cues that direct cell-type specific gene networks. The inner ear is comprised of highly specialized cell types with identical genomes that originate from a single totipotent zygote. During inner ear development specific combinations of transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers must function in a coordinated manner to establish and maintain cellular identity. These epigenetic regulatory mechanisms contribute to the maintenance of distinct chromatin states and cell-type specific gene expression patterns. In this review, we highlight emerging paradigms for epigenetic modifications related to inner ear development, and how epigenetics may have a significant role in hearing loss, protection, and regeneration. PMID:25750614

  16. [Epigenetic Regulation by Androgen Receptor and Possible Function in Bone Metabolism].

    PubMed

    Imai, Yuuki

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic regulation underlying AR(Androgen receptor)mediated transcription is important component to understand pathophysiology of osteoporosis in men. In this commentary, it is reported recent findings related to epigenetic landscape governed by AR and its cofactors including lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), and possible implication for bone metabolism. PMID:27346313

  17. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Vrba, Lukas; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  18. Genome-wide methylome analyses reveal novel epigenetic regulation patterns in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Magaña, Alvaro Antonio Jerez; Rubin, Lewis P; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3'-UTRs and 5'-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3'-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25734057

  19. Genome-Wide Methylome Analyses Reveal Novel Epigenetic Regulation Patterns in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A.; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Jerez Magaña, Alvaro Antonio; Rubin, Lewis P.; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3′-UTRs and 5′-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3′-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25734057

  20. Genome-wide methylome analyses reveal novel epigenetic regulation patterns in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Magaña, Alvaro Antonio Jerez; Rubin, Lewis P; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3'-UTRs and 5'-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3'-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. Relationship of immunohistochemistry, copy number aberrations and epigenetic disorders with BRCAness pattern in hereditary and sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Murria Estal, Rosa; Palanca Suela, Sarai; de Juan Jiménez, Inmaculada; Alenda Gonzalez, Cristina; Egoavil Rojas, Cecilia; García-Casado, Zaida; López Guerrero, Jose Antonio; Juan Fita, María José; Sánchez Heras, Ana Beatriz; Segura Huerta, Ángel; Santaballa Bertrán, Ana; Chirivella González, Isabel; Llop García, Marta; Pérez Simó, Gema; Barragán González, Eva; Bolufer Gilabert, Pascual

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to identify the relevance of immunohistochemistry (IHC), copy number aberrations (CNA) and epigenetic disorders in BRCAness breast cancers (BCs). We studied 95 paraffin included BCs, of which 41 carried BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations and 54 were non hereditary (BRCAX/Sporadic). Samples were assessed for BRCA1ness and CNAs by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA); promoter methylation (PM) was assessed by methylation-specific-MLPA and the expression of miR-4417, miR-423-3p, miR-590-5p and miR-187-3p by quantitative RT-PCR. IHC markers Ki67, ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR and CK18 were detected with specific primary antibodies (DAKO, Denmark). BRCAness association with covariates was performed using multivariate binary logistic regression (stepwise backwards Wald option). BRCA1/2 mutational status (p = 0.027), large tumor size (p = 0.041) and advanced histological grade (p = 0.017) among clinic-pathological variables; ER (p < 0.001) among IHC markers; MYC (p < 0.001) among CNA; APC (p = 0.065), ATM (p = 0.014) and RASSF1 (p = 0.044) among PM; and miR-590-5p (p = 0.001), miR-4417 (p = 0.019) and miR-423 (p = 0.013) among microRNA expression, were the selected parameters significantly related with the BRCAness status. The logistic regression performed with all these parameters selected ER+ as linked with the lack of BRCAness (p = 0.001) and MYC CNA, APC PM and miR-590-5p expression with BRCAness (p = 0.014, 0.045 and 0.007, respectively). In conclusion, the parameters ER expression, APC PM, MYC CNA and miR-590-5p expression, allowed detection of most BRCAness BCs. The identification of BRCAness can help establish a personalized medicine addressed to predict the response to specific treatments.

  2. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Andlauer, Till F. M.; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A.; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G.; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H.; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K.; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O.; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M.; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M.; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis. PMID:27386562

  3. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Andlauer, Till F M; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis. PMID:27386562

  4. Epigenetic regulation of macrophage polarization by DNA methyltransferase 3b.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaosong; Wang, Xianfeng; Liu, Dongxu; Yu, Liqing; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang

    2014-04-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) undergo a phenotypic switch from alternatively activated antiinflammatory M2 macrophages in lean individuals to classically activated proinflammatory M1 macrophages in obese subjects. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study we aim to determine whether DNA methyltransferase 3b (DNMT3b) regulates macrophage polarization and inflammation. We found that the expression of DNMT3b was significantly induced in macrophages exposed to the saturated fatty acid stearate, was higher in ATMs isolated from obese mice, but was significantly lower in alternatively activated M2 vs classically activated M1 ATMs, suggesting a role for DNMT3b in regulation of macrophage polarization and inflammation in obesity. DNMT3b knockdown promoted macrophage polarization to alternatively activated M2 phenotype and suppressed macrophage inflammation, whereas overexpressing DNMT3b did the opposite. Importantly, in a macrophage-adipocyte coculture system, we found that DNMT3b knockdown significantly improved adipocyte insulin signaling. The promoter of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ1, a key transcriptional factor that regulates macrophage polarization, is enriched with CpG sites. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that DNMT3b bound to the methylation region at PPARγ1 promoter, which was further enhanced by stearate. Moreover, pyrosequencing analysis revealed that stearate increased DNA methylation at PPARγ1, which was prevented by DNMT3b deficiency. Therefore, our data demonstrate that DNMT3b plays an important role in regulating macrophage polarization through epigenetic mechanisms. In obesity, elevated saturated fatty acids enhance DNMT3b expression, leading to DNA methylation at the PPARγ1 promoter, which may contribute to deregulated adipose tissue macrophage polarization, inflammation, and insulin resistance.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of the RHOX homeobox gene cluster and its association with human male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Marcy E.; Bleiziffer, Andreas; Tüttelmann, Frank; Gromoll, Jörg; Wilkinson, Miles F.

    2014-01-01

    The X-linked RHOX cluster encodes a set of homeobox genes that are selectively expressed in the reproductive tract. Members of the RHOX cluster regulate target genes important for spermatogenesis promote male fertility in mice. Studies show that demethylating agents strongly upregulate the expression of mouse Rhox genes, suggesting that they are regulated by DNA methylation. However, whether this extends to human RHOX genes, whether DNA methylation directly regulates RHOX gene transcription and how this relates to human male infertility are unknown. To address these issues, we first defined the promoter regions of human RHOX genes and performed gain- and loss-of-function experiments to determine whether human RHOX gene transcription is regulated by DNA methylation. Our results indicated that DNA methylation is necessary and sufficient to silence human RHOX gene expression. To determine whether RHOX cluster methylation associates with male infertility, we evaluated the methylation status of RHOX genes in sperm from a large cohort of infertility patients. Linear regression analysis revealed a strong association between RHOX gene cluster hypermethylation and three independent types of semen abnormalities. Hypermethylation was restricted specifically to the RHOX cluster; we did not observe it in genes immediately adjacent to it on the X chromosome. Our results strongly suggest that human RHOX homeobox genes are under an epigenetic control mechanism that is aberrantly regulated in infertility patients. We propose that hypermethylation of the RHOX gene cluster serves as a marker for idiopathic infertility and that it is a candidate to exert a causal role in male infertility. PMID:23943794

  6. The omniscient placenta: Metabolic and epigenetic regulation of fetal programming

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Bridget M.; Bale, Tracy L.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal development could be considered a sensitive period wherein exogenous insults and changes to the maternal milieu can have long-term impacts on developmental programming. The placenta provides the fetus with protection and necessary nutrients for growth, and responds to maternal cues and changes in nutrient signaling through multiple epigenetic mechanisms. The X-linked enzyme O-linked-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) acts as a nutrient sensor that modifies numerous proteins to alter various cellular signals, including major epigenetic processes. This review describes epigenetic alterations in the placenta in response to insults during pregnancy, the potential links of OGT as a nutrient sensor to placental epigenetics, and the implications of placental epigenetics in long-term neurodevelopmental programming. We describe the role of placental OGT in the sex-specific programming of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis programming deficits by early prenatal stress as an example of how placental signaling can have long-term effects on neurodevelopment. PMID:26368654

  7. The omniscient placenta: Metabolic and epigenetic regulation of fetal programming.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Bridget M; Bale, Tracy L

    2015-10-01

    Fetal development could be considered a sensitive period wherein exogenous insults and changes to the maternal milieu can have long-term impacts on developmental programming. The placenta provides the fetus with protection and necessary nutrients for growth, and responds to maternal cues and changes in nutrient signaling through multiple epigenetic mechanisms. The X-linked enzyme O-linked-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) acts as a nutrient sensor that modifies numerous proteins to alter various cellular signals, including major epigenetic processes. This review describes epigenetic alterations in the placenta in response to insults during pregnancy, the potential links of OGT as a nutrient sensor to placental epigenetics, and the implications of placental epigenetics in long-term neurodevelopmental programming. We describe the role of placental OGT in the sex-specific programming of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis programming deficits by early prenatal stress as an example of how placental signaling can have long-term effects on neurodevelopment.

  8. Epigenetics in Cancer: A Hematological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Maximilian; Kim, Tae Kon; Zeidan, Amer M.; Prebet, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, we have known that epigenetic regulation is disrupted in cancer. Recently, an increasing body of data suggests epigenetics might be an intersection of current cancer research trends: next generation sequencing, immunology, metabolomics, and cell aging. The new emphasis on epigenetics is also related to the increasing production of drugs capable of interfering with epigenetic mechanisms and able to trigger clinical responses in even advanced phase patients. In this review, we will use myeloid malignancies as proof of concept examples of how epigenetic mechanisms can trigger or promote oncogenesis. We will also show how epigenetic mechanisms are related to genetic aberrations, and how they affect other systems, like immune response. Finally, we will show how we can try to influence the fate of cancer cells with epigenetic therapy. PMID:27723796

  9. Epigenetic Readers of Lysine Acetylation Regulate Cocaine-Induced Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Gregory C.; Powell, Samuel K.; Brothers, Shaun P.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic processes that regulate histone acetylation play an essential role in behavioral and molecular responses to cocaine. To date, however, only a small fraction of the mechanisms involved in the addiction-associated acetylome have been investigated. Members of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of epigenetic “reader” proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT) bind acetylated histones and serve as a scaffold for the recruitment of macromolecular complexes to modify chromatin accessibility and transcriptional activity. The role of BET proteins in cocaine-induced plasticity, however, remains elusive. Here, we used behavioral, pharmacological, and molecular techniques to examine the involvement of BET bromodomains in cocaine reward. Of the BET proteins, BRD4, but not BRD2 or BRD3, was significantly elevated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice and rats following repeated cocaine injections and self-administration. Systemic and intra-accumbal inhibition of BRD4 with the BET inhibitor, JQ1, attenuated the rewarding effects of cocaine in a conditioned place preference procedure but did not affect conditioned place aversion, nor did JQ1 alone induce conditioned aversion or preference. Investigating the underlying mechanisms, we found that repeated cocaine injections enhanced the binding of BRD4, but not BRD3, to the promoter region of Bdnf in the NAc, whereas systemic injection of JQ1 attenuated cocaine-induced expression of Bdnf in the NAc. JQ1 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of BRD4 in vitro also reduced expression of Bdnf. These findings indicate that disrupting the interaction between BET proteins and their acetylated lysine substrates may provide a new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of drug addiction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Proteins involved in the “readout” of lysine acetylation marks, referred to as BET bromodomain proteins (including BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT), have been shown to be key regulators of chromatin dynamics and disease, and

  10. Thermodynamic model of heterochromatin formation through epigenetic regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Peter J.; Koslover, Elena F.; Spakowitz, Andrew J.

    2015-02-01

    Gene regulation in eukaryotes requires the segregation of silenced genomic regions into densely packed heterochromatin, leaving the active genes in euchromatin regions more accessible. We introduce a model that connects the presence of epigenetically inherited histone marks, methylation at histone 3 lysine-9, to the physical compaction of chromatin fibers via the binding of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). Our model demonstrates some of the key physical features that are necessary to explain experimental observations. In particular, we demonstrate that strong cooperative interactions among the HP1 proteins are necessary to see the phase segregation of heterochromatin and euchromatin regions. We also explore how the cell can use the concentration of HP1 to control condensation and under what circumstances there is a threshold of methylation over which the fibers will compact. Finally, we consider how different potential in vivo fiber structures as well as the flexibility of the histone 3 tail can affect the bridging of HP1. Many of the observations that we make about the HP1 system are guided by general thermodynamics principles and thus could play a role in other DNA organizational processes such as the binding of linker histones.

  11. Epigenetic regulation of ageing: linking environmental inputs to genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Benayoun, Bérénice A.; Pollina, Elizabeth A.; Brunet, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Preface Ageing is affected by both genetic and non-genetic factors. Here, we review the chromatin-based epigenetic changes that occur during ageing, the role of chromatin modifiers in modulating lifespan and the importance of epigenetic signatures as biomarkers of ageing. We also discuss how epigenome remodeling by environmental stimuli impacts several aspects of transcription and genomic stability, with important consequences on longevity, and outline epigenetic differences between the ‘mortal soma’ and the ‘immortal germline’. Finally, we discuss the inheritance of ageing characteristics and potential chromatin-based strategies to delay or reverse hallmarks of ageing or age-related diseases. PMID:26373265

  12. Epigenetic regulation of miR-21 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Angelo; Kontos, Christos K; Boni, Themis; Bantounas, Ioannis; Siakouli, Dimitra; Kosmidou, Vivian; Vlassi, Margarita; Spyridakis, Yannis; Tsipras, Iraklis; Zografos, George; Pintzas, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have uncovered several transcription factors that determine biological alterations in tumor cells to execute the invasion-metastasis cascade, including the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We sought to investigate the role of miR-21 in colorectal cancer regulation. For this purpose, miR-21 expression was quantified in a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines and clinical specimens. High expression was found in cell lines with EMT properties and in the vast majority of human tumor specimens. We demonstrate in a cell-specific manner the occupancy of MIR-21 gene promoter by AP-1 and ETS1 transcription factors and, for the first time, the pattern of histone posttranslational modifications necessary for miR-21 overexpression. We also show that Integrin-β4 (ITGβ4), exclusively expressed in polarized epithelial cells, is a novel miR-21 target gene and plays a role in the regulation of EMT, since it is remarkably de-repressed after transient miR-21 silencing and downregulated after miR-21 overexpression. miR-21-dependent change of ITGβ4 expression significantly affects cell migration properties of colon cancer cells. Finally, in a subgroup of tumor specimens, ROC curve analysis performed on quantitative PCR data sets for miR-21, ITGβ4, and PDCD4 shows that the combination of high miR-21 with low ITGβ4 and PDCD4 expression is able to predict presence of metastasis. In conclusion, miR-21 is a key player in oncogenic EMT, its overexpression is controlled by the cooperation of genetic and epigenetic alterations, and its levels, along with ITGβ4 and PDCD4 expression, could be exploited as a prognostic tool for CRC metastasis. PMID:24149370

  13. Integration of the Transcription Factor-Regulated and Epigenetic Mechanisms in the Control of Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation program is regulated at several levels including signaling pathways, lineage-specific transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators that establish well-coordinated process of terminal differentiation resulting in formation of the epidermal barrier. The epigenetic regulatory machinery operates at several levels including modulation of covalent DNA/histone modifications, as well as through higher-order chromatin remodeling to establish long-range topological interactions between the genes and their enhancer elements. Epigenetic regulators exhibit both activating and repressive effects on chromatin in keratinocytes (KCs): whereas some of them promote terminal differentiation, the others stimulate proliferation of progenitor cells, as well as inhibit premature activation of terminal differentiation-associated genes. Transcription factor-regulated and epigenetic mechanisms are highly connected, and the p63 transcription factor has an important role in the higher-order chromatin remodeling of the KC-specific gene loci via direct control of the genome organizer Satb1 and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler Brg1. However, additional efforts are required to fully understand the complexity of interactions between distinct transcription factors and epigenetic regulators in the control of KC differentiation. Further understanding of these interactions and their alterations in different pathological skin conditions will help to progress toward the development of novel approaches for the treatment of skin disorders by targeting epigenetic regulators and modulating chromatin organization in KCs. PMID:26551942

  14. Epigenetic regulator Lid maintains germline stem cells through regulating JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity

    PubMed Central

    Tarayrah, Lama; Li, Yuping; Gan, Qiang; Chen, Xin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms have both been shown to play essential roles in regulating stem cell activity. While the role of either mechanism in this regulation is well established in multiple stem cell lineages, how the two mechanisms interact to regulate stem cell activity is not as well understood. Here we report that in the Drosophila testis, an H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase encoded by little imaginal discs (lid) maintains germline stem cell (GSC) mitotic index and prevents GSC premature differentiation. Lid is required in germ cells for proper expression of the Stat92E transcription factor, the downstream effector of the Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway. Our findings support a germ cell autonomous role for the JAK-STAT pathway in maintaining GSCs and place Lid as an upstream regulator of this pathway. Our study provides new insights into the biological functions of a histone demethylase in vivo and sheds light on the interaction between epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways in regulating stem cell activities. PMID:26490676

  15. Epigenetic regulation of Sox4 during palate development

    PubMed Central

    Seelan, Ratnam S; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Warner, Dennis R; Webb, Cynthia L; Pisano, Michele; Greene, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Aim Identification of genes that contribute to secondary palate development provide a better understanding of the etiology of palatal clefts. Gene-expression profiling of the murine palate from gestational days 12–14 (GD12–14), a critical period in palate development, identified Sox4 as a differentially expressed gene. In this study, we have examined if the differential expression of Sox4 in the palate is due to changes in DNA methylation. Materials & methods In situ hybridization analysis was used to localize the expression of Sox4 in the developing murine secondary palate. CpG methylation profiling of a 1.8-kb upstream region of Sox4 in the secondary palate from GD12–14 and transfection analysis in murine embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells using Sox4 deletion, mutant and in vitro methylated plasmid constructs were used to identify critical CpG residues regulating Sox4 expression in the palate. Results Spatiotemporal analysis revealed that Sox4 is expressed in the medial edge epithelium and presumptive rugae-forming regions of the palate from GD12 to GD13. Following palatal shelf fusion on GD14, Sox4 was expressed exclusively in the epithelia of the palatal rugae, structures that serve as signaling centers for the anteroposterior extension of the palate, and that are thought to serve as neural stem cell niches. Methylation of a 1.8-kb region upstream of Sox4, containing the putative promoter, completely eliminated promoter activity. CpG methylation profiling of the 1.8-kb region identified a CpG-poor region (DMR4) that exhibited significant differential methylation during palate development, consistent with changes in Sox4 mRNA expression. Changes in the methylation of DMR4 were attributed primarily to CpGs 83 and 85. Conclusion Our studies indicate that Sox4 is an epigenetically regulated gene that likely integrates multiple signaling systems for mediating palatal fusion, palatal extension and/or the maintenance of the neural stem cell niche in the rugae

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Shannalee R.; Gay, Maresha S.; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed ‘developmental origins of health and disease’. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:25572405

  17. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Shannalee R; Gay, Maresha S; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-07-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed 'developmental origins of health and disease'. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease.

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms regulating learning and long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, Robert H

    2013-10-01

    A balance between rapid, short lived, neuronal responses and prolonged ones fulfill the biochemical and cellular requirements for creating a molecular memory. I provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms in the brain and discuss their impact on synaptic plasticity, cognitive functions, and discuss a recent example of how they can contribute to neurodegeneration and the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of serotype expression antagonizes transcriptome dynamics in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Cheaib, Miriam; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Nordström, Karl J V; Schulz, Marcel H; Simon, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Phenotypic variation of a single genotype is achieved by alterations in gene expression patterns. Regulation of such alterations depends on their time scale, where short-time adaptations differ from permanently established gene expression patterns maintained by epigenetic mechanisms. In the ciliate Paramecium, serotypes were described for an epigenetically controlled gene expression pattern of an individual multigene family. Paradoxically, individual serotypes can be triggered in Paramecium by alternating environments but are then stabilized by epigenetic mechanisms, thus raising the question to which extend their expression follows environmental stimuli. To characterize environmental adaptation in the context of epigenetically controlled serotype expression, we used RNA-seq to characterize transcriptomes of serotype pure cultures. The resulting vegetative transcriptome resource is first analysed for genes involved in the adaptive response to the altered environment. Secondly, we identified groups of genes that do not follow the adaptive response but show co-regulation with the epigenetically controlled serotype system, suggesting that their gene expression pattern becomes manifested by similar mechanisms. In our experimental set-up, serotype expression and the entire group of co-regulated genes were stable among environmental changes and only heat-shock genes altered expression of these gene groups. The data suggest that the maintenance of these gene expression patterns in a lineage represents epigenetically controlled robustness counteracting short-time adaptation processes. PMID:26231545

  20. Epigenetic regulation of serotype expression antagonizes transcriptome dynamics in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Cheaib, Miriam; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Nordström, Karl J V; Schulz, Marcel H; Simon, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Phenotypic variation of a single genotype is achieved by alterations in gene expression patterns. Regulation of such alterations depends on their time scale, where short-time adaptations differ from permanently established gene expression patterns maintained by epigenetic mechanisms. In the ciliate Paramecium, serotypes were described for an epigenetically controlled gene expression pattern of an individual multigene family. Paradoxically, individual serotypes can be triggered in Paramecium by alternating environments but are then stabilized by epigenetic mechanisms, thus raising the question to which extend their expression follows environmental stimuli. To characterize environmental adaptation in the context of epigenetically controlled serotype expression, we used RNA-seq to characterize transcriptomes of serotype pure cultures. The resulting vegetative transcriptome resource is first analysed for genes involved in the adaptive response to the altered environment. Secondly, we identified groups of genes that do not follow the adaptive response but show co-regulation with the epigenetically controlled serotype system, suggesting that their gene expression pattern becomes manifested by similar mechanisms. In our experimental set-up, serotype expression and the entire group of co-regulated genes were stable among environmental changes and only heat-shock genes altered expression of these gene groups. The data suggest that the maintenance of these gene expression patterns in a lineage represents epigenetically controlled robustness counteracting short-time adaptation processes.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of serotype expression antagonizes transcriptome dynamics in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Cheaib, Miriam; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Nordström, Karl J. V.; Schulz, Marcel H.; Simon, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic variation of a single genotype is achieved by alterations in gene expression patterns. Regulation of such alterations depends on their time scale, where short-time adaptations differ from permanently established gene expression patterns maintained by epigenetic mechanisms. In the ciliate Paramecium, serotypes were described for an epigenetically controlled gene expression pattern of an individual multigene family. Paradoxically, individual serotypes can be triggered in Paramecium by alternating environments but are then stabilized by epigenetic mechanisms, thus raising the question to which extend their expression follows environmental stimuli. To characterize environmental adaptation in the context of epigenetically controlled serotype expression, we used RNA-seq to characterize transcriptomes of serotype pure cultures. The resulting vegetative transcriptome resource is first analysed for genes involved in the adaptive response to the altered environment. Secondly, we identified groups of genes that do not follow the adaptive response but show co-regulation with the epigenetically controlled serotype system, suggesting that their gene expression pattern becomes manifested by similar mechanisms. In our experimental set-up, serotype expression and the entire group of co-regulated genes were stable among environmental changes and only heat-shock genes altered expression of these gene groups. The data suggest that the maintenance of these gene expression patterns in a lineage represents epigenetically controlled robustness counteracting short-time adaptation processes. PMID:26231545

  2. Epigenetic Regulation of TNFA Expression in Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaoping; Barros, Silvana P.; Moretti, Antonio J.; Yu, Ning; Zhou, Jing; Preisser, John S.; Offenbacher, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays a central role in the molecular pathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, the epigenetic regulation attributable to microbial and inflammatory signals at the biofilm gingival interface are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the DNA methylation alteration within the TNFA promoter in human gingival biopsies from different stages of periodontal disease, and explored the regulatory mechanism of TNFA transcription by DNA methylation. Methods Gingival biopsies were harvested from 17 chronic periodontitis patients and 18 subjects with periodontal health. Another 11 subjects participated in an experimentally induced gingivitis study, and gingival biopsies were collected at the baseline, induction, and resolution phase. To confirm that TNFA promoter methylation modulated TNFA transcription we treated THP.1 cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and used a RAW 294.7 cell line transfected with a TNFA promoter-specific luciferase reporter system with or without methlyaiton, Results In gingival biopsies from subjects with severe chronic periodontitis two individual CpG sites within the TNFA promoter (at -163bp and -161bp) displayed increased methylation in periodontitis samples as compared to gingival health (16.1±5.1% vs. 11.0±4.6%, p=0.02, 19.8±4.1% vs. 15.4±3.6%, p=0.04, respectively). The methylation level at -163bp was inversely associated with the transcription level of TNFA (p=0.018). However, no significant difference in the TNFA promoter methylation pattern was observed in samples biopsied during the induction or resolution phase of experimentally induced gingivitis, which represented a reversible periodontal lesion. THP.1 cells treated with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TNFA messenger level. We also found that the luciferase activity decreased 2.6 fold in a construct containing an in vitro methylated TNFA promoter as compared to

  3. Preserving human potential as freedom: a framework for regulating epigenetic harms.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazal

    2010-01-01

    this type of harm. This article argues that it is imperative to initiate a regulatory framework to address epigenetic risk from specific substances even if conclusive proof of disease causation cannot be established. Shifting the burden of generating epigenetic risk data to producers of suspected harmful substances serves as a start. As information concerning epigenetic risks accrues, the regulatory response should evolve concurrently. As part of a dynamic policy-making approach our goals need to encompass the following: (i) promotion of knowledge in the scientific, legal, and public domains; (ii) assessment and modification of current regulations to address preventable risk; and (iii) an overarching commitment to protect human capabilities in an equitable manner.

  4. Inhibition of the mevalonate pathway affects epigenetic regulation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Karlic, Heidrun; Thaler, Roman; Gerner, Christopher; Grunt, Thomas; Proestling, Katharina; Haider, Florian; Varga, Franz

    2015-05-01

    The mevalonate pathway provides metabolites for post-translational modifications such as farnesylation, which are critical for the activity of RAS downstream signaling. Subsequently occurring regulatory processes can induce an aberrant stimulation of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) as well as changes in histone deacetylases (HDACs) and microRNAs in many cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway are increasingly recognized as anticancer drugs. Extensive evidence indicates an intense cross-talk between signaling pathways, which affect growth, differentiation, and apoptosis either directly or indirectly via epigenetic mechanisms. Herein, we show data obtained by novel transcriptomic and corresponding methylomic or proteomic analyses from cell lines treated with pharmacologic doses of respective inhibitors (i.e., simvastatin, ibandronate). Metabolic pathways and their epigenetic consequences appear to be affected by a changed concentration of NADPH. Moreover, since the mevalonate metabolism is part of a signaling network, including vitamin D metabolism or fatty acid synthesis, the epigenetic activity of associated pathways is also presented. This emphasizes the far-reaching epigenetic impact of metabolic therapies on cancer cells and provides some explanation for clinical observations, which indicate the anticancer activity of statins and bisphosphonates.

  5. Dietary Sulforaphane in Cancer Chemoprevention: The Role of Epigenetic Regulation and HDAC Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tortorella, Stephanie M.; Royce, Simon G.; Licciardi, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Sulforaphane, produced by the hydrolytic conversion of glucoraphanin after ingestion of cruciferous vegetables, particularly broccoli and broccoli sprouts, has been extensively studied due to its apparent health-promoting properties in disease and limited toxicity in normal tissue. Recent Studies: Recent identification of a sub-population of tumor cells with stem cell-like self-renewal capacity that may be responsible for relapse, metastasis, and resistance, as a potential target of the dietary compound, may be an important aspect of sulforaphane chemoprevention. Evidence also suggests that sulforaphane may target the epigenetic alterations observed in specific cancers, reversing aberrant changes in gene transcription through mechanisms of histone deacetylase inhibition, global demethylation, and microRNA modulation. Critical Issues: In this review, we discuss the biochemical and biological properties of sulforaphane with a particular emphasis on the anticancer properties of the dietary compound. Sulforaphane possesses the capacity to intervene in multistage carcinogenesis through the modulation and/or regulation of important cellular mechanisms. The inhibition of phase I enzymes that are responsible for the activation of pro-carcinogens, and the induction of phase II enzymes that are critical in mutagen elimination are well-characterized chemopreventive properties. Furthermore, sulforaphane mediates a number of anticancer pathways, including the activation of apoptosis, induction of cell cycle arrest, and inhibition of NFκB. Future Directions: Further characterization of the chemopreventive properties of sulforaphane and its capacity to be selectively toxic to malignant cells are warranted to potentially establish the clinical utility of the dietary compound as an anti-cancer compound alone, and in combination with clinically relevant therapeutic and management strategies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1382–1424. PMID:25364882

  6. [Angelman syndrome--the research model of epigenetic mechanisms expression genes regulation].

    PubMed

    Szpecht-Potocka, Agnieszka; Gos, Monika; Struniawski, Radosław; Bal, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetics, one of the widely investigated topics in human genetics, refers to phenotypic or gene expression changes caused by specific regulatory mechanisms (eg. DNA methylation, histone proteins modifications, antisense RNA or RNAi expression) that do not involve changes in DNA sequence. The disturbances in epigenetic gene expression regulatory mechanisms might lead to oncogenic transformation as well as monogenic or complex diseases. On the other side, better knowledge about epigenetic causes of certain diseases, gives an opportunity to potential therapies. One of the epigenetic research models in Angelman syndrome (AS). This neurologic disorder associated with improper central nervous system development and function, together with Prader-Willi syndrome are caused by the defects of epigenetic regulation. These disturbances are related to the defects of genomic imprinting, a phenomenon that contributes to allele specific, depending from parental origin, gene expression. In the majority of AS cases, the large deletion in chromosome 15 (15q11-13) of maternal origin (65-75%) or paternal disomy of chromosome 15 (3-7%) are observed. However, in a limited number of cases, other imprinting defects or mosaicism can be found and confirmed by new molecular biology techniques. Investigation of the etiology of the diseases caused by the defects in epigenetic regulation gives a basis to the development of epi-therapy that might be a promising alternative for their treatment. Moreover, knowledge about the epigenome gives an opportunity for prevention of human genetic disorders.

  7. Epigenetics: a key regulator of platyhelminth developmental biology?

    PubMed

    Geyer, Kathrin K; Hoffmann, Karl F

    2012-01-01

    The Platyhelminthes (flukes/flatworms) are a large group of derived metazoans beautifully adapted for existence in diversely challenging ecosystems. As tractable examples of development and self-regeneration or as causative agents of aquacultural, veterinary and biomedically-relevant parasitic diseases, the platyhelminths are subject to intensive inter-disciplinary research. Given the complex lifestyles exhibited by individuals within this phylum, we postulate that epigenetic processes feature in many aspects of platyhelminth lifecycle diversity, development and environmentally-driven adaptations.

  8. Epigenetic Regulation of Chromatin States in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Allshire, Robin C; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-07-01

    This article discusses the advances made in epigenetic research using the model organism fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. S. pombe has been used for epigenetic research since the discovery of position effect variegation (PEV). This is a phenomenon in which a transgene inserted within heterochromatin is variably expressed, but can be stably inherited in subsequent cell generations. PEV occurs at centromeres, telomeres, ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci, and mating-type regions of S. pombe chromosomes. Heterochromatin assembly in these regions requires enzymes that modify histones and the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery. One of the key histone-modifying enzymes is the lysine methyltransferase Clr4, which methylates histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9), a classic hallmark of heterochromatin. The kinetochore is assembled on specialized chromatin in which histone H3 is replaced by the variant CENP-A. Studies in fission yeast have contributed to our understanding of the establishment and maintenance of CENP-A chromatin and the epigenetic activation and inactivation of centromeres.

  9. Biophysical regulation of epigenetic state and cell reprogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, Timothy L.; Soto, Jennifer; Morez, Constant; Houssin, Timothee; Fritz, Ashley; Yuan, Falei; Chu, Julia; Patel, Shyam; Schaffer, David V.; Li, Song

    2013-12-01

    Biochemical factors can help reprogram somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells, yet the role of biophysical factors during reprogramming is unknown. Here, we show that biophysical cues, in the form of parallel microgrooves on the surface of cell-adhesive substrates, can replace the effects of small-molecule epigenetic modifiers and significantly improve reprogramming efficiency. The mechanism relies on the mechanomodulation of the cells’ epigenetic state. Specifically, decreased histone deacetylase activity and upregulation of the expression of WD repeat domain 5 (WDR5)—a subunit of H3 methyltranferase—by microgrooved surfaces lead to increased histone H3 acetylation and methylation. We also show that microtopography promotes a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition in adult fibroblasts. Nanofibrous scaffolds with aligned fibre orientation produce effects similar to those produced by microgrooves, suggesting that changes in cell morphology may be responsible for modulation of the epigenetic state. These findings have important implications in cell biology and in the optimization of biomaterials for cell-engineering applications.

  10. Impact of physical activity and doping on epigenetic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2011-10-01

    To achieve success in sports, many athletes consume doping substances, such as anabolic androgenic steroids and growth hormones, and ignore the negative influence of these drugs on their health. Apart from the unethical aspect of doping in sports, it is essential to consider the tremendous risk it represents to their physical condition. The abuse of pharmaceuticals which improve athletic performance may alter the expression of specific genes involved in muscle and bone metabolism by epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. Moreover, excessive and relentless training to increase the muscle mass, may also have an influence on the health of the athletes. This stress releases neurotransmitters and growth factors, and may affect the expression of endogenous genes by DNA methylation, too. This paper focuses on the relationship between epigenetic mechanisms and sports, highlights the potential consequences of abuse of doping drugs on gene expression, and describes methods to molecularly detect epigenetic changes of gene markers reflecting the physiological or metabolic effects of doping agents.

  11. Epigenetic Regulation of Epidermal Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Role in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Sabita N.; Royston, Kendra J.; Udayakumar, Neha; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2015-01-01

    As an actively renewable tissue, changes in skin architecture are subjected to the regulation of stem cells that maintain the population of cells responsible for the formation of epidermal layers. Stems cells retain their self-renewal property and express biomarkers that are unique to this population. However, differential regulation of the biomarkers can initiate the pathway of terminal cell differentiation. Although, pockets of non-clarity in stem cell maintenance and differentiation in skin still exist, the influence of epigenetics in epidermal stem cell functions and differentiation in skin homeostasis and wound healing is clearly evident. The focus of this review is to discuss the epigenetic regulation of confirmed and probable epidermal stem cell biomarkers in epidermal stratification of normal skin and in diseased states. The role of epigenetics in wound healing, especially in diseased states of diabetes and cancer, will also be conveyed. PMID:26712738

  12. Epigenetic Regulation of Epidermal Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Role in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Sabita N; Royston, Kendra J; Udayakumar, Neha; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2015-12-24

    As an actively renewable tissue, changes in skin architecture are subjected to the regulation of stem cells that maintain the population of cells responsible for the formation of epidermal layers. Stems cells retain their self-renewal property and express biomarkers that are unique to this population. However, differential regulation of the biomarkers can initiate the pathway of terminal cell differentiation. Although, pockets of non-clarity in stem cell maintenance and differentiation in skin still exist, the influence of epigenetics in epidermal stem cell functions and differentiation in skin homeostasis and wound healing is clearly evident. The focus of this review is to discuss the epigenetic regulation of confirmed and probable epidermal stem cell biomarkers in epidermal stratification of normal skin and in diseased states. The role of epigenetics in wound healing, especially in diseased states of diabetes and cancer, will also be conveyed.

  13. Epigenetic genes regulated by the BRAFV600E signaling are associated with alterations in the methylation and expression of tumor suppressor genes and patient survival in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dingxie; Liu, Xuan; Xing, Mingzhao

    2012-08-17

    We have previously reported that the BRAFV600E signaling causes genome-wide aberrations in gene methylation in melanoma cells. To explore the potential molecular mechanisms for this epigenetic effect of BRAFV600E, in this in silico study we analyzed 11 microarray datasets retrieved from NCBI GEO database and examined the relationship of the expression of the epigenetic genes (genes involved in epigenetic regulation) with BRAFV600E signaling, methylation and expression of tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) in melanoma, and patient survival with this cancer. Among 273 epigenetic genes examined, 12 genes were down-regulated (named DD genes) and 16 were up-regulated (UU genes) by suppression of the BRAFV600E signaling using inhibitors. While the expression of 245 non-DD/UU genes overall had no correlation with the expression and methylation of a set of potential TSGs, the expression of DD genes was significantly correlated negatively with the TSG expression and positively with TSG methylation. Expression of UU genes was positively, albeit weakly, associated with the TSG expression. Overall, no correlation was found between UU gene expression and TSG methylation. Importantly, the expression of DD genes, but not UU genes, was significantly associated with decreased survival of patients with melanoma. Interestingly, the promoters of DD genes contain more binding motifs of c-fos and myc, two BRAFV600E signaling-related transcription factors, than those of UU and non-DD/UU genes. Thus, these results link epigenetic genes to methylation and suppression of tumor suppressor genes as a mechanism involved in BRAFV600E-promoted melanoma tumorigenesis and uncover a novel molecular signature that predicts a poor prognosis of melanoma.

  14. Evidence of an epigenetic origin for high-risk 1q21 copy number aberrations in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Erming; Heuck, Christoph J.; Johann, Donald J.; Epstein, Joshua; Swanson, Charles M.; Lukacs, Janet L.; Binz, Regina Lichti; Johnson, Marian; Sammartino, Gael; Zangari, Maurizio; Davies, Faith E.; van Rhee, Frits; Morgan, Gareth J.; Barlogie, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a B-cell malignancy stratified in part by cytogenetic abnormalities, including the high-risk copy number aberrations (CNAs) of +1q21 and 17p−. To investigate the relationship between 1q21 CNAs and DNA hypomethylation of the 1q12 pericentromeric heterochromatin, we treated in vitro peripheral blood cultures of 5 patients with balanced constitutional rearrangements of 1q12 and 5 controls with the hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine. Using G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and spectral karyotyping, we identified structural aberrations and copy number gains of 1q21 in the treated cells similar to those found in patients with cytogenetically defined high-risk disease. Aberrations included 1q12 triradials, amplifications of regions juxtaposed to 1q12, and jumping translocations 1q12. Strikingly, all 5 patients with constitutional 1q12 rearrangements showed amplifications on the derivative chromosomes distal to the inverted or translocated 1q12 region, including MYCN in 1 case. At the same time, no amplification of the 1q21 region was found when the 1q12 region was inverted or absent. These findings provide evidence that the hypomethylation of the 1q12 region can potentially amplify any genomic region juxtaposed to it and mimic CNAs found in the bone marrow of patients with high-risk disease. PMID:25943786

  15. Evidence of an epigenetic origin for high-risk 1q21 copy number aberrations in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Tian, Erming; Heuck, Christoph J; Johann, Donald J; Epstein, Joshua; Swanson, Charles M; Lukacs, Janet L; Binz, Regina Lichti; Johnson, Marian; Sammartino, Gael; Zangari, Maurizio; Davies, Faith E; van Rhee, Frits; Morgan, Gareth J; Barlogie, Bart

    2015-06-11

    Multiple myeloma is a B-cell malignancy stratified in part by cytogenetic abnormalities, including the high-risk copy number aberrations (CNAs) of +1q21 and 17p(-). To investigate the relationship between 1q21 CNAs and DNA hypomethylation of the 1q12 pericentromeric heterochromatin, we treated in vitro peripheral blood cultures of 5 patients with balanced constitutional rearrangements of 1q12 and 5 controls with the hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine. Using G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and spectral karyotyping, we identified structural aberrations and copy number gains of 1q21 in the treated cells similar to those found in patients with cytogenetically defined high-risk disease. Aberrations included 1q12 triradials, amplifications of regions juxtaposed to 1q12, and jumping translocations 1q12. Strikingly, all 5 patients with constitutional 1q12 rearrangements showed amplifications on the derivative chromosomes distal to the inverted or translocated 1q12 region, including MYCN in 1 case. At the same time, no amplification of the 1q21 region was found when the 1q12 region was inverted or absent. These findings provide evidence that the hypomethylation of the 1q12 region can potentially amplify any genomic region juxtaposed to it and mimic CNAs found in the bone marrow of patients with high-risk disease. PMID:25943786

  16. The developmental basis of epigenetic regulation of HTR2A and psychiatric outcomes.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Alison G; Marsit, Carmen J

    2014-12-01

    The serotonin receptor 5-HT2A (encoded by HTR2A) is an important regulator of fetal brain development and adult cognitive function. Environmental signals that induce epigenetic changes of serotonin response genes, including HTR2A, have been implicated in adverse mental health outcomes. The objective of this perspective article is to address the medical implications of HTR2A epigenetic regulation, which has been associated with both infant neurobehavioral outcomes and adult mental health. Ongoing research has identified a region of the HTR2A promoter that has been associated with a number of medical outcomes in adults and infants, including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, chronic fatigue syndrome, borderline personality disorder, suicidality, and neurobehavioral outcomes. Epigenetic regulation of HTR2A has been studied in several different types of tissues, including the placenta. The placenta is an important source of serotonin during fetal neurodevelopment, and placental epigenetic variation of HTR2A has been associated with infant neurobehavioral outcomes, which may represent the basis of adult mental health disorders. Further analysis is needed to identify intrinsic and extrinsic factors that modulate HTR2A methylation, and the mechanism by which this epigenetic variation influences fetal growth and leads to altered brain development, manifesting in psychiatric disorders.

  17. Krebs cycle intermediates regulate DNA and histone methylation: epigenetic impact on the aging process.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kauppinen, Anu; Hiltunen, Mikko; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2014-07-01

    Many aging theories have proposed that mitochondria and energy metabolism have a major role in the aging process. There are recent studies indicating that Krebs cycle intermediates can shape the epigenetic landscape of chromatin by regulating DNA and histone methylation. A growing evidence indicates that epigenetics plays an important role in the regulation of healthspan but also is involved in the aging process. 2-Oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) is a key metabolite in the Krebs cycle but it is also an obligatory substrate for 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-OGDO). The 2-OGDO enzyme family includes the major enzymes of DNA and histone demethylation, i.e. Ten-Eleven Translocation (TETs) and Jumonji C domain containing (JmjC) demethylases. In addition, 2-OGDO members can regulate collagen synthesis and hypoxic responses in a non-epigenetical manner. Interestingly, succinate and fumarate, also Krebs cycle intermediates, are potent inhibitors of 2-OGDO enzymes, i.e. the balance of Krebs cycle reactions can affect the level of DNA and histone methylation and thus control gene expression. We will review the epigenetic mechanisms through which Krebs cycle intermediates control the DNA and histone methylation. We propose that age-related disturbances in the Krebs cycle function induce stochastic epigenetic changes in chromatin structures which in turn promote the aging process.

  18. The Developmental Basis of Epigenetic Regulation of HTR2A and Psychiatric Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Alison G.; Marsit, Carmen J.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin receptor 5-HT2A (encoded by HTR2A) is an important regulator of fetal brain development and adult cognitive function. Environmental signals that induce epigenetic changes of serotonin response genes, including HTR2A, have been implicated in adverse mental health outcomes. The objective of this perspective article is to address the medical implications of HTR2A epigenetic regulation, which has been associated with both infant neurobehavioral outcomes and adult mental health. Ongoing research has identified a region of the HTR2A promoter that has been associated with a number of medical outcomes in adults and infants, including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, chronic fatigue syndrome, borderline personality disorder, suicidality, and neurobehavioral outcomes. Epigenetic regulation of HTR2A has been studied in several different types of tissues, including the placenta. The placenta is an important source of serotonin during fetal neurodevelopment, and placental epigenetic variation of HTR2A has been associated with infant neurobehavioral outcomes, which may represent the basis of adult mental health disorders. Further analysis is needed to identify intrinsic and extrinsic factors modulate HTR2A methylation, and the mechanism by which this epigenetic variation influences fetal growth and leads to altered brain development, manifesting in psychiatric disorders. PMID:25043477

  19. A genomic screen for long noncoding RNA genes epigenetically silenced by aberrant DNA methylation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumegawa, Kohei; Maruyama, Reo; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Ashida, Masami; Kitajima, Hiroshi; Tsuyada, Akihiro; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kai, Masahiro; Yamano, Hiro-o; Sugai, Tamotsu; Tokino, Takashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Imai, Kohzoh; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as key components in multiple cellular processes, although their physiological and pathological functions are not fully understood. To identify cancer-related lncRNAs, we screened for those that are epigenetically silenced in colorectal cancer (CRC). Through a genome-wide analysis of histone modifications in CRC cells, we found that the transcription start sites (TSSs) of 1,027 lncRNA genes acquired trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) after DNA demethylation. Integrative analysis of chromatin signatures and the DNA methylome revealed that the promoter CpG islands (CGIs) of 66 lncRNA genes contained cancer-specific methylation. By validating the expression and methylation of lncRNA genes in CRC cells, we ultimately identified 20 lncRNAs, including ZNF582-AS1, as targets of epigenetic silencing in CRC. ZNF582-AS1 is frequently methylated in CRC cell lines (87.5%), primary CRCs (77.2%), colorectal adenomas (44.7%) and advanced adenomas (87.8%), suggesting that this methylation is an early event during colorectal tumorigenesis. Methylation of ZNF582-AS1 is associated with poor survival of CRC patients, and ectopic expression of ZNF582-AS1 suppressed colony formation by CRC cells. Our findings offer insight into the association between epigenetic alterations and lncRNA dysregulation in cancer and suggest that ZNF582-AS1 may be a novel tumor-suppressive lncRNA. PMID:27215978

  20. The effects of diabetes on male fertility and epigenetic regulation during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guo-Lian; Liu, Ye; Liu, Miao-E; Pan, Jie-Xue; Guo, Meng-Xi; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The effects of diabetes mellitus include long-term damages, dysfunctions, and failures of various organs. An important complication of diabetes is the disturbance in the male reproductive system. Glucose metabolism is an important event in spermatogenesis. Moreover, glucose metabolism is also important for maintaining basic cell activity, as well as specific functions, such as motility and fertilization ability in mature sperm. Diabetic disease and experimentally induced diabetes both demonstrated that either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes could have detrimental effects on male fertility, especially on sperm quality, such as sperm motility, sperm DNA integrity, and ingredients of seminal plasma. Epigenetic modifications are essential during spermatogenesis. The epigenetic regulation represents chromatin modifications including DNA methylation, histone modifications, remodeling of nucleosomes and the higher-order chromatin reorganization and noncoding RNAs. If spermatogenesis is affected during the critical developmental window, embryonic gonadal development, and germline differentiation, environmentally-induced epigenetic modifications may become permanent in the germ line epigenome and have a potential impact on subsequent generations through epigenetic transgenerational inheritance. Diabetes may influence the epigenetic modification during sperm spermatogenesis and that these epigenetic dysregulation may be inherited through the male germ line and passed onto more than one generation, which in turn may increase the risk of diabetes in offspring. PMID:25814158

  1. The effects of diabetes on male fertility and epigenetic regulation during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Guo-Lian; Liu, Ye; Liu, Miao-E; Pan, Jie-Xue; Guo, Meng-Xi; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The effects of diabetes mellitus include long-term damages, dysfunctions, and failures of various organs. An important complication of diabetes is the disturbance in the male reproductive system. Glucose metabolism is an important event in spermatogenesis. Moreover, glucose metabolism is also important for maintaining basic cell activity, as well as specific functions, such as motility and fertilization ability in mature sperm. Diabetic disease and experimentally induced diabetes both demonstrated that either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes could have detrimental effects on male fertility, especially on sperm quality, such as sperm motility, sperm DNA integrity, and ingredients of seminal plasma. Epigenetic modifications are essential during spermatogenesis. The epigenetic regulation represents chromatin modifications including DNA methylation, histone modifications, remodeling of nucleosomes and the higher-order chromatin reorganization and noncoding RNAs. If spermatogenesis is affected during the critical developmental window, embryonic gonadal development, and germline differentiation, environmentally-induced epigenetic modifications may become permanent in the germ line epigenome and have a potential impact on subsequent generations through epigenetic transgenerational inheritance. Diabetes may influence the epigenetic modification during sperm spermatogenesis and that these epigenetic dysregulation may be inherited through the male germ line and passed onto more than one generation, which in turn may increase the risk of diabetes in offspring. PMID:25814158

  2. Epigenetic Regulation of Hepatic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathways in the Ethanol-fed Cystathionine βeta Synthase Deficient Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Esfandiari, Farah; Medici, Valentina; Wong, Donna H.; Jose, Soumia; Dolatshahi, Maryam; Quinlivan, Eoin; Dayal, Sanjana; Lentz, Steven R.; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Zhang, Yue Hua; French, Samuel W.; Halsted, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury is mediated by epigenetic changes in regulatory genes that result from the induction of aberrant methionine metabolism by ethanol feeding. Five month old cystathionine beta synthase (CβS) heterozygous and wildtype C57BL/6J littermate mice were fed liquid control or ethanol diets by intragastric infusion for four weeks. Both ethanol fed groups showed typical histopathology of alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), with reduction in liver S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), elevation in liver S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and reduction in the SAM/SAH ratio with interactions of ethanol and genotype effects. Hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signals including glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), growth arrest and DNA damage inducible gene 153 (GADD153), caspase 12, and transcription factor sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) were up-regulated in ethanol fed mice with genotype interactions and negative correlations with the SAM/SAH ratio. Immunohistochemical staining showed reduction in trimethylated histone H3 lysine-9 (3meH3K9) protein levels in centrilobular regions in both ethanol groups, with no changes in trimethylated histone H3 Lysine-4 (3meH3K4) levels. The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay found decrease in levels of suppressor chromatin marker 3meH3K9 in the promoter regions of GRP78, SREBP-1c and GADD153 in the ethanol-treated heterozygous CβS mice. The mRNA expression of the histone H3K9 methyltransferase EHMT2 (G9a), was selectively decreased in ethanol-fed mice. Conclusion: The pathogenesis of ASH is mediated in part through the effects of altered methionine metabolism on epigenetic regulation of pathways of ER stress relating to apoptosis and lipogenesis. PMID:19957376

  3. Chromatin and epigenetics in all their states: Meeting report of the first conference on Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits - January 14 - 15, 2016 - Strasbourg, France.

    PubMed

    Bey, Till; Jamge, Suraj; Klemme, Sonja; Komar, Dorota Natalia; Le Gall, Sabine; Mikulski, Pawel; Schmidt, Martin; Zicola, Johan; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    In January 2016, the first Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits conference was held in Strasbourg, France. An all-star lineup of speakers, a packed audience of 130 participants from over 20 countries, and a friendly scientific atmosphere contributed to make this conference a meeting to remember. In this article we summarize some of the new insights into chromatin, epigenetics, and epigenomics research and highlight nascent ideas and emerging concepts in this exciting area of research. PMID:27184433

  4. Chromatin and epigenetics in all their states: Meeting report of the first conference on Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits - January 14 - 15, 2016 - Strasbourg, France.

    PubMed

    Bey, Till; Jamge, Suraj; Klemme, Sonja; Komar, Dorota Natalia; Le Gall, Sabine; Mikulski, Pawel; Schmidt, Martin; Zicola, Johan; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    In January 2016, the first Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits conference was held in Strasbourg, France. An all-star lineup of speakers, a packed audience of 130 participants from over 20 countries, and a friendly scientific atmosphere contributed to make this conference a meeting to remember. In this article we summarize some of the new insights into chromatin, epigenetics, and epigenomics research and highlight nascent ideas and emerging concepts in this exciting area of research.

  5. BCOR regulates mesenchymal stem cell function by epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhipeng; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Lee, Janice S; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Songlin; Fan, Guoping; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2009-08-01

    The BCL-6 co-repressor (BCOR) represses gene transcription by interacting with BCL-6 (Refs 1, 2). BCOR mutation is responsible for oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome, which is characterized by canine teeth with extremely long roots, congenital cataracts, craniofacial defects and congenital heart disease. Here we show that BCOR mutation increased the osteo-dentinogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from a patient with OFCD, providing a molecular explanation for abnormal root growth. AP-2alpha was identified as a repressive target of BCOR, and BCOR mutation resulted in abnormal activation of AP-2alpha. Gain- and loss-of-function assays suggest that AP-2alpha is a key factor that mediates the increased osteo-dentinogenic capacity of MSCs. Moreover, we found that BCOR maintained tissue homeostasis and gene silencing through epigenetic mechanisms. BCOR mutation increased histone H3K4 and H3K36 methylation in MSCs, thereby reactivating transcription of silenced target genes. By studying a rare human genetic disease, we have unravelled an epigenetic mechanism for control of human adult stem cell function. PMID:19578371

  6. The landscape of somatic mutations in epigenetic regulators across 1,000 paediatric cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Huether, Robert; Dong, Li; Chen, Xiang; Wu, Gang; Parker, Matthew; Wei, Lei; Ma, Jing; Edmonson, Michael N; Hedlund, Erin K; Rusch, Michael C; Shurtleff, Sheila A; Mulder, Heather L; Boggs, Kristy; Vadordaria, Bhavin; Cheng, Jinjun; Yergeau, Donald; Song, Guangchun; Becksfort, Jared; Lemmon, Gordon; Weber, Catherine; Cai, Zhongling; Dang, Jinjun; Walsh, Michael; Gedman, Amanda L; Faber, Zachary; Easton, John; Gruber, Tanja; Kriwacki, Richard W; Partridge, Janet F; Ding, Li; Wilson, Richard K; Mardis, Elaine R; Mullighan, Charles G; Gilbertson, Richard J; Baker, Suzanne J; Zambetti, Gerard; Ellison, David W; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R

    2014-01-01

    Studies of paediatric cancers have shown a high frequency of mutation across epigenetic regulators. Here we sequence 633 genes, encoding the majority of known epigenetic regulatory proteins, in over 1,000 paediatric tumours to define the landscape of somatic mutations in epigenetic regulators in paediatric cancer. Our results demonstrate a marked variation in the frequency of gene mutations across 21 different paediatric cancer subtypes, with the highest frequency of mutations detected in high-grade gliomas, T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and medulloblastoma, and a paucity of mutations in low-grade glioma and retinoblastoma. The most frequently mutated genes are H3F3A, PHF6, ATRX, KDM6A, SMARCA4, ASXL2, CREBBP, EZH2, MLL2, USP7, ASXL1, NSD2, SETD2, SMC1A and ZMYM3. We identify novel loss-of-function mutations in the ubiquitin-specific processing protease 7 (USP7) in paediatric leukaemia, which result in decreased deubiquitination activity. Collectively, our results help to define the landscape of mutations in epigenetic regulatory genes in paediatric cancer and yield a valuable new database for investigating the role of epigenetic dysregulations in cancer.

  7. Epigenetic regulation leading to induced pluripotency drives cancer development in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Kotaro; Semi, Katsunori; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Epigenetic regulation of failed reprogramming-associated cancer cells is discussed. • Similarity between pediatric cancer and reprogramming-associated cancer is discussed. • Concept for epigenetic cancer is discussed. - Abstract: Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the transient expression of reprogramming factors. During the reprogramming process, somatic cells acquire the ability to undergo unlimited proliferation, which is also an important characteristic of cancer cells, while their underlying DNA sequence remains unchanged. Based on the characteristics shared between pluripotent stem cells and cancer cells, the potential involvement of the factors leading to reprogramming toward pluripotency in cancer development has been discussed. Recent in vivo reprogramming studies provided some clues to understanding the role of reprogramming-related epigenetic regulation in cancer development. It was shown that premature termination of the in vivo reprogramming result in the development of tumors that resemble pediatric cancers. Given that epigenetic modifications play a central role during reprogramming, failed reprogramming-associated cancer development may have provided a proof of concept for epigenetics-driven cancer development in vivo.

  8. Genes encoding members of the JAK-STAT pathway or epigenetic regulators are recurrently mutated in T-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    López, Cristina; Bergmann, Anke K; Paul, Ulrike; Murga Penas, Eva M; Nagel, Inga; Betts, Matthew J; Johansson, Patricia; Ritgen, Matthias; Baumann, Tycho; Aymerich, Marta; Jayne, Sandrine; Russell, Robert B; Campo, Elias; Dyer, Martin J S; Dürig, Jan; Siebert, Reiner

    2016-04-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia (T-PLL) is an aggressive leukaemia. The primary genetic alteration in T-PLL are the inv(14)(q11q32)/t(14;14)(q11;q32) leading to TRD/TRA-TCL1A fusion, or the t(X;14)(q28;q11) associated with TRD/TRA-MTCP1 fusion. However, additional cooperating abnormalities are necessary for emergence of the full neoplastic phenotype. Though the pattern of secondary chromosomal aberrations is remarkably conserved, targets of the changes are largely unknown. We analysed a cohort of 43 well-characterized T-PLL for hotspot mutations in the genes JAK3, STAT5B and RHOA. Additionally, we selected a subset of 23 T-PLL cases for mutational screening of 54 genes known to be recurrently mutated in T-cell and other haematological neoplasms. Activating mutations in the investigated regions of the JAK3 and STAT5B genes were detected in 30% (13/43) and 21% (8/39) of the cases, respectively, and were mutually exclusive. Further, we identified mutations in the genes encoding the epigenetic regulators EZH2 in 13% (3/23), TET2 in 17% (4/23) and BCOR in 9% (2/23) of the cases. We confirmed that the JAK-STAT pathway is a major mutational target, and identified epigenetic regulators recurrently mutated in T-PLL. These findings complement the mutational spectrum of secondary aberrations in T-PLL and underscore the potential therapeutical relevance of epigenetic regulators in T-PLL.

  9. Genes encoding members of the JAK-STAT pathway or epigenetic regulators are recurrently mutated in T-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    López, Cristina; Bergmann, Anke K; Paul, Ulrike; Murga Penas, Eva M; Nagel, Inga; Betts, Matthew J; Johansson, Patricia; Ritgen, Matthias; Baumann, Tycho; Aymerich, Marta; Jayne, Sandrine; Russell, Robert B; Campo, Elias; Dyer, Martin J S; Dürig, Jan; Siebert, Reiner

    2016-04-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia (T-PLL) is an aggressive leukaemia. The primary genetic alteration in T-PLL are the inv(14)(q11q32)/t(14;14)(q11;q32) leading to TRD/TRA-TCL1A fusion, or the t(X;14)(q28;q11) associated with TRD/TRA-MTCP1 fusion. However, additional cooperating abnormalities are necessary for emergence of the full neoplastic phenotype. Though the pattern of secondary chromosomal aberrations is remarkably conserved, targets of the changes are largely unknown. We analysed a cohort of 43 well-characterized T-PLL for hotspot mutations in the genes JAK3, STAT5B and RHOA. Additionally, we selected a subset of 23 T-PLL cases for mutational screening of 54 genes known to be recurrently mutated in T-cell and other haematological neoplasms. Activating mutations in the investigated regions of the JAK3 and STAT5B genes were detected in 30% (13/43) and 21% (8/39) of the cases, respectively, and were mutually exclusive. Further, we identified mutations in the genes encoding the epigenetic regulators EZH2 in 13% (3/23), TET2 in 17% (4/23) and BCOR in 9% (2/23) of the cases. We confirmed that the JAK-STAT pathway is a major mutational target, and identified epigenetic regulators recurrently mutated in T-PLL. These findings complement the mutational spectrum of secondary aberrations in T-PLL and underscore the potential therapeutical relevance of epigenetic regulators in T-PLL. PMID:26917488

  10. Aberrant subcellular neuronal calcium regulation in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-05-01

    In this mini-review/opinion article we describe evidence that multiple cellular and molecular alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis involve perturbed cellular calcium regulation, and that alterations in synaptic calcium handling may be early and pivotal events in the disease process. With advancing age neurons encounter increased oxidative stress and impaired energy metabolism, which compromise the function of proteins that control membrane excitability and subcellular calcium dynamics. Altered proteolytic cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in response to the aging process in combination with genetic and environmental factors results in the production and accumulation of neurotoxic forms of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Aβ undergoes a self-aggregation process and concomitantly generates reactive oxygen species that can trigger membrane-associated oxidative stress which, in turn, impairs the functions of ion-motive ATPases and glutamate and glucose transporters thereby rendering neurons vulnerable to excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Mutations in presenilin-1 that cause early-onset AD increase Aβ production, but also result in an abnormal increase in the size of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Some of the events in the neurodegenerative cascade can be counteracted in animal models by manipulations that stabilize neuronal calcium homeostasis including dietary energy restriction, agonists of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors and drugs that activate mitochondrial potassium channels. Emerging knowledge of the actions of calcium upstream and downstream of Aβ provides opportunities to develop novel preventative and therapeutic interventions for AD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium. PMID:20950656

  11. Epigenetic regulation of Delta-Like1 controls Notch1 activation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Piazzi, Giulia; Fini, Lucia; Selgrad, Michael; Garcia, Melissa; Daoud, Yahya; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Romano, Marco; Meyer, Richard L; Genta, Robert M; Fox, James G; Boland, C Richard; Bazzoli, Franco; Ricciardiello, Luigi

    2011-12-01

    The Notch signaling pathway drives proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell fate, and maintenance of stem cells in several tissues. Aberrant activation of Notch signaling has been described in several tumours and in gastric cancer (GC), activated Notch1 has been associated with de-differentiation of lineage-committed stomach cells into stem progenitors and GC progression. However, the specific role of the Notch1 ligand DLL1 in GC has not yet been elucidated. To assess the role of DLL1 in GC cancer, the expression of Notch1 and its ligands DLL1 and Jagged1, was analyzed in 8 gastric cancer cell lines (KATOIII, SNU601, SNU719, AGS, SNU16, MKN1, MKN45, TMK1). DLL1 expression was absent in KATOIII, SNU601, SNU719 and AGS. The lack of DLL1 expression in these cells was associated with promoter hypermethylation and 5-aza-2'dC caused up-regulation of DLL1. The increase in DLL1 expression was associated with activation of Notch1 signalling, with an increase in cleaved Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) and Hes1, and down-regulation in Hath1. Concordantly, Notch1 signalling was activated with the overexpression of DLL1. Moreover, Notch1 signalling together with DLL1 methylation were evaluated in samples from 52 GC patients and 21 healthy control as well as in INS-GAS mice infected with H. pylori and randomly treated with eradication therapy. In GC patients, we found a correlation between DLL1 and Hes1 expression, while DLL1 methylation and Hath1 expression were associated with the diffuse and mixed type of gastric cancer. Finally, none of the samples from INS-GAS mice infected with H. pylori, a model of intestinal-type gastric tumorigenesis, showed promoter methylation of DLL1. This study shows that Notch1 activity in gastric cancer is controlled by the epigenetic silencing of the ligand DLL1, and that Notch1 inhibition is associated with the diffuse type of gastric cancer. PMID:22249198

  12. Epigenetic regulation in murine offspring as a novel mechanism for transmaternal asthma protection induced by microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bronchial asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting from complex gene-environment interactions. Natural microbial exposure has been identified as an important environmental condition that provides asthma protection in a prenatal window of opportunity. Epigenetic regulation is an important m...

  13. Influence of environmental exposure on human epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Marsit, Carmen J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental toxicants can alter epigenetic regulatory features such as DNA methylation and microRNA expression. As the sensitivity of epigenomic regulatory features may be greatest during the in utero period, when critical windows are narrow, and when epigenomic profiles are being set, this review will highlight research focused on that period. I will focus on work in human populations, where the impact of environmental toxicants in utero, including cigarette smoke and toxic trace metals such as arsenic, mercury and manganese, on genome-wide, gene-specific DNA methylation has been assessed. In particular, arsenic is highlighted, as this metalloid has been the focus of a number of studies and its detoxification mechanisms are well understood. Importantly, the tissues and cells being examined must be considered in context in order to interpret the findings of these studies. For example, by studying the placenta, it is possible to identify potential epigenetic adaptations of key genes and pathways that may alter the developmental course in line with the developmental origins of health and disease paradigm. Alternatively, studies of newborn cord blood can be used to examine how environmental exposure in utero can impact the composition of cells within the peripheral blood, leading to immunological effects of exposure. The results suggest that in humans, like other vertebrates, there is a susceptibility for epigenomic alteration by the environment during intrauterine development, and this may represent a mechanism of plasticity of the organism in response to its environment as well as a mechanism through which long-term health consequences can be shaped. PMID:25568453

  14. Epigenetic regulation of the histone-to-protamine transition during spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jianqiang; Bedford, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, male germ cells differentiate from haploid round spermatids to flagella-containing motile sperm, in a process called spermiogenesis. This process is distinct from somatic cell differentiation in that the majority of the core histones are replaced sequentially, first by transition proteins and then protamines, facilitating chromatin hyper-compaction. This histone-to-protamine transition process represents an excellent model for the investigation of how epigenetic regulators interact with each other to remodel chromatin architecture. While early work in the field highlighted the critical roles of testis-specific transcription factors in controlling the haploid-specific developmental program, recent studies underscore the essential functions of epigenetic players involved in the dramatic genome remodeling that takes place during wholesale histone replacement. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of how epigenetic players, like histone variants and histone writers/readers/erasers, rewire the haploid spermatid genome to facilitate histone substitution by protamines in mammals. PMID:26850883

  15. Genome-wide binding and mechanistic analyses of Smchd1-mediated epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelan; Hu, Jiang; Moore, Darcy L; Liu, Ruijie; Kessans, Sarah A; Breslin, Kelsey; Lucet, Isabelle S; Keniry, Andrew; Leong, Huei San; Parish, Clare L; Hilton, Douglas J; Lemmers, Richard J L F; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Czabotar, Peter E; Dobson, Renwick C J; Ritchie, Matthew E; Kay, Graham F; Murphy, James M; Blewitt, Marnie E

    2015-07-01

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (Smchd1) is an epigenetic repressor with described roles in X inactivation and genomic imprinting, but Smchd1 is also critically involved in the pathogenesis of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. The underlying molecular mechanism by which Smchd1 functions in these instances remains unknown. Our genome-wide transcriptional and epigenetic analyses show that Smchd1 binds cis-regulatory elements, many of which coincide with CCCTC-binding factor (Ctcf) binding sites, for example, the clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) genes, where we show Smchd1 and Ctcf act in opposing ways. We provide biochemical and biophysical evidence that Smchd1-chromatin interactions are established through the homodimeric hinge domain of Smchd1 and, intriguingly, that the hinge domain also has the capacity to bind DNA and RNA. Our results suggest Smchd1 imparts epigenetic regulation via physical association with chromatin, which may antagonize Ctcf-facilitated chromatin interactions, resulting in coordinated transcriptional control. PMID:26091879

  16. Nuclear Sensing of Viral DNA, Epigenetic Regulation of Herpes Simplex Virus Infection, and Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. Herpes viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. PMID:25742715

  17. Epigenetic Regulation by Sulforaphane: Opportunities for Breast and Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Atwell, Lauren L.; Beaver, Laura M.; Shannon, Jackilen; Williams, David E.; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a phytochemical derived from cruciferous vegetables that has multiple molecular targets and anti-cancer properties. Researchers have demonstrated several chemopreventive benefits of SFN consumption, such as reductions in tumor growth, increases in cancer cell apoptosis, and disruption of signaling within tumor microenvironments both in vitro and in vivo. Emerging evidence indicates that SFN exerts several of its chemopreventive effects by altering epigenetic mechanisms. This review summarizes evidence of the impact of SFN on epigenetic events and how they relate to the chemopreventive effects of SFN observed in preclinical and clinical studies of breast and prostate cancers. Specific areas of focus include the role of SFN in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, inflammation, antioxidant defense, and cancer cell signaling and their relationships to epigenetic mechanisms. Finally, remaining challenges and research needs for translating mechanistic work with SFN into human studies and clinical intervention trials are discussed. PMID:26042194

  18. Epigenetic and 3-dimensional regulation of V(D)J rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Degner-Leisso, Stephanie C; Feeney, Ann J

    2010-12-01

    V(D)J recombination is a crucial component of the adaptive immune response, allowing for the production of a diverse antigen receptor repertoire (Ig and TCR). This review will focus on how epigenetic regulation and 3-dimensional (3D) interactions may control V(D)J recombination at Ig loci. The interplay between transcription factors and post-translational modifications at the Igh, Igκ, and Igλ loci will be highlighted. Furthermore, we propose that the spatial organization and epigenetic boundaries of each Ig loci before and during V(D)J recombination may be influenced in part by the CTCF/cohesin complex. Taken together, the many epigenetic and 3D layers of control ensure that Ig loci are only rearranged at appropriate stages of B cell development.

  19. Exploring Epigenetic Regulation of Fear Memory and Biomarkers Associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Stephanie A.; Schafe, Glenn E.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2013-01-01

    This review examines recent work on epigenetic mechanisms underlying animal models of fear learning as well as its translational implications in disorders of fear regulation, such as Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Specifically, we will examine work outlining roles of differential histone acetylation and DNA-methylation associated with consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction in Pavlovian fear paradigms. We then focus on the numerous studies examining the epigenetic modifications of the Brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) pathway and the extension of these findings from animal models to recent work in human clinical populations. We will also review recently published data on FKBP5 regulation of glucocorticoid receptor function, and how this is modulated in animal models of PTSD and in human clinical populations via epigenetic mechanisms. As glucocorticoid regulation of memory consolidation is well established in fear models, we examine how these recent data contribute to our broader understanding of fear memory formation. The combined recent progress in epigenetic modulation of memory with the advances in fear neurobiology suggest that this area may be critical to progress in our understanding of fear-related disorders with implications for new approaches to treatment and prevention. PMID:23847551

  20. Exploring epigenetic regulation of fear memory and biomarkers associated with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Stephanie A; Schafe, Glenn E; Ressler, Kerry J

    2013-01-01

    This review examines recent work on epigenetic mechanisms underlying animal models of fear learning as well as its translational implications in disorders of fear regulation, such as Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Specifically, we will examine work outlining roles of differential histone acetylation and DNA-methylation associated with consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction in Pavlovian fear paradigms. We then focus on the numerous studies examining the epigenetic modifications of the Brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) pathway and the extension of these findings from animal models to recent work in human clinical populations. We will also review recently published data on FKBP5 regulation of glucocorticoid receptor function, and how this is modulated in animal models of PTSD and in human clinical populations via epigenetic mechanisms. As glucocorticoid regulation of memory consolidation is well established in fear models, we examine how these recent data contribute to our broader understanding of fear memory formation. The combined recent progress in epigenetic modulation of memory with the advances in fear neurobiology suggest that this area may be critical to progress in our understanding of fear-related disorders with implications for new approaches to treatment and prevention.

  1. Nuclear Receptors and Epigenetic Regulation: Opportunities for Nutritional Targeting and Disease Prevention12

    PubMed Central

    Romagnolo, Donato F.; Zempleni, Janos; Selmin, Ornella I.

    2014-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications of histones, alterations in the recruitment and functions of non-histone proteins, DNA methylation, and changes in expression of noncoding RNAs contribute to current models of epigenetic regulation. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a group of transcription factors that, through ligand-binding, act as sensors to changes in nutritional, environmental, developmental, pathophysiologic, and endocrine conditions and drive adaptive responses via gene regulation. One mechanism through which NRs direct gene expression is the assembly of transcription complexes with cofactors and coregulators that possess chromatin-modifying properties. Chromatin modifications can be transient or become part of the cellular “memory” and contribute to genomic imprinting. Because many food components bind to NRs, they can ultimately influence transcription of genes associated with biologic processes, such as inflammation, proliferation, apoptosis, and hormonal response, and alter the susceptibility to chronic diseases (e.g., cancer, diabetes, obesity). The objective of this review is to highlight how NRs influence epigenetic regulation and the relevance of dietary compound–NR interactions in human nutrition and for disease prevention and treatment. Identifying gene targets of unliganded and bound NRs may assist in the development of epigenetic maps for food components and dietary patterns. Progress in these areas may lead to the formulation of disease-prevention models based on epigenetic control by individual or associations of food ligands of NRs. PMID:25022987

  2. Ancient evolutionary origins of epigenetic regulation associated with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Levent; Uddin, Monica; Hou, Zhou-Cheng; Aiello, Allison E; Koenen, Karestan C; Galea, Sandro; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation, are modifiable molecular factors that may underlie mental disorders, especially responses to trauma, including the development of and resilience to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Previous work has identified differential DNA methylation at CpG dinucleotide sites genomewide between trauma exposed individuals with and without PTSD, suggesting a role for epigenetic potential-the capacity to epigenetically regulate behavior and physiology in response to lived experiences. The human species is characterized by an increased period of adaptive plasticity during brain development. The evolutionary history of epigenetic potential in relation to adaptive plasticity is currently unknown. Using phylogenetic methods and functional annotation analyses, we trace the evolution of over 7000 CpG dinucleotides, including 203 associated with PTSD, during the descent of humans in during mammalian evolution and characterize the biological significance of this evolution. We demonstrate that few (7%) PTSD-associated CpG sites are unique to humans, while the vast majority of sites have deep evolutionary origins: 73 and 93% were unambiguously present in the last common ancestor of humans/orangutans and humans/chimpanzees, respectively. Genes proximal to evolved PTSD-associated CpG sites revealed significant enrichment for immune function during recent human evolution and regulation of gene expression during more ancient periods of human evolution. Additionally, 765 putative transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs) were identified that overlap with PTSD-associated CpG sites. Elucidation of the evolutionary history of PTSD-associated CpG sites may provide insights into the function and origin of epigenetic potential in trauma responses, generally, and PTSD, specifically. The human capacity to respond to trauma with stable physiologic and behavioral changes may be due to epigenetic potentials that are shared among many mammalian species

  3. Ancient evolutionary origins of epigenetic regulation associated with posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Levent; Uddin, Monica; Hou, Zhou-Cheng; Aiello, Allison E.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Galea, Sandro; Wildman, Derek E.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation, are modifiable molecular factors that may underlie mental disorders, especially responses to trauma, including the development of and resilience to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Previous work has identified differential DNA methylation at CpG dinucleotide sites genomewide between trauma exposed individuals with and without PTSD, suggesting a role for epigenetic potential—the capacity to epigenetically regulate behavior and physiology in response to lived experiences. The human species is characterized by an increased period of adaptive plasticity during brain development. The evolutionary history of epigenetic potential in relation to adaptive plasticity is currently unknown. Using phylogenetic methods and functional annotation analyses, we trace the evolution of over 7000 CpG dinucleotides, including 203 associated with PTSD, during the descent of humans in during mammalian evolution and characterize the biological significance of this evolution. We demonstrate that few (7%) PTSD-associated CpG sites are unique to humans, while the vast majority of sites have deep evolutionary origins: 73 and 93% were unambiguously present in the last common ancestor of humans/orangutans and humans/chimpanzees, respectively. Genes proximal to evolved PTSD-associated CpG sites revealed significant enrichment for immune function during recent human evolution and regulation of gene expression during more ancient periods of human evolution. Additionally, 765 putative transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs) were identified that overlap with PTSD-associated CpG sites. Elucidation of the evolutionary history of PTSD-associated CpG sites may provide insights into the function and origin of epigenetic potential in trauma responses, generally, and PTSD, specifically. The human capacity to respond to trauma with stable physiologic and behavioral changes may be due to epigenetic potentials that are shared among many mammalian species

  4. NPM-ALK oncogenic tyrosine kinase controls T-cell identity by transcriptional regulation and epigenetic silencing in lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrogio, Chiara; Martinengo, Cinzia; Voena, Claudia; Tondat, Fabrizio; Riera, Ludovica; di Celle, Paola Francia; Inghirami, Giorgio; Chiarle, Roberto

    2009-11-15

    Transformed cells in lymphomas usually maintain the phenotype of the postulated normal lymphocyte from which they arise. By contrast, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a T-cell lymphoma with aberrant phenotype because of the defective expression of the T-cell receptor and other T-cell-specific molecules for still undetermined mechanisms. The majority of ALCL carries the translocation t(2;5) that encodes for the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK, fundamental for survival, proliferation, and migration of transformed T cells. Here, we show that loss of T-cell-specific molecules in ALCL cases is broader than reported previously and involves most T-cell receptor-related signaling molecules, including CD3epsilon, ZAP70, LAT, and SLP76. We further show that NPM-ALK, but not the kinase-dead NPM-ALK(K210R), downregulated the expression of these molecules by a STAT3-mediated gene transcription regulation and/or epigenetic silencing because this downregulation was reverted by treating ALCL cells with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine or by knocking down STAT3 through short hairpin RNA. Finally, NPM-ALK increased the methylation of ZAP70 intron 1-exon 2 boundary region, and both NPM-ALK and STAT3 regulated the expression levels of DNA methyltransferase 1 in transformed T cells. Thus, our data reveal that oncogene-deregulated tyrosine kinase activity controls the expression of molecules that determine T-cell identity and signaling.

  5. Epigenetic modification of miR-141 regulates SKA2 by an endogenous ‘sponge’ HOTAIR in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Zong, Gang; Wang, Hong-Liang; Zhao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of miR-141 has recently implicated in the occurrence and development of various types of malignant tumors. However whether the involvement of miR-141 in the pathogenesis of glioma remains unknown. Here, we showed that miR-141 was markedly downregulated in glioma tissues and cell lines compared with normal brain tissues, and its expression correlated with the pathological grading. Enforced expression of miR-141 in glioma cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of miR-141 exerted opposite effect. Mechanistic investigations revealed that HOTAIR might act as an endogenous ‘sponge’ of miR-141, thereby regulating the derepression of SKA2. Further, we explored the molecular mechanism by which miR-141 expression was regulated, and found that the miR-141 promoter was hypermethylated and that promoter methylation of miR-141 was mediated by DNMT1 in glioma cells. Finally, both overexpression of miR-141 and knockdown of HOTAIR in a mouse model of human glioma resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that epigenetic modification of miR-141 and the interaction of ceRNA regulatory network will provide a new approach for therapeutics against glioma. PMID:27121316

  6. Next stop for the CRISPR revolution: RNA-guided epigenetic regulators.

    PubMed

    Vora, Suhani; Tuttle, Marcelle; Cheng, Jenny; Church, George

    2016-09-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins offer a breakthrough platform for cheap, programmable, and effective sequence-specific DNA targeting. The CRISPR-Cas system is naturally equipped for targeted DNA cutting through its native nuclease activity. As such, groups researching a broad spectrum of biological organisms have quickly adopted the technology with groundbreaking applications to genomic sequence editing in over 20 different species. However, the biological code of life is not only encoded in genetics but also in epigenetics as well. While genetic sequence editing is a powerful ability, we must also be able to edit and regulate transcriptional and epigenetic code. Taking inspiration from work on earlier sequence-specific targeting technologies such as zinc fingers (ZFs) and transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs), researchers quickly expanded the CRISPR-Cas toolbox to include transcriptional activation, repression, and epigenetic modification. In this review, we highlight advances that extend the CRISPR-Cas toolkit for transcriptional and epigenetic regulation, as well as best practice guidelines for these tools, and a perspective on future applications.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of the neural transcriptome and alcohol interference during development

    PubMed Central

    Resendiz, Marisol; Mason, Stephen; Lo, Chiao-Ling; Zhou, Feng C.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol intoxicated cells broadly alter their metabolites – among them methyl and acetic acid can alter the DNA and histone epigenetic codes. Together with the promiscuous effect of alcohol on enzyme activities (including DNA methyltransferases) and the downstream effect on microRNA and transposable elements, alcohol is well placed to affect intrinsic transcriptional programs of developing cells. Considering that the developmental consequences of early alcohol exposure so profoundly affect neural systems, it is not unfounded to reason that alcohol exploits transcriptional regulators to challenge canonical gene expression and in effect, intrinsic developmental pathways to achieve widespread damage in the developing nervous system. To fully evaluate the role of epigenetic regulation in alcohol-related developmental disease, it is important to first gather the targets of epigenetic players in neurodevelopmental models. Here, we attempt to review the cellular and genomic windows of opportunity for alcohol to act on intrinsic neurodevelopmental programs. We also discuss some established targets of fetal alcohol exposure and propose pathways for future study. Overall, this review hopes to illustrate the known epigenetic program and its alterations in normal neural stem cell development and further, aims to depict how alcohol, through neuroepigenetics, may lead to neurodevelopmental deficits observed in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. PMID:25206361

  8. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-05-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression.

  9. Sensory Cortical Plasticity Participates in the Epigenetic Regulation of Robust Memory Formation.

    PubMed

    Phan, Mimi L; Bieszczad, Kasia M

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity remodels sensory cortex across the lifespan. A function of adult sensory cortical plasticity may be capturing available information during perception for memory formation. The degree of experience-dependent remodeling in sensory cortex appears to determine memory strength and specificity for important sensory signals. A key open question is how plasticity is engaged to induce different degrees of sensory cortical remodeling. Neural plasticity for long-term memory requires the expression of genes underlying stable changes in neuronal function, structure, connectivity, and, ultimately, behavior. Lasting changes in transcriptional activity may depend on epigenetic mechanisms; some of the best studied in behavioral neuroscience are DNA methylation and histone acetylation and deacetylation, which, respectively, promote and repress gene expression. One purpose of this review is to propose epigenetic regulation of sensory cortical remodeling as a mechanism enabling the transformation of significant information from experiences into content-rich memories of those experiences. Recent evidence suggests how epigenetic mechanisms regulate highly specific reorganization of sensory cortical representations that establish a widespread network for memory. Thus, epigenetic mechanisms could initiate events to establish exceptionally persistent and robust memories at a systems-wide level by engaging sensory cortical plasticity for gating what and how much information becomes encoded.

  10. Next stop for the CRISPR revolution: RNA-guided epigenetic regulators.

    PubMed

    Vora, Suhani; Tuttle, Marcelle; Cheng, Jenny; Church, George

    2016-09-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins offer a breakthrough platform for cheap, programmable, and effective sequence-specific DNA targeting. The CRISPR-Cas system is naturally equipped for targeted DNA cutting through its native nuclease activity. As such, groups researching a broad spectrum of biological organisms have quickly adopted the technology with groundbreaking applications to genomic sequence editing in over 20 different species. However, the biological code of life is not only encoded in genetics but also in epigenetics as well. While genetic sequence editing is a powerful ability, we must also be able to edit and regulate transcriptional and epigenetic code. Taking inspiration from work on earlier sequence-specific targeting technologies such as zinc fingers (ZFs) and transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs), researchers quickly expanded the CRISPR-Cas toolbox to include transcriptional activation, repression, and epigenetic modification. In this review, we highlight advances that extend the CRISPR-Cas toolkit for transcriptional and epigenetic regulation, as well as best practice guidelines for these tools, and a perspective on future applications. PMID:27248712

  11. Sensory Cortical Plasticity Participates in the Epigenetic Regulation of Robust Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Mimi L.; Bieszczad, Kasia M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity remodels sensory cortex across the lifespan. A function of adult sensory cortical plasticity may be capturing available information during perception for memory formation. The degree of experience-dependent remodeling in sensory cortex appears to determine memory strength and specificity for important sensory signals. A key open question is how plasticity is engaged to induce different degrees of sensory cortical remodeling. Neural plasticity for long-term memory requires the expression of genes underlying stable changes in neuronal function, structure, connectivity, and, ultimately, behavior. Lasting changes in transcriptional activity may depend on epigenetic mechanisms; some of the best studied in behavioral neuroscience are DNA methylation and histone acetylation and deacetylation, which, respectively, promote and repress gene expression. One purpose of this review is to propose epigenetic regulation of sensory cortical remodeling as a mechanism enabling the transformation of significant information from experiences into content-rich memories of those experiences. Recent evidence suggests how epigenetic mechanisms regulate highly specific reorganization of sensory cortical representations that establish a widespread network for memory. Thus, epigenetic mechanisms could initiate events to establish exceptionally persistent and robust memories at a systems-wide level by engaging sensory cortical plasticity for gating what and how much information becomes encoded. PMID:26881129

  12. Co-ordination of Flower Development Through Epigenetic Regulation in Two Model Species: Rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Siyi; Sun, Bo; Looi, Liang-Sheng; Xu, Yifeng; Gan, Eng-Seng; Huang, Jiangbo; Ito, Toshiro

    2015-05-01

    Angiosperms produce flowers for reproduction. Flower development is a multistep developmental process, beginning with the initiation of the floral meristems, followed by floral meristem identity specification and maintenance, organ primordia initiation, floral organ identity specification, floral stem cell termination and finally floral organ maturation. During flower development, each of a large number of genes is expressed in a spatiotemporally regulated manner. Underlying these molecular and phenotypic events are various genetic and epigenetic pathways, consisting of diverse transcription factors, chromatin-remodeling factors and signaling molecules. Over the past 30 years, genetic, biochemical and genomic assays have revealed the underlying genetic frameworks that control flower development. Here, we will review the transcriptional regulation of flower development in two model species: Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We focus on epigenetic regulation that functions to co-ordinate transcription pathways in flower development.

  13. SIRT1 regulates the ribosomal DNA locus: epigenetic candles twinkle longevity in the Christmas tree.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes arrange themselves in a tandem pattern in nucleolus and during the transcription of rRNA genes, the elongating nascent rRNA transcripts create a structure called Christmas tree. rRNA genes in the rDNA locus can be either active or silent depending on the epigenetic regulation of the chromatin structure. Yeast Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) protein containing complexes can repress the recombination in the rDNA locus and subsequently extend the replicative lifespan of the budding yeast. The mammalian rDNA locus is also under the epigenetic regulation by protein complexes, such as NoRC (nucleolar remodeling complex) and eNoSC (energy-dependent nucleolar silencing complex), involving histone deacetylases and methyltransferases. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase, is the key component in the eNoSC complex and hence energetic changes can regulate the activation of eNoSC complex and in this way mediate the epigenetic silencing of rRNA gene expression. The eNoSC complex links SIRT1-induced longevity regulation to the metabolic rate theory of aging.

  14. Epigenetic Regulation in Particulate Matter-Mediated Cardiopulmonary Toxicities: A Systems Biology Perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe Gn; Zhang, Wei

    2012-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution exerts significant adverse health effects in global populations, particularly in developing countries with extensive air pollution. Understanding of the mechanisms of PM-induced health effects including the risk for cardiovascular diseases remains limited. In addition to the direct cellular physiological responses such as mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, PM mediates remarkable dysregulation of gene expression, especially in cardiovascular tissues. The PM-mediated gene dysregulation is likely to be a complex mechanism affected by various genetic and non-genetic factors. Notably, PM is known to alter epigenetic markers (e.g., DNA methylation and histone modifications), which may contribute to air pollution-mediated health consequences including the risk for cardiovascular diseases. Notably, epigenetic changes induced by ambient PM exposure have emerged to play a critical role in gene regulation. Though the underlying mechanism(s) are not completely clear, the available evidence suggests that the modulated activities of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT), histone acetylase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) may contribute to the epigenetic changes induced by PM or PM-related chemicals. By employing genome-wide epigenomic and systems biology approaches, PM toxicogenomics could conceivably progress greatly with the potential identification of individual epigenetic loci associated with dysregulated gene expression after PM exposure, as well the interactions between epigenetic pathways and PM. Furthermore, novel therapeutic targets based on epigenetic markers could be identified through future epigenomic studies on PM-mediated cardiopulmonary toxicities. These considerations collectively inform the future population health applications of genomics in developing countries while benefiting global personalized medicine at the same time. PMID:23185213

  15. Epigenetic Regulation in Particulate Matter-Mediated Cardiopulmonary Toxicities: A Systems Biology Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe GN; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution exerts significant adverse health effects in global populations, particularly in developing countries with extensive air pollution. Understanding of the mechanisms of PM-induced health effects including the risk for cardiovascular diseases remains limited. In addition to the direct cellular physiological responses such as mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, PM mediates remarkable dysregulation of gene expression, especially in cardiovascular tissues. The PM-mediated gene dysregulation is likely to be a complex mechanism affected by various genetic and non-genetic factors. Notably, PM is known to alter epigenetic markers (e.g., DNA methylation and histone modifications), which may contribute to air pollution-mediated health consequences including the risk for cardiovascular diseases. Notably, epigenetic changes induced by ambient PM exposure have emerged to play a critical role in gene regulation. Though the underlying mechanism(s) are not completely clear, the available evidence suggests that the modulated activities of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT), histone acetylase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) may contribute to the epigenetic changes induced by PM or PM-related chemicals. By employing genome-wide epigenomic and systems biology approaches, PM toxicogenomics could conceivably progress greatly with the potential identification of individual epigenetic loci associated with dysregulated gene expression after PM exposure, as well the interactions between epigenetic pathways and PM. Furthermore, novel therapeutic targets based on epigenetic markers could be identified through future epigenomic studies on PM-mediated cardiopulmonary toxicities. These considerations collectively inform the future population health applications of genomics in developing countries while benefiting global personalized medicine at the same time. PMID:23185213

  16. Sulforaphane Epigenetically Regulates Innate Immune Responses of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Induced with Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xueqi; Pröll, Maren; Neuhoff, Christiane; Zhang, Rui; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Hossain, Md. Munir; Tesfaye, Dawit; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Hölker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim

    2015-01-01

    Histone acetylation, regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) is a key epigenetic mechanism controlling gene expressions. Although dendritic cells (DCs) are playing pivotal roles in host immune responses, the effect of epigenetic modulation of DCs immune responses remains unknown. Sulforaphane (SFN) as a HDAC inhibitor has anti-inflammatory properties, which is used to investigate the epigenetic regulation of LPS-induced immune gene and HDAC family gene expressions in porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). SFN was found to inhibit the lipopolysaccharide LPS induced HDAC6, HDAC10 and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT3a) gene expression, whereas up-regulated the expression of DNMT1 gene. Additionally, SFN was observed to inhibit the global HDAC activity, and suppressed moDCs differentiation from immature to mature DCs through down-regulating the CD40, CD80 and CD86 expression and led further to enhanced phagocytosis of moDCs. The SFN pre-treated of moDCs directly altered the LPS-induced TLR4 and MD2 gene expression and dynamically regulated the TLR4-induced activity of transcription factor NF-κB and TBP. SFN showed a protective role in LPS induced cell apoptosis through suppressing the IRF6 and TGF-ß1 production. SFN impaired the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and IL-1ß secretion into the cell culture supernatants that were induced in moDCs by LPS stimulation, whereas SFN increased the cellular-resident TNF-α accumulation. This study demonstrates that through the epigenetic mechanism the HDAC inhibitor SFN could modulate the LPS induced innate immune responses of porcine moDCs. PMID:25793534

  17. An Epigenetic Pathway Regulates Sensitivity of Breast Cancer Cells to HER2 Inhibition via FOXO/c-Myc Axis.

    PubMed

    Matkar, Smita; Sharma, Paras; Gao, Shubin; Gurung, Buddha; Katona, Bryson W; Liao, Jennifer; Muhammad, Abdul Bari; Kong, Xiang-Cheng; Wang, Lei; Jin, Guanghui; Dang, Chi V; Hua, Xianxin

    2015-10-12

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is upregulated in a subset of human breast cancers. However, the cancer cells often quickly develop an adaptive response to HER2 kinase inhibitors. We found that an epigenetic pathway involving MLL2 is crucial for growth of HER2(+) cells and MLL2 reduces sensitivity of the cancer cells to a HER2 inhibitor, lapatinib. Lapatinib-induced FOXO transcription factors, normally tumor-suppressing, paradoxically upregulate c-Myc epigenetically in concert with a cascade of MLL2-associating epigenetic regulators to dampen sensitivity of the cancer cells to lapatinib. An epigenetic inhibitor suppressing c-Myc synergizes with lapatinib to suppress cancer growth in vivo, partly by repressing the FOXO/c-Myc axis, unraveling an epigenetically regulated FOXO/c-Myc axis as a potential target to improve therapy. PMID:26461093

  18. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy. PMID:24216997

  19. Nutritional epigenetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is intended to provide a timely overview of the current state of research at the intersection of nutrition and epigenetics. I begin by describing epigenetics and molecular mechanisms of eigenetic regulation, then highlight four classes of nutritional exposures currently being investiga...

  20. NFIB-Mediated Repression of the Epigenetic Factor Ezh2 Regulates Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Guy; Harvey, Tracey J.; McLeay, Robert; Smith, Aaron G.; Harris, Lachlan; Mason, Sharon; Stringer, Brett W.; Day, Bryan W.; Wray, Naomi R.; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Bailey, Timothy L.; Boyd, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are essential in regulating neural progenitor cell self-renewal, with the chromatin-modifying protein Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) emerging as a central player in promoting progenitor cell self-renewal during cortical development. Despite this, how Ezh2 is itself regulated remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the transcription factor nuclear factor IB (NFIB) plays a key role in this process. Nfib−/− mice exhibit an increased number of proliferative ventricular zone cells that express progenitor cell markers and upregulation of EZH2 expression within the neocortex and hippocampus. NFIB binds to the Ezh2 promoter and overexpression of NFIB represses Ezh2 transcription. Finally, key downstream targets of EZH2-mediated epigenetic repression are misregulated in Nfib−/− mice. Collectively, these results suggest that the downregulation of Ezh2 transcription by NFIB is an important component of the process of neural progenitor cell differentiation during cortical development. PMID:24553933

  1. The metabolome regulates the epigenetic landscape during naive-to-primed human embryonic stem cell transition.

    PubMed

    Sperber, Henrik; Mathieu, Julie; Wang, Yuliang; Ferreccio, Amy; Hesson, Jennifer; Xu, Zhuojin; Fischer, Karin A; Devi, Arikketh; Detraux, Damien; Gu, Haiwei; Battle, Stephanie L; Showalter, Megan; Valensisi, Cristina; Bielas, Jason H; Ericson, Nolan G; Margaretha, Lilyana; Robitaille, Aaron M; Margineantu, Daciana; Fiehn, Oliver; Hockenbery, David; Blau, C Anthony; Raftery, Daniel; Margolin, Adam A; Hawkins, R David; Moon, Randall T; Ware, Carol B; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-12-01

    For nearly a century developmental biologists have recognized that cells from embryos can differ in their potential to differentiate into distinct cell types. Recently, it has been recognized that embryonic stem cells derived from both mice and humans exhibit two stable yet epigenetically distinct states of pluripotency: naive and primed. We now show that nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) and the metabolic state regulate pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).  Specifically, in naive hESCs, NNMT and its enzymatic product 1-methylnicotinamide are highly upregulated, and NNMT is required for low S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) levels and the H3K27me3 repressive state. NNMT consumes SAM in naive cells, making it unavailable for histone methylation that represses Wnt and activates the HIF pathway in primed hESCs. These data support the hypothesis that the metabolome regulates the epigenetic landscape of the earliest steps in human development. PMID:26571212

  2. Long-range epigenetic regulation is conferred by genetic variation located at thousands of independent loci.

    PubMed

    Lemire, Mathieu; Zaidi, Syed H E; Ban, Maria; Ge, Bing; Aïssi, Dylan; Germain, Marine; Kassam, Irfahan; Wang, Mike; Zanke, Brent W; Gagnon, France; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Wells, Philip S; Sawcer, Stephen; Gallinger, Steven; Pastinen, Tomi; Hudson, Thomas J

    2015-02-26

    The interplay between genetic and epigenetic variation is only partially understood. One form of epigenetic variation is methylation at CpG sites, which can be measured as methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTL). Here we report that in a panel of lymphocytes from 1,748 individuals, methylation levels at 1,919 CpG sites are correlated with at least one distal (trans) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (P<3.2 × 10(-13); FDR<5%). These trans-meQTLs include 1,657 SNP-CpG pairs from different chromosomes and 262 pairs from the same chromosome that are >1 Mb apart. Over 90% of these pairs are replicated (FDR<5%) in at least one of two independent data sets. Genomic loci harbouring trans-meQTLs are significantly enriched (P<0.001) for long non-coding transcripts (2.2-fold), known epigenetic regulators (2.3-fold), piwi-interacting RNA clusters (3.6-fold) and curated transcription factors (4.1-fold), including zinc-finger proteins (8.75-fold). Long-range epigenetic networks uncovered by this approach may be relevant to normal and disease states.

  3. Genetic Determinants of Epigenetic Patterns: Providing Insight into Disease.

    PubMed

    Cazaly, Emma; Charlesworth, Jac; Dickinson, Joanne L; Holloway, Adele F

    2015-01-01

    The field of epigenetics and our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the establishment, maintenance and heritability of epigenetic patterns continue to grow at a remarkable rate. This information is providing increased understanding of the role of epigenetic changes in disease, insight into the underlying causes of these epigenetic changes and revealing new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Epigenetic modifiers are increasingly being pursued as therapeutic targets in a range of diseases, with a number of agents targeting epigenetic modifications already proving effective in diseases such as cancer. Although it is well established that DNA mutations and aberrant expression of epigenetic modifiers play a key role in disease, attention is now turning to the interplay between genetic and epigenetic factors in complex disease etiology. The role of genetic variability in determining epigenetic profiles, which can then be modified by environmental and stochastic factors, is becoming more apparent. Understanding the interplay between genetic and epigenetic factors is likely to aid in identifying individuals most likely to benefit from epigenetic therapies. This goal is coming closer to realization because of continual advances in laboratory and statistical tools enabling improvements in the integration of genomic, epigenomic and phenotypic data.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of miRNA-Cancer Stem Cells nexus by Nutraceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aamir; Li, Yiwei; Bao, Bin; Kong, Dejuan; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2014-01-01

    Nutraceuticals, the bioactive food components represented by many naturally occurring dietary compounds, have been investigated for a few decades for their numerous beneficial effects, including their anticancer properties. The initial interest in the cancer-preventing/therapeutic ability of these agents was based on their ability to affect multiple signaling pathways that are deregulated in cancer cells. With a shift in the focus of cancer research to the emerging areas such as epigenetic regulation, microRNAs (miRNAs) and the cancer stem cells (CSCs), nutraceuticals initially appeared out of place. However, research investigations over the last several years have slowly but firmly presented evidence that supports a relevance of these agents in modern day research. While nutraceuticals are increasingly being realized to alter miRNA/CSCs expression and function, the molecular mechanism(s) are not very clearly understood. Epigenetic regulation is one mechanism by which these agents exert their anticancer effects. In this focused mini review, we summarize our current understanding of epigenetic regulation of miRNAs and CSCs by nutraceuticals. We discuss both direct and indirect evidences that support such an activity of these compounds. PMID:24272883

  5. No longer a nuisance: long non-coding RNAs join CENP-A in epigenetic centromere regulation.

    PubMed

    Rošić, Silvana; Erhardt, Sylvia

    2016-04-01

    Centromeres represent the basis for kinetochore formation, and are essential for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Despite these essential roles, centromeres are not defined by specific DNA sequences, but by epigenetic means. The histone variant CENP-A controls centromere identity epigenetically and is essential for recruiting kinetochore components that attach the chromosomes to the mitotic spindle during mitosis. Recently, a new player in centromere regulation has emerged: long non-coding RNAs transcribed from repetitive regions of centromeric DNA function in regulating centromeres epigenetically. This review summarizes recent findings on the essential roles that transcription, pericentromeric transcripts, and centromere-derived RNAs play in centromere biology.

  6. Histone Regulation in the CNS: Basic Principles of Epigenetic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Maze, Ian; Noh, Kyung-Min; Allis, C David

    2013-01-01

    Postmitotic neurons are subject to a vast array of environmental influences that require the nuclear integration of intracellular signaling events to promote a wide variety of neuroplastic states associated with synaptic function, circuit formation, and behavioral memory. Over the last decade, much attention has been paid to the roles of transcription and chromatin regulation in guiding fundamental aspects of neuronal function. A great deal of this work has centered on neurodevelopmental and adulthood plasticity, with increased focus in the areas of neuropharmacology and molecular psychiatry. Here, we attempt to provide a broad overview of chromatin regulation, as it relates to central nervous system (CNS) function, with specific emphasis on the modes of histone posttranslational modifications, chromatin remodeling, and histone variant exchange. Understanding the functions of chromatin in the context of the CNS will aid in the future development of pharmacological therapeutics aimed at alleviating devastating neurological disorders. PMID:22828751

  7. Epigenetic Modifications in Neurological Diseases: Natural Products as Epigenetic Modulators a Treatment Strategy.

    PubMed

    Gangisetty, Omkaram; Murugan, Sengottuvelan

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, covalent histone modifications, and small noncoding RNAs, play a key role in regulating the gene expression. This regulatory mechanism is important in cellular differentiation and development. Recent advances in the field of epigenetics extended the role of epigenetic mechanisms in controlling key biological processes such as genome imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. Aberrant epigenetic modifications are associated with the development of many diseases. The role of epigenetic modifications in various neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis is rapidly emerging. The use of epigenetic modifying drugs to treat these diseases has been the interest in recent years. A number of natural products having diverse mechanism of action are used for drug discovery. For many years, natural compounds have been used to treat various neurodegenerative diseases, but the use of such compounds as epigenetic modulators to reverse or treat neurological diseases are not well studied. In this chapter, we mainly focus on how various epigenetic modifications play a key role in neurodegenerative diseases, their mechanism of action, and how it acts as a potential therapeutic target for epigenetic drugs to treat these diseases will be discussed.

  8. Epigenetic Modifications in Neurological Diseases: Natural Products as Epigenetic Modulators a Treatment Strategy.

    PubMed

    Gangisetty, Omkaram; Murugan, Sengottuvelan

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, covalent histone modifications, and small noncoding RNAs, play a key role in regulating the gene expression. This regulatory mechanism is important in cellular differentiation and development. Recent advances in the field of epigenetics extended the role of epigenetic mechanisms in controlling key biological processes such as genome imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. Aberrant epigenetic modifications are associated with the development of many diseases. The role of epigenetic modifications in various neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis is rapidly emerging. The use of epigenetic modifying drugs to treat these diseases has been the interest in recent years. A number of natural products having diverse mechanism of action are used for drug discovery. For many years, natural compounds have been used to treat various neurodegenerative diseases, but the use of such compounds as epigenetic modulators to reverse or treat neurological diseases are not well studied. In this chapter, we mainly focus on how various epigenetic modifications play a key role in neurodegenerative diseases, their mechanism of action, and how it acts as a potential therapeutic target for epigenetic drugs to treat these diseases will be discussed. PMID:27651245

  9. Epigenetic deregulations in chordoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Li, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Chordoma is a rare type of malignant bone tumour arising from remnant notochord and prognosis of patients with it remains poor as its molecular and genetic mechanisms are not well understood. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modification and nucleosome remodelling), play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Aberrant epigenetic patterns are present in patients with chordoma, indicating a potential role for epigenetic mechanisms inthis malignancy. Furthermore, epigenetic alterations may provide novel biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets for treatment. In this review, we discuss relevant epigenetic findings associated with chordoma, and their potential application for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  10. Microbiota and epigenetic regulation of inflammatory mediators in type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Remely, M; Aumueller, E; Jahn, D; Hippe, B; Brath, H; Haslberger, A G

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with alterations in the structure of the gut microbiota leading to low-grade inflammatory responses. An increased penetration of the impaired gut membrane by bacterial components is believed to induce this inflammation, possibly involving epigenetic alteration of inflammatory molecules such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We evaluated changes of the gut microbiota and epigenetic DNA methylation of TLR2 and TLR4 in three groups of subjects: type 2 diabetics under glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist therapy, obese individuals without established insulin resistance, and a lean control group. Clostridium cluster IV, Clostridium cluster XIVa, lactic acid bacteria, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bacteroidetes abundances were analysed by PCR and 454 high-throughput sequencing. The epigenetic methylation in the regulatory region of TLR4 and TLR2 was analysed using bisulfite conversion and pyrosequencing. We observed a significantly higher ratio of Firmicutes/ Bacteroidetes in type 2 diabetics compared to lean controls and obese. Major differences were shown in lactic acid bacteria, with the highest abundance in type 2 diabetics, followed by obese and lean participants. In comparison, F. prausnitzii was least abundant in type 2 diabetics, and most abundant in lean controls. Methylation analysis of four CpGs in the first exon of TLR4 showed significantly lower methylation in obese individuals, but no significant difference between type 2 diabetics and lean controls. Methylation of seven CpGs in the promoter region of TLR2 was significantly lower in type 2 diabetics compared to obese subjects and lean controls. The methylation levels of both TLRs were significantly correlated with body mass index. Our data suggest that changes in gut microbiota and thus cell wall components are involved in the epigenetic regulation of inflammatory reactions. An improved diet targeted to induce gut microbial balance and in the following even epigenetic changes of

  11. Epigenetics in Breast and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanyuan; Sarkissyan, Marianna; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Most recent investigations into cancer etiology have identified a key role played by epigenetics. Specifically, aberrant DNA and histone modifications which silence tumor suppressor genes or promote oncogenes have been demonstrated in multiple cancer models. While the role of epigenetics in several solid tumor cancers such as colorectal cancer are well established, there is emerging evidence that epigenetics also plays a critical role in breast and prostate cancer. In breast cancer, DNA methylation profiles have been linked to hormone receptor status and tumor progression. Similarly in prostate cancer, epigenetic patterns have been associated with androgen receptor status and response to therapy. The regulation of key receptor pathways and activities which affect clinical therapy treatment options by epigenetics renders this field high priority for elucidating mechanisms and potential targets. A new set of methylation arrays are now available to screen epigenetic changes and provide the cuttingedge tools needed to perform such investigations. The role of nutritional interventions affecting epigenetic changes particularly holds promise. Ultimately, determining the causes and outcomes from epigenetic changes will inform translational applications for utilization as biomarkers for risk and prognosis as well as candidates for therapy. PMID:25421674

  12. Down-regulation of EVI1 is associated with epigenetic alterations and good prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Iria; Maicas, Miren; Cervera, José; Agirre, Xabier; Marin-Béjar, Oskar; Marcotegui, Nerea; Vicente, Carmen; Lahortiga, Idoya; Gomez-Benito, Maria; Carranza, Claudia; Valencia, Ana; Brunet, Salut; Lumbreras, Eva; Prosper, Felipe; Gómez-Casares, María T.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; Calasanz, María J.; Sanz, Miguel A.; Sierra, Jorge; Odero, María D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The EVI1 gene (3q26) codes for a zinc finger transcription factor with important roles in both mammalian development and leukemogenesis. Over-expression of EVI1 through either 3q26 rearrangements, MLL fusions, or other unknown mechanisms confers a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. Design and Methods We analyzed the prevalence and prognostic impact of EVI1 over-expression in a series of 476 patients with acute myeloid leukemia, and investigated the epigenetic modifications of the EVI1 locus which could be involved in the transcriptional regulation of this gene. Results Our data provide further evidence that EVI1 over-expression is a poor prognostic marker in acute myeloid leukemia patients less than 65 years old. Moreover, we found that patients with no basal expression of EVI1 had a better prognosis than patients with expression/over-expression (P=0.036). We also showed that cell lines with over-expression of EVI1 had no DNA methylation in the promoter region of the EVI1 locus, and had marks of active histone modifications: H3 and H4 acetylation, and trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4. Conversely, cell lines with no expression of EVI1 have DNA hypermethylation and are marked by repressive trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 at the EVI1 promoter. Conclusions Our results identify EVI1 over-expression as a poor prognostic marker in a large, independent cohort of acute myeloid leukemia patients less than 65 years old, and show that the total absence of EVI1 expression has a prognostic impact on the outcome of such patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated for the first time that an aberrant epigenetic pattern involving DNA methylation, H3 and H4 acetylation, and trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 and histone H3 lysine 27 might play a role in the transcriptional regulation of EVI1 in acute myeloid leukemia. This study opens new avenues for a better understanding of the regulation of EVI1 expression at a transcriptional level. PMID:21750091

  13. Rice ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1, encoding an F-box protein, regulates meristem fate.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kyoko; Ito, Momoyo; Nagasawa, Nobuhiro; Kyozuka, Junko; Nagato, Yasuo

    2007-09-01

    Inflorescence architecture is one of the most important agronomical traits. Characterization of rice aberrant panicle organization 1 (apo1) mutants revealed that APO1 positively controls spikelet number by suppressing the precocious conversion of inflorescence meristems to spikelet meristems. In addition, APO1 is associated with the regulation of the plastchron, floral organ identity, and floral determinacy. Phenotypic analyses of apo1 and floral homeotic double mutants demonstrate that APO1 positively regulates class-C floral homeotic genes, but not class-B genes. Molecular studies revealed that APO1 encodes an F-box protein, an ortholog of Arabidopsis UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGAN (UFO), which is a positive regulator of class-B genes. Overexpression of APO1 caused an increase in inflorescence branches and spikelets. As the mutant inflorescences and flowers differed considerably between apo1 and ufo, the functions of APO1 and UFO appear to have diverged during evolution. PMID:17666027

  14. Rice ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1, encoding an F-box protein, regulates meristem fate.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kyoko; Ito, Momoyo; Nagasawa, Nobuhiro; Kyozuka, Junko; Nagato, Yasuo

    2007-09-01

    Inflorescence architecture is one of the most important agronomical traits. Characterization of rice aberrant panicle organization 1 (apo1) mutants revealed that APO1 positively controls spikelet number by suppressing the precocious conversion of inflorescence meristems to spikelet meristems. In addition, APO1 is associated with the regulation of the plastchron, floral organ identity, and floral determinacy. Phenotypic analyses of apo1 and floral homeotic double mutants demonstrate that APO1 positively regulates class-C floral homeotic genes, but not class-B genes. Molecular studies revealed that APO1 encodes an F-box protein, an ortholog of Arabidopsis UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGAN (UFO), which is a positive regulator of class-B genes. Overexpression of APO1 caused an increase in inflorescence branches and spikelets. As the mutant inflorescences and flowers differed considerably between apo1 and ufo, the functions of APO1 and UFO appear to have diverged during evolution.

  15. Chromatin regulator PRC2 is a key regulator of epigenetic plasticity in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Atsushi; Ito, Motokazu; Katsushima, Keisuke; Ohka, Fumiharu; Hatanaka, Akira; Shinjo, Keiko; Sato, Shinya; Takahashi, Satoru; Ishikawa, Yuta; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Shimogawa, Hiroki; Uesugi, Motonari; Okano, Hideyuki; Kim, Seung U; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Yutaka

    2013-07-15

    Tumor cell plasticity contributes to functional and morphologic heterogeneity. To uncover the underlying mechanisms of this plasticity, we examined glioma stem-like cells (GSC) where we found that the biologic interconversion between GSCs and differentiated non-GSCs is functionally plastic and accompanied by gain or loss of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), a complex that modifies chromatin structure. PRC2 mediates lysine 27 trimethylation on histone H3 and in GSC it affected pluripotency or development-associated genes (e.g., Nanog, Wnt1, and BMP5) together with alterations in the subcellular localization of EZH2, a catalytic component of PRC2. Intriguingly, exogenous expression of EZH2-dNLS, which lacks nuclear localization sequence, impaired the repression of Nanog expression under differentiation conditions. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated attenuation or pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2 had little to no effect on apoptosis or bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in GSCs, but it disrupted morphologic interconversion and impaired GSC integration into the brain tissue, thereby improving survival of GSC-bearing mice. Pathologic analysis of human glioma specimens revealed that the number of tumor cells with nuclear EZH2 is larger around tumor vessels and the invasive front, suggesting that nuclear EZH2 may help reprogram tumor cells in close proximity to this microenvironment. Our results indicate that epigenetic regulation by PRC2 is a key mediator of tumor cell plasticity, which is required for the adaptation of glioblastoma cells to their microenvironment. Thus, PRC2-targeted therapy may reduce tumor cell plasticity and tumor heterogeneity, offering a new paradigm for glioma treatment.

  16. Epigenetic Regulation of Antibody Responses by the Histone H2A Deubiquitinase MYSM1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiao-Xia; Chou, YuChia; Jones, Lindsey; Wang, Tao; Sanchez, Suzi; Huang, Xue F; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Changyong; Chen, Si-Yi

    2015-01-01

    B cell-mediated antibody response plays critical roles in protective immunity, as well as in the pathogenesis of allergic and autoimmune diseases. Epigenetic histone and DNA modifications regulate gene transcription and immunity; however, so far, little is known about the role of epigenetic regulation in antibody responses. In this study, we found that mice deficient in the histone H2A deubiquitinase MYSM1, despite their severe defect in B cell development, exhibit an enhanced antibody response against both T cell-dependent and independent antigens. We revealed that MYSM1 intrinsically represses plasma cell differentiation and antibody production. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that MYSM1 is a transcriptional activator of Pax5, the repressors of plasma cell differentiation, by facilitating key transcriptional factor recruitment and coordinating histone modifications at the Pax5 loci. Hence, this study uncovers a critical role for MYSM1 in epigenetically repressing plasma cell differentiation and antibody production, in addition to its opposing, active role in B cell development. Importantly, this study further provides a new target and strategy to modulate antibody production and responses with profound therapeutic implications. PMID:26348977

  17. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of centromeres: a look at HAC formation.

    PubMed

    Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal locus required for accurate chromosome segregation. A specific histone H3 variant, CENP-A, assembles at centromeres. CENP-A is required for kinetochore protein assembly and is an epigenetic marker for the maintenance of a functional centromere. Human CENP-A chromatin normally assembles on α-satellite DNA (alphoid DNA), a centromeric repetitive sequence. Using alphoid DNA arrays, human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have been constructed in human HT1080 cells and used to dissect the requirements for CENP-A assembly on DNA sequence. However, centromere formation is not a simple genetic event. In other commonly used human cell lines, such as HeLa and U2OS cells, no functional de novo centromere formation occurs efficiently with the same centromeric alphoid DNA sequences. Recent studies using protein tethering combined with the HAC system and/or genetic manipulation have revealed that epigenetic chromatin regulation mechanisms are also involved in the CENP-A chromatin assembly pathway and subsequent centromere/kinetochore formation. We summarize the DNA sequence requirements for CENP-A assembly and discuss the epigenetic regulation of human centromeres. PMID:25682171

  18. Epigenetic regulation of mitochondrial function in neurodegenerative disease: New insights from advances in genomic technologies.

    PubMed

    Devall, Matthew; Roubroeks, Janou; Mill, Jonathan; Weedon, Michael; Lunnon, Katie

    2016-06-20

    The field of mitochondrial epigenetics has received increased attention in recent years and changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation has been implicated in a number of diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, current publications have been limited by the use of global or targeted methods of measuring DNA methylation. In this review, we discuss current findings in mitochondrial epigenetics as well as its potential role as a regulator of mitochondria within the brain. Finally, we summarize the current technologies best suited to capturing mtDNA methylation, and how a move towards whole epigenome sequencing of mtDNA may help to advance our current understanding of the field. PMID:26876477

  19. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  20. Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Christoph; Veldwijk, Marlon R.; Oakes, Christopher C.; Seibold, Petra; Slynko, Alla; Liesenfeld, David B.; Rabionet, Mariona; Hanke, Sabrina A.; Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena; Benner, Axel; Rösli, Christoph; Sandhoff, Roger; Assenov, Yassen; Plass, Christoph; Herskind, Carsten; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmezer, Peter; Popanda, Odilia

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a fundamental part of cancer treatment but its use is limited by the onset of late adverse effects in the normal tissue, especially radiation-induced fibrosis. Since the molecular causes for fibrosis are largely unknown, we analyse if epigenetic regulation might explain inter-individual differences in fibrosis risk. DNA methylation profiling of dermal fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients prior to irradiation identifies differences associated with fibrosis. One region is characterized as a differentially methylated enhancer of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKA). Decreased DNA methylation at this enhancer enables recruitment of the profibrotic transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) and facilitates radiation-induced DGKA transcription in cells from patients later developing fibrosis. Conversely, inhibition of DGKA has pronounced effects on diacylglycerol-mediated lipid homeostasis and reduces profibrotic fibroblast activation. Collectively, DGKA is an epigenetically deregulated kinase involved in radiation response and may serve as a marker and therapeutic target for personalized radiotherapy. PMID:26964756

  1. Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Christoph; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Oakes, Christopher C; Seibold, Petra; Slynko, Alla; Liesenfeld, David B; Rabionet, Mariona; Hanke, Sabrina A; Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena; Benner, Axel; Rösli, Christoph; Sandhoff, Roger; Assenov, Yassen; Plass, Christoph; Herskind, Carsten; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmezer, Peter; Popanda, Odilia

    2016-03-11

    Radiotherapy is a fundamental part of cancer treatment but its use is limited by the onset of late adverse effects in the normal tissue, especially radiation-induced fibrosis. Since the molecular causes for fibrosis are largely unknown, we analyse if epigenetic regulation might explain inter-individual differences in fibrosis risk. DNA methylation profiling of dermal fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients prior to irradiation identifies differences associated with fibrosis. One region is characterized as a differentially methylated enhancer of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKA). Decreased DNA methylation at this enhancer enables recruitment of the profibrotic transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) and facilitates radiation-induced DGKA transcription in cells from patients later developing fibrosis. Conversely, inhibition of DGKA has pronounced effects on diacylglycerol-mediated lipid homeostasis and reduces profibrotic fibroblast activation. Collectively, DGKA is an epigenetically deregulated kinase involved in radiation response and may serve as a marker and therapeutic target for personalized radiotherapy.

  2. LSD1-a pivotal epigenetic regulator of brown and beige fat differentiation and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jean Z; Farmer, Stephen R

    2016-08-15

    In this issue of Genes & Development, Zeng and colleagues (pp. 1822-1836) identify lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) as a pivotal regulator of whole-body energy expenditure by controlling the oxidative and thermogenic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT). They show that LSD1 interacts with PRDM16 to repress select white adipose tissue (WAT) genes but also represses hydroxysteroid 11-β-dehydrogenase 1 (HSD11B1) independently of PRDM16 to prevent production of glucocorticoids that impair BAT functions. Their study provides important insight into epigenetic mechanisms regulating the function of BAT. PMID:27601528

  3. Current and upcoming approaches to exploit the reversibility of epigenetic mutations in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Falahi, Fahimeh; van Kruchten, Michel; Martinet, Nadine; Hospers, Geke A P; Rots, Marianne G

    2014-07-29

    DNA methylation and histone modifications are important epigenetic modifications associated with gene (dys)regulation. The epigenetic modifications are balanced by epigenetic enzymes, so-called writers and erasers, such as DNA (de)methylases and histone (de)acetylases. Aberrant epigenetic alterations have been associated with various diseases, including breast cancer. Since aberrant epigenetic modifications are potentially reversible, they might represent targets for breast cancer therapy. Indeed, several drugs have been designed to inhibit epigenetic enzymes (epi-drugs), thereby reversing epigenetic modifications. US Food and Drug Administration approval has been obtained for some epi-drugs for hematological malignancies. However, these drugs have had very modest anti-tumor efficacy in phase I and II clinical trials in breast cancer patients as monotherapy. Therefore, current clinical trials focus on the combination of epi-drugs with other therapies to enhance or restore the sensitivity to such therapies. This approach has yielded some promising results in early phase II trials. The disadvantage of epi-drugs, however, is genome-wide effects, which may cause unwanted upregulation of, for example, pro-metastatic genes. Development of gene-targeted epigenetic modifications (epigenetic editing) in breast cancer can provide a novel approach to prevent such unwanted events. In this context, identification of crucial epigenetic modifications regulating key genes in breast cancer is of critical importance. In this review, we first describe aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications as two important classes of epigenetic mutations in breast cancer. Then we focus on the preclinical and clinical epigenetic-based therapies currently being explored for breast cancer. Finally, we describe epigenetic editing as a promising new approach for possible applications towards more targeted breast cancer treatment.

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of Placenta-Specific 8 Contributes to Altered Function of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Exposed to Intrauterine Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Blue, Emily K; Sheehan, BreAnn M; Nuss, Zia V; Boyle, Frances A; Hocutt, Caleb M; Gohn, Cassandra R; Varberg, Kaela M; McClintick, Jeanette N; Haneline, Laura S

    2015-07-01

    Intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is linked to development of hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes in children. Our previous studies determined that endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from neonates exposed to GDM exhibit impaired function. The current goals were to identify aberrantly expressed genes that contribute to impaired function of GDM-exposed ECFCs and to evaluate for evidence of altered epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Genome-wide mRNA expression analysis was conducted on ECFCs from control and GDM pregnancies. Candidate genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Bisulfite sequencing evaluated DNA methylation of placenta-specific 8 (PLAC8). Proliferation and senescence assays of ECFCs transfected with siRNA to knockdown PLAC8 were performed to determine functional impact. Thirty-eight genes were differentially expressed between control and GDM-exposed ECFCs. PLAC8 was highly expressed in GDM-exposed ECFCs, and PLAC8 expression correlated with maternal hyperglycemia. Methylation status of 17 CpG sites in PLAC8 negatively correlated with mRNA expression. Knockdown of PLAC8 in GDM-exposed ECFCs improved proliferation and senescence defects. This study provides strong evidence in neonatal endothelial progenitor cells that GDM exposure in utero leads to altered gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting the possibility of altered epigenetic regulation. PMID:25720387

  5. Sulforaphane Enhances Nrf2 Expression in Prostate Cancer TRAMP C1 Cells through Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengyue; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Khor, Tin Oo; Shu, Limin; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests epigenetic alteration is involved during the development and progression of prostate cancer. Previously, we found Nrf2, a key regulator of cellular antioxidant defense systems, was silenced through epigenetic mechanism during tumorigenesis in vivo TRAMP mice and in vitro TRAMP C1 cells. Sulforaphane (SFN) in cruciferous vegetable has been demonstrated to be a potent cancer prevention agent for years. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of SFN to restore Nrf2 expression in TRAMP C1 cells through epigenetic modifications. Bisulfite genomic sequencing results indicated that SFN treatment led to demethylation of the first 5 CpGs in the promoter region of the Nrf2 gene in TRAMP C1 cells. Using methylation DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) assay, SFN significantly reduced the ratio of anti-mecyt antibody binding to the Nrf2 promoter containing the first 5 CpGs. SFN increased mRNA and protein expressions of Nrf2 and Nrf2 downstream target gene NQO-1. In addition, SFN decreased the protein levels of DNMT1 and DNMT3a. SFN treatment also attenuated the protein expression levels of HDACs 1, 4, 5, and 7 while increased the level of active chromatin marker acetyl-Histone 3 (Ac-H3). SFN treatments also increased chromatin-immunoprecipitated DNA of Nrf2 gene promoter using anti-Ac-H3 antibody. Taken together, our current study shows that SFN regulates Nrf2's CpGs demethylation and reactivation in TRAMP C1 cells, suggesting SFN may exert its chemopreventive effect in part via epigenetic modifications of Nrf2 gene with subsequent induction of its downstream anti-oxidative stress pathway. PMID:23416117

  6. Emodin Bidirectionally Modulates Macrophage Polarization and Epigenetically Regulates Macrophage Memory.

    PubMed

    Iwanowycz, Stephen; Wang, Junfeng; Altomare, Diego; Hui, Yvonne; Fan, Daping

    2016-05-27

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells capable of performing a broad spectrum of functions. Macrophage phenotypes are classified along a continuum between the extremes of proinflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. The seemingly opposing functions of M1 and M2 macrophages must be tightly regulated for an effective and proper response to foreign molecules or damaged tissue. Excessive activation of either M1 or M2 macrophages contributes to the pathology of many diseases. Emodin is a Chinese herb-derived compound and has shown potential to inhibit inflammation in various settings. In this study, we tested the ability of emodin to modulate the macrophage response to both M1 and M2 stimuli. Primary mouse macrophages were stimulated with LPS/IFNγ or IL4 with or without emodin, and the effects of emodin on gene transcription, cell signaling pathways, and histone modifications were examined by a variety of approaches, including microarray, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and functional assays. We found that emodin bidirectionally tunes the induction of LPS/IFNγ- and IL4-responsive genes through inhibiting NFκB/IRF5/STAT1 signaling and IRF4/STAT6 signaling, respectively. Thereby, emodin modulates macrophage phagocytosis, migration, and NO production. Furthermore, emodin inhibited the removal of H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27m3) marks and the addition of H3K27 acetylation (H3K27ac) marks on genes required for M1 or M2 polarization of macrophages. In conclusion, our data suggest that emodin is uniquely able to suppress the excessive response of macrophages to both M1 and M2 stimuli and therefore has the potential to restore macrophage homeostasis in various pathologies.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of cathepsin L expression in chronic myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Samaiya, Misti; Bakhshi, Sameer; Shukla, Abhay A; Kumar, Lalit; Chauhan, Shyam S

    2011-01-01

    The expression and significance of cathepsin L (CTSL) has been extensively studied in solid tumours. However no such information in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) was available. We investigated the activity and expression of this protease in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 47 adult CML patients. Thirty adults suffering from systemic diseases and 50 healthy volunteers served as controls. The mRNA levels of CTSL, its specific endogenous inhibitor cystatin C and transcriptional up-regulator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantitated by real-time qPCR. CTSL protease activity and its mRNA expression were significantly higher in CML chronic phase (CP) patients compared to CML accelerated phase/blast crisis (AP/BC) patients and controls (P≤ 0.001). VEGF whose expression was most pronounced in CP and declined (P≤ 0.001) in the advanced phases of the malignancy exhibited a strong positive correlation with CTSL expression (r= 0.97; P≤ 0.001). Cystatin C expression was significantly lower (P≤ 0.001) in CML and displayed inverse correlation with CTSL (r=−0.713; P≤ 0.001) activity. CTSL promoter was significantly hypomethylated in CML CP compared to CML AP/BC patients as well as controls. K562, a BC CML cell line displayed CTSL activity, expression and methylation status of CTSL promoter that was comparable to CML AP/BC patients. Treatment of these cells or PBMCs isolated from CML AP/BC patients with 5′-aza-cytidine resulted in a dramatic increase in CSTL activity and/or expression thereby demonstrating the role of promoter methylation in the stage specific expression of CTSL in CML. Differential expression of CTSL in CML at various stages of malignancy may prove useful in identification of the high-risk patients thereby facilitating better management of disease. PMID:21496199

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate stage differentiation in the minimized protozoan Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Sonda, Sabrina; Morf, Laura; Bottova, Iveta; Baetschmann, Hansruedi; Rehrauer, Hubert; Caflisch, Amedeo; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Hehl, Adrian B

    2010-04-01

    Histone modification is an important mechanism regulating both gene expression and the establishment and maintenance of cellular phenotypes during development. Regulation of histone acetylation via histone acetylases and deacetylases (HDACs) appears to be particularly crucial in determining gene expression patterns. In this study we explored the effect of HDAC inhibition on the life cycle of the human pathogen Giardia lamblia, a highly reduced parasitic protozoan characterized by minimized cellular processes. We found that the HDAC inhibitor FR235222 increased the level of histone acetylation and induced transcriptional regulation of approximately 2% of genes in proliferating and encysting parasites. In addition, our analyses showed that the levels of histone acetylation decreased during differentiation into cysts, the infective stage of the parasite. Importantly, FR235222 treatment during encystation reversed this histone hypo-acetylation and potently blocked the formation of cysts. These results provide the first direct evidence for epigenetic regulation of gene expression in this simple eukaryote. This suggests that regulation of histone acetylation is involved in the control of Giardia stage differentiation, and identifies epigenetic mechanisms as a promising target to prevent Giardia transmission. PMID:20132448

  9. O-GlcNAc Signaling in Cancer Metabolism and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jay Prakash; Zhang, Kaisi; Wu, Jing; Yang, Xiaoyong

    2014-01-01

    The covalent attachment of β-D-N-acetylglucosamine monosaccharides (O-GlcNAc) to serine/threonine residues of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins is a major regulatory mechanism in cell physiology. Aberrant O-GlcNAc modification of signaling proteins, metabolic enzymes, and transcriptional and epigenetic regulators has been implicated in cancer. Relentless growth of cancer cells requires metabolic reprogramming that is intertwined with changes in the epigenetic landscape. This review highlights the emerging role of protein O-GlcNAcylation at the interface of cancer metabolism and epigenetics. PMID:24769077

  10. Characterization and Pharmacologic Targeting of EZH2, a Fetal Retinal Protein and Epigenetic Regulator, in Human Retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mehnaz; Walters, Laura L.; Li, Qiang; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Miller, Jason M.L.; Zhang, Qitao; Sciallis, Andrew P.; Liu, Yu; Dlouhy, Brian J.; Fort, Patrice E.; Archer, Steven M.; Demirci, Hakan; Dou, Yali; Rao, Rajesh C.

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary intraocular cancer in children, a nd the third most common cancer overall in infants. No molecular-targeted therapy for this lethal tumor exists. Since the tumor suppressor RB1, whose genetic inactivation underlies RB, is upstream of the epigenetic regulator EZH2, a pharmacologic target for many solid tumors, we reasoned that EZH2 might regulate human RB tumorigenesis. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses were performed using an EZH2 antibody in sections from 43 samples of primary, formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded human RB tissue, cryopreserved mouse retina; and in whole cell lysates from human RB cell lines (Y79 and WERI-Rb1), primary human fetal RPE and fetal and adult retina, mouse retina and embryonic stem (ES) cells. While enriched during fetal human retinal development, EZH2 protein was not present in the normal postnatal retina. However, EZH2 was detected in all 43 analyzed human RB specimens, indicating that EZH2 is a fetal protein expressed in postnatal human RB. EZH2 expression marked single RB cell invasion into the optic nerve, a site of invasion whose involvement may influence the decision for systemic chemotherapy. To assess the role of EZH2 in RB cell survival, human RB and primary RPE cells were treated with two EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), GSK126 and SAH-EZH2 (SAH). EZH2i inhibitors impaired intracellular ATP production, an indicator of cell viability, in a time and dose-dependent manner, but did not affect primary human fetal RPE. Thus, aberrant expression of a histone methyltransferase protein is a feature of human RB. This is the first time this mechanism has been implicated for an eye, adnexal, or orbital tumor. The specificity of EZH2i toward human RB cells, but not RPE, warrants further in vivo testing in animal models of RB, especially those EZH2i currently in clinical trials for solid tumors and lymphoma. PMID:26280220

  11. Epigenetic modulation of Homer1a transcription regulation in amygdala and hippocampus with pavlovian fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Amy L; Mou, Liping; Shah, Nirali; Hu, Jia-Hua; Worley, Paul F; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-03-28

    The consolidation of conditioned fear involves upregulation of genes necessary for long-term memory formation. An important question remains as to whether this results in part from epigenetic regulation and chromatin modulation. We examined whether Homer1a, which is required for memory formation, is necessary for Pavlovian cued fear conditioning, whether it is downstream of BDNF-TrkB activation, and whether this pathway utilizes histone modifications for activity-dependent transcriptional regulation. We initially found that Homer1a knock-out mice exhibited deficits in cued fear conditioning (5 tone-shock presentations with 70 dB, 6 kHz tones and 0.5 s, 0.6 mA footshocks). We then demonstrated that: (1) Homer1a mRNA increases after fear conditioning in vivo within both amygdala and hippocampus of wild-type mice; (2) it increases after BDNF application to primary hippocampal and amygdala cultures in vitro; and (3) these increases are dependent on transcription and MAPK signaling. Furthermore, using chromatin immunoprecipitation we found that both in vitro and in vivo manipulations result in decreases in Homer1 promoter H3K9 methylation in amygdala cells but increases in Homer1 promoter H3 acetylation in hippocampal cells. However, no changes were observed in H4 acetylation or H3K27 dimethylation. Inhibition of histone deacetylation by sodium butyrate enhanced contextual but not cued fear conditioning and enhanced Homer1 H3 acetylation in the hippocampus. These data provide evidence for dynamic epigenetic regulation of Homer1a following BDNF-induced plasticity and during a BDNF-dependent learning process. Furthermore, upregulation of this gene may be regulated through distinct epigenetic modifications in the hippocampus and amygdala.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana Carvalho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2015-08-14

    Although thousands of DNA damaging events occur in each cell every day, efficient DNA repair pathways have evolved to counteract them. The DNA repair machinery plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability by avoiding the maintenance of mutations. The DNA repair enzymes continuously monitor the chromosomes to correct any damage that is caused by exogenous and endogenous mutagens. If DNA damage in proliferating cells is not repaired because of an inadequate expression of DNA repair genes, it might increase the risk of cancer. In addition to mutations, which can be either inherited or somatically acquired, epigenetic silencing of DNA repair genes has been associated with carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer represents the second highest cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The disease develops from the accumulation of several genetic and epigenetic changes during the lifetime. Among the risk factors, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is considered the main driving factor to gastric cancer development. Thus, in this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of H. pylori infection on the epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in gastric carcinogenesis.

  13. Epigenetic regulation of the histone-to-protamine transition during spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianqiang; Bedford, Mark T

    2016-05-01

    In mammals, male germ cells differentiate from haploid round spermatids to flagella-containing motile sperm in a process called spermiogenesis. This process is distinct from somatic cell differentiation in that the majority of the core histones are replaced sequentially, first by transition proteins and then by protamines, facilitating chromatin hyper-compaction. This histone-to-protamine transition process represents an excellent model for the investigation of how epigenetic regulators interact with each other to remodel chromatin architecture. Although early work in the field highlighted the critical roles of testis-specific transcription factors in controlling the haploid-specific developmental program, recent studies underscore the essential functions of epigenetic players involved in the dramatic genome remodeling that takes place during wholesale histone replacement. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how epigenetic players, such as histone variants and histone writers/readers/erasers, rewire the haploid spermatid genome to facilitate histone substitution by protamines in mammals. PMID:26850883

  14. Genome-wide binding and mechanistic analyses of Smchd1-mediated epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kelan; Hu, Jiang; Moore, Darcy L.; Liu, Ruijie; Kessans, Sarah A.; Breslin, Kelsey; Lucet, Isabelle S.; Keniry, Andrew; Leong, Huei San; Parish, Clare L.; Hilton, Douglas J.; Lemmers, Richard J. L. F.; van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Czabotar, Peter E.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Ritchie, Matthew E.; Kay, Graham F.; Murphy, James M.; Blewitt, Marnie E.

    2015-01-01

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (Smchd1) is an epigenetic repressor with described roles in X inactivation and genomic imprinting, but Smchd1 is also critically involved in the pathogenesis of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. The underlying molecular mechanism by which Smchd1 functions in these instances remains unknown. Our genome-wide transcriptional and epigenetic analyses show that Smchd1 binds cis-regulatory elements, many of which coincide with CCCTC-binding factor (Ctcf) binding sites, for example, the clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) genes, where we show Smchd1 and Ctcf act in opposing ways. We provide biochemical and biophysical evidence that Smchd1–chromatin interactions are established through the homodimeric hinge domain of Smchd1 and, intriguingly, that the hinge domain also has the capacity to bind DNA and RNA. Our results suggest Smchd1 imparts epigenetic regulation via physical association with chromatin, which may antagonize Ctcf-facilitated chromatin interactions, resulting in coordinated transcriptional control. PMID:26091879

  15. Epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana Carvalho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2015-01-01

    Although thousands of DNA damaging events occur in each cell every day, efficient DNA repair pathways have evolved to counteract them. The DNA repair machinery plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability by avoiding the maintenance of mutations. The DNA repair enzymes continuously monitor the chromosomes to correct any damage that is caused by exogenous and endogenous mutagens. If DNA damage in proliferating cells is not repaired because of an inadequate expression of DNA repair genes, it might increase the risk of cancer. In addition to mutations, which can be either inherited or somatically acquired, epigenetic silencing of DNA repair genes has been associated with carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer represents the second highest cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The disease develops from the accumulation of several genetic and epigenetic changes during the lifetime. Among the risk factors, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is considered the main driving factor to gastric cancer development. Thus, in this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of H. pylori infection on the epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26290630

  16. Krebs cycle dysfunction shapes epigenetic landscape of chromatin: novel insights into mitochondrial regulation of aging process.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai; Hiltunen, Mikko; Kauppinen, Anu

    2014-07-01

    Although there is a substantial literature that mitochondria have a crucial role in the aging process, the mechanism has remained elusive. The role of reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial DNA injuries, and a decline in mitochondrial quality control has been proposed. Emerging studies have demonstrated that Krebs cycle intermediates, 2-oxoglutarate (also known as α-ketoglutarate), succinate and fumarate, can regulate the level of DNA and histone methylation. Moreover, citrate, also a Krebs cycle metabolite, can enhance histone acetylation. Genome-wide screening studies have revealed that the aging process is linked to significant epigenetic changes in the chromatin landscape, e.g. global demethylation of DNA and histones and increase in histone acetylation. Interestingly, recent studies have revealed that the demethylases of DNA (TET1-3) and histone lysines (KDM2-7) are members of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-OGDO). The 2-OGDO enzymes are activated by oxygen, iron and the major Krebs cycle intermediate, 2-oxoglutarate, whereas they are inhibited by succinate and fumarate. Considering the endosymbiont origin of mitochondria, it is not surprising that Krebs cycle metabolites can control the gene expression of host cell by modifying the epigenetic landscape of chromatin. It seems that age-related disturbances in mitochondrial metabolism can induce epigenetic reprogramming, which promotes the appearance of senescent phenotype and degenerative diseases.

  17. Polycomb PRC2 complex mediates epigenetic silencing of a critical osteogenic master regulator in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Rodrigo; Bustos, Fernando J; Saez, Mauricio; Rojas, Adriana; Allende, Miguel L; van Wijnen, Andre J; van Zundert, Brigitte; Montecino, Martin

    2016-08-01

    During hippocampal neuron differentiation, the expression of critical inducers of non-neuronal cell lineages must be efficiently silenced. Runx2 transcription factor is the master regulator of mesenchymal cells responsible for intramembranous osteoblast differentiation and formation of the craniofacial bone tissue that surrounds and protects the central nervous system (CNS) in mammalian embryos. The molecular mechanisms that mediate silencing of the Runx2 gene and its downstream target osteogenic-related genes in neuronal cells have not been explored. Here, we assess the epigenetic mechanisms that mediate silencing of osteoblast-specific genes in CNS neurons. In particular, we address the contribution of histone epigenetic marks and histone modifiers on the silencing of the Runx2/p57 bone-related isoform in rat hippocampal tissues at embryonic to adult stages. Our results indicate enrichment of repressive chromatin histone marks and of the Polycomb PRC2 complex at the Runx2/p57 promoter region. Knockdown of PRC2 H3K27-methyltransferases Ezh2 and Ezh1, or forced expression of the Trithorax/COMPASS subunit Wdr5 activates Runx2/p57 mRNA expression in both immature and mature hippocampal cells. Together these results indicate that complementary epigenetic mechanisms progressively and efficiently silence critical osteoblastic genes during hippocampal neuron differentiation. PMID:27216774

  18. Retinoic Acid and Histone Deacetylases Regulate Epigenetic Changes in Embryonic Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Urvalek, Alison M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A metabolite that plays major roles in regulating stem cell differentiation and development. RA is the ligand of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) family of transcription factors, which interact with retinoic acid response elements (RAREs) within target gene proximal promoters and enhancers. Although RA-mediated gene activation is well understood, less is known about the mechanisms for repression at RA-regulated genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that in embryonic stem cells in the absence of RA, histone deacetylases (HDACs) differentially bind to various RAREs in proximal promoters or enhancer regions of RA-regulated genes; HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 bind at RAREs in the Hoxa1 and Cyp26a1 gene regulatory regions, whereas only HDAC1 binds at the RARβ2 RARE. shRNA knockdown of HDAC1, HDAC2, or HDAC3 differentially increases the deposition of the histone 3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac) epigenetic mark associated with increases in these three transcripts. Importantly, RA treatment differentially mediates the removal of HDACs from the Hoxa1, Cyp26a1, and RARβ2 genes and promotes the deposition of the H3K27ac mark at these genes. Overall, we show that HDACs differentially bind to RA-regulated genes to control key epigenetic marks involved in stem cell differentiation. PMID:24821725

  19. Epigenetic Basis of Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J; Peña, Catherine J; Kundakovic, Marija; Mitchell, Amanda; Akbarian, Schahram

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders are complex multifactorial illnesses involving chronic alterations in neural circuit structure and function as well as likely abnormalities in glial cells. While genetic factors are important in the etiology of most mental disorders, the relatively high rates of discordance among identical twins, particularly for depression and other stress-related syndromes, clearly indicate the importance of additional mechanisms. Environmental factors such as stress are known to play a role in the onset of these illnesses. Exposure to such environmental insults induces stable changes in gene expression, neural circuit function, and ultimately behavior, and these maladaptations appear distinct between developmental versus adult exposures. Increasing evidence indicates that these sustained abnormalities are maintained by epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions. Indeed, transcriptional dysregulation and the aberrant epigenetic regulation that underlies this dysregulation is a unifying theme in psychiatric disorders. Here, we provide a progress report of epigenetic studies of the three major psychiatric syndromes, depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. We review the literature derived from animal models of these disorders as well as from studies of postmortem brain tissue from human patients. While epigenetic studies of mental illness remain at early stages, understanding how environmental factors recruit the epigenetic machinery within specific brain regions to cause lasting changes in disease susceptibility and pathophysiology is revealing new insight into the etiology and treatment of these conditions. PMID:26450593

  20. Epigenetic regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by methylation of c8orf4 in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Iona C; Barnes, Josephine L; Garner, Ian M; Pearce, David R; Maher, Toby M; Shiwen, Xu; Renzoni, Elisabetta A; Wells, Athol U; Denton, Christopher P; Laurent, Geoffrey J; Abraham, David J; McAnulty, Robin J

    2016-04-01

    Fibroblasts derived from the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and systemic sclerosis (SSc) produce low levels of prostaglandin (PG) E2, due to a limited capacity to up-regulate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). This deficiency contributes functionally to the fibroproliferative state, however the mechanisms responsible are incompletely understood. In the present study, we examined whether the reduced level of COX-2 mRNA expression observed in fibrotic lung fibroblasts is regulated epigenetically. The DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5AZA) restored COX-2 mRNA expression by fibrotic lung fibroblasts dose dependently. Functionally, this resulted in normalization of fibroblast phenotype in terms of PGE2 production, collagen mRNA expression and sensitivity to apoptosis. COX-2 methylation assessed by bisulfite sequencing and methylation microarrays was not different in fibrotic fibroblasts compared with controls. However, further analysis of the methylation array data identified a transcriptional regulator, chromosome 8 open reading frame 4 (thyroid cancer protein 1, TC-1) (c8orf4), which is hypermethylated and down-regulated in fibrotic fibroblasts compared with controls. siRNA knockdown of c8orf4 in control fibroblasts down-regulated COX-2 and PGE2 production generating a phenotype similar to that observed in fibrotic lung fibroblasts. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c8orf4 regulates COX-2 expression in lung fibroblasts through binding of the proximal promoter. We conclude that the decreased capacity of fibrotic lung fibroblasts to up-regulate COX-2 expression and COX-2-derived PGE2 synthesis is due to an indirect epigenetic mechanism involving hypermethylation of the transcriptional regulator, c8orf4.

  1. Arsenic exposure disrupts epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Holloway, Adele; Cook, Anthony L.; Chin, Suyin P.; Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2014-11-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin which increases skin cancer risk for exposed populations worldwide; however the underlying biomolecular mechanism for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis is complex and poorly defined. Recent investigations show that histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase activity is impaired, and epigenetic patterns of gene regulation are consistently altered in cancers associated with arsenic exposure. Expression of the histone deacetylase SIRT1 is altered in solid tumours and haematological malignancies; however its role in arsenic-induced pathology is unknown. In this study we investigated the effect of arsenic on epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 and its targeting microRNA, miR-34a in primary human keratinocytes. Acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16) increased in keratinocytes exposed to 0.5 μM arsenite [As(III)]; and this was associated with chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a promoter. Moreover, although SIRT1 protein initially increased in these As(III)-exposed cells, after 24 days expression was not significantly different from untreated controls. Extended exposure to low-dose As(III) (0.5 μM; > 5 weeks) compromised the pattern of CpG methylation at SIRT1 and miR-34a gene promoters, and this was associated with altered expression for both genes. We have found that arsenic alters epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 expression via structural reorganisation of chromatin at the miR-34a gene promoter in the initial 24 h of exposure; and over time, through shifts in miR-34a and SIRT1 gene methylation. Taken together, this investigation demonstrates that arsenic produces cumulative disruptions to epigenetic regulation of miR-34a expression, and this is associated with impaired coordination of SIRT1 functional activity. - Highlights: • Submicromolar arsenic concentrations disrupt SIRT1 activity and expression in human keratinocytes. • Arsenic-induced chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a gene promoter is associated with hyperacetylation

  2. Glucocorticoid signaling drives epigenetic and transcription factors to induce key regulators of human parturition.

    PubMed

    Zannas, Anthony S; Chrousos, George P

    2015-10-27

    Glucocorticoids are thought to play an important role in parturition. Two recent articles by Di Stefano et al. in the Archives and Wang et al. in this issue of Science Signaling reveal novel mechanisms by which glucocorticoid signaling can drive the epigenetic and transcriptional machinery to induce molecules involved in parturition, including the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and the autacoid hormone prostaglandin E2. These findings contribute to our understanding of how glucocorticoids may regulate human parturition.

  3. Epigenetic regulation of sex ratios may explain natural variation in self-fertilization rates.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Amy; Rodríguez López, Carlos Marcelino; Moran, Paloma; Breen, James; Swain, Martin; Megias, Manuel; Hegarty, Matthew; Wilkinson, Mike; Pawluk, Rebecca; Consuegra, Sofia

    2015-11-22

    Self-fertilization (selfing) favours reproductive success when mate availability is low, but renders populations more vulnerable to environmental change by reducing genetic variability. A mixed-breeding strategy (alternating selfing and outcrossing) may allow species to balance these needs, but requires a system for regulating sexual identity. We explored the role of DNA methylation as a regulatory system for sex-ratio modulation in the mixed-mating fish Kryptolebias marmoratus. We found a significant interaction between sexual identity (male or hermaphrodite), temperature and methylation patterns when two selfing lines were exposed to different temperatures during development. We also identified several genes differentially methylated in males and hermaphrodites that represent candidates for the temperature-mediated sex regulation in K. marmoratus. We conclude that an epigenetic mechanism regulated by temperature modulates sexual identity in this selfing species, providing a potentially widespread mechanism by which environmental change may influence selfing rates. We also suggest that K. marmoratus, with naturally inbred populations, represents a good vertebrate model for epigenetic studies. PMID:26559950

  4. Epigenetic Pathways Regulating Bone Homeostasis: Potential Targeting for Intervention of Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jonathan A. R.; Montecino, Martin A.; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation utilizes different mechanisms to convey heritable traits to progeny cells that are independent of DNA sequence, including DNA silencing, post-translational modifications of histone proteins and the post-transcriptional modulation of RNA transcript levels by non-coding RNAs. Although long non-coding RNAs have recently emerged as important regulators of gene imprinting, but their functions during osteogenesis are as yet unexplored. In contrast, microRNAs (miRNAs) are well characterized for their control of osteogenic and osteoclastic pathways; thus, further defining how gene regulatory networks essential for skeleton functions are coordinated and finely tuned through the activities of miRNAs. Roles of miRNAs are constantly expanding as new studies uncover associations with skeletal disorders. The distinct functions of epigenetic regulators and evidence for integrating their activities to control normal bone gene expression and bone disease will be presented. In addition, potential for using “signature microRNAs” to identify, manage and therapeutically treat osteosarcoma will be discussed in this review. PMID:25260661

  5. Proteomic analysis of embryonic kidney development: Heterochromatin proteins as epigenetic regulators of nephrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dihazi, Gry H.; Jahn, Olaf; Tampe, Björn; Zeisberg, Michael; Müller, Claudia; Müller, Gerhard A.; Dihazi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the nephrogenesis will boost enormously the regenerative medicine. Here we performed 2-D gel-based comparative proteome analyses of rat embryonic kidney from different developmental stages. Out of 288 non-redundant identified proteins, 102 were common in all developmental stages. 86% of the proteins found in E14 and E16 were identical, in contrast only 37% of the identified proteins overlap between E14 and P1. Bioinformatics analysis suggests developmental stage-specific pathway activation and highlighted heterochromatin protein 1 (Cbx1, Cbx3, Cbx5) and Trim28 as potential key players in nephrogenesis. These are involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene silencing and were down-regulated in the course of kidney development. Trim28 is a potential epigenetic regulator of the branching inhibitor Bmp4. Silencing of Trim28 in cultured kidneys resulted in branching arrest. In contrast knockdown of Cbx5 was associated with abnormal ureteric bud growth and slight impairment of branching. ChIP analysis showed that the H3K9me3 distribution on Bmp4 promoters at E14 and E19 inversely correlate with mRNA expression levels. The concentrated expression-pattern of heterochromatin proteins and the negative impact of their silencing on kidney development, suggest an important role in reciprocal and inductive signaling between the ureteric bud and the metanephric mesenchyme. PMID:26359909

  6. Epigenomic footprints across 111 reference epigenomes reveal tissue-specific epigenetic regulation of lincRNAs.

    PubMed

    Amin, Viren; Harris, R Alan; Onuchic, Vitor; Jackson, Andrew R; Charnecki, Tim; Paithankar, Sameer; Lakshmi Subramanian, Sai; Riehle, Kevin; Coarfa, Cristian; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2015-02-18

    Tissue-specific expression of lincRNAs suggests developmental and cell-type-specific functions, yet tissue specificity was established for only a small fraction of lincRNAs. Here, by analysing 111 reference epigenomes from the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics project, we determine tissue-specific epigenetic regulation for 3,753 (69% examined) lincRNAs, with 54% active in one of the 14 cell/tissue clusters and an additional 15% in two or three clusters. A larger fraction of lincRNA TSSs is marked in a tissue-specific manner by H3K4me1 than by H3K4me3. The tissue-specific lincRNAs are strongly linked to tissue-specific pathways and undergo distinct chromatin state transitions during cellular differentiation. Polycomb-regulated lincRNAs reside in the bivalent state in embryonic stem cells and many of them undergo H3K27me3-mediated silencing at early stages of differentiation. The exquisitely tissue-specific epigenetic regulation of lincRNAs and the assignment of a majority of them to specific tissue types will inform future studies of this newly discovered class of genes.

  7. Inhibition of osteoclastogenesis and inflammatory bone resorption by targeting BET proteins and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun; Lim, Elisha; Lee, Min Joon; Park, Sung Ho; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Yarilina, Anna; van der Meulen, Marjolein; Zhao, Baohong; Smithers, Nicholas; Witherington, Jason; Lee, Kevin; Tak, Paul P; Prinjha, Rab K; Ivashkiv, Lionel B

    2014-11-13

    Emerging evidence suggests that RANKL-induced changes in chromatin state are important for osteoclastogenesis, but these epigenetic mechanisms are not well understood and have not been therapeutically targeted. In this study, we find that the small molecule I-BET151 that targets bromo and extra-terminal (BET) proteins that 'read' chromatin states by binding to acetylated histones strongly suppresses osteoclastogenesis. I-BET151 suppresses pathologic bone loss in TNF-induced inflammatory osteolysis, inflammatory arthritis and post-ovariectomy models. Transcriptome analysis identifies a MYC-NFAT axis important for osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, I-BET151 inhibits expression of the master osteoclast regulator NFATC1 by suppressing expression and recruitment of its newly identified upstream regulator MYC. MYC is elevated in rheumatoid arthritis macrophages and its induction by RANKL is important for osteoclastogenesis and TNF-induced bone resorption. These findings highlight the importance of an I-BET151-inhibited MYC-NFAT axis in osteoclastogenesis, and suggest targeting epigenetic chromatin regulators holds promise for treatment of inflammatory and oestrogen deficiency-mediated pathologic bone resorption.

  8. Epigenetic regulators governing cancer stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shanaya; Shah, Kanisha; Mirza, Sheefa; Daga, Aditi; Rawal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is amongst the most prevalent form of cancer worldwide with its predominance in the Indian subcontinent due to its etiological behavioral pattern of tobacco consumption. Late diagnosis, low therapeutic response and aggressive metastasis are the foremost confounders accountable for the poor 5 year survival rate of OSCC. These failures are attributed to the existence of "Cancer Stem cell (CSC)" subpopulation within the tumour environment. Quiescence, apoptotic evasion, resistance to DNA damage, abnormal expression of drug transporter pumps and in vivo tumorigenesis are the defining hallmarks of CSC phenotype. These CSCs have been distinguished from the tumor mass by determining the expression patterns of cell surface proteins, specific stemness markers and quantifying the cellular activities such as drug efflux & aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. Hence, it is necessary to understand the underlying mechanisms that regulate the CSC features in tumor development, metastasis and response to chemotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that majority of malignant cells eventually undergoing Epithelial-Mesenchymal transition (EMT) share many biological characteristics with CSCs. Thus, this review encompasses the functional relevance of CSC and EMT markers in OSCC population with a hope to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying cancer progression and to highlight the most relevant epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of CSC features. We further aimed to explore the causal effects of nicotine, a major tobacco carcinogen, on epigenetic mechanisms regulating the OSCC CSCs and EMT markers which unravels the undisputable contribution of tobacco in oral carcinogenesis. PMID:25330402

  9. Inhibition of osteoclastogenesis and inflammatory bone resorption by targeting BET proteins and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun; Lim, Elisha; Lee, Min Joon; Park, Sung Ho; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Yarilina, Anna; van der Meulen, Marjolein; Zhao, Baohong; Smithers, Nicholas; Witherington, Jason; Lee, Kevin; Tak, Paul P; Prinjha, Rab K; Ivashkiv, Lionel B

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that RANKL-induced changes in chromatin state are important for osteoclastogenesis, but these epigenetic mechanisms are not well understood and have not been therapeutically targeted. In this study, we find that the small molecule I-BET151 that targets bromo and extra-terminal (BET) proteins that 'read' chromatin states by binding to acetylated histones strongly suppresses osteoclastogenesis. I-BET151 suppresses pathologic bone loss in TNF-induced inflammatory osteolysis, inflammatory arthritis and post-ovariectomy models. Transcriptome analysis identifies a MYC-NFAT axis important for osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, I-BET151 inhibits expression of the master osteoclast regulator NFATC1 by suppressing expression and recruitment of its newly identified upstream regulator MYC. MYC is elevated in rheumatoid arthritis macrophages and its induction by RANKL is important for osteoclastogenesis and TNF-induced bone resorption. These findings highlight the importance of an I-BET151-inhibited MYC-NFAT axis in osteoclastogenesis, and suggest targeting epigenetic chromatin regulators holds promise for treatment of inflammatory and oestrogen deficiency-mediated pathologic bone resorption. PMID:25391636

  10. Inhibition of Osteoclastogenesis and Inflammatory Bone Resorption by Targeting BET Proteins and Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun; Lim, Elisha; Lee, Min Joon; Park, Sung Ho; Giannopoulos, Eugenia; Yarilina, Anna; van der Meulen, Marjolein; Zhao, Baohong; Smithers, Nicholas; Witherington, Jason; Lee, Kevin; Tak, Paul P.; Prinjha, Rab K.; Ivashkiv, Lionel B.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that RANKL-induced changes in chromatin state are important for osteoclastogenesis, but these epigenetic mechanisms are not well understood and have not been therapeutically targeted. In this study we find that the small molecule I-BET151 that targets bromo and extra-terminal (BET) proteins that “read” chromatin states by binding to acetylated histones strongly suppresses osteoclastogenesis. I-BET151 suppresses pathologic bone loss in TNF-induced inflammatory osteolysis, inflammatory arthritis, and post-ovariectomy models. Transcriptome analysis identifies a MYC-NFAT axis important for osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, I-BET151 inhibits expression of the master osteoclast regulator NFATC1 by suppressing expression and recruitment of its newly identified upstream regulator MYC. MYC is elevated in rheumatoid arthritis and its induction by RANKL is important for osteoclastogenesis and TNF-induced bone resorption. These findings highlight the importance of an I-BET151-inhibited MYC-NFAT axis in osteoclastogenesis, and suggest targeting epigenetic chromatin regulators holds promise for treatment of inflammatory and estrogen deficiency-mediated pathologic bone resorption. PMID:25391636

  11. Role of polycomb proteins Ring1A and Ring1B in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Generation of cell diversity depends on epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are central components of epigenetic regulation in metazoans. The system, initially associated with transcriptional program stability during development, is also involved in the regulation of other processes, such as maintenance of stem cell pluripotency and cell proliferation. PcG regulation involves chromatin modifications through covalent histone modifications. One of these modifications, the monoubiquitylation of the H2A histone, depends on Ring1 proteins, which are essential for development in insects and mammals. In murine embryonic stem cells, Ring1A and Ring1B-dependent ubiquitylation of H2A is linked to repression of transcriptional initiation. Studies in mammalian cells have found a multiplicity of protein complexes containing Ring1A and Ring1B, suggesting an expanded regulatory role for Ring1A, Ring1B proteins in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Jiao, Jiao; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Wang, Xiu-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has led to considerable interest in the role of Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) development. However, the epigenetic mechanism regulating TNIK transcription remains largely unknown. Here, we show that (i) TNIK mRNA expression is significantly increased in PCOS ovarian tissues, compared to normal ovarian tissues; (ii) PCOS ovarian tissues exhibit a hypermethylation pattern at the cg10180092 site, (iii) and cg10180092 is the critical site for the transcriptional regulation of TNIK. Mechanistically, hypermethylated cg10180092 site-mediated loss of holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS)-related H3K9me enrichment activated TNIK transcription in PCOS ovarian tissues. Notably, a substantial body of evidence indicates that DNA hypermethylation is an alternative mechanism for gene inactivation, and a new role for DNA hypermethylationmediated TNIK activating was observed in this study. This may improve our understanding of divergent transcriptional regulation in the initiation and progression of TNIK-related PCOS. PMID:26279758

  13. Epigenetic regulation of UBE3A and roles in human neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    LaSalle, Janine M; Reiter, Lawrence T; Chamberlain, Stormy J

    2015-10-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase UBE3A, also known as E6-AP, has a multitude of ascribed functions and targets relevant to human health and disease. Epigenetic regulation of the UBE3A gene by parentally imprinted noncoding transcription within human chromosome 15q11.2-q13.3 is responsible for the maternal-specific effects of 15q11.2-q13.3 deletion or duplication disorders. Here, we review the evidence for diverse and emerging roles for UBE3A in the proteasome, synapse and nucleus in regulating protein stability and transcription as well as the current mechanistic understanding of UBE3A imprinting in neurons. Angelman and Dup15q syndromes as well as experimental models of these neurodevelopmental disorders are highlighted as improving understanding of UBE3A and its complex regulation for improving therapeutic strategies. PMID:26585570

  14. Epigenetic regulation of learning and memory by Drosophila EHMT/G9a.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Jamie M; Kochinke, Korinna; Oortveld, Merel A W; Marks, Hendrik; Kramer, Daniela; de Jong, Eiko K; Asztalos, Zoltan; Westwood, J Timothy; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Sokolowski, Marla B; Keleman, Krystyna; Zhou, Huiqing; van Bokhoven, Hans; Schenck, Annette

    2011-01-01

    The epigenetic modification of chromatin structure and its effect on complex neuronal processes like learning and memory is an emerging field in neuroscience. However, little is known about the "writers" of the neuronal epigenome and how they lay down the basis for proper cognition. Here, we have dissected the neuronal function of the Drosophila euchromatin histone methyltransferase (EHMT), a member of a conserved protein family that methylates histone 3 at lysine 9 (H3K9). EHMT is widely expressed in the nervous system and other tissues, yet EHMT mutant flies are viable. Neurodevelopmental and behavioral analyses identified EHMT as a regulator of peripheral dendrite development, larval locomotor behavior, non-associative learning, and courtship memory. The requirement for EHMT in memory was mapped to 7B-Gal4 positive cells, which are, in adult brains, predominantly mushroom body neurons. Moreover, memory was restored by EHMT re-expression during adulthood, indicating that cognitive defects are reversible in EHMT mutants. To uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms, we generated genome-wide H3K9 dimethylation profiles by ChIP-seq. Loss of H3K9 dimethylation in EHMT mutants occurs at 5% of the euchromatic genome and is enriched at the 5' and 3' ends of distinct classes of genes that control neuronal and behavioral processes that are corrupted in EHMT mutants. Our study identifies Drosophila EHMT as a key regulator of cognition that orchestrates an epigenetic program featuring classic learning and memory genes. Our findings are relevant to the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying Kleefstra Syndrome, a severe form of intellectual disability caused by mutations in human EHMT1, and have potential therapeutic implications. Our work thus provides novel insights into the epigenetic control of cognition in health and disease. PMID:21245904

  15. Epigenetic Regulation of miR-17∼92 Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dakhlallah, Duaa; Batte, Kara; Wang, Yijie; Cantemir-Stone, Carmen Z.; Yan, Pearlly; Nuovo, Gerard; Mikhail, Adel; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Wright, Valerie P.; Nana-Sinkam, S. Patrick; Piper, Melissa G.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a disease of progressive lung fibrosis with a high mortality rate. In organ repair and remodeling, epigenetic events are important. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally and can target epigenetic molecules important in DNA methylation. The miR-17∼92 miRNA cluster is critical for lung development and lung epithelial cell homeostasis and is predicted to target fibrotic genes and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)-1 expression. Objectives: We investigated the miR-17∼92 cluster expression and its role in regulating DNA methylation events in IPF lung tissue. Methods: Expression and DNA methylation patterns of miR-17∼92 were determined in human IPF lung tissue and fibroblasts and fibrotic mouse lung tissue. The relationship between the miR-17∼92 cluster and DNMT-1 expression was examined in vitro. Using a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis, we examined the therapeutic potential of the demethylating agent, 5′-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Measurements and Main Results: Compared with control samples, miR-17∼92 expression was reduced in lung biopsies and lung fibroblasts from patients with IPF, whereas DNMT-1 expression and methylation of the miR-17∼92 promoter was increased. Several miRNAs from the miR-17∼92 cluster targeted DNMT-1 expression resulting in a negative feedback loop. Similarly, miR-17∼92 expression was reduced in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice. Treatment with 5′-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in a murine bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model reduced fibrotic gene and DNMT-1 expression, enhanced miR-17∼92 cluster expression, and attenuated pulmonary fibrosis. Conclusions: This study provides insight into the pathobiology of IPF and identifies a novel epigenetic feedback loop between miR-17∼92 and DNMT-1 in lung fibrosis. PMID:23306545

  16. Mendelian randomization supports causality between maternal hyperglycemia and epigenetic regulation of leptin gene in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Allard, C; Desgagné, V; Patenaude, J; Lacroix, M; Guillemette, L; Battista, MC; Doyon, M; Ménard, J; Ardilouze, JL; Perron, P; Bouchard, L; Hivert, MF

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that acts in the central nervous system and regulates energy balance. Animal models and human observational studies have suggested that leptin surge in the perinatal period has a critical role in programming long-term risk of obesity. In utero exposure to maternal hyperglycemia has been associated with increased risk of obesity later in life. Epigenetic mechanisms are suspected to be involved in fetal programming of long term metabolic diseases. We investigated whether DNA methylation levels near LEP locus mediate the relation between maternal glycemia and neonatal leptin levels using the 2-step epigenetic Mendelian randomization approach. We used data and samples from up to 485 mother-child dyads from Gen3G, a large prospective population-based cohort. First, we built a genetic risk score to capture maternal glycemia based on 10 known glycemic genetic variants (GRS10) and showed it was an adequate instrumental variable (β = 0.046 mmol/L of maternal fasting glucose per additional risk allele; SE = 0.007; P = 7.8 × 10−11; N = 467). A higher GRS10 was associated with lower methylation levels at cg12083122 located near LEP (β = −0.072 unit per additional risk allele; SE = 0.04; P = 0.05; N = 166). Direction and effect size of association between the instrumental variable GRS10 and methylation at cg12083122 were consistent with the negative association we observed using measured maternal glycemia. Lower DNA methylation levels at cg12083122 were associated with higher cord blood leptin levels (β = −0.17 log of cord blood leptin per unit; SE = 0.07; P = 0.01; N = 170). Our study supports that maternal glycemia is part of causal pathways influencing offspring leptin epigenetic regulation. PMID:25800063

  17. Epigenetic regulation of human buccal mucosa mitochondrial superoxide dismutase gene expression by diet.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Roman; Karlic, Heidrun; Rust, Petra; Haslberger, Alexander G

    2009-03-01

    The impact of nutrition on the epigenetic machinery has increasingly attracted interest. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the effects of various diets on methylation and gene expression. The antioxidative enzyme mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was chosen as the model system because epigenetic regulation has been previously shown in cell lines for this gene. Promoter methylation and gene expression of MnSOD in buccal swabs from three sample groups were analysed. The three groups included: (1) forty vegetarians (aged 20-30 years); (2) age-matched omnivores; (3) elderly omnivores (aged>85 years). A 3-fold increase in the expression of the MnSOD gene was associated with decreased CpG methylation of the analysed promoter region in the vegetarian group compared with the age-matched omnivores group. Expression and promoter methylation of the MnSOD gene in elderly omnivores showed no significant differences compared with younger omnivores. In accordance with previous findings in various tissues, DNA global methylation was found to be significantly higher (30 %) in buccal swabs of younger subjects (independent of the diet), than in those of elderly omnivores. In the control experiment which was designed to verify the findings of the human buccal swab studies, the Caco-2 cell line was treated with zebularine. Results of the control study showed a 6-fold increase of MnSOD expression, an approximately 40 % decreased methylation of specified CpG in the MnSOD promoter and a 50 % reduction of global DNA methylation. These results indicate that diet affects the epigenetic regulation of human MnSOD.

  18. Mendelian randomization supports causality between maternal hyperglycemia and epigenetic regulation of leptin gene in newborns.

    PubMed

    Allard, C; Desgagné, V; Patenaude, J; Lacroix, M; Guillemette, L; Battista, M C; Doyon, M; Ménard, J; Ardilouze, J L; Perron, P; Bouchard, L; Hivert, M F

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that acts in the central nervous system and regulates energy balance. Animal models and human observational studies have suggested that leptin surge in the perinatal period has a critical role in programming long-term risk of obesity. In utero exposure to maternal hyperglycemia has been associated with increased risk of obesity later in life. Epigenetic mechanisms are suspected to be involved in fetal programming of long term metabolic diseases. We investigated whether DNA methylation levels near LEP locus mediate the relation between maternal glycemia and neonatal leptin levels using the 2-step epigenetic Mendelian randomization approach. We used data and samples from up to 485 mother-child dyads from Gen3G, a large prospective population-based cohort. First, we built a genetic risk score to capture maternal glycemia based on 10 known glycemic genetic variants (GRS10) and showed it was an adequate instrumental variable (β = 0.046 mmol/L of maternal fasting glucose per additional risk allele; SE = 0.007; P = 7.8 × 10(-11); N = 467). A higher GRS10 was associated with lower methylation levels at cg12083122 located near LEP (β = -0.072 unit per additional risk allele; SE = 0.04; P = 0.05; N = 166). Direction and effect size of association between the instrumental variable GRS10 and methylation at cg12083122 were consistent with the negative association we observed using measured maternal glycemia. Lower DNA methylation levels at cg12083122 were associated with higher cord blood leptin levels (β = -0.17 log of cord blood leptin per unit; SE = 0.07; P = 0.01; N = 170). Our study supports that maternal glycemia is part of causal pathways influencing offspring leptin epigenetic regulation. PMID:25800063

  19. lolal Is an Evolutionarily New Epigenetic Regulator of dpp Transcription during Dorsal–Ventral Axis Formation

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, Janine C.; Wisotzkey, Robert G.; Tran, Nancy Lan; Huang, Yunxian; Stinchfield, Michael J.; Haerry, Theodor E.; Shimmi, Osamu; Newfeld, Stuart J.

    2016-01-01

    Secreted ligands in the Dpp/BMP family drive dorsal–ventral (D/V) axis formation in all Bilaterian species. However, maternal factors regulating Dpp/BMP transcription in this process are largely unknown. We identified the BTB domain protein longitudinals lacking-like (lolal) as a modifier of decapentaplegic (dpp) mutations. We show that Lolal is evolutionarily related to the Trithorax group of chromatin regulators and that lolal interacts genetically with the epigenetic factor Trithorax-like during Dpp D/V signaling. Maternally driven LolalHA is found in oocytes and translocates to zygotic nuclei prior to the point at which dpp transcription begins. lolal maternal and zygotic mutant embryos display significant reductions in dpp, pMad, and zerknullt expression, but they are never absent. The data suggest that lolal is required to maintain dpp transcription during D/V patterning. Phylogenetic data revealed that lolal is an evolutionarily new gene present only in insects and crustaceans. We conclude that Lolal is the first maternal protein identified with a role in dpp D/V transcriptional maintenance, that Lolal and the epigenetic protein Trithorax-like are essential for Dpp D/V signaling and that the architecture of the Dpp D/V pathway evolved in the arthropod lineage after the separation from vertebrates via the incorporation of new genes such as lolal. PMID:27401231

  20. lolal Is an Evolutionarily New Epigenetic Regulator of dpp Transcription during Dorsal-Ventral Axis Formation.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Janine C; Wisotzkey, Robert G; Tran, Nancy Lan; Huang, Yunxian; Stinchfield, Michael J; Haerry, Theodor E; Shimmi, Osamu; Newfeld, Stuart J

    2016-10-01

    Secreted ligands in the Dpp/BMP family drive dorsal-ventral (D/V) axis formation in all Bilaterian species. However, maternal factors regulating Dpp/BMP transcription in this process are largely unknown. We identified the BTB domain protein longitudinals lacking-like (lolal) as a modifier of decapentaplegic (dpp) mutations. We show that Lolal is evolutionarily related to the Trithorax group of chromatin regulators and that lolal interacts genetically with the epigenetic factor Trithorax-like during Dpp D/V signaling. Maternally driven Lolal(HA) is found in oocytes and translocates to zygotic nuclei prior to the point at which dpp transcription begins. lolal maternal and zygotic mutant embryos display significant reductions in dpp, pMad, and zerknullt expression, but they are never absent. The data suggest that lolal is required to maintain dpp transcription during D/V patterning. Phylogenetic data revealed that lolal is an evolutionarily new gene present only in insects and crustaceans. We conclude that Lolal is the first maternal protein identified with a role in dpp D/V transcriptional maintenance, that Lolal and the epigenetic protein Trithorax-like are essential for Dpp D/V signaling and that the architecture of the Dpp D/V pathway evolved in the arthropod lineage after the separation from vertebrates via the incorporation of new genes such as lolal. PMID:27401231

  1. Multiple dimensions of epigenetic gene regulation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum: gene regulation via histone modifications, nucleosome positioning and nuclear architecture in P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Ay, Ferhat; Bunnik, Evelien M; Varoquaux, Nelle; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William Stafford; Le Roch, Karine G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the most deadly human malarial parasite, responsible for an estimated 207 million cases of disease and 627,000 deaths in 2012. Recent studies reveal that the parasite actively regulates a large fraction of its genes throughout its replicative cycle inside human red blood cells and that epigenetics plays an important role in this precise gene regulation. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of three aspects of epigenetic regulation in P. falciparum: changes in histone modifications, nucleosome occupancy and the three-dimensional genome structure. We compare these three aspects of the P. falciparum epigenome to those of other eukaryotes, and show that large-scale compartmentalization is particularly important in determining histone decomposition and gene regulation in P. falciparum. We conclude by presenting a gene regulation model for P. falciparum that combines the described epigenetic factors, and by discussing the implications of this model for the future of malaria research.

  2. “Seq-ing” Insights into the Epigenetics of Neuronal Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Telese, Francesca; Gamliel, Amir; Skowronska-Krawczyk, Dorota; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    The epigenetic control of neuronal gene expression patterns has emerged as an underlying regulatory mechanism for neuronal function, identity and plasticity, where short-to long-lasting adaptation is required to dynamically respond and process external stimuli. To achieve a comprehensive understanding of the physiology and pathology of the brain, it becomes essential to understand the mechanisms that regulate the epigenome and transcriptome in neurons. Here, we review recent advances in the study of regulated neuronal gene expression, which are dramatically expanding as a result of the development of new and powerful contemporary methodologies, based on the power of next-generation sequencing. This flood of new information has already transformed our understanding of the biology of cells, and is now driving discoveries elucidating the molecular mechanisms of brain function in cognition, behavior and disease, and may also inform the study of neuronal identity, diversity and cell reprogramming. PMID:23439116

  3. Odd-skipped related 2 is epigenetically regulated in cellular quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinji; Amano, Atsuo

    2010-06-11

    Cellular behavior and development are extensively altered during the transition from cell cycle into quiescence, though the mechanism involved in establishing and maintaining quiescence is largely unknown. We found that Odd-skipped related 2 (Osr2) was up-regulated during cellular quiescence by serum starvation as well as culturing to confluence. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of Osr2 under these conditions, we characterized the mouse Osr2 promoter. CpG islands in the flanking region of the transcription start site were predominantly methylated in exponentially growing cells, resulting in silencing of Osr2 expression. In addition, CpG demethylation in quiescence caused activation of Osr2 expression, while acetylation of the H3 and H4 histones during quiescence also led to an increase in Osr2 expression. These results suggest that epigenetically regulated Osr2 plays an important role in cellular quiescence and proliferation.

  4. An epigenetic regulator emerges as microtubule minus-end binding and stabilizing factor in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Sylvain; Shvedunova, Maria; Van Nguyen, Nhuong; Avila, Leonor; Vernos, Isabelle; Akhtar, Asifa

    2015-08-05

    The evolutionary conserved NSL complex is a prominent epigenetic regulator controlling expression of thousands of genes. Here we uncover a novel function of the NSL complex members in mitosis. As the cell enters mitosis, KANSL1 and KANSL3 undergo a marked relocalisation from the chromatin to the mitotic spindle. By stabilizing microtubule minus ends in a RanGTP-dependent manner, they are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Moreover, we identify KANSL3 as a microtubule minus-end-binding protein, revealing a new class of mitosis-specific microtubule minus-end regulators. By adopting distinct functions in interphase and mitosis, KANSL proteins provide a link to coordinate the tasks of faithful expression and inheritance of the genome during different phases of the cell cycle.

  5. MOS1 epigenetically regulates the expression of plant Resistance gene SNC1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingzhong; Dong, Oliver X; Johnson, Kaeli; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    MOS1 (MODIFIER OF snc1) was identified through a genetic screen for suppressors of snc1, an autoimmune mutant caused by a gain-of-function mutation in a TIR-NB-LRR-type Resistance gene. Loss of MOS1 function completely suppresses snc1-mediated autoimmunity. The MOS1 protein contains a BAT2 domain and regulates the expression of SNC1 in a locus-specific manner, but the mechanism on how MOS1 epigenetically regulates SNC1 gene expression is unclear. Here, we report the gene expression pattern and subcellular localization of MOS1. In addition, we analyze and discuss the roles of DNA and histone methylation in mos1-mediated suppression of SNC1 expression. PMID:21350329

  6. Epigenetic regulation of COL15A1 in smooth muscle cell replicative aging and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Jessica J.; Cherepanova, Olga A.; Doss, Jennifer F.; Karaoli, Themistoclis; Lillard, Travis S.; Markunas, Christina A.; Nelson, Sarah; Wang, Tianyuan; Ellis, Peter D.; Langford, Cordelia F.; Haynes, Carol; Seo, David M.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Shah, Svati H.; Kraus, William E.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Gregory, Simon G.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation is a hallmark of vascular injury and disease. Global hypomethylation occurs during SMC proliferation in culture and in vivo during neointimal formation. Regardless of the programmed or stochastic nature of hypomethylation, identifying these changes is important in understanding vascular disease, as maintenance of a cells' epigenetic profile is essential for maintaining cellular phenotype. Global hypomethylation of proliferating aortic SMCs and concomitant decrease of DNMT1 expression were identified in culture during passage. An epigenome screen identified regions of the genome that were hypomethylated during proliferation and a region containing Collagen, type XV, alpha 1 (COL15A1) was selected by ‘genomic convergence’ for characterization. COL15A1 transcript and protein levels increased with passage-dependent decreases in DNA methylation and the transcript was sensitive to treatment with 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine, suggesting DNA methylation-mediated gene expression. Phenotypically, knockdown of COL15A1 increased SMC migration and decreased proliferation and Col15a1 expression was induced in an atherosclerotic lesion and localized to the atherosclerotic cap. A sequence variant in COL15A1 that is significantly associated with atherosclerosis (rs4142986, P = 0.017, OR = 1.434) was methylated and methylation of the risk allele correlated with decreased gene expression and increased atherosclerosis in human aorta. In summary, hypomethylation of COL15A1 occurs during SMC proliferation and the consequent increased gene expression may impact SMC phenotype and atherosclerosis formation. Hypomethylated genes, such as COL15A1, provide evidence for concomitant epigenetic regulation and genetic susceptibility, and define a class of causal targets that sit at the intersection of genetic and epigenetic predisposition in the etiology of complex disease. PMID:23912340

  7. Polyketide Production of Pestaloficiols and Macrodiolide Ficiolides Revealed by Manipulations of Epigenetic Regulators in an Endophytic Fungus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangwei; Zhou, Haichuan; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Xiuna; Li, Wei; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Xingzhong; Liu, Hong-Wei; Keller, Nancy P; An, Zhiqiang; Yin, Wen-Bing

    2016-04-15

    Regarding targeted disruption of epigenetic regulators, histone methyltransferase and deacetylase in a plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis fici have been uncovered as an unexplored chemical repertoire. Manipulation of epigenetic regulators led to the isolation of 15 new polyketides, including pestaloficiols T-W (1-3 and 5), as well as 11 macrodiolide ficiolides A-K (6-16). Ficiolide K (16) was found to contain a very rare 1,6-anhydro-pyranose moiety. Finally, the biosynthetic origin of macrodiolide was characterized by isotope-labeling experiments.

  8. IGF-1 signaling in neonatal hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension: Role of epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Sun, Miranda; Ramchandran, Ramaswamy; Raj, J Usha

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a fatal disease characterized by a progressive increase in pulmonary artery pressure accompanied by pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased vasomotor tone. Although some biological pathways have been identified in neonatal hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH), little is known regarding the role of growth factors in the pathogenesis of PH in neonates. In this study, using a model of hypoxia-induced PH in neonatal mice, we demonstrate that the growth factor insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), a potent activator of the AKT signaling pathway, is involved in neonatal PH. After exposure to hypoxia, IGF-1 signaling is activated in pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vitro, and the IGF-1 downstream signal pAKT(S473) is upregulated in lungs of neonatal mice. We found that IGF-1 regulates ET-1 expression in pulmonary endothelial cells and that IGF-1 expression is regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs). In addition, there is a differential cytosine methylation site in the IGF-1 promoter region in response to neonatal hypoxia. Moreover, inhibition of HDACs with apicidin decreases neonatal hypoxia-induced global DNA methylation levels in lungs and specific cytosine methylation levels around the pulmonary IGF-1 promoter region. Finally, HDAC inhibition with apicidin reduces chronic hypoxia-induced activation of IGF-1/pAKT signaling in lungs and attenuates right ventricular hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Taken together, we conclude that IGF-1, which is epigenetically regulated, is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in neonatal mice. This study implicates a novel HDAC/IGF-1 epigenetic pathway in the regulation of hypoxia-induced PH and warrants further study of the role of IGF-1 in neonatal pulmonary hypertensive disease. PMID:25921925

  9. Epigenetics of the antibody response.

    PubMed

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and miRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR), and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and miRNAs modulate the expression of critical elements of that machinery, such as activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), as well as factors central to plasma cell differentiation, such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). These inducible B cell-intrinsic epigenetic marks instruct the maturation of antibody responses. Their dysregulation plays an important role in aberrant antibody responses to foreign antigens, such as those of microbial pathogens, and self-antigens, such as those targeted in autoimmunity, and B cell neoplasia.

  10. Aberrant activation and regulation of the oxidative burst in neutrophils with Mo1 glycoprotein deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nauseef, W.M.; de Alarcon, P.; Bale, J.F.; Clark, R.A.

    1986-07-15

    Patients whose cells are deficient in the glycoproteins LFA-1, Mo1, and p150,95 have recurrent infections and pronounced abnormalities in neutrophil adherence, aggregation, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. Activation and regulation of oxidative metabolism of Mo1-deficient neutrophils have been characterized. These cells failed to depolarize or to produce O/sub 2//sup -/ or H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ normally when stimulated by opsonized zymosan. The chemotactic peptide formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine depolarized Mo1-deficient neutrophils normally but caused supernormal production of O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, a result of a prolonged burst in oxidative metabolism. Phorbol myristate acetate depolarized Mo1-deficient neutrophils at a nearly normal rate but evoked release of significantly less O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ than from normal PMN. The aberrant activation and regulation of the oxidative burst in Mo1-deficient neutrohpils are considered in light of recently neutrophils are considered in light of recently emerging concepts in the cell biology of this process, and the possibility that these abnormalities reflect a defect in the cytoskeleton-membrane interaction is discussed.

  11. Role of bacterial infection in the epigenetic regulation of Wnt antagonist WIF1 by PRC2 protein EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Badal C.; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ahmed, Ishfaq; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.; Hester, Christina; Greiner, K. Allen; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Anant, Shrikant; Umar, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancer of Zeste Homolog-2 (EZH2) represses gene transcription through histone H3 lysine-27-trimethylation (H3K27me3). Citrobacter rodentium (CR) promotes crypt hyperplasia and tumorigenesis by aberrantly regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We aimed at investigating EZH2’s role in epigenetically regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling following bacterial infection. NIH:Swiss outbred and ApcMin/+ mice were infected with CR (108cfu); BLT1−/−ApcMin/+ mice, AOM/DSS-treated mice and de-identified human adenocarcinoma samples were models of colon cancer. Following infection with wild type but not mutant CR, elevated EZH2 levels in the crypt at days-6 and 12 (peak hyperplasia) coincided with increases in H3K27me3 and β-catenin levels, respectively. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed EZH2 and H3K27me3’s occupancy on WIF1 (Wnt Inhibitory Factor-1) promoter resulting in reduced WIF1 mRNA and protein expression. Following EZH2 knockdown via siRNA or EZH2-inhibitor DZNep either alone or in combination with HDAC inhibitor SAHA, WIF1 promoter activity increased significantly while overexpression of EZH2 attenuated WIF1-reporter activity. Ectopic overexpression of SET domain mutant (F681Y) almost completely rescued WIF1 reporter activity and partially rescued WIF1 protein levels while H3K27me3 levels were significantly attenuated suggesting that an intact methyltransferases activity is required for EZH2-dependent effects. Interestingly, while β-catenin levels were lower in EZH2-knocked-down cells, F681Y mutants exhibited only partial reduction in β-catenin levels. Besides EZH2, increases in miR-203 expression in the crypts at days-6 and 12 post-infection correlated with reduced levels of its target WIF1; overexpression of miR-203 in primary colonocytes decreased WIF1 mRNA and protein levels. Elevated levels of EZH2 and β-catenin with concomitant decrease in WIF1 expression in the polyps of CR-infected ApcMin/+ mice paralleled changes recorded in BLT1

  12. Nonselective inhibition of the epigenetic transcriptional regulator BET induces marked lymphoid and hematopoietic toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong U; Katavolos, Paula; Palanisamy, Gopinath; Katewa, Arna; Sioson, Charly; Corpuz, Janice; Pang, Jodie; DeMent, Kevin; Choo, Edna; Ghilardi, Nico; Diaz, Dolores; Danilenko, Dimitry M

    2016-06-01

    Bromo and extra terminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4 and BRDT) are epigenetic transcriptional regulators required for efficient expression of growth promoting, cell cycle progression and antiapoptotic genes. Through their bromodomain, these proteins bind to acetylated lysine residues of histones and are recruited to transcriptionally active chromatin. Inhibition of the BET-histone interaction provides a tractable therapeutic strategy to treat diseases that may have epigenetic dysregulation. JQ1 is a small molecule that blocks BET interaction with histones. It has been shown to decrease proliferation of patient-derived multiple myeloma in vitro and to decrease tumor burden in vivo in xenograft mouse models. While targeting BET appears to be a viable and efficacious approach, the nonclinical safety profile of BET inhibition remains to be well-defined. We report that mice dosed with JQ1 at efficacious exposures demonstrate dose-dependent decreases in their lymphoid and immune cell compartments. At higher doses, JQ1 was not tolerated and due to induction of significant body weight loss led to early euthanasia. Flow cytometry analysis of lymphoid tissues showed a decrease in both B- and T-lymphocytes with a concomitant decrease in peripheral white blood cells that was confirmed by hematology. Further investigation with the inactive enantiomer of JQ1 showed that these in vivo effects were on-target mediated and not elicited through secondary pharmacology due to chemical structure. PMID:27078884

  13. Immunosenescence is associated with altered gene expression and epigenetic regulation in primary and secondary immune organs

    PubMed Central

    Sidler, Corinne; Wóycicki, Rafał; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Metz, Gerlinde; Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Deterioration of the immune system (immunosenescence) with age is associated with an increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmune disease and cancer, and reduced responsiveness to vaccination. Immunosenescence entails a reduced supply of naïve T cells from the thymus and increased specialization of peripheral T cell clones. Both thymic involution and peripheral T cell homeostasis are thought to involve cellular senescence. In order to analyze this at the molecular level, we studied gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, and genome stability in the thymus and spleen of 1-, 4-, and 18-month-old Long Evans rats. In the thymus, altered gene expression, DNA and histone H3K9 hypomethylation, increased genome instability, and apoptosis were observed in 18-month-old animals compared to 1- and 4-month-old animals. In the spleen, alterations in gene expression and epigenetic regulation occurred already by the age of 4 months compared to 1 month and persisted in 18-month-old compared to 1-month-old rats. In both organs, these changes were accompanied by the altered composition of resident T cell populations. Our study suggests that both senescence and apoptosis may be involved in altered organ function. PMID:24151501

  14. Epigenetic regulation of ID4 in the determination of the BRCAness phenotype in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Branham, M T; Campoy, E; Laurito, S; Branham, R; Urrutia, G; Orozco, J; Gago, F; Urrutia, R; Roqué, M

    2016-01-01

    BRCAness breast tumors represent a group of sporadic tumors characterized by a reduction in BRCA1 gene expression. As BRCA1 is involved in double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair, dysfunctional BRCA pathway could make a tumor sensitive to DNA damaging drugs (e.g., platinum agents). Thus, accurately identifying BRCAness could contribute to therapeutic decision making in patients harboring these tumors. The purpose of this study was to identify if BRCAness tumors present a characteristic methylation profile and/or were related to specific clinico-pathological features. BRCAness was measured by MLPA in 63 breast tumors; methylation status of 98 CpG sites within 84 cancer-related genes was analyzed by MS-MLPA. Protein and mRNA expressions of the selected genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and Western Blot. BRCAness was associated with younger age, higher nuclear pleomorphism, and triple-negative (TN) status. Epigenetically, we found that the strongest predictors for BRCAness tumors were the methylations of MLH1 and PAX5 plus the unmethylations of CCND2 and ID4. We determined that ID4 unmethylation correlated with the expression levels of both its mRNA and protein. We observed an inverse relation between the expressions of ID4 and BRCA1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting an epigenetic regulation of ID4 in BRCAness tumors. Our findings give new information of BRCAness etiology and encourage future studies on potential drug targets for BRCAness breast tumors.

  15. Genome-Wide Epigenetic Regulation of Gene Transcription in Maize Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Zhenguang; Guo, Wenzhu; Chen, Rumei; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Jun; Lang, Zhihong; Fan, Yunliu; Zhao, Jiuran; Zhang, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic regulation is well recognized for its importance in gene expression in organisms. DNA methylation, an important epigenetic mark, has received enormous attention in recent years as it’s a key player in many biological processes. It remains unclear how DNA methylation contributes to gene transcription regulation in maize seeds. Here, we take advantage of recent technologies to examine the genome-wide association of DNA methylation with transcription of four types of DNA sequences, including protein-coding genes, pseudogenes, transposable elements, and repeats in maize embryo and endosperm, respectively. Results The methylation in CG, CHG and CHH contexts plays different roles in the control of gene expression. Methylation around the transcription start sites and transcription stop regions of protein-coding genes is negatively correlated, but in gene bodies positively correlated, to gene expression level. The upstream regions of protein-coding genes are enriched with 24-nt siRNAs and contain high levels of CHH methylation, which is correlated to gene expression level. The analysis of sequence content within CG, CHG, or CHH contexts reveals that only CHH methylation is affected by its local sequences, which is different from Arabidopsis. Conclusions In summary, we conclude that methylation-regulated transcription varies with the types of DNA sequences, sequence contexts or parts of a specific gene in maize seeds and differs from that in other plant species. Our study helps people better understand from a genome-wide viewpoint that how transcriptional expression is controlled by DNA methylation, one of the important factors influencing transcription, and how the methylation is associated with small RNAs. PMID:26469520

  16. Epigenetic Mechanisms Regulate MHC and Antigen Processing Molecules in Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; Rodriguez, Ramón M.; Calvanese, Vincenzo; Blanco-Gelaz, Miguel A.; Suhr, Steve T.; Ortega, Francisco; Otero, Jesus; Cibelli, Jose B.; Moore, Harry; Fraga, Mario F.; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Background Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are an attractive resource for new therapeutic approaches that involve tissue regeneration. hESCs have exhibited low immunogenicity due to low levels of Mayor Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class-I and absence of MHC class-II expression. Nevertheless, the mechanisms regulating MHC expression in hESCs had not been explored. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the expression levels of classical and non-classical MHC class-I, MHC class-II molecules, antigen-processing machinery (APM) components and NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L) in hESCs, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and NTera2 (NT2) teratocarcinoma cell line. Epigenetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of these genes were investigated by bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. We showed that low levels of MHC class-I molecules were associated with absent or reduced expression of the transporter associated with antigen processing 1 (TAP-1) and tapasin (TPN) components in hESCs and iPSCs, which are involved in the transport and load of peptides. Furthermore, lack of β2-microglobulin (β2m) light chain in these cells limited the expression of MHC class I trimeric molecule on the cell surface. NKG2D ligands (MICA, MICB) were observed in all pluripotent stem cells lines. Epigenetic analysis showed that H3K9me3 repressed the TPN gene in undifferentiated cells whilst HLA-B and β2m acquired the H3K4me3 modification during the differentiation to embryoid bodies (EBs). Absence of HLA-DR and HLA-G expression was regulated by DNA methylation. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide fundamental evidence for the epigenetic control of MHC in hESCs and iPSCs. Reduced MHC class I and class II expression in hESCs and iPSCs can limit their recognition by the immune response against these cells. The knowledge of these mechanisms will further allow the development of strategies to induce tolerance and improve stem cell allograft acceptance

  17. Targeted Epigenetic Remodeling of the Cdk5 Gene in Nucleus Accumbens Regulates Cocaine- and Stress-Evoked Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Peter J.; Burek, Dominika D.; Lombroso, Sonia I.; Peña, Catherine J.; Neve, Rachael L.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated epigenetic remodeling in brain reward regions following psychostimulant or stress exposure. It has only recently become possible to target a given type of epigenetic remodeling to a single gene of interest, and to probe the functional relevance of such regulation to neuropsychiatric disease. We sought to examine the role of histone modifications at the murine Cdk5 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5) locus, given growing evidence of Cdk5 expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc) influencing reward-related behaviors. Viral-mediated delivery of engineered zinc finger proteins (ZFP) targeted histone H3 lysine 9/14 acetylation (H3K9/14ac), a transcriptionally active mark, or histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2), which is associated with transcriptional repression, specifically to the Cdk5 locus in NAc in vivo. We found that Cdk5-ZFP transcription factors are sufficient to bidirectionally regulate Cdk5 gene expression via enrichment of their respective histone modifications. We examined the behavioral consequences of this epigenetic remodeling and found that Cdk5-targeted H3K9/14ac increased cocaine-induced locomotor behavior, as well as resilience to social stress. Conversely, Cdk5-targeted H3K9me2 attenuated both cocaine-induced locomotor behavior and conditioned place preference, but had no effect on stress-induced social avoidance behavior. The current study provides evidence for the causal role of Cdk5 epigenetic remodeling in NAc in Cdk5 gene expression and in the control of reward and stress responses. Moreover, these data are especially compelling given that previous work demonstrated opposite behavioral phenotypes compared with those reported here upon Cdk5 overexpression or knockdown, demonstrating the importance of targeted epigenetic remodeling tools for studying more subtle molecular changes that contribute to neuropsychiatric disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Addiction and depression are highly heritable diseases, yet it has been

  18. Epigenetic Regulation of Non-Lymphoid Cells by Bisphenol A, a Model Endocrine Disrupter: Potential Implications for Immunoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Deena; Ahmed, S. Ansar

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) abound in the environment since many compounds are released from chemical, agricultural, pharmaceutical, and consumer product industries. Many of the EDCs such as Bisphenol A (BPA) have estrogenic activity or interfere with endogenous sex hormones. Experimental studies have reported a positive correlation of BPA with reproductive toxicity, altered growth, and immune dysregulation. Although the precise relevance of these studies to the environmental levels is unclear, nevertheless, their potential health implications remain a concern. One possible mechanism by which BPA can alter genes is by regulating epigenetics, including microRNA, alteration of methylation, and histone acetylation. There is now wealth of information on BPA effects on non-lymphoid cells and by comparison, paucity of data on effects of BPA on the immune system. In this mini review, we will highlight the BPA regulation of estrogen receptor-mediated immune cell functions and in different inflammatory conditions. In addition, BPA-mediated epigenetic regulation of non-lymphoid cells is emphasized. We recognize that most of these studies are on non-lymphoid cells, and given that BPA also affects the immune system, it is plausible that BPA could have similar epigenetic regulation in immune cells. It is hoped that this review will stimulate studies in this area to ascertain whether or not BPA epigenetically regulates the cells of the immune system. PMID:26097467

  19. Regulation of Nox enzymes expression in vascular pathophysiology: Focusing on transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Manea, Simona-Adriana; Constantin, Alina; Manda, Gina; Sasson, Shlomo; Manea, Adrian

    2015-08-01

    NADPH oxidases (Nox) represent a family of hetero-oligomeric enzymes whose exclusive biological function is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nox-derived ROS are essential modulators of signal transduction pathways that control key physiological activities such as cell growth, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis, immune responses, and biochemical pathways. Enhanced formation of Nox-derived ROS, which is generally associated with the up-regulation of different Nox subtypes, has been established in various pathologies, namely cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and neurodegeneration. The detrimental effects of Nox-derived ROS are related to alterations in cell signalling and/or direct irreversible oxidative damage of nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Thus, understanding of transcriptional regulation mechanisms of Nox enzymes have been extensively investigated in an attempt to find ways to counteract the excessive formation of Nox-derived ROS in various pathological states. Despite the numerous existing data, the molecular pathways responsible for Nox up-regulation are not completely understood. This review article summarizes some of the recent advances and concepts related to the regulation of Nox expression in the vascular pathophysiology. It highlights the role of transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms in this process. Identification of the signalling molecules involved in Nox up-regulation, which is associated with the onset and development of cardiovascular dysfunction may contribute to the development of novel strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  20. The critical importance of epigenetics in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qianjin

    2013-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by aberrant immune responses against healthy cells and tissues, in which a given individual's genetic susceptibilities play a central role; however, the exact mechanisms underlying the development of these conditions remain for the most part unknown. In recent years, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that, in addition to genetics, other complementary mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, in particular, epigenetics. Epigenetics is defined as stable and heritable patterns of gene expression that do not entail any alterations to the original DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms primarily consist of DNA methylation, histone modifications and small non-coding RNA transcripts. Epigenetic marks can be affected by age and other environmental triggers, providing a plausible link between environmental factors and the onset and development of various human diseases. Because of their primary function in regulating timely gene expression, epigenetic mechanisms offer potential advantages in terms of interpreting the molecular basis of complicated diseases and providing new promising therapeutic avenues for their treatment. The present review focuses on recent progress made in elucidating the relationship between epigenetics and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, primary Sjögren's syndrome, primary biliary cirrhosis, psoriasis and type 1 diabetes. PMID:23375849

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of miRNAs and Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Nadire; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Eades, Gabriel; Eckert, Richard; Zhou, Qun

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important targets of chemopreventive strategies in breast cancer. We have found that miRNAs are dysregulated at an early stage in breast cancer, in non-malignant Ductal Carcinoma In Situ. Many dietary chemoprevention agents can act by epigenetically activating miRNA-signaling pathways involved in tumor cell proliferation and invasive progression. In addition, many miRNAs activated via chemopreventive strategies target cancer stem cell signaling and prevent tumor progression or relapse. Specifically, we have found that miRNAs regulate DCIS stem cells, which may play important roles in breast cancer progression to invasive disease. We have shown that chemopreventive agents can directly inhibit DCIS stem cells and block tumor formation in vivo, via activation of tumor suppressor miRNAs. PMID:26052481

  2. Pathway landscapes and epigenetic regulation in breast cancer and melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigenetic variation is a main regulation mechanism of gene expression in various cancer histotypes, and due to its reversibility, the potential impact in therapy can be very relevant. Methods Based on a selected pair, breast cancer (BC) and melanoma, we conducted inference analysis in parallel on a few cell lines (MCF-7 for BC and A375 for melanoma). Starting from differential expression after treatment with a demethylating agent, the 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC), we provided pathway enrichment analysis and gene regulatory maps with cross-linked microRNAs and transcription factors. Results Several oncogenic signaling pathways altered upon DAC treatment were detected with significant enrichment. We represented the association between these cancers by depicting the landscape of common and specific variation affecting them. PMID:25077705

  3. The Epigenetic Regulator G9a Mediates Tolerance to RNA Virus Infection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Merkling, Sarah H.; Bronkhorst, Alfred W.; Kramer, Jamie M.; Overheul, Gijs J.; Schenck, Annette; Van Rij, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the tolerance mechanisms that reduce the negative effects of microbial infection on host fitness. Here, we demonstrate that the histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase G9a regulates tolerance to virus infection by shaping the response of the evolutionary conserved Jak-Stat pathway in Drosophila. G9a-deficient mutants are more sensitive to RNA virus infection and succumb faster to infection than wild-type controls, which was associated with strongly increased Jak-Stat dependent responses, but not with major differences in viral load. Genetic experiments indicate that hyperactivated Jak-Stat responses are associated with early lethality in virus-infected flies. Our results identify an essential epigenetic mechanism underlying tolerance to virus infection. PMID:25880195

  4. Characterization and pharmacologic targeting of EZH2, a fetal retinal protein and epigenetic regulator, in human retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mehnaz; Walters, Laura L; Li, Qiang; Thomas, Dafydd G; Miller, Jason M L; Zhang, Qitao; Sciallis, Andrew P; Liu, Yu; Dlouhy, Brian J; Fort, Patrice E; Archer, Steven M; Demirci, Hakan; Dou, Yali; Rao, Rajesh C

    2015-11-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary intraocular cancer in children, and the third most common cancer overall in infants. No molecular-targeted therapy for this lethal tumor exists. Since the tumor suppressor RB1, whose genetic inactivation underlies RB, is upstream of the epigenetic regulator EZH2, a pharmacologic target for many solid tumors, we reasoned that EZH2 might regulate human RB tumorigenesis. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses were performed using an EZH2 antibody in sections from 43 samples of primary, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human RB tissue, cryopreserved mouse retina, and in whole cell lysates from human RB cell lines (Y79 and WERI-Rb1), primary human fetal retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and fetal and adult retina, mouse retina and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Although enriched during fetal human retinal development, EZH2 protein was not present in the normal postnatal retina. However, EZH2 was detected in all 43 analyzed human RB specimens, indicating that EZH2 is a fetal protein expressed in postnatal human RB. EZH2 expression marked single RB cell invasion into the optic nerve, a site of invasion whose involvement may influence the decision for systemic chemotherapy. To assess the role of EZH2 in RB cell survival, human RB and primary RPE cells were treated with two EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), GSK126 and SAH-EZH2 (SAH). EZH2i impaired intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, an indicator of cell viability, in a time and dose-dependent manner, but did not affect primary human fetal RPE. Thus, aberrant expression of a histone methyltransferase protein is a feature of human RB. This is the first time this mechanism has been implicated for an eye, adnexal, or orbital tumor. The specificity of EZH2i toward human RB cells, but not RPE, warrants further in vivo testing in animal models of RB, especially those EZH2i currently in clinical trials for solid tumors and lymphoma. PMID:26280220

  5. Leg regeneration is epigenetically regulated by histone H3K27 methylation in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshimasa; Bando, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Taro; Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Mito, Taro; Noji, Sumihare; Tomioka, Kenji; Ohuchi, Hideyo

    2015-09-01

    Hemimetabolous insects such as the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus regenerate lost tissue parts using blastemal cells, a population of dedifferentiated proliferating cells. The expression of several factors that control epigenetic modification is upregulated in the blastema compared with differentiated tissue, suggesting that epigenetic changes in gene expression might control the differentiation status of blastema cells during regeneration. To clarify the molecular basis of epigenetic regulation during regeneration, we focused on the function of the Gryllus Enhancer of zeste [Gb'E(z)] and Ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat gene on the X chromosome (Gb'Utx) homologues, which regulate methylation and demethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27), respectively. Methylated histone H3K27 in the regenerating leg was diminished by Gb'E(z)(RNAi) and was increased by Gb'Utx(RNAi). Regenerated Gb'E(z)(RNAi) cricket legs exhibited extra leg segment formation between the tibia and tarsus, and regenerated Gb'Utx(RNAi) cricket legs showed leg joint formation defects in the tarsus. In the Gb'E(z)(RNAi) regenerating leg, the Gb'dac expression domain expanded in the tarsus. By contrast, in the Gb'Utx(RNAi) regenerating leg, Gb'Egfr expression in the middle of the tarsus was diminished. These results suggest that regulation of the histone H3K27 methylation state is involved in the repatterning process during leg regeneration among cricket species via the epigenetic regulation of leg patterning gene expression.

  6. Epigenetic Regulation of Placental "NR3C1": Mechanism Underlying Prenatal Programming of Infant Neurobehavior by Maternal Smoking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Laura R.; Papandonatos, George D.; Salisbury, Amy L.; Phipps, Maureen G.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Niaura, Raymond; Padbury, James F.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Lester, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of the placental glucocorticoid receptor gene ("NR3C1") was investigated as a mechanism underlying links between maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) and infant neurobehavior in 45 mother-infant pairs (49% MSDP-exposed; 52% minorities; ages 18-35). The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Network Neurobehavioral…

  7. Bioinformatics analysis of thousands of TCGA tumors to determine the involvement of epigenetic regulators in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Many cancer cells show distorted epigenetic landscapes. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project profiles thousands of tumors, allowing the discovery of somatic alterations in the epigenetic machinery and the identification of potential cancer drivers among members of epigenetic protein families. Methods We integrated mutation, expression, and copy number data from 5943 tumors from 13 cancer types to train a classification model that predicts the likelihood of being an oncogene (OG), tumor suppressor (TSG) or neutral gene (NG). We applied this predictor to epigenetic regulator genes (ERGs), and used differential expression and correlation network analysis to identify dysregulated ERGs along with co-expressed cancer genes. Furthermore, we quantified global proteomic changes by mass spectrometry after EZH2 inhibition. Results Mutation-based classifiers uncovered the OG-like profile of DNMT3A and TSG-like profiles for several ERGs. Differential gene expression and correlation network analyses revealed that EZH2 is the most significantly over-expressed ERG in cancer and is co-regulated with a cell cycle network. Proteomic analysis showed that EZH2 inhibition induced down-regulation of cell cycle regulators in lymphoma cells. Conclusions Using classical driver genes to train an OG/TSG predictor, we determined the most predictive features at the gene level. Our predictor uncovered one OG and several TSGs among ERGs. Expression analyses elucidated multiple dysregulated ERGs including EZH2 as member of a co-expressed cell cycle network. PMID:26110843

  8. Epigenetic regulation of Atoh1 guides hair cell development in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Stojanova, Zlatka P; Kwan, Tao; Segil, Neil

    2015-10-15

    In the developing cochlea, sensory hair cell differentiation depends on the regulated expression of the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. In mammals, if hair cells die they do not regenerate, leading to permanent deafness. By contrast, in non-mammalian vertebrates robust regeneration occurs through upregulation of Atoh1 in the surviving supporting cells that surround hair cells, leading to functional recovery. Investigation of crucial transcriptional events in the developing organ of Corti, including those involving Atoh1, has been hampered by limited accessibility to purified populations of the small number of cells present in the inner ear. We used µChIP and qPCR assays of FACS-purified cells to track changes in the epigenetic status of the Atoh1 locus during sensory epithelia development in the mouse. Dynamic changes in the histone modifications H3K4me3/H3K27me3, H3K9ac and H3K9me3 reveal a progression from poised, to active, to repressive marks, correlating with the onset of Atoh1 expression and its subsequent silencing during the perinatal (P1 to P6) period. Inhibition of acetylation blocked the increase in Atoh1 mRNA in nascent hair cells, as well as ongoing hair cell differentiation during embryonic organ of Corti development ex vivo. These results reveal an epigenetic mechanism of Atoh1 regulation underlying hair cell differentiation and subsequent maturation. Interestingly, the H3K4me3/H3K27me3 bivalent chromatin structure observed in progenitors persists at the Atoh1 locus in perinatal supporting cells, suggesting an explanation for the latent capacity of these cells to transdifferentiate into hair cells, and highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets in hair cell regeneration.

  9. The Role of the p53 Protein in Stem-Cell Biology and Epigenetic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Levine, Arnold J; Puzio-Kuter, Anna M; Chan, Chang S; Hainaut, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    The p53 protein plays a passive and an active role in stem cells. The transcriptional activities of p53 for cell-cycle arrest and DNA repair are largely turned off in stem cells, but there is some indication that long-term stem-cell viability may require other p53-regulated functions. When p53 is activated in stem cells, it stops cell division and promotes the commitment to a differentiation pathway and the formation of progenitor cells. In the absence of any p53 activity, stem-cell replication continues and mistakes in the normal epigenetic pathway occur at a higher probability. In the presence of a functionally active p53 protein, epigenetic stability is enforced and stem-cell replication is regulated by commitment to differentiation. Over a lifetime of an organism, stem-cell clones compete in a tissue niche for Darwinian replicative advantages and in doing so accumulate mutations that permit stem-cell replication. Mutations in the p53 gene give stem cells this advantage, increase the clonal stem-cell population, and lower the age at which cancers can occur. Li-Fraumeni patients that inherit p53 mutations develop tumors in a tissue-type-specific fashion at younger ages. Throughout the life of a Li-Fraumeni patient, the tumor types that arise occur in tissues where stem cells are active and cell division is most rapid. Thus, p53 mutations that are inherited or occur during developmental life act in stem cells of the mesenchymal and epithelial lineages, whereas p53 mutations that occur in progenitor or differentiated (somatic) cells later in life function in tissues of endodermal origins, indicating that p53 may function differently in different developmental lineages.

  10. REM Sleep and Its Loss-associated Epigenetic Regulation with Reference to Noradrenaline in Particular

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rachna; Singh, Abhishek; Bókkon, István; Nath Mallick, Birendra

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is an essential physiological process, which has been divided into rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) in higher animals. REMS is a unique phenomenon that unlike other sleep-waking states is not under voluntary control. Directly or indirectly it influences or gets influenced by most of the physiological processes controlled by the brain. It has been proposed that REMS serves housekeeping function of the brain. Extensive research has shown that during REMS at least noradrenaline (NA) -ergic neurons must cease activity and upon REMS loss, there are increased levels of NA in the brain, which then induces many of the REMS loss associated acute and chronic effects. The NA level is controlled by many bio-molecules that are regulated at the molecular and transcriptional levels. Similarly, NA can also directly or indirectly modulate the synthesis and levels of many molecules, which in turn may affect physiological processes. The burgeoning field of behavioral neuroepigenetics has gained importance in recent years and explains the regulatory mechanisms underlying several behavioral phenomena. As REMS and its loss associated changes in NA modulate several pathophysiological processes, in this review we have attempted to explain on one hand how the epigenetic mechanisms regulating the gene expression of factors like tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), monoamine oxidase (MAO), noradrenaline transporter (NAT) control NA levels and on the other hand, how NA per se can affect other molecules in neural circuitry at the epigenetic level resulting in behavioral changes in health and diseases. An understanding of these events will expose the molecular basis of REMS and its loss-associated pathophysiological changes; which are presented as a testable hypothesis for confirmation. PMID:26813120

  11. Epigenetic marks: regulators of livestock phenotypes and conceivable sources of missing variation in livestock improvement programs

    PubMed Central

    Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M.; Zhao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in animal productivity has been achieved over the years through careful breeding and selection programs. Today, variations in the genome are gaining increasing importance in livestock improvement strategies. Genomic information alone, however, explains only a part of the phenotypic variance in traits. It is likely that a portion of the unaccounted variance is embedded in the epigenome. The epigenome encompasses epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation, histone tail modifications, chromatin remodeling, and other molecules that can transmit epigenetic information such as non-coding RNA species. Epigenetic factors respond to external or internal environmental cues such as nutrition, pathogens, and climate, and have the ability to change gene expression leading to emergence of specific phenotypes. Accumulating evidence shows that epigenetic marks influence gene expression and phenotypic outcome in livestock species. This review examines available evidence of the influence of epigenetic marks on livestock (cattle, sheep, goat, and pig) traits and discusses the potential for consideration of epigenetic markers in livestock improvement programs. However, epigenetic research activities on farm animal species are currently limited partly due to lack of recognition, funding and a global network of researchers. Therefore, considerable less attention has been given to epigenetic research in livestock species in comparison to extensive work in humans and model organisms. Elucidating therefore the epigenetic determinants of animal diseases and complex traits may represent one of the principal challenges to use epigenetic markers for further improvement of animal productivity. PMID:26442116

  12. Epigenetic mechanisms and associated brain circuits in the regulation of positive emotions: A role for transposable elements.

    PubMed

    Gaudi, Simona; Guffanti, Guia; Fallon, James; Macciardi, Fabio

    2016-10-15

    Epigenetic programming and reprogramming are at the heart of cellular differentiation and represent developmental and evolutionary mechanisms in both germline and somatic cell lines. Only about 2% of our genome is composed of protein-coding genes, while the remaining 98%, once considered "junk" DNA, codes for regulatory/epigenetic elements that control how genes are expressed in different tissues and across time from conception to death. While we already know that epigenetic mechanisms are at play in cancer development and in regulating metabolism (cellular and whole body), the role of epigenetics in the developing prenatal and postnatal brain, and in maintaining a proper brain activity throughout the various stages of life, in addition to having played a critical role in human evolution, is a relatively new domain of knowledge. Here we present the current state-of-the-art techniques and results of these studies within the domain of emotions, and then speculate on how genomic and epigenetic mechanisms can modify and potentially alter our emotional (limbic) brain and affect our social interactions. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2944-2954, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27224878

  13. UVA-induced epigenetic regulation of P16(INK4a) in human epidermal keratinocytes and skin tumor derived cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Peng; Henning, Stefan; Faust, Alexandra; Boukamp, Petra; Volkmer, Beate; Greinert, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    UVA-radiation (315-400 nm) has been demonstrated to be capable of inducing DNA damage and is regarded as a carcinogen. While chromosomal aberrations found in UVA-irradiated cells and skin tumors provided evidence of the genetic involvement in UVA-carcinogenesis, its epigenetic participation is still illusive. We thus analysed the epigenetic patterns of 5 specific genes that are involved in stem cell fate (KLF4, NANOG), telomere maintenance (hTERT) and tumor suppression in cell cycle control (P16(INK4a), P21(WAFI/CIPI)) in chronically UVA-irradiated HaCaT human keratinocytes. A striking reduction of the permissive histone mark H3K4me3 has been detected in the promoter of P16(INK4a) (4-fold and 9-fold reduction for 10 and 15 weeks UVA-irradiated cells, respectively), which has often been found deregulated in skin cancers. This alteration in histone modification together with a severe promoter hypermethylation strongly impaired the transcription of P16(INK4a) (20-fold and 40-fold for 10 weeks and 15 weeks UVA-irradiation, respectively). Analysis of the skin tumor-derived cells revealed the same severe impairment of the P16(INK4a) transcription attributed to promoter hypermethylation and enrichment of the heterochromatin histone mark H3K9me3 and the repressive mark H3K27me3. Less pronounced UVA-induced epigenetic alterations were also detected for the other genes, demonstrating for the first time that UVA is able to modify transcription of skin cancer associated genes by means of epigenetic DNA and histone alterations. PMID:21986889

  14. Epigenetic regulation of OAS2 shows disease-specific DNA methylation profiles at individual CpG sites.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaolian; Boldrup, Linda; Coates, Philip J; Fahraeus, Robin; Nylander, Elisabet; Loizou, Christos; Olofsson, Katarina; Norberg-Spaak, Lena; Gärskog, Ola; Nylander, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are essential regulators of biological processes. Decreased DNA methylation of OAS2 (2'-5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase 2), encoding an antiviral protein, has been seen in psoriasis. To provide further insight into the epigenetic regulation of OAS2, we performed pyrosequencing to detect OAS2 DNA methylation status at 11 promoter and first exon located CpG sites in psoriasis (n = 12) and two common subtypes of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck: tongue (n = 12) and tonsillar (n = 11). Compared to corresponding controls, a general hypomethylation was seen in psoriasis. In tongue and tonsillar SCC, hypomethylation was found at only two CpG sites, the same two sites that were least demethylated in psoriasis. Despite differences in the specific residues targeted for methylation/demethylation, OAS2 expression was upregulated in all conditions and correlations between methylation and expression were seen in psoriasis and tongue SCC. Distinctive methylation status at four successively located CpG sites within a genomic area of 63 bp reveals a delicately integrated epigenetic program and indicates that detailed analysis of individual CpGs provides additional information into the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in specific disease states. Methylation analyses as clinical biomarkers need to be tailored according to disease-specific sites. PMID:27572959

  15. Epigenetic regulation of OAS2 shows disease-specific DNA methylation profiles at individual CpG sites

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaolian; Boldrup, Linda; Coates, Philip J.; Fahraeus, Robin; Nylander, Elisabet; Loizou, Christos; Olofsson, Katarina; Norberg-Spaak, Lena; Gärskog, Ola; Nylander, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are essential regulators of biological processes. Decreased DNA methylation of OAS2 (2′-5′-Oligoadenylate Synthetase 2), encoding an antiviral protein, has been seen in psoriasis. To provide further insight into the epigenetic regulation of OAS2, we performed pyrosequencing to detect OAS2 DNA methylation status at 11 promoter and first exon located CpG sites in psoriasis (n = 12) and two common subtypes of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck: tongue (n = 12) and tonsillar (n = 11). Compared to corresponding controls, a general hypomethylation was seen in psoriasis. In tongue and tonsillar SCC, hypomethylation was found at only two CpG sites, the same two sites that were least demethylated in psoriasis. Despite differences in the specific residues targeted for methylation/demethylation, OAS2 expression was upregulated in all conditions and correlations between methylation and expression were seen in psoriasis and tongue SCC. Distinctive methylation status at four successively located CpG sites within a genomic area of 63 bp reveals a delicately integrated epigenetic program and indicates that detailed analysis of individual CpGs provides additional information into the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in specific disease states. Methylation analyses as clinical biomarkers need to be tailored according to disease-specific sites. PMID:27572959

  16. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  17. Epigenetic and Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Glutathione Peroxidase 3 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Byung Chull; Jung, Nak-Kyun; Park, Chun Young; Oh, In-Jae; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Park, Jae-Il; Lee, Seung-won

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), an antioxidant enzyme, acts as a modulator of redox signaling, has immunomodulatory function, and catalyzes the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPx3 has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. Although hyper-methylation of the GPx3 promoter has been shown to down-regulate its expression, other mechanisms by which GPx3 expression is regulated have not been reported. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanisms of GPx3 regulation. GPx3 gene analysis predicted the presence of ten glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) on the GPx3 gene. This result prompted us to investigate whether GPx3 expression is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is implicated in tumor response to chemotherapy. The corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) was used to examine the possible relationship between GR and GPx3 expression. Dex significantly induced GPx3 expression in H1299, H1650, and H1975 cell lines, which exhibit low levels of GPx3 expression under normal conditions. The results of EMSA and ChIP-PCR suggest that GR binds directly to GRE 6 and 7, both of which are located near the GPx3 promoter. Assessment of GPx3 transcription efficiency using a luciferase reporter system showed that blocking formation of the GR-GRE complexes reduced luciferase activity by 7–8-fold. Suppression of GR expression by siRNA transfection also induced down-regulation of GPx3. These data indicate that GPx3 expression can be regulated independently via epigenetic or GR-mediated mechanisms in lung cancer cells, and suggest that GPx3 could potentiate glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling in lung cancer cells. PMID:27484907

  18. Epigenetic and Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Glutathione Peroxidase 3 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    An, Byung Chull; Jung, Nak-Kyun; Park, Chun Young; Oh, In-Jae; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Park, Jae-Il; Lee, Seung-Won

    2016-08-31

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), an antioxidant enzyme, acts as a modulator of redox signaling, has immunomodulatory function, and catalyzes the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPx3 has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. Although hyper-methylation of the GPx3 promoter has been shown to down-regulate its expression, other mechanisms by which GPx3 expression is regulated have not been reported. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanisms of GPx3 regulation. GPx3 gene analysis predicted the presence of ten glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) on the GPx3 gene. This result prompted us to investigate whether GPx3 expression is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is implicated in tumor response to chemotherapy. The corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) was used to examine the possible relationship between GR and GPx3 expression. Dex significantly induced GPx3 expression in H1299, H1650, and H1975 cell lines, which exhibit low levels of GPx3 expression under normal conditions. The results of EMSA and ChIP-PCR suggest that GR binds directly to GRE 6 and 7, both of which are located near the GPx3 promoter. Assessment of GPx3 transcription efficiency using a luciferase reporter system showed that blocking formation of the GR-GRE complexes reduced luciferase activity by 7-8-fold. Suppression of GR expression by siRNA transfection also induced down-regulation of GPx3. These data indicate that GPx3 expression can be regulated independently via epigenetic or GR-mediated mechanisms in lung cancer cells, and suggest that GPx3 could potentiate glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling in lung cancer cells. PMID:27484907

  19. E2 Regulates Epigenetic Signature on Neuroglobin Enhancer-Promoter in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmotto, Michela; Reineri, Stefania; Iannello, Andrea; Ferrero, Giulio; Vanzan, Ludovica; Miano, Valentina; Ricci, Laura; Tamagno, Elena; De Bortoli, Michele; Cutrupi, Santina

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are neuroprotective factors in several neurological diseases. Neuroglobin (NGB) is one of the estrogen target genes involved in neuroprotection, but little is known about its transcriptional regulation. Estrogen genomic pathway in gene expression regulation is mediated by estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) that bind to specific regulatory genomic regions. We focused our attention on 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced NGB expression in human differentiated neuronal cell lines (SK-N-BE and NT-2). Previously, using bioinformatics analysis we identified a putative enhancer in the first intron of NGB locus. Therefore, we observed that E2 increased the enrichment of the H3K4me3 epigenetic marks at the promoter and of the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac at the intron enhancer. In these NGB regulatory regions, we found estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) binding suggesting that ERα may mediate chromatin remodeling to induce NGB expression upon E2 treatment. Altogether our data show that NGB expression is regulated by ERα binding on genomic regulatory regions supporting hormone therapy applications for the neuroprotection against neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27313512

  20. Epigenetic alterations in sperm associated with male infertility.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Akane; Miyauchi, Naoko; Hamada, Hirotaka; Hiura, Hitoshi; Chiba, Hatsune; Okae, Hiroaki; Sato, Akiko; John, Rosalind M; Arima, Takahiro

    2015-08-01

    The most common form of male infertility is a low sperm count, known as oligozoospermia. Studies suggest that oligozoospermia is associated with epigenetic alterations. Epigenetic alterations in sperm, which may arise due to the exposure of gametes to environmental factors or those that pre-exist in the sperm of infertile individuals, may contribute to the increased incidence of normally rare imprinting disorders in babies conceived after assisted reproductive technology using the sperm of infertile men. Genomic imprinting is an important developmental process whereby the allelic activity of certain genes is regulated by DNA methylation established during gametogenesis. The aberrant expression of several imprinted genes has been linked to various diseases, malignant tumors, lifestyle and mental disorders in humans. Understanding how infertility and environmental factors such as reproductive toxicants, certain foods, and drug exposures during gametogenesis contribute to the origins of these disorders via defects in sperm is of paramount importance. In this review, we discuss the association of epigenetic alterations with abnormal spermatogenesis and the evidence that epigenetic processes, including those required for genomic imprinting, may be sensitive to environmental exposures during gametogenesis, fertilization and early embryonic development. In addition, we review imprinting diseases and their relationships with environmental factors. While the plasticity of epigenetic marks may make these more susceptible to modification by the environment, this also suggests that aberrant epigenetic marks may be reversible. A greater understanding of this process and the function of epidrugs may lead to the development of new treatment methods for many adult diseases in the future. PMID:26212350

  1. Epigenetic regulation of high glucose-induced proinflammatory cytokine productionin monocytes by curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jung-Mi; Jialal, Ishwarlal; Devaraj, Sridevi

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a pro-inflammatory state. We have previously shown increased monocyte pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. High glucose induces pro-inflammatory cytokines via epigenetic changes. Curcumin, a polyphenol responsible for the yellow color of the spice turmeric, is known to exert potent anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. Recent studies indicate that it may regulate chromatin remodeling by inhibiting histone acetylation. In this study, we aimed to test the effect of curcumin on histone acetylation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion under high-glucose conditions in human monocytes. Human monocytic (THP-1) cells were cultured in presence of mannitol (osmolar control, mannitol) or normoglycemic (NG, 5.5 mmol/L glucose) or hyperglycemic (HG, 25 mmol/L glucose) conditions in absence or presence of curcumin (1.5-12.5μM) for 72 h. Cytokine level, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transactivation, histone deacetylases (HDACs) activity, histone acetylases (HATs) activity were measured by western blots, qRT-PCR, ELISA, Immunofluorescence (IF) staining. HG significantly induced histone acetylation, NF-κB activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-6, TNF-α and MCP-1) release from THP-1 cells. Curcumin suppressed NF-κB binding and cytokine release in THP-1 cells. Also, since p300 histone acetyltransferase is a coactivator of NF-κB, we examined its acetylation. Curcumin treatment also significantly reduced HAT activity, level of p300 and acetylated CBP/p300 gene expression, and induced histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) expression by curcumin. These results indicate that curcumin decreases HG-induced cytokine production in monocytes via epigenetic changes involving NF-κB. In conclusion, curcumin supplementation by reducing vascular inflammation may prevent diabetic complications. PMID:20655188

  2. Evolutionary history and epigenetic regulation of the three paralogous pax7 genes in rainbow trout

    PubMed Central

    Seiliez, Iban; Froehlich, Jacob Michael; Marandel, Lucie; Gabillard, Jean-Charles; Biga, Peggy R.

    2015-01-01

    The extraordinary muscle growth potential of teleost fish, particular those of the Salmoninae clade, elicits questions about how the relatively highly conserved transcription factors of the myogenic program are regulated. In addition, the pseudotetraploid nature of the salmonid genome adds another layer of regulatory complexity, and this must be reconciled with epigenetic data to better understand how these fish achieve lifelong muscle growth. To this end, we identified three paralogous pax7 genes (pax7a1, pax7a2, and pax7b) in the rainbow trout genome. During in vitro myogenesis, pax7a1 transcripts remain stable, while pax7a2 and pax7b mRNAs increase in abundance, similarly to myogenin mRNAs and in contrast to the expression pattern of the mammalian ortholog. In addition, we profiled the distribution of repressive H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 and permissive H3K4me3 marks during in vitro myogenesis across these loci, finding that pax7a2 expression was associated with decreased H3K27 trimethylation, while pax7b expression was correlated with decreased H3K9me3 and −K27me3. Altogether, these data link the highly unique differential expression of pax7 paralogs with epigenetic histone modifications in a vertebrate species displaying growth divergent from that of mammals and highlight an important divergence in the regulatory mechanisms of pax7 expression among vertebrates. The system described here provides a more comprehensive picture of the combinatorial control mechanisms orchestrating skeletal muscle growth in a salmonid, leading to a better understanding of myogenesis in this species and across Vertebrata more generally. PMID:25487404

  3. Epigenetic regulation of insulin-like growth factor axis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    El Tayebi, Hend Mohamed; Abdelaziz, Ahmed Ihab

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is an important pathway in the process of hepatocarcinogenesis, and the IGF network is clearly dysregulated in many cancers and developmental abnormalities. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), only a minority of patients are eligible for curative treatments, such as tumor resection or liver transplant. Unfortunately, there is a high recurrence of HCC after surgical tumor removal. Recent research efforts have focused on targeting IGF axis members in an attempt to find therapeutic options for many health problems. In this review, we shed lights on the regulation of members of the IGF axis, mainly by microRNAs in HCC. MicroRNAs in HCC attempt to halt the aberrant expression of the IGF network, and a single microRNA can have multiple downstream targets in one or more signaling pathways. Targeting microRNAs is a relatively new approach for identifying an efficient radical cure for HCC. PMID:26973407

  4. Epigenetic Control of Cytokine Gene Expression: Regulation of the TNF/LT Locus and T Helper Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, James V.; Jasenosky, Luke D.; Kruidenier, Laurens; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics encompasses transient and heritable modifications to DNA and nucleosomes in the native chromatin context. For example, enzymatic addition of chemical moieties to the N-terminal “tails” of histones, particularly acetylation and methylation of lysine residues in the histone tails of H3 and H4, plays a key role in regulation of gene transcription. The modified histones, which are physically associated with gene regulatory regions that typically occur within conserved noncoding sequences, play a functional role in active, poised, or repressed gene transcription. The “histone code” defined by these modifications, along with the chromatin-binding acetylases, deacetylases, methylases, demethylases, and other enzymes that direct modifications resulting in specific patterns of histone modification, shows considerable evolutionary conservation from yeast to humans. Direct modifications at the DNA level, such as cytosine methylation at CpG motifs that represses promoter activity, are another highly conserved epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Furthermore, epigenetic modifications at the nucleosome or DNA level can also be coupled with higher-order intra- or interchromosomal interactions that influence the location of regulatory elements and that can place them in an environment of specific nucleoprotein complexes associated with transcription. In the mammalian immune system, epigenetic gene regulation is a crucial mechanism for a range of physiological processes, including the innate host immune response to pathogens and T cell differentiation driven by specific patterns of cytokine gene expression. Here, we will review current findings regarding epigenetic regulation of cytokine genes important in innate and/or adaptive immune responses, with a special focus upon the tumor necrosis factor/lymphotoxin locus and cytokine-driven CD4+ T cell differentiation into the Th1, Th2, and Th17 lineages. PMID:23683942

  5. Aberrant Alternative Polyadenylation is Responsible for Survivin Up-regulation in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang-Jun; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Li-Ping; Li, Na; Chang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Survivin is an oncoprotein silenced in normal mature tissues but reactivated in serous ovarian cancer (SOC). Although transcriptional activation is assumed for its overexpression, the long 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) in survivin gene, which contains many alternate polyadenylation (APA) sites, implies a propensity for posttranscriptional control and therefore was the aim of our study. Methods: The abundance of the coding region, the proximal and the distal region of survivin mRNA 3'-UTR, was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in SOC samples, cell lines, and normal fallopian tube (NFT) tissues. The APA sites were confirmed by rapid amplification of cDNA 3' ends and DNA sequencing. Real-time PCR were used to screen survivin-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) that were inversely correlated with survivin. The expression of an inversely correlated miRNA was restored by pre-miRNA transfection or induction with a genotoxic agent to test its inhibitory effect on survivin overexpression. Results: Varying degrees of APA were observed in SOC by comparing the abundance of the proximal and the distal region of survivin 3'-UTR, and changes of 3'-UTR correlated significantly with survivin expression (r = 0.708, P < 0.01). The main APA sites are proved at 1197 and 1673 of survivin 3'-UTR by DNA sequencing. Higher level of 3'-UTR proximal region than coding region was observed in NFT, as well as in SOC and cell lines. Among the survivin-targeting miRNAs, only a few highly expressed miRNAs were inversely correlated with survivin levels, and they mainly targeted the distal part of the 3'-UTR. However, in ovarian cancer cells, restoration of an inversely correlated miRNA (miR-34c) showed little effect on survivin expression. Conclusions: In NFT tissues, survivin is not transcriptionally silenced but regulate posttranscriptionally. In SOC, aberrant APA leads to the shortening of survivin 3'-UTR which enables it to escape the negative regulation of mi

  6. Potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulation of trophoblast differentiation, migration, and invasion in the human placenta

    PubMed Central

    Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Kadam, Leena; Jain, Chandni; Armant, D. Randall; Drewlo, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proper establishment and organogenesis of the placenta is crucial for intrauterine fetal growth and development. Endometrial invasion by the extravillous trophoblast cells, as well as formation of the syncytiotrophoblast (STB), are of vital importance for placental function. Trophoblast migration and invasion is often compared to tumor metastasis, which uses many of the same molecular mechanisms. However, unlike cancer cells, both initiation and the extent of trophoblast invasion are tightly regulated by feto-maternal cross-talk, which when perturbed, results in a wide range of abnormalities. Multiple factors control the trophoblast, including cytokines and hormones, which are subject to transcriptional regulatory networks. The relevance of epigenetics in transcriptional regulation of trophoblast differentiation and invasion, as well as in the onset of placenta-related pregnancy disorders, became recognized decades ago. Although, there has been tremendous progress in uncovering the molecular foundation of placental development, there is still much to be learned about the epigenetic machinery, and its role in trophoblast differentiation and invasion. This review will provide an overview of the epigenetic control of trophoblast differentiation and invasion. It will also highlight the major epigenetic mechanisms involved in pregnancy complications related to placental deficiencies. PMID:26745760

  7. The epigenetic regulators CBP and p300 facilitate leukemogenesis and represent therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Giotopoulos, G; Chan, W-I; Horton, SJ; Ruau, D; Gallipoli, P; Fowler, A; Crawley, C; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, PJ; Göttgens, B; Van Deursen, JM; Cole, PA; Huntly, BJP

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence links abnormal epigenetic control to the development of hematological malignancies. Accordingly, inhibition of epigenetic regulators is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. The acetylation status of lysine residues in histone tails is one of a number of epigenetic post-translational modifications that alter DNA-templated processes, such as transcription, to facilitate malignant transformation. Although histone deacetylases are already being clinically targeted, the role of histone lysine acetyltransferases (KAT) in malignancy is less well characterized. We chose to study this question in the context of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where, using in vitro and in vivo genetic ablation and knockdown experiments in murine models, we demonstrate a role for the epigenetic regulators CBP and p300 in the induction and maintenance of AML. Furthermore, using selective small molecule inhibitors of their lysine acetyltransferase activity, we validate CBP/p300 as therapeutic targets in vitro across a wide range of human AML subtypes. We proceed to show that growth retardation occurs through the induction of transcriptional changes that induce apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in leukemia cells and finally demonstrate the efficacy of the KAT inhibitors in decreasing clonogenic growth of primary AML patient samples. Taken together, these data suggest that CBP/p300 are promising therapeutic targets across multiple subtypes in AML. PMID:25893291

  8. Epigenetics and aging

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sangita; Tyler, Jessica K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, a growing number of studies have revealed that progressive changes to epigenetic information accompany aging in both dividing and nondividing cells. Functional studies in model organisms and humans indicate that epigenetic changes have a huge influence on the aging process. These epigenetic changes occur at various levels, including reduced bulk levels of the core histones, altered patterns of histone posttranslational modifications and DNA methylation, replacement of canonical histones with histone variants, and altered noncoding RNA expression, during both organismal aging and replicative senescence. The end result of epigenetic changes during aging is altered local accessibility to the genetic material, leading to aberrant gene expression, reactivation of transposable elements, and genomic instability. Strikingly, certain types of epigenetic information can function in a transgenerational manner to influence the life span of the offspring. Several important conclusions emerge from these studies: rather than being genetically predetermined, our life span is largely epigenetically determined; diet and other environmental influences can influence our life span by changing the epigenetic information; and inhibitors of epigenetic enzymes can influence life span of model organisms. These new findings provide better understanding of the mechanisms involved in aging. Given the reversible nature of epigenetic information, these studies highlight exciting avenues for therapeutic intervention in aging and age-associated diseases, including cancer. PMID:27482540

  9. Epigenetics and aging.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sangita; Tyler, Jessica K

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, a growing number of studies have revealed that progressive changes to epigenetic information accompany aging in both dividing and nondividing cells. Functional studies in model organisms and humans indicate that epigenetic changes have a huge influence on the aging process. These epigenetic changes occur at various levels, including reduced bulk levels of the core histones, altered patterns of histone posttranslational modifications and DNA methylation, replacement of canonical histones with histone variants, and altered noncoding RNA expression, during both organismal aging and replicative senescence. The end result of epigenetic changes during aging is altered local accessibility to the genetic material, leading to aberrant gene expression, reactivation of transposable elements, and genomic instability. Strikingly, certain types of epigenetic information can function in a transgenerational manner to influence the life span of the offspring. Several important conclusions emerge from these studies: rather than being genetically predetermined, our life span is largely epigenetically determined; diet and other environmental influences can influence our life span by changing the epigenetic information; and inhibitors of epigenetic enzymes can influence life span of model organisms. These new findings provide better understanding of the mechanisms involved in aging. Given the reversible nature of epigenetic information, these studies highlight exciting avenues for therapeutic intervention in aging and age-associated diseases, including cancer. PMID:27482540

  10. Long non-coding RNAs: the epigenetic regulators involved in the pathogenesis of reproductive disorder.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Zhong, Nanbert

    2015-02-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are long single-stranded RNAs without translation potential. LncRNAs function in regulating epigenetic and cellular processes through various mechanisms. Nowadays, rapidly growing evidence has shown that abnormally expressed lncRNAs were involved in various inflammation-related states or diseases. Abnormal inflammation responses contribute to reproductive pathology and play vital roles in developing most disorders of the female reproductive system. In this review, we discussed the history of ncRNAs including lncRNAs, methodologies for lncRNA identification, mechanisms of lncRNA expression and regulation and mainly discussed the expression and function of lncRNAs in the female reproductive system with special focus on the inflammation and infection pathway. By analyzing the present available studies of lncRNA transcripts within the reproductive system and the current understanding of the biology of lncRNAs, we have suggested the important diagnostic and therapeutic roles of lncRNAs in the etiology of reproductive disorders.

  11. Genome-wide analysis distinguishes hyperglycemia regulated epigenetic signatures of primary vascular cells

    PubMed Central

    Pirola, Luciano; Balcerczyk, Aneta; Tothill, Richard W.; Haviv, Izhak; Kaspi, Antony; Lunke, Sebastian; Ziemann, Mark; Karagiannis, Tom; Tonna, Stephen; Kowalczyk, Adam; Beresford-Smith, Bryan; Macintyre, Geoff; Kelong, Ma; Hongyu, Zhang; Zhu, Jingde; El-Osta, Assam

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that poor glycemic control mediates post-translational modifications to the H3 histone tail. We are only beginning to understand the dynamic role of some of the diverse epigenetic changes mediated by hyperglycemia at single loci, yet elevated glucose levels are thought to regulate genome-wide changes, and this still remains poorly understood. In this article we describe genome-wide histone H3K9/K14 hyperacetylation and DNA methylation maps conferred by hyperglycemia in primary human vascular cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) as well as CpG methylation (CpG) assays, followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq and CpG-seq) identified unique hyperacetylation and CpG methylation signatures with proximal and distal patterns of regionalization associative with gene expression. Ingenuity knowledge-based pathway and gene ontology analyses indicate that hyperglycemia significantly affects human vascular chromatin with the transcriptional up-regulation of genes involved in metabolic and cardiovascular disease. We have generated the first installment of a reference collection of hyperglycemia-induced chromatin modifications using robust and reproducible platforms that allow parallel sequencing-by-synthesis of immunopurified content. We uncover that hyperglycemia-mediated induction of genes and pathways associated with endothelial dysfunction occur through modulation of acetylated H3K9/K14 inversely correlated with methyl-CpG content. PMID:21890681

  12. Nuclear Localised MORE SULPHUR ACCUMULATION1 Epigenetically Regulates Sulphur Homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin-Yuan; Chao, Dai-Yin; Koprivova, Anna; Danku, John; Wirtz, Markus; Müller, Steffen; Sandoval, Francisco J; Bauwe, Hermann; Roje, Sanja; Dilkes, Brian; Hell, Rüdiger; Kopriva, Stanislav; Salt, David E

    2016-09-01

    Sulphur (S) is an essential element for all living organisms. The uptake, assimilation and metabolism of S in plants are well studied. However, the regulation of S homeostasis remains largely unknown. Here, we report on the identification and characterisation of the more sulphur accumulation1 (msa1-1) mutant. The MSA1 protein is localized to the nucleus and is required for both S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) production and DNA methylation. Loss of function of the nuclear localised MSA1 leads to a reduction in SAM in roots and a strong S-deficiency response even at ample S supply, causing an over-accumulation of sulphate, sulphite, cysteine and glutathione. Supplementation with SAM suppresses this high S phenotype. Furthermore, mutation of MSA1 affects genome-wide DNA methylation, including the methylation of S-deficiency responsive genes. Elevated S accumulation in msa1-1 requires the increased expression of the sulphate transporter genes SULTR1;1 and SULTR1;2 which are also differentially methylated in msa1-1. Our results suggest a novel function for MSA1 in the nucleus in regulating SAM biosynthesis and maintaining S homeostasis epigenetically via DNA methylation. PMID:27622452

  13. Epigenetic regulation of olfactory receptor gene expression by the Myb-MuvB/dREAM complex.

    PubMed

    Sim, Choon Kiat; Perry, Sarah; Tharadra, Sana Khalid; Lipsick, Joseph S; Ray, Anandasankar

    2012-11-15

    In both mammals and insects, an olfactory neuron will usually select a single olfactory receptor and repress remaining members of large receptor families. Here we show that a conserved multiprotein complex, Myb-MuvB (MMB)/dREAM, plays an important role in mediating neuron-specific expression of the carbon dioxide (CO(2)) receptor genes (Gr63a/Gr21a) in Drosophila. Activity of Myb in the complex is required for expression of Gr63a/Gr21a and acts in opposition to the histone methyltransferase Su(var)3-9. Consistent with this, we observed repressive dimethylated H3K9 modifications at the receptor gene loci, suggesting a mechanism for silencing receptor gene expression. Conversely, other complex members, Mip120 (Myb-interacting protein 120) and E2F2, are required for repression of Gr63a in inappropriate neurons. Misexpression in mutants is accompanied by an increase in the H3K4me3 mark of active chromatin at the receptor gene locus. Nuclei of CO(2) receptor-expressing neurons contain reduced levels of the repressive subunit Mip120 compared with surrounding neurons and increased levels of Myb, suggesting that activity of the complex can be regulated in a cell-specific manner. Our evidence suggests a model in which olfactory receptors are regulated epigenetically and the MMB/dREAM complex plays a critical role in specifying, maintaining, and modulating the receptor-to-neuron map.

  14. Nuclear Localised MORE SULPHUR ACCUMULATION1 Epigenetically Regulates Sulphur Homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin-Yuan; Chao, Dai-Yin; Koprivova, Anna; Müller, Steffen; Sandoval, Francisco J.; Bauwe, Hermann; Roje, Sanja; Dilkes, Brian; Kopriva, Stanislav; Salt, David E

    2016-01-01

    Sulphur (S) is an essential element for all living organisms. The uptake, assimilation and metabolism of S in plants are well studied. However, the regulation of S homeostasis remains largely unknown. Here, we report on the identification and characterisation of the more sulphur accumulation1 (msa1-1) mutant. The MSA1 protein is localized to the nucleus and is required for both S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) production and DNA methylation. Loss of function of the nuclear localised MSA1 leads to a reduction in SAM in roots and a strong S-deficiency response even at ample S supply, causing an over-accumulation of sulphate, sulphite, cysteine and glutathione. Supplementation with SAM suppresses this high S phenotype. Furthermore, mutation of MSA1 affects genome-wide DNA methylation, including the methylation of S-deficiency responsive genes. Elevated S accumulation in msa1-1 requires the increased expression of the sulphate transporter genes SULTR1;1 and SULTR1;2 which are also differentially methylated in msa1-1. Our results suggest a novel function for MSA1 in the nucleus in regulating SAM biosynthesis and maintaining S homeostasis epigenetically via DNA methylation. PMID:27622452

  15. The epigenetic regulator Smchd1 contains a functional GHKL-type ATPase domain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelan; Dobson, Renwick C J; Lucet, Isabelle S; Young, Samuel N; Pearce, F Grant; Blewitt, Marnie E; Murphy, James M

    2016-06-15

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (Smchd1) is an epigenetic regulator that plays critical roles in gene regulation during development. Mutations in SMCHD1 were recently implicated in the pathogenesis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), although the mechanistic basis remains of outstanding interest. We have previously shown that Smchd1 associates with chromatin via its homodimeric C-terminal hinge domain, yet little is known about the function of the putative GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, MutL)-type ATPase domain at its N-terminus. To formally assess the structure and function of Smchd1's ATPase domain, we have generated recombinant proteins encompassing the predicted ATPase domain and the adjacent region. Here, we show that the Smchd1 N-terminal region exists as a monomer and adopts a conformation resembling that of monomeric full-length heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) protein in solution, even though the two proteins share only ∼8% overall sequence identity. Despite being monomeric, the N-terminal region of Smchd1 exhibits ATPase activity, which can be antagonized by the reaction product, ADP, or the Hsp90 inhibitor, radicicol, at a nanomolar concentration. Interestingly, introduction of an analogous mutation to that identified in SMCHD1 of an FSHD patient compromised protein stability, suggesting a possible molecular basis for loss of protein function and pathogenesis. Together, these results reveal important structure-function characteristics of Smchd1 that may underpin its mechanistic action at the chromatin level. PMID:27059856

  16. Regulation of intestinal serotonin transporter expression via epigenetic mechanisms: role of HDAC2.

    PubMed

    Gill, Ravinder K; Kumar, Anoop; Malhotra, Pooja; Maher, Daniel; Singh, Varsha; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Alrefai, Waddah; Saksena, Seema

    2013-02-15

    The serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) facilitates clearance of extracellular 5-HT by its uptake and internalization. Decreased expression of SERT and consequent high 5-HT levels have been implicated in various diarrheal disorders. Thus, appropriate regulation of SERT is critical for maintenance of 5-HT homeostasis in health and disease. Previous studies demonstrated that SERT is regulated via posttranslational and transcriptional mechanisms. However, the role of epigenetic mechanisms in SERT regulation is not known. Current studies investigated the effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition on SERT expression and delineated the mechanisms. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with the pan-HDAC inhibitors butyrate (5 mM) and trichostatin (TSA, 1 μM) decreased SERT mRNA and protein levels. Butyrate- or TSA-induced decrease in SERT was associated with decreased activity of human SERT (hSERT) promoter 1 (upstream of exon 1a), but not hSERT promoter 2 (upstream of exon 2). Butyrate + TSA did not show an additive effect on SERT expression, indicating that mechanisms involving histone hyperacetylation may be involved. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated enrichment of the hSERT promoter 1 (flanking nt -250/+2) with tetra-acetylated histone H3 or H4, which was increased (~3-fold) by butyrate. Interestingly, specific inhibition of HDAC2 (but not HDAC1) utilizing small interfering RNA decreased SERT mRNA and protein levels. The decrease in SERT expression by HDAC inhibition was recapitulated in an in vivo model. SERT mRNA levels were decreased in the ileum and colon of mice fed pectin (increased availability of butyrate) compared with controls fed a fiber-free diet (~50-60%). Our results identify a novel role of HDAC2 as a regulator of SERT gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells.

  17. Established epigenetic modifications determine the expression of developmentally regulated globin genes in somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Stanworth, S J; Roberts, N A; Sharpe, J A; Sloane-Stanley, J A; Wood, W G

    1995-01-01

    Somatic cell hybrids generated from transgenic mouse cells have been used to examine the developmental regulation of human gamma-to-beta-globin gene switching. In hybrids between mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells and transgenic erythroblasts taken at various stages of development, there was regulated expression of the human fetal gamma and adult beta genes, reproducing the in vivo pattern prior to fusion. Hybrids formed from embryonic blood cells produced predominantly gamma mRNA, whereas beta gene expression was observed in adult hybrids and a complete range of intermediate patterns was found in fetal liver hybrids. The adult environment of the MEL cells, therefore, did not appear to influence selective transcription from this gene complex. Irradiation of the embryonic erythroid cells prior to fusion resulted in hybrids containing only small fragments of donor chromosomes, but the pattern of gene expression did not differ from that of unirradiated hybrids. This finding suggests that continued expression of trans-acting factors from the donor erythroblasts is not necessary for continued expression of the human gamma gene in MEL cells. These results contrast with the lack of developmental regulation of the cluster after transfection of naked DNA into MEL cells and suggest that epigenetic processes established during normal development result in the gene cluster adopting a developmental stage-specific, stable conformation which is maintained through multiple rounds of replication and transcription in the MEL cell hybrids. On prolonged culture, hybrids that initially expressed only the gamma transgene switched to beta gene expression. The time period of switching, from approximately 10 to > 40 weeks, was similar to that seen previously in human fetal erythroblast x MEL cell hybrids but in this case bore no relationship to the time of in vivo switching. It seems unlikely, therefore, that switching in these hybrids is regulated by a developmental clock. PMID:7623793

  18. Epigenetic regulation of adaptive responses of forest tree species to the environment

    PubMed Central

    Bräutigam, Katharina; Vining, Kelly J; Lafon-Placette, Clément; Fossdal, Carl G; Mirouze, Marie; Marcos, José Gutiérrez; Fluch, Silvia; Fraga, Mario Fernández; Guevara, M Ángeles; Abarca, Dolores; Johnsen, Øystein; Maury, Stéphane; Strauss, Steven H; Campbell, Malcolm M; Rohde, Antje; Díaz-Sala, Carmen; Cervera, María-Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic variation is likely to contribute to the phenotypic plasticity and adaptative capacity of plant species, and may be especially important for long-lived organisms with complex life cycles, including forest trees. Diverse environmental stresses and hybridization/polyploidization events can create reversible heritable epigenetic marks that can be transmitted to subsequent generations as a form of molecular “memory”. Epigenetic changes might also contribute to the ability of plants to colonize or persist in variable environments. In this review, we provide an overview of recent data on epigenetic mechanisms involved in developmental processes and responses to environmental cues in plant, with a focus on forest tree species. We consider the possible role of forest tree epigenetics as a new source of adaptive traits in plant breeding, biotechnology, and ecosystem conservation under rapid climate change. PMID:23467802

  19. Epigenetics: A possible answer to the undeciphered etiopathogenesis and behavior of oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra Nath; Peer, Aakanksha; Nair, Sherin; Chaturvedi, Rupesh K

    2016-01-01

    Much controversy has existed over the etiopathogenesis and management of oral lesions, especially oral malignancies. The knowledge of genetic basis is proving to be inadequate in the light of emerging new mechanisms termed epigenetic phenomena. The present review article aims to understand the role of epigenetic mechanisms in oral lesions. Epigenetics is the study of acquired changes in chromatin structure that arise independently of a change in the underlying deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nucleotide sequence. Key components involved in epigenetic regulation are DNA methylation, histone modifications and modifications in micro ribonucleic acids (miRNA). Epigenetics is a reversible system that can be affected by various environmental factors such as diet, drugs, mental stress, physical activity and addictive substances such as tobacco, nicotine and alcohol. Epigenetics may also play a role in explaining the etiopathogenesis of developmental anomalies, genetic defects, cancer as well as substance addiction (tobacco, cigarette and alcohol). Epigenetic modifications may contribute to aberrant epigenetic mechanisms seen in oral precancers and cancers. In the near future, epigenetic variations found in oral dysplastic cells can act as a molecular fingerprint for malignancies. The literature in English language was searched and a structured scientific review and meta-analysis of scientific publications from the year 2000 to year 2015 was carried out from various journals. It was observed that epigenetic marks can prove to be novel markers for early diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of oral cancers as well as other oral diseases. PMID:27194874

  20. Epigenetics: A possible answer to the undeciphered etiopathogenesis and behavior of oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narendra Nath; Peer, Aakanksha; Nair, Sherin; Chaturvedi, Rupesh K

    2016-01-01

    Much controversy has existed over the etiopathogenesis and management of oral lesions, especially oral malignancies. The knowledge of genetic basis is proving to be inadequate in the light of emerging new mechanisms termed epigenetic phenomena. The present review article aims to understand the role of epigenetic mechanisms in oral lesions. Epigenetics is the study of acquired changes in chromatin structure that arise independently of a change in the underlying deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nucleotide sequence. Key components involved in epigenetic regulation are DNA methylation, histone modifications and modifications in micro ribonucleic acids (miRNA). Epigenetics is a reversible system that can be affected by various environmental factors such as diet, drugs, mental stress, physical activity and addictive substances such as tobacco, nicotine and alcohol. Epigenetics may also play a role in explaining the etiopathogenesis of developmental anomalies, genetic defects, cancer as well as substance addiction (tobacco, cigarette and alcohol). Epigenetic modifications may contribute to aberrant epigenetic mechanisms seen in oral precancers and cancers. In the near future, epigenetic variations found in oral dysplastic cells can act as a molecular fingerprint for malignancies. The literature in English language was searched and a structured scientific review and meta-analysis of scientific publications from the year 2000 to year 2015 was carried out from various journals. It was observed that epigenetic marks can prove to be novel markers for early diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of oral cancers as well as other oral diseases. PMID:27194874

  1. Lineage-Specific Regulation of Epigenetic Modifier Genes in Human Liver and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Matthias K.; Natarajan, Karthick; Scholz, Diana; Ivanova, Violeta N.; Sachinidis, Agapios; Hengstler, Jan G.; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Despite an abundance of studies on chromatin states and dynamics, there is an astonishing dearth of information on the expression of genes responsible for regulating histone and DNA modifications. We used here a set of 156 defined epigenetic modifier genes (EMG) and profiled their expression pattern in cells of different lineages. As reference value, expression data from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) were used. Hepatocyte-like cells were generated from hESC, and their EMG expression was compared to primary human liver cells. In parallel, we generated postmitotic human neurons (Lu d6), and compared their relative EMG expression to human cortex (Ctx). Clustering analysis of all cell types showed that neuronal lineage samples grouped together (94 similarly regulated EMG), as did liver cells (61 similarly-regulated), while the two lineages were clearly distinct. The general classification was followed by detailed comparison of the major EMG groups; genes that were higher expressed in differentiated cells than in hESC included the acetyltransferase KAT2B and the methyltransferase SETD7. Neuro-specific EMGs were the histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and the arginine-methyltransferase PRMT8. Comparison of young (Lu d6) and more aged (Ctx) neuronal samples suggested a maturation-dependent switch in the expression of functionally homologous proteins. For instance, the ratio of the histone H3 K27 methyltransfereases, EZH1 to EZH2, was high in Ctx and low in Lu d6. The same was observed for the polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) subunits CBX7 and CBX8. A large proportion of EMGs in differentiated cells was very differently expressed than in hESC, and absolute levels were significantly higher in neuronal samples than in hepatic cells. Thus, there seem to be distinct qualitative and quantitative differences in EMG expression between cell lineages. PMID:25054330

  2. Galectin-7 is epigenetically-regulated tumor suppressor in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jun; Hwang, Jung-Ah; Ro, Jae Y.; Lee, Yeon-Su; Chun, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death and remains a major clinical challenge due to poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Therefore, the basic mechanisms underlying gastric tumorigenesis deserve investigation. Although regulation of the galactoside-binding lectin galectin-7 in cancer has been studied, its role in tumor formation and progression remains controversial. In this study, we investigated galectin-7 expression and its role in gastric cancer. Immunohistochemical staining using a tissue microarray of gastric cancer patients revealed significantly low expression levels of galectin-7 in malignant tissues compared with matched normal tissues, and decreased expression of galectin-7 in malignant tissues was associated with advanced TMN stage disease (p =0.034). Importantly, low expression of galectin-7 in normal tissues was associated with a poor survival rate (p =0.0561). Over-expression of galectin-7 in AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cells suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, whereas ablation of galectin-7 in KATO III gastric carcinoma cells reversed these properties. AGS cells that overexpressed galectin-7 could not form gastric tumors in xenografted mice. More than 70% hypermethylation was observed in 7 of 9 gastric cancer cell lines tested and 5-aza-cytidine treatment lowered galectin-7 expression by reducing methylation in 24 cancer cell lines from five different organ origins. We analyzed CpG islands in the galectin-7 genomic region and detected hypermethylation at +1566bp of exon 2, the predicted p53 binding region. DNA hypermethylation of this region was also detected in gastric cancer tissues from 20 patients. Taken together, our data indicate that galectin-7 has a tumor suppressive function, and that the gene is epigenetically modified by DNA methylation and significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer. Further study of galectin-7 regulation may lead to improved gastric cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID

  3. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  4. Sex, stress, and epigenetics: regulation of behavior in animal models of mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Women have a higher incidence of stress related disorders including depression and generalized anxiety disorder, and epigenetic mechanisms likely contribute to this sex difference. Evidence from preclinical research suggests that epigenetic mechanisms are responsible for both sexual dimorphism of brain regions and sensitivity of the stress response. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation and histone modifications can occur transgenerationally, developmentally, or in response to environmental stimuli such as stress exposure. This review will provide an overview of the various forms of epigenetic modifications observed in the central nervous system and will explain how these mechanisms contribute to a sexually dimorphic brain. It will also discuss the ways in which epigenetic alterations coincide with, and functionally contribute to, the behavioral response to stress across the lifespan. Ultimately, this review will focus on novel research utilizing animal models to investigate sex differences in epigenetic mechanisms that influence susceptibility to stress. Exploration of this relationship reveals epigenetic mechanisms with the potential to explain sexual dimorphism in the occurrence of stress related disorders. PMID:23331332

  5. The metabolome regulates the epigenetic landscape during naïve to primed human embryonic stem cell transition

    PubMed Central

    Sperber, Henrik; Mathieu, Julie; Wang, Yuliang; Ferreccio, Amy; Hesson, Jennifer; Xu, Zhuojin; Fischer, Karin A.; Devi, Arikketh; Detraux, Damien; Gu, Haiwei; Battle, Stephanie L.; Showalter, Megan; Valensisi, Cristina; Bielas, Jason H.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Margaretha, Lilyana; Robitaille, Aaron M.; Margineantu, Daciana; Fiehn, Oliver; Hockenbery, David; Blau, C. Anthony; Raftery, Daniel; Margolin, Adam; Hawkins, R. David; Moon, Randall T.; Ware, Carol B.; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    For nearly a century developmental biologists have recognized that cells from embryos can differ in their potential to differentiate into distinct cell types. Recently, it has been recognized that embryonic stem cells derived from both mice and humans display two stable yet epigenetically distinct states of pluripotency, naïve and primed. We now show that nicotinamide-N-methyl transferase (NNMT) and metabolic state regulate pluripotency in hESCs. Specifically, in naïve hESCs NNMT and its enzymatic product 1-methylnicotinamide (1-MNA) are highly upregulated, and NNMT is required for low SAM levels and H3K27me3 repressive state. NNMT consumes SAM in naïve cells, making it unavailable for histone methylation that represses Wnt and activates HIF pathway in primed hESCs. These data support the hypothesis that the metabolome regulates the epigenetic landscape of the earliest steps in human development. PMID:26571212

  6. The Second Subunit of DNA Polymerase Delta Is Required for Genomic Stability and Epigenetic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jixiang; Xie, Shaojun; Cheng, Jinkui; Lai, Jinsheng; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2016-06-01

    DNA polymerase δ plays crucial roles in DNA repair and replication as well as maintaining genomic stability. However, the function of POLD2, the second small subunit of DNA polymerase δ, has not been characterized yet in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). During a genetic screen for release of transcriptional gene silencing, we identified a mutation in POLD2. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing indicated that POLD2 is not involved in the regulation of DNA methylation. POLD2 genetically interacts with Ataxia Telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related and DNA polymerase α The pold2-1 mutant exhibits genomic instability with a high frequency of homologous recombination. It also exhibits hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and short telomere length. Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses suggest that pold2-1 changes H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications, and these changes are correlated with the gene expression levels. Our study suggests that POLD2 is required for maintaining genome integrity and properly establishing the epigenetic markers during DNA replication to modulate gene expression. PMID:27208288

  7. Epigenetic remodeling regulates transcriptional changes between ovarian cancer and benign precursors

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Kevin M.; Emori, Megan M.; Westerling, Thomas; Long, Henry; Budina-Kolomets, Anna; Li, Fugen; MacDuffie, Emily; Davis, Michelle R.; Holman, Alexander; Lawney, Brian; Freedman, Matthew L.; Quackenbush, John; Brown, Myles; Drapkin, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of lineage-restricted transcription factors has been shown to influence malignant transformation in several types of cancer. Whether similar mechanisms are involved in ovarian cancer pathogenesis is unknown. PAX8 is a nuclear transcription factor that controls the embryologic development of the Müllerian system, including the fallopian tubes. Recent studies have shown that fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs) give rise to the most common form of ovarian cancer, high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). We designed the present study in order to understand whether changes in gene expression between FTSECs and HGSOCs relate to alterations in PAX8 binding to chromatin. Using whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-Seq) after PAX8 knockdown and ChIP-Seq, we show that FTSECs and HGSOCs are distinguished by marked reprogramming of the PAX8 cistrome. Genes that are significantly altered between FTSECs and HGSOCs are enriched near PAX8 binding sites. These sites are also near TEAD binding sites, and these transcriptional changes may be related to PAX8 interactions with the TEAD/YAP1 signaling pathway. These data suggest that transcriptional changes after transformation in ovarian cancer are closely related to epigenetic remodeling in lineage-specific transcription factors.

  8. Epigenetic remodeling regulates transcriptional changes between ovarian cancer and benign precursors

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Kevin M.; Emori, Megan M.; Westerling, Thomas; Long, Henry; Budina-Kolomets, Anna; Li, Fugen; MacDuffie, Emily; Davis, Michelle R.; Holman, Alexander; Lawney, Brian; Freedman, Matthew L.; Brown, Myles

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of lineage-restricted transcription factors has been shown to influence malignant transformation in several types of cancer. Whether similar mechanisms are involved in ovarian cancer pathogenesis is unknown. PAX8 is a nuclear transcription factor that controls the embryologic development of the Müllerian system, including the fallopian tubes. Recent studies have shown that fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs) give rise to the most common form of ovarian cancer, high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). We designed the present study in order to understand whether changes in gene expression between FTSECs and HGSOCs relate to alterations in PAX8 binding to chromatin. Using whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-Seq) after PAX8 knockdown and ChIP-Seq, we show that FTSECs and HGSOCs are distinguished by marked reprogramming of the PAX8 cistrome. Genes that are significantly altered between FTSECs and HGSOCs are enriched near PAX8 binding sites. These sites are also near TEAD binding sites, and these transcriptional changes may be related to PAX8 interactions with the TEAD/YAP1 signaling pathway. These data suggest that transcriptional changes after transformation in ovarian cancer are closely related to epigenetic remodeling in lineage-specific transcription factors. PMID:27617304

  9. Epigenetic regulation of human DCLK-1 gene during colon-carcinogenesis: clinical and mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Malaney; Shubhashish, Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. While ~25% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise in patients with a family history (genetic predisposition), ~75% of CRCs are due to age-associated accumulation of epigenetic alterations which can result in the suppression of key tumor suppressor genes leading to mutations and activation of oncogenic pathways. Sporadic colon-carcinogenesis is facilitated by many molecular pathways of genomic instability which include chromosomal instability (CIN), micro-satellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), leading towards loss of homeostasis and onset of neoplastic transformation. The unopposed activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathways, either due to loss of APC function or up-regulation of related stimulatory pathways, results in unopposed hyperproliferation of colonic crypts, considered the single most important risk factor for colon carcinogenesis. Hypermethylation of CpG islands within the promoters of specific genes can potentially inactivate DNA repair genes and/or critical tumor suppressor genes. Recently, CpG methylation of the 5’ promoter of human (h) DCLK1 gene was reported in many human epithelial cancers, including colorectal cancers (CRCs), resulting in the loss of expression of the canonical long isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-L) in hCRCs. Instead, a shorter isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-S) was discovered to be expressed in hCRCs, from an alternate β promoter of DCLKL1-gene; the clinical and biological implications of these novel findings, in relation to recent publications is discussed. PMID:27777940

  10. HDAC Inhibitors as Epigenetic Regulators of the Immune System: Impacts on Cancer Therapy and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, McKale R.; Leyva, Kathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are powerful epigenetic regulators that have enormous therapeutic potential and have pleiotropic effects at the cellular and systemic levels. To date, HDAC inhibitors are used clinically for a wide variety of disorders ranging from hematopoietic malignancies to psychiatric disorders, are known to have anti-inflammatory properties, and are in clinical trials for several other diseases. In addition to influencing gene expression, HDAC enzymes also function as part of large, multisubunit complexes which have many nonhistone targets, alter signaling at the cellular and systemic levels, and result in divergent and cell-type specific effects. Thus, the effects of HDAC inhibitor treatment are too intricate to completely understand with current knowledge but the ability of HDAC inhibitors to modulate the immune system presents intriguing therapeutic possibilities. This review will explore the complexity of HDAC inhibitor treatment at the cellular and systemic levels and suggest strategies for effective use of HDAC inhibitors in biomedical research, focusing on the ability of HDAC inhibitors to modulate the immune system. The possibility of combining the documented anticancer effects and newly emerging immunomodulatory effects of HDAC inhibitors represents a promising new combinatorial therapeutic approach for HDAC inhibitor treatments. PMID:27556043

  11. Menin promotes hepatocellular carcinogenesis and epigenetically up-regulates Yap1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Li, Shan-Hua; Zheng, Rong; Gao, Shu-Bin; Ding, Li-Hong; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Xiao; Feng, Zi-Jie; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Min; Jin, Guang-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Menin is a scaffold protein encoded by the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene in humans, and it interacts with a variety of transcriptional proteins to control active or repressive cellular processes. Here, we show that heterozygous ablation of Men1 in female mice reduces chemical carcinogen-induced liver carcinogenesis and represses the activation of the inflammation pathway. Using ChIP-on-chip screens and ChIP assays, we find that menin occupancy frequently coincides with H3K4me3 at the promoter of many liver cancer-related genes, such as Yes-associated protein (Yap1). Increased menin and Yap1 expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma specimens was associated with poor prognosis. Our findings reveal that menin plays an important epigenetic role in promoting liver tumorigenesis, and support the notion that H3K4me3, which is regulated by the menin–mixed-lineage leukemia complex, is a potential therapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24101467

  12. The Epigenetic Regulator CXXC Finger Protein 1 is Essential for Murine Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Dobrota, Erika; Tate, Courtney; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Khan, Shehnaz; Haneline, Laura; HogenEsch, Harm; Skalnik, David G.

    2014-01-01

    CXXC finger protein 1 (Cfp1), encoded by the Cxxc1 gene, binds to DNA sequences containing an unmethylated CpG dinucleotide and is an epigenetic regulator of both cytosine and histone methylation. Cxxc1-null mouse embryos fail to gastrulate, and Cxxc1-null embryonic stem cells are viable but cannot differentiate, suggesting that Cfp1 is required for chromatin remodeling associated with stem cell differentiation and embryogenesis. Mice homozygous for a conditional Cxxc1 deletion allele and carrying the inducible Mx1-Cre transgene were generated to assess Cfp1 function in adult animals. Induction of Cre expression in adult animals led to Cfp1 depletion in hematopoietic cells, a failure of hematopoiesis with a nearly complete loss of lineage-committed progenitors and mature cells, elevated levels of apoptosis, and death within two weeks. A similar pathology resulted following transplantation of conditional Cxxc1 bone marrow cells into wild type recipients, demonstrating this phenotype is intrinsic to Cfp1 function within bone marrow cells. Remarkably, the Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ population of cells in the bone marrow, which is enriched for hematopoietic stem cells and multi-potential progenitor cells, persists and expands in the absence of Cfp1 during this time frame. Thus, Cfp1 is necessary for hematopoietic stem and multi-potential progenitor cell function and for the developmental potential of differentiating hematopoietic cells. PMID:25470594

  13. A random six-phase switch regulates pneumococcal virulence via global epigenetic changes

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Ana Sousa; Chai, Melissa H.; Atack, John M.; Furi, Leonardo; De Ste Croix, Megan; Haigh, Richard; Trappetti, Claudia; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.; Shewell, Lucy K.; Boitano, Matthew; Clark, Tyson A.; Korlach, Jonas; Blades, Matthew; Mirkes, Evgeny; Gorban, Alexander N.; Paton, James C.; Jennings, Michael P.; Oggioni, Marco R.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is the world’s foremost bacterial pathogen in both morbidity and mortality. Switching between phenotypic forms (or ‘phases’) that favour asymptomatic carriage or invasive disease was first reported in 1933. Here, we show that the underlying mechanism for such phase variation consists of genetic rearrangements in a Type I restriction-modification system (SpnD39III). The rearrangements generate six alternative specificities with distinct methylation patterns, as defined by single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylomics. The SpnD39III variants have distinct gene expression profiles. We demonstrate distinct virulence in experimental infection and in vivo selection for switching between SpnD39III variants. SpnD39III is ubiquitous in pneumococci, indicating an essential role in its biology. Future studies must recognize the potential for switching between these heretofore undetectable, differentiated pneumococcal subpopulations in vitro and in vivo. Similar systems exist in other bacterial genera, indicating the potential for broad exploitation of epigenetic gene regulation. PMID:25268848

  14. Apomictic and sexual germline development differ with respect to cell cycle, transcriptional, hormonal and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anja; Schmid, Marc W; Klostermeier, Ulrich C; Qi, Weihong; Guthörl, Daniela; Sailer, Christian; Waller, Manuel; Rosenstiel, Philip; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2014-07-01

    Seeds of flowering plants can be formed sexually or asexually through apomixis. Apomixis occurs in about 400 species and is of great interest for agriculture as it produces clonal offspring. It differs from sexual reproduction in three major aspects: (1) While the sexual megaspore mother cell (MMC) undergoes meiosis, the apomictic initial cell (AIC) omits or aborts meiosis (apomeiosis); (2) the unreduced egg cell of apomicts forms an embryo without fertilization (parthenogenesis); and (3) the formation of functional endosperm requires specific developmental adaptations. Currently, our knowledge about the gene regulatory programs underlying apomixis is scarce. We used the apomict Boechera gunnisoniana, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana, to investigate the transcriptional basis underlying apomeiosis and parthenogenesis. Here, we present the first comprehensive reference transcriptome for reproductive development in an apomict. To compare sexual and apomictic development at the cellular level, we used laser-assisted microdissection combined with microarray and RNA-Seq analyses. Conservation of enriched gene ontologies between the AIC and the MMC likely reflects functions of importance to germline initiation, illustrating the close developmental relationship of sexuality and apomixis. However, several regulatory pathways differ between sexual and apomictic germlines, including cell cycle control, hormonal pathways, epigenetic and transcriptional regulation. Enrichment of specific signal transduction pathways are a feature of the apomictic germline, as is spermidine metabolism, which is associated with somatic embryogenesis in various plants. Our study provides a comprehensive reference dataset for apomictic development and yields important new insights into the transcriptional basis underlying apomixis in relation to sexual reproduction.

  15. Apomictic and Sexual Germline Development Differ with Respect to Cell Cycle, Transcriptional, Hormonal and Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Anja; Schmid, Marc W.; Klostermeier, Ulrich C.; Qi, Weihong; Guthörl, Daniela; Sailer, Christian; Waller, Manuel; Rosenstiel, Philip; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2014-01-01

    Seeds of flowering plants can be formed sexually or asexually through apomixis. Apomixis occurs in about 400 species and is of great interest for agriculture as it produces clonal offspring. It differs from sexual reproduction in three major aspects: (1) While the sexual megaspore mother cell (MMC) undergoes meiosis, the apomictic initial cell (AIC) omits or aborts meiosis (apomeiosis); (2) the unreduced egg cell of apomicts forms an embryo without fertilization (parthenogenesis); and (3) the formation of functional endosperm requires specific developmental adaptations. Currently, our knowledge about the gene regulatory programs underlying apomixis is scarce. We used the apomict Boechera gunnisoniana, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana, to investigate the transcriptional basis underlying apomeiosis and parthenogenesis. Here, we present the first comprehensive reference transcriptome for reproductive development in an apomict. To compare sexual and apomictic development at the cellular level, we used laser-assisted microdissection combined with microarray and RNA-Seq analyses. Conservation of enriched gene ontologies between the AIC and the MMC likely reflects functions of importance to germline initiation, illustrating the close developmental relationship of sexuality and apomixis. However, several regulatory pathways differ between sexual and apomictic germlines, including cell cycle control, hormonal pathways, epigenetic and transcriptional regulation. Enrichment of specific signal transduction pathways are a feature of the apomictic germline, as is spermidine metabolism, which is associated with somatic embryogenesis in various plants. Our study provides a comprehensive reference dataset for apomictic development and yields important new insights into the transcriptional basis underlying apomixis in relation to sexual reproduction. PMID:25010342

  16. Epigenetic regulation by BAF (mSWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complexes is indispensable for embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huong; Sokpor, Godwin; Pham, Linh; Rosenbusch, Joachim; Stoykova, Anastassia; Staiger, Jochen F; Tuoc, Tran

    2016-05-18

    The multi-subunit chromatin-remodeling SWI/SNF (known as BAF for Brg/Brm-associated factor) complexes play essential roles in development. Studies have shown that the loss of individual BAF subunits often affects local chromatin structure and specific transcriptional programs. However, we do not fully understand how BAF complexes function in development because no animal mutant had been engineered to lack entire multi-subunit BAF complexes. Importantly, we recently reported that double conditional knock-out (dcKO) of the BAF155 and BAF170 core subunits in mice abolished the presence of the other BAF subunits in the developing cortex. The generated dcKO mutant provides a novel and powerful tool for investigating how entire BAF complexes affect cortical development. Using this model, we found that BAF complexes globally control the key heterochromatin marks, H3K27me2 and -3, by directly modulating the enzymatic activity of the H3K27 demethylases, Utx and Jmjd3. Here, we present further insights into how the scaffolding ability of the BAF155 and BAF170 core subunits maintains the stability of BAF complexes in the forebrain and throughout the embryo during development. Furthermore, we show that the loss of BAF complexes in the above-described model up-regulates H3K27me3 and impairs forebrain development and embryogenesis. These findings improve our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms and their modulation by the chromatin-remodeling SWI/SNF complexes that control embryonic development.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum epigenome: A distinct dynamic epigenetic regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Mukul; Bhosale, Madhvi A.; Karmodiya, Krishanpal

    2015-01-01

    Histone modification profiles are predictive of gene expression and most of the knowledge gained is acquired through studies done in higher eukaryotes. However, genome-wide studies involving Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria, have been rather few, at lower resolution (mostly using ChIP-on-chip), and covering limited number of histone modifications. In our recent study [1], we have performed extensive genome-wide analyses of multiple histone modifications including the active (H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K9ac, H3K14ac, H3K27ac and H4ac), inactive (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3), elongation (H3K79me3) and regulatory element (H3K4me1) in a stage-specific manner. Furthermore, we used a ligation-based method suitable for sequencing homopolymeric stretches as seen in P. falciparum for next-generation sequencing library amplification [2], enabling highly quantitative analysis of the extremely AT-rich P. falciparum genome. Our recently published study suggests that transcription regulation by virtue of poised chromatin and differential histone modifications is unique to P. falciparum [1]. Here we describe the experiments, quality controls and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing data analysis of our associated study published in Epigenetics and Chromatin [1]. Stage-specific ChIP-sequencing data for histone modifications is submitted to Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under the accession number GSE63369. PMID:26981368

  18. Apomictic and sexual germline development differ with respect to cell cycle, transcriptional, hormonal and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anja; Schmid, Marc W; Klostermeier, Ulrich C; Qi, Weihong; Guthörl, Daniela; Sailer, Christian; Waller, Manuel; Rosenstiel, Philip; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2014-07-01

    Seeds of flowering plants can be formed sexually or asexually through apomixis. Apomixis occurs in about 400 species and is of great interest for agriculture as it produces clonal offspring. It differs from sexual reproduction in three major aspects: (1) While the sexual megaspore mother cell (MMC) undergoes meiosis, the apomictic initial cell (AIC) omits or aborts meiosis (apomeiosis); (2) the unreduced egg cell of apomicts forms an embryo without fertilization (parthenogenesis); and (3) the formation of functional endosperm requires specific developmental adaptations. Currently, our knowledge about the gene regulatory programs underlying apomixis is scarce. We used the apomict Boechera gunnisoniana, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana, to investigate the transcriptional basis underlying apomeiosis and parthenogenesis. Here, we present the first comprehensive reference transcriptome for reproductive development in an apomict. To compare sexual and apomictic development at the cellular level, we used laser-assisted microdissection combined with microarray and RNA-Seq analyses. Conservation of enriched gene ontologies between the AIC and the MMC likely reflects functions of importance to germline initiation, illustrating the close developmental relationship of sexuality and apomixis. However, several regulatory pathways differ between sexual and apomictic germlines, including cell cycle control, hormonal pathways, epigenetic and transcriptional regulation. Enrichment of specific signal transduction pathways are a feature of the apomictic germline, as is spermidine metabolism, which is associated with somatic embryogenesis in various plants. Our study provides a comprehensive reference dataset for apomictic development and yields important new insights into the transcriptional basis underlying apomixis in relation to sexual reproduction. PMID:25010342

  19. Tissue-specific effects of genetic and epigenetic variation on gene regulation and splicing.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Ongen, Halit; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Montgomery, Stephen B; Buil, Alfonso; Yurovsky, Alisa; Bryois, Julien; Padioleau, Ismael; Romano, Luciana; Planchon, Alexandra; Falconnet, Emilie; Bielser, Deborah; Gagnebin, Maryline; Giger, Thomas; Borel, Christelle; Letourneau, Audrey; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Guipponi, Michel; Gehrig, Corinne; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how genetic variation affects distinct cellular phenotypes, such as gene expression levels, alternative splicing and DNA methylation levels, is essential for better understanding of complex diseases and traits. Furthermore, how inter-individual variation of DNA methylation is associated to gene expression is just starting to be studied. In this study, we use the GenCord cohort of 204 newborn Europeans' lymphoblastoid cell lines, T-cells and fibroblasts derived from umbilical cords. The samples were previously genotyped for 2.5 million SNPs, mRNA-sequenced, and assayed for methylation levels in 482,421 CpG sites. We observe that methylation sites associated to expression levels are enriched in enhancers, gene bodies and CpG island shores. We show that while the correlation between DNA methylation and gene expression can be positive or negative, it is very consistent across cell-types. However, this epigenetic association to gene expression appears more tissue-specific than the genetic effects on gene expression or DNA methylation (observed in both sharing estimations based on P-values and effect size correlations between cell-types). This predominance of genetic effects can also be reflected by the observation that allele specific expression differences between individuals dominate over tissue-specific effects. Additionally, we discover genetic effects on alternative splicing and interestingly, a large amount of DNA methylation correlating to alternative splicing, both in a tissue-specific manner. The locations of the SNPs and methylation sites involved in these associations highlight the participation of promoter proximal and distant regulatory regions on alternative splicing. Overall, our results provide high-resolution analyses showing how genome sequence variation has a broad effect on cellular phenotypes across cell-types, whereas epigenetic factors provide a secondary layer of variation that is more tissue-specific. Furthermore, the details of

  20. Memory acquisition and retrieval impact different epigenetic processes that regulate gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    necessary step for the analysis of genome-wide transcriptional studies in the context of brain and behavior. We show for the first time that histone variants are downregulated after memory acquisition, and splicing factors and microRNAs after memory retrieval. Our results provide mechanistic insights into the molecular basis of cognition by highlighting the differential involvement of epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone variants and post-transcriptional RNA regulation, after acquisition and retrieval of memory. PMID:26040834

  1. Live cell imaging analysis of the epigenetic regulation of the human endothelial cell migration at single-cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunhong; Yu, Zhilong; Zhou, Ying; Tao, Louis; Pang, Yuhong; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiannian; Qiu, Haiwei; Zhou, Hongwei; Chen, Zitian; Huang, Yanyi

    2012-09-01

    Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in cell migration. Although many methods have been developed to measure the motility of mammalian cells, accurate quantitative assessments of the migration speed of individual cells remain a major challenge. It is difficult for conventional scratch assays to differentiate proliferation from migration during the so-called wound-healing processes because of the long experimental time required. In addition, it is also challenging to create identical conditions for evaluating cell migration by conventional methods. We developed a microfluidic device with precisely created blanks allowing for robust and reproducible cell migration inside accurately-controlled microenvironments to study the regulatory effect of the epigenetic regulator histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) on cell migration. Through analyzing time-lapse imaging of the cells migrating into individual blank regions, we can measure the migration speed parameter for human primary cells within a few hours, eliminating the confounding effect of cell proliferation. We also developed an automatic image analysis and a numeric model-based data fitting to set up an integrated cell migration analysis system at single-cell resolution. Using this system, we measured the motility of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the migration speed reduction due to the silencing of HDAC7 and various other genes. We showed that the migration behaviour of these human primary cells are clearly regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, demonstrating the great potential of this accurate and robust assay in the fields of quantitatively migration studies and high-throughput screening.

  2. Epigenetic programming and risk: the birthplace of cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Vinci, Maria Cristina; Polvani, Gianluca; Pesce, Maurizio

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetics, through control of gene expression circuitries, plays important roles in various physiological processes such as stem cell differentiation and self renewal. This occurs during embryonic development, in different tissues, and in response to environmental stimuli. The language of epigenetic program is based on specific covalent modifications of DNA and chromatin. Thus, in addition to the individual identity, encoded by sequence of the four bases of the DNA, there is a cell type identity characterized by its positioning in the epigenetic "landscape". Aberrant changes in epigenetic marks induced by environmental cues may contribute to the development of abnormal phenotypes associated with different human diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders and inflammation. Most of the epigenetic studies have focused on embryonic development and cancer biology, while little has been done to explore the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. This review highlights our current knowledge of epigenetic gene regulation and the evidence that chromatin remodeling and histone modifications play key roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease through (re)programming of cardiovascular (stem) cells commitment, identity and function. PMID:22773406

  3. Non-random fragmentation patterns in circulating cell-free DNA reflect epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The assessment of cell-free circulating DNA fragments, also known as a "liquid biopsy" of the patient's plasma, is an important source for the discovery and subsequent non-invasive monitoring of cancer and other pathological conditions. Although the nucleosome-guided fragmentation patterns of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have not yet been studied in detail, non-random representation of cfDNA sequencies may reflect chromatin features in the tissue of origin at gene-regulation level. Results In this study, we investigated the association between epigenetic landscapes of human tissues evident in the patterns of cfDNA in plasma by deep sequencing of human cfDNA samples. We have demonstrated that baseline characteristics of cfDNA fragmentation pattern are in concordance with the ones corresponding to cell lines-derived. To identify the loci differentially represented in cfDNA fragment, we mapped the transcription start sites within the sequenced cfDNA fragments and tested for association of these genomic coordinates with the relative strength and the patterns of gene expressions. Preselected sets of house-keeping and tissue specific genes were used as models for actively expressed and silenced genes. Developed measure of gene regulation was able to differentiate these two sets based on sequencing coverage near gene transcription start site. Conclusion Experimental outcomes suggest that cfDNA retains characteristics previously noted in genome-wide analysis of chromatin structure, in particular, in MNase-seq assays. Thus far the analysis of the DNA fragmentation pattern may aid further developing of cfDNA based biomarkers for a variety of human conditions. PMID:26693644

  4. Histone deacetylase 11: A novel epigenetic regulator of myeloid derived suppressor cell expansion and function.

    PubMed

    Sahakian, Eva; Powers, John J; Chen, Jie; Deng, Susan L; Cheng, Fengdong; Distler, Allison; Woods, David M; Rock-Klotz, Jennifer; Sodre, Andressa L; Youn, Je-In; Woan, Karrune V; Villagra, Alejandro; Gabrilovich, Dmitry; Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2015-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous population of cells capable of suppressing anti-tumor T cell function in the tumor microenvironment, represent an imposing obstacle in the development of cancer immunotherapeutics. Thus, identifying elements essential to the development and perpetuation of these cells will undoubtedly improve our ability to circumvent their suppressive impact. HDAC11 has emerged as a key regulator of IL-10 gene expression in myeloid cells, suggesting that this may represent an important targetable axis through which to dampen MDSC formation. Using a murine transgenic reporter model system where eGFP expression is controlled by the HDAC11 promoter (Tg-HDAC11-eGFP), we provide evidence that HDAC11 appears to function as a negative regulator of MDSC expansion/function in vivo. MDSCs isolated from EL4 tumor-bearing Tg-HDAC11-eGFP display high expression of eGFP, indicative of HDAC11 transcriptional activation at steady state. In striking contrast, immature myeloid cells in tumor-bearing mice display a diminished eGFP expression, implying that the transition of IMC to MDSC's require a decrease in the expression of HDAC11, where we postulate that it acts as a gate-keeper of myeloid differentiation. Indeed, tumor-bearing HDAC11-knockout mice (HDAC11-KO) demonstrate a more suppressive MDSC population as compared to wild-type (WT) tumor-bearing control. Notably, the HDAC11-KO tumor-bearing mice exhibit enhanced tumor growth kinetics when compare to the WT control mice. Thus, through a better understanding of this previously unknown role of HDAC11 in MDSC expansion and function, rational development of targeted epigenetic modifiers may allow us to thwart a powerful barrier to efficacious immunotherapies.

  5. Epigenetic Signaling in Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Catherine J; Bagot, Rosemary C; Labonté, Benoit; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are complex multifactorial illnesses involving chronic alterations in neural circuit structure and function. While genetic factors are important in the etiology of disorders such as depression and addiction, relatively high rates of discordance among identical twins clearly indicate the importance of additional mechanisms. Environmental factors such as stress or prior drug exposure are known to play a role in the onset of these illnesses. Such exposure to environmental insults induces stable changes in gene expression, neural circuit function, and ultimately behavior, and these maladaptations appear distinct between developmental and adult exposures. Increasing evidence indicates that these sustained abnormalities are maintained by epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions. Indeed, transcriptional dysregulation and associated aberrant epigenetic regulation is a unifying theme in psychiatric disorders. Aspects of depression and addiction can be modeled in animals by inducing disease-like states through environmental manipulations (e.g., chronic-stress, drug administration). Understanding how environmental factors recruit the epigenetic machinery in animal models is revealing new insight into disease mechanisms in humans. PMID:24709417

  6. Compendium of aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Naoko; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2014-12-01

    Epigenetics now refers to the study or research field related to DNA methylation and histone modifications. Historically, global DNA hypomethylation was first revealed in 1983, and, after a decade, silencing of a tumor suppressor gene by regional DNA hypermethylation was reported. After the proposal of the histone code in the 2000s, alterations of histone methylation were also identified in cancers. Now, it is established that aberrant epigenetic alterations are involved in cancer development and progression, along with mutations and chromosomal losses. Recent cancer genome analyses have revealed a large number of mutations of epigenetic modifiers, supporting their important roles in cancer pathogenesis. Taking advantage of the reversibility of epigenetic alterations, drugs targeting epigenetic regulators and readers have been developed for restoration of normal pattern of the epigenome, and some have already demonstrated clinical benefits. In addition, DNA methylation of specific marker genes can be used as a biomarker for cancer diagnosis, including risk diagnosis, detection of cancers, and pathophysiological diagnosis. In this paper, we will summarize the major concepts of cancer epigenetics, placing emphasis on history.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of the DRD4 gene and dimensions of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children.

    PubMed

    Dadds, Mark R; Schollar-Root, Olivia; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Moul, Caroline; Hawes, David J

    2016-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that epigenetic regulation of the DRD4 gene may characterise specific aspects of ADHD symptomology. We tested associations between ADHD symptoms and epigenetic changes to the DRD4 gene in DNA extracted from blood and saliva in N = 330 children referred for a variety of behavioural and emotional problems. ADHD was indexed using DSM diagnoses as well as mother, father, and teacher reports. Methylation levels were assayed for the island of 18 CpG sites in the DRD4 receptor gene. A nearby SNP, rs3758653, was also genotyped as it has previously been shown to influence methylation levels. There was high consistency of methylation levels across CpG sites and tissue sources, and higher methylation levels were associated with the major allele of SNP rs3758653. Higher methylation levels were associated with more severe ADHD independent of SNP status, tissue source, ethnicity, environmental adversity, and comorbid conduct problems. The association applied specifically to the cognitive/attentional, rather than hyperactivity problems that characterise ADHD. The results indicate that epigenetic regulation of the DRD4 gene in the form of increased methylation is associated with the cognitive/attentional deficits in ADHD.

  8. Stress-induced and epigenetic-mediated maize transcriptome regulation study by means of transcriptome reannotation and differential expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Forestan, Cristian; Aiese Cigliano, Riccardo; Farinati, Silvia; Lunardon, Alice; Sanseverino, Walter; Varotto, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Plant’s response and adaptation to abiotic stresses involve sophisticated genetic and epigenetic regulatory systems. To obtain a global view of molecular response to osmotic stresses, including the non-coding portion of genome, we conducted a total leaf transcriptome analysis on maize plants subjected to prolonged drought and salt stresses. Stress application to both B73 wild type and the epiregulator mutant rpd1-1/rmr6 allowed dissection of the epigenetic component of stress response. Coupling total RNA-Seq and transcriptome re-assembly we annotated thousands of new maize transcripts, together with 13,387 lncRNAs that may play critical roles in regulating gene expression. Differential expression analysis revealed hundreds of genes modulated by long-term stress application, including also many lncRNAs and transposons specifically induced by stresses. The amplitude and dynamic of the stress-modulated gene sets are very different between B73 and rpd1-1/rmr6 mutant plants, as result of stress-like effect on genome regulation caused by the mutation itself, which activates many stress-related genes even in control condition. The analyzed extensive set of total RNA-Seq data, together with the improvement of the transcriptome and the identification of the non-coding portion of the transcriptome give a revealing insight into the genetic and epigenetic mechanism responsible for maize molecular response to abiotic stresses. PMID:27461139

  9. Stress-induced and epigenetic-mediated maize transcriptome regulation study by means of transcriptome reannotation and differential expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Forestan, Cristian; Aiese Cigliano, Riccardo; Farinati, Silvia; Lunardon, Alice; Sanseverino, Walter; Varotto, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Plant's response and adaptation to abiotic stresses involve sophisticated genetic and epigenetic regulatory systems. To obtain a global view of molecular response to osmotic stresses, including the non-coding portion of genome, we conducted a total leaf transcriptome analysis on maize plants subjected to prolonged drought and salt stresses. Stress application to both B73 wild type and the epiregulator mutant rpd1-1/rmr6 allowed dissection of the epigenetic component of stress response. Coupling total RNA-Seq and transcriptome re-assembly we annotated thousands of new maize transcripts, together with 13,387 lncRNAs that may play critical roles in regulating gene expression. Differential expression analysis revealed hundreds of genes modulated by long-term stress application, including also many lncRNAs and transposons specifically induced by stresses. The amplitude and dynamic of the stress-modulated gene sets are very different between B73 and rpd1-1/rmr6 mutant plants, as result of stress-like effect on genome regulation caused by the mutation itself, which activates many stress-related genes even in control condition. The analyzed extensive set of total RNA-Seq data, together with the improvement of the transcriptome and the identification of the non-coding portion of the transcriptome give a revealing insight into the genetic and epigenetic mechanism responsible for maize molecular response to abiotic stresses. PMID:27461139

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of the GCN5 gene reveals mechanisms of the epigenetic regulation of virulence and morphogenesis in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Soto, Domingo; González-Prieto, Juan Manuel; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2015-09-01

    Chromatin in the eukaryotic nucleus is highly organized in the form of nucleosomes where histones wrap DNA. This structure may be altered by some chemical modifications of histones, one of them, acetylation by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that originates relaxation of the nucleosome structure, providing access to different transcription factors and other effectors. In this way, HATs regulate cellular processes including DNA replication, and gene transcription. Previously, we isolated Ustilago maydis mutants deficient in the GCN5 HAT that are avirulent, and grow constitutively as mycelium. In this work, we proceeded to identify the genes differentially regulated by GCN5, comparing the transcriptomes of the mutant and the wild type using microarrays, to analyse the epigenetic control of virulence and morphogenesis. We identified 1203 genes, 574 positively and 629 negatively regulated in the wild type. We found that genes belonging to different categories involved in pathogenesis were downregulated in the mutant, and that genes involved in mycelial growth were negatively regulated in the wild type, offering a working hypothesis on the epigenetic control of virulence and morphogenesis of U. maydis. Interestingly, several differentially regulated genes appeared in clusters, suggesting a common regulation. Some of these belonged to pathogenesis or secondary metabolism.

  11. Effects of short chain fatty acid producing bacteria on epigenetic regulation of FFAR3 in type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Remely, Marlene; Aumueller, Eva; Merold, Christine; Dworzak, Simone; Hippe, Berit; Zanner, Julia; Pointner, Angelika; Brath, Helmut; Haslberger, Alexander G

    2014-03-01

    The human gut microbiota and microbial influences on lipid and glucose metabolism, satiety, and chronic low-grade inflammation are known to be involved in metabolic syndrome. Fermentation end products, especially short chain fatty acids, are believed to engage the epigenetic regulation of inflammatory reactions via FFARs (free fatty acid receptor) and other short chain fatty acid receptors. We studied a potential interaction of the microbiota with epigenetic regulation in obese and type 2 diabetes patients compared to a lean control group over a four month intervention period. Intervention comprised a GLP-1 agonist (glucagon-like peptide 1) for type 2 diabetics and nutritional counseling for both intervention groups. Microbiota was analyzed for abundance, butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene and for diversity by polymerase chain reaction and 454 high-throughput sequencing. Epigenetic methylation of the promoter region of FFAR3 and LINE1 (long interspersed nuclear element 1) was analyzed using bisulfite conversion and pyrosequencing. The diversity of the microbiota as well as the abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly lower in obese and type 2 diabetic patients compared to lean individuals. Results from Clostridium cluster IV and Clostridium cluster XIVa showed a decreasing trend in type 2 diabetics in comparison to the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene and according to melt curve analysis. During intervention no significant changes were observed in either intervention group. The analysis of five CpGs in the promoter region of FFAR3 showed a significant lower methylation in obese and type 2 diabetics with an increase in obese patients over the intervention period. These results disclosed a significant correlation between a higher body mass index and lower methylation of FFAR3. LINE-1, a marker of global methylation, indicated no significant differences between the three groups or the time points, although methylation of type 2

  12. Epigenetic Regulation of Individual Modules of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus 3′ Regulatory Region

    PubMed Central

    Birshtein, Barbara K.

    2014-01-01

    The Igh locus undergoes an amazing array of DNA rearrangements and modifications during B cell development. During early stages, the variable region gene is constructed from constituent variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments (VDJ joining). B cells that successfully express an antibody can be activated, leading to somatic hypermutation (SHM) focused on the variable region, and class switch recombination (CSR), which substitutes downstream constant region genes for the originally used Cμ constant region gene. Many investigators, ourselves included, have sought to understand how these processes specifically target the Igh locus and avoid other loci and potential deleterious consequences of malignant transformation. Our laboratory has concentrated on a complex regulatory region (RR) that is located downstream of Cα, the most 3′ of the Igh constant region genes. The ~40 kb 3′ RR, which is predicted to serve as a downstream major regulator of the Igh locus, contains two distinct segments: an ~28 kb region comprising four enhancers, and an adjacent ~12 kb region containing multiple CTCF and Pax5 binding sites. Analysis of targeted mutations in mice by a number of investigators has concluded that the entire 3′ RR enhancer region is essential for SHM and CSR (but not for VDJ joining) and for high levels of expression of multiple isotypes. The CTCF/Pax5 binding region is a candidate for influencing VDJ joining early in B cell development and serving as a potential insulator of the Igh locus. Components of the 3′ RR are subject to a variety of epigenetic changes during B cell development, i.e., DNAse I hypersensitivity, histone modifications, and DNA methylation, in association with transcription factor binding. I propose that these changes provide a foundation by which regulatory elements in modules of the 3′ RR function by interacting with each other and with target sequences of the Igh locus. PMID:24795714

  13. Epigenetic Regulation of Individual Modules of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus 3' Regulatory Region.

    PubMed

    Birshtein, Barbara K

    2014-01-01

    The Igh locus undergoes an amazing array of DNA rearrangements and modifications during B cell development. During early stages, the variable region gene is constructed from constituent variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments (VDJ joining). B cells that successfully express an antibody can be activated, leading to somatic hypermutation (SHM) focused on the variable region, and class switch recombination (CSR), which substitutes downstream constant region genes for the originally used Cμ constant region gene. Many investigators, ourselves included, have sought to understand how these processes specifically target the Igh locus and avoid other loci and potential deleterious consequences of malignant transformation. Our laboratory has concentrated on a complex regulatory region (RR) that is located downstream of Cα, the most 3' of the Igh constant region genes. The ~40 kb 3' RR, which is predicted to serve as a downstream major regulator of the Igh locus, contains two distinct segments: an ~28 kb region comprising four enhancers, and an adjacent ~12 kb region containing multiple CTCF and Pax5 binding sites. Analysis of targeted mutations in mice by a number of investigators has concluded that the entire 3' RR enhancer region is essential for SHM and CSR (but not for VDJ joining) and for high levels of expression of multiple isotypes. The CTCF/Pax5 binding region is a candidate for influencing VDJ joining early in B cell development and serving as a potential insulator of the Igh locus. Components of the 3' RR are subject to a variety of epigenetic changes during B cell development, i.e., DNAse I hypersensitivity, histone modifications, and DNA methylation, in association with transcription factor binding. I propose that these changes provide a foundation by which regulatory elements in modules of the 3' RR function by interacting with each other and with target sequences of the Igh locus.

  14. Stress dynamically regulates behavior and glutamatergic gene expression in hippocampus by opening a window of epigenetic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Nasca, Carla; Zelli, Danielle; Bigio, Benedetta; Piccinin, Sonia; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Nisticò, Robert; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2015-01-01

    Excitatory amino acids play a key role in both adaptive and deleterious effects of stressors on the brain, and dysregulated glutamate homeostasis has been associated with psychiatric and neurological disorders. Here, we elucidate mechanisms of epigenetic plasticity in the hippocampus in the interactions between a history of chronic stress and familiar and novel acute stressors that alter expression of anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. We demonstrate that acute restraint and acute forced swim stressors induce differential effects on these behaviors in naive mice and in mice with a history of chronic-restraint stress (CRS). They reveal a key role for epigenetic up- and down-regulation of the putative presynaptic type 2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors and the postsynaptic NR1/NMDA receptors in the hippocampus and particularly in the dentate gyrus (DG), a region of active neurogenesis and a target of antidepressant treatment. We show changes in DG long-term potentiation (LTP) that parallel behavioral responses, with habituation to the same acute restraint stressor and sensitization to a novel forced-swim stressor. In WT mice after CRS and in unstressed mice with a BDNF loss-of-function allele (BDNF Val66Met), we show that the epigenetic activator of histone acetylation, P300, plays a pivotal role in the dynamic up- and down-regulation of mGlu2 in hippocampus via histone-3-lysine-27-acetylation (H3K27Ac) when acute stressors are applied. These hippocampal responses reveal a window of epigenetic plasticity that may be useful for treatment of disorders in which glutamatergic transmission is dysregulated. PMID:26627246

  15. Epigenetics and crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nathan M

    2013-04-01

    There is considerable excitement about the potential for epigenetic information to contribute to heritable variation in many species. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance is rapidly growing, and it is now possible to profile the epigenome at high resolution. Epigenetic information plays a role in developmental gene regulation, response to the environment, and in natural variation of gene expression levels. Because of these central roles, there is the potential for epigenetics to play a role in crop improvement strategies including the selection for favorable epigenetic states, creation of novel epialleles, and regulation of transgene expression. In this review we consider the potential, and the limitations, of epigenetic variation in crop improvement.

  16. Acute and Chronic Electroconvulsive Seizures (ECS) Differentially Regulate the Expression of Epigenetic Machinery in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Pusalkar, Madhavi; Ghosh, Shreya; Jaggar, Minal; Husain, Basma Fatima Anwar; Galande, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive seizure treatment is a fast-acting antidepressant therapy that evokes rapid transcriptional, neurogenic, and behavioral changes. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute to altered gene regulation, which underlies the neurogenic and behavioral effects of electroconvulsive seizure. We hypothesized that electroconvulsive seizure may modulate the expression of epigenetic machinery, thus establishing potential alterations in the epigenetic landscape. Methods: We examined the influence of acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure on the gene expression of histone modifiers, namely histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetylases, histone methyltransferases, and histone (lysine) demethylases as well as DNA modifying enzymes, including DNA methyltransferases, DNA demethylases, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins in the hippocampi of adult male Wistar rats using quantitative real time-PCR analysis. Further, we examined the influence of acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure on global and residue-specific histone acetylation and methylation levels within the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in the cellular and behavioral effects of electroconvulsive seizure. Results: Acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure induced a primarily unique, and in certain cases bidirectional, regulation of histone and DNA modifiers, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins, with an overlapping pattern of gene regulation restricted to Sirt4, Mll3, Jmjd3, Gadd45b, Tet2, and Tet3. Global histone acetylation and methylation levels were predominantly unchanged, with the exception of a significant decline in H3K9 acetylation in the hippocampus following chronic electroconvulsive seizure. Conclusions: Electroconvulsive seizure treatment evokes the transcriptional regulation of several histone and DNA modifiers, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins within the hippocampus, with a predominantly distinct pattern of regulation induced by acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure. PMID

  17. Gut Microbiota as an Epigenetic Regulator: Pilot Study Based on Whole-Genome Methylation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Riikka; Laiho, Asta; Lundelin, Krista; Ley, Ruth E.; Isolauri, Erika; Salminen, Seppo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The core human gut microbiota contributes to the developmental origin of diseases by modifying metabolic pathways. To evaluate the predominant microbiota as an epigenetic modifier, we classified 8 pregnant women into two groups based on their dominant microbiota, i.e., Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Deep sequencing of DNA methylomes revealed a clear association between bacterial predominance and epigenetic profiles. The genes with differentially methylated promoters in the group in which Firmicutes was dominant were linked to risk of disease, predominantly to cardiovascular disease and specifically to lipid metabolism, obesity, and the inflammatory response. This is one of the first studies that highlights the association of the predominant bacterial phyla in the gut with methylation patterns. Further longitudinal and in-depth studies targeting individual microbial species or metabolites are recommended to give us a deeper insight into the molecular mechanism of such epigenetic modifications. PMID:25516615

  18. Epigenetics: A New Model for Intracellular Parasite-Host Cell Regulation.

    PubMed

    Robert McMaster, W; Morrison, Charlotte J; Kobor, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Intracellular protozoan parasites are an extremely important class of pathogens that cause a spectrum of diseases in human and animal hosts. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that protozoan parasites, like other prokaryotic and viral pathogens, manipulate host cells via epigenetic modifications of the host genome that alter transcription and corresponding signaling pathways. In light of these data, we examine the role of epigenetics in downregulation of host macrophages by Leishmania that could potentially lead to a permanent state of inactivation, thus favoring pathogen survival and disease progression. PMID:27142564

  19. Redox and epigenetic regulation of the APE1 gene in the hippocampus of piglets: The effect of early life exposures.

    PubMed

    Langie, Sabine A S; Kowalczyk, Pawel; Tomaszewski, Bartłomiej; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Maas, Lou M; Moonen, Edwin J; Palagani, Ajay; Godschalk, Roger W L; Tudek, Barbara; van Schooten, Frederik J; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Zabielski, Romuald; Mathers, John C

    2014-06-01

    Oxidative stress via redox reactions can regulate DNA repair pathways. The base excision repair (BER) enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a key player in the redox regulation of DNA repair. Environmental factors can alter the methylation of DNA repair genes, change their expression and thus modulate BER activity and susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we hypothesized that epigenetic modifications play a role in the redox regulation of APE1 in hippocampi of newborns and investigated the effect of supplementation of pregnant sows with a diet enriched in antioxidants and other nutrients on oxidative stress, DNA methylation and DNA repair in their offspring. High levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and low levels of glutathione were detected in control piglets after birth compared with supplemented piglets, indicating the presence of oxidative stress. In control animals, this oxidative stress was associated with genomic DNA demethylation, decreased APE1 promoter methylation, increased APE1 expression and with slightly but not statistically significant increased BER-related DNA incision activity. Supplementation of piglets with antioxidants and other nutrients significantly lowered 8-oxodG levels compared to control animals, which was accompanied by overall lower APE1 promoter methylation and enhanced APE1 expression at day 7-28 after birth in supplemented piglets, although DNA incision activity was not significantly different between groups. Preliminary attempts to study the interaction between redox and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms revealed an inverse correlation between APE1 expression and methylation of CpG-sites 11 and 13 in the promoter region, which according to Genomatix "MatInspector" are located in the core binding sites of redox-sensitive transcription factors. We are the first to study methylation of the APE1 promoter and its role in mediating the functional effects of redox reactions induced by

  20. The oncogenic BRD4-NUT chromatin regulator drives aberrant transcription within large topological domains

    PubMed Central

    Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Walsh, Erica M.; Wang, Xin; Grayson, Adlai R.; Hsi, Peter T.; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; French, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC), a subtype of squamous cell cancer, is one of the most aggressive human solid malignancies known. NMC is driven by the creation of a translocation oncoprotein, BRD4-NUT, which blocks differentiation and drives growth of NMC cells. BRD4-NUT forms distinctive nuclear foci in patient tumors, which we found correlate with ∼100 unprecedented, hyperacetylated expanses of chromatin that reach up to 2 Mb in size. These “megadomains” appear to be the result of aberrant, feed-forward loops of acetylation and binding of acetylated histones that drive transcription of underlying DNA in NMC patient cells and naïve cells induced to express BRD4-NUT. Megadomain locations are typically cell lineage-specific; however, the cMYC and TP63 regions are targeted in all NMCs tested and play functional roles in tumor growth. Megadomains appear to originate from select pre-existing enhancers that progressively broaden but are ultimately delimited by topologically associating domain (TAD) boundaries. Therefore, our findings establish a basis for understanding the powerful role played by large-scale chromatin organization in normal and aberrant lineage-specific gene transcription. PMID:26220994

  1. Epigenetic Alterations in Fanconi Anaemia: Role in Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Belo, Hélio; Silva, Gabriela; Cardoso, Bruno A.; Porto, Beatriz; Minguillon, Jordi; Barbot, José; Coutinho, Jorge; Casado, Jose A.; Benedito, Manuela; Saturnino, Hema; Costa, Emília; Bueren, Juan A.; Surralles, Jordi; Almeida, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an inherited disorder characterized by chromosomal instability. The phenotype is variable, which raises the possibility that it may be affected by other factors, such as epigenetic modifications. These play an important role in oncogenesis and may be pharmacologically manipulated. Our aim was to explore whether the epigenetic profiles in FA differ from non-FA individuals and whether these could be manipulated to alter the disease phenotype. We compared expression of epigenetic genes and DNA methylation profile of tumour suppressor genes between FA and normal samples. FA samples exhibited decreased expression levels of genes involved in epigenetic regulation and hypomethylation in the promoter regions of tumour suppressor genes. Treatment of FA cells with histone deacetylase inhibitor Vorinostat increased the expression of DNM3Tβ and reduced the levels of CIITA and HDAC9, PAK1, USP16, all involved in different aspects of epigenetic and immune regulation. Given the ability of Vorinostat to modulate epigenetic genes in FA patients, we investigated its functional effects on the FA phenotype. This was assessed by incubating FA cells with Vorinostat and quantifying chromosomal breaks induced by DNA cross-linking agents. Treatment of FA cells with Vorinostat resulted in a significant reduction of aberrant cells (81% on average). Our results suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in oncogenesis in FA. Epigenetic agents may be helpful in improving the phenotype of FA patients, potentially reducing tumour incidence in this population. PMID:26466379

  2. Epigenetic Alterations in Fanconi Anaemia: Role in Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Potential.

    PubMed

    Belo, Hélio; Silva, Gabriela; Cardoso, Bruno A; Porto, Beatriz; Minguillon, Jordi; Barbot, José; Coutinho, Jorge; Casado, Jose A; Benedito, Manuela; Saturnino, Hema; Costa, Emília; Bueren, Juan A; Surralles, Jordi; Almeida, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an inherited disorder characterized by chromosomal instability. The phenotype is variable, which raises the possibility that it may be affected by other factors, such as epigenetic modifications. These play an important role in oncogenesis and may be pharmacologically manipulated. Our aim was to explore whether the epigenetic profiles in FA differ from non-FA individuals and whether these could be manipulated to alter the disease phenotype. We compared expression of epigenetic genes and DNA methylation profile of tumour suppressor genes between FA and normal samples. FA samples exhibited decreased expression levels of genes involved in epigenetic regulation and hypomethylation in the promoter regions of tumour suppressor genes. Treatment of FA cells with histone deacetylase inhibitor Vorinostat increased the expression of DNM3Tβ and reduced the levels of CIITA and HDAC9, PAK1, USP16, all involved in different aspects of epigenetic and immune regulation. Given the ability of Vorinostat to modulate epigenetic genes in FA patients, we investigated its functional effects on the FA phenotype. This was assessed by incubating FA cells with Vorinostat and quantifying chromosomal breaks induced by DNA cross-linking agents. Treatment of FA cells with Vorinostat resulted in a significant reduction of aberrant cells (81% on average). Our results suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in oncogenesis in FA. Epigenetic agents may be helpful in improving the phenotype of FA patients, potentially reducing tumour incidence in this population. PMID:26466379

  3. Impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism in Alzheimer's disease: Impact on pathogenesis via disturbed epigenetic regulation of chromatin landscape.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai; Soininen, Hilkka; Hiltunen, Mikko

    2015-08-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) was proposed over twenty years ago. However, the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and synaptic loss have remained elusive delaying the effective drug discovery. Recent studies have revealed that amyloid-β peptides as well as phosphorylated and fragmented tau proteins accumulate within mitochondria. This process triggers mitochondrial fission (fragmentation) and disturbs Krebs cycle function e.g. by inhibiting the activity of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. Oxidative stress, hypoxia and calcium imbalance also disrupt the function of Krebs cycle in AD brains. Recent studies on epigenetic regulation have revealed that Krebs cycle intermediates control DNA and histone methylation as well as histone acetylation and thus they have fundamental roles in gene expression. DNA demethylases (TET1-3) and histone lysine demethylases (KDM2-7) are included in the family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenases (2-OGDO). Interestingly, 2-oxoglutarate is the obligatory substrate of 2-OGDO enzymes, whereas succinate and fumarate are the inhibitors of these enzymes. Moreover, citrate can stimulate histone acetylation via acetyl-CoA production. Epigenetic studies have revealed that AD is associated with changes in DNA methylation and histone acetylation patterns. However, the epigenetic results of different studies are inconsistent but one possibility is that they represent both coordinated adaptive responses and uncontrolled stochastic changes, which provoke pathogenesis in affected neurons. Here, we will review the changes observed in mitochondrial dynamics and Krebs cycle function associated with AD, and then clarify the mechanisms through which mitochondrial metabolites can control the epigenetic landscape of chromatin and induce pathological changes in AD. PMID:26001589

  4. Impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism in Alzheimer's disease: Impact on pathogenesis via disturbed epigenetic regulation of chromatin landscape.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai; Soininen, Hilkka; Hiltunen, Mikko

    2015-08-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) was proposed over twenty years ago. However, the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and synaptic loss have remained elusive delaying the effective drug discovery. Recent studies have revealed that amyloid-β peptides as well as phosphorylated and fragmented tau proteins accumulate within mitochondria. This process triggers mitochondrial fission (fragmentation) and disturbs Krebs cycle function e.g. by inhibiting the activity of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. Oxidative stress, hypoxia and calcium imbalance also disrupt the function of Krebs cycle in AD brains. Recent studies on epigenetic regulation have revealed that Krebs cycle intermediates control DNA and histone methylation as well as histone acetylation and thus they have fundamental roles in gene expression. DNA demethylases (TET1-3) and histone lysine demethylases (KDM2-7) are included in the family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenases (2-OGDO). Interestingly, 2-oxoglutarate is the obligatory substrate of 2-OGDO enzymes, whereas succinate and fumarate are the inhibitors of these enzymes. Moreover, citrate can stimulate histone acetylation via acetyl-CoA production. Epigenetic studies have revealed that AD is associated with changes in DNA methylation and histone acetylation patterns. However, the epigenetic results of different studies are inconsistent but one possibility is that they represent both coordinated adaptive responses and uncontrolled stochastic changes, which provoke pathogenesis in affected neurons. Here, we will review the changes observed in mitochondrial dynamics and Krebs cycle function associated with AD, and then clarify the mechanisms through which mitochondrial metabolites can control the epigenetic landscape of chromatin and induce pathological changes in AD.

  5. Postnatal epigenetic regulation of intestinal stem cells requires DNA methylation and is guided by the microbiome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism central to the development and maintenance of complex mammalian tissues, but our understanding of its role in intestinal development is limited. We used whole genome bisulfite sequencing, and found that differentiation of mouse colonic intestinal stem cell...

  6. Multigenerational and transgenerational effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals: A role for altered epigenetic regulation?

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Frances; Susiarjo, Martha; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has highlighted the critical role of early life environment in shaping the future health outcomes of an individual. Moreover, recent studies have revealed that early life perturbations can affect the health of subsequent generations. Hypothesized mechanisms of multi- and transgenerational inheritance of abnormal developmental phenotypes include epigenetic misregulation in germ cells. In this review, we will focus on the available data demonstrating the ability of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, and parabens, to alter epigenetic marks in rodents and humans. These epigenetic marks include DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, and non-coding RNAs. We also review the current evidence for multi- and transgenerational inheritance of abnormal developmental changes in the offspring following EDC exposure. Based on published results, we conclude that EDC exposure can alter the mouse and human epigenome, with variable tissue susceptibilities. Although increasing data suggest that exposure to EDCs is linked to transgenerational inheritance of reproductive, metabolic, or neurological phenotypes, more studies are needed to validate these observations and to elucidate further whether these developmental changes are directly associated with the relevant epigenetic alterations. PMID:26026600

  7. Multigenerational and transgenerational effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals: A role for altered epigenetic regulation?

    PubMed

    Xin, Frances; Susiarjo, Martha; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2015-07-01

    Increasing evidence has highlighted the critical role of early life environment in shaping the future health outcomes of an individual. Moreover, recent studies have revealed that early life perturbations can affect the health of subsequent generations. Hypothesized mechanisms of multi- and transgenerational inheritance of abnormal developmental phenotypes include epigenetic misregulation in germ cells. In this review, we will focus on the available data demonstrating the ability of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, and parabens, to alter epigenetic marks in rodents and humans. These epigenetic marks include DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, and non-coding RNAs. We also review the current evidence for multi- and transgenerational inheritance of abnormal developmental changes in the offspring following EDC exposure. Based on published results, we conclude that EDC exposure can alter the mouse and human epigenome, with variable tissue susceptibilities. Although increasing data suggest that exposure to EDCs is linked to transgenerational inheritance of reproductive, metabolic, or neurological phenotypes, more studies are needed to validate these observations and to elucidate further whether these developmental changes are directly associated with the relevant epigenetic alterations.

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms affecting regulation of energy balance: many questions, few answers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive human and animal model data show that nutrition and other environmental influences during critical periods of embryonic, fetal, and early postnatal life can affect the development of body weight regulatory pathways, with permanent consequences for risk of obesity. Epigenetic processes are ...

  9. Oxidative Stress and Epigenetic Regulation in Ageing and Age-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cencioni, Chiara; Spallotta, Francesco; Martelli, Fabio; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Gaetano, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Recent statistics indicate that the human population is ageing rapidly. Healthy, but also diseased, elderly people are increasing. This trend is particularly evident in Western countries, where healthier living conditions and better cures are available. To understand the process leading to age-associated alterations is, therefore, of the highest relevance for the development of new treatments for age-associated diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer and cardiovascular accidents. Mechanistically, it is well accepted that the accumulation of intracellular damage determined by reactive oxygen species (ROS) might orchestrate the progressive loss of control over biological homeostasis and the functional impairment typical of aged tissues. Here, we review how epigenetics takes part in the control of stress stimuli and the mechanisms of ageing physiology and physiopathology. Alteration of epigenetic enzyme activity, histone modifications and DNA-methylation is, in fact, typically associated with the ageing process. Specifically, ageing presents peculiar epigenetic markers that, taken altogether, form the still ill-defined “ageing epigenome”. The comprehension of mechanisms and pathways leading to epigenetic modifications associated with ageing may help the development of anti-ageing therapies. PMID:23989608

  10. Epigenetic regulation of pluripotent genes mediates stem cell features in human hepatocellular carcinoma and cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Qi; Ng, Ray Kit; Ming, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Wu; Chen, Lin; Chu, Andrew C Y; Pang, Roberta; Lo, Chung Mau; Tsao, Sai Wah; Liu, Xuqing; Poon, Ronnie T P; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the stem cell transcriptional circuitry is an important event in cancer development. Although cancer cells demonstrate a stem cell-like gene expression signature, the epigenetic regulation of pluripotency-associated genes in cancers remains poorly understood. In this study, we characterized the epigenetic regulation of the pluripotency-associated genes NANOG, OCT4, c-MYC, KLF4, and SOX2 in a variety of cancer cell lines and in primary tumor samples, and investigated the re-activation of pluripotency regulatory circuits in cancer progression. Differential patterns of DNA methylation, histone modifications, and gene expression of pluripotent genes were demonstrated in different types of cancers, which may reflect their tissue origins. NANOG promoter hypomethylation and gene upregulation were found in metastatic human liver cancer cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) primary tumor tissues. The upregulation of NANOG, together with p53 depletion, was significantly associated with clinical late stage of HCC. A pro-metastatic role of NANOG in colon cancer cells was also demonstrated, using a NANOG-overexpressing orthotopic tumor implantation mouse model. Demethylation of NANOG promoter was observed in CD133+(high) cancer cells. In accordance, overexpression of NANOG resulted in an increase in the population of CD133+(high) cells. In addition, we demonstrated a cross-regulation between OCT4 and NANOG in cancer cells via reprogramming of promoter methylation. Taken together, epigenetic reprogramming of NANOG can lead to the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. These results underscore the restoration of pluripotency circuits in cancer cells as a potential mechanism for cancer progression. PMID:24023739

  11. [Role of Biology Based on Epigenetics in Multiple Myeloma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin-Bin; Wu, Tao

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant tumor, characterized by dysplasia of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow secreting large amounts of monoclonal immunoglobulin or fragments (M protein), resulting in damage in relevant organs or tissues. The biological complexity of MM is based on disrupted cancer pathways. Except the central role of cytogenetic abnormalities, epigenetic aberrations have also been shown to be involved in the occurrence and development of MM. Epigenetics of MM is mainly concentrated in the ways of DNA methylation, histone modifications and noncoding RNA, which have generated abnormal signaling pathways to regulate cell cycle and apoptosis of MM. In this article, advances of research on epigenetics of development, clinical diagnosis and treatments of MM are reviewed. PMID:27342538

  12. Early Life Adverse Environmental Exposures Increase the Risk of Uterine Fibroid Development: Role of Epigenetic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair capacity eventually causes the emergence of mutations such as Med12 in myometrial stem cells converting them into fibroid tumor-forming stem cells, and thereby leads to the development of UFs. Advancing our understanding of the mechanistic role epigenetic regulation of stem cells plays in mediating risk and tumorigenesis will help in pointing the way toward the development of novel therapeutic options. PMID:26973527

  13. Early Life Adverse Environmental Exposures Increase the Risk of Uterine Fibroid Development: Role of Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair capacity eventually causes the emergence of mutations such as Med12 in myometrial stem cells converting them into fibroid tumor-forming stem cells, and thereby leads to the development of UFs. Advancing our understanding of the mechanistic role epigenetic regulation of stem cells plays in mediating risk and tumorigenesis will help in pointing the way toward the development of novel therapeutic options. PMID:26973527

  14. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  15. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  16. Epigenetic alterations in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions of the cervix

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is one of the most malignant tumors and the second or third most common type of cancer in women worldwide. The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and CC is widely known and accepted (99.7% of cases). At present, the pathogenesis mechanisms of CC are not entirely clear. It has been shown that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes play a significant role in carcinogenesis, caused by the genetic and epigenetic alterations. In the past, it was generally thought that genetic mutation was a key event of tumor pathogenesis, especially somatic mutation of tumor suppressor genes. With deeper understanding of tumors in recent years, increasing evidence has shown that epigenetic silencing of those genes, as a result of aberrant hypermethylation of CpG islands in promoters and histone modification, is essential to carcinogenesis and metastasis. The term epigenetics refers to heritable changes in gene expression caused by regulation mechanisms, other than changes in DNA sequence. Specific epigenetic processes include DNA methylation, chromotin remodeling, histone modification, and microRNA regulations. These alterations, in combination or individually, make it possible to establish the methylation profiles, histone modification maps, and expression profiles characteristic of this pathology, which become useful tools for screening, early detection, or prognostic markers in cervical cancer. This paper reviews recent epigenetics research progress in the CC study, and tries to depict the relationships between CC and DNA methylation, histone modification, as well as microRNA regulations. PMID:22938091

  17. Environmental Epigenetic of Asthma – An update

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Asthma, a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airway, is influenced by interplay between genetic and environmental factors now known to be mediated by epigenetics. Aberrant DNA methylation, altered histone modifications, specific microRNA expression, and other chromatin alterations orchestrate a complex early-life reprogramming of immune T cell response, dendritic cell function, macrophage activation, and a breach of airway epithelial barrier that dictates asthma risk and severity in later life. Adult-onset asthma is under analogous regulation. The sharp increase in asthma prevalence over the past two or three decades and the large variations among populations of similar racial/ethnic background but different environmental exposures favors a strong contribution of environmental factors. This review addresses the fundamental question of whether environmental influences on asthma risk, severity, and steroid resistance are partly due to differential epigenetic modulations. Current knowledge on epigenetic effects of tobacco smoke, microbial allergens, oxidants, airborne particulate matter, diesel exhaust particles, dietary methyl donors and other nutritional factors, and dust mites is discussed. Exciting findings have been generated by rapid technological advances and well-designed experimental and population studies. The discovery and validation of epigenetic biomarkers linked to exposure and/or asthma may lead to better epigenotyping of risk, prognosis, treatment prediction, and development of novel therapies. PMID:20816181

  18. Genome-Wide Epigenetic Studies in Human Disease: A Primer on -Omic Technologies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huihuang; Tian, Shulan; Slager, Susan L; Sun, Zhifu; Ordog, Tamas

    2016-01-15

    Epigenetic information encoded in covalent modifications of DNA and histone proteins regulates fundamental biological processes through the action of chromatin regulators, transcription factors, and noncoding RNA species. Epigenetic plasticity enables an organism to respond to developmental and environmental signals without genetic changes. However, aberrant epigenetic control plays a key role in pathogenesis of disease. Normal epigenetic states could be disrupted by detrimental mutations and expression alteration of chromatin regulators or by environmental factors. In this primer, we briefly review the epigenetic basis of human disease and discuss how recent discoveries in this field could be translated into clinical diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. We introduce platforms for mapping genome-wide chromatin accessibility, nucleosome occupancy, DNA-binding proteins, and DNA methylation, primarily focusing on the integration of DNA methylation and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing technologies into disease association studies. We highlight practical considerations in applying high-throughput epigenetic assays and formulating analytical strategies. Finally, we summarize current challenges in sample acquisition, experimental procedures, data analysis, and interpretation and make recommendations on further refinement in these areas. Incorporating epigenomic testing into the clinical research arsenal will greatly facilitate our understanding of the epigenetic basis of disease and help identify novel therapeutic targets.

  19. Involvement of Epigenetic Mechanisms in the Regulation of Secreted Phospholipase A2 Expressions in Jurkat Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Menschikowski, Mario; Hagelgans, Albert; Kostka, Heike; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Siegert, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic changes provide a frequent mechanism for transcriptional silencing of genes in cancer cells. We previously established that epigenetic mechanisms are important for control of group IIA phospholipase A2 (PLA2G2A) gene transcription in human DU-145 prostate cells. In this study, we analyzed the involvement of such mechanisms in the regulation of five sPLA2 isozymes and the M-type receptor of sPLA2 (sPLA2-R) in human leukemic Jurkat cells. These cells constitutively expressed sPLA2-IB, sPLA2-III, sPLA2-X, and sPLA2-R but not sPLA2-IIA and sPLA2-V. Transcription of sPLA2-IIA and sPLA2-V was, however, detected after exposure of cells to the DNA demethylating agent, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC). Expression of sPLA2-IIA was further enhanced by additional exposure to interferon-γ and blocked by inhibitors of specificity protein 1, nuclear factor κB, and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription-dependent pathways. Sequence analysis and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction of bisulfite-modified genomic DNA revealed two 5′-CpG sites (-111 and -82) in the sPLA2-IIA proximal promoter that were demethylated after 5-aza-dC treatment. These sites may be involved in the DNA binding of specificity protein 1 and other transcription factors. Similar findings after treatment of human U937 leukemia cells with 5-aza-dC indicate that this mechanism of PLA2G2A gene silencing is not restricted to Jurkat and DU-145 cells. These data establish that regulation of sPLA2-IIA and sPLA2-V in Jurkat and other cells involves epigenetic silencing by DNA hypermethylation. PMID:18953428

  20. SY 03-3 OVERVIEW OF SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND EPIGENETIC REGULATION OF ALDOSTERONE PRODUCING ADENOMA (APA).

    PubMed

    Umemura, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    clear cells with abundant microvesicular cytoplasm with numerous lipid droplets ('fasciculata-like'). The histological pattern of tumors with CACNA1D and ATPase mutations was still controversial (Clin Endo 2015; 83: 779, JCEM 2016;101:494)(3) Epigenetics in APAIntegrated analysis of genome-wide methylation and gene expression shows epigenetic regulation of CYP11B2 in aldosteronomas. APA were hypomethylated compared with normal, nonfunctioning adrenocortical tumors and APA-adjacent adrenal gland samples from the same patient. CYP11B2 was upregulated and hypomethylated, suggesting that dysregulated methylation preferentially upregulates CYP11B2 with commensurate inhibition of other key genes involved in steroid biosynthesis. Comparing the methylation status of CYP11B2 CpG islands in paired DNA samples from aldosteronomas and blood from the same patients showed CpG hypomethylation was found in aldosteronomas but not in peripheral blood DNA in all cases. These results may suggest the involvement of these DNA hypomethylation in aldosterone production. (J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2014; 99: E536. Eur J Endocrinol 2015; 173: 185)(4) Aldosterone-producing cell clusters (APCCs) with high expression of CYP11B2 in both normal and PA adrenal tissueRecently, aldosterone-producing cell clusters (APCCs) with high expression of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) were found in both normal and PA adrenal tissue. Known aldosterone driver mutations were identified in some of APCCs, including CACNA1D and ATP1A1, which were not observed in the adjacent normal adrenal tissue. These studies suggest that APCCs are common in normal adrenals, and APCCs harbor somatic mutations known to cause excess aldosterone production. Furthermore, the mutation spectrum of aldosterone-driving mutations is different in APCCs from that seen in APA. The mutations in KCNJ5 were not detected in those APCCs. The frequency of somatic mutations in CACNA1D in APCCs from normal adrenals increases with age. These results may

  1. Crosstalk between epigenetic readers regulates the MOZ/MORF HAT complexes

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Brianna J; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Côté, Jacques; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2014-01-01

    The MOZ/MORF complexes represent an example of a chromatin-binding assembly whose recruitment to specific genomic regions and activity can be fine-tuned by posttranslational modifications of histones. Here we detail the structures and biological functions of epigenetic readers present in the four core subunits of the MOZ/MORF complexes, highlight the imperative role of combinatorial readout by the multiple readers, and discuss new research directions to advance our understanding of histone acetylation. PMID:24169304

  2. Beyond receptors and signaling: epigenetic factors in the regulation of innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Stuti; Jeffrey, Kate L

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of innate immune cells with pathogens leads to changes in gene expression that elicit our body’s first line of defense against infection. Although signaling pathways and transcription factors have a central role, it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic factors, in the form of DNA or histone modifications, as well as noncoding RNAs, are critical for generating the necessary cell lineage as well as context-specific gene expression in diverse innate immune cell types. Much of the epigenetic landscape is set during cellular differentiation; however, pathogens and other environmental triggers also induce changes in histone modifications that can either promote tolerance or ‘train’ innate immune cells for a more robust antigen-independent secondary response. Here we review the important contribution of epigenetic factors to the initiation, maintenance and training of innate immune responses. In addition, we explore how pathogens have hijacked these mechanisms for their benefit and the potential of small molecules targeting chromatin machinery as a way to boost or subdue the innate immune response in disease. PMID:25559622

  3. NrasG12D/+ promotes leukemogenesis by aberrantly regulating hematopoietic stem cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyong; Kong, Guangyao; Liu, Yangang; Du, Juan; Chang, Yuan-I; Tey, Sin Ruow; Zhang, Xinmin; Ranheim, Erik A.; Saba-El-Leil, Marc K.; Meloche, Sylvain; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Zhang, Jingfang; Zhang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic NRAS mutations are frequently identified in human myeloid leukemias. In mice, expression of endogenous oncogenic Nras (NrasG12D/+) in hematopoietic cells leads to expansion of myeloid progenitors, increased long-term reconstitution of bone marrow cells, and a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). However, acute expression of NrasG12D/+ in a pure C57BL/6 background does not induce hyperactivated granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor signaling or increased proliferation in myeloid progenitors. It is thus unclear how NrasG12D/+ signaling promotes leukemogenesis. Here, we show that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) expressing NrasG12D/+ serve as MPN-initiating cells. They undergo moderate hyperproliferation with increased self-renewal. The aberrant NrasG12D/+ HSC function is associated with hyperactivation of ERK1/2 in HSCs. Conversely, downregulation of MEK/ERK by pharmacologic and genetic approaches attenuates the cycling of NrasG12D/+ HSCs and prevents the expansion of NrasG12D/+ HSCs and myeloid progenitors. Our data delineate critical mechanisms of oncogenic Nras signaling in HSC function and leukemogenesis. PMID:23687087

  4. Regulation of MYC gene expression by aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rennoll, Sherri; Yochum, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway controls intestinal homeostasis and mutations in components of this pathway are prevalent in human colorectal cancers (CRCs). These mutations lead to inappropriate expression of genes controlled by Wnt responsive DNA elements (WREs). T-cell factor/Lymphoid enhancer factor transcription factors bind WREs and recruit the β-catenin transcriptional co-activator to activate target gene expression. Deregulated expression of the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC) by aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling drives colorectal carcinogenesis. In this review, we discuss the current literature pertaining to the identification and characterization of WREs that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRCs. A common theme has emerged whereby these WREs often map distally to the MYC genomic locus and control MYC gene expression through long-range chromatin loops with the MYC proximal promoter. We propose that by determining which of these WREs is critical for CRC pathogenesis, novel strategies can be developed to treat individuals suffering from this disease. PMID:26629312

  5. Aberrant cell cycle regulation in rat liver cells induced by post-initiation treatment with hepatocarcinogens/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoters.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Watanabe, Yousuke; Onda, Nobuhiko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to determine the onset time of hepatocarcinogen/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoter-specific cell proliferation, apoptosis and aberrant cell cycle regulation after post-initiation treatment. Six-week-old rats were treated with the genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, carbadox (CRB), the marginally hepatocarcinogenic leucomalachite green (LMG), the tumor promoter, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) or the non-carcinogenic hepatotoxicant, acetaminophen, for 2, 4 or 6 weeks during the post-initiation phase using a medium-term liver bioassay. Cell proliferation activity, expression of G2 to M phase- and spindle checkpoint-related molecules, and apoptosis were immunohistochemically analyzed at week 2 and 4, and tumor promotion activity was assessed at week 6. At week 2, hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific aberrant cell cycle regulation was not observed. At week 4, BNF and LMG increased cell proliferation together with hepatotoxicity, while CRB did not. Additionally, BNF and CRB reduced the number of cells expressing phosphorylated-histone H3 in both ubiquitin D (UBD)(+) cells and Ki-67(+) proliferating cells, suggesting development of spindle checkpoint dysfunction, regardless of cell proliferation activity. At week 6, examined hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increased preneoplastic hepatic foci expressing glutathione S-transferase placental form. These results suggest that some hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increase their toxicity after post-initiation treatment, causing regenerative cell proliferation. In contrast, some genotoxic hepatocarcinogens may disrupt the spindle checkpoint without facilitating cell proliferation at the early stage of tumor promotion. This suggests that facilitation of cell proliferation and disruption of spindle checkpoint function are induced by different mechanisms during hepatocarcinogenesis. Four weeks of post-initiation treatment may be sufficient to induce hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific cellular responses. PMID

  6. Up-regulated expression and aberrant DNA methylation of LEP and SH3PXD2A in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuqian; Cheng, Yan; Li, Xiaotian; Li, Qiaoli; Xu, Jiawei; Zhang, Junyu; Liu, Yun; Xing, Qinghe; Wang, Lei; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2013-01-01

    The primary mechanism underlying pre-eclampsia (PE) remains one of the most burning problems in the obstetrics and gynecology. In this study, we performed an expression profiling screen and detected 1312 genes that were differentially expressed (p<0.05 and fold change >1.5) in PE placentas, including LEP and SH3PXD2A. After validating the microarray results, we conducted the quantitative methylation analysis of LEP and SH3PXD2A in preeclamptic (n = 16) versus normal placentas (n = 16). Our results showed that many CpG sites close to the transcriptional start site (TSS) of LEP gene were hypomethylated in placentas from pregnancies with PE compared with those of in controls, including the TSS position (p = 0.001), the binding sites of Sp1 (p = 1.57×10(-4)), LP1 (p = 0.023) and CEBPα (p = 0.031). Luciferase reporter analysis confirmed the aberrant methylation of LEP promoter and CEBPα co-transfection had a role in the regulation of gene expression. Our results indicated the aberrant LEP promoter methylation was involved in the development of PE. We did not find a significant methylation differences between groups in the promoter region of SH3PXD2A, however, a CGI region in the gene body (CGI34) presented a higher methylation in preeclamptic placentas (p = 1.57×10(-4)), which might promote the efficiency of gene transcription. We speculated that SH3PXD2A may take part in the pathogenesis of PE through its role in the regulation of trophoblast cell invasion in the period of placenta formation.

  7. RNA epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mammalian messenger and long non-coding RNA contain tens of thousands of post-transcriptional chemical modifications. Among these, the N6-methyl-adenosine (m6A) modification is the most abundant and can be removed by specific mammalian enzymes. M6A modification is recognized by families of RNA binding proteins that affect many aspects of mRNA function. mRNA/lncRNA modification represents another layer of epigenetic regulation of gene expression, analogous to DNA methylation and histone modification. PMID:24768686

  8. Expression atlas of the multivalent epigenetic regulator Brpf1 and its requirement for survival of mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    You, Linya; Chen, Lulu; Penney, Janice; Miao, Dengshun; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a unique epigenetic regulator that contains multiple structural domains for recognizing different chromatin modifications. In addition, it possesses sequence motifs for forming multiple complexes with three different histone acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF, and HBO1. Within these complexes, BRPF1 serves as a scaffold for bridging subunit interaction, stimulating acetyltransferase activity, governing substrate specificity and stimulating gene expression. To investigate how these molecular interactions are extrapolated to biological functions of BRPF1, we utilized a mouse strain containing a knock-in reporter and analyzed the spatiotemporal expression from embryos to adults. The analysis revealed dynamic expression in the extraembryonic, embryonic, and fetal tissues, suggesting important roles of Brpf1 in prenatal development. In support of this, inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes lethality around embryonic day 9.5. After birth, high expression is present in the testis and specific regions of the brain. The 4-dimensional expression atlas of mouse Brpf1 should serve as a valuable guide for analyzing its interaction with Moz, Morf, and Hbo1 in vivo, as well as for investigating whether Brpf1 functions independently of these three enzymatic epigenetic regulators. PMID:24646517

  9. Novel Histone Deacetylase Class IIa Selective Substrate Radiotracers for PET Imaging of Epigenetic Regulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Robin; Mukhopadhyay, Uday; Shavrin, Aleksandr; Yeh, Hsien-Hsien; Majhi, Anjoy; Dewage, Sajeewa W.; Najjar, Amer; Lu, Xin; Cisneros, G. Andrés; Tong, William P.; Alauddin, Mian M.; Liu, Ren-Shuan; Mangner, Thomas J.; Turkman, Nashaat; Gelovani, Juri G.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC’s) became increasingly important targets for therapy of various diseases, resulting in a pressing need to develop HDAC class- and isoform-selective inhibitors. Class IIa deacetylases possess only minimal deacetylase activity against acetylated histones, but have several other client proteins as substrates through which they participate in epigenetic regulation. Herein, we report the radiosyntheses of the second generation of HDAC class IIa–specific radiotracers: 6-(di-fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide (DFAHA) and 6-(tri-fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide ([18F]-TFAHA). The selectivity of these radiotracer substrates to HDAC class IIa enzymes was assessed in vitro, in a panel of recombinant HDACs, and in vivo using PET/CT imaging in rats. [18F]TFAHA showed significantly higher selectivity for HDAC class IIa enzymes, as compared to [18F]DFAHA and previously reported [18F]FAHA. PET imaging with [18F]TFAHA can be used to visualize and quantify spatial distribution and magnitude of HDAC class IIa expression-activity in different organs and tissues in vivo. Furthermore, PET imaging with [18F]TFAHA may advance the understanding of HDACs class IIa mediated epigenetic regulation of normal and pathophysiological processes, and facilitate the development of novel HDAC class IIa-specific inhibitors for therapy of different diseases. PMID:26244761

  10. Epigenetic regulation of spinal cord gene expression contributes to enhanced postoperative pain and analgesic tolerance subsequent to continuous opioid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, De-Yong; Shi, Xiao-You; Sun, Yuan; Clark, J David

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids have become the mainstay for treatment of moderate to severe pain and are commonly used to treat surgical pain. While opioid administration has been shown to cause opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance, interactions between opioid administration and surgery with respect to these problematic adaptations have scarcely been addressed. Accumulating evidence suggests opioids and nociceptive signaling may converge on epigenetic mechanisms in spinal cord to enhance or prolong neuroplastic changes. Epigenetic regulation of Bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and Pdyn (prodynorphin) genes may be involved. Results Four days of ascending doses of morphine treatment caused opioid-induced hyperalgesia and reduced opioid analgesic efficacy in mice. Both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the reduced opioid analgesic efficacy were enhanced in mice that received hindpaw incisions. The expression of Bdnf and Pdyn (qPCR) was increased after morphine treatment and incision. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the Pdyn and Bdnf promoters were more strongly associated with acetylated H3K9 after morphine plus incision than in the morphine or incision alone groups. Selective tropomyosin-related kinase B (ANA-12) and κ-opioid receptor (nor-binaltorphimine) antagonists were administered intrathecally, both reduced hyperalgesia one or three days after surgery. Administration of ANA-12 or nor-binaltorphimine attenuated the decreased morphine analgesic efficacy on day 1, but only nor-binaltorphimine was effective on day 3 after incision in opioid-exposed group. Coadministration of histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid daily with morphine blocked the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and attenuated incision-enhanced hyperalgesia in morphine-treated mice. Anacardic acid had similar effects on analgesic tolerance, showing the involvement of histone acetylation in the interactions detected. Conclusions Spinal epigenetic changes

  11. Natural Compounds: Role in Reversal of Epigenetic Changes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ruchi; Jha, Meenakshi; Shrivastava, Anju; Jha, Abhimanyu Kumar

    2015-08-01

    The hallmarks of carcinogenesis are characterized by alterations in the expression of multiple genes that occur via genetic and epigenetic alterations, leading to genome rearrangements and instability. The reversible process of epigenetic regulation, which includes changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications, and alteration in microRNA (miRNA) expression that alter phenotype without any change in the DNA sequence, is recognized as a key mechanism in cancer cell metabolism. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown the anticarcinogenic potential of natural compounds targeting epigenetic mechanism as a common molecular approach for cancer treatment. This review summarizes the potential of natural chemopreventive agents to reverse cancer-related epigenetic aberrations by regulating the activity of histone deacetylases, histone acetyltransferases, DNA methyltransferase I, and miRNAs. Furthermore, there is impetus for determining novel and effective chemopreventive strategies, either alone or in combination with other anticancer agents that exhibit similar properties, for improving the therapeutic aspects of cancer. PMID:26547065

  12. Epigenetics: Deciphering its role in Diabetes and its Chronic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Louisa M.; Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors may regulate the complex interplay between genes and the environment and affect human diseases such as diabetes and its complications. Clinical trials have underscored the long lasting beneficial effects of strict glycemic control for reducing the progression of diabetic complications. They have also demonstrated that diabetic complications such as diabetic nephropathy, a chronic kidney disorder, can continue even after blood glucose normalization, suggesting a metabolic memory of the prior glycemic state. Dysregulation of epigenetic post-transcriptional modifications of histones in chromatin, including histone lysine methylation, has been implicated in aberrant gene regulation associated with the pathology of diabetes and its complications. Genome-wide studies have demonstrated cell-type specific changes in histone methylation patterns under diabetic conditions. In addition, studies in vascular cells have shown long lasting changes in epigenetic modifications at key inflammatory gene promoters after prior exposure to diabetic conditions suggesting a possible mechanism for metabolic memory. Recent studies have demonstrated roles for histone methylation, DNA methylation, as well as microRNAs in diabetic nephropathy. Whether these epigenetic factors play a role in metabolic memory of diabetic kidney disease is less well understood. The incidence of diabetes is growing rapidly, as also the cost of treating the resulting complications. A better understanding of metabolic memory and the potential involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in this phenomenon could enable the development of new therapeutic targets for the treatment and/or prevention of sustained diabetic complications. PMID:21309809

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans TRPV channels function in a modality-specific pathway to regulate response to aberrant sensory signaling.

    PubMed

    Ezak, Meredith J; Hong, Elizabeth; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Ferkey, Denise M

    2010-05-01

    Olfaction and some forms of taste (including bitter) are mediated by G protein-coupled signal transduction pathways. Olfactory and gustatory ligands bind to chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in specialized sensory cells to activate intracellular signal transduction cascades. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are negative regulators of signaling that specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs to terminate signaling. Although loss of GRK function usually results in enhanced cellular signaling, Caenorhabditis elegans lacking GRK-2 function are not hypersensitive to chemosensory stimuli. Instead, grk-2 mutant animals do not chemotax toward attractive olfactory stimuli or avoid aversive tastes and smells. We show here that loss-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 selectively restore grk-2 behavioral avoidance of bitter tastants, revealing modality-specific mechanisms for TRPV channel function in the regulation of C. elegans chemosensation. Additionally, a single amino acid point mutation in OCR-2 that disrupts TRPV channel-mediated gene expression, but does not decrease channel function in chemosensory primary signal transduction, also restores grk-2 bitter taste avoidance. Thus, loss of GRK-2 function may lead to changes in gene expression, via OSM-9/OCR-2, to selectively alter the levels of signaling components that transduce or regulate bitter taste responses. Our results suggest a novel mechanism and multiple modality-specific pathways that sensory cells employ in response to aberrant signal transduction. PMID:20176974

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans TRPV Channels Function in a Modality-Specific Pathway to Regulate Response to Aberrant Sensory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ezak , Meredith J.; Hong , Elizabeth; Chaparro-Garcia , Angela; Ferkey , Denise M.

    2010-01-01

    Olfaction and some forms of taste (including bitter) are mediated by G protein-coupled signal transduction pathways. Olfactory and gustatory ligands bind to chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in specialized sensory cells to activate intracellular signal transduction cascades. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are negative regulators of signaling that specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs to terminate signaling. Although loss of GRK function usually results in enhanced cellular signaling, Caenorhabditis elegans lacking GRK-2 function are not hypersensitive to chemosensory stimuli. Instead, grk-2 mutant animals do not chemotax toward attractive olfactory stimuli or avoid aversive tastes and smells. We show here that loss-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 selectively restore grk-2 behavioral avoidance of bitter tastants, revealing modality-specific mechanisms for TRPV channel function in the regulation of C. elegans chemosensation. Additionally, a single amino acid point mutation in OCR-2 that disrupts TRPV channel-mediated gene expression, but does not decrease channel function in chemosensory primary signal transduction, also restores grk-2 bitter taste avoidance. Thus, loss of GRK-2 function may lead to changes in gene expression, via OSM-9/OCR-2, to selectively alter the levels of signaling components that transduce or regulate bitter taste responses. Our results suggest a novel mechanism and multiple modality-specific pathways that sensory cells employ in response to aberrant signal transduction. PMID:20176974

  15. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Asthma.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Avery; Vercelli, Donata

    2016-03-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic noncommunicable diseases of childhood, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Because epigenetic mechanisms link gene regulation to environmental cues and developmental trajectories, their contribution to asthma and allergy pathogenesis is under active investigation. DNA methylation signatures associated with concurrent disease and with the development of asthma during childhood asthma have been identified, but their significance is not easily interpretable. On the other hand, the characterization of early epigenetic predictors of asthma points to a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the inception of, and the susceptibility to, this disease. PMID:27027952

  16. Comparative analysis of human mitochondrial methylomes shows distinct patterns of epigenetic regulation in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourav; Sengupta, Shantanu; Scaria, Vinod

    2014-09-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications across the nuclear genome have been extensively analyzed, but the epigenetic modifications associated with the mitochondrial genome have not yet been analyzed at high resolutions. In the present work, we analyzed methyl-cytosine profiles from methylated DNA immunoprecipitation datasets from 39 different human cell and tissue types from the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics project and validated the data using an orthologous bisulfite sequencing dataset. We observe a distinct distribution of zmethyl-cytosine in mitochondrial genomes which are conserved across all cell and tissue types. This study thus describes the first comprehensive map of methyl cytosines across the human mitochondrial genome.

  17. Epigenetic regulation of the transcription factor Foxa2 directs differential elafin expression in melanocytes and melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kyung Sook; Jo, Ji Yoon; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Yangsoon; Bae, Jong Hwan; Chung, Young-Hwa; Koh, Sang Seok

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Elafin expression is epigenetically silenced in human melanoma cells. {yields} Foxa2 expression in melanoma cells is silenced by promoter hypermethylation. {yields} Foxa2 directs activation of the elafin promoter in vivo. {yields} Foxa2 expression induces apoptosis of melanoma cells via elafin re-expression. -- Abstract: Elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, induces the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human melanoma cells, where its expression is transcriptionally silenced. However, it remains unknown how the elafin gene is repressed in melanoma cells. We here demonstrate that elafin expression is modulated via epigenetically regulated expression of the transcription factor Foxa2. Treatment of melanoma cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor induced elafin expression, which was specifically responsible for reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis. Suppression of Foxa2 transcription, mediated by DNA hypermethylation in its promoter region, was released in melanoma cells upon treatment with the demethylating agent. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that the Foxa2 binding site in the elafin promoter was critical for the activation of the promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further showed that Foxa2 bound to the elafin promoter in vivo. Analyses of melanoma cells with varied levels of Foxa2 revealed a correlated expression between Foxa2 and elafin and the ability of Foxa2 to induce apoptosis. Our results collectively suggest that, in melanoma cells, Foxa2 expression is silenced and therefore elafin is maintained unexpressed to facilitate cell proliferation in the disease melanoma.

  18. The Role of Chromosomal Instability and Epigenetics in Colorectal Cancers Lacking β-Catenin/TCF Regulated Transcription.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Lotsari-Salomaa, Johanna E; Kaur, Sippy; Niskakoski, Anni; Knuutila, Sakari; Järvinen, Heikki; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    All colorectal cancer cell lines except RKO displayed active β-catenin/TCF regulated transcription. This feature of RKO was noted in familial colon cancers; hence our aim was to dissect its carcinogenic mechanism. MFISH and CGH revealed distinct instability of chromosome structure in RKO. Gene expression microarray of RKO versus 7 colon cancer lines (with active Wnt signaling) and 3 normal specimens revealed 611 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the tested gene loci were susceptible to LOH in primary tumors with various β-catenin localizations as a surrogate marker for β-catenin activation. The immunohistochemistry of selected genes (IFI16, RGS4, MCTP1, DGKI, OBCAM/OPCML, and GLIPR1) confirmed that they were differentially expressed in clinical specimens. Since epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to expression changes, selected target genes were evaluated for promoter methylation in patient specimens from sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers. CMTM3, DGKI, and OPCML were frequently hypermethylated in both groups, whereas KLK10, EPCAM, and DLC1 displayed subgroup specificity. The overall fraction of hypermethylated genes was higher in tumors with membranous β-catenin. We identified novel genes in colorectal carcinogenesis that might be useful in personalized tumor profiling. Tumors with inactive Wnt signaling are a heterogeneous group displaying interaction of chromosomal instability, Wnt signaling, and epigenetics. PMID:27047543

  19. Epigenetics and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases. PMID:23209181

  20. Mechanisms of epigenetic memory

    PubMed Central

    D’Urso, Agustina; Brickner, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Although genetics play an essential role in defining an organism’s development, morphology and physiology, epigenetic mechanisms play an essential role in modulating these properties by regulating gene expression. During development, epigenetic mechanisms establish stable gene expression patterns to ensure proper differentiation. Epigenetic mechanisms also allow organisms to adapt to environmental changes and previous experiences can impact the future responsiveness of an organism to a stimulus over long time scales and even over generations. Here we discuss the concept of epigenetic memory, defined as the stable propagation of a change in gene expression or potentially induced by developmental or environmental stimuli. We highlight three distinct paradigms of epigenetic memory that operate on different time scales. PMID:24780085

  1. Complex epigenetic regulation of engrailed-2 (EN-2) homeobox gene in the autism cerebellum.

    PubMed

    James, S J; Shpyleva, Svitlana; Melnyk, Stepan; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Pogribny, I P

    2013-02-19

    The elucidation of epigenetic alterations in the autism brain has potential to provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal gene expression in this disorder. Given strong evidence that engrailed-2 (EN-2) is a developmentally expressed gene relevant to cerebellar abnormalities and autism, the epigenetic evaluation of this candidate gene was undertaken in 26 case and control post-mortem cerebellar samples. Assessments included global DNA methylation, EN-2 promoter methylation, EN-2 gene expression and EN-2 protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to evaluate trimethylation status of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) associated with gene downregulation and histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) associated with gene activation. The results revealed an unusual pattern of global and EN-2 promoter region DNA hypermethylation accompanied by significant increases in EN-2 gene expression and protein levels. Consistent with EN-2 overexpression, histone H3K27 trimethylation mark in the EN-2 promoter was significantly decreased in the autism samples relative to matched controls. Supporting a link between reduced histone H3K27 trimethylation and increased EN-2 gene expression, the mean level of histone H3K4 trimethylation was elevated in the autism cerebellar samples. Together, these results suggest that the normal EN-2 downregulation that signals Purkinje cell maturation during late prenatal and early-postnatal development may not have occurred in some individuals with autism and that the postnatal persistence of EN-2 overexpression may contribute to autism cerebellar abnormalities.

  2. Prenatal maternal stress and wheeze in children: novel insights into epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Saskia; Bieg, Matthias; Gu, Zuguang; Thürmann, Loreen; Bauer, Tobias; Bauer, Mario; Ishaque, Naveed; Röder, Stefan; Gu, Lei; Herberth, Gunda; Lawerenz, Christian; Borte, Michael; Schlesner, Matthias; Plass, Christoph; Diessl, Nicolle; Eszlinger, Markus; Mücke, Oliver; Elvers, Horst-Dietrich; Wissenbach, Dirk K.; von Bergen, Martin; Herrmann, Carl; Weichenhan, Dieter; Wright, Rosalind J.; Lehmann, Irina; Eils, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress during pregnancy increases the risk of childhood wheeze and asthma. However, the transmitting mechanisms remain largely unknown. Since epigenetic alterations have emerged as a link between perturbations in the prenatal environment and an increased disease risk we used whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) to analyze changes in DNA methylation in mothers and their children related to prenatal psychosocial stress and assessed its role in the development of wheeze in the child. We evaluated genomic regions altered in their methylation level due to maternal stress based of WGBS data of 10 mother-child-pairs. These data were complemented by longitudinal targeted methylation and transcriptional analyses in children from our prospective mother-child cohort LINA for whom maternal stress and wheezing information was available (n = 443). High maternal stress was associated with an increased risk for persistent wheezing in the child until the age of 5. Both mothers and children showed genome-wide alterations in DNA-methylation specifically in enhancer elements. Deregulated neuroendocrine and neurotransmitter receptor interactions were observed in stressed mothers and their children. In children but not in mothers, calcium- and Wnt-signaling required for lung maturation in the prenatal period were epigenetically deregulated and could be linked with wheezing later in children’s life. PMID:27349968

  3. RRM3 regulates epigenetic conversions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in conjunction with Chromatin Assembly Factor I.

    PubMed

    Wyse, Brandon; Oshidari, Roxanne; Rowlands, Hollie; Abbasi, Sanna; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2016-07-01

    Chromatin structures are transmitted to daughter cells through a complex system of nucleosome disassembly and re-assembly at the advancing replication forks. However, the role of replication pausing in the transmission and perturbation of chromatin structures has not been addressed. RRM3 encodes a DNA helicase, which facilitates replication at sites covered with non-histone protein complexes (tRNA genes, active gene promoters, telomeres) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this report we show that the deletion of RRM3 reduces the frequency of epigenetic conversions in the subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes. This phenotype is strongly dependent on 2 histone chaperones, CAF-I and ASF1, which are involved in the reassembly of nucleosomes behind replication forks, but not on the histone chaperone HIR1. We also show that the deletion of RRM3 increases the spontaneous mutation rates in conjunction with CAF-I and ASF1, but not HIR1. Finally, we demonstrate that Rrm3p and CAF-I compete for the binding to the DNA replication clamp PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen). We propose that the stalling of DNA replication predisposes to epigenetic conversions and that RRM3 and CAF-I play key roles in this process. PMID:27645054

  4. Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A Epigenetically Regulates Renal Fibrosis in Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huihui; Wu, Xiaoyan; Qin, Hao; Tian, Wenfang; Chen, Junliang; Sun, Lina; Fang, Mingming; Xu, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most common complications associated with diabetes and characterized by renal microvascular injury along with accelerated synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins causing tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Production of type I collagen, the major component of extracellular matrix, is augmented during renal fibrosis after chronic exposure to hyperglycemia. However, the transcriptional modulator responsible for the epigenetic manipulation leading to induction of type I collagen genes is not clearly defined. We show here that tubulointerstitial fibrosis as a result of DN was diminished in myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A) -deficient mice. In cultured renal tubular epithelial cells and the kidneys of mice with DN, MRTF-A was induced by glucose and synergized with glucose to activate collagen transcription. Notably, MRTF-A silencing led to the disappearance of prominent histone modifications indicative of transcriptional activation, including acetylated histone H3K18/K27 and trimethylated histone H3K4. Detailed analysis revealed that MRTF-A recruited p300, a histone acetyltransferase, and WD repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5), a key component of the histone H3K4 methyltransferase complex, to the collagen promoters and engaged these proteins in transcriptional activation. Estradiol suppressed collagen production by dampening the expression and binding activity of MRTF-A and interfering with the interaction between p300 and WDR5 in renal epithelial cells. Therefore, targeting the MRTF-A-associated epigenetic machinery might yield interventional strategies against DN-associated renal fibrosis. PMID:25349198

  5. Epigenetic regulation of G protein coupled receptor signaling and its implications in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Shalini; Sona, Chandan; Kumar, Ajeet; Yadav, Prem N

    2016-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) act as a relay center through which extracellular signals, in the form of neurotransmitters or therapeutics, are converted into an intracellular response, which ultimately shapes the overall response at the tissue and behavioral level. Remarkably in similar ways, epigenetic mechanisms also modulate the expression pattern of a large number of genes in response to the dynamic environment inside and outside of the body, and consequently overall response. Emerging evidences from the pharmacogenomics and preclinical studies clearly suggest that these two distinct mechanisms criss-cross each other in several neurological disorders. At one hand such cross-talks between two distinct mechanisms make disease etiology more challenging to understand, while on the other hand if dealt appropriately, such situations might provide an opportunity to find novel druggable target and strategy for the treatment of complex diseases. In this review article, we have summarized and highlighted the main findings that tie epigenetic mechanisms to GPCR mediated signaling in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including depression, addiction and pain. PMID:27046448

  6. Epigenetic regulation of puberty via Zinc finger protein-mediated transcriptional repression

    PubMed Central

    Lomniczi, Alejandro; Wright, Hollis; Castellano, Juan Manuel; Matagne, Valerie; Toro, Carlos A.; Ramaswamy, Suresh; Plant, Tony M.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2015-01-01

    In primates, puberty is unleashed by increased GnRH release from the hypothalamus following an interval of juvenile quiescence. GWAS implicates Zinc finger (ZNF) genes in timing human puberty. Here we show that hypothalamic expression of several ZNFs decreased in agonadal male monkeys in association with the pubertal reactivation of gonadotropin secretion. Expression of two of these ZNFs, GATAD1 and ZNF573, also decreases in peripubertal female monkeys. However, only GATAD1 abundance increases when gonadotropin secretion is suppressed during late infancy. Targeted delivery of GATAD1 or ZNF573 to the rat hypothalamus delays puberty by impairing the transition of a transcriptional network from an immature repressive epigenetic configuration to one of activation. GATAD1 represses transcription of two key puberty-related genes, KISS1 and TAC3, directly, and reduces the activating histone mark H3K4me2 at each promoter via recruitment of histone demethylase KDM1A. We conclude that GATAD1 epitomizes a subset of ZNFs involved in epigenetic repression of primate puberty. PMID:26671628

  7. Prenatal maternal stress and wheeze in children: novel insights into epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Trump, Saskia; Bieg, Matthias; Gu, Zuguang; Thürmann, Loreen; Bauer, Tobias; Bauer, Mario; Ishaque, Naveed; Röder, Stefan; Gu, Lei; Herberth, Gunda; Lawerenz, Christian; Borte, Michael; Schlesner, Matthias; Plass, Christoph; Diessl, Nicolle; Eszlinger, Markus; Mücke, Oliver; Elvers, Horst-Dietrich; Wissenbach, Dirk K; von Bergen, Martin; Herrmann, Carl; Weichenhan, Dieter; Wright, Rosalind J; Lehmann, Irina; Eils, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress during pregnancy increases the risk of childhood wheeze and asthma. However, the transmitting mechanisms remain largely unknown. Since epigenetic alterations have emerged as a link between perturbations in the prenatal environment and an increased disease risk we used whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) to analyze changes in DNA methylation in mothers and their children related to prenatal psychosocial stress and assessed its role in the development of wheeze in the child. We evaluated genomic regions altered in their methylation level due to maternal stress based of WGBS data of 10 mother-child-pairs. These data were complemented by longitudinal targeted methylation and transcriptional analyses in children from our prospective mother-child cohort LINA for whom maternal stress and wheezing information was available (n = 443). High maternal stress was associated with an increased risk for persistent wheezing in the child until the age of 5. Both mothers and children showed genome-wide alterations in DNA-methylation specifically in enhancer elements. Deregulated neuroendocrine and neurotransmitter receptor interactions were observed in stressed mothers and their children. In children but not in mothers, calcium- and Wnt-signaling required for lung maturation in the prenatal period were epigenetically deregulated and could be linked with wheezing later in children's life.

  8. New insights into somatic embryogenesis: leafy cotyledon1, baby boom1 and WUSCHEL-related homeobox4 are epigenetically regulated in Coffea canephora.

    PubMed

    Nic-Can, Geovanny I; López-Torres, Adolfo; Barredo-Pool, Felipe; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Loyola-Vargas, Víctor M; Rojas-Herrera, Rafael; De-la-Peña, Clelia

    2013-01-01

    Plant cells have the capacity to generate a new plant without egg fertilization by a process known as somatic embryogenesis (SE), in which differentiated somatic cells can form somatic embryos able to generate a functional plant. Although there have been advances in understanding the genetic basis of SE, the epigenetic mechanism that regulates this process is still unknown. Here, we show that the embryogenic development of Coffea canephora proceeds through a crosstalk between DNA methylation and histone modifications during the earliest embryogenic stages of SE. We found that low levels of DNA methylation, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) and H3K27me3 change according to embryo development. Moreover, the expression of LEAFY cotyledon1 (LEC1) and BABY BOOM1 (BBM1) are only observed after SE induction, whereas WUSCHEL-related homeobox4 (WOX4) decreases its expression during embryo maturation. Using a pharmacological approach, it was found that 5-Azacytidine strongly inhibits the embryogenic response by decreasing both DNA methylation and gene expression of LEC1 and BBM1. Therefore, in order to know whether these genes were epigenetically regulated, we used Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. It was found that WOX4 is regulated by the repressive mark H3K9me2, while LEC1 and BBM1 are epigenetically regulated by H3K27me3. We conclude that epigenetic regulation plays an important role during somatic embryogenic development, and a molecular mechanism for SE is proposed.

  9. A study on the buffeting aberrance regulation of TDICCD mapping camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhe; Ma, Zhen; Zhang, Boheng

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the fundamental of the TDICCD mapping camera is introduced, and the influence of the satellite buffeting on the image quality of the TDICCD camera is analyzed. In order to reduce the influence, a regulated resolution is put forward. Compared with the traditional TDICCD mapping camera, a special TDICCD focal plane which several TDICCD devices splited joint end to end is designed. A great deal of information are captured through the focal plane, and a mathematical model is established to analyze the data information. Then the results are feed back to the satellite, and the attitude of the satellite is actively regulated in real time. Finally, make experiments and simulation to validate it. The experiment result indicate that the design is valid.

  10. DEFORMED FLORAL ORGAN1 (DFO1) regulates floral organ identity by epigenetically repressing the expression of OsMADS58 in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming; Wang, Yihua; Wang, Yunlong; Wang, Chunming; Ren, Yulong; Lv, Jia; Peng, Cheng; Wu, Tao; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Shaolu; Liu, Xi; Guo, Xiuping; Jiang, Ling; Terzaghi, William; Wan, Jianmin

    2015-06-01

    Floral organ identity in plants is controlled by floral homeotic A/B/C/D/E-class genes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, several epigenetic repressors that regulate these floral organ identity genes have been characterized. However, the roles of epigenetic factors in rice floral development have not been explored in detail. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of a rice epigenetic repressor, DEFORMED FLORAL ORGAN1 (DFO1) gene, which causes abnormal floral morphology when mutated. We isolated dfo1 by mapping, and confirmed its function by rescue experiments, combined with genetic, cytological and molecular biological analysis. We showed that DFO1 is constitutively expressed and encodes a nuclear-localized protein. Mutation of DFO1 causes the ectopic expression of C-class genes in the dfo1-1 mutant, and overexpression of OsMADS58, a C-class gene, phenocopies the dfo1 mutants. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that DFO1 interacts with the rice polycomb group (PcG) proteins (OsMSI1 and OsiEZ1). Remarkably, trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27, a mark of epigenetic repression, is significantly reduced on OsMADS58 chromatin in the dfo1-1 mutant. Our results suggest that DFO1 functions in maintaining rice floral organ identity by cooperating with PcG proteins to regulate the H3K27me3-mediated epigenetic repression on OsMADS58.

  11. Epigenetics and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Stefanska, Barbara; MacEwan, David J

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of gene regulation have shown there to be much more regulation of the genome than first thought, through epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic mechanisms are systems that have evolved to either switch off gene activity altogether, or fine-tune any existing genetic activation. Such systems are present in all genes and include chromatin modifications and remodelling, DNA methylation (such as CpG island methylation rates) and histone covalent modifications (e.g. acetylation, methylation), RNA interference by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). These systems regulate genomic activity 'beyond' simple transcriptional factor inducer or repressor function of genes to generate mRNA. Epigenetic regulation of gene activity has been shown to be important in maintaining normal phenotypic activity of cells, as well as having a role in development and diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's. Newer classes of drugs regulate epigenetic mechanisms to counteract disease states in humans. The reports in this issue describe some advances in epigenetic understanding that relate to human disease, and our ability to control these mechanisms by pharmacological means. Increasingly the importance of epigenetics is being uncovered - it is pharmacology that will have to keep pace.

  12. Epigenetics and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Stefanska, Barbara; MacEwan, David J

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of gene regulation have shown there to be much more regulation of the genome than first thought, through epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic mechanisms are systems that have evolved to either switch off gene activity altogether, or fine-tune any existing genetic activation. Such systems are present in all genes and include chromatin modifications and remodelling, DNA methylation (such as CpG island methylation rates) and histone covalent modifications (e.g. acetylation, methylation), RNA interference by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). These systems regulate genomic activity ‘beyond’ simple transcriptional factor inducer or repressor function of genes to generate mRNA. Epigenetic regulation of gene activity has been shown to be important in maintaining normal phenotypic activity of cells, as well as having a role in development and diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's. Newer classes of drugs regulate epigenetic mechanisms to counteract disease states in humans. The reports in this issue describe some advances in epigenetic understanding that relate to human disease, and our ability to control these mechanisms by pharmacological means. Increasingly the importance of epigenetics is being uncovered – it is pharmacology that will have to keep pace. PMID:25966315

  13. Carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption: an epigenetic viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Salavaty, Abbas

    2015-08-08

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modifications and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modifications, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I first discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modifications that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic viewpoint. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  14. The complexity of epigenetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Brazel, Ailbhe Jane; Vernimmen, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, a plethora of pathogenic mutations affecting enhancer regions and epigenetic regulators have been identified. Coupled with more recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) implicating major roles for regulatory mutations in disease, it is clear that epigenetic mechanisms represent important biomarkers for disease development and perhaps even therapeutic targets. Here, we discuss the diversity of disease-causing mutations in enhancers and epigenetic regulators, with a particular focus on cancer.

  15. Cortisol-treated zebrafish embryos develop into pro-inflammatory adults with aberrant immune gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hartig, Ellen I.; Zhu, Shusen; King, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic early-life stress increases adult susceptibility to numerous health problems linked to chronic inflammation. One way that this may occur is via glucocorticoid-induced developmental programming. To gain insight into such programming we treated zebrafish embryos with cortisol and examined the effects on both larvae and adults. Treated larvae had elevated whole-body cortisol and glucocorticoid signaling, and upregulated genes associated with defense response and immune system processes. In adulthood the treated fish maintained elevated basal cortisol levels in the absence of exogenous cortisol, and constitutively mis-expressed genes involved in defense response and its regulation. Adults derived from cortisol-treated embryos displayed defective tailfin regeneration, heightened basal expression of pro-inflammatory genes, and failure to appropriately regulate those genes following injury or immunological challenge. These results support the hypothesis that chronically elevated glucocorticoid signaling early in life directs development of a pro-inflammatory adult phenotype, at the expense of immunoregulation and somatic regenerative capacity. PMID:27444789

  16. The molecular basis of the memory T cell response: differential gene expression and its epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Nan-ping; Araki, Yasuto; Subedi, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    How the immune system remembers a previous encounter with a pathogen and responds more efficiently to a subsequent encounter has been one of the central enigmas for immunologists for over a century. The identification of pathogen-specific memory lymphocytes that arise after an infection provided a cellular basis for immunological memory. But the molecular mechanisms of immunological memory remain only partially understood. The emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes have a key role in controlling the distinct transcriptional profiles of memory lymphocytes and thus in shaping their function. In this Review, we summarize the recent progress that has been made in assessing the differential gene expression and chromatin modifications in memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and we present our current understanding of the molecular basis of memory T cell function. PMID:22421787

  17. PTPN6 expression is epigenetically regulated and influences survival and response to chemotherapy in high-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Sooman, Linda; Ekman, Simon; Tsakonas, Georgios; Jaiswal, Archita; Navani, Sanjay; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Bergström, Stefan; Johansson, Mikael; Wu, Xuping; Blomquist, Erik; Bergqvist, Michael; Gullbo, Joachim; Lennartsson, Johan

    2014-05-01

    The prognosis of high-grade glioma patients is poor, and the tumors are characterized by resistance to therapy. The aims of this study were to analyze the prognostic value of the expression of the protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6, also referred to as SHP1) in high-grade glioma patients, the epigenetic regulation of the expression of PTPN6, and the role of its expression in chemotherapy resistance in glioma-derived cells. PTPN6 expression was analyzed with immunohistochemistry in 89 high-grade glioma patients. Correlation between PTPN6 expression and overall survival was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier univariate analysis and Cox regression multivariate analysis. Differences in drug sensitivity to a panel of 16 chemotherapeutic drugs between PTPN6-overexpressing clones and control clones were analyzed in vitro with the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay. Cell cycle analysis was done with Krishan staining and flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analyzed with a cell death detection ELISA kit as well as cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 Western blotting. Autophagy was analyzed with LC3B Western blotting. Methylation of the PTPN6 promoter was analyzed with bisulfite pyrosequencing, and demethylation of PTPN6 was done with decitabine treatment. The PTPN6 expression correlated in univariate analysis to poor survival for anaplastic glioma patients (p = 0.026). In glioma-derived cell lines, overexpression of PTPN6 caused increase resistance (p < 0.05) to the chemotherapeutic drugs bortezomib, cisplatin, and melphalan. PTPN6 expression did not affect bortezomib-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or autophagy. Low PTPN6 promoter methylation correlated to protein expression, and the protein expression was increased upon demethylation in glioma-derived cells. PTPN6 expression may be a factor contributing to poor survival for anaplastic glioma patients, and in glioma-derived cells, its expression is epigenetically regulated and influences the

  18. Tissue specific up regulation of ACE2 in rabbit model of atherosclerosis by atorvastatin: role of epigenetic histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Patel, Gaurang; Kumar, Sandeep; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Sanghavi, Maitri; Malek, Vajir; Srinivasan, K

    2015-02-01

    Growing body of evidence points out the crucial role of ACE2 in preventing atherosclerosis. However, data on how atherosclerosis affects ACE2 expression in heart and kidney remains unknown. Atherosclerosis was induced by feeding New Zealand White rabbits with high cholesterol diet (HCD - 2%) for 12 weeks and atorvastatin was administered (5mg/kg/day p.o) in last 3 weeks. ACE2 mRNA and protein expression was assessed by Western blotting and real time PCR. HCD fed rabbits developed atherosclerosis as confirmed by increase in plasma total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides as well as formation atherosclerotic plaques in arch of aorta. The ACE2 protein but not mRNA expression was reduced in heart and kidney of HCD rabbits. Interestingly, atorvastatin increased the ACE2 protein expression in heart and kidney of HCD rabbits. However, atorvastatin increased ACE2 mRNA in heart but not in kidney of HCD rabbits. Atorvastatin increased the occupancy of histone H3 acetylation (H3-Ac) mark on ACE2 promoter region in heart of HCD rabbits indicating direct or indirect epigenetic up-regulation of ACE2 by atorvastatin. Further, atorvastatin suppressed Ang II-induced contractile responses and enhanced AT2 receptor mediated relaxant responses in atherosclerotic aorta. We propose that atherosclerosis is associated with reduced ACE2 expression in heart and kidney. We also show an unexplored potential of atorvastatin to up-regulate ACE2 via epigenetic histone modifications. Our data suggest a novel way of replenishing ACE2 expression for preventing not only atherosclerosis but also other cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25482567

  19. Epigenetic changes in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, Rami; Karnib, Nabil; Assaad, Rawad Abi; Bilen, Yara; Emmanuel, Nancy; Ghanem, Anthony; Younes, Joe; Zibara, Victor; Stephan, Joseph S; Sleiman, Sama F

    2016-06-20

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing worldwide. Diabetes is quickly becoming one of the leading causes of death. Diabetes is a genetic disease; however, the environment plays critical roles in its development and progression. Epigenetic changes often translate environmental stimuli to changes in gene expression. Changes in epigenetic marks and differential regulation of epigenetic modulators have been observed in different models of diabetes and its associated complications. In this minireview, we will focus DNA methylation, Histone acetylation and methylation and their roles in the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:27130819

  20. Genetic association analyses implicate aberrant regulation of innate and adaptive immunity genes in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Deborah S Cunninghame; Pinder, Christopher L; Tombleson, Philip; Behrens, Timothy W; Martín, Javier; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Chen, Lingyan; Replogle, Joseph; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rönnblom, Lars; Graham, Robert R; Wither, Joan E; Rioux, John D; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Vyse, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; OMIM 152700) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease characterized by loss of immune tolerance to nuclear and cell surface antigens. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) had modest sample sizes, reducing their scope and reliability. Our study comprised 7,219 cases and 15,991 controls of European ancestry: a new GWAS, meta-analysis with a published GWAS and a replication study. We have mapped 43 susceptibility loci, including 10 novel associations. Assisted by dense genome coverage, imputation provided evidence for missense variants underpinning associations in eight genes. Other likely causal genes were established by examining associated alleles for cis-acting eQTL effects in a range of ex vivo immune cells. We found an over-representation (n=16) of transcription factors among SLE susceptibility genes. This supports the view that aberrantly regulated gene expression networks in multiple cell types in both the innate and adaptive immune response contribute to the risk of developing SLE. PMID:26502338

  1. Genetic association analyses implicate aberrant regulation of innate and adaptive immunity genes in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bentham, James; Morris, David L; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S; Pinder, Christopher L; Tombleson, Philip; Behrens, Timothy W; Martín, Javier; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Chen, Lingyan; Replogle, Joseph; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rönnblom, Lars; Graham, Robert R; Wither, Joan E; Rioux, John D; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Vyse, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease characterized by loss of immune tolerance to nuclear and cell surface antigens. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) had modest sample sizes, reducing their scope and reliability. Our study comprised 7,219 cases and 15,991 controls of European ancestry, constituting a new GWAS, a meta-analysis with a published GWAS and a replication study. We have mapped 43 susceptibility loci, including ten new associations. Assisted by dense genome coverage, imputation provided evidence for missense variants underpinning associations in eight genes. Other likely causal genes were established by examining associated alleles for cis-acting eQTL effects in a range of ex vivo immune cells. We found an over-representation (n = 16) of transcription factors among SLE susceptibility genes. This finding supports the view that aberrantly regulated gene expression networks in multiple cell types in both the innate and adaptive immune response contribute to the risk of developing SLE. PMID:26502338

  2. The epigenetic conductor: a genomic orchestrator in chronic kidney disease complications?

    PubMed

    Ekström, Tomas J; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetics defines the cellularly heritable properties of genome function, which are not directly encoded in the DNA primary sequence. The underlying mechanisms orchestrate cell identity and memory and are targets for external and internal environmental influences. It becomes increasingly clear that genetic and epigenetic factors are completely interdependent for homeostasis. Subsequently, the same is certainly true for disease. Our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is still lagging, and further studies are needed to understand the importance of, e.g., aberrant DNA methylation in relation to the uremic impact on the functional genome, organismal metabolism and associated premature vascular disease. More research in this field will also help us understand the links between altered gene regulation of specific genes by the uremic environment via epigenetic mechanisms, and initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. The dynamic nature of epigenetic mechanisms prompts therapeutic investigations in CKD, targeting the epigenome with epigenetic drugs. The importance of 1-carbon metabolism for epigenetic modifications suggests that specific diets may also prove to play an important part as efficient remedies in CKD and associated atherosclerotic pathologies.

  3. Aberrant Subcellular Neuronal Calcium Regulation in Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    In this mini-review/opinion article we describe evidence that multiple cellular and molecular alterations in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis involve perturbed cellular calcium regulation, and that alterations in synaptic calcium handling may be early and pivotal events in the disease process. With advancing age neurons encounter increased oxidative stress and impaired energy metabolism, which compromise the function of proteins that control membrane excitability and subcellular calcium dynamics. Altered proteolytic cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in response to the aging process in combination with genetic and environmental factors results in the production and accumulation of neurotoxic forms of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ ). Aβ undergoes a self-aggregation process and concomitantly generates reactive oxygen species that can trigger membrane-associated oxidative stress which, in turn, impairs the functions of ion-motive ATPases and glutamate and glucose transporters thereby rendering neurons vulnerable to excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Mutations in presenilin-1 that cause early-onset AD increase Aβ production, but also result in an abnormal increase in the size of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Some of the events in the neurodegenerative cascade can be counteracted in animal models by manipulations that stabilize neuronal calcium homeostasis including dietary energy restriction, agonists of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors and drugs that activate mitochondrial potassium channels. Emerging knowledge of the actions of calcium upstream and downstream of Aβ provides opportunities to develop novel preventative and therapeutic interventions for AD. PMID:20950656

  4. Transcription factor networks in embryonic stem cells and testicular cancer and the definition of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Wolfgang A; Hoffmann, Michèle J

    2007-01-01

    The stem cell phenotype of human and murine ES cells has recently been shown to be maintained by a self-stabilizing network of transcription factors, NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2. These factors maintain their own and each other's transcription, activating, by combinatorial interactions, genes responsible for the ES cell phenotype while repressing genes required for differentiation. This 'core circuitry' interacts with an 'expanded circuitry' encompassing signal transduction and chromatin regulator proteins. During ES cell differentiation the crucial transcription factors are down-regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation. Aberrant activation of the ES transcription factor network elicited by increased dosage of an embryonic gene cluster at 12p including NANOG, together with additional genetic and epigenetic alterations, appears to be a crucial event in the genesis of testicular germ cell cancers. Intriguingly, the ES cell transcription factor network fits current as well as past definitions of 'epigenetic'.

  5. Auxin and epigenetic regulation of SKP2B, an F-box that represses lateral root formation.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Concepción; Ramirez-Parra, Elena; Casimiro, Ilda; Otero, Sofía; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; De Rybel, Bert; Beeckman, Tom; Casero, Pedro; Gutierrez, Crisanto; C Del Pozo, Juan

    2012-10-01

    In plants, lateral roots originate from pericycle founder cells that are specified at regular intervals along the main root. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SKP2B (for S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein2B), an F-box protein, negatively regulates cell cycle and lateral root formation as it represses meristematic and founder cell divisions. According to its function, SKP2B is expressed in founder cells, lateral root primordia and the root apical meristem. We identified a novel motif in the SKP2B promoter that is required for its specific root expression and auxin-dependent induction in the pericycle cells. Next to a transcriptional control by auxin, SKP2B expression is regulated by histone H3.1/H3.3 deposition in a CAF-dependent manner. The SKP2B promoter and the 5' end of the transcribed region are enriched in H3.3, which is associated with active chromatin states, over H3.1. Furthermore, the SKP2B promoter is also regulated by H3 acetylation in an auxin- and IAA14-dependent manner, reinforcing the idea that epigenetics represents an important regulatory mechanism during lateral root formation.

  6. Epigenetic regulation of Kcna3-encoding Kv1.3 potassium channel by cereblon contributes to regulation of CD4+ T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ah; Park, Sang-Heon; Jeong, Sang Phil; Han, Min-Hee; Lee, Cho-Rong; Lee, Kwang Min; Kim, Namhee; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Choi, Murim; Ye, Michael; Jung, Guhung; Lee, Won-Woo; Eom, Soo Hyun; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo

    2016-01-01

    The role of cereblon (CRBN) in T cells is not well understood. We generated mice with a deletion in Crbn and found cereblon to be an important antagonist of T-cell activation. In mice lacking CRBN, CD4+ T cells show increased activation and IL-2 production on T-cell receptor stimulation, ultimately resulting in increased potassium flux and calcium-mediated signaling. CRBN restricts T-cell activation via epigenetic modification of Kcna3, which encodes the Kv1.3 potassium channel required for robust calcium influx in T cells. CRBN binds directly to conserved DNA elements adjacent to Kcna3 via a previously uncharacterized DNA-binding motif. Consequently, in the absence of CRBN, the expression of Kv1.3 is derepressed, resulting in increased Kv1.3 expression, potassium flux, and CD4+ T-cell hyperactivation. In addition, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in T-cell–specific Crbn-deficient mice was exacerbated by increased T-cell activation via Kv1.3. Thus, CRBN limits CD4+ T-cell activation via epigenetic regulation of Kv1.3 expression. PMID:27439875

  7. Epigenetic regulation of Kcna3-encoding Kv1.3 potassium channel by cereblon contributes to regulation of CD4+ T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Ah; Park, Sang-Heon; Jeong, Sang Phil; Han, Min-Hee; Lee, Cho-Rong; Lee, Kwang Min; Kim, Namhee; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Choi, Murim; Ye, Michael; Jung, Guhung; Lee, Won-Woo; Eom, Soo Hyun; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo

    2016-08-01

    The role of cereblon (CRBN) in T cells is not well understood. We generated mice with a deletion in Crbn and found cereblon to be an important antagonist of T-cell activation. In mice lacking CRBN, CD4(+) T cells show increased activation and IL-2 production on T-cell receptor stimulation, ultimately resulting in increased potassium flux and calcium-mediated signaling. CRBN restricts T-cell activation via epigenetic modification of Kcna3, which encodes the Kv1.3 potassium channel required for robust calcium influx in T cells. CRBN binds directly to conserved DNA elements adjacent to Kcna3 via a previously uncharacterized DNA-binding motif. Consequently, in the absence of CRBN, the expression of Kv1.3 is derepressed, resulting in increased Kv1.3 expression, potassium flux, and CD4(+) T-cell hyperactivation. In addition, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in T-cell-specific Crbn-deficient mice was exacerbated by increased T-cell activation via Kv1.3. Thus, CRBN limits CD4(+) T-cell activation via epigenetic regulation of Kv1.3 expression. PMID:27439875

  8. Area-specific development of distinct projection neuron subclasses is regulated by postnatal epigenetic modifications.

    PubMed

    Harb, Kawssar; Magrinelli, Elia; Nicolas, Céline S; Lukianets, Nikita; Frangeul, Laura; Pietri, Mariel; Sun, Tao; Sandoz, Guillaume; Grammont, Franck; Jabaudon, Denis; Studer, Michele; Alfano, Christian

    2016-01-27

    During cortical development, the identity of major classes of long-distance projection neurons is established by the expression of molecular determinants, which become gradually restricted and mutually exclusive. However, the mechanisms by which projection neurons acquire their final properties during postnatal stages are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the number of neurons co-expressing Ctip2 and Satb2, respectively involved in the early specification of subcerebral and callosal projection neurons, progressively increases after birth in the somatosensory cortex. Ctip2/Satb2 postnatal co-localization defines two distinct neuronal subclasses projecting either to the contralateral cortex or to the brainstem suggesting that Ctip2/Satb2 co-expression may refine their properties rather than determine their identity. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that the transcriptional adaptor Lmo4 drives this maturation program through modulation of epigenetic mechanisms in a time- and area-specific manner, thereby indicating that a previously unknown genetic program postnatally promotes the acquisition of final subtype-specific features.

  9. MicroRNA 665 Regulates Dentinogenesis through MicroRNA-Mediated Silencing and Epigenetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Heair, Hannah M.; Kemper, Austin G.; Roy, Bhaskar; Lopes, Helena B.; Rashid, Harunur; Clarke, John C.; Afreen, Lubana K.; Ferraz, Emanuela P.; Kim, Eddy; Javed, Amjad; Beloti, Marcio M.; MacDougall, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Studies of proteins involved in microRNA (miRNA) processing, maturation, and silencing have indicated the importance of miRNAs in skeletogenesis, but the specific miRNAs involved in this process are incompletely defined. Here, we identified miRNA 665 (miR-665) as a potential repressor of odontoblast maturation. Studies with cultured cell lines and primary embryonic cells showed that miR-665 represses the expression of early and late odontoblast marker genes and stage-specific proteases involved in dentin maturation. Notably, miR-665 directly targeted Dlx3 mRNA and decreased Dlx3 expression. Furthermore, RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) immunoprecipitation and biotin-labeled miR-665 pulldown studies identified Kat6a as another potential target of miR-665. KAT6A interacted physically and functionally with RUNX2, activating tissue-specific promoter activity and prompting odontoblast differentiation. Overexpression of miR-665 reduced the recruitment of KAT6A to Dspp and Dmp1 promoters and prevented KAT6A-induced chromatin remodeling, repressing gene transcription. Taken together, our results provide novel molecular evidence that miR-665 functions in an miRNA-epigenetic regulatory network to control dentinogenesis. PMID:26124283

  10. Epigenetic self-regulation of developmental excision of an internal eliminated sequence on Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Duharcourt, S; Butler, A; Meyer, E

    1995-08-15

    Differentiation of the somatic macronucleus of ciliates after sexual events involves the programmed excision of thousands of single-copy internal eliminated sequences (IESs) from the germ-line genome. We have studied two cell lines of Paramecium tetraurelia that have identical germ-line genomes but differ in their macronuclear genomes. In the IES- cell line, a 222-bp IES interrupting a coding sequence is reproducibly excised during macronuclear differentiation, whereas it is not in the IES+ cell line. In a cross between the two lines, the developmental alternative in maternally inherited, suggesting that it is epigenetically controlled by the old (prezygotic) macronucleus in each cell. Transformation of the macronucleus of both lines with plasmids carrying fragments of either version of the gene shows that the presence of the IES sequence in the old macronucleus results in retention of the IES in the new macronuclear genome of sexual progeny. This could be attributable to (1) inhibition of excision, or (2) repair of a double-strand gap left in the genomic sequence after constitutive excision of the IES, by a polymerization mechanism using a homologous IES+ template from the old macronucleus. The latter possibility is ruled out by experiments showing that modified IESs can inhibit excision without being copied in the new macronuclear genome. Possible mechanisms are discussed in the light of a quantitative analysis of excision inhibition by the maternal IES sequence. PMID:7649484

  11. Glucagon regulates gluconeogenesis through KAT2B- and WDR5-mediated epigenetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Hogan, Meghan F.; Lackey, Denise; Tora, Laszlo; Dent, Sharon Y.R.; Olefsky, Jerrold; Montminy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Circulating pancreatic glucagon is increased during fasting and maintains glucose balance by stimulating hepatic gluconeogenesis. Glucagon triggering of the cAMP pathway upregulates the gluconeogenic program through the phosphorylation of cAMP response element–binding protein (CREB) and the dephosphorylation of the CREB coactivator CRTC2. Hormonal and nutrient signals are also thought to modulate gluconeogenic gene expression by promoting epigenetic changes that facilitate assembly of the transcriptional machinery. However, the nature of these modifications is unclear. Using mouse models and in vitro assays, we show that histone H3 acetylation at Lys 9 (H3K9Ac) was elevated over gluconeogenic genes and contributed to increased hepatic glucose production during fasting and in diabetes. Dephosphorylation of CRTC2 promoted increased H3K9Ac through recruitment of the lysine acetyltransferase 2B (KAT2B) and WD repeat–containing protein 5 (WDR5), a core subunit of histone methyltransferase (HMT) complexes. KAT2B and WDR5 stimulated the gluconeogenic program through a self-reinforcing cycle, whereby increases in H3K9Ac further potentiated CRTC2 occupancy at CREB binding sites. Depletion of KAT2B or WDR5 decreased gluconeogenic gene expression, consequently breaking the cycle. Administration of a small-molecule KAT2B antagonist lowered circulating blood glucose concentrations in insulin resistance, suggesting that this enzyme may be a useful target for diabetes treatment. PMID:24051374

  12. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Jenna; Ekwall, Karl

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  13. Area-specific development of distinct projection neuron subclasses is regulated by postnatal epigenetic modifications

    PubMed Central

    Harb, Kawssar; Magrinelli, Elia; Nicolas, Céline S; Lukianets, Nikita; Frangeul, Laura; Pietri, Mariel; Sun, Tao; Sandoz, Guillaume; Grammont, Franck; Jabaudon, Denis; Studer, Michèle; Alfano, Christian

    2016-01-01

    During cortical development, the identity of major classes of long-distance projection neurons is established by the expression of molecular determinants, which become gradually restricted and mutually exclusive. However, the mechanisms by which projection neurons acquire their final properties during postnatal stages are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the number of neurons co-expressing Ctip2 and Satb2, respectively involved in the early specification of subcerebral and callosal projection neurons, progressively increases after birth in the somatosensory cortex. Ctip2/Satb2 postnatal co-localization defines two distinct neuronal subclasses projecting either to the contralateral cortex or to the brainstem suggesting that Ctip2/Satb2 co-expression may refine their properties rather than determine their identity. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that the transcriptional adaptor Lmo4 drives this maturation program through modulation of epigenetic mechanisms in a time- and area-specific manner, thereby indicating that a previously unknown genetic program postnatally promotes the acquisition of final subtype-specific features. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09531.001 PMID:26814051

  14. In Ovo Injection of Betaine Affects Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolism through Epigenetic Gene Regulation in Newly Hatched Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yun; Sun, Qinwei; Li, Xiaoliang; Wang, Min; Cai, Demin; Li, Xi; Zhao, Ruqian

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is reported to regulate hepatic cholesterol metabolism in mammals. Chicken eggs contain considerable amount of betaine, yet it remains unknown whether and how betaine in the egg affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks. In this study, eggs were injected with betaine at 2.5 mg/egg and the hepatic cholesterol metabolism was investigated in newly hatched chicks. Betaine did not affect body weight or liver weight, but significantly increased the serum concentration (P < 0.05) and the hepatic content (P < 0.01) of cholesterol. Accordingly, the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMGCR was up-regulated (P < 0.05 for both mRNA and protein), while CYP7A1 which converts cholesterol to bile acids was down-regulated (P < 0.05 for mRNA and P = 0.07 for protein). Moreover, hepatic protein content of the sterol-regulatory element binding protein 1 which regulates cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis, and the mRNA abundance of ATP binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) which mediates cholesterol counter transport were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in betaine-treated chicks. Meanwhile, hepatic protein contents of DNA methyltransferases 1 and adenosylhomocysteinase-like 1 were increased (P < 0.05), which was associated with global genomic DNA hypermethylation (P < 0.05) and diminished gene repression mark histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, CpG methylation level on gene promoters was found to be increased (P < 0.05) for CYP7A1 yet decreased (P < 0.05) for ABCA1. These results indicate that in ovo betaine injection regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks through epigenetic mechanisms including DNA and histone methylations. PMID:25860502

  15. P1 Epigenetic Regulation in Leaves of High Altitude Maize Landraces: Effect of UV-B Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rius, Sebastián P.; Emiliani, Julia; Casati, Paula

    2016-01-01

    P1 is a R2R3-MYB transcription factor that regulates the accumulation of a specific group of flavonoids in maize floral tissues, such as flavones and phlobaphenes. P1 is also highly expressed in leaves of maize landraces adapted to high altitudes and higher levels of UV-B radiation. In this work, we analyzed the epigenetic regulation of the P1 gene by UV-B in leaves of different maize landraces. Our results demonstrate that DNA methylation in the P1 proximal promoter, intron1 and intron2 is decreased by UV-B in all lines analyzed; however, the basal DNA methylation levels are lower in the landraces than in B73, a low altitude inbred line. DNA demethylation by UV-B is accompanied by a decrease in H3 methylation at Lys 9 and 27, and by an increase in H3 acetylation. smRNAs complementary to specific regions of the proximal promoter and of intron 2 3′ end are also decreased by UV-B; interestingly, P1 smRNA levels are lower in the landraces than in B73 both under control conditions and after UV-B exposure, suggesting that smRNAs regulate P1 expression by UV-B in maize leaves. Finally, we investigated if different P1 targets in flower tissues are also regulated by this transcription factor in response to UV-B. Some targets analyzed show an induction in maize landraces in response to UV-B, with higher basal expression levels in the landraces than in B73; however, not all the transcripts analyzed were found to be regulated by UV-B in leaves. PMID:27148340

  16. In Ovo injection of betaine affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism through epigenetic gene regulation in newly hatched chicks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Sun, Qinwei; Li, Xiaoliang; Wang, Min; Cai, Demin; Li, Xi; Zhao, Ruqian

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is reported to regulate hepatic cholesterol metabolism in mammals. Chicken eggs contain considerable amount of betaine, yet it remains unknown whether and how betaine in the egg affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks. In this study, eggs were injected with betaine at 2.5 mg/egg and the hepatic cholesterol metabolism was investigated in newly hatched chicks. Betaine did not affect body weight or liver weight, but significantly increased the serum concentration (P < 0.05) and the hepatic content (P < 0.01) of cholesterol. Accordingly, the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMGCR was up-regulated (P < 0.05 for both mRNA and protein), while CYP7A1 which converts cholesterol to bile acids was down-regulated (P < 0.05 for mRNA and P = 0.07 for protein). Moreover, hepatic protein content of the sterol-regulatory element binding protein 1 which regulates cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis, and the mRNA abundance of ATP binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) which mediates cholesterol counter transport were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in betaine-treated chicks. Meanwhile, hepatic protein contents of DNA methyltransferases 1 and adenosylhomocysteinase-like 1 were increased (P < 0.05), which was associated with global genomic DNA hypermethylation (P < 0.05) and diminished gene repression mark histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, CpG methylation level on gene promoters was found to be increased (P < 0.05) for CYP7A1 yet decreased (P < 0.05) for ABCA1. These results indicate that in ovo betaine injection regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks through epigenetic mechanisms including DNA and histone methylations.

  17. Epigenetics, Development, and Cancer: Zebrafish Make Their Mark

    PubMed Central

    Mudbhary, Raksha; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish embryos are an exceptional system for studying vertebrate development. Historically, studies using zebrafish to uncover key players in developmentally regulated gene expression have entailed detailed analysis of transcription factors. It is now apparent that epigenetic modifications of both DNA and histone tails are equally important in the regulation of gene expression during development. As such, blocking the function of key epigenetic modifiers impairs development, albeit with surprising tissue specificity. For instance, DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark that is depleted in embryos lacking dnmt1 and uhrf1. These embryos display developmental defects in the eye, liver, pancreas, and larval lethality. Interestingly, human tumors derived from these same organs have aberrant changes in DNA methylation and altered expression of genes that are thought to contribute to formation of these cancers. These observations have provided a mechanistic basis for treating cancer with drugs that block the enzymes that facilitate DNA and histone modifications. Thus, it is important to understand the consequences of targeting these factors in a whole animal. We review the use of zebrafish for probing the genetic, cellular, and physiological response to alterations in the epigenome and highlight exciting data illustrating that epigenetic studies using zebrafish can inform and impact cancer biology. PMID:21671358

  18. The Interaction between the Immune System and Epigenetics in the Etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Stefano; Elliott, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have firmly established that the etiology of autism includes both genetic and environmental components. However, we are only just beginning to elucidate the environmental factors that might be involved in the development of autism, as well as the molecular mechanisms through which they function. Mounting epidemiological and biological evidence suggest that prenatal factors that induce a more activated immune state in the mother are involved in the development of autism. In parallel, molecular studies have highlighted the role of epigenetics in brain development as a process susceptible to environmental influences and potentially causative of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this review, we will discuss converging evidence for a multidirectional interaction between immune system activation in the mother during pregnancy and epigenetic regulation in the brain of the fetus that may cooperate to produce an autistic phenotype. This interaction includes immune factor-induced changes in epigenetic signatures in the brain, dysregulation of epigenetic modifications specifically in genomic regions that encode immune functions, and aberrant epigenetic regulation of microglia. Overall, the interaction between immune system activation in the mother and the subsequent epigenetic dysregulation in the developing fetal brain may be a main consideration for the environmental factors that cause autism.

  19. The Interaction between the Immune System and Epigenetics in the Etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Stefano; Elliott, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have firmly established that the etiology of autism includes both genetic and environmental components. However, we are only just beginning to elucidate the environmental factors that might be involved in the development of autism, as well as the molecular mechanisms through which they function. Mounting epidemiological and biological evidence suggest that prenatal factors that induce a more activated immune state in the mother are involved in the development of autism. In parallel, molecular studies have highlighted the role of epigenetics in brain development as a process susceptible to environmental influences and potentially causative of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this review, we will discuss converging evidence for a multidirectional interaction between immune system activation in the mother during pregnancy and epigenetic regulation in the brain of the fetus that may cooperate to produce an autistic phenotype. This interaction includes immune factor-induced changes in epigenetic signatures in the brain, dysregulation of epigenetic modifications specifically in genomic regions that encode immune functions, and aberrant epigenetic regulation of microglia. Overall, the interaction between immune system activation in the mother and the subsequent epigenetic dysregulation in the developing fetal brain may be a main consideration for the environmental factors that cause autism. PMID:27462204

  20. The Interaction between the Immune System and Epigenetics in the Etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Stefano; Elliott, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have firmly established that the etiology of autism includes both genetic and environmental components. However, we are only just beginning to elucidate the environmental factors that might be involved in the development of autism, as well as the molecular mechanisms through which they function. Mounting epidemiological and biological evidence suggest that prenatal factors that induce a more activated immune state in the mother are involved in the development of autism. In parallel, molecular studies have highlighted the role of epigenetics in brain development as a process susceptible to environmental influences and potentially causative of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this review, we will discuss converging evidence for a multidirectional interaction between immune system activation in the mother during pregnancy and epigenetic regulation in the brain of the fetus that may cooperate to produce an autistic phenotype. This interaction includes immune factor-induced changes in epigenetic signatures in the brain, dysregulation of epigenetic modifications specifically in genomic regions that encode immune functions, and aberrant epigenetic regulation of microglia. Overall, the interaction between immune system activation in the mother and the subsequent epigenetic dysregulation in the developing fetal brain may be a main consideration for the environmental factors that cause autism. PMID:27462204

  1. Epigenetic: A missing paradigm in cellular and molecular pathways of sulfur mustard lung: a prospective and comparative study.

    PubMed

    Imani, Saber; Panahi, Yunes; Salimian, Jafar; Fu, Junjiang; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-08-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis- (2-chloroethyl) sulphide) is a chemical warfare agent that causes DNA alkylation, protein modification and membrane damage. SM can trigger several molecular pathways involved in inflammation and oxidative stress, which cause cell necrosis and apoptosis, and loss of cells integrity and function. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a growing research topic and is addressed by DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and noncoding RNAs expression. It seems SM can induce the epigenetic modifications that are translated into change in gene expression. Classification of epigenetic modifications long after exposure to SM would clarify its mechanism and paves a better strategy for the treatment of SM-affected patients. In this study, we review the key aberrant epigenetic modifications that have important roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compared with mustard lung.

  2. Epigenetic: A missing paradigm in cellular and molecular pathways of sulfur mustard lung: a prospective and comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Saber; Panahi, Yunes; Salimian, Jafar; Fu, Junjiang; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis- (2-chloroethyl) sulphide) is a chemical warfare agent that causes DNA alkylation, protein modification and membrane damage. SM can trigger several molecular pathways involved in inflammation and oxidative stress, which cause cell necrosis and apoptosis, and loss of cells integrity and function. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a growing research topic and is addressed by DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and noncoding RNAs expression. It seems SM can induce the epigenetic modifications that are translated into change in gene expression. Classification of epigenetic modifications long after exposure to SM would clarify its mechanism and paves a better strategy for the treatment of SM-affected patients. In this study, we review the key aberrant epigenetic modifications that have important roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compared with mustard lung. PMID:26557960

  3. Epigenetic: A missing paradigm in cellular and molecular pathways of sulfur mustard lung: a prospective and comparative study.

    PubMed

    Imani, Saber; Panahi, Yunes; Salimian, Jafar; Fu, Junjiang; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-08-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis- (2-chloroethyl) sulphide) is a chemical warfare agent that causes DNA alkylation, protein modification and membrane damage. SM can trigger several molecular pathways involved in inflammation and oxidative stress, which cause cell necrosis and apoptosis, and loss of cells integrity and function. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a growing research topic and is addressed by DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and noncoding RNAs expression. It seems SM can induce the epigenetic modifications that are translated into change in gene expression. Classification of epigenetic modifications long after exposure to SM would clarify its mechanism and paves a better strategy for the treatment of SM-affected patients. In this study, we review the key aberrant epigenetic modifications that have important roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compared with mustard lung. PMID:26557960

  4. The epigenetic regulation of HIF-1α by SIRT1 in MPP(+) treated SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Su-Yan; Guo, Yan-Jie; Feng, Ya; Cui, Xin-Xin; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Liu, Te; Wu, Yun-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Both silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) and hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) have been found to play important roles in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, their mechanisms and their relationship still require further study. In the present study, we focused on the change and relationship of SIRT1 and HIF-1α in PD. PD cell models were established by using methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), which induced inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We found that the expression of HIF-1α and its target genes VEGFA and LDHA increased and that SIRT1 expression was inhibited in MPP(+) treated cells. With further analysis, we found that the acetylation of H3K14 combined with the HIF-1α promoter was dramatically increased in cells treated with MPP(+), which resulted in the transcriptional activation of HIF-1α. Moreover, the acetylation of H3K14 and the expression of HIF-1α increased when SIRT1 was knocked down, suggesting that SIRT1 was involved in the epigenetic regulation of HIF-1α. At last, phenformin, another mitochondrial complex1 inhibitor, was used to testify that the increased HIF-1a was not due to off target effects of MPP(+). Therefore, our results support a link between PD and SIRT1/HIF-1α signaling, which may serve as a clue for understanding PD. PMID:26768367

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of the Blimp-1 Gene (Prdm1) in B Cells Involves Bach2 and Histone Deacetylase 3.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiromu; Muto, Akihiko; Shima, Hiroki; Katoh, Yasutake; Sax, Nicolas; Tajima, Shinya; Brydun, Andrey; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Yoshizawa, Naoko; Masai, Hisao; Hoshikawa, Yutaka; Noda, Tetsuo; Nio, Masaki; Ochiai, Kyoko; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-03-18

    B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1) encoded by Prdm1 is a master regulator of plasma cell differentiation. The transcription factor Bach2 represses Blimp-1 expression in B cells to stall terminal differentiation, by which it supports reactions such as class switch recombination of the antibody genes. We found that histones H3 and H4 around the Prdm1 intron 5 Maf recognition element were acetylated at higher levels in X63/0 plasma cells expressing Blimp-1 than in BAL17 mature B cells lacking its expression. Conversely, methylation of H3-K9 was lower in X63/0 cells than BAL17 cells. Purification of the Bach2 complex in BAL17 cells revealed its interaction with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), nuclear co-repressors NCoR1 and NCoR2, transducin β-like 1X-linked (Tbl1x), and RAP1-interacting factor homolog (Rif1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed the binding of HDAC3 and Rif1 to the Prdm1 locus. Reduction of HDAC3 or NCoR1 expression by RNA interference in B cells resulted in an increased Prdm1 mRNA expression. Bach2 is suggested to cooperate with HDAC3-containing co-repressor complexes in B cells to regulate the stage-specific expression of Prdm1 by writing epigenetic modifications at the Prdm1 locus.

  6. An epigenetic switch regulates de novo DNA methylation at a subset of pluripotency gene enhancers during embryonic stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Petell, Christopher J.; Alabdi, Lama; He, Ming; San Miguel, Phillip; Rose, Richard; Gowher, Humaira

    2016-01-01

    Coordinated regulation of gene expression that involves activation of lineage specific genes and repression of pluripotency genes drives differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC). For complete repression of pluripotency genes during ESC differentiation, chromatin at their enhancers is silenced by the activity of the Lsd1-Mi2/NuRD complex. The mechanism/s that regulate DNA methylation at these enhancers are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the affect of the Lsd1-Mi2/NuRD complex on the dynamic regulatory switch that induces the local interaction of histone tails with the Dnmt3 ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L (ADD) domain, thus promoting DNA methylation at the enhancers of a subset of pluripotency genes. This is supported by previous structural studies showing a specific interaction between Dnmt3-ADD domain with H3K4 unmethylated histone tails that is disrupted by histone H3K4 methylation and histone acetylation. Our data suggest that Dnmt3a activity is triggered by Lsd1-Mi2/NuRD-mediated histone deacetylation and demethylation at these pluripotency gene enhancers when they are inactivated during mouse ESC differentiation. Using Dnmt3 knockout ESCs and the inhibitors of Lsd1 and p300 histone modifying enzymes during differentiation of E14Tg2A and ZHBTc4 ESCs, our study systematically reveals this mechanism and establishes that Dnmt3a is both reader and effector of the epigenetic state at these target sites. PMID:27179026

  7. Sulforaphane modulates telomerase activity via epigenetic regulation in prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ata; Hall, J Adam; Patterson, William L; Ho, Emily; Hsu, Anna; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Georgel, Philippe T

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed that diets rich in sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, are associated with a marked decrease in prostate cancer incidence. The chemo-preventive role of SFN is associated with its histone de-acetylase inhibitor activity. However, the effect of SFN on chromatin composition and dynamic folding, especially in relation to HDAC inhibitor activity, remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that SFN can inhibit the expression and activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase, in 2 prostate cancer cell lines. This decrease in gene expression is correlated with SFN-induced changes in chromatin structure and composition. The SFN-mediated changes in levels of histone post-translational modifications, more specifically acetylation of histone H3 lysine 18 and di-methylation of histone H3 lysine 4, 2 modifications linked with high risk of prostate cancer recurrence, were associated with regulatory elements within the hTERT promoter region. Chromatin condensation may also play a role in SFN-mediated hTERT repression, since expression and recruitment of MeCP2, a known chromatin compactor, were altered in SFN treated prostate cancer cells. Chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) of MeCP2 showed enrichment over regions of the hTERT promoter with increased nucleosome density. These combined results strongly support a role for SFN in the mediation of epigenetic events leading to the repression of hTERT in prostate cancer cells. This ability of SFN to modify chromatin composition and structure associated with target gene expression provides a new model by which dietary phytochemicals may exert their chemoprevention activity. PMID:26458818

  8. Epigenetics meets endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Although genetics determines endocrine phenotypes, it cannot fully explain the great variability and reversibility of the system in response to environmental changes. Evidence now suggests that epigenetics, i.e. heritable but reversible changes in gene fu