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Sample records for aberrant gene regulation

  1. Regulation of MYC gene expression by aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rennoll, Sherri; Yochum, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway controls intestinal homeostasis and mutations in components of this pathway are prevalent in human colorectal cancers (CRCs). These mutations lead to inappropriate expression of genes controlled by Wnt responsive DNA elements (WREs). T-cell factor/Lymphoid enhancer factor transcription factors bind WREs and recruit the β-catenin transcriptional co-activator to activate target gene expression. Deregulated expression of the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC) by aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling drives colorectal carcinogenesis. In this review, we discuss the current literature pertaining to the identification and characterization of WREs that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRCs. A common theme has emerged whereby these WREs often map distally to the MYC genomic locus and control MYC gene expression through long-range chromatin loops with the MYC proximal promoter. We propose that by determining which of these WREs is critical for CRC pathogenesis, novel strategies can be developed to treat individuals suffering from this disease. PMID:26629312

  2. Cortisol-treated zebrafish embryos develop into pro-inflammatory adults with aberrant immune gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hartig, Ellen I.; Zhu, Shusen; King, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic early-life stress increases adult susceptibility to numerous health problems linked to chronic inflammation. One way that this may occur is via glucocorticoid-induced developmental programming. To gain insight into such programming we treated zebrafish embryos with cortisol and examined the effects on both larvae and adults. Treated larvae had elevated whole-body cortisol and glucocorticoid signaling, and upregulated genes associated with defense response and immune system processes. In adulthood the treated fish maintained elevated basal cortisol levels in the absence of exogenous cortisol, and constitutively mis-expressed genes involved in defense response and its regulation. Adults derived from cortisol-treated embryos displayed defective tailfin regeneration, heightened basal expression of pro-inflammatory genes, and failure to appropriately regulate those genes following injury or immunological challenge. These results support the hypothesis that chronically elevated glucocorticoid signaling early in life directs development of a pro-inflammatory adult phenotype, at the expense of immunoregulation and somatic regenerative capacity. PMID:27444789

  3. Genetic association analyses implicate aberrant regulation of innate and adaptive immunity genes in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Deborah S Cunninghame; Pinder, Christopher L; Tombleson, Philip; Behrens, Timothy W; Martín, Javier; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Chen, Lingyan; Replogle, Joseph; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rönnblom, Lars; Graham, Robert R; Wither, Joan E; Rioux, John D; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Vyse, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; OMIM 152700) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease characterized by loss of immune tolerance to nuclear and cell surface antigens. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) had modest sample sizes, reducing their scope and reliability. Our study comprised 7,219 cases and 15,991 controls of European ancestry: a new GWAS, meta-analysis with a published GWAS and a replication study. We have mapped 43 susceptibility loci, including 10 novel associations. Assisted by dense genome coverage, imputation provided evidence for missense variants underpinning associations in eight genes. Other likely causal genes were established by examining associated alleles for cis-acting eQTL effects in a range of ex vivo immune cells. We found an over-representation (n=16) of transcription factors among SLE susceptibility genes. This supports the view that aberrantly regulated gene expression networks in multiple cell types in both the innate and adaptive immune response contribute to the risk of developing SLE. PMID:26502338

  4. Genetic association analyses implicate aberrant regulation of innate and adaptive immunity genes in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bentham, James; Morris, David L; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S; Pinder, Christopher L; Tombleson, Philip; Behrens, Timothy W; Martín, Javier; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Chen, Lingyan; Replogle, Joseph; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rönnblom, Lars; Graham, Robert R; Wither, Joan E; Rioux, John D; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Vyse, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease characterized by loss of immune tolerance to nuclear and cell surface antigens. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) had modest sample sizes, reducing their scope and reliability. Our study comprised 7,219 cases and 15,991 controls of European ancestry, constituting a new GWAS, a meta-analysis with a published GWAS and a replication study. We have mapped 43 susceptibility loci, including ten new associations. Assisted by dense genome coverage, imputation provided evidence for missense variants underpinning associations in eight genes. Other likely causal genes were established by examining associated alleles for cis-acting eQTL effects in a range of ex vivo immune cells. We found an over-representation (n = 16) of transcription factors among SLE susceptibility genes. This finding supports the view that aberrantly regulated gene expression networks in multiple cell types in both the innate and adaptive immune response contribute to the risk of developing SLE. PMID:26502338

  5. Aberration in epigenetic gene regulation in hippocampal neurogenesis by developmental exposure to manganese chloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyun; Shiraki, Ayako; Itahashi, Megu; Akane, Hirotoshi; Abe, Hajime; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    We have shown that maternal manganese (Mn) exposure caused sustained disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis of mouse offspring. To clarify the effects of maternal Mn exposure on epigenetic gene regulation contributing to the sustained disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis, we treated pregnant ICR mice with MnCl₂ in diet from gestational day 10 through day 21 after delivery on weaning and searched epigenetically downregulated genes by global promoter methylation analysis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of male offspring on postnatal day (PND) 21 and PND 77. By CpG promoter microarray analysis on PND 21 following 800-ppm Mn exposure, sustained promoter hypermethylation and transcript downregulation through PND 77 were confirmed with Mid1, Atp1a3, and Nr2f1, whereas Pvalb showed a transient hypermethylation only on weaning. The numbers of Pvalb⁺ and ATP1a3⁺ neurons suggestive of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons, Mid1⁺ cells suggestive of late-stage granule cell lineage and GABAergic interneurons, and COUP-TF1⁺ cells suggestive of early-stage granule cell lineage were all reduced on PND 21, and reductions were sustained on PND 77 except for no change in Pvalb⁺ cells. Mid1⁺ cells showed asymmetric distribution with right-side predominance, and Mn exposure abolished it by promoter hypermethylation of the right side. These findings indicate epigenetic mechanisms as mediators, through which Mn exposure modulates neurogenesis involving both granule cell lineage and GABAergic interneurons with long-lasting and stable repercussions. Disruption of asymmetric cellular distribution of Mid1 suggests that higher brain functions specialized in the left or right side of the brain were affected.

  6. Analysis of the transcriptional regulation of cancer-related genes by aberrant DNA methylation of the cis-regulation sites in the promoter region during hepatocyte carcinogenesis caused by arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhuang; Wu, Lin; Lu, Ming; Meng, Xianzhi; Gao, Bo; Qiao, Xin; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2015-01-01

    Liver is the major organ for arsenic methylation metabolism and may be the potential target of arsenic-induced cancer. In this study, normal human liver cell was treated with arsenic trioxide, and detected using DNA methylation microarray. Some oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, transcription factors (TF), and tumor-associated genes (TAG) that have aberrant DNA methylation have been identified. However, simple functional studies of genes adjacent to aberrant methylation sites cannot well reflect the regulatory relationship between DNA methylation and gene transcription during the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced liver cancer, whereas a further analysis of the cis-regulatory elements and their trans-acting factors adjacent to DNA methylation can more precisely reflect the relationship between them. MYC and MAX (MYC associated factor X) were found to participating cell cycle through a bioinformatics analysis. Additionally, it was found that the hypomethylation of cis-regulatory sites in the MYC promoter region and the hypermethylation of cis-regulatory sites in the MAX promoter region result in the up-regulation of MYC mRNA expression and the down-regulation of MAX mRNA, which increased the hepatocyte carcinogenesis tendency. PMID:26046465

  7. WISP genes are members of the connective tissue growth factor family that are up-regulated in wnt-1-transformed cells and aberrantly expressed in human colon tumors.

    PubMed

    Pennica, D; Swanson, T A; Welsh, J W; Roy, M A; Lawrence, D A; Lee, J; Brush, J; Taneyhill, L A; Deuel, B; Lew, M; Watanabe, C; Cohen, R L; Melhem, M F; Finley, G G; Quirke, P; Goddard, A D; Hillan, K J; Gurney, A L; Botstein, D; Levine, A J

    1998-12-01

    Wnt family members are critical to many developmental processes, and components of the Wnt signaling pathway have been linked to tumorigenesis in familial and sporadic colon carcinomas. Here we report the identification of two genes, WISP-1 and WISP-2, that are up-regulated in the mouse mammary epithelial cell line C57MG transformed by Wnt-1, but not by Wnt-4. Together with a third related gene, WISP-3, these proteins define a subfamily of the connective tissue growth factor family. Two distinct systems demonstrated WISP induction to be associated with the expression of Wnt-1. These included (i) C57MG cells infected with a Wnt-1 retroviral vector or expressing Wnt-1 under the control of a tetracyline repressible promoter, and (ii) Wnt-1 transgenic mice. The WISP-1 gene was localized to human chromosome 8q24.1-8q24.3. WISP-1 genomic DNA was amplified in colon cancer cell lines and in human colon tumors and its RNA overexpressed (2- to >30-fold) in 84% of the tumors examined compared with patient-matched normal mucosa. WISP-3 mapped to chromosome 6q22-6q23 and also was overexpressed (4- to >40-fold) in 63% of the colon tumors analyzed. In contrast, WISP-2 mapped to human chromosome 20q12-20q13 and its DNA was amplified, but RNA expression was reduced (2- to >30-fold) in 79% of the tumors. These results suggest that the WISP genes may be downstream of Wnt-1 signaling and that aberrant levels of WISP expression in colon cancer may play a role in colon tumorigenesis.

  8. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  9. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Biankin, Andrew V.; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David K.; Wilson, Peter J.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K.; Cowley, Mark J.; Gardiner, Brooke B.; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Gill, Anthony J.; Pinho, Andreia V.; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J. Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R. Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L.; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D.; Colvin, Emily K.; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Humphrey, Emily S.; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T.; Chantrill, Lorraine A.; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Kench, James G.; Lovell, Jessica A.; Daly, Roger J.; Merrett, Neil D.; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M.; Fisher, William E.; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Hodges, Sally E.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R.; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J.; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E.; Yung, Christina K.; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Morgan, Richard A.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A.; Mann, Karen M.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Adams, David J.; Largaespada, David A.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Rust, Alistair G.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Tuveson, David A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Wheeler, David A.; Pearson, John V.; McPherson, John D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:23103869

  10. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Yiu Huen; Dogruluk, Turgut; Tedeschi, Philip M; Wardwell-Ozgo, Joanna; Lu, Hengyu; Espitia, Maribel; Nair, Nikitha; Minelli, Rosalba; Chong, Zechen; Chen, Fengju; Chang, Qing Edward; Dennison, Jennifer B; Dogruluk, Armel; Li, Min; Ying, Haoqiang; Bertino, Joseph R; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Ittmann, Michael; Kerrigan, John; Chen, Ken; Creighton, Chad J; Eterovic, Karina; Mills, Gordon B; Scott, Kenneth L

    2016-01-01

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This approach reveals oncogenic activity for rare gene aberrations in genes including NAD Kinase (NADK), which regulates NADP(H) homeostasis and cellular redox state. We further validate mutant NADK, whose expression provides gain-of-function enzymatic activity leading to a reduction in cellular reactive oxygen species and tumorigenesis, and show that depletion of wild-type NADK in PDAC cell lines attenuates cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that annotating rare aberrations can reveal important cancer signalling pathways representing additional therapeutic targets. PMID:26806015

  11. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Yiu Huen; Dogruluk, Turgut; Tedeschi, Philip M.; Wardwell-Ozgo, Joanna; Lu, Hengyu; Espitia, Maribel; Nair, Nikitha; Minelli, Rosalba; Chong, Zechen; Chen, Fengju; Chang, Qing Edward; Dennison, Jennifer B.; Dogruluk, Armel; Li, Min; Ying, Haoqiang; Bertino, Joseph R.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Ittmann, Michael; Kerrigan, John; Chen, Ken; Creighton, Chad J.; Eterovic, Karina; Mills, Gordon B.; Scott, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This approach reveals oncogenic activity for rare gene aberrations in genes including NAD Kinase (NADK), which regulates NADP(H) homeostasis and cellular redox state. We further validate mutant NADK, whose expression provides gain-of-function enzymatic activity leading to a reduction in cellular reactive oxygen species and tumorigenesis, and show that depletion of wild-type NADK in PDAC cell lines attenuates cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that annotating rare aberrations can reveal important cancer signalling pathways representing additional therapeutic targets. PMID:26806015

  12. Aberrant epigenetic regulators control expansion of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Farnaz; Ponnusamy, Kanagaraju; Quagliano-Lo Coco, Isabell; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Grez, Manuel; Henschler, Reinhard; Wichmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Transcription is a tightly regulated process ensuring the proper expression of numerous genes regulating all aspects of cellular behavior. Transcription factors regulate multiple genes including other transcription factors that together control a highly complex gene network. The transcriptional machinery can be “hijacked” by oncogenic transcription factors, thereby leading to malignant cell transformation. Oncogenic transcription factors manipulate a variety of epigenetic control mechanisms to fulfill gene regulatory and cell transforming functions. These factors assemble epigenetic regulators at target gene promoter sequences, thereby disturbing physiological gene expression patterns. Retroviral vector technology and the availability of “healthy” human hematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells enable the generation of pre-leukemic cell models for the analysis of aberrant human hematopoietic progenitor cell expansion mediated by leukemogenic transcription factors. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the mechanism by which leukemogenic gene products control human hematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cell expansion by disrupting the normal epigenetic program. PMID:24348510

  13. Genes and gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, N.

    1988-01-01

    Genetics has long been a central topic for biologists, and recent progress has captured the public imagination as well. This book addresses questions that are at the leading edge of this continually advancing discipline. In tune with the increasing emphasis on molecular biology and genetic engineering, this text emphasizes the molecular aspects of gene expression, and the evolution of gene sequence organization and control. It reviews the genetic material of viruses, bacteria, and of higher organisms. Cells and organisms are compared in terms of gene numbers, their arrangements within a cell, and the control mechanisms which regulate the activity of genes.

  14. Aberrant splicing of the PTPRD gene mimics microdeletions identified at this locus in neuroblastomas.

    PubMed

    Nair, Prakash; De Preter, Katleen; DePreter, Katleen; Vandesompele, Jo; Speleman, Frank; Stallings, Raymond L

    2008-03-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL), a pediatric tumor arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is characterized by numerous recurrent large-scale chromosomal imbalances. High resolution oligonucleotide array CGH analysis of NBL has previously identified microdeletions that are confined to the 5' UTR of the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor D (PTPRD) gene, implicating this gene in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Here, we demonstrate that the 5' UTR of this gene, consisting of 11 noncoding exons, is also aberrantly spliced in >50% of NBL primary tumors and cell lines. The loss of exons from the 5' UTR region through aberrant splicing results in aberrant mRNA isoforms that are similar to those generated through microdeletions. The aberrant splicing or microdeletion of 5' UTR exons in such a high proportion of tumors indicates that loss of these exons dys-regulates the mRNA sequence. To further validate the role of PTPRD in NBL, we have examined the expression of this gene in normal fetal adrenal neuroblasts (the cell of origin of NBL) and in tumors from patients with either low stage or high stage disease. This gene is expressed at lower levels in high stage NBL tumors, particularly those with amplification of MYCN, relative to low stage tumors or normal fetal adrenal neuroblasts, consistent with the possibility that loss of the 5' UTR exons have destabilized the mRNA.

  15. Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Juan; Xie, Shui-Xiang; Chen, Ya-Tang; Xue, Jing-Ling; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal malignancies in the world. Several signaling pathways, including the wingless/int-1 (Wnt) signaling pathway, have been shown to be commonly activated in HCC. The Wnt signaling pathway can be triggered via both catenin β1 (CTNNB1)-dependent (also known as “canonical”) and CTNNB1-independent (often referred to as “non-canonical”) pathways. Specifically, the canonical Wnt pathway is one of those most frequently reported in HCC. Aberrant regulation from three complexes (the cell-surface receptor complex, the cytoplasmic destruction complex and the nuclear CTNNB1/T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor transcriptional complex) are all involved in HCC. Although the non-canonical Wnt pathway is rarely reported, two main non-canonical pathways, Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway and Wnt/Ca2+ pathway, participate in the regulation of hepatocarcinogenesis. Interestingly, the canonical Wnt pathway is antagonized by non-canonical Wnt signaling in HCC. Moreover, other signaling cascades have also been demonstrated to regulate the Wnt pathway through crosstalk in HCC pathogenesis. This review provides a perspective on the emerging evidence that the aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a critical mechanism for the development of HCC. Furthermore, crosstalk between different signaling pathways might be conducive to the development of novel molecular targets of HCC. PMID:27672271

  16. Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Juan; Xie, Shui-Xiang; Chen, Ya-Tang; Xue, Jing-Ling; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhu, Fan

    2016-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal malignancies in the world. Several signaling pathways, including the wingless/int-1 (Wnt) signaling pathway, have been shown to be commonly activated in HCC. The Wnt signaling pathway can be triggered via both catenin β1 (CTNNB1)-dependent (also known as "canonical") and CTNNB1-independent (often referred to as "non-canonical") pathways. Specifically, the canonical Wnt pathway is one of those most frequently reported in HCC. Aberrant regulation from three complexes (the cell-surface receptor complex, the cytoplasmic destruction complex and the nuclear CTNNB1/T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor transcriptional complex) are all involved in HCC. Although the non-canonical Wnt pathway is rarely reported, two main non-canonical pathways, Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway and Wnt/Ca(2+) pathway, participate in the regulation of hepatocarcinogenesis. Interestingly, the canonical Wnt pathway is antagonized by non-canonical Wnt signaling in HCC. Moreover, other signaling cascades have also been demonstrated to regulate the Wnt pathway through crosstalk in HCC pathogenesis. This review provides a perspective on the emerging evidence that the aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a critical mechanism for the development of HCC. Furthermore, crosstalk between different signaling pathways might be conducive to the development of novel molecular targets of HCC. PMID:27672271

  17. Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Juan; Xie, Shui-Xiang; Chen, Ya-Tang; Xue, Jing-Ling; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal malignancies in the world. Several signaling pathways, including the wingless/int-1 (Wnt) signaling pathway, have been shown to be commonly activated in HCC. The Wnt signaling pathway can be triggered via both catenin β1 (CTNNB1)-dependent (also known as “canonical”) and CTNNB1-independent (often referred to as “non-canonical”) pathways. Specifically, the canonical Wnt pathway is one of those most frequently reported in HCC. Aberrant regulation from three complexes (the cell-surface receptor complex, the cytoplasmic destruction complex and the nuclear CTNNB1/T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor transcriptional complex) are all involved in HCC. Although the non-canonical Wnt pathway is rarely reported, two main non-canonical pathways, Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway and Wnt/Ca2+ pathway, participate in the regulation of hepatocarcinogenesis. Interestingly, the canonical Wnt pathway is antagonized by non-canonical Wnt signaling in HCC. Moreover, other signaling cascades have also been demonstrated to regulate the Wnt pathway through crosstalk in HCC pathogenesis. This review provides a perspective on the emerging evidence that the aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a critical mechanism for the development of HCC. Furthermore, crosstalk between different signaling pathways might be conducive to the development of novel molecular targets of HCC.

  18. Gene expression analysis of aberrant signaling pathways in meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    TORRES-MARTÍN, MIGUEL; MARTINEZ-GLEZ, VICTOR; PEÑA-GRANERO, CAROLINA; ISLA, ALBERTO; LASSALETTA, LUIS; DE CAMPOS, JOSE M.; PINTO, GIOVANNY R.; BURBANO, ROMMEL R.; MELÉNDEZ, BÁRBARA; CASTRESANA, JAVIER S.; REY, JUAN A.

    2013-01-01

    Examining aberrant pathway alterations is one method for understanding the abnormal signals that are involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, expression arrays were performed on tumor-related genes in meningiomas. The GE Array Q Series HS-006 was used to determine the expression levels of 96 genes that corresponded to six primary biological regulatory pathways in a series of 42 meningiomas, including 32 grade I, four recurrent grade I and six grade II tumors, in addition to three normal tissue controls. Results showed that 25 genes that were primarily associated with apoptosis and angiogenesis functions were downregulated and 13 genes frequently involving DNA damage repair functions were upregulated. In addition to the inactivation of the neurofibromin gene, NF2, which is considered to be an early step in tumorigenesis, variations of other biological regulatory pathways may play a significant role in the development of meningioma. PMID:23946817

  19. Gene expression analysis of aberrant signaling pathways in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martín, Miguel; Martinez-Glez, Victor; Peña-Granero, Carolina; Isla, Alberto; Lassaletta, Luis; DE Campos, Jose M; Pinto, Giovanny R; Burbano, Rommel R; Meléndez, Bárbara; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2013-07-01

    Examining aberrant pathway alterations is one method for understanding the abnormal signals that are involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, expression arrays were performed on tumor-related genes in meningiomas. The GE Array Q Series HS-006 was used to determine the expression levels of 96 genes that corresponded to six primary biological regulatory pathways in a series of 42 meningiomas, including 32 grade I, four recurrent grade I and six grade II tumors, in addition to three normal tissue controls. Results showed that 25 genes that were primarily associated with apoptosis and angiogenesis functions were downregulated and 13 genes frequently involving DNA damage repair functions were upregulated. In addition to the inactivation of the neurofibromin gene, NF2, which is considered to be an early step in tumorigenesis, variations of other biological regulatory pathways may play a significant role in the development of meningioma. PMID:23946817

  20. Rice ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1, encoding an F-box protein, regulates meristem fate.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kyoko; Ito, Momoyo; Nagasawa, Nobuhiro; Kyozuka, Junko; Nagato, Yasuo

    2007-09-01

    Inflorescence architecture is one of the most important agronomical traits. Characterization of rice aberrant panicle organization 1 (apo1) mutants revealed that APO1 positively controls spikelet number by suppressing the precocious conversion of inflorescence meristems to spikelet meristems. In addition, APO1 is associated with the regulation of the plastchron, floral organ identity, and floral determinacy. Phenotypic analyses of apo1 and floral homeotic double mutants demonstrate that APO1 positively regulates class-C floral homeotic genes, but not class-B genes. Molecular studies revealed that APO1 encodes an F-box protein, an ortholog of Arabidopsis UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGAN (UFO), which is a positive regulator of class-B genes. Overexpression of APO1 caused an increase in inflorescence branches and spikelets. As the mutant inflorescences and flowers differed considerably between apo1 and ufo, the functions of APO1 and UFO appear to have diverged during evolution. PMID:17666027

  1. Rice ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1, encoding an F-box protein, regulates meristem fate.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kyoko; Ito, Momoyo; Nagasawa, Nobuhiro; Kyozuka, Junko; Nagato, Yasuo

    2007-09-01

    Inflorescence architecture is one of the most important agronomical traits. Characterization of rice aberrant panicle organization 1 (apo1) mutants revealed that APO1 positively controls spikelet number by suppressing the precocious conversion of inflorescence meristems to spikelet meristems. In addition, APO1 is associated with the regulation of the plastchron, floral organ identity, and floral determinacy. Phenotypic analyses of apo1 and floral homeotic double mutants demonstrate that APO1 positively regulates class-C floral homeotic genes, but not class-B genes. Molecular studies revealed that APO1 encodes an F-box protein, an ortholog of Arabidopsis UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGAN (UFO), which is a positive regulator of class-B genes. Overexpression of APO1 caused an increase in inflorescence branches and spikelets. As the mutant inflorescences and flowers differed considerably between apo1 and ufo, the functions of APO1 and UFO appear to have diverged during evolution.

  2. From DNA Copy Number to Gene Expression: Local aberrations, Trisomies and Monosomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Tal

    The goal of my PhD research was to study the effect of DNA copy number changes on gene expression. DNA copy number aberrations may be local, encompassing several genes, or on the level of an entire chromosome, such as trisomy and monosomy. The main dataset I studied was of Glioblastoma, obtained in the framework of a collaboration, but I worked also with public datasets of cancer and Down's Syndrome. The molecular basis of expression changes in Glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumors in adults. In collaboration with Prof. Hegi (CHUV, Switzerland), we analyzed a rich Glioblastoma dataset including clinical information, DNA copy number (array CGH) and expression profiles. We explored the correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression at the level of chromosomal arms and local genomic aberrations. We detected known amplification and over expression of oncogenes, as well as deletion and down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. We exploited that information to map alterations of pathways that are known to be disrupted in Glioblastoma, and tried to characterize samples that have no known alteration in any of the studied pathways. Identifying local DNA aberrations of biological significance. Many types of tumors exhibit chromosomal losses or gains and local amplifications and deletions. A region that is aberrant in many tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, is more likely to be clinically relevant, and not just a by-product of genetic instability. We developed a novel method that defines and prioritizes aberrations by formalizing these intuitions. The method scores each aberration by the fraction of patients harboring it, its length and its amplitude, and assesses the significance of the score by comparing it to a null distribution obtained by permutations. This approach detects genetic locations that are significantly aberrant, generating a 'genomic aberration profile' for each sample. The 'genomic

  3. Prognostic significance of aberrant gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Zhang, Guanjun; Yao, Demao; Liu, Wei; Wang, Na; Ji, Meiju; He, Nongyue; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Promoter methylation acts as an important alternative to genetic alterations for gene inactivation in gastric carcinogenesis. Although a number of gastric cancer-associated genes have been found to be methylated in gastric cancer, valuable methylation markers for early diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of this cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, we used methylation-specific PCR (MSP) to analyze promoter methylation of 9 gastric cancer-associated genes, including MLF1, MGMT, p16, RASSF2, hMLH1, HAND1, HRASLS, TM, and FLNc, and their association with clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcome in a large cohort of gastric cancers. Our data showed that all of these genes were aberrantly methylated in gastric cancer, ranging from 8% to 51%. Moreover, gene methylation was strongly associated with certain clinicopathological characteristics, such as tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and cancer-related death. Of interest, methylation of MGMT, p16, RASSF2, hMLH1, HAND1, and FLNc was closely associated with poor survival in gastric cancer, particularly MGMT, p16, RASSF2 and FLNc. Thus, our findings suggested these epigenetic events may contribute to the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. Importantly, methylation of some genes were closely relevant to poor prognosis in gastric cancer, providing the strong evidences that these hypermethylated genes may be served as valuable biomarkers for prognostic evaluation in this cancer.

  4. Genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes in chordoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-07-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ∼8 Mb segment at 3p21.1-p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (∼23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (∼40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Genomic Aberrations Frequently Alter Chromatin Regulatory Genes in Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F.; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C. David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ~8 Mb segment at 3p21.1–p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (~23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (~40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. PMID:27072194

  6. Aberrant gene expression patterns in extraembryonic tissue from cloned porcine embryos.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Ryung; Im, Gi-Sun; Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seongsoo; Park, Jae-Hong; Kim, Hyun; Do, Yoon Jung; Park, Soo Bon; Yang, Bo-Suck; Song, Young Min; Cho, Jae-Hyeon; Ko, Yeoung-Gyu

    2013-06-01

    The abnormal development of embryos reconstructed by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is considered to be associated with consequent changes in gene expression following errors in epigenetic reprogramming. In this study, we carried out SCNT using donor fibroblast cells derived from 3-way hybrids (Landrace×Duroc×Yorkshire). A total of 655 SCNT embryos were transferred, and 6.97±2.3 cloned fetuses were successfully recovered from three surrogates at gestational day 30. An analysis of the 6.97±2.3 cloned embryos revealed that most had severe extraembryonic defects. The extraembryonic tissue from the SCNT embryos was abnormally small compared with that of the control. To investigate the differentially expressed genes between the SCNT and control extraembryonic tissues, we compared the gene expression profiles of the extraembryonic tissues from gestational day 30 cloned pig embryos with those from the control using an annealing control primer-based GeneFishing polymerase chain reaction. As a result, we found that a total of 50 genes were differentially expressed by utilizing 120 ACPs, 38 genes of which were known. Among them, 26 genes were up-regulated, whereas 12 genes were down-regulated. Real-time RT-PCR showed that apoptosis-related genes were expressed significantly higher in SCNT extraembryonic tissue than in the control, whereas metabolism-related genes were expressed at significantly lower levels in the SCNT extraembryonic tissue. These observations strongly indicate that early gestational death of SCNT embryo is caused, at least in part, by the disruption of developing extraembryonic tissues as a result of aberrant gene expression, which results in abnormal apoptosis and metabolism.

  7. Aberrant Hepatic Methionine Metabolism and Gene Methylation in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Alcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) involves ethanol-induced aberrations in hepatic methionine metabolism that decrease levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a compound which regulates the synthesis of the antioxidant glutathione and is the principal methyl donor in the epigenetic regulation of genes relevant to liver injury. The present paper describes the effects of ethanol on the hepatic methionine cycle, followed by evidence for the central role of reduced SAM in the pathogenesis of ASH according to clinical data and experiments in ethanol-fed animals and in cell models. The efficacy of supplemental SAM in the prevention of ASH in animal models and in the clinical treatment of ASH will be discussed. PMID:22007317

  8. Aberrant Expression of Posterior HOX Genes in Well Differentiated Histotypes of Thyroid Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cantile, Monica; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; La Sala, Lucia; La Mantia, Elvira; Scaramuzza, Veronica; Valentino, Elena; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Losito, Simona; Pezzullo, Luciano; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Fulciniti, Franco; Franco, Renato; Botti, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Molecular etiology of thyroid cancers has been widely studied, and several molecular alterations have been identified mainly associated with follicular and papillary histotypes. However, the molecular bases of the complex pathogenesis of thyroid carcinomas remain poorly understood. HOX genes regulate normal embryonic development, cell differentiation and other critical processes in eukaryotic cell life. Several studies have shown that HOX genes play a role in neoplastic transformation of several human tissues. In particular, the genes belonging to HOX paralogous group 13 seem to hold a relevant role in both tumor development and progression. We have identified a significant prognostic role of HOX D13 in pancreatic cancer and we have recently showed the strong and progressive over-expression of HOX C13 in melanoma metastases and deregulation of HOX B13 expression in bladder cancers. In this study we have investigated, by immunohistochemisty and quantitative Real Time PCR, the HOX paralogous group 13 genes/proteins expression in thyroid cancer evolution and progression, also evaluating its ability to discriminate between main histotypes. Our results showed an aberrant expression, both at gene and protein level, of all members belonging to paralogous group 13 (HOX A13, HOX B13, HOX C13 and HOX D13) in adenoma, papillary and follicular thyroid cancers samples. The data suggest a potential role of HOX paralogous group 13 genes in pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of thyroid cancers. PMID:24189220

  9. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system.

  10. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    PubMed

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations. PMID:26300000

  11. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    PubMed

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations.

  12. Focal Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations Identify CMTM8 and GPR177 as New Candidate Driver Genes in Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Johannes; Schaap, Gerard R.; Baas, Frank; Ylstra, Bauke; Hulsebos, Theo J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive bone tumor that preferentially develops in adolescents. The tumor is characterized by an abundance of genomic aberrations, which hampers the identification of the driver genes involved in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. Our study aims to identify these genes by the investigation of focal copy number aberrations (CNAs, <3 Mb). For this purpose, we subjected 26 primary tumors of osteosarcoma patients to high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and identified 139 somatic focal CNAs. Of these, 72 had at least one gene located within or overlapping the focal CNA, with a total of 94 genes. For 84 of these genes, the expression status in 31 osteosarcoma samples was determined by expression microarray analysis. This enabled us to identify the genes of which the over- or underexpression was in more than 35% of cases in accordance to their copy number status (gain or loss). These candidate genes were subsequently validated in an independent set and furthermore corroborated as driver genes by verifying their role in other tumor types. We identified CMTM8 as a new candidate tumor suppressor gene and GPR177 as a new candidate oncogene in osteosarcoma. In osteosarcoma, CMTM8 has been shown to suppress EGFR signaling. In other tumor types, CMTM8 is known to suppress the activity of the oncogenic protein c-Met and GPR177 is known as an overexpressed upstream regulator of the Wnt-pathway. Further studies are needed to determine whether these proteins also exert the latter functions in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. PMID:25551557

  13. ABERRANT PROMOTER METHYLATION OF MULTIPLE GENES IN SPUTUM FROM INDIVIDUALS EXPOSED TO SMOKY COAL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aberrant methylation in the promoter region of cancer-related genes leads to gene transcriptional inactivation and plays an integral role in lung tumorigenesis. Recent studies demonstrated that promoter methylation was detected not only in lung tumors from patients with lung canc...

  14. Aberrant subcellular neuronal calcium regulation in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-05-01

    In this mini-review/opinion article we describe evidence that multiple cellular and molecular alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis involve perturbed cellular calcium regulation, and that alterations in synaptic calcium handling may be early and pivotal events in the disease process. With advancing age neurons encounter increased oxidative stress and impaired energy metabolism, which compromise the function of proteins that control membrane excitability and subcellular calcium dynamics. Altered proteolytic cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in response to the aging process in combination with genetic and environmental factors results in the production and accumulation of neurotoxic forms of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Aβ undergoes a self-aggregation process and concomitantly generates reactive oxygen species that can trigger membrane-associated oxidative stress which, in turn, impairs the functions of ion-motive ATPases and glutamate and glucose transporters thereby rendering neurons vulnerable to excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Mutations in presenilin-1 that cause early-onset AD increase Aβ production, but also result in an abnormal increase in the size of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Some of the events in the neurodegenerative cascade can be counteracted in animal models by manipulations that stabilize neuronal calcium homeostasis including dietary energy restriction, agonists of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors and drugs that activate mitochondrial potassium channels. Emerging knowledge of the actions of calcium upstream and downstream of Aβ provides opportunities to develop novel preventative and therapeutic interventions for AD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium. PMID:20950656

  15. Up-regulated expression and aberrant DNA methylation of LEP and SH3PXD2A in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuqian; Cheng, Yan; Li, Xiaotian; Li, Qiaoli; Xu, Jiawei; Zhang, Junyu; Liu, Yun; Xing, Qinghe; Wang, Lei; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2013-01-01

    The primary mechanism underlying pre-eclampsia (PE) remains one of the most burning problems in the obstetrics and gynecology. In this study, we performed an expression profiling screen and detected 1312 genes that were differentially expressed (p<0.05 and fold change >1.5) in PE placentas, including LEP and SH3PXD2A. After validating the microarray results, we conducted the quantitative methylation analysis of LEP and SH3PXD2A in preeclamptic (n = 16) versus normal placentas (n = 16). Our results showed that many CpG sites close to the transcriptional start site (TSS) of LEP gene were hypomethylated in placentas from pregnancies with PE compared with those of in controls, including the TSS position (p = 0.001), the binding sites of Sp1 (p = 1.57×10(-4)), LP1 (p = 0.023) and CEBPα (p = 0.031). Luciferase reporter analysis confirmed the aberrant methylation of LEP promoter and CEBPα co-transfection had a role in the regulation of gene expression. Our results indicated the aberrant LEP promoter methylation was involved in the development of PE. We did not find a significant methylation differences between groups in the promoter region of SH3PXD2A, however, a CGI region in the gene body (CGI34) presented a higher methylation in preeclamptic placentas (p = 1.57×10(-4)), which might promote the efficiency of gene transcription. We speculated that SH3PXD2A may take part in the pathogenesis of PE through its role in the regulation of trophoblast cell invasion in the period of placenta formation.

  16. Aberrantly methylated genes in human papillary thyroid cancer and their association with BRAF/RAS mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Yasuko; Tsuji, Eiichi; Yagi, Koichi; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Tsuji, Shingo; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Ogawa, Toshihisa; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Cancer arises through accumulation of epigenetic and genetic alteration. Aberrant promoter methylation is a common epigenetic mechanism of gene silencing in cancer cells. We here performed genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation of promoter regions by Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, using 14 clinical papillary thyroid cancer samples and 10 normal thyroid samples. Among the 14 papillary cancer cases, 11 showed frequent aberrant methylation, but the other three cases showed no aberrant methylation at all. Distribution of the hypermethylation among cancer samples was non-random, which implied existence of a subset of preferentially methylated papillary thyroid cancer. Among 25 frequently methylated genes, methylation status of six genes (HIST1H3J, POU4F2, SHOX2, PHKG2, TLX3, HOXA7) was validated quantitatively by pyrosequencing. Epigenetic silencing of these genes in methylated papillary thyroid cancer cell lines was confirmed by gene re-expression following treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A, and detected by real-time RT-PCR. Methylation of these six genes was validated by analysis of additional 20 papillary thyroid cancer and 10 normal samples. Among the 34 cancer samples in total, 26 cancer samples with preferential methylation were significantly associated with mutation of BRAF/RAS oncogene (P = 0.04, Fisher's exact test). Thus, we identified new genes with frequent epigenetic hypermethylation in papillary thyroid cancer, two subsets of either preferentially methylated or hardly methylated papillary thyroid cancer, with a concomitant occurrence of oncogene mutation and gene methylation. These hypermethylated genes may constitute potential biomarkers for papillary thyroid cancer. PMID:24367375

  17. Aberrant Alternative Polyadenylation is Responsible for Survivin Up-regulation in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang-Jun; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Li-Ping; Li, Na; Chang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Survivin is an oncoprotein silenced in normal mature tissues but reactivated in serous ovarian cancer (SOC). Although transcriptional activation is assumed for its overexpression, the long 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) in survivin gene, which contains many alternate polyadenylation (APA) sites, implies a propensity for posttranscriptional control and therefore was the aim of our study. Methods: The abundance of the coding region, the proximal and the distal region of survivin mRNA 3'-UTR, was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in SOC samples, cell lines, and normal fallopian tube (NFT) tissues. The APA sites were confirmed by rapid amplification of cDNA 3' ends and DNA sequencing. Real-time PCR were used to screen survivin-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) that were inversely correlated with survivin. The expression of an inversely correlated miRNA was restored by pre-miRNA transfection or induction with a genotoxic agent to test its inhibitory effect on survivin overexpression. Results: Varying degrees of APA were observed in SOC by comparing the abundance of the proximal and the distal region of survivin 3'-UTR, and changes of 3'-UTR correlated significantly with survivin expression (r = 0.708, P < 0.01). The main APA sites are proved at 1197 and 1673 of survivin 3'-UTR by DNA sequencing. Higher level of 3'-UTR proximal region than coding region was observed in NFT, as well as in SOC and cell lines. Among the survivin-targeting miRNAs, only a few highly expressed miRNAs were inversely correlated with survivin levels, and they mainly targeted the distal part of the 3'-UTR. However, in ovarian cancer cells, restoration of an inversely correlated miRNA (miR-34c) showed little effect on survivin expression. Conclusions: In NFT tissues, survivin is not transcriptionally silenced but regulate posttranscriptionally. In SOC, aberrant APA leads to the shortening of survivin 3'-UTR which enables it to escape the negative regulation of mi

  18. Trichostatin A specifically improves the aberrant expression of transcription factor genes in embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Oikawa, Mami; Kamimura, Satoshi; Ogonuki, Narumi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Although mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established in various species, the low developmental efficiency has hampered its practical applications. Treatment of SCNT-derived embryos with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can improve their development, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. To address this question, we analysed gene expression profiles of SCNT-derived 2-cell mouse embryos treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a potent HDAC inhibitor that is best used for mouse cloning. Unexpectedly, TSA had no effect on the numbers of aberrantly expressed genes or the overall gene expression pattern in the embryos. However, in-depth investigation by gene ontology and functional analyses revealed that TSA treatment specifically improved the expression of a small subset of genes encoding transcription factors and their regulatory factors, suggesting their positive involvement in de novo RNA synthesis. Indeed, introduction of one of such transcription factors, Spi-C, into the embryos at least partially mimicked the TSA-induced improvement in embryonic development by activating gene networks associated with transcriptional regulation. Thus, the effects of TSA treatment on embryonic gene expression did not seem to be stochastic, but more specific than expected, targeting genes that direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the 2-cell stage. PMID:25974394

  19. ERα propelled aberrant global DNA hypermethylation by activating the DNMT1 gene to enhance anticancer drug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jinghuan; Ding, Haijian; Zhang, Xin A.; Shao, Lipei; Yang, Nan; Cheng, He; Sun, Luan; Zhu, Dongliang; Yang, Yin; Li, Andi; Han, Xiao; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced aberrant DNA methylation is the first identified epigenetic marker involved in chemotherapy resistance. Understanding how the aberrant DNA methylation is acquired would impact cancer treatment in theory and practice. In this study we systematically investigated whether and how ERα propelled aberrant global DNA hypermethylation in the context of breast cancer drug resistance. Our data demonstrated that anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) augmented ERα binding to the DNMT1 and DNMT3b promoters to activate DNMT1 and DNMT3b genes, enhancing the PTX resistance of breast cancer cells. In support of these observations, estrogen enhanced multi-drug resistance of breast cancer cells by up-regulation of DNMT1 and DNMT3b genes. Nevertheless, the aberrant global DNA hypermethylation was dominantly induced by ERα-activated-DNMT1, since DNMT1 over-expression significantly increased global DNA methylation and DNMT1 knockdown reversed the ERα-induced global DNA methylation. Altering DNMT3b expression had no detectable effect on global DNA methylation. Consistently, the expression level of DNMT1 was positively correlated with ERα in 78 breast cancer tissue samples shown by our immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis and negatively correlated with relapse-free survival (RFS) and distance metastasis-free survival (DMFS) of ERα-positive breast cancer patients. This study provides a new perspective for understanding the mechanism underlying drug-resistance-facilitating aberrant DNA methylation in breast cancer and other estrogen dependent tumors. PMID:26980709

  20. PAX8 is transcribed aberrantly in cervical tumors and derived cell lines due to complex gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    López-Urrutia, Eduardo; Pedroza-Torres, Abraham; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; De Leon, David Cantu; Morales-González, Fermín; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Mendez, Jorge; García-Castillo, Verónica; Bautista-Isidro, Osvaldo; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor PAX8, a member of the paired box-containing gene family with an important role in embryogenesis of the kidney, thyroid gland and nervous system, has been described as a biomarker in tumors of the thyroid, parathyroid, kidney and thymus. The PAX8 gene gives rise to four isoforms, through alternative mRNA splicing, but the splicing pattern in tumors is not yet established. Cervical cancer has a positive expression of PAX8; however, there is no available data determining which PAX8 isoform or isoforms are present in cervical cancer tissues as well as in cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines. Instead of a differential pattern of splicing isoforms, we found numerous previously unreported PAX8 aberrant transcripts ranging from 378 to 542 bases and present in both cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines and tumor samples. This is the first report of PAX8 aberrant transcript production in cervical cancer. Reported PAX8 isoforms possess differential transactivation properties; therefore, besides being a helpful marker for detection of cancer, PAX8 isoforms can plausibly exert differential regulation properties during carcinogenesis. PMID:27175788

  1. Chromosomal Aberrations in Canine Gliomas Define Candidate Genes and Common Pathways in Dogs and Humans.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Peter J; York, Dan; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A; Joshi, Nikhil; Bannasch, Danika

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous gliomas in dogs occur at a frequency similar to that in humans and may provide a translational model for therapeutic development and comparative biological investigations. Copy number alterations in 38 canine gliomas, including diffuse astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligoastrocytomas, were defined using an Illumina 170K single nucleotide polymorphism array. Highly recurrent alterations were seen in up to 85% of some tumor types, most notably involving chromosomes 13, 22, and 38, and gliomas clustered into 2 major groups consisting of high-grade IV astrocytomas, or oligodendrogliomas and other tumors. Tumor types were characterized by specific broad and focal chromosomal events including focal loss of the INK4A/B locus in glioblastoma and loss of the RB1 gene and amplification of the PDGFRA gene in oligodendrogliomas. Genes associated with the 3 critical pathways in human high-grade gliomas (TP53, RB1, and RTK/RAS/PI3K) were frequently associated with canine aberrations. Analysis of oligodendrogliomas revealed regions of chromosomal losses syntenic to human 1p involving tumor suppressor genes, such as CDKN2C, as well as genes associated with apoptosis, autophagy, and response to chemotherapy and radiation. Analysis of high frequency chromosomal aberrations with respect to human orthologues may provide insight into both novel and common pathways in gliomagenesis and response to therapy.

  2. Chromosomal Aberrations in Canine Gliomas Define Candidate Genes and Common Pathways in Dogs and Humans.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Peter J; York, Dan; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A; Joshi, Nikhil; Bannasch, Danika

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous gliomas in dogs occur at a frequency similar to that in humans and may provide a translational model for therapeutic development and comparative biological investigations. Copy number alterations in 38 canine gliomas, including diffuse astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligoastrocytomas, were defined using an Illumina 170K single nucleotide polymorphism array. Highly recurrent alterations were seen in up to 85% of some tumor types, most notably involving chromosomes 13, 22, and 38, and gliomas clustered into 2 major groups consisting of high-grade IV astrocytomas, or oligodendrogliomas and other tumors. Tumor types were characterized by specific broad and focal chromosomal events including focal loss of the INK4A/B locus in glioblastoma and loss of the RB1 gene and amplification of the PDGFRA gene in oligodendrogliomas. Genes associated with the 3 critical pathways in human high-grade gliomas (TP53, RB1, and RTK/RAS/PI3K) were frequently associated with canine aberrations. Analysis of oligodendrogliomas revealed regions of chromosomal losses syntenic to human 1p involving tumor suppressor genes, such as CDKN2C, as well as genes associated with apoptosis, autophagy, and response to chemotherapy and radiation. Analysis of high frequency chromosomal aberrations with respect to human orthologues may provide insight into both novel and common pathways in gliomagenesis and response to therapy. PMID:27251041

  3. Implication of IRF4 aberrant gene expression in the acute leukemias of childhood.

    PubMed

    Adamaki, Maria; Lambrou, George I; Athanasiadou, Anastasia; Tzanoudaki, Marianna; Vlahopoulos, Spiros; Moschovi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The most frequent targets of genetic alterations in human leukemias are transcription factor genes with essential functions in normal blood cell development. The Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) gene encodes a transcription factor important for key developmental stages of hematopoiesis, with known oncogenic implications in multiple myeloma, adult leukemias and lymphomas. Very few studies have reported an association of IRF4 with childhood malignancy, whereas high transcript levels have been observed in the more mature immunophenotype of ALL. Our aim was to investigate the expression levels of IRF4 in the diagnostic samples of pediatric leukemias and compare them to those of healthy controls, in order to determine aberrant gene expression and whether it extends to leukemic subtypes other than the relatively mature ALL subpopulation. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR methodology was used to investigate IRF4 expression in 58 children with acute leukemias, 4 leukemic cell lines and 20 healthy children. We show that aberrant IRF4 gene expression is implicated in a variety of leukemic subtypes; higher transcript levels appear in the more immature B-common ALL subtype and in T-cell than in B-cell leukemias, with the highest expression levels appearing in the AML group. Interestingly, we show that childhood leukemia, irrespective of subtype or cell maturation stage, is characterised by a minimum of approximately twice the amount of IRF4 gene expression encountered in healthy children. A statistically significant correlation also appeared to exist between high IRF4 expression and relapse. Our results show that ectopic expression of IRF4 follows the reverse expression pattern of what is encountered in normal B-cell development and that there might be a dose-dependency of childhood leukemia for aberrantly expressed IRF4, a characteristic that could be explored therapeutically. It is also suggested that high IRF4 expression might be used as an additional prognostic marker of

  4. Caenorhabditis elegans TRPV channels function in a modality-specific pathway to regulate response to aberrant sensory signaling.

    PubMed

    Ezak, Meredith J; Hong, Elizabeth; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Ferkey, Denise M

    2010-05-01

    Olfaction and some forms of taste (including bitter) are mediated by G protein-coupled signal transduction pathways. Olfactory and gustatory ligands bind to chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in specialized sensory cells to activate intracellular signal transduction cascades. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are negative regulators of signaling that specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs to terminate signaling. Although loss of GRK function usually results in enhanced cellular signaling, Caenorhabditis elegans lacking GRK-2 function are not hypersensitive to chemosensory stimuli. Instead, grk-2 mutant animals do not chemotax toward attractive olfactory stimuli or avoid aversive tastes and smells. We show here that loss-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 selectively restore grk-2 behavioral avoidance of bitter tastants, revealing modality-specific mechanisms for TRPV channel function in the regulation of C. elegans chemosensation. Additionally, a single amino acid point mutation in OCR-2 that disrupts TRPV channel-mediated gene expression, but does not decrease channel function in chemosensory primary signal transduction, also restores grk-2 bitter taste avoidance. Thus, loss of GRK-2 function may lead to changes in gene expression, via OSM-9/OCR-2, to selectively alter the levels of signaling components that transduce or regulate bitter taste responses. Our results suggest a novel mechanism and multiple modality-specific pathways that sensory cells employ in response to aberrant signal transduction. PMID:20176974

  5. Aberrant epigenetic regulation in clear cell sarcoma of the kidney featuring distinct DNA hypermethylation and EZH2 overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Caroline; O'Sullivan, Maureen J.; Mengelbier, Linda Holmquist; Gisselsson, David

    2016-01-01

    The global methylation profile and the mutational status of 633 specific epigenetic regulators were analyzed in the pediatric tumor clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK). Methylation array analyses of 30 CCSKs revealed CCSK tumor DNA to be globally hypermethylated compared to Wilms tumor, normal fetal kidney, and adult kidney. The aberrant methylation pattern of CCSKs was associated with activation of genes involved in embryonic processes and with silencing of genes linked to normal kidney function. No epigenetic regulator was recurrently mutated in our cohort, but a mutation in the key epigenetic regulator EZH2 was discovered in one case. EZH2 mRNA was significantly higher in CCSK compared to Wilms tumor and normal kidney, and the EZH2 protein was strongly expressed in more than 90 % of CCSK tumor cells in 9/9 tumors analyzed. This was in striking contrast to the lack of EZH2 protein expression in Wilms tumor stromal elements, indicating that EZH2 could be explored further as a diagnostic marker and a potential drug target for CCSK. PMID:26848979

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans TRPV Channels Function in a Modality-Specific Pathway to Regulate Response to Aberrant Sensory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ezak , Meredith J.; Hong , Elizabeth; Chaparro-Garcia , Angela; Ferkey , Denise M.

    2010-01-01

    Olfaction and some forms of taste (including bitter) are mediated by G protein-coupled signal transduction pathways. Olfactory and gustatory ligands bind to chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in specialized sensory cells to activate intracellular signal transduction cascades. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are negative regulators of signaling that specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs to terminate signaling. Although loss of GRK function usually results in enhanced cellular signaling, Caenorhabditis elegans lacking GRK-2 function are not hypersensitive to chemosensory stimuli. Instead, grk-2 mutant animals do not chemotax toward attractive olfactory stimuli or avoid aversive tastes and smells. We show here that loss-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 selectively restore grk-2 behavioral avoidance of bitter tastants, revealing modality-specific mechanisms for TRPV channel function in the regulation of C. elegans chemosensation. Additionally, a single amino acid point mutation in OCR-2 that disrupts TRPV channel-mediated gene expression, but does not decrease channel function in chemosensory primary signal transduction, also restores grk-2 bitter taste avoidance. Thus, loss of GRK-2 function may lead to changes in gene expression, via OSM-9/OCR-2, to selectively alter the levels of signaling components that transduce or regulate bitter taste responses. Our results suggest a novel mechanism and multiple modality-specific pathways that sensory cells employ in response to aberrant signal transduction. PMID:20176974

  7. Deletion and aberrant CpG island methylation of Caspase 8 gene in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Pilar; Bello, M Josefa; Inda, M Mar; Alonso, M Eva; Arjona, Dolores; Amiñoso, Cinthia; Lopez-Marin, Isabel; de Campos, Jose M; Sarasa, Jose L; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2004-09-01

    Aberrant methylation of promoter CpG islands in human genes is an alternative genetic inactivation mechanism that contributes to the development of human tumors. Nevertheless, few studies have analyzed methylation in medulloblastomas. We determined the frequency of aberrant CpG island methylation for Caspase 8 (CASP8) in a group of 24 medulloblastomas arising in 8 adult and 16 pediatric patients. Complete methylation of CASP8 was found in 15 tumors (62%) and one case displayed hemimethylation. Three samples amplified neither of the two primer sets for methylated or unmethylated alleles, suggesting that genomic deletion occurred in the 5' flanking region of CASP8. Our findings suggest that methylation commonly contributes to CASP8 silencing in medulloblastomas and that homozygous deletion or severe sequence changes involving the promoter region may be another mechanism leading to CASP8 inactivation in this neoplasm.

  8. Aberrant promoter methylation of multiple genes in sputum from individuals exposed to smoky coal emissions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Lan, Qing; Shen, Min; Mumford, Judy; Keohavong, Phouthone

    2010-01-01

    Summary Aberrant methylation in the promoter region of cancer-related genes leads to gene transcriptional inactivation and plays an integral role in lung tumorigenesis. Recent studies demonstrated that promoter methylation was detected not only in lung tumors from patients with lung cancer but also in sputum of smokers without the disease, suggesting the potential for aberrant gene promoter methylation in sputum as a predictive marker for lung cancer. In the present study, we investigated promoter methylation of 4 genes frequently detected in lung tumors, including p16, MGMT, RASSF1A and DAPK genes, in sputum samples obtained from 107 individuals, including 34 never-smoking females and 73 mostly smoking males, who had no evidence of lung cancer but who were exposed to smoky coal emission in Xuan Wei County, China, where lung cancer rate is more than 6 times the Chinese national average rate. Forty nine of the individuals showed evidence of chronic bronchitis while the remaining 58 individuals showed no such a symptom. Promoter methylation of p16, MGMT, RASSF1A and DAPK was detected in 51.4% (55/107), 17.8% (19/107), 29.9% (32/107), and 15.9% (17/107) of the sputum samples from these individuals, respectively. There were no differences in promoter methylation frequencies of any of these genes according to smoking status or gender of the subjects or between individuals with chronic bronchitis and those without evidence of such a symptom. Therefore, individuals exposed to smoky coal emissions in this region harbored in their sputum frequent promoter methylation of these genes that have been previously found in lung tumors and implicated in lung cancer development. PMID:18751376

  9. Physiological characterization and genetic modifiers of aberrant root thigmomorphogenesis in mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana MILDEW LOCUS O genes.

    PubMed

    Bidzinski, Przemyslaw; Noir, Sandra; Shahi, Shermineh; Reinstädler, Anja; Gratkowska, Dominika Marta; Panstruga, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Root architecture and growth patterns are plant features that are still poorly understood. When grown under in vitro conditions, seedlings with mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes MLO4 or MLO11 exhibit aberrant root growth patterns upon contact with hard surfaces, exemplified as tight root spirals. We used a set of physiological assays and genetic tools to characterize this thigmomorphogenic defect in detail. We observed that the mlo4/mlo11-associated root curling phenotype is not recapitulated in a set of mutants with altered root growth patterns or architecture. We further found that mlo4/mlo11-conditioned root curling is not dependent upon light and endogenous flavonoids, but is pH-sensitive and affected by exogenous calcium levels. Based upon the latter two characteristics, mlo4-associated root coiling appears to be mechanistically different from the natural strong root curvature of the Arabidopsis ecotype Landsberg erecta. Gravistimulation reversibly overrides the aberrant thigmomorphogenesis of mlo4 seedlings. Mutants with dominant negative defects in α-tubulin modulate the extent and directionality of mlo4/mlo11-conditioned root coils, whereas mutants defective in polar auxin transport (axr4, aux1) or gravitropism (pgm1) completely suppress the mlo4 root curling phenotype. Our data implicate a joint contribution of calcium signalling, pH regulation, microtubular function, polar auxin transport and gravitropism in root thigmomorphogenesis.

  10. Aberrant and unstable expression of immunoglobulin genes in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Bessudo, A; Rassenti, L; Havlir, D; Richman, D; Feigal, E; Kipps, T J

    1998-08-15

    We examined the IgM VH gene subgroup use-distribution in serial blood samples of 37 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and a group of HIV-seronegative healthy adults. The IgM VH gene repertoires of healthy adults were relatively similar to one another and were stable over time. In contrast, individuals infected with HIV had IgM VH gene repertoires that were significantly more heterogeneous and unstable. Persons at early stages of HIV infection generally had abnormal expression levels of Ig VH3 genes and frequently displayed marked fluctuations in the relative expression levels of this VH gene subgroup over time. In contrast, persons with established acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had a significantly lower incidence of abnormalities in Ig VH3 expression levels, although continued to display abnormalities and instability in the expression levels of the smaller Ig VH gene subgroups. Moreover, the skewing and/or fluctuations in the expressed-IgM VH gene repertoire appeared greatest for persons at earlier stages of HIV infection. These studies show that persons infected with HIV have aberrant and unstable expression of immunoglobulin genes suggestive of a high degree humoral immune dysregulation and ongoing humoral immune responses to HIV-associated antigens and superantigens.

  11. The oncogenic BRD4-NUT chromatin regulator drives aberrant transcription within large topological domains

    PubMed Central

    Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Walsh, Erica M.; Wang, Xin; Grayson, Adlai R.; Hsi, Peter T.; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; French, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC), a subtype of squamous cell cancer, is one of the most aggressive human solid malignancies known. NMC is driven by the creation of a translocation oncoprotein, BRD4-NUT, which blocks differentiation and drives growth of NMC cells. BRD4-NUT forms distinctive nuclear foci in patient tumors, which we found correlate with ∼100 unprecedented, hyperacetylated expanses of chromatin that reach up to 2 Mb in size. These “megadomains” appear to be the result of aberrant, feed-forward loops of acetylation and binding of acetylated histones that drive transcription of underlying DNA in NMC patient cells and naïve cells induced to express BRD4-NUT. Megadomain locations are typically cell lineage-specific; however, the cMYC and TP63 regions are targeted in all NMCs tested and play functional roles in tumor growth. Megadomains appear to originate from select pre-existing enhancers that progressively broaden but are ultimately delimited by topologically associating domain (TAD) boundaries. Therefore, our findings establish a basis for understanding the powerful role played by large-scale chromatin organization in normal and aberrant lineage-specific gene transcription. PMID:26220994

  12. Association of Cigarette Smoking with Aberrant Methylation of the Tumor Suppressor Gene RARβ2 in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiseljak-Vassiliades, Katja; Xing, Mingzhao

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant gene methylation is often seen in thyroid cancer, a common endocrine malignancy. Tobacco smoking has been shown to be associated with aberrant gene methylation in several cancers, but its relationship with gene methylation in thyroid cancer has not been examined. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between smoking of patients and aberrant methylation of tumor suppressor genes for TIMP3, SLC5A8, death-associated protein kinase, and retinoic acid receptor β2 (RARβ2) in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer. The promoter methylation status of these genes was analyzed using quantitative real-time methylation-specific PCR on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA isolated from tumor tissues and correlated with smoking history of the patients. Among the four genes, methylation of the RARβ2 gene was significantly associated with smoking and other three genes showed a trend of association. Specifically, among the 138 patients investigated, 13/42 (31.0%) ever smokers vs. 10/96 (10.4%) never smokers harbored methylation of the RARβ2 gene (P = 0.003). This association was highly significant also in the subset of conventional variant PTC (P = 0.005) and marginally significant in follicular variant PTC (P = 0.06). The results demonstrate that smoking-associated aberrant methylation of the RARβ2 gene is a specific molecular event that may represent an important mechanism in thyroid tumorigenesis in smokers. PMID:22649395

  13. Screening targeted testis-specific genes for molecular assessment of aberrant sperm quality

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue Xia; Shen, Xiao Fang; Liu, Fu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Teratospermia is a heterogeneous and complex disorder, which is closely associated with male fertility. Genes and gene products associated with teratospermia may serve as targeted biomarkers that help understand the underlying mechanisms of male infertility; however, systematic information on the subject remains to be elucidated. The present study performed a comparative bioinformatics analysis to identify biomarkers associated with sperm quality, particular focusing on testis-specific biomarkers. A stepwise screening approach identified 1,085 testis/epididymis-specific genes and 3,406 teratospermia-associated genes, resulting in 348 testis-specific genes associated with aberrant sperm quality. These genes were functionally associated with the reproduction process. Gene products corresponding to heat shock protein family A (Hsp70) member 4 like (HSPA4L) and phosphoglycerate kinase 2 were characterized at the cellular level in human testes and ejaculated spermatozoa. HSPA4L expression in sperm was revealed to be associated with sperm quality. The present study provided a novel insight into the understanding of sperm quality, and a potential method for the diagnosis and assessment of sperm quality in the event of male infertility. PMID:27356588

  14. Analysis of genomic aberrations and gene expression profiling identifies novel lesions and pathways in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rice, K L; Lin, X; Wolniak, K; Ebert, B L; Berkofsky-Fessler, W; Buzzai, M; Sun, Y; Xi, C; Elkin, P; Levine, R; Golub, T; Gilliland, D G; Crispino, J D; Licht, J D; Zhang, W

    2011-01-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, are myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) with distinct clinical features and are associated with the JAK2V617F mutation. To identify genomic anomalies involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders, we profiled 87 MPN patients using Affymetrix 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Aberrations affecting chr9 were the most frequently observed and included 9pLOH (n=16), trisomy 9 (n=6) and amplifications of 9p13.3–23.3 (n=1), 9q33.1–34.13 (n=1) and 9q34.13 (n=6). Patients with trisomy 9 were associated with elevated JAK2V617F mutant allele burden, suggesting that gain of chr9 represents an alternative mechanism for increasing JAK2V617F dosage. Gene expression profiling of patients with and without chr9 abnormalities (+9, 9pLOH), identified genes potentially involved in disease pathogenesis including JAK2, STAT5B and MAPK14. We also observed recurrent gains of 1p36.31–36.33 (n=6), 17q21.2–q21.31 (n=5) and 17q25.1–25.3 (n=5) and deletions affecting 18p11.31–11.32 (n=8). Combined SNP and gene expression analysis identified aberrations affecting components of a non-canonical PRC2 complex (EZH1, SUZ12 and JARID2) and genes comprising a ‘HSC signature' (MLLT3, SMARCA2 and PBX1). We show that NFIB, which is amplified in 7/87 MPN patients and upregulated in PV CD34+ cells, protects cells from apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal. PMID:22829077

  15. Analysis of genomic aberrations and gene expression profiling identifies novel lesions and pathways in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Rice, K L; Lin, X; Wolniak, K; Ebert, B L; Berkofsky-Fessler, W; Buzzai, M; Sun, Y; Xi, C; Elkin, P; Levine, R; Golub, T; Gilliland, D G; Crispino, J D; Licht, J D; Zhang, W

    2011-11-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, are myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) with distinct clinical features and are associated with the JAK2V617F mutation. To identify genomic anomalies involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders, we profiled 87 MPN patients using Affymetrix 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Aberrations affecting chr9 were the most frequently observed and included 9pLOH (n=16), trisomy 9 (n=6) and amplifications of 9p13.3-23.3 (n=1), 9q33.1-34.13 (n=1) and 9q34.13 (n=6). Patients with trisomy 9 were associated with elevated JAK2V617F mutant allele burden, suggesting that gain of chr9 represents an alternative mechanism for increasing JAK2V617F dosage. Gene expression profiling of patients with and without chr9 abnormalities (+9, 9pLOH), identified genes potentially involved in disease pathogenesis including JAK2, STAT5B and MAPK14. We also observed recurrent gains of 1p36.31-36.33 (n=6), 17q21.2-q21.31 (n=5) and 17q25.1-25.3 (n=5) and deletions affecting 18p11.31-11.32 (n=8). Combined SNP and gene expression analysis identified aberrations affecting components of a non-canonical PRC2 complex (EZH1, SUZ12 and JARID2) and genes comprising a 'HSC signature' (MLLT3, SMARCA2 and PBX1). We show that NFIB, which is amplified in 7/87 MPN patients and upregulated in PV CD34+ cells, protects cells from apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal.

  16. Clinical Omics Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Incorporating Copy Number Aberrations and Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Takumi; Itoda, Masaya; Muto, Taika; Miyaguchi, Ken; Mogushi, Kaoru; Shoji, Satoshi; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Iida, Satoru; Uetake, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Toshiaki; Sugihara, Kenichi; Mizushima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently occurring cancers in Japan, and thus a wide range of methods have been deployed to study the molecular mechanisms of CRC. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of CRC, incorporating copy number aberration (CRC) and gene expression data. For the last four years, we have been collecting data from CRC cases and organizing the information as an “omics” study by integrating many kinds of analysis into a single comprehensive investigation. In our previous studies, we had experienced difficulty in finding genes related to CRC, as we observed higher noise levels in the expression data than in the data for other cancers. Because chromosomal aberrations are often observed in CRC, here, we have performed a combination of CNA analysis and expression analysis in order to identify some new genes responsible for CRC. This study was performed as part of the Clinical Omics Database Project at Tokyo Medical and Dental University. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of genetic instability in CRC by this combination of expression analysis and CNA, and to establish a new method for the diagnosis and treatment of CRC. Materials and methods: Comprehensive gene expression analysis was performed on 79 CRC cases using an Affymetrix Gene Chip, and comprehensive CNA analysis was performed using an Affymetrix DNA Sty array. To avoid the contamination of cancer tissue with normal cells, laser micro-dissection was performed before DNA/RNA extraction. Data analysis was performed using original software written in the R language. Result: We observed a high percentage of CNA in colorectal cancer, including copy number gains at 7, 8q, 13 and 20q, and copy number losses at 8p, 17p and 18. Gene expression analysis provided many candidates for CRC-related genes, but their association with CRC did not reach the level of statistical significance. The combination of CNA and gene expression analysis

  17. Aberrant host immune response induced by highly virulent PRRSV identified by digital gene expression tag profiling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There was a large scale outbreak of the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in China and Vietnam during 2006 and 2007 that resulted in unusually high morbidity and mortality among pigs of all ages. The mechanisms underlying the molecular pathogenesis of the highly virulent PRRS virus (H-PRRSV) remains unknown. Therefore, the relationship between pulmonary gene expression profiles after H-PRRSV infection and infection pathology were analyzed in this study using high-throughput deep sequencing and histopathology. Results H-PRRSV infection resulted in severe lung pathology. The results indicate that aberrant host innate immune responses to H-PRRSV and induction of an anti-apoptotic state could be responsible for the aggressive replication and dissemination of H-PRRSV. Prolific rapid replication of H-PRRSV could have triggered aberrant sustained expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines leading to a markedly robust inflammatory response compounded by significant cell death and increased oxidative damage. The end result was severe tissue damage and high pathogenicity. Conclusions The systems analysis utilized in this study provides a comprehensive basis for better understanding the pathogenesis of H-PRRSV. Furthermore, it allows the genetic components involved in H-PRRSV resistance/susceptibility in swine populations to be identified. PMID:20929578

  18. Aberrant activation and regulation of the oxidative burst in neutrophils with Mo1 glycoprotein deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nauseef, W.M.; de Alarcon, P.; Bale, J.F.; Clark, R.A.

    1986-07-15

    Patients whose cells are deficient in the glycoproteins LFA-1, Mo1, and p150,95 have recurrent infections and pronounced abnormalities in neutrophil adherence, aggregation, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. Activation and regulation of oxidative metabolism of Mo1-deficient neutrophils have been characterized. These cells failed to depolarize or to produce O/sub 2//sup -/ or H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ normally when stimulated by opsonized zymosan. The chemotactic peptide formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine depolarized Mo1-deficient neutrophils normally but caused supernormal production of O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, a result of a prolonged burst in oxidative metabolism. Phorbol myristate acetate depolarized Mo1-deficient neutrophils at a nearly normal rate but evoked release of significantly less O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ than from normal PMN. The aberrant activation and regulation of the oxidative burst in Mo1-deficient neutrohpils are considered in light of recently neutrophils are considered in light of recently emerging concepts in the cell biology of this process, and the possibility that these abnormalities reflect a defect in the cytoskeleton-membrane interaction is discussed.

  19. Reversible histone methylation regulates brain gene expression and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Andreassi, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic chromatin remodeling, including reversible histone methylation, regulates gene transcription in brain development and synaptic plasticity. Aberrant chromatin modifications due to mutant chromatin enzymes or chemical exposures have been associated with neurological or psychiatric disorders such as mental retardation, schizophrenia, depression, and drug addiction. Some chromatin enzymes, such as histone demethylases JARID1C and UTX, are coded by X-linked genes which are not X-inactivated in females. The higher expression of JARID1C and UTX in females could contribute to sex differences in brain development and behavior. PMID:20816965

  20. Segmentation of genomic and transcriptomic microarrays data reveals major correlation between DNA copy number aberrations and gene-loci expression.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Estevez, M; De Las Rivas, J; Fontanillo, C; Rubio, A

    2011-02-01

    DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) are genetic alterations common in cancer cells. Their transcriptional consequences are still poorly understood. Based on the fact that DNA copy number (CN) is highly correlated with the genomic position, we have applied a segmentation algorithm to gene expression (GE) to explore its relation with CN. We have found a strong correlation between segmented CN (sCN) and segmented GE (sGE), corroborating that CNAs have clear effects on genome-wide expression. We have found out that most of the recurrent regions of sGE are common to those obtained from sCN analysis. Results for two cancer datasets confirm the known targets of aberrations and provide new candidates to study. The suggested methodology allows to find recurrent aberrations specific to sGE, revealing loci where the expression of the genes is independent from their CNs. R code and additional files are available as supplementary material. PMID:21044881

  1. Identification of candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian-Yun; Mei, Li-Li; Qiu, Yun-Tan; Shi, Zhi-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were applied to analyze the copy number changes and expression level of candidate genes, respectively. Integrative analysis revealed that homozygous deletions of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKN) 2A and CDKN2B and gains of fascin actin-bundling protein 1 (FSCN1) and homer scaffolding protein 3 (HOMER3) occurred frequently in ESCC. The results demonstrated that the homozygous deletion of CDKN2A or CDKN2B was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis. Notably, the expression of CDKN2A and CDKN2B was lower in dysplasia than in normal esophageal epithelium. We also observed that the copy number increase of FSCN1 was significantly associated with pT, pN and pStage, and that the gain of HOMER3 was significantly linked with pN and pStage. We further revealed that FSCN1 and HOMER3 were overexpressed in ESCC, and that their overexpression was correlated with copy number increase. In conclusion, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, FSCN1 and HOMER3 are candidate cancer-associated genes and may play a tumorigenic role in ESCC.

  2. Identification of candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian-Yun; Mei, Li-Li; Qiu, Yun-Tan; Shi, Zhi-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were applied to analyze the copy number changes and expression level of candidate genes, respectively. Integrative analysis revealed that homozygous deletions of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKN) 2A and CDKN2B and gains of fascin actin-bundling protein 1 (FSCN1) and homer scaffolding protein 3 (HOMER3) occurred frequently in ESCC. The results demonstrated that the homozygous deletion of CDKN2A or CDKN2B was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis. Notably, the expression of CDKN2A and CDKN2B was lower in dysplasia than in normal esophageal epithelium. We also observed that the copy number increase of FSCN1 was significantly associated with pT, pN and pStage, and that the gain of HOMER3 was significantly linked with pN and pStage. We further revealed that FSCN1 and HOMER3 were overexpressed in ESCC, and that their overexpression was correlated with copy number increase. In conclusion, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, FSCN1 and HOMER3 are candidate cancer-associated genes and may play a tumorigenic role in ESCC. PMID:27698883

  3. The Histone Demethylase Jarid1b Ensures Faithful Mouse Development by Protecting Developmental Genes from Aberrant H3K4me3

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Susanne M.; Malatesta, Martina; Morales Torres, Cristina; Rekling, Jens C.; Johansen, Jens V.; Abarrategui, Iratxe; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic development is tightly regulated by transcription factors and chromatin-associated proteins. H3K4me3 is associated with active transcription and H3K27me3 with gene repression, while the combination of both keeps genes required for development in a plastic state. Here we show that deletion of the H3K4me2/3 histone demethylase Jarid1b (Kdm5b/Plu1) results in major neonatal lethality due to respiratory failure. Jarid1b knockout embryos have several neural defects including disorganized cranial nerves, defects in eye development, and increased incidences of exencephaly. Moreover, in line with an overlap of Jarid1b and Polycomb target genes, Jarid1b knockout embryos display homeotic skeletal transformations typical for Polycomb mutants, supporting a functional interplay between Polycomb proteins and Jarid1b. To understand how Jarid1b regulates mouse development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of histone modifications, which demonstrated that normally inactive genes encoding developmental regulators acquire aberrant H3K4me3 during early embryogenesis in Jarid1b knockout embryos. H3K4me3 accumulates as embryonic development proceeds, leading to increased expression of neural master regulators like Pax6 and Otx2 in Jarid1b knockout brains. Taken together, these results suggest that Jarid1b regulates mouse development by protecting developmental genes from inappropriate acquisition of active histone modifications. PMID:23637629

  4. Aberrant expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene DAL-1 due to hypermethylation in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Xu, Man; Cui, Xiaobo; Liu, Yixin; Zhang, Yi; Sui, Yu; Wang, Dong; Peng, Lei; Wang, Dexu; Yu, Jingcui

    2016-01-01

    By allelotyping for loss of heterozygosity (LOH), we previously identified a deletion region that harbors the candidate tumor suppressor gene DAL-1 at 18p11.3 in sporadic gastric cancers (GCs). The expression and function of DAL-1 in GCs remained unclear. Here, we demonstrated that the absence of or notable decreases in the expression of DAL-1 mRNA and protein was highly correlated with CpG hypermethylation of the DAL-1 promoter in primary GC tissues and in GC cell lines. Furthermore, abnormal DAL-1 subcellular localization was also observed in GC cells. Exogenous DAL-1 effectively inhibited cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT); exogenous DAL-1 also promoted apoptosis in GC AGS cells. When endogenous DAL-1 was knocked down in GC HGC-27 cells, the cells appeared highly aggressive. Taken together, these findings provide solid evidence that aberrant expression of DAL-1 by hypermethylation in the promoter region results in tumor suppressor gene behavior that plays important roles in the malignancy of GCs. Understanding the role of it played in the molecular pathogenesis of GC, DAL-1 might be a potential biomarker for molecular diagnosis and evaluation of the GC. PMID:26923709

  5. Nutritional regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cousins, R J

    1999-01-25

    Genes are regulated by complex arrays of response elements that influence the rate of transcription. Nutrients and hormones either act directly to influence these rates or act indirectly through specialized signaling pathways. Metabolites of vitamins A and D, fatty acids, some sterols, and zinc are among the nutrients that influence transcription directly. Components of dietary fiber may influence gene expression indirectly through changes in hormonal signaling, mechanical stimuli, and metabolites produced by the intestinal microflora. In addition, consumption of water-soluble fibers may lead to changes in gene expression mediated through indirect mechanisms that influence transcription rates. In the large intestine, short-chain fatty acids, including butyric acid, are produced by microflora. Butyric acid can indirectly influence gene expression. Some sources of fiber limit nutrient absorption, particularly of trace elements. This could have direct or indirect effects on gene expression. Identification of genes in colonic epithelial cells that are differentially regulated by dietary fiber will be an important step toward understanding the role of dietary factors in colorectal cancer progression.

  6. Aberrant Splicing of Estrogen Receptor, HER2, and CD44 Genes in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death among women under the age of 50 years. Established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (estrogen receptor [ER]/progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), play significant roles in the selection of patients for endocrine and trastuzumab therapies. However, the initial treatment response is often followed by tumor relapse with intrinsic resistance to the first-line therapy, so it has been expected to identify novel molecular markers to improve the survival and quality of life of patients. Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNAs is a ubiquitous and flexible mechanism for the control of gene expression in mammalian cells. It provides cells with the opportunity to create protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions from a single genomic locus. Aberrant alternative splicing is very common in cancer where emerging tumor cells take advantage of this flexibility to produce proteins that promote cell growth and survival. While a number of splicing alterations have been reported in human cancers, we focus on aberrant splicing of ER, HER2, and CD44 genes from the viewpoint of BC development. ERα36, a splice variant from the ER1 locus, governs nongenomic membrane signaling pathways triggered by estrogen and confers 4-hydroxytamoxifen resistance in BC therapy. The alternative spliced isoform of HER2 lacking exon 20 (Δ16HER2) has been reported in human BC; this isoform is associated with transforming ability than the wild-type HER2 and recapitulates the phenotypes of endocrine therapy-resistant BC. Although both CD44 splice isoforms (CD44s, CD44v) play essential roles in BC development, CD44v is more associated with those with favorable prognosis, such as luminal A subtype, while CD44s is linked to those with poor prognosis, such as HER2 or basal cell subtypes that are often metastatic. Hence, the detection of splice variants from these loci will provide keys

  7. Pluripotency Genes and Their Functions in the Normal and Aberrant Breast and Brain.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Tracy; Twigger, Alecia-Jane; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) attracted considerable interest with the successful isolation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from the inner cell mass of murine, primate and human embryos. Whilst it was initially thought that the only PSCs were ESCs, in more recent years cells with similar properties have been isolated from organs of the adult, including the breast and brain. Adult PSCs in these organs have been suggested to be remnants of embryonic development that facilitate normal tissue homeostasis during repair and regeneration. They share certain characteristics with ESCs, such as an inherent capacity to self-renew and differentiate into cells of the three germ layers, properties that are regulated by master pluripotency transcription factors (TFs) OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor 4), SOX2 (sex determining region Y-box 2), and homeobox protein NANOG. Aberrant expression of these TFs can be oncogenic resulting in heterogeneous tumours fueled by cancer stem cells (CSC), which are resistant to conventional treatments and are associated with tumour recurrence post-treatment. Further to enriching our understanding of the role of pluripotency TFs in normal tissue function, research now aims to develop optimized isolation and propagation methods for normal adult PSCs and CSCs for the purposes of regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and disease modeling aimed at targeted personalised cancer therapies. PMID:26580604

  8. Pluripotency Genes and Their Functions in the Normal and Aberrant Breast and Brain.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Tracy; Twigger, Alecia-Jane; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-11-13

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) attracted considerable interest with the successful isolation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from the inner cell mass of murine, primate and human embryos. Whilst it was initially thought that the only PSCs were ESCs, in more recent years cells with similar properties have been isolated from organs of the adult, including the breast and brain. Adult PSCs in these organs have been suggested to be remnants of embryonic development that facilitate normal tissue homeostasis during repair and regeneration. They share certain characteristics with ESCs, such as an inherent capacity to self-renew and differentiate into cells of the three germ layers, properties that are regulated by master pluripotency transcription factors (TFs) OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor 4), SOX2 (sex determining region Y-box 2), and homeobox protein NANOG. Aberrant expression of these TFs can be oncogenic resulting in heterogeneous tumours fueled by cancer stem cells (CSC), which are resistant to conventional treatments and are associated with tumour recurrence post-treatment. Further to enriching our understanding of the role of pluripotency TFs in normal tissue function, research now aims to develop optimized isolation and propagation methods for normal adult PSCs and CSCs for the purposes of regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and disease modeling aimed at targeted personalised cancer therapies.

  9. Oncogene regulation of tumor suppressor genes in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jimmy; Turner, Joel; McCarthy, Susan; Enkemann, Steve; Li, Chan Gong; Yan, Perally; Huang, Timothy; Yeatman, Timothy J

    2005-02-01

    We attempted to demonstrate whether there is an epigenetic link between oncogenes and tumor suppression genes in tumorigenesis. We designed a high throughput model to identify a candidate group of tumor suppressor genes potentially regulated by oncogenes. Gene expression profiling of mock-transfected versus v-src-transfected 3Y1 rat fibroblasts identified significant overexpression of DNA methyltransferase 1, the enzyme responsible for aberrant genome methylation, in v-src-transfected fibroblasts. Secondary microarray analyses identified a number of candidate tumor suppressor genes that were down-regulated by v-src but were also re-expressed following treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a potent demethylating agent. This candidate group included both tumor suppressor genes that are known to be silenced by DNA hypermethylation and those that have not been previously identified with promoter hypermethylation. To further validate our model, we identified tsg, a tumor suppressor gene that was shown to be down-regulated by v-src and found to harbor dense promoter hypermethylation. Our model demonstrates a cooperative relationship between oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes mediated through promoter hypermethylation.

  10. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  11. Aberrant splicing of genes involved in haemoglobin synthesis and impaired terminal erythroid maturation in SF3B1 mutated refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Conte, Simona; Katayama, Shintaro; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Karimi, Mohsen; Dimitriou, Marios; Jansson, Monika; Mortera-Blanco, Teresa; Unneberg, Per; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Sander, Birgitta; Skoog, Tiina; Campbell, Peter; Walfridsson, Julian; Kere, Juha; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is distinguished by hyperplastic inefficient erythropoiesis, aberrant mitochondrial ferritin accumulation and anaemia. Heterozygous mutations in the spliceosome gene SF3B1 are found in a majority of RARS cases. To explore the link between SF3B1 mutations and anaemia, we studied mutated RARS CD34(+) marrow cells with regard to transcriptome sequencing, splice patterns and mutational allele burden during erythroid differentiation. Transcriptome profiling during early erythroid differentiation revealed a marked up-regulation of genes involved in haemoglobin synthesis and in the oxidative phosphorylation process, and down-regulation of mitochondrial ABC transporters compared to normal bone marrow. Moreover, mis-splicing of genes involved in transcription regulation, particularly haemoglobin synthesis, was confirmed, indicating a compromised haemoglobinization during RARS erythropoiesis. In order to define the phase during which erythroid maturation of SF3B1 mutated cells is most affected, we assessed allele burden during erythroid differentiation in vitro and in vivo and found that SF3B1 mutated erythroblasts showed stable expansion until late erythroblast stage but that terminal maturation to reticulocytes was significantly reduced. In conclusion, SF3B1 mutated RARS progenitors display impaired splicing with potential downstream consequences for genes of key importance for haemoglobin synthesis and terminal erythroid differentiation.

  12. Gene regulation by mechanical forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oluwole, B. O.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo from the flow of blood across the luminal surface of the blood vessel. The purpose of this review was to examine the data available on how these mechanical forces, in particular cyclic strain, affect the expression and regulation of endothelial cell function. Studies from various investigators using models of cyclic strain in vitro have shown that various vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin are induced by the effect of mechanical deformation, and that the expression of these mediators may be regulated at the transcription level by mechanical forces. There also seems to be emerging evidence that endothelial cells may also act as mechanotransducers, whereby the transmission of external forces induces various cytoskeletal changes and second messenger cascades. Furthermore, it seems these forces may act on specific response elements of promoter genes.

  13. QB1 - Stochastic Gene Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Munsky, Brian

    2012-07-23

    Summaries of this presentation are: (1) Stochastic fluctuations or 'noise' is present in the cell - Random motion and competition between reactants, Low copy, quantization of reactants, Upstream processes; (2) Fluctuations may be very important - Cell-to-cell variability, Cell fate decisions (switches), Signal amplification or damping, stochastic resonances; and (3) Some tools are available to mode these - Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (SSA and variants), Moment approximation methods, Finite State Projection. We will see how modeling these reactions can tell us more about the underlying processes of gene regulation.

  14. Mathematical Models of Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Michael C.

    2004-03-01

    This talk will focus on examples of mathematical models for the regulation of repressible operons (e.g. the tryptophan operon), inducible operons (e.g. the lactose operon), and the lysis/lysogeny switch in phage λ. These ``simple" gene regulatory elements can display characteristics experimentally of rapid response to perturbations and bistability, and biologically accurate mathematical models capture these aspects of the dynamics. The models, if realistic, are always nonlinear and contain significant time delays due to transcriptional and translational delays that pose substantial problems for the analysis of the possible ranges of dynamics.

  15. Developmental genes significantly afflicted by aberrant promoter methylation and somatic mutation predict overall survival of late-stage colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    An, Ning; Yang, Xue; Cheng, Shujun; Wang, Guiqi; Zhang, Kaitai

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is an exceedingly complicated process, which involves multi-level dysregulations, including genomics (majorly caused by somatic mutation and copy number variation), DNA methylomics, and transcriptomics. Therefore, only looking into one molecular level of cancer is not sufficient to uncover the intricate underlying mechanisms. With the abundant resources of public available data in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, an integrative strategy was conducted to systematically analyze the aberrant patterns of colorectal cancer on the basis of DNA copy number, promoter methylation, somatic mutation and gene expression. In this study, paired samples in each genomic level were retrieved to identify differentially expressed genes with corresponding genetic or epigenetic dysregulations. Notably, the result of gene ontology enrichment analysis indicated that the differentially expressed genes with corresponding aberrant promoter methylation or somatic mutation were both functionally concentrated upon developmental process, suggesting the intimate association between development and carcinogenesis. Thus, by means of random walk with restart, 37 significant development-related genes were retrieved from a priori-knowledge based biological network. In five independent microarray datasets, Kaplan–Meier survival and Cox regression analyses both confirmed that the expression of these genes was significantly associated with overall survival of Stage III/IV colorectal cancer patients. PMID:26691761

  16. DNA Copy Number Aberrations, and Human Papillomavirus Status in Penile Carcinoma. Clinico-Pathological Correlations and Potential Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Rajab, Ramzi; Tinwell, Brendan; Corbishley, Cathy; Watkin, Nick; Berney, Dan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2016-01-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma is a rare disease, in which somatic genetic aberrations have yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that gene copy aberrations might correlate with human papillomavirus status and clinico-pathological features. We sought to determine the spectrum of gene copy number aberrations in a large series of PSCCs and to define their correlations with human papillomavirus, histopathological subtype, and tumor grade, stage and lymph node status. Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded penile squamous cell carcinomas were centrally reviewed by expert uropathologists. DNA was extracted from micro-dissected samples, subjected to PCR-based human papillomavirus assessment and genotyping (INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus Genotyping Extra Assay) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a 32K Bacterial Artificial Chromosome array platform. Sixty-four samples yielded interpretable results. Recurrent gains were observed in chromosomes 1p13.3-q44 (88%), 3p12.3-q29 (86%), 5p15.33-p11 (67%) and 8p12-q24.3 (84%). Amplifications of 5p15.33-p11 and 11p14.1-p12 were found in seven (11%) and four (6%) cases, respectively. Losses were observed in chromosomes 2q33-q37.3 (86%), 3p26.3-q11.1 (83%) and 11q12.2-q25 (81%). Although many losses and gains were similar throughout the cohort, there were small significant differences observed at specific loci, between human papillomavirus positive and negative tumors, between tumor types, and tumor grade and nodal status. These results demonstrate that despite the diversity of genetic aberrations in penile squamous cell carcinomas, there are significant correlations between the clinico-pathological data and the genetic changes that may play a role in disease natural history and progression and highlight potential driver genes, which may feature in molecular pathways for existing therapeutic agents. PMID:26901676

  17. Transcriptional regulation of tenascin genes

    PubMed Central

    Chiovaro, Francesca; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Chiquet, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins of the tenascin family resemble each other in their domain structure, and also share functions in modulating cell adhesion and cellular responses to growth factors. Despite these common features, the 4 vertebrate tenascins exhibit vastly different expression patterns. Tenascin-R is specific to the central nervous system. Tenascin-C is an “oncofetal” protein controlled by many stimuli (growth factors, cytokines, mechanical stress), but with restricted occurrence in space and time. In contrast, tenascin-X is a constituitive component of connective tissues, and its level is barely affected by external factors. Finally, the expression of tenascin-W is similar to that of tenascin-C but even more limited. In accordance with their highly regulated expression, the promoters of the tenascin-C and -W genes contain TATA boxes, whereas those of the other 2 tenascins do not. This article summarizes what is currently known about the complex transcriptional regulation of the 4 tenascin genes in development and disease. PMID:25793574

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression regulation in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gos, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are a heterogenous group of disorders that are related to alterations in nervous system function. The genetic background of neurological diseases is heterogenous and may include chromosomal aberrations, specific gene mutations and epigenetic defects. This review is aimed at presenting of selected diseases that are associated with different epigenetic alterations. The imprinting defects on chromosome 15 are the cause of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes that both are characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay and specific behavioral phenotype. Besides the imprinting defect, these diseases can also be caused by deletion of chromosome 15 or uniparental disomy. Aberrant epigenetic regulation is also specific for Fragile X syndrome that is caused by expansion of CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene that leads to global methylation of the promoter region and repression of FMR1 transcription. A number of neurological diseases, mainly associated with intellectual impairment, may be caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in epigenetic regulation. The number of such diseases is rapidly growing thanks to the implementation of genomic sequencing for the identification of their molecular causes. One of the best known diseases linked to defects in epigenetic modifiers is Rett syndrome caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene or its variant - Rett-like syndrome caused by a mutation in CDKL5 or FOXG1 genes. As the epigenetic signature is potentially reversible, much attention is focused on possible therapies with drugs that influence DNA or histone modifications. This is especially important in the case of neurological disorders in which epigenetic changes are observed as the effect of the disease.

  19. Gender differences in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations in rodent germ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, Ilse-Dore; Carere, Angelo; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2007-05-15

    Germ cell mutagenicity testing provides experimental data to quantify genetic risk for exposed human populations. The majority of tests are performed with exposure of males, and female data are relatively rare. The reason for this paucity lies in the differences between male and female germ cell biology. Male germ cells are produced throughout reproductive life and all developmental stages can be ascertained by appropriate breeding schemes. In contrast, the female germ cell pool is limited, meiosis begins during embryogenesis and oocytes are arrested over long periods of time until maturation processes start for small numbers of oocytes during the oestrus cycle in mature females. The literature data are reviewed to point out possible gender differences of germ cells to exogenous agents such as chemicals or ionizing radiation. From the limited information, it can be concluded that male germ cells are more sensitive than female germ cells to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations. However, exceptions are described which shed doubt on the extrapolation of experimental data from male rodents to the genetic risk of the human population. Furthermore, the female genome may be more sensitive to mutation induction during peri-conceptional stages compared to the male genome of the zygote. With few exceptions, germ cell experiments have been carried out under high acute exposure to optimize the effects and to compensate for the limited sample size in animal experiments. Human exposure to environmental agents, on the other hand, is usually chronic and involves low doses. Under these conditions, gender differences may become apparent that have not been studied so far. Additionally, data are reviewed that suggest a false impression of safety when responses are negative under high acute exposure of male rodents while a mutational response is induced by low chronic exposure. The classical (morphological) germ cell mutation tests are not performed anymore

  20. Dynamics of bacterial gene regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Atul

    2009-03-01

    The phenomenon of diauxic growth is a classical problem of bacterial gene regulation. The most well studied example of this phenomenon is the glucose-lactose diauxie, which occurs because the expression of the lac operon is strongly repressed in the presence of glucose. This repression is often explained by appealing to molecular mechanisms such as cAMP activation and inducer exclusion. I will begin by analyzing data showing that these molecular mechanisms cannot explain the strong lac repression because they exert a relatively weak effect. I will then present a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution, which yields strong repression despite the absence of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. The model also explains the growth patterns observed in batch and continuous cultures of various bacterial strains and substrate mixtures. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the experimental evidence regarding positive feedback, the key component of the minimal model.

  1. High prevalence of immunoglobulin light chain gene aberrations as revealed by FISH in multiple myeloma and MGUS.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Seval; Binder, Anastasia; Gerlach, Antje; Niehage, Sylke; Theodora Melissari, Maria; Inandiklioglu, Nihal; Dörken, Bernd; Burmeister, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant B-cell neoplasm characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of aberrant plasma cells in the bone marrow. Chromosome aberrations in MM are complex and represent a hallmark of the disease, involving many chromosomes that are altered both numerically and structurally. Nearly half of the cases are nonhyperdiploid and show IGH translocations with the following partner genes: CCND1, FGFR3 and MMSET, MAF, MAFB, and CCND3. The remaining 50% are grouped into a hyperdiploid group that is characterized by multiple trisomies involving chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 15, 19, and 21. In this study, we analyzed the immunoglobulin light chain kappa (IGK, 2p12) and lambda (IGL, 22q11) loci in 150 cases, mostly with MM but in a few cases monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), without IGH translocations. We identified aberrations in 27% (= 40 patients) including rearrangements (12%), gains (12%), and deletions (4.6%). In 6 of 18 patients with IGK or/and IGL rearrangements, we detected a MYC rearrangement which suggests that MYC is the translocation partner in the majority of these cases. PMID:24729354

  2. Aberrant gene expression in mucosa adjacent to tumor reveals a molecular crosstalk in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A colorectal tumor is not an isolated entity growing in a restricted location of the body. The patient’s gut environment constitutes the framework where the tumor evolves and this relationship promotes and includes a complex and tight correlation of the tumor with inflammation, blood vessels formation, nutrition, and gut microbiome composition. The tumor influence in the environment could both promote an anti-tumor or a pro-tumor response. Methods A set of 98 paired adjacent mucosa and tumor tissues from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and 50 colon mucosa from healthy donors (246 samples in total) were included in this work. RNA extracted from each sample was hybridized in Affymetrix chips Human Genome U219. Functional relationships between genes were inferred by means of systems biology using both transcriptional regulation networks (ARACNe algorithm) and protein-protein interaction networks (BIANA software). Results Here we report a transcriptomic analysis revealing a number of genes activated in adjacent mucosa from CRC patients, not activated in mucosa from healthy donors. A functional analysis of these genes suggested that this active reaction of the adjacent mucosa was related to the presence of the tumor. Transcriptional and protein-interaction networks were used to further elucidate this response of normal gut in front of the tumor, revealing a crosstalk between proteins secreted by the tumor and receptors activated in the adjacent colon tissue; and vice versa. Remarkably, Slit family of proteins activated ROBO receptors in tumor whereas tumor-secreted proteins transduced a cellular signal finally activating AP-1 in adjacent tissue. Conclusions The systems-level approach provides new insights into the micro-ecology of colorectal tumorogenesis. Disrupting this intricate molecular network of cell-cell communication and pro-inflammatory microenvironment could be a therapeutic target in CRC patients. PMID:24597571

  3. Transplacental exposure to inorganic arsenic at a hepatocarcinogenic dose induces fetal gene expression changes in mice indicative of aberrant estrogen signaling and disrupted steroid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Xie Yaxiong; Cooper, Ryan; Ducharme, Danica M.K.; Tennant, Raymond; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2007-05-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic in utero in C3H mice produces hepatocellular carcinoma in male offspring when they reach adulthood. To help define the molecular events associated with the fetal onset of arsenic hepatocarcinogenesis, pregnant C3H mice were given drinking water containing 0 (control) or 85 ppm arsenic from day 8 to 18 of gestation. At the end of the arsenic exposure period, male fetal livers were removed and RNA isolated for microarray analysis using 22K oligo chips. Arsenic exposure in utero produced significant (p < 0.001) alterations in expression of 187 genes, with approximately 25% of aberrantly expressed genes related to either estrogen signaling or steroid metabolism. Real-time RT-PCR on selected genes confirmed these changes. Various genes controlled by estrogen, including X-inactive-specific transcript, anterior gradient-2, trefoil factor-1, CRP-ductin, ghrelin, and small proline-rich protein-2A, were dramatically over-expressed. Estrogen-regulated genes including cytokeratin 1-19 and Cyp2a4 were over-expressed, although Cyp3a25 was suppressed. Several genes involved with steroid metabolism also showed remarkable expression changes, including increased expression of 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-7 (HSD17{beta}7; involved in estradiol production) and decreased expression of HSD17{beta}5 (involved in testosterone production). The expression of key genes important in methionine metabolism, such as methionine adenosyltransferase-1a, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and thioether S-methyltransferase, were suppressed. Thus, exposure of mouse fetus to inorganic arsenic during a critical period in development significantly alters the expression of various genes encoding estrogen signaling and steroid or methionine metabolism. These alterations could disrupt genetic programming at the very early life stage, which could impact tumor formation much later in adulthood.

  4. Aberrant expression of the CHFR prophase checkpoint gene in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Aiqin; Ye, Junli; Zhang, Kunpeng; Yu, Hongsheng; Gao, Yanhua; Wang, Hongfang; Sun, Lirong; Xing, Xiaoming; Yang, Kun; Zhao, Min

    2015-05-01

    Checkpoint with FHA and Ring Finger (CHFR) is a checkpoint protein that reportedly initiates a cell cycle delay in response to microtubule stress during prophase in mitosis, which has become an interesting target for understanding cancer pathogenesis. Recently, aberrant methylation of the CHFR gene associated with gene silencing has been reported in several cancers. In the present study, we examined the expression of CHFR in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the expression level of CHFR mRNA and protein was reduced in B-NHL tissue samples and B cell lines. Furthermore, CHFR methylation was detected in 39 of 122 B-NHL patients, which was not found in noncancerous reactive hyperplasia of lymph node (RH) tissues. CHFR methylation correlated with the reduced expression of CHFR, high International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and later pathologic Ann Arbor stages of B-NHL. Treatment with demethylation reagent, 5-Aza-dC, could eliminate the hypermethylation of CHFR, enhance CHFR expression and cell apoptosis and inhibit the cell proliferation of Raji cells, which could be induced by high expression of CHFR in Raji cells. Our results indicated that aberrant methylation of CHFR may be associated with the pathogenesis, progression for B-NHL, which might be a novel molecular marker as prognosis and treatment for B-NHL. PMID:25798877

  5. Epigenetic regulation of the RHOX homeobox gene cluster and its association with human male infertility.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Marcy E; Bleiziffer, Andreas; Tüttelmann, Frank; Gromoll, Jörg; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2014-01-01

    The X-linked RHOX cluster encodes a set of homeobox genes that are selectively expressed in the reproductive tract. Members of the RHOX cluster regulate target genes important for spermatogenesis promote male fertility in mice. Studies show that demethylating agents strongly upregulate the expression of mouse Rhox genes, suggesting that they are regulated by DNA methylation. However, whether this extends to human RHOX genes, whether DNA methylation directly regulates RHOX gene transcription and how this relates to human male infertility are unknown. To address these issues, we first defined the promoter regions of human RHOX genes and performed gain- and loss-of-function experiments to determine whether human RHOX gene transcription is regulated by DNA methylation. Our results indicated that DNA methylation is necessary and sufficient to silence human RHOX gene expression. To determine whether RHOX cluster methylation associates with male infertility, we evaluated the methylation status of RHOX genes in sperm from a large cohort of infertility patients. Linear regression analysis revealed a strong association between RHOX gene cluster hypermethylation and three independent types of semen abnormalities. Hypermethylation was restricted specifically to the RHOX cluster; we did not observe it in genes immediately adjacent to it on the X chromosome. Our results strongly suggest that human RHOX homeobox genes are under an epigenetic control mechanism that is aberrantly regulated in infertility patients. We propose that hypermethylation of the RHOX gene cluster serves as a marker for idiopathic infertility and that it is a candidate to exert a causal role in male infertility.

  6. NrasG12D/+ promotes leukemogenesis by aberrantly regulating hematopoietic stem cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyong; Kong, Guangyao; Liu, Yangang; Du, Juan; Chang, Yuan-I; Tey, Sin Ruow; Zhang, Xinmin; Ranheim, Erik A.; Saba-El-Leil, Marc K.; Meloche, Sylvain; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Zhang, Jingfang; Zhang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic NRAS mutations are frequently identified in human myeloid leukemias. In mice, expression of endogenous oncogenic Nras (NrasG12D/+) in hematopoietic cells leads to expansion of myeloid progenitors, increased long-term reconstitution of bone marrow cells, and a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). However, acute expression of NrasG12D/+ in a pure C57BL/6 background does not induce hyperactivated granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor signaling or increased proliferation in myeloid progenitors. It is thus unclear how NrasG12D/+ signaling promotes leukemogenesis. Here, we show that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) expressing NrasG12D/+ serve as MPN-initiating cells. They undergo moderate hyperproliferation with increased self-renewal. The aberrant NrasG12D/+ HSC function is associated with hyperactivation of ERK1/2 in HSCs. Conversely, downregulation of MEK/ERK by pharmacologic and genetic approaches attenuates the cycling of NrasG12D/+ HSCs and prevents the expansion of NrasG12D/+ HSCs and myeloid progenitors. Our data delineate critical mechanisms of oncogenic Nras signaling in HSC function and leukemogenesis. PMID:23687087

  7. Aberrant cell cycle regulation in rat liver cells induced by post-initiation treatment with hepatocarcinogens/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoters.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Watanabe, Yousuke; Onda, Nobuhiko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to determine the onset time of hepatocarcinogen/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoter-specific cell proliferation, apoptosis and aberrant cell cycle regulation after post-initiation treatment. Six-week-old rats were treated with the genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, carbadox (CRB), the marginally hepatocarcinogenic leucomalachite green (LMG), the tumor promoter, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) or the non-carcinogenic hepatotoxicant, acetaminophen, for 2, 4 or 6 weeks during the post-initiation phase using a medium-term liver bioassay. Cell proliferation activity, expression of G2 to M phase- and spindle checkpoint-related molecules, and apoptosis were immunohistochemically analyzed at week 2 and 4, and tumor promotion activity was assessed at week 6. At week 2, hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific aberrant cell cycle regulation was not observed. At week 4, BNF and LMG increased cell proliferation together with hepatotoxicity, while CRB did not. Additionally, BNF and CRB reduced the number of cells expressing phosphorylated-histone H3 in both ubiquitin D (UBD)(+) cells and Ki-67(+) proliferating cells, suggesting development of spindle checkpoint dysfunction, regardless of cell proliferation activity. At week 6, examined hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increased preneoplastic hepatic foci expressing glutathione S-transferase placental form. These results suggest that some hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increase their toxicity after post-initiation treatment, causing regenerative cell proliferation. In contrast, some genotoxic hepatocarcinogens may disrupt the spindle checkpoint without facilitating cell proliferation at the early stage of tumor promotion. This suggests that facilitation of cell proliferation and disruption of spindle checkpoint function are induced by different mechanisms during hepatocarcinogenesis. Four weeks of post-initiation treatment may be sufficient to induce hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific cellular responses. PMID

  8. Influence of DNA repair gene polymorphisms of hOGG1, XRCC1, XRCC3, ERCC2 and the folate metabolism gene MTHFR on chromosomal aberration frequencies.

    PubMed

    Skjelbred, Camilla Furu; Svendsen, Marit; Haugan, Vera; Eek, Anette Kildal; Clausen, Kjell Oskar; Svendsen, Martin Veel; Hansteen, Inger-Lise

    2006-12-01

    We have studied the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes hOGG1, XRCC1, XRCC3, ERCC2 and the MTHFR gene in the folate metabolism on the frequencies of cells with chromosomal aberrations (CA), chromosome-type aberrations (CSA), chromatid-type aberrations (CTA), chromatid breaks (CTB) and chromatid gaps (CTG) scored in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 651 Norwegian subjects of Caucasian descendant. DNA was extracted from fixed cell suspensions. The log-linear Poisson regression model was used for the combined data which included age, smoking, occupational exposure and genotype for 449 subjects. Our results suggest that individuals carrying the hOGG1 326Cys or the XRCC1 399Gln allele have an increased risk of chromosomal damage, while individuals carrying the XRCC1 194Trp or the ERCC2 751Gln allele have a reduced risk regardless of smoking habits and age. Individuals carrying the XRCC1 280His allele had an increased risk of CSA which was only apparent in non-smokers. This was independent of age. A protective effect of the XRCC3 241Met allele was only found in the older age group in non-smokers for CA, CSA and CTA, and in smokers for CSA. In the youngest age group, the opposite effect was found, with an increased risk for CA, CTA and CTG in smokers. Carrying the MTHFR 222Val allele gave an increased risk for chromosome and chromatid-type aberrations for both non-smokers and smokers, especially for individuals in the older age group, and with variable results in the youngest age group. The variables included in the different regression models accounted, however, for only 4-10% of the variation. The frequency ratio for CTG was significantly higher than for CTA and CTB for only 7 of the 43 comparisons performed. Some of the gap frequencies diverge from the trend in the CA, CSA, CTA and CTB results.

  9. Coordinately up-regulated genes in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hough, C D; Cho, K R; Zonderman, A B; Schwartz, D R; Morin, P J

    2001-05-15

    A better understanding of the molecular circuitry in normal ovarian tissues and in ovarian cancer will likely provide new targets for diagnosis and therapy. Recently, much has been learned about the genes expressed in ovarian cancer through studies with cDNA arrays and serial analysis of gene expression. However, these methods do not allow highly quantitative analysis of gene expression on a large number of specimens. Here, we have used quantitative real-time RT-PCR in a panel of 39 microdissected ovarian carcinomas of various subtypes to systematically analyze the expression of 13 genes, many of which were previously identified as up-regulated in a subset of ovarian cancers by serial analyses of gene expression. The genes analyzed are glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3), apolipoprotein J/clusterin, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2, epithelial cell adhesion molecule/GA733-2, Kop protease inhibitor, matrix gla protein, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3, folate receptor 1, S100A2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, and ceruloplasmin. All of the genes were found overexpressed, some at extremely high levels, in the vast majority of ovarian carcinomas irrespective of the subtype. Interestingly, GPX3 was found at much higher levels in tumors with clear cell histology and may represent a biomarker for this subtype. Some of the genes studied here may thus represent targets for early detection ovarian cancer. The gene expression patterns were not associated with age at diagnosis, stage, or K-ras mutation status in ovarian cancer. We find that several genes are coordinately regulated in ovarian cancer, likely representing the fact that many genes are activated as part of common signaling pathways or that extensive cross-talk exists between several pathways in ovarian cancer. A statistical analysis shows that genes commonly up-regulated in ovarian cancer may result from the aberrant

  10. Pneumococcal hydrogen peroxide-induced stress signaling regulates inflammatory genes.

    PubMed

    Loose, Maria; Hudel, Martina; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Garcia, Ernesto; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Lucas, Rudolf; Chakraborty, Trinad; Pillich, Helena

    2015-01-15

    Microbial infections can induce aberrant responses in cellular stress pathways, leading to translational attenuation, metabolic restriction, and activation of oxidative stress, with detrimental effects on cell survival. Here we show that infection of human airway epithelial cells with Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress, activation of mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, and regulation of their respective target genes. We identify pneumococcal H2O2 as the causative agent for these responses, as both catalase-treated and pyruvate oxidase-deficient bacteria lacked these activities. Pneumococcal H2O2 induced nuclear NF-κB translocation and transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of translational arrest and ER stress by salubrinal or of MAPK signaling pathways attenuate cytokine transcription. These results provide strong evidence for the notion that inhibition of translation is an important host pathway in monitoring harmful pathogen-associated activities, thereby enabling differentiation between pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. PMID:25183769

  11. Chromatin-prebound Crm1 recruits Nup98-HoxA9 fusion to induce aberrant expression of Hox cluster genes.

    PubMed

    Oka, Masahiro; Mura, Sonoko; Yamada, Kohji; Sangel, Percival; Hirata, Saki; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Kawakami, Koichi; Tachibana, Taro; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-07

    The nucleoporin Nup98 is frequently rearranged to form leukemogenic Nup98-fusion proteins with various partners. However, their function remains largely elusive. Here, we show that Nup98-HoxA9, a fusion between Nup98 and the homeobox transcription factor HoxA9, forms nuclear aggregates that frequently associate with facultative heterochromatin. We demonstrate that stable expression of Nup98-HoxA9 in mouse embryonic stem cells selectively induces the expression of Hox cluster genes. Genome-wide binding site analysis revealed that Nup98-HoxA9 is preferentially targeted and accumulated at Hox cluster regions where the export factor Crm1 is originally prebound. In addition, leptomycin B, an inhibitor of Crm1, disassembled nuclear Nup98-HoxA9 dots, resulting in the loss of chromatin binding of Nup98-HoxA9 and Nup98-HoxA9-mediated activation of Hox genes. Collectively, our results indicate that highly selective targeting of Nup98-fusion proteins to Hox cluster regions via prebound Crm1 induces the formation of higher order chromatin structures that causes aberrant Hox gene regulation.

  12. Aberrant regulation of synthesis and degradation of viral proteins in coliphage lambda-infected UV-irradiated cells and in minicells.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J E; Epp, C; Pearson, M L; Reeve, J N

    1987-01-01

    The patterns of bacteriophage lambda proteins synthesized in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli cells and in anucleate minicells are significantly different; both systems exhibit aberrations of regulation in lambda gene expression. In unirradiated cells or cells irradiated with low UV doses (less than 600 J/m2), regulation of lambda protein synthesis is controlled by the regulatory proteins CI, N, CII, CIII, Cro, and Q. As the UV dose increases, activation of transcription of the cI, rexA, and int genes by CII and CIII proteins fails to occur and early protein synthesis, normally inhibited by the action of Cro, continues. After high UV doses (greater than 2,000 J/m2), late lambda protein synthesis does not occur. Progression through the sequence of regulatory steps in lambda gene expression is slower in infected minicells. In minicells, there is no detectable cII- and cIII-dependent synthesis of CI, RexA, or Int proteins and inhibition of early protein synthesis by Cro activity is always incomplete. The synthesis of early b region proteins is not subject to control by CI, N, or Cro proteins, and evidence is presented suggesting that, in minicells, transcription of the early b region is initiated at a promoter(s) within the b region. Proteolytic cleavage of the regulatory proteins O and N and of the capsid proteins C, B, and Nu3 is much reduced in infected minicells. Exposure of minicells to very high UV doses before infection does not completely inhibit late lambda protein synthesis. Images PMID:2957511

  13. The aberrantly expressed miR-193b-3p contributes to preeclampsia through regulating transforming growth factor-β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinyao; Li, Qiaoli; Xu, Jiawei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Huijuan; Xiang, Yuqian; Fang, Chuantao; Wang, Teng; Xia, Shihui; Zhang, Qiang; Xing, Qinghe; He, Lin; Wang, Lei; Xu, Mingqing; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Several studies have detected some differentially expressed microRNAs in the preeclamptic placenta, but few of the identified microRNAs demonstrated consistent findings among different research studies. In this study, high-throughput microRNA sequencing (HTS) of 9 preeclamptic and 9 normal placentas was performed. Seventeen microRNAs were identified to be up-regulated, and 8 down-regulated in preeclamptic placentas. Eight differentially expressed microRNAs except one identified in our study were determined to be consistent with at least one previous study, while sixteen were newly found. We performed qRT-PCR with independent 22 preeclamptic placentas and 20 control placentas to verify the differentially expressed microRNAs, and ten microRNAs were validated. The predicted target genes of the aberrantly expressed miR-193b-3p were enriched in the following gene ontology categories: cell motility and migration, cell proliferation and angiogenesis. We also found that miR-193b-3p significantly decreased the migration and invasion of trophoblast (HTR-8/SVneo) cells and that miR-193b-3p could regulate trophoblasts migration and invasion through binding onto the 3′UTR target site of TGF-β2. In conclusion, we identified a list of differentially expressed microRNAs in PE placentas by HTS and provided preliminary evidence for the role of miR-193b-3p in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. PMID:26822621

  14. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Shih, Zong-Siou; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Ya-Wen; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai

    2016-01-01

    To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG) proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression) and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM)-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations. PMID:27588417

  15. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Shih, Zong-Siou; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Ya-Wen; Chan, Shih-Peng; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai

    2016-09-01

    To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG) proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression) and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM)-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations. PMID:27588417

  16. Regulation of Neuronal Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Gerald; Lietz, Michael; Leichter, Michael

    Humans as multicellular organisms contain a variety of different cell types where each cell population must fulfill a distinct function in the interest of the whole organism. The molecular basis for the variations in morphology, biochemistry, molecular biology, and function of the various cell types is the cell-type specific expression of genes. These genes encode proteins necessary for executing the specialized functions of each cell type within an organism. We describe here a regulatory mechanism for the expression of neuronal genes. The zinc finger protein REST binds to the regulatory region of many neuronal genes and represses neuronal gene expression in nonneuronal tissues. A negative regulatory mechanism, involving a transcriptional repressor, seems to play an important role in establishing the neuronal phenotype.

  17. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi . E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-10-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells.

  18. Gene Regulation Networks for Modeling Drosophila Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, E.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila Melanogaster.

  19. Molecular pathogenesis of multiple myeloma: chromosomal aberrations, changes in gene expression, cytokine networks, and the bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Klein, Bernard; Seckinger, Anja; Moehler, Thomas; Hose, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    This chapter focuses on two aspects of myeloma pathogenesis: (1) chromosomal aberrations and resulting changes in gene and protein expression with a special focus on growth and survival factors of malignant (and normal) plasma cells and (2) the remodeling of the bone marrow microenvironment induced by accumulating myeloma cells. We begin this chapter with a discussion of normal plasma cell generation, their survival, and a novel class of inhibitory factors. This is crucial for the understanding of multiple myeloma, as several abilities attributed to malignant plasma cells are already present in their normal counterpart, especially the production of survival factors and interaction with the bone marrow microenvironment (niche). The chapter closes with a new model of pathogenesis of myeloma.

  20. A study on the buffeting aberrance regulation of TDICCD mapping camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhe; Ma, Zhen; Zhang, Boheng

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the fundamental of the TDICCD mapping camera is introduced, and the influence of the satellite buffeting on the image quality of the TDICCD camera is analyzed. In order to reduce the influence, a regulated resolution is put forward. Compared with the traditional TDICCD mapping camera, a special TDICCD focal plane which several TDICCD devices splited joint end to end is designed. A great deal of information are captured through the focal plane, and a mathematical model is established to analyze the data information. Then the results are feed back to the satellite, and the attitude of the satellite is actively regulated in real time. Finally, make experiments and simulation to validate it. The experiment result indicate that the design is valid.

  1. Cytoskeletal genes regulating brain size.

    PubMed

    Bond, Jacquelyn; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2006-02-01

    One of the most notable trends in human evolution is the dramatic increase in brain size that has occurred in the great ape clade, culminating in humans. Of particular interest is the vast expanse of the cerebral cortex, which is believed to have resulted in our ability to perform higher cognitive functions. Recent investigations of congenital microcephaly in humans have resulted in the identification of several genes that non-redundantly and specifically influence mammalian brain size. These genes appear to affect neural progenitor cell number through microtubular organisation at the centrosome. PMID:16337370

  2. How Europe regulates its genes

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, M.

    1991-06-07

    As Europe moves toward unification in 1992, more than two dozen regulations and directives that will affect biotech are working their way through the complex European legislative system. The result could mean tough scrutiny for genetically engineered products. One reason is that the European Community (EC) has chosen to examine genetically engineered products as a special category - an approach the FDA has rejected. Another is that the EC is considering enacting regulations that would mandate consideration of the socioeconomic effects of biotech products in addition to their safety. In addition, some - particularly in industry - fear a nightmare of overlapping and contradictory regulations. It's too soon to tell how well the European system will work, or how stifling the regulations might be. In all likelihood the regulations emerging in Europe won't be demonstrably superior - or inferior - to the American ones, just different, with different strengths and weaknesses. But since many US biotech companies are looking to the huge market that a unified Europe represents, the specifics of those strengths and weaknesses will ultimately be of more than passing interest.

  3. Aberrant silencing of the endocrine peptide gene tachykinin-1 in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    David, Stefan; Kan, Takatsugu; Cheng, Yulan; Agarwal, Rachana; Jin, Zhe; Mori, Yuriko

    2009-01-16

    Tachykinin-1 (TAC1) is the precursor protein for neuroendocrine peptides, including substance P, and is centrally involved in gastric secretion, motility, mucosal immunity, and cell proliferation. Here we report aberrant silencing of TAC1 in gastric cancer (GC) by promoter hypermethylation. TAC1 methylation and mRNA expression in 47 primary GCs and 41 noncancerous gastric mucosae (NLs) were analyzed by utilizing real-time quantitative PCR-based assays. TAC1 methylation was more prevalent in GCs than in NLs: 21 (45%) of 47 GCs versus 6 (15%) of 41 NLs (p < 0.01). Microsatellite instability was also associated with TAC1 methylation in GCs. There was no significant association between TAC1 methylation and age, gender, stage, histological differentiation, or the presence of Helicobacter pylori. TAC1 mRNA was markedly downregulated in GCs relative to NLs. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine-induced demethylation of the TAC1 promoter resulted in TAC1 mRNA upregulation. Further studies are indicated to elucidate the functional involvement of TAC1 in gastric carcinogenesis.

  4. Regulation of Flagellar Gene Expression in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Osterman, I A; Dikhtyar, Yu Yu; Bogdanov, A A; Dontsova, O A; Sergiev, P V

    2015-11-01

    The flagellum of a bacterium is a supramolecular structure of extreme complexity comprising simultaneously both a unique system of protein transport and a molecular machine that enables the bacterial cell movement. The cascade of expression of genes encoding flagellar components is closely coordinated with the steps of molecular machine assembly, constituting an amazing regulatory system. Data on structure, assembly, and regulation of flagellar gene expression are summarized in this review. The regulatory mechanisms and correlation of the process of regulation of gene expression and flagellum assembly known from the literature are described. PMID:26615435

  5. [Expression and regulation of the SOST gene].

    PubMed

    Qin, Long-Juan; Ding, Da-Xia; Cui, Lu-Lu; Huang, Qing-Yang

    2013-08-01

    Sclerostin(SOST), mainly expressed in osteocytes, is a negative regulator of bone formation. Hormones PTH and E2 inhibit the expression of the SOST gene. Transcription factors Osterix, Runx2, and Mef2c promote the SOST expression, while Sirt1 negatively regulates the SOST expression. In addition, the expression of the SOST gene is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and microRNA. Mutations in the SOST gene, which cause sclerosteosis and Van Buchem diseases, are associated with osteoporosis. Wnt and BMP are two important signaling pathways in bone metabolic regulation. SOST can regulate osteoblastic differentiation and bone formation by binding type I/II receptors and co-receptor LRP5/6 to inhibit BMP and Wnt signaling pathways. Suppression of SOST provides a new approach for osteoporosis treatment. This review covers the structure, function and expression regulation of the SOST gene, human disease association, mechanism in the regulation of bone metabolism and prospect in clinical application.

  6. Recombination products suggest the frequent occurrence of aberrant gene replacement in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Wendeler, Edelgard; Zobell, Oliver; Chrost, Bozena; Reiss, Bernd

    2015-02-01

    In gene replacement, a variant of gene targeting, transformed DNA integrates into the genome by homologous recombination (HR) to replace resident sequences. Gene replacement in the moss Physcomitrella patens is extremely efficient, but often large amounts of additional DNA are integrated at the target locus. A detailed analysis of recombination junctions of PpCOL2 gene knockout mutants shows that the integrated DNA can be highly rearranged. Our data suggest that the replaced sequences were excised by HR and became integrated back into the genome by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). RAD51-mediated strand-invasion and subsequent strand-exchange is central to the two-end invasion pathway, the major gene replacement pathway in yeast. In this pathway, integration is initiated by the free ends of a single replacement vector-derived donor molecule which then integrates as an entity. Gene replacement in P. patens is entirely RAD51-dependent suggesting the existence of a pathway mechanistically similar to two-end invasion. However, invasion of the two ends does not seem to be stringently coordinated in P. patens. Actually, often only one fragment end became integrated by HR, or one-sided integration of two independent donor fragments occurred simultaneously leading to a double-strand break that is subsequently sealed by NHEJ and thus causes the observed rearrangements.

  7. Mutational Profiles Reveal an Aberrant TGF-β-CEA Regulated Pathway in Colon Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Jogunoori, Wilma; Menon, Vipin; Majumdar, Avijit; Chen, Jiun-Sheng; Gi, Young Jin; Jeong, Yun Seong; Phan, Liem; Belkin, Mitchell; Gu, Shoujun; Kundra, Suchin; Mistry, Nipun A.; Zhang, Jianping; Su, Xiaoping; Li, Shulin; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Javle, Milind; McMurray, John S.; Rahlfs, Thomas F.; Mishra, Bibhuti; White, Jon; Rashid, Asif; Beauchemin, Nicole; Weston, Brian R.; Shafi, Mehnaz A.; Stroehlein, John R.; Davila, Marta; Akbani, Rehan; Weinstein, John N.; Wu, Xifeng; Mishra, Lopa

    2016-01-01

    Mutational processes and signatures that drive early tumorigenesis are centrally important for early cancer prevention. Yet, to date, biomarkers and risk factors for polyps (adenomas) that inordinately and rapidly develop into colon cancer remain poorly defined. Here, we describe surprisingly high mutational profiles through whole-genome sequence (WGS) analysis in 2 of 4 pairs of benign colorectal adenoma tissue samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustered transcriptomic analysis of a further 7 pairs of adenomas reveals distinct mutational signatures regardless of adenoma size. Transitional single nucleotide substitutions of C:G>T:A predominate in the adenoma mutational spectrum. Strikingly, we observe mutations in the TGF-β pathway and CEA-associated genes in 4 out of 11 adenomas, overlapping with the Wnt pathway. Immunohistochemical labeling reveals a nearly 5-fold increase in CEA levels in 23% of adenoma samples with a concomitant loss of TGF-β signaling. We also define a functional role by which the CEA B3 domain interacts with TGFBR1, potentially inactivating the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β signaling. Our study uncovers diverse mutational processes underlying the transition from early adenoma to cancer. This has broad implications for biomarker-driven targeting of CEA/TGF-β in high-risk adenomas and may lead to early detection of aggressive adenoma to CRC progression. PMID:27100181

  8. Mutational Profiles Reveal an Aberrant TGF-β-CEA Regulated Pathway in Colon Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Raju, Gottumukkala S; Jogunoori, Wilma; Menon, Vipin; Majumdar, Avijit; Chen, Jiun-Sheng; Gi, Young Jin; Jeong, Yun Seong; Phan, Liem; Belkin, Mitchell; Gu, Shoujun; Kundra, Suchin; Mistry, Nipun A; Zhang, Jianping; Su, Xiaoping; Li, Shulin; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Javle, Milind; McMurray, John S; Rahlfs, Thomas F; Mishra, Bibhuti; White, Jon; Rashid, Asif; Beauchemin, Nicole; Weston, Brian R; Shafi, Mehnaz A; Stroehlein, John R; Davila, Marta; Akbani, Rehan; Weinstein, John N; Wu, Xifeng; Mishra, Lopa

    2016-01-01

    Mutational processes and signatures that drive early tumorigenesis are centrally important for early cancer prevention. Yet, to date, biomarkers and risk factors for polyps (adenomas) that inordinately and rapidly develop into colon cancer remain poorly defined. Here, we describe surprisingly high mutational profiles through whole-genome sequence (WGS) analysis in 2 of 4 pairs of benign colorectal adenoma tissue samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustered transcriptomic analysis of a further 7 pairs of adenomas reveals distinct mutational signatures regardless of adenoma size. Transitional single nucleotide substitutions of C:G>T:A predominate in the adenoma mutational spectrum. Strikingly, we observe mutations in the TGF-β pathway and CEA-associated genes in 4 out of 11 adenomas, overlapping with the Wnt pathway. Immunohistochemical labeling reveals a nearly 5-fold increase in CEA levels in 23% of adenoma samples with a concomitant loss of TGF-β signaling. We also define a functional role by which the CEA B3 domain interacts with TGFBR1, potentially inactivating the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β signaling. Our study uncovers diverse mutational processes underlying the transition from early adenoma to cancer. This has broad implications for biomarker-driven targeting of CEA/TGF-β in high-risk adenomas and may lead to early detection of aggressive adenoma to CRC progression. PMID:27100181

  9. Aberrant Subcellular Neuronal Calcium Regulation in Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    In this mini-review/opinion article we describe evidence that multiple cellular and molecular alterations in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis involve perturbed cellular calcium regulation, and that alterations in synaptic calcium handling may be early and pivotal events in the disease process. With advancing age neurons encounter increased oxidative stress and impaired energy metabolism, which compromise the function of proteins that control membrane excitability and subcellular calcium dynamics. Altered proteolytic cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in response to the aging process in combination with genetic and environmental factors results in the production and accumulation of neurotoxic forms of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ ). Aβ undergoes a self-aggregation process and concomitantly generates reactive oxygen species that can trigger membrane-associated oxidative stress which, in turn, impairs the functions of ion-motive ATPases and glutamate and glucose transporters thereby rendering neurons vulnerable to excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Mutations in presenilin-1 that cause early-onset AD increase Aβ production, but also result in an abnormal increase in the size of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Some of the events in the neurodegenerative cascade can be counteracted in animal models by manipulations that stabilize neuronal calcium homeostasis including dietary energy restriction, agonists of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors and drugs that activate mitochondrial potassium channels. Emerging knowledge of the actions of calcium upstream and downstream of Aβ provides opportunities to develop novel preventative and therapeutic interventions for AD. PMID:20950656

  10. Knocking in and out genes and trans genes: the use of the engineered mouse to study normal and aberrant hemopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, P P

    1998-04-01

    Mouse genetics and engineered mice have become invaluable tools for the study of normal and aberrant hemopoiesis, in modeling hemopoietic disorders, and developing new therapeutic approaches using these models. However, the technological exploitation of these powerful genetic tools, as well as the scientific exploitation of the mutants which are generated is still in a primordial phase. For instance, the possibility to introduce specific point mutation, in vivo, in any desired locus, will allow the production of a second generation of mutants, which will be much more informative in the dissection of the function of any molecule. Furthermore, the possibility to interbreed mutants thus generating organisms harboring concomitantly "n" mutations in "n" loci will allow the possibility to test and validate, in vivo, the role of individual biochemical and cellular pathways.

  11. Disruption of Murine mp29/Syf2/Ntc31 Gene Results in Embryonic Lethality with Aberrant Checkpoint Response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Liekyeow; Lien, Huang-Wei; Lin, Tse-Ling; Fan, Chi-Chen; Chi, Peter; Huang, Chang-Jen; Chang, Mau-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Human p29 is a putative component of spliceosomes, but its role in pre-mRNA is elusive. By siRNA knockdown and stable overexpression, we demonstrated that human p29 is involved in DNA damage response and Fanconi anemia pathway in cultured cells. In this study, we generated p29 knockout mice (mp29GT/GT) using the mp29 gene trap embryonic stem cells to study the role of mp29 in DNA damage response in vivo. Interruption of mp29 at both alleles resulted in embryonic lethality. Embryonic abnormality occurred as early as E6.5 in mp29GT/GT mice accompanied with decreased mRNA levels of α-tubulin and Chk1. The reduction of α-tubulin and Chk1 mRNAs is likely due to an impaired post-transcriptional event. An aberrant G2/M checkpoint was found in mp29 gene trap embryos when exposed to aphidicolin and UV light. This embryonic lethality was rescued by crossing with mp29 transgenic mice. Additionally, the knockdown of zfp29 in zebrafish resulted in embryonic death at 72 hours of development postfertilization (hpf). A lower level of acetylated α-tubulin was also observed in zfp29 morphants. Together, these results illustrate an indispensable role of mp29 in DNA checkpoint response during embryonic development. PMID:22448250

  12. Analysis of aberrant methylation in DNA repair genes during malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells induced by cadmium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-heng; Lei, Yi-xiong; Wang, Cai-xia

    2012-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and its compounds are well-known human carcinogens, but the mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis are not entirely understood yet. Aberrant methylation was investigated in order to obtain insight into the DNA repair-related epigenetic mechanisms underlying CdCl(2)-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE). Gene expression and DNA methylation were assessed in untreated control cells; 5th, 15th, and 35th passage of CdCl2-treated cells and tumorigenic cells (TCs) from nude mice by using high-performance liquid chromatography, real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and methylation-specific PCR assay. During Cd-induced malignant transformation, global DNA methylation progressively increased and was associated with the overexpression of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3a but not DNMT3b. Expression of both the messenger RNA and proteins of the DNA repair genes (hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1) progressively reduced and DNA damage increased with Cd-induced transformation. The promoter regions of hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1 were heavily methylated in the 35th passage transformed cells and the TCs. The DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine could reverse the Cd-induced global DNA hypermethylation, DNMT hyperactivity, and the silencing of hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1 in a time-dependent manner. The results indicate that DNMT1 and DNMT3a overexpression can result in global DNA hypermethylation and silencing of the hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1 genes. They may partly explain the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis due to Cd.

  13. Procedures to view aberrations--a travel from protein to gene: literature review.

    PubMed

    Premalatha, B; Ramesh, V; Babu, S P K Kennedy; Balamurali, P D

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of any pathology is fundamentally based on the microscopic structure of cells and tissues and this remains as the standard by which all other diagnostic tests are measured. In this era, the pathologists are relying on the examination of tissue section stained by histochemical means and it is supported by the advanced immunological, biochemical and molecular techniques. This review will provide the information about one of the way that can be followed to unravel the molecular mechanism in spotting the disease process. Technologies used to study the cellular process are same for the normal and the abnormal cell. Experimental strategy briefed here is also applicable for both. The cellular process can be studied either from protein to gene or from gene to protein. Earlier days biochemical analysis (isolation of protein, protein sequencing) was separate and genetic analysis (genomic mapping) was separate. But now with advent of recombinant DNA technology it is possible to have a link between the biochemical and genetic analysis. Intermediary step of development of oligonucleotide synthesis, complementary DNA probe and cloning has revolutionized the research process. Identified gene can be compared with the normal gene by comparative genomics or expressed proteins by expression proteomics. PMID:24748307

  14. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

  15. Gene deletion of KLF9 in mice results in aberrant endometrial proliferation and myometrial function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Timely regulation of uterine function is critical for successful pregnancy. Our laboratory has previously identified Basic transcription element binding protein-1/Krüppel-like factor 9 (Bteb1/Klf9), a member of Sp/KLF family of transcription factor, as a progesterone receptor (Pgr) interacting prote...

  16. Developmental regulation of embryonic genes in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Borkird, C.; Choi, Jung, H.; Jin, Zhenghua; Franz, G.; Hatzopoulos, P.; Chorneaus, R.; Bonas, U.; Pelegri, F.; Sung, Z.R.

    1988-09-01

    Somatic embryogenesis from cultured carrot cells progresses through successive morphogenetic stages termed globular, heart, and torpedo. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying plant embryogenesis, the authors isolated two genes differentially expressed during embryo development. The expression of these two genes is associated with heart-stage embryogenesis. By altering the culture conditions and examining their expressions in a developmental variant cell line, they found that these genes were controlled by the developmental program of embryogenesis and were not directly regulated by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, the growth regulator that promotes unorganized growth of cultured cells and suppresses embryo morphogenesis. These genes are also expressed in carrot zygotic embryos but not in seedlings or mature plants.

  17. Ozone-Induced Rice Grain Yield Loss Is Triggered via a Change in Panicle Morphology That Is Controlled by ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Keita; Sawada, Hiroko; Kohno, Yoshihisa; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C.; Terao, Tomio; Ioki, Motohide; Tamaoki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Rice grain yield is predicted to decrease in the future because of an increase in tropospheric ozone concentration. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the responses to ozone of two rice (Oryza Sativa L.) cultivars, Sasanishiki and Habataki. Sasanishiki showed ozone-induced leaf injury, but no grain yield loss. By contrast, Habataki showed grain yield loss with minimal leaf injury. A QTL associated with grain yield loss caused by ozone was identified in Sasanishiki/Habataki chromosome segment substitution lines and included the ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 (APO1) gene. The Habataki allele of the APO1 locus in a near-isogenic line also resulted in grain yield loss upon ozone exposure, suggesting APO1 involvement in ozone-induced yield loss. Only a few differences in the APO1 amino acid sequences were detected between the cultivars, but the APO1 transcript level was oppositely regulated by ozone exposure: i.e., it increased in Sasanishiki and decreased in Habataki. Interestingly, the levels of some phytohormones (jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, and abscisic acid) known to be involved in attenuation of ozone-induced leaf injury tended to decrease in Sasanishiki but to increase in Habataki upon ozone exposure. These data indicate that ozone-induced grain yield loss in Habataki is caused by a reduction in the APO1 transcript level through an increase in the levels of phytohormones that reduce leaf damage. PMID:25923431

  18. Ozone-Induced Rice Grain Yield Loss Is Triggered via a Change in Panicle Morphology That Is Controlled by ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Keita; Sawada, Hiroko; Kohno, Yoshihisa; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C; Terao, Tomio; Ioki, Motohide; Tamaoki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Rice grain yield is predicted to decrease in the future because of an increase in tropospheric ozone concentration. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the responses to ozone of two rice (Oryza Sativa L.) cultivars, Sasanishiki and Habataki. Sasanishiki showed ozone-induced leaf injury, but no grain yield loss. By contrast, Habataki showed grain yield loss with minimal leaf injury. A QTL associated with grain yield loss caused by ozone was identified in Sasanishiki/Habataki chromosome segment substitution lines and included the ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 (APO1) gene. The Habataki allele of the APO1 locus in a near-isogenic line also resulted in grain yield loss upon ozone exposure, suggesting APO1 involvement in ozone-induced yield loss. Only a few differences in the APO1 amino acid sequences were detected between the cultivars, but the APO1 transcript level was oppositely regulated by ozone exposure: i.e., it increased in Sasanishiki and decreased in Habataki. Interestingly, the levels of some phytohormones (jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, and abscisic acid) known to be involved in attenuation of ozone-induced leaf injury tended to decrease in Sasanishiki but to increase in Habataki upon ozone exposure. These data indicate that ozone-induced grain yield loss in Habataki is caused by a reduction in the APO1 transcript level through an increase in the levels of phytohormones that reduce leaf damage. PMID:25923431

  19. Arabidopsis STERILE APETALA, a multifunctional gene regulating inflorescence, flower, and ovule development

    PubMed Central

    Byzova, Marina V.; Franken, John; Aarts, Mark G.M.; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Engler, Gilbert; Mariani, Celestina; Van Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    1999-01-01

    A recessive mutation in the Arabidopsis STERILE APETALA (SAP) causes severe aberrations in inflorescence and flower and ovule development. In sap flowers, sepals are carpelloid, petals are short and narrow or absent, and anthers are degenerated. Megasporogenesis, the process of meiotic divisions preceding the female gametophyte formation, is arrested in sap ovules during or just after the first meiotic division. More severe aberrations were observed in double mutants between sap and mutant alleles of the floral homeotic gene APETALA2 (AP2) suggesting that both genes are involved in the initiation of female gametophyte development. Together with the organ identity gene AGAMOUS (AG) SAP is required for the maintenance of floral identity acting in a manner similar to APETALA1. In contrast to the outer two floral organs in sap mutant flowers, normal sepals and petals develop in ag/sap double mutants, indicating that SAP negatively regulates AG expression in the perianth whorls. This supposed cadastral function of SAP is supported by in situ hybridization experiments showing ectopic expression of AG in the sap mutant. We have cloned the SAP gene by transposon tagging and revealed that it encodes a novel protein with sequence motifs, that are also present in plant and animal transcription regulators. Consistent with the mutant phenotype, SAP is expressed in inflorescence and floral meristems, floral organ primordia, and ovules. Taken together, we propose that SAP belongs to a new class of transcription regulators essential for a number of processes in Arabidopsis flower development. PMID:10215627

  20. Associations between antibiotic exposure during pregnancy, birth weight and aberrant methylation at imprinted genes among offspring

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, A C; Murphy, S K; Murtha, A P; Schildkraut, J M; Soubry, A; Huang, Z; Neelon, S E B; Fuemmeler, B; Iversen, E; Wang, F; Kurtzberg, J; Jirtle, R L; Hoyo, C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Low birth weight (LBW) has been associated with common adult-onset chronic diseases, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes and some cancers. The etiology of LBW is multi-factorial. However, recent evidence suggests exposure to antibiotics may also increase the risk of LBW. The mechanisms underlying this association are unknown, although epigenetic mechanisms are hypothesized. In this study, we evaluated the association between maternal antibiotic use and LBW and examined the potential role of altered DNA methylation that controls growth regulatory imprinted genes in these associations. Methods: Between 2009–2011, 397 pregnant women were enrolled and followed until delivery. Prenatal antibiotic use was ascertained through maternal self-report. Imprinted genes methylation levels were measured at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) using bisulfite pyrosequencing. Generalized linear models were used to examine associations among antibiotic use, birth weight and DMR methylation fractions. Results: After adjusting for infant gender, race/ethnicity, maternal body mass index, delivery route, gestational weight gain, gestational age at delivery, folic acid intake, physical activity, maternal smoking and parity, antibiotic use during pregnancy was associated with 138 g lower birth weight compared with non-antibiotic use (β-coefficient=−132.99, s.e.=50.70, P=0.008). These associations were strongest in newborns of women who reported antibiotic use other than penicillins (β-coefficient=−135.57, s.e.=57.38, P=0.02). Methylation at five DMRs, IGF2 (P=0.05), H19 (P=0.15), PLAGL1 (P=0.01), MEG3 (P=0.006) and PEG3 (P=0.08), was associated with maternal antibiotic use; among these, only methylation at the PLAGL1 DMR was also associated with birth weight. Conclusion: We report an inverse association between in utero exposure to antibiotics and lower infant birth weight and provide the first empirical evidence supporting imprinted gene

  1. Gene regulation by dietary microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zempleni, Janos; Baier, Scott R; Howard, Katherine M; Cui, Juan

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) silence genes through destabilizing mRNA or preventing translation of mRNA, thereby playing an essential role in gene silencing. Traditionally, miRNAs have been considered endogenous regulators of genes, i.e., miRNAs synthesized by an organism regulate the genes in that organism. Recently, that dogma has been challenged in studies suggesting that food-borne miRNAs are bioavailable and affect gene expression in mice and humans. While the evidence in support of this theory may be considered weak for miRNAs that originate in plants, there is compelling evidence to suggest that humans use bovine miRNAs in cow's milk and avian miRNAs in chicken eggs for gene regulation. Importantly, evidence also suggests that mice fed a miRNA-depleted diet cannot compensate for dietary depletion by increased endogenous synthesis. Bioinformatics predictions implicate bovine miRNAs in the regulation of genes that play roles in human health and development. Current challenges in this area of research include that some miRNAs are unable to establish a cause-and-effect between miRNA depletion and disease in miRNA knockout mice, and sequence similarities and identities for bovine and human miRNAs render it difficult to distinguish between exogenous and endogenous miRNAs. Based on what is currently known about dietary miRNAs, the body of evidence appears to be sufficient to consider milk miRNA bioactive compounds in foods, and to increase research activities in this field.

  2. Aberrant Methylation of the E-Cadherin Gene Promoter Region in the Endometrium of Women With Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ran, Ran; Guan, Yingxia; Zhu, Xiaoxiong; Kang, Shan

    2016-08-01

    A uterine fibroid is a leiomyoma that originates from the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. A variety of endometrial abnormalities are associated with uterine fibroids. This study aims to investigate the methylation status of the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) promoter region in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids. The methylation of CDH1 was studied using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in the endometrial tissue of 102 patients with uterine fibroids and 50 control patients. The E-cadherin expression was examined by flow cytometry. The methylation rate of CDH1 promoter region was 33.3% in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids and 8% in the endometrium of women without fibroids. The frequency of CDH1 promoter methylation in the endometrium of patients with fibroids was significantly higher than that in the endometrium of women without fibroids (P = .001). Furthermore, the E-cadherin expression level in methylation-positive tissues was significantly lower than that in methylation-negative tissues (P = .017). These results suggest that epigenetic aberration of CDH1 may occur in the endometrium of patients with fibroids, which may be associated with E-cadherin protein expression in endometrial tissue. PMID:26880767

  3. Aberrant Methylation of the E-Cadherin Gene Promoter Region in the Endometrium of Women With Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ran, Ran; Guan, Yingxia; Zhu, Xiaoxiong; Kang, Shan

    2016-08-01

    A uterine fibroid is a leiomyoma that originates from the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. A variety of endometrial abnormalities are associated with uterine fibroids. This study aims to investigate the methylation status of the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) promoter region in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids. The methylation of CDH1 was studied using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in the endometrial tissue of 102 patients with uterine fibroids and 50 control patients. The E-cadherin expression was examined by flow cytometry. The methylation rate of CDH1 promoter region was 33.3% in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids and 8% in the endometrium of women without fibroids. The frequency of CDH1 promoter methylation in the endometrium of patients with fibroids was significantly higher than that in the endometrium of women without fibroids (P = .001). Furthermore, the E-cadherin expression level in methylation-positive tissues was significantly lower than that in methylation-negative tissues (P = .017). These results suggest that epigenetic aberration of CDH1 may occur in the endometrium of patients with fibroids, which may be associated with E-cadherin protein expression in endometrial tissue.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of the RHOX homeobox gene cluster and its association with human male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Marcy E.; Bleiziffer, Andreas; Tüttelmann, Frank; Gromoll, Jörg; Wilkinson, Miles F.

    2014-01-01

    The X-linked RHOX cluster encodes a set of homeobox genes that are selectively expressed in the reproductive tract. Members of the RHOX cluster regulate target genes important for spermatogenesis promote male fertility in mice. Studies show that demethylating agents strongly upregulate the expression of mouse Rhox genes, suggesting that they are regulated by DNA methylation. However, whether this extends to human RHOX genes, whether DNA methylation directly regulates RHOX gene transcription and how this relates to human male infertility are unknown. To address these issues, we first defined the promoter regions of human RHOX genes and performed gain- and loss-of-function experiments to determine whether human RHOX gene transcription is regulated by DNA methylation. Our results indicated that DNA methylation is necessary and sufficient to silence human RHOX gene expression. To determine whether RHOX cluster methylation associates with male infertility, we evaluated the methylation status of RHOX genes in sperm from a large cohort of infertility patients. Linear regression analysis revealed a strong association between RHOX gene cluster hypermethylation and three independent types of semen abnormalities. Hypermethylation was restricted specifically to the RHOX cluster; we did not observe it in genes immediately adjacent to it on the X chromosome. Our results strongly suggest that human RHOX homeobox genes are under an epigenetic control mechanism that is aberrantly regulated in infertility patients. We propose that hypermethylation of the RHOX gene cluster serves as a marker for idiopathic infertility and that it is a candidate to exert a causal role in male infertility. PMID:23943794

  5. Aberrant splicing of the COL4A5 gene in patients with Alport syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lemmink, H H; Kluijtmans, L A; Brunner, H G; Schröder, C H; Knebelmann, B; Jelínková, E; van Oost, B A; Monnens, L A; Smeets, H J

    1994-02-01

    A variety of mutations have been identified in the X-linked type IV collagen alpha 5 chain (COL4A5) gene in patients with Alport syndrome. A substantial number of these mutations were predicted to have an effect on RNA splicing. For 4 such mutations in our group of patients the effect of the DNA mutation on the COL4A5 mRNA structure and stability was analysed. An alteration of the invariant splice acceptor site of intron 41 resulted in a shift of the actual splicing to either a cryptic splice site within exon 42 or the normal splice site in the next intron. A single base substitution of the final nucleotide of exon 48 resulted in the removal of the entire exon. Two frameshift mutations, a 10 basepair duplication in exon 49 and a single base deletion in exon 41, were incorporated in the mRNA as such and resulted in a stretch of missense codons terminated by a premature stop codon. Exon skipping was occasionally observed in these samples, but not reproducibly in every experiment. In healthy controls exon skipping was never detected. Analysis of female carriers revealed that in only one case was the stability of the mutated mRNA reduced in comparison with the normal transcript. The extent to which the non-collagenous domain was predicted to be deleted correlated with the severeness of the disease. PMID:8004101

  6. Transcription factors and microRNA-co-regulated genes in gastric cancer invasion in ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yue; Wang, Jihan; Xin, Zhuoyuan; Duan, Zipeng; Wang, Guoqing; Li, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression abnormally modulates gene expression in cells and can contribute to tumorigenesis in humans. This study identified functionally relevant differentially expressed genes using the transcription factors and miRNA-co-regulated network analysis for gastric cancer. The TF-miRNA co-regulatory network was constructed based on data obtained from cDNA microarray and miRNA expression profiling of gastric cancer tissues. The network along with their co-regulated genes was analyzed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database (TRED). We found eighteen (17 up-regulated and 1 down-regulated) differentially expressed genes that were co-regulated by transcription factors and miRNAs. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that these genes were part of the extracellular matrix-receptor interaction and focal adhesion signaling pathways. In addition, qRT- PCR and Western blot data showed an increase in COL1A1 and decrease in NCAM1 mRNA and protein levels in gastric cancer tissues. Thus, these data provided the first evidence to illustrate that altered gene network was associated with gastric cancer invasion. Further study with a large sample size and more functional experiments is needed to confirm these data and contribute to diagnostic and treatment strategies for gastric cancer.

  7. Transcription Factors and microRNA-Co-Regulated Genes in Gastric Cancer Invasion in Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yue; Wang, Jihan; Xin, Zhuoyuan; Duan, Zipeng; Wang, Guoqing; Li, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression abnormally modulates gene expression in cells and can contribute to tumorigenesis in humans. This study identified functionally relevant differentially expressed genes using the transcription factors and miRNA-co-regulated network analysis for gastric cancer. The TF-miRNA co-regulatory network was constructed based on data obtained from cDNA microarray and miRNA expression profiling of gastric cancer tissues. The network along with their co-regulated genes was analyzed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database (TRED). We found eighteen (17 up-regulated and 1 down-regulated) differentially expressed genes that were co-regulated by transcription factors and miRNAs. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that these genes were part of the extracellular matrix-receptor interaction and focal adhesion signaling pathways. In addition, qRT- PCR and Western blot data showed an increase in COL1A1 and decrease in NCAM1 mRNA and protein levels in gastric cancer tissues. Thus, these data provided the first evidence to illustrate that altered gene network was associated with gastric cancer invasion. Further study with a large sample size and more functional experiments is needed to confirm these data and contribute to diagnostic and treatment strategies for gastric cancer. PMID:25860484

  8. Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Consuelo; Esther Ramirez, M.; Calixto-Galvez, Mercedes; Medel, Olivia; Rodríguez, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or drug resistance, and the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in that control could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. However, until now these mechanisms are poorly understood in protozoa. Recent investigations into gene expression in protozoa parasites suggest that they possess many of the canonical machineries employed by higher eukaryotes for the control of gene expression at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, but they also contain exclusive mechanisms. Here, we review the current understanding about the regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium sp., Trypanosomatids, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. PMID:20204171

  9. GENE REGULATION BY MAPK SUBSTRATE COMPETITION

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoosik; Andreu, María José; Lim, Bomyi; Chung, Kwanghun; Terayama, Mark; Jiménez, Gerardo; Berg, Celeste A.; Lu, Hang; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Developing tissues are patterned by coordinated activities of signaling systems, which can be integrated by a regulatory region of a gene that binds multiple transcription factors or by a transcription factor that is modified by multiple enzymes. Based on a combination of genetic and imaging experiments in the early Drosophila embryo, we describe a signal integration mechanism that cannot be reduced to a single gene regulatory element or a single transcription factor. This mechanism relies on an enzymatic network formed by Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) and its substrates. Specifically, anteriorly localized MAPK substrates, such as Bicoid, antagonize MAPK-dependent downregulation of Capicua, a repressor which is involved in gene regulation along the dorsoventral axis of the embryo. MAPK substrate competition provides a basis for ternary interaction of the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems. A mathematical model of this interaction can explain gene expression patterns with both anteroposterior and dorsoventral polarities. PMID:21664584

  10. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots.

  11. Transposable element origins of epigenetic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Lisch, Damon; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2011-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are massively abundant and unstable in all plant genomes, but are mostly silent because of epigenetic suppression. Because all known epigenetic pathways act on all TEs, it is likely that the specialized epigenetic regulation of regular host genes (RHGs) was co-opted from this ubiquitous need for the silencing of TEs and viruses. With their internally repetitive and rearranging structures, and the acquisition of fragments of RHGs, the expression of TEs commonly makes antisense RNAs for both TE genes and RHGs. These antisense RNAs, particularly from heterochromatic reservoirs of 'zombie' TEs that are rearranged to form variously internally repetitive structures, may be advantageous because their induction will help rapidly suppress active TEs of the same family. RHG fragments within rapidly rearranging TEs may also provide the raw material for the ongoing generation of miRNA genes. TE gene expression is regulated by both environmental and developmental signals, and insertions can place nearby RHGs under the regulation (both standard and epigenetic) of the TE. The ubiquity of TEs, their frequent preferential association with RHGs, and their ability to be programmed by epigenetic signals all indicate that RGHs have nearly unlimited access to novel regulatory cassettes to assist plant adaptation. PMID:21444239

  12. IBD Candidate Genes and Intestinal Barrier Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McCole, Declan F.

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances in the large scale analysis of human genetics have generated profound insights into possible genetic contributions to chronic diseases including the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. To date, 163 distinct genetic risk loci have been associated with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, with a substantial degree of genetic overlap between these 2 conditions. Although many risk variants show a reproducible correlation with disease, individual gene associations only affect a subset of patients, and the functional contribution(s) of these risk variants to the onset of IBD is largely undetermined. Although studies in twins have demonstrated that the development of IBD is not mediated solely by genetic risk, it is nevertheless important to elucidate the functional consequences of risk variants for gene function in relevant cell types known to regulate key physiological processes that are compromised in IBD. This article will discuss IBD candidate genes that are known to be, or are suspected of being, involved in regulating the intestinal epithelial barrier and several of the physiological processes presided over by this dynamic and versatile layer of cells. This will include assembly and regulation of tight junctions, cell adhesion and polarity, mucus and glycoprotein regulation, bacterial sensing, membrane transport, epithelial differentiation, and restitution. PMID:25215613

  13. Linker histones in hormonal gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Vicent, G P; Wright, R H G; Beato, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present review, we summarize advances in our knowledge on the role of the histone H1 family of proteins in breast cancer cells, focusing on their response to progestins. Histone H1 plays a dual role in gene regulation by hormones, both as a structural component of chromatin and as a dynamic modulator of transcription. It contributes to hormonal regulation of the MMTV promoter by stabilizing a homogeneous nucleosome positioning, which reduces basal transcription whereas at the same time promoting progesterone receptor binding and nucleosome remodeling. These combined effects enhance hormone dependent gene transcription, which eventually requires H1 phosphorylation and displacement. Various isoforms of histone H1 have specific functions in differentiated breast cancer cells and compact nucleosomal arrays to different extents in vitro. Genome-wide studies show that histone H1 has a key role in chromatin dynamics of hormone regulated genes. A complex sequence of enzymatic events, including phosphorylation by CDK2, PARylation by PARP1 and the ATP-dependent activity of NURF, are required for H1 displacement and gene de-repression, as a prerequisite for further nucleosome remodeling. Similarly, during hormone-dependent gene repression a dedicated enzymatic mechanism controls H1 deposition at promoters by a complex containing HP1γ, LSD1 and BRG1, the ATPase of the BAF complex. Thus, a broader vision of the histone code should include histone H1, as the linker histone variants actively participate in the regulation of the chromatin structure. How modifications of the core histones tails affect H1 modifications and vice versa is one of the many questions that remains to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of the histone cross-talk mechanisms.

  14. Gene regulation and speciation in house mice

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Katya L.; Campbell, Polly; Nachman, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    One approach to understanding the process of speciation is to characterize the genetic architecture of post-zygotic isolation. As gene regulation requires interactions between loci, negative epistatic interactions between divergent regulatory elements might underlie hybrid incompatibilities and contribute to reproductive isolation. Here, we take advantage of a cross between house mouse subspecies, where hybrid dysfunction is largely unidirectional, to test several key predictions about regulatory divergence and reproductive isolation. Regulatory divergence between Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus was characterized by studying allele-specific expression in fertile hybrid males using mRNA-sequencing of whole testes. We found extensive regulatory divergence between M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus, largely attributable to cis-regulatory changes. When both cis and trans changes occurred, they were observed in opposition much more often than expected under a neutral model, providing strong evidence of widespread compensatory evolution. We also found evidence for lineage-specific positive selection on a subset of genes related to transcriptional regulation. Comparisons of fertile and sterile hybrid males identified a set of genes that were uniquely misexpressed in sterile individuals. Lastly, we discovered a nonrandom association between these genes and genes showing evidence of compensatory evolution, consistent with the idea that regulatory interactions might contribute to Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities and be important in speciation. PMID:26833790

  15. Regulation of gene expression by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall Steven; Rocha, Sonia

    2008-08-15

    Hypoxia induces profound changes in the cellular gene expression profile. The discovery of a major transcription factor family activated by hypoxia, HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor), and the factors that contribute to HIF regulation have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the molecular aspects of the hypoxic response. However, in addition to HIF, other transcription factors and cellular pathways are activated by exposure to reduced oxygen. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge of how additional hypoxia-responsive transcription factors integrate with HIF and how other cellular pathways such as chromatin remodelling, translation regulation and microRNA induction, contribute to the co-ordinated cellular response observed following hypoxic stress.

  16. Combinatorial Transcription Control in Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Terence; Buchler, Nicolas E.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2003-03-01

    We develop a simple thermodynamic model for the regulation of gene transcription and explore the limits of combinatorial control. Our model is based on the ``regulated recruitment'' mechanism [M. Ptashne and A. Gann, Nature 386 (1997) 569], assuming weak contact interaction between the regulatory proteins together with specific protein-DNA interactions. We further assume "programmability" in the strengths of these interactions within a biophysically allowed range [U. Gerland, J.D. Moroz, and T.Hwa, PNAS 99 (2002) 12015], through the choices and the locations of the protein-binding DNA sequences in the regulatory region. Within our thermodynamic model, we demonstrate the implementability of various binary logic functions (including XOR) by computing the degree of gene transcription (output) for all combinations of regulatory protein concentrations (input).

  17. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    SciTech Connect

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  18. Coactivators in PPAR-Regulated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Viswakarma, Navin; Jia, Yuzhi; Bai, Liang; Vluggens, Aurore; Borensztajn, Jayme; Xu, Jianming; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α, β (also known as δ), and γ function as sensors for fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives and control important metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance. PPARs also regulate other diverse biological processes such as development, differentiation, inflammation, and neoplasia. In the nucleus, PPARs exist as heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α bound to DNA with corepressor molecules. Upon ligand activation, PPARs undergo conformational changes that facilitate the dissociation of corepressor molecules and invoke a spatiotemporally orchestrated recruitment of transcription cofactors including coactivators and coactivator-associated proteins. While a given nuclear receptor regulates the expression of a prescribed set of target genes, coactivators are likely to influence the functioning of many regulators and thus affect the transcription of many genes. Evidence suggests that some of the coactivators such as PPAR-binding protein (PBP/PPARBP), thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 220 (TRAP220), and mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1) may exert a broader influence on the functions of several nuclear receptors and their target genes. Investigations into the role of coactivators in the function of PPARs should strengthen our understanding of the complexities of metabolic diseases associated with energy metabolism. PMID:20814439

  19. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  20. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:21539748

  1. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases. PMID:23566848

  2. Gene regulation in parthenocarpic tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Federico; Uratsu, Sandra L; Reagan, Russell L; Chen, Ying; Tricoli, David; Fiehn, Oliver; Rocke, David M; Gasser, Charles S; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2009-01-01

    Parthenocarpy is potentially a desirable trait for many commercially grown fruits if undesirable changes to structure, flavour, or nutrition can be avoided. Parthenocarpic transgenic tomato plants (cv MicroTom) were obtained by the regulation of genes for auxin synthesis (iaaM) or responsiveness (rolB) driven by DefH9 or the INNER NO OUTER (INO) promoter from Arabidopsis thaliana. Fruits at a breaker stage were analysed at a transcriptomic and metabolomic level using microarrays, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and a Pegasus III TOF (time of flight) mass spectrometer. Although differences were observed in the shape of fully ripe fruits, no clear correlation could be made between the number of seeds, transgene, and fruit size. Expression of auxin synthesis or responsiveness genes by both of these promoters produced seedless parthenocarpic fruits. Eighty-three percent of the genes measured showed no significant differences in expression due to parthenocarpy. The remaining 17% with significant variation (P <0.05) (1748 genes) were studied by assigning a predicted function (when known) based on BLAST to the TAIR database. Among them several genes belong to cell wall, hormone metabolism and response (auxin in particular), and metabolism of sugars and lipids. Up-regulation of lipid transfer proteins and differential expression of several indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)- and ethylene-associated genes were observed in transgenic parthenocarpic fruits. Despite differences in several fatty acids, amino acids, and other metabolites, the fundamental metabolic profile remains unchanged. This work showed that parthenocarpy with ovule-specific alteration of auxin synthesis or response driven by the INO promoter could be effectively applied where such changes are commercially desirable. PMID:19700496

  3. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  4. Gene and genon concept: coding versus regulation

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We analyse here the definition of the gene in order to distinguish, on the basis of modern insight in molecular biology, what the gene is coding for, namely a specific polypeptide, and how its expression is realized and controlled. Before the coding role of the DNA was discovered, a gene was identified with a specific phenotypic trait, from Mendel through Morgan up to Benzer. Subsequently, however, molecular biologists ventured to define a gene at the level of the DNA sequence in terms of coding. As is becoming ever more evident, the relations between information stored at DNA level and functional products are very intricate, and the regulatory aspects are as important and essential as the information coding for products. This approach led, thus, to a conceptual hybrid that confused coding, regulation and functional aspects. In this essay, we develop a definition of the gene that once again starts from the functional aspect. A cellular function can be represented by a polypeptide or an RNA. In the case of the polypeptide, its biochemical identity is determined by the mRNA prior to translation, and that is where we locate the gene. The steps from specific, but possibly separated sequence fragments at DNA level to that final mRNA then can be analysed in terms of regulation. For that purpose, we coin the new term “genon”. In that manner, we can clearly separate product and regulative information while keeping the fundamental relation between coding and function without the need to introduce a conceptual hybrid. In mRNA, the program regulating the expression of a gene is superimposed onto and added to the coding sequence in cis - we call it the genon. The complementary external control of a given mRNA by trans-acting factors is incorporated in its transgenon. A consequence of this definition is that, in eukaryotes, the gene is, in most cases, not yet present at DNA level. Rather, it is assembled by RNA processing, including differential splicing, from various

  5. The Interplay between the Hippocampus and Amygdala in Regulating Aberrant Hippocampal Neurogenesis during Protracted Abstinence from Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2013-01-01

    The development of alcohol dependence involves elevated anxiety, low mood, and increased sensitivity to stress, collectively labeled negative affect. Particularly interesting is the recent accumulating evidence that sensitized extrahypothalamic stress systems [e.g., hyperglutamatergic activity, blunted hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hormonal levels, altered corticotropin-releasing factor signaling, and altered glucocorticoid receptor signaling in the extended amygdala] are evident in withdrawn dependent rats, supporting the hypothesis that pathological neuroadaptations in the extended amygdala contribute to the negative affective state. Notably, hippocampal neurotoxicity observed as aberrant dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis (neurogenesis is a process where neural stem cells in the adult hippocampal subgranular zone generate DG granule cell neurons) and DG neurodegeneration are observed in withdrawn dependent rats. These correlations between withdrawal and aberrant neurogenesis in dependent rats suggest that alterations in the DG could be hypothesized to be due to compromised HPA axis activity and associated hyperglutamatergic activity originating from the basolateral amygdala in withdrawn dependent rats. This review discusses a possible link between the neuroadaptations in the extended amygdala stress systems and the resulting pathological plasticity that could facilitate recruitment of new emotional memory circuits in the hippocampus as a function of aberrant DG neurogenesis. PMID:23818882

  6. miRNAs in multiple myeloma – a survival relevant complex regulator of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Seckinger, Anja; MeiΔner, Tobias; Moreaux, Jérôme; Benes, Vladimir; Hillengass, Jens; Castoldi, Mirco; Zimmermann, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Jauch, Anna; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard; Hose, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose microRNAs regulate gene-expression in biological and pathophysiological processes, including multiple myeloma. Here we address i) What are the number and magnitude of changes in miRNA-expression between normal plasma cells and myeloma- or MGUS-samples, and the latter two? ii) What is the biological relevance and how does miRNA-expression impact on gene-expression? iii) Is there a prognostic significance, and what is its background? Experimental design Ninety-two purified myeloma-, MGUS-, normal plasma cell- and myeloma cell line-samples were investigated using miChip-arrays interrogating 559 human miRNAs. Impact on gene-expression was assessed by Affymetrix DNA-microarrays in two cohorts of myeloma patients (n = 677); chromosomal aberrations were assessed by iFISH, survival for 592 patients undergoing up-front high-dose chemotherapy. Results Compared to normal plasma cells, 67/559 miRNAs (12%) with fold changes of 4.6 to −3.1 are differentially expressed in myeloma-, 20 (3.6%) in MGUS-samples, and three (0.5%) between MGUS and myeloma. Expression of miRNAs is associated with proliferation, chromosomal aberrations, tumor mass, and gene expression-based risk-scores. This holds true for target-gene signatures of regulated mRNAs. miRNA-expression confers prognostic significance for event-free and overall survival, as do respective target-gene signatures. Conclusions The myeloma-miRNome confers a pattern of small changes of individual miRNAs impacting on gene-expression, biological functions, and survival. PMID:26472281

  7. Following the Footsteps of Chlamydial Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Domman, D.; Horn, M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression ensures an organism responds to stimuli and undergoes proper development. Although the regulatory networks in bacteria have been investigated in model microorganisms, nearly nothing is known about the evolution and plasticity of these networks in obligate, intracellular bacteria. The phylum Chlamydiae contains a vast array of host-associated microbes, including several human pathogens. The Chlamydiae are unique among obligate, intracellular bacteria as they undergo a complex biphasic developmental cycle in which large swaths of genes are temporally regulated. Coupled with the low number of transcription factors, these organisms offer a model to study the evolution of regulatory networks in intracellular organisms. We provide the first comprehensive analysis exploring the diversity and evolution of regulatory networks across the phylum. We utilized a comparative genomics approach to construct predicted coregulatory networks, which unveiled genus- and family-specific regulatory motifs and architectures, most notably those of virulence-associated genes. Surprisingly, our analysis suggests that few regulatory components are conserved across the phylum, and those that are conserved are involved in the exploitation of the intracellular niche. Our study thus lends insight into a component of chlamydial evolution that has otherwise remained largely unexplored. PMID:26424812

  8. Aberrant Cytoplasm Localization and Protein Stability of SIRT1 is Regulated by PI3K/IGF-1R Signaling in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Byles, Vanessa; Chmilewski, Laura K.; Wang, Joyce; Zhu, Lijia; Forman, Lora W.; Faller, Douglas V.; Dai, Yan

    2010-01-01

    SIRT1, an NAD-dependent histone/protein deacetylase, has classically been thought of as a nuclear protein. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT1 is mainly localized in the nucleus of normal cells, but is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm of the cancer / transformed cells we tested. We found this predominant cytoplasmic localization of SIRT1 is regulated by elevated mitotic activity and PI3K/IGF-1R signaling in cancer cells. We show that aberrant cytoplasmic localization of SIRT1 is due to increased protein stability and is regulated by PI3K/IGF-1R signaling. In addition, we determined that SIRT1 is required for PI3K-mediated cancer cell growth. Our study represents the first identification that aberrant cytoplasm localization is one of the specific alternations to SIRT1 that occur in cancer cells, and PI3K/IGF-1R signaling plays an important role in the regulation of cytoplasmic SIRT1 stability. Our findings suggest that the over-expressed cytoplasmic SIRT1 in cancer cells may greatly contribute to its cancer-specific function by working downstream of the PI3K/IGF-1R signaling pathway. PMID:20941378

  9. Proteomic changes associated with deletion of the Magnaporthe oryzae conidial morphology-regulating gene COM1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is a major constraint on world rice production. The conidia produced by this fungal pathogen are the main source of disease dissemination. The morphology of conidia may be a critical factor in the spore dispersal and virulence of M. oryzae in the field. Deletion of a conidial morphology regulating gene encoding putative transcriptional regulator COM1 in M. oryzae resulted in aberrant conidial shape, reduced conidiation and attenuated virulence. Results In this study, a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/matrix assisted laser desorption ionization- time of flight mass spectrometry (2-DE/MALDI-TOF MS) based proteomics approach was employed to identify the cellular and molecular components regulated by the COM1 protein (COM1p) that might contribute to the aberrant phenotypes in M. oryzae. By comparing the conidial proteomes of COM1 deletion mutant and its isogenic wild-type strain P131, we identified a potpourri of 31 proteins that exhibited statistically significant alterations in their abundance levels. Of these differentially regulated proteins, the abundance levels of nine proteins were elevated and twelve were reduced in the Δcom1 mutant. Three proteins were detected only in the Δcom1 conidial proteome, whereas seven proteins were apparently undetectable. The data obtained in the study suggest that the COM1p plays a key role in transcriptional reprogramming of genes implicated in melanin biosynthesis, carbon and energy metabolism, structural organization of cell, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, etc. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the down-regulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in melanin biosynthesis in the COM1 mutant. Conclusions Our results suggest that the COM1p may regulate the transcription of genes involved in various cellular processes indispensable for conidial development and appressorial penetration. These functions are likely to contribute to the effects of

  10. Retrotransposons as regulators of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Lucas, Bronwyn A; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-02-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are both a boon and a bane to eukaryotic organisms, depending on where they integrate into the genome and how their sequences function once integrated. We focus on two types of TEs: long interspersed elements (LINEs) and short interspersed elements (SINEs). LINEs and SINEs are retrotransposons; that is, they transpose via an RNA intermediate. We discuss how LINEs and SINEs have expanded in eukaryotic genomes and contribute to genome evolution. An emerging body of evidence indicates that LINEs and SINEs function to regulate gene expression by affecting chromatin structure, gene transcription, pre-mRNA processing, or aspects of mRNA metabolism. We also describe how adenosine-to-inosine editing influences SINE function and how ongoing retrotransposition is countered by the body's defense mechanisms.

  11. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  12. GLAST: gene expression regulation by phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Rojo, M; López-Bayghen, E; Ortega, A

    2000-08-21

    The gene expression regulation of the Na+-dependent high affinity glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST expressed in cultured Bergmann glia cells from chick cerebellum was studied. A 679 bp fragment of the chick GLAST cDNA was cloned and sequenced. Specific PCR primers were used to quantify chick GLAST mRNA levels. Treatment of the cells with the Ca2+/diacylglycerol dependent protein kinase C (PKC) activator, phorbol 12-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA) produced a decrease in transporter mRNA levels, without an effect in its mRNA half life, suggesting a transcriptional down regulation. Activation of the cAMP pathway results in a transient decrease in GLAST mRNA levels, in contrast with the TPA effect. These findings suggest that GLAST expression is under control of distinct signaling pathways.

  13. Regulation of gene transcription by Polycomb proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Sergi; Mas, Gloria; Di Croce, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins defines a subset of factors that physically associate and function to maintain the positional identity of cells from the embryo to adult stages. PcG has long been considered a paradigmatic model for epigenetic maintenance of gene transcription programs. Despite intensive research efforts to unveil the molecular mechanisms of action of PcG proteins, several fundamental questions remain unresolved: How many different PcG complexes exist in mammalian cells? How are PcG complexes targeted to specific loci? How does PcG regulate transcription? In this review, we discuss the diversity of PcG complexes in mammalian cells, examine newly identified modes of recruitment to chromatin, and highlight the latest insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the function of PcGs in transcription regulation and three-dimensional chromatin conformation. PMID:26665172

  14. Social regulation of cortisol receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Korzan, Wayne J.; Grone, Brian P.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2014-01-01

    In many social species, individuals influence the reproductive capacity of conspecifics. In a well-studied African cichlid fish species, Astatotilapia burtoni, males are either dominant (D) and reproductively competent or non-dominant (ND) and reproductively suppressed as evidenced by reduced gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH1) release, regressed gonads, lower levels of androgens and elevated levels of cortisol. Here, we asked whether androgen and cortisol levels might regulate this reproductive suppression. Astatotilapia burtoni has four glucocorticoid receptors (GR1a, GR1b, GR2 and MR), encoded by three genes, and two androgen receptors (ARα and ARβ), encoded by two genes. We previously showed that ARα and ARβ are expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the preoptic area (POA), which regulates reproduction, and that the mRNA levels of these receptors are regulated by social status. Here, we show that GR1, GR2 and MR mRNAs are also expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the POA, revealing potential mechanisms for both androgens and cortisol to influence reproductive capacity. We measured AR, MR and GR mRNA expression levels in a microdissected region of the POA containing GnRH1 neurons, comparing D and ND males. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), we found D males had higher mRNA levels of ARα, MR, total GR1a and GR2 in the POA compared with ND males. In contrast, ND males had significantly higher levels of GR1b mRNA, a receptor subtype with a reduced transcriptional response to cortisol. Through this novel regulation of receptor type, neurons in the POA of an ND male will be less affected by the higher levels of cortisol typical of low status, suggesting GR receptor type change as a potential adaptive mechanism to mediate high cortisol levels during social suppression. PMID:25013108

  15. Regulation of gene expression by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E

    1993-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, is regulated in the carotid body, sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla by hypoxia. We found that a reduction in oxygen tension from 21% to 10% caused a substantial increase (200% at 1 hour and 500% at 6 hours exposure) in the concentration of TH mRNA in carotid body type I cells but not in either the sympathetic ganglia or adrenal gland. In addition, we found that hypercapnia, another natural stimulus of carotid body activity, failed to enhance TH mRNA in type I cells. Removal of the sensory and sympathetic innervation of the carotid body failed to prevent the induction of TH mRNA by hypoxia in type I cells. Our results show that TH gene expression is regulated by hypoxia in the carotid body but not in other peripheral catecholamine synthesizing tissue and that the regulatory mechanism is intrinsic to type I cells. PMID:7909954

  16. Redox regulation of photosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine H.

    2012-01-01

    Redox chemistry and redox regulation are central to the operation of photosynthesis and respiration. However, the roles of different oxidants and antioxidants in the regulation of photosynthetic or respiratory gene expression remain poorly understood. Leaf transcriptome profiles of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that are deficient in either hydrogen peroxide processing enzymes or in low molecular weight antioxidant were therefore compared to determine how different antioxidant systems that process hydrogen peroxide influence transcripts encoding proteins targeted to the chloroplasts or mitochondria. Less than 10 per cent overlap was observed in the transcriptome patterns of leaves that are deficient in either photorespiratory (catalase (cat)2) or chloroplastic (thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tapx)) hydrogen peroxide processing. Transcripts encoding photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle components were lower in glutathione-deficient leaves, as were the thylakoid NAD(P)H (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)) dehydrogenases (NDH) mRNAs. Some thylakoid NDH mRNAs were also less abundant in tAPX-deficient and ascorbate-deficient leaves. Transcripts encoding the external and internal respiratory NDHs were increased by low glutathione and low ascorbate. Regulation of transcripts encoding specific components of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains by hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate and glutathione may serve to balance non-cyclic and cyclic electron flow pathways in relation to oxidant production and reductant availability. PMID:23148274

  17. Epigenetic genes regulated by the BRAFV600E signaling are associated with alterations in the methylation and expression of tumor suppressor genes and patient survival in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dingxie; Liu, Xuan; Xing, Mingzhao

    2012-08-17

    We have previously reported that the BRAFV600E signaling causes genome-wide aberrations in gene methylation in melanoma cells. To explore the potential molecular mechanisms for this epigenetic effect of BRAFV600E, in this in silico study we analyzed 11 microarray datasets retrieved from NCBI GEO database and examined the relationship of the expression of the epigenetic genes (genes involved in epigenetic regulation) with BRAFV600E signaling, methylation and expression of tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) in melanoma, and patient survival with this cancer. Among 273 epigenetic genes examined, 12 genes were down-regulated (named DD genes) and 16 were up-regulated (UU genes) by suppression of the BRAFV600E signaling using inhibitors. While the expression of 245 non-DD/UU genes overall had no correlation with the expression and methylation of a set of potential TSGs, the expression of DD genes was significantly correlated negatively with the TSG expression and positively with TSG methylation. Expression of UU genes was positively, albeit weakly, associated with the TSG expression. Overall, no correlation was found between UU gene expression and TSG methylation. Importantly, the expression of DD genes, but not UU genes, was significantly associated with decreased survival of patients with melanoma. Interestingly, the promoters of DD genes contain more binding motifs of c-fos and myc, two BRAFV600E signaling-related transcription factors, than those of UU and non-DD/UU genes. Thus, these results link epigenetic genes to methylation and suppression of tumor suppressor genes as a mechanism involved in BRAFV600E-promoted melanoma tumorigenesis and uncover a novel molecular signature that predicts a poor prognosis of melanoma.

  18. Binding of 14-3-3 reader proteins to phosphorylated DNMT1 facilitates aberrant DNA methylation and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Estève, Pierre-Olivier; Zhang, Guoqiang; Ponnaluri, V.K. Chaithanya; Deepti, Kanneganti; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Dai, Nan; Sagum, Cari; Black, Karynne; Corrêa, Ivan R.; Bedford, Mark T.; Cheng, Xiaodong; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is essential for maintenance methylation. Phosphorylation of Ser143 (pSer143) stabilizes DNMT1 during DNA replication. Here, we show 14-3-3 is a reader protein of DNMT1pSer143. In mammalian cells 14-3-3 colocalizes and binds DNMT1pSer143 post-DNA replication. The level of DNMT1pSer143 increased with overexpression of 14-3-3 and decreased by its depletion. Binding of 14-3-3 proteins with DNMT1pSer143 resulted in inhibition of DNA methylation activity in vitro. In addition, overexpression of 14-3-3 in NIH3T3 cells led to decrease in DNMT1 specific activity resulting in hypomethylation of the genome that was rescued by transfection of DNMT1. Genes representing cell migration, mobility, proliferation and focal adhesion pathway were hypomethylated and overexpressed. Furthermore, overexpression of 14-3-3 also resulted in enhanced cell invasion. Analysis of TCGA breast cancer patient data showed significant correlation for DNA hypomethylation and reduced patient survival with increased 14-3-3 expressions. Therefore, we suggest that 14-3-3 is a crucial reader of DNMT1pSer143 that regulates DNA methylation and altered gene expression that contributes to cell invasion. PMID:26553800

  19. Class I Homeobox Genes, "The Rosetta Stone of the Cell Biology", in the Regulation of Cardiovascular Development.

    PubMed

    Procino, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Class I homeobox genes (Hox in mice and HOX in humans), encode for 39 transcription factors and display a unique genomic network organization mainly involved in the regulation of embryonic development and in the cell memory program. The HOX network controls the aberrant epigenetic modifications involving in the cell memory program. In details, the HOX cluster plays a crucial role in the generation and evolution of several diseases: congenic malformation, oncogenesis, metabolic processes and deregulation of cell cycle. In this review, I discussed about the role of HOX gene network in the control of cardiovascular development.

  20. Gene regulation by non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Patil, Veena S; Zhou, Rui; Rana, Tariq M

    2014-01-01

    The past two decades have seen an explosion in research on non-coding RNAs and their physiological and pathological functions. Several classes of small (20-30 nucleotides) and long (>200 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs have been firmly established as key regulators of gene expression in myriad processes ranging from embryonic development to innate immunity. In this review, we focus on our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and function of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). In addition, we briefly review the relevance of small and long non-coding RNAs to human physiology and pathology and their potential to be exploited as therapeutic agents.

  1. Melatonin regulation of antioxidant enzyme gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mayo, J C; Sainz, R M; Antoli, I; Herrera, F; Martin, V; Rodriguez, C

    2002-10-01

    Antioxidant enzymes (AOEs) are part of the primary cellular defense against free radicals induced by toxins and/or spontaneously formed in cells. Melatonin (MLT) has received much attention in recent years due to its direct free radical scavenging and antioxidant properties. In the present work we report that MLT, at physiological serum concentrations (1 nM), increases the mRNA of both superoxide dismutases (SODs) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in two neuronal cell lines. The MLT effect on both SODs and GPx mRNA was mediated by a de novo synthesized protein. MLT alters mRNA stability for Cu-Zn SOD and GPx. Experiments with a short time treatment (pulse action) of MLT suggest that the regulation of AOE gene expression is likely to be receptor mediated, because 1-h treatment with MLT results in the same response as a 24-h treatment.

  2. Transcriptional control of human p53-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Riley, Todd; Sontag, Eduardo; Chen, Patricia; Levine, Arnold

    2008-05-01

    The p53 protein regulates the transcription of many different genes in response to a wide variety of stress signals. Following DNA damage, p53 regulates key processes, including DNA repair, cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, in order to suppress cancer. This Analysis article provides an overview of the current knowledge of p53-regulated genes in these pathways and others, and the mechanisms of their regulation. In addition, we present the most comprehensive list so far of human p53-regulated genes and their experimentally validated, functional binding sites that confer p53 regulation. PMID:18431400

  3. Conditional gene vectors regulated in cis

    PubMed Central

    Pich, Dagmar; Humme, Sibille; Spindler, Mark-Peter; Schepers, Aloys; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Non-integrating gene vectors, which are stably and extrachromosomally maintained in transduced cells would be perfect tools to support long-term expression of therapeutic genes but preserve the genomic integrity of the cellular host. Small extrachromosomal plasmids share some of these ideal characteristics but are primarily based on virus blueprints. These plasmids are dependent on viral trans-acting factors but they can replicate their DNA molecules in synchrony with the chromosome of the cellular host and segregate to daughter cells in an autonomous fashion. On the basis of the concept of the latent origin of DNA replication of Epstein-Barr virus, oriP, we devised novel derivatives, which exclusively rely on an artificial replication factor for both nuclear retention and replication of plasmid DNA. In addition, an allosteric switch regulates the fate of the plasmid molecules, which are rapidly lost upon addition of doxycycline. Conditional maintenance of these novel plasmid vectors allows the reversible transfer of genetic information into target cells for the first time. PMID:18566006

  4. The transcriptional regulation of the Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor (csf1r) gene during hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Bonifer, Constanze; Hume, David A

    2008-01-01

    The colony-stimulating-factor 1 receptor (CSF-1 R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor that is absolutely required for macrophage differentiation and thus occupies a central role in hematopoiesis. Mice deficient for the csf1r gene show multiple defects in macrophage development, reproduction and tissue remodeling. Moreover, deregulation of this gene is a hallmark of many tumors. This includes repression of expression in acute myeloid leukemia and aberrant activation in certain solid tumors, such as breast cancer. Expression of this gene therefore needs to be tightly controlled. This review summarizes experiments providing a detailed picture of how transcription of csf1r gene expression is regulated. Aside from the direct relevance to hematopoiesis, studies of csf1r transcriptional regulation provide a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms that control mammalian cell fate.

  5. Identification of Proteins Related to Epigenetic Regulation in the Malignant Transformation of Aberrant Karyotypic Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Yang, Yixuan; Zeng, Sicong; Tan, Yueqiu; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) tend to develop genomic alterations and progress to a malignant state during long-term in vitro culture. This raises concerns of the clinical safety in using cultured hESCs. However, transformed hESCs might serve as an excellent model to determine the process of embryonic stem cell transition. In this study, ITRAQ-based tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify normal and aberrant karyotypic hESCs proteins from simple to more complex karyotypic abnormalities. We identified and quantified 2583 proteins, and found that the expression levels of 316 proteins that represented at least 23 functional molecular groups were significantly different in both normal and abnormal hESCs. Dysregulated protein expression in epigenetic regulation was further verified in six pairs of hESC lines in early and late passage. In summary, this study is the first large-scale quantitative proteomic analysis of the malignant transformation of aberrant karyotypic hESCs. The data generated should serve as a useful reference of stem cell-derived tumor progression. Increased expression of both HDAC2 and CTNNB1 are detected as early as the pre-neoplastic stage, and might serve as prognostic markers in the malignant transformation of hESCs. PMID:24465727

  6. Epigenetic Gene Regulation in the Adult Mammalian Brain: Multiple roles in Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Farah D.

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) is one of numerous gene products necessary for long-term memory formation and dysregulation of bdnf has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive and mental disorders. Recent work indicates that epigenetic-regulatory mechanisms including the markings of histone proteins and associated DNA remain labile throughout the lifespan and represent an attractive molecular process contributing to gene regulation in the brain. In this review, important information will be discussed on epigenetics as a set of newly identified dynamic transcriptional mechanisms serving to regulate gene expression changes in the adult brain with particular emphasis on bdnf transcriptional readout in learning and memory formation. This review will also highlight evidence for the role of epigenetics in aberrant bdnf gene regulation in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction associated with seizure disorders, Rett syndrome, Schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Such research offers novel concepts for understanding epigenetic transcriptional mechanisms subserving adult cognition and mental health, and furthermore promises novel avenues for therapeutic approach in the clinic. PMID:21419233

  7. Asymmetric Regulation of Peripheral Genes by Two Transcriptional Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Ru; Suzuki, Takahiro; Nishimura, Hajime; Kishima, Mami; Maeda, Shiori; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) reconstitution and deconstruction occur simultaneously during reprogramming; however, it remains unclear how the starting and targeting TRNs regulate the induction and suppression of peripheral genes. Here we analyzed the regulation using direct cell reprogramming from human dermal fibroblasts to monocytes as the platform. We simultaneously deconstructed fibroblastic TRN and reconstituted monocytic TRN; monocytic and fibroblastic gene expression were analyzed in comparison with that of fibroblastic TRN deconstruction only or monocytic TRN reconstitution only. Global gene expression analysis showed cross-regulation of TRNs. Detailed analysis revealed that knocking down fibroblastic TRN positively affected half of the upregulated monocytic genes, indicating that intrinsic fibroblastic TRN interfered with the expression of induced genes. In contrast, reconstitution of monocytic TRN showed neutral effects on the majority of fibroblastic gene downregulation. This study provides an explicit example that demonstrates how two networks together regulate gene expression during cell reprogramming processes and contributes to the elaborate exploration of TRNs. PMID:27483142

  8. Transplacental arsenic plus postnatal 12-O-teradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate exposures associated with hepatocarcinogenesis induce similar aberrant gene expression patterns in male and female mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Xie Yaxiong; Merrick, B. Alex; Shen Jun; Ducharme, Danica M.K.; Collins, Jennifer; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Logsdon, Daniel; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2006-06-15

    Our prior work shows that in utero arsenic exposure alone is a complete transplacental carcinogen, producing hepatocellular carcinoma in adult male offspring but not in females. In a follow-up study to potentially promote arsenic-initiated tumors, mice were exposed to arsenic (85 ppm) from gestation day 8 to 18 and then exposed to 12-O-teradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a well-known tumor promoter after weaning. The dermal application of TPA (2 {mu}g/0.1 ml acetone, twice/week for 21 weeks) after transplacental arsenic did not further increase arsenic-induced liver tumor formation in adult males but significantly increased liver tumor formation in adult females. Thus, for comparison, liver tumors and normal liver samples taken from adult male and female mice at necropsy were analyzed for aberrant gene/protein expression by microarray, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Arsenic/TPA treatment resulted in increased expression of {alpha}-fetoprotein, k-ras, c-myc, estrogen receptor-{alpha}, cyclin D1, cdk2na, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, cytokeratin-8, cytokeratin-18, glutathione S-transferases and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in liver and liver tumors from both male and female mice. Arsenic/TPA also decreased the expression of BRCA1, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, CYP7B1, CYP2F2 and insulin-like growth factor-1 in normal and cancerous livers. Alterations in these gene products were associated with arsenic/TPA-induced liver tumors, regardless of sex. Thus, transplacental arsenic plus postnatal TPA exposure induced similar aberrant gene expression patterns in male and female mouse liver, which are persistent and potentially important to the mechanism of arsenic initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  9. Aberrant CpG methylation of the TFAP2A gene constitutes a mechanism for loss of TFAP2A expression in human metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, Andrea R; Vorrink, Sabine U; Hudachek, Danielle R; Cramer-Morales, Kimberly; Milhem, Mohammed M; Cornell, Robert A; Domann, Frederick E

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a deadly treatment-resistant form of skin cancer whose global incidence is on the rise. During melanocyte transformation and melanoma progression the expression profile of many genes changes. Among these, a gene implicated in several steps of melanocyte development, TFAP2A, is frequently silenced; however, the molecular mechanism of TFAP2A silencing in human melanoma remains unknown. In this study, we measured TFAP2A mRNA expression in primary human melanocytes compared to 11 human melanoma samples by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In addition, we assessed CpG DNA methylation of the TFAP2A promoter in these samples using bisulfite sequencing. Compared to primary melanocytes, which showed high TFAP2A mRNA expression and no promoter methylation, human melanoma samples showed decreased TFAP2A mRNA expression and increased promoter methylation. We further show that increased CpG methylation correlates with decreased TFAP2A mRNA expression. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, we further identified TFAP2A as a gene displaying among the most decreased expression in stage 4 melanomas vs. non-stage 4 melanomas, and whose CpG methylation was frequently associated with lack of mRNA expression. Based on our data, we conclude that TFAP2A expression in human melanomas can be silenced by aberrant CpG methylation of the TFAP2A promoter. We have identified aberrant CpG DNA methylation as an epigenetic mark associated with TFAP2A silencing in human melanoma that could have significant implications for the therapy of human melanoma using epigenetic modifying drugs. PMID:25625848

  10. Pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation: examples, models and consistent theory

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Elisa N.; Shu, Jiang; Cserhati, Matyas F.; Weeks, Donald P.; Ladunga, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    We present a theory of pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation. To bridge the gap between empirical studies and mathematical models, we integrate pre-existing observations with our meta-analyses of the ENCODE ChIP-Seq experiments. Earlier evidence includes fluctuations in levels, location, activity, and binding of transcription factors, variable DNA motifs, and bursts in gene expression. Stochastic regulation is also indicated by frequently subdued effects of knockout mutants of regulators, their evolutionary losses/gains and massive rewiring of regulatory sites. We report wide-spread pluralistic regulation in ≈800 000 tightly co-expressed pairs of diverse human genes. Typically, half of ≈50 observed regulators bind to both genes reproducibly, twice more than in independently expressed gene pairs. We also examine the largest set of co-expressed genes, which code for cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Numerous regulatory complexes are highly significant enriched in ribosomal genes compared to highly expressed non-ribosomal genes. We could not find any DNA-associated, strict sense master regulator. Despite major fluctuations in transcription factor binding, our machine learning model accurately predicted transcript levels using binding sites of 20+ regulators. Our pluralistic and stochastic theory is consistent with partially random binding patterns, redundancy, stochastic regulator binding, burst-like expression, degeneracy of binding motifs and massive regulatory rewiring during evolution. PMID:26823500

  11. Pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation: examples, models and consistent theory.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisa N; Shu, Jiang; Cserhati, Matyas F; Weeks, Donald P; Ladunga, Istvan

    2016-06-01

    We present a theory of pluralistic and stochastic gene regulation. To bridge the gap between empirical studies and mathematical models, we integrate pre-existing observations with our meta-analyses of the ENCODE ChIP-Seq experiments. Earlier evidence includes fluctuations in levels, location, activity, and binding of transcription factors, variable DNA motifs, and bursts in gene expression. Stochastic regulation is also indicated by frequently subdued effects of knockout mutants of regulators, their evolutionary losses/gains and massive rewiring of regulatory sites. We report wide-spread pluralistic regulation in ≈800 000 tightly co-expressed pairs of diverse human genes. Typically, half of ≈50 observed regulators bind to both genes reproducibly, twice more than in independently expressed gene pairs. We also examine the largest set of co-expressed genes, which code for cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Numerous regulatory complexes are highly significant enriched in ribosomal genes compared to highly expressed non-ribosomal genes. We could not find any DNA-associated, strict sense master regulator. Despite major fluctuations in transcription factor binding, our machine learning model accurately predicted transcript levels using binding sites of 20+ regulators. Our pluralistic and stochastic theory is consistent with partially random binding patterns, redundancy, stochastic regulator binding, burst-like expression, degeneracy of binding motifs and massive regulatory rewiring during evolution.

  12. Global identification of bursicon-regulated genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    An, Shiheng; Wang, Songjie; Gilbert, Lawrence I; Beerntsen, Brenda; Ellersieck, Mark; Song, Qisheng

    2008-01-01

    Background Bursicon is a heterodimer neuropeptide responsible for regulating cuticle sclerotization and wing expansion in several insect species. Recent studies indicate that the action of bursicon is mediated by a specific G protein-coupled receptor DLGR2 and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. However, little is known regarding the genes that are regulated by bursicon. The identification of bursicon-regulated genes is the focus of this investigation. Results We used DNA microarray analysis to identify bursicon-regulated genes in neck-ligated flies (Drosophila melanogaster) that received recombinant bursicon (r-bursicon). Fifty four genes were found to be regulated by bursicon 1 h post r-bursicon injection, 52 being up-regulated and 2 down-regulated while 33 genes were influenced by r-bursicon 3 h post-injection (24 up-regulated and 9 down-regulated genes). Analysis of these genes by inference from the fly database revealed that these genes encode proteins with diverse functions, including cell signaling, gene transcription, DNA/RNA binding, ion trafficking, proteolysis-peptidolysis, metabolism, cytoskeleton formation, immune response and cell-adhesion. Twenty eight genes randomly selected from the microarray-identified list were verified by real time PCR (qPCR) which supported the microarray data. Temporal response studies of 13 identified and verified genes by qPCR revealed that the temporal expression patterns of these genes are consistent with the microarray data. Conclusion Using r-bursicon, we identified 87 genes that are regulated by bursicon, 30 of which have no previously known function. Most importantly, all genes randomly selected from the microarray-identified list were verified by real time PCR. Temporal analysis of 13 verified genes revealed that the expression of these genes was indeed induced by bursicon and correlated well with the cuticle sclerotization process. The composite data suggest that these genes play important roles in regulating the

  13. Antipsychotic Induced Gene Regulation in Multiple Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Girgenti, Matthew James; Nisenbaum, Laura K.; Bymaster, Franklin; Terwilliger, Rosemarie; Duman, Ronald S; Newton, Samuel Sathyanesan

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs is not well understood. Their complex receptor affinity profiles indicate that their action could extend beyond dopamine receptor blockade. Single gene expression studies and high-throughput gene profiling have shown the induction of genes from several molecular classes and functional categories. Using a focused microarray approach we investigated gene regulation in rat striatum, frontal cortex and hippocampus after chronic administration of haloperidol or olanzapine. Regulated genes were validated by in-situ hybridization, realtime PCR and immunohistochemistry. Only limited overlap was observed in genes regulated by haloperidol and olanzapine. Both drugs elicited maximal gene regulation in the striatum and least in the hippocampus. Striatal gene induction by haloperidol was predominantly in neurotransmitter signaling, G-protein coupled receptors and transcription factors. Olanzapine prominently induced retinoic acid and trophic factor signaling genes in the frontal cortex. The data also revealed the induction of several genes that could be targeted in future drug development efforts. The study uncovered the induction of several novel genes, including somatostatin receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The results demonstrating the regulation of multiple receptors and transcription factors suggests that both typical and atypical antipsychotics could possess a complex molecular mechanism of action. PMID:20070867

  14. Drosophila mutants of the autism candidate gene neurobeachin (rugose) exhibit neuro-developmental disorders, aberrant synaptic properties, altered locomotion, impaired adult social behavior and activity patterns

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Alexandra; Tenezaca, Luis; Fernandez, Robert W.; Schatoff, Emma; Flores, Julian; Ueda, Atsushi; Zhong, Xiaotian; Wu, Chun-Fang; Simon, Anne F.; Venkatesh, Tadmiri

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder in humans characterized by complex behavioral deficits, including intellectual disability, impaired social interactions and hyperactivity. ASD exhibits a strong genetic component with underlying multi-gene interactions. Candidate gene studies have shown that the neurobeachin gene is disrupted in human patients with idiopathic autism (Castermans et al., 2003). The gene for neurobeachin (NBEA) spans the common fragile site FRA 13A and encodes a signal scaffold protein (Savelyeva et al., 2006). In mice, NBEA has been shown to be involved in the trafficking and function of a specific subset of synaptic vesicles. (Medrihan et al., 2009; Savelyeva, Sagulenko, Schmitt, & Schwab, 2006). rugose (rg) is the Drosophila homologue of the mammalian and human neurobeachin. Our previous genetic and molecular analyses have shown that rg encodes an A kinase anchor protein (DAKAP 550), which interacts with components of the EGFR and Notch mediated signaling pathways, facilitating cross-talk between these and other pathways (Shamloula et al., 2002). We now present functional data from studies on the larval neuromuscular junction that reveal abnormal synaptic architecture and physiology. In addition, adult rg loss-of-function mutants exhibit defective social interactions, impaired habituation, aberrant locomotion and hyperactivity. These results demonstrate that Drosophila neurobeachin (rugose) mutants exhibit phenotypic characteristics reminiscent of human ASD and thus could serve as a genetic model for studying autism spectrum disorders. PMID:26100104

  15. Trainable Gene Regulation Networks with Applications to Drosophila Pattern Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, Eric

    2000-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. For details the reader is referred to the papers introduced below. It will then introduce a new gene regulation network model which can describe promoter-level substructure in gene regulation. As described in chapter 2, gene regulation may be thought of as a combination of cis-acting regulation by the extended promoter of a gene (including all regulatory sequences) by way of the transcription complex, and of trans-acting regulation by the transcription factor products of other genes. If we simplify the cis-action by using a phenomenological model which can be tuned to data, such as a unit or other small portion of an artificial neural network, then the full transacting interaction between multiple genes during development can be modelled as a larger network which can again be tuned or trained to data. The larger network will in general need to have recurrent (feedback) connections since at least some real gene regulation networks do. This is the basic modeling approach taken, which describes how a set of recurrent neural networks can be used as a modeling language for multiple developmental processes including gene regulation within a single cell, cell-cell communication, and cell division. Such network models have been called "gene circuits", "gene regulation networks", or "genetic regulatory networks", sometimes without distinguishing the models from the actual modeled systems.

  16. Gene expression profile of brain regions reflecting aberrations in nervous system development targeting the process of neurite extension of rat offspring exposed developmentally to glycidol.

    PubMed

    Akane, Hirotoshi; Saito, Fumiyo; Shiraki, Ayako; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi; Itahashi, Megu; Wang, Liyun; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    We previously found that exposure to glycidol at 1000 ppm in drinking water caused axonopathy in maternal rats and aberrations in late-stage hippocampal neurogenesis, targeting the process of neurite extension in offspring. To identify the profile of developmental neurotoxicity of glycidol, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given drinking water containing glycidol from gestational day 6 until weaning on day 21 after delivery, and offspring at 0, 300 and 1000 ppm were subjected to region-specific global gene expression profiling. Four brain regions were selected to represent both cerebral and cerebellar tissues, i.e., the cingulate cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampal dentate gyrus and cerebellar vermis. Downregulated genes in the dentate gyrus were related to axonogenesis (Nfasc), myelination (Mal, Mrf and Ugt8), and cell proliferation (Aurkb and Ndc80) at ≥ 300 ppm, and upregulated genes were related to neural development (Frzb and Fzd6) at 1000 ppm. Upregulation was observed for genes related to myelination (Kl, Igf2 and Igfbp2) in the corpus callosum and axonogenesis and neuritogenesis (Efnb3, Tnc and Cd44) in the cingulate cortex, whereas downregulation was observed for genes related to synaptic transmission (Thbs2 and Ccl2) in the cerebellar vermis; all of these changes were mostly observed at 1000 ppm. Altered gene expression of Cntn3, which functions on neurite outgrowth-promotion, was observed in all four brain regions at 1000 ppm. Gene expression profiles suggest that developmental exposure to glycidol affected plasticity of neuronal networks in the broad brain areas, and dentate gyrus neurogenesis may be the sensitive target of this type of toxicity.

  17. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of the death-associated protein kinase gene is early and frequent in murine lung tumors induced by cigarette smoke and tobacco carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Pulling, Leah C; Vuillemenot, Brian R; Hutt, Julie A; Devereux, Theodora R; Belinsky, Steven A

    2004-06-01

    Loss of expression of the death-associated protein (DAP)-kinase gene by aberrant promoter methylation may play an important role in cancer development and progression. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the commonality for inactivation of the DAP-kinase gene in adenocarcinomas induced in mice by chronic exposure to mainstream cigarette smoke, the tobacco carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and vinyl carbamate, and the occupational carcinogen methylene chloride. The timing for inactivation was also determined in alveolar hyperplasias that arise in lung cancer induced in the A/J mouse by NNK. The DAP-kinase gene was not expressed in three of five NNK-induced lung tumor-derived cell lines or in a spontaneously arising lung tumor-derived cell line. Treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored expression; dense methylation throughout the DAP-kinase CpG island detected by bisulfite sequencing supported methylation as the inactivating event in these cell lines. Methylation-specific PCR detected inactivation of the DAP-kinase gene in 43% of tumors associated with cigarette smoke, a frequency similar to those reported in human non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, DAP-kinase methylation was detected in 52%, 60%, and 50% of tumors associated with NNK, vinyl carbamate, and methylene chloride, respectively. Methylation was observed at similar prevalence in both NNK-induced hyperplasias and adenocarcinomas (46% versus 52%), suggesting that inactivation of this gene is one pathway for tumor development in the mouse lung. Bisulfite sequencing of both premalignant and malignant lesions revealed dense methylation, substantiating that this gene is functionally inactivated at the earliest histological stages of adenocarcinoma development. This study is the first to use a murine model of cigarette smoke-induced lung cancer and demonstrate commonality for inactivation by promoter hypermethylation of a gene implicated in the development

  18. Argonaute 2-dependent Regulation of Gene Expression by Single-stranded miRNA Mimics.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Masayuki; Prakash, Thazha P; Corey, David R

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding transcripts that regulate gene expression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs can affect development of cancer and other diseases. Synthetic miRNA mimics can modulate gene expression and offer an approach to therapy. Inside cells, mature miRNAs are produced as double-stranded RNAs and miRNA mimics typically retain both strands. This need for two strands has the potential to complicate drug development. Recently, synthetic chemically modified single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNA) have been shown to function through the RNAi pathway to induce gene silencing in cell culture and animals. Here, we test the hypothesis that single-stranded miRNA (ss-miRNA) can also mimic the function of miRNAs. We show that ss-miRNAs can act as miRNA mimics to silence the expression of target genes. Gene silencing requires expression of argonaute 2 (AGO2) protein and involves recruitment of AGO2 to the target transcripts. Chemically modified ss-miRNAs function effectively inside cells through endogenous RNAi pathways and broaden the options for miRNA-based oligonucleotide drug development.

  19. Aberrant gene expression patterns in placentomes are associated with phenotypically normal and abnormal cattle cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Everts, Robin E; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Razzak, Anthony; Hue, Isabelle; Green, Cheryl A; Oliveira, Rosane; Vignon, Xavier; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Tian, X Cindy; Yang, Xiangzhong; Renard, Jean-Paul; Lewin, Harris A

    2008-03-14

    Transcription profiling of placentomes derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, n = 20), in vitro fertilization (IVF, n = 9), and artificial insemination (AI, n = 9) at or near term development was performed to better understand why SCNT and IVF often result in placental defects, hydrops, and large offspring syndrome (LOS). Multivariate analysis of variance was used to distinguish the effects of SCNT, IVF, and AI on gene expression, taking into account the effects of parturition (term or preterm), sex of fetus, breed of dam, breed of fetus, and pathological finding in the offspring (hydrops, normal, or other abnormalities). Differential expression of 20 physiologically important genes was confirmed with quantitative PCR. The largest effect on placentome gene expression was attributable to whether placentas were collected at term or preterm (i.e., whether the collection was because of disease or to obtain stage-matched controls) followed by placentome source (AI, IVF, or SCNT). Gene expression in SCNT placentomes was dramatically different from AI (n = 336 genes; 276 >2-fold) and from IVF (n = 733 genes; 162 >2-fold) placentomes. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEG) showed that IVF has significant effects on genes associated with cellular metabolism. In contrast, DEG associated with SCNT are involved in multiple pathways, including cell cycle, cell death, and gene expression. Many DEG were shared between the gene lists for IVF and SCNT comparisons, suggesting that common pathways are affected by the embryo culture methods used for IVF and SCNT. However, the many unique gene functions and pathways affected by SCNT suggest that cloned fetuses may be starved and accumulating toxic wastes due to placental insufficiency caused by reprogramming errors. Many of these genes are candidates for hydrops and LOS.

  20. Environmental and nutritional effects on the epigenetic regulation of genes.

    PubMed

    Feil, Robert

    2006-08-30

    Major efforts have been directed towards the identification of genetic mutations, their use as biomarkers, and the understanding of their consequences on human health and well-being. There is an emerging interest, however, in the possibility that environmentally-induced changes at levels other than the genetic information could have long-lasting consequences as well. This review summarises our current knowledge of how the environment, nutrition, and ageing affect the way mammalian genes are organised and transcribed, without changes in the underlying DNA sequence. Admittedly, the link between environment and epigenetics remains largely to be explored. However, recent studies indicate that environmental factors and diet can perturb the way genes are controlled by DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications. Unexpectedly, and not unlike genetic mutations, aberrant epigenetic alterations and their phenotypic effects can sometimes be passed on to the next generation.

  1. Germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppresssor gene are similar to somatic VHL aberrations in sporadic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, J.M.; Naglich, J.; Gelbert, L.

    1994-09-01

    A candidate gene for von Hippel Lindau disease was recently identified that led to the isolation of a partial cDNA clone with extended open reading frame without significant homology to known genes or obvious functional motifs, except for an acidic pentamer repeat domain. To further characterize the functional domains of the VHL gene and assess its involvement in hereditary and non-hereditary tumors, we performed mutation analyses and studied its expresssion in normal and tumor tissue. We identified germline mutations in 39% of VHL disease families. Moreover, 33% of sporadic RCCs, and all (6/6) sporadic RCC cell lines analyzed, showed mutations within the VHL gene. Both germline and somatic mutations included deletions, insertions, splice site mutations, missense and nonsense mutations, all of which clustered at the 3{prime} end of the corresponding partial VHL cDNA open reading frame including an alternatively-spliced exon of 123 nucleotides in length, suggesting functionally important domains encoded by the VHL gene in this region. Over 180 sporadic tumors of other types have shown no detectable base changes within the presumed coding sequence of the VHL gene to date. We conclude that the gene causing VHL has an important and specific role in the etiology of sporadic renal cell carcinomas, acts as a recessive tumor suppressor gene, and appears to encode important functional domains within the 3{prime} end of the known open reading frame.

  2. Chromosome aberrations induced by zebularine in triticale.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuhui; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yanzhi; Ma, Jieyun; Wu, Nan; Ni, Shuang; Luo, Tengxiao; Zhuang, Lifang; Chu, Chenggen; Cho, Seong-Woo; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Qi, Zengjun

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome engineering is an important approach for generating wheat germplasm. Efficient development of chromosome aberrations will facilitate the introgression and application of alien genes in wheat. In this study, zebularine, a DNA methylation transferase inhibitor, was successfully used to induce chromosome aberrations in the octoploid triticale cultivar Jinghui#1. Dry seeds were soaked in zebularine solutions (250, 500, and 750 μmol/L) for 24 h, and the 500 μmol/L treatment was tested in three additional treatment times, i.e., 12, 36, and 48 h. All treatments induced aberrations involving wheat and rye chromosomes. Of the 920 cells observed in 67 M1 plants, 340 (37.0%) carried 817 aberrations with an average of 0.89 aberrations per cell (range: 0-12). The aberrations included probable deletions, telosomes and acentric fragments (49.0%), large segmental translocations (28.9%), small segmental translocations (17.1%), intercalary translocations (2.6%), long chromosomes that could carry more than one centromere (2.0%), and ring chromosomes (0.5%). Of 510 M2 plants analyzed, 110 (21.6%) were found to carry stable aberrations. Such aberrations included 79 with varied rye chromosome numbers, 7 with wheat and rye chromosome translocations, 15 with possible rye telosomes/deletions, and 9 with complex aberrations involving variation in rye chromosome number and wheat-rye translocations. These indicated that aberrations induced by zebularine can be steadily transmitted, suggesting that zebularine is a new efficient agent for chromosome manipulation. PMID:27334255

  3. Comprehensive and quantitative multilocus methylation analysis reveals the susceptibility of specific imprinted differentially methylated regions to aberrant methylation in Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome with epimutations

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Toshiyuki; Higashimoto, Ken; Jozaki, Kosuke; Yatsuki, Hitomi; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Makita, Yoshio; Tonoki, Hidefumi; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Takada, Fumio; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Migita, Makoto; Kosaki, Rika; Matsubara, Keiko; Ogata, Tsutomu; Matsuo, Muneaki; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Ohtsuka, Yasufumi; Nishioka, Kenichi; Joh, Keiichiro; Mukai, Tsunehiro; Hata, Kenichiro; Soejima, Hidenobu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Expression of imprinted genes is regulated by DNA methylation of differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome is an imprinting disorder caused by epimutations of DMRs at 11p15.5. To date, multiple methylation defects have been reported in Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome patients with epimutations; however, limited numbers of DMRs have been analyzed. The susceptibility of DMRs to aberrant methylation, alteration of gene expression due to aberrant methylation, and causative factors for multiple methylation defects remain undetermined. Methods: Comprehensive methylation analysis with two quantitative methods, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and bisulfite pyrosequencing, was conducted across 29 DMRs in 54 Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome patients with epimutations. Allelic expressions of three genes with aberrant methylation were analyzed. All DMRs with aberrant methylation were sequenced. Results: Thirty-four percent of KvDMR1–loss of methylation patients and 30% of H19DMR–gain of methylation patients showed multiple methylation defects. Maternally methylated DMRs were susceptible to aberrant hypomethylation in KvDMR1–loss of methylation patients. Biallelic expression of the genes was associated with aberrant methylation. Cis-acting pathological variations were not found in any aberrantly methylated DMR. Conclusion: Maternally methylated DMRs may be vulnerable to DNA demethylation during the preimplantation stage, when hypomethylation of KvDMR1 occurs, and aberrant methylation of DMRs affects imprinted gene expression. Cis-acting variations of the DMRs are not involved in the multiple methylation defects. PMID:24810686

  4. Aberrant placenta gene expression pattern in bovine pregnancies established after transfer of cloned or in vitro produced embryos.

    PubMed

    Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Tesfaye, Dawit; Hossain, Munir; Held, Eva; Rings, Franca; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Cinar, Ulas; Schellander, Karl; Hoelker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we used the global transcriptome profile approach to identify dysregulated genes, molecular pathways, and molecular functional alterations in bovine placentas derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and in vitro embryo production (IVP) pregnancies compared with their artificial insemination (AI) counterparts at day 50 of gestation. For this, day 7 blastocysts derived from AI, IVP, or SCNT were transferred to oestrus-synchronized cows. The pregnant animals were slaughtered at day 50 of gestation, and the placentas were then recovered and used for transcriptome analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip bovine genome array. Results showed the SCNT placenta to be different from its AI counterpart in the expression of 1,196 transcripts. These genes were found to be associated with alterations in key biological processes and molecular pathways in SCNT placenta, and the dysregulation of 9% (n = 110) of these genes was due to transcriptional reprogramming error. IVP placenta also displayed alterations in the expression of 72 genes, of which 58 were common to SCNT placenta. Gene enrichment analysis revealed that the expression of genes involved in organ development, blood vessel development, extracellular matrix organization, and the immune system was affected in both SCNT and IVP placentas. However, 96% of the affected genes in SCNT were not significantly altered in IVP groups. Thus, the higher transcriptome dysregulation in SCNT placenta followed by IVP would reflect the degree of placental abnormality in SCNT and IVP pregnancies at day 50 of the gestation, which may have a profound effect on subsequent fetal development and health of the offspring.

  5. Prognostic value of aberrant promoter hypermethylation of tumor-related genes in early-stage head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Kiyoshi; Mochizuki, Daiki; Imai, Atsushi; Endo, Shiori; Mima, Masato; Misawa, Yuki; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Carey, Thomas E.; Mineta, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Staging and pathological grading are useful, but imperfect predictors of recurrence in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Accordingly, molecular biomarkers that predict the risk of recurrence are necessary to improve clinical outcomes. The methylation statuses of the promoters of 11 tumor-related genes (p16, RASSF1A, E-cadherin, H-cadherin, MGMT, DAPK, DCC, COL1A2, TAC1, SST, and GALR1) were analyzed in 133 HNSCC cases using quantitative methylation-specific PCR. We detected frequent methylation of p16 (44%), RASSF1A (18%), E-cadherin (53%), H-cadherin (35%), MGMT (35%), DAPK (53%), DCC (42%), COL1A2 (44%), TAC1 (61%), SST (64%), and GALR1 (44%) in HNSCC. Disease-free survival was lower in patients with 6–11 methylated genes than in those with 0–5 methylated genes (log-rank test, P = 0.001). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis, the methylation of E-cadherin, COL1A2, TAC1, and GALR1 was associated with poor survival, with hazard ratios of 4.474 (95% CI, 1.241–16.124). In a joint analysis of these four genes, patients with 2–4 methylated genes had a significantly lower survival rate than those with 0–1 methylated genes in early-stage HNSCC. Importantly, the methylation of some genes was closely related to poor prognosis in early-stage HNSCC, providing strong evidence that these hypermethylated genes are valuable biomarkers for prognostic evaluation. PMID:27027429

  6. Prognostic value of aberrant promoter hypermethylation of tumor-related genes in early-stage head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Kiyoshi; Mochizuki, Daiki; Imai, Atsushi; Endo, Shiori; Mima, Masato; Misawa, Yuki; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Carey, Thomas E; Mineta, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Staging and pathological grading are useful, but imperfect predictors of recurrence in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Accordingly, molecular biomarkers that predict the risk of recurrence are necessary to improve clinical outcomes. The methylation statuses of the promoters of 11 tumor-related genes (p16, RASSF1A, E-cadherin, H-cadherin, MGMT, DAPK, DCC, COL1A2, TAC1, SST, and GALR1) were analyzed in 133 HNSCC cases using quantitative methylation-specific PCR. We detected frequent methylation of p16 (44%), RASSF1A (18%), E-cadherin (53%), H-cadherin (35%), MGMT (35%), DAPK (53%), DCC (42%), COL1A2 (44%), TAC1 (61%), SST (64%), and GALR1 (44%) in HNSCC. Disease-free survival was lower in patients with 6-11 methylated genes than in those with 0-5 methylated genes (log-rank test, P = 0.001). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis, the methylation of E-cadherin, COL1A2, TAC1, and GALR1 was associated with poor survival, with hazard ratios of 4.474 (95% CI, 1.241-16.124). In a joint analysis of these four genes, patients with 2-4 methylated genes had a significantly lower survival rate than those with 0-1 methylated genes in early-stage HNSCC. Importantly, the methylation of some genes was closely related to poor prognosis in early-stage HNSCC, providing strong evidence that these hypermethylated genes are valuable biomarkers for prognostic evaluation. PMID:27027429

  7. Characterization of gene rearrangements resulted from genomic structural aberrations in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma KYSE150 cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jia-Jie; Gong, Ting; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Zhi-Zhou; Xu, Xin; Dong, Jin-Tang; Zhan, Qi-Min; Fu, Song-Bin; Wang, Ming-Rong

    2013-01-15

    Chromosomal rearrangements and involved genes have been reported to play important roles in the development and progression of human malignancies. But the gene rearrangements in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain to be identified. In the present study, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was performed on the ESCC cell line KYSE150. Eight disrupted genes were detected according to the obviously distinct unbalanced breakpoints. The splitting of these genes was validated by dual-color fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), genome walking and sequencing analysis, we further identified gene disruptions and rearrangements. A fusion transcript DTL-1q42.2 was derived from an intrachromosomal rearrangement of chromosome 1. Highly amplified segments of DTL and PTPRD were self-rearranged. The sequences on either side of the junctions possess micro-homology with each other. FISH results indicated that the split DTL and PTPRD were also involved in comprising parts of the derivative chromosomes resulted from t(1q;9p;12p) and t(9;1;9). Further, we found that regions harboring DTL (1q32.3) and PTPRD (9p23) were also splitting in ESCC tumors. The data supplement significant information on the existing genetic background of KYSE150, which may be used as a model for studying these gene rearrangements.

  8. Impaired Contextual Fear Extinction Learning is Associated with Aberrant Regulation of CHD-Type Chromatin Remodeling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wille, Alexandra; Maurer, Verena; Piatti, Paolo; Whittle, Nigel; Rieder, Dietmar; Singewald, Nicolas; Lusser, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Successful attenuation of fearful memories is a cognitive process requiring initiation of highly coordinated transcription programs. Chromatin-modulating mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, including acetylation, are key regulators of these processes. However, knowledge concerning the role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors (ChRFs) being required for successful fear extinction is lacking. Underscoring the potential importance of these factors that alter histone-DNA contacts within nucleosomes are recent genome-wide association studies linking several ChRFs to various human cognitive and psychiatric disorders. To better understand the role of ChRFs in the brain, and since to date little is known about ChRF expression in the brain, we performed a comprehensive survey of expression levels of 24 ATP-dependent remodelers across different brain areas, and we identified several distinct high molecular weight complexes by chromatographic methods. We next aimed to gain novel insight into the potential regulation of ChRFs in different brain regions in association with normal and impaired fear extinction learning. To this end, we established the 129S1/SvImJ (S1) laboratory mouse strain as a model for compromised contextual fear extinction learning that can be rescued by dietary zinc restriction (ZnR). Using this model along with genetically related but fear extinction-competent 129S6/SvEv (S6) mice as controls, we found that impaired fear extinction in S1 was associated with enhanced ventral hippocampal expression of CHD1 and reduced expression of CHD5 that was normalized following successful rescue of impaired fear extinction. Moreover, a select reduction in CHD3 expression was observed in the ventral hippocampus (vHC) following successful rescue of fear extinction in S1 mice. Taken together, these data provide novel insight into the regulation of specific ChRFs following an impaired cognitive process and its rescue, and they suggest that

  9. Impaired Contextual Fear Extinction Learning is Associated with Aberrant Regulation of CHD-Type Chromatin Remodeling Factors.

    PubMed

    Wille, Alexandra; Maurer, Verena; Piatti, Paolo; Whittle, Nigel; Rieder, Dietmar; Singewald, Nicolas; Lusser, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Successful attenuation of fearful memories is a cognitive process requiring initiation of highly coordinated transcription programs. Chromatin-modulating mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, including acetylation, are key regulators of these processes. However, knowledge concerning the role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors (ChRFs) being required for successful fear extinction is lacking. Underscoring the potential importance of these factors that alter histone-DNA contacts within nucleosomes are recent genome-wide association studies linking several ChRFs to various human cognitive and psychiatric disorders. To better understand the role of ChRFs in the brain, and since to date little is known about ChRF expression in the brain, we performed a comprehensive survey of expression levels of 24 ATP-dependent remodelers across different brain areas, and we identified several distinct high molecular weight complexes by chromatographic methods. We next aimed to gain novel insight into the potential regulation of ChRFs in different brain regions in association with normal and impaired fear extinction learning. To this end, we established the 129S1/SvImJ (S1) laboratory mouse strain as a model for compromised contextual fear extinction learning that can be rescued by dietary zinc restriction (ZnR). Using this model along with genetically related but fear extinction-competent 129S6/SvEv (S6) mice as controls, we found that impaired fear extinction in S1 was associated with enhanced ventral hippocampal expression of CHD1 and reduced expression of CHD5 that was normalized following successful rescue of impaired fear extinction. Moreover, a select reduction in CHD3 expression was observed in the ventral hippocampus (vHC) following successful rescue of fear extinction in S1 mice. Taken together, these data provide novel insight into the regulation of specific ChRFs following an impaired cognitive process and its rescue, and they suggest that

  10. A Discovery Lab for Studying Gene Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents a laboratory in which students are provided with cultures of three bacterial strains. Using the results, students will determine which of the strains corresponds to a mutant lacking a particular functional gene. (DDR)

  11. Adding In Silico Assessment of Potential Splice Aberration to the Integrated Evaluation of BRCA Gene Unclassified Variants

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Maxime P.; Di Sera, Tonya L.; Nix, David A.; Paquette, Andrew M.; Parsons, Michael T.; Bell, Russel; Hoffman, Andrea; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Goldgar, David E.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clinical mutation screening of the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 generates many unclassified variants (UVs). Most of these UVs are either rare missense substitutions or nucleotide substitutions near the splice junctions of the protein coding exons. Previously, we developed a quantitative method for evaluation of BRCA gene UVs—the “integrated evaluation”—that combines a sequence analysis‐based prior probability of pathogenicity with patient and/or tumor observational data to arrive at a posterior probability of pathogenicity. One limitation of the sequence analysis‐based prior has been that it evaluates UVs from the perspective of missense substitution severity but not probability to disrupt normal mRNA splicing. Here, we calibrated output from the splice‐site fitness program MaxEntScan to generate spliceogenicity‐based prior probabilities of pathogenicity for BRCA gene variants; these range from 0.97 for variants with high probability to damage a donor or acceptor to 0.02 for exonic variants that do not impact a splice junction and are unlikely to create a de novo donor. We created a database http://priors.hci.utah.edu/PRIORS/ that provides the combined missense substitution severity and spliceogenicity‐based probability of pathogenicity for BRCA gene single‐nucleotide substitutions. We also updated the BRCA gene Ex‐UV LOVD, available at http://hci‐exlovd.hci.utah.edu, with 77 re‐evaluable variants. PMID:26913838

  12. A multi-gene phylogeny reveals novel relationships for aberrant genera of Australo-Papuan core Corvoidea and polyphyly of the Pachycephalidae and Psophodidae (Aves: Passeriformes).

    PubMed

    Norman, Janette A; Ericson, Per G P; Jønsson, Knud A; Fjeldså, Jon; Christidis, Les

    2009-08-01

    The core Corvoidea is the largest and most diverse oscine assemblage within the Australo-Papuan region. Although central to an understanding of the evolutionary history and biogeography of the group the composition and intergeneric relationships of the Australo-Papuan radiation remain poorly understood. Here we analysed DNA sequence data from two nuclear gene regions and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, for 40 species of core Corvoidea to test the systematic affinities of key Australo-Papuan lineages. The families Pachycephalidae (whistlers, shrike-thrushes and allies) and Psophodidae (whipbirds, quail-thrush and allies) were both recovered as polyphyletic assemblages. The core pachycephaline assemblage comprised Pachycephala, Colluricincla, parts of Pitohui, and Falcunculus with the remaining genera resolving as four divergent lineages with no clearly defined affinities. Ptilorrhoa and Cinclosoma (Cinclosomatidae) formed a clade separate from Psophodes (Psophodidae) but neither clade showed clear affinities to any other taxa. Novel relationships were also identified for three aberrant New Guinean genera; ditypic Machaerirhynchus and monotypic Rhagologus were both nested within an assemblage that included the Artamidae and African malaconotoids (bush-shrikes and allies) while the enigmatic Ifrita was found to be part of an assemblage that included the Monarchidae and Paradisaeidae.

  13. Familial retinoblastoma due to intronic LINE-1 insertion causes aberrant and noncanonical mRNA splicing of the RB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, Carlos; Cidre, Florencia; Fernández-Teijeiro, Ana; Gómez-Mariano, Gema; de la Vega, Leticia; Ramos, Patricia; Zaballos, Ángel; Monzón, Sara; Alonso, Javier

    2016-05-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, MIM 180200) is the paradigm of hereditary cancer. Individuals harboring a constitutional mutation in one allele of the RB1 gene have a high predisposition to develop RB. Here, we present the first case of familial RB caused by a de novo insertion of a full-length long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) into intron 14 of the RB1 gene that caused a highly heterogeneous splicing pattern of RB1 mRNA. LINE-1 insertion was inferred by mRNA studies and full-length sequenced by massive parallel sequencing. Some of the aberrant mRNAs were produced by noncanonical acceptor splice sites, a new finding that up to date has not been described to occur upon LINE-1 retrotransposition. Our results clearly show that RNA-based strategies have the potential to detect disease-causing transposon insertions. It also confirms that the incorporation of new genetic approaches, such as massive parallel sequencing, contributes to characterize at the sequence level these unique and exceptional genetic alterations.

  14. Diesel exhaust particulate matter dispersed in a phospholipid surfactant induces chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei but not 6-thioguanine-resistant gene mutation in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zu-Wei; Keane, Michael J; Ong, Tong-man; Wallace, William E

    2005-03-26

    Diesel exhaust particulate material (DPM) was assayed for induction of chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronucleus (MN) formation, and 6-thioguanine-resistant (TG9 gene mutation in V79 cells as a dispersion in dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in physiological saline, a simulated pulmonary surfactant. Filter-collected automobile DPM provided for the study was not organic solvent extracted, but was directly mixed into DPPC in saline dispersion as a model of pulmonary surfactant conditioning of a soot particle depositing in a lung alveolus. A statistically significant difference was found between treated and control groups at all concentrations tested in a CA assay. Assay for MN induction also gave a positive response: Above 50 microg/ml, the frequencies of micronucleated cells (MNC) were about 2 times higher than those in the control group. The forward gene mutation assay did not show a positive response when cells were treated with up to 136 microg DPM/ml for 24 h, as dispersion in DPPC in saline. Some comparison assays were run on direct dispersions of the DPM into dimethyl sulfoxide, with results equivalent to those seen with a DPPC-saline preparation: DPM in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was positive for MN induction but was negative for forward gene mutation in V79 cells. The positive clastogenicity results are consistent with other studies of DPM dispersed into DPPC-saline surfactant that have shown activity in mammalian cells for sister chromatid exchange, unscheduled DNA synthesis, and MN induction. The forward gene mutation negative results are consistent with studies of that assay applied to V79 cells challenged with DPM solvent extract.

  15. Lentivectors for regulated and reversible cutaneous gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Siprashvili, Zurab; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-01-01

    Systemic administration of therapeutic proteins has value in treating a wide variety of disorders, including erythropoietin (Epo)-responsive anemias. Recombinant proteins, however, are costly and require repeated injections, while gene delivery approaches have suffered from inefficiency and difficulties with regulation. The skin effectively delivers polypeptides to the circulation, and improved approaches would support sustainable, topically regulated protein expression after a single vector injection. Toward this goal, we generated lentivectors in which both gene delivery and persistence in skin are regulated by administration of distinct steroid ligands. Following a single injection of regulated lentivector into human skin regenerated on immunodeficient mice, topical glucocorticoid ligands regulated Epo levels and hematocrit over time. Abrogation of gene delivery was achieved by both glucocorticoid cessation and proviral excision via a 4-hydroxytamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase. These findings establish an approach to durable, topically controlled systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins from human skin tissue.

  16. Ligand-Bound GeneSwitch Causes Developmental Aberrations in Drosophila that Are Alleviated by the Alternative Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Andjelković, Ana; Kemppainen, Kia K.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2016-01-01

    Culture of Drosophila expressing the steroid-dependent GeneSwitch transcriptional activator under the control of the ubiquitous α-tubulin promoter was found to produce extensive pupal lethality, as well as a range of dysmorphic adult phenotypes, in the presence of high concentrations of the inducing drug RU486. Prominent among these was cleft thorax, seen previously in flies bearing mutant alleles of the nuclear receptor Ultraspiracle and many other mutants, as well as notched wings, leg malformations, and bristle abnormalities. Neither the α-tubulin-GeneSwitch driver nor the inducing drug on their own produced any of these effects. A second GeneSwitch driver, under the control of the daughterless promoter, which gave much lower and more tissue-restricted transgene expression, exhibited only mild bristle abnormalities in the presence of high levels of RU486. Coexpression of the alternative oxidase (AOX) from Ciona intestinalis produced a substantial shift in the developmental outcome toward a wild-type phenotype, which was dependent on the AOX expression level. Neither an enzymatically inactivated variant of AOX, nor GFP, or the alternative NADH dehydrogenase Ndi1 from yeast gave any such rescue. Users of the GeneSwitch system should be aware of the potential confounding effects of its application in developmental studies. PMID:27412986

  17. Ligand-Bound GeneSwitch Causes Developmental Aberrations in Drosophila that Are Alleviated by the Alternative Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Andjelković, Ana; Kemppainen, Kia K; Jacobs, Howard T

    2016-01-01

    Culture of Drosophila expressing the steroid-dependent GeneSwitch transcriptional activator under the control of the ubiquitous α-tubulin promoter was found to produce extensive pupal lethality, as well as a range of dysmorphic adult phenotypes, in the presence of high concentrations of the inducing drug RU486. Prominent among these was cleft thorax, seen previously in flies bearing mutant alleles of the nuclear receptor Ultraspiracle and many other mutants, as well as notched wings, leg malformations, and bristle abnormalities. Neither the α-tubulin-GeneSwitch driver nor the inducing drug on their own produced any of these effects. A second GeneSwitch driver, under the control of the daughterless promoter, which gave much lower and more tissue-restricted transgene expression, exhibited only mild bristle abnormalities in the presence of high levels of RU486. Coexpression of the alternative oxidase (AOX) from Ciona intestinalis produced a substantial shift in the developmental outcome toward a wild-type phenotype, which was dependent on the AOX expression level. Neither an enzymatically inactivated variant of AOX, nor GFP, or the alternative NADH dehydrogenase Ndi1 from yeast gave any such rescue. Users of the GeneSwitch system should be aware of the potential confounding effects of its application in developmental studies. PMID:27412986

  18. Regulation of gene expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Camilla A; Breault, David T

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium is complex and controlled by various signaling pathways that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation is required both to grow and to replace cells lost through apoptosis and attrition, yet in all but a few cells, differentiation must take place to prevent uncontrolled growth (cancer) and to provide essential functions. In this chapter, we review the major signaling pathways underlying regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium, based primarily on data from mouse models, as well as specific morphogens and transcription factor families that have a major role in regulating intestinal gene expression, including the Hedgehog family, Forkhead Box (FOX) factors, Homeobox (HOX) genes, ParaHox genes, GATA transcription factors, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, EPH/Ephrins, Sox9, BMP signaling, PTEN/PI3K, LKB1, K-RAS, Notch pathway, HNF, and MATH1. We also briefly highlight important emerging areas of gene regulation, including microRNA (miRNA) and epigenetic regulation. PMID:21075346

  19. REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION IN THE INTESTINAL EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Camilla A.; Breault, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium is complex and controlled by various signaling pathways that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation is required both to grow and to replace cells lost through apoptosis and attrition, yet in all but a few cells, differentiation must take place to prevent uncontrolled growth (cancer) and to provide essential functions. In this chapter, we will review the major signaling pathways underlying regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium, based primarily on data from mouse models, as well as specific morphogens and transcription factor families that have a major role in regulating intestinal gene expression, including: the Hedgehog family, Forkhead Box (FOX) factors, Homeobox (HOX) genes, ParaHox genes, GATA transcription factors, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, EPH/Ephrins, Sox9, BMP signaling, PTEN/PI3K, LKB1, K-RAS, Notch pathway, HNF and MATH1. We will also briefly highlight important emerging areas of gene regulation including microRNA and epigenetic regulation. PMID:21075346

  20. Nerve growth factor regulates gene expression by several distinct mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, K.O.; Skarnes, W.C. ); Minsk, B.; Palmier, S. ); Jackson-Grusby, L.; Wagner, J.A. . Dept. of Biological Chemistry)

    1989-01-01

    To help elucidate the mechanisms by which nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates gene expression, the authors have identified and studied four genes (a-2, d-2, d-4, and d-5) that are positively regulated by NGF in PC12 cells, including one (d-2) which has previously been identified as a putative transcription factor (NGF I-A). Three of these genes, including d-2, were induced very rapidly at the transcriptional level, but the relative time courses of transcription and mRNA accumulation of each of these three genes were distinct. The fourth gene (d-4) displayed no apparent increase in transcription that corresponded to the increase in its mRNA, suggesting that NGF may regulate its expression at a posttranscriptional level. Thus NGF positively regulates gene expression by more than one mechanism. The study of the regulation of the expression of these and other NGF-inducible genes should provide valuable new information concerning how NGF and other growth factors cause neural differentiation.

  1. Stochastic models of gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul; Jia, Tao

    2011-10-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can give rise to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Correspondingly, there is considerable interest in understanding how different molecular mechanisms impact the 'noise' in gene expression. Of particular interest are post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involving genes called small RNAs, which control important processes such as development and cancer. We propose and analyze general stochastic models of gene expression and derive exact analytical expressions quantifying the noise in protein distributions [1]. Focusing on specific regulatory mechanisms, we analyze a general model for post-transcriptional regulation of stochastic gene expression [2]. The results obtained provide new insights into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the noise in gene expression. [4pt] [1] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett.,106, 058102 (2011) [0pt] [2] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett., 105, 018101 (2010)

  2. Identification of LytSR-regulated genes from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, E W; Bayles, K W

    1996-10-01

    In this report, the characterization of a Staphylococcus aureus operon containing two LytSR-regulated genes, lrgA and lrgB, is described. Sequence and mutagenesis studies of these genes suggest that lrgA encodes a murein hydrolase exporter similar to bacteriophage holin proteins while lrgB may encode a protein having murein hydrolase activity. PMID:8824633

  3. Gene regulation: hacking the network on a sugar high.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Tom; Wang, Xiao; Collins, James J

    2008-04-11

    In a recent issue of Molecular Cell, Kaplan et al. (2008) determine the input functions for 19 E. coli sugar-utilization genes by using a two-dimensional high-throughput approach. The resulting input-function map reveals that gene network regulation follows non-Boolean, and often nonmonotonic, logic.

  4. Oncodevelopmental and hormonal regulation of alpha 1-fetoprotein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Belanger, L; Baril, P; Guertin, M; Gingras, M C; Gourdeau, H; Anderson, A; Hamel, D; Boucher, J M

    1983-01-01

    The main features of the oncodevelopmental biology of alpha 1-fetoprotein (AFP) are reviewed. Progress made in the molecular biology of AFP gene regulation is discussed and we present our recent data on the mechanisms of AFP suppression by glucocorticoid hormones. The relationship between AFP gene transcription and cell replication is examined, and it is suggested that the degree of methylation of the AFP gene (or of co-methylated regulatory DNA sequences) conditions its response to hormones.

  5. The tumorigenic FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion escapes miR-99a regulation in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Brittany C.; Annala, Matti J.; Cogdell, David E.; Granberg, Kirsi J.; Sun, Yan; Ji, Ping; Li, Xia; Gumin, Joy; Zheng, Hong; Hu, Limei; Yli-Harja, Olli; Haapasalo, Hannu; Visakorpi, Tapio; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-gong; Sawaya, Raymond; Fuller, Gregory N.; Chen, Kexin; Lang, Frederick F.; Nykter, Matti; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fusion genes are chromosomal aberrations that are found in many cancers and can be used as prognostic markers and drug targets in clinical practice. Fusions can lead to production of oncogenic fusion proteins or to enhanced expression of oncogenes. Several recent studies have reported that some fusion genes can escape microRNA regulation via 3′–untranslated region (3′-UTR) deletion. We performed whole transcriptome sequencing to identify fusion genes in glioma and discovered FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in 4 of 48 glioblastoma samples from patients both of mixed European and of Asian descent, but not in any of 43 low-grade glioma samples tested. The fusion, caused by tandem duplication on 4p16.3, led to the loss of the 3′-UTR of FGFR3, blocking gene regulation of miR-99a and enhancing expression of the fusion gene. The fusion gene was mutually exclusive with EGFR, PDGFR, or MET amplification. Using cultured glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model, we found that fusion protein expression promoted cell proliferation and tumor progression, while WT FGFR3 protein was not tumorigenic, even under forced overexpression. These results demonstrated that the FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion is expressed in human cancer and generates an oncogenic protein that promotes tumorigenesis in glioblastoma. PMID:23298836

  6. Pristinamycin-inducible gene regulation in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Forti, Francesca; Crosta, Andrea; Ghisotti, Daniela

    2009-03-25

    In this work the Pip-inducible system, already used in eukaryotes, was tested in mycobacteria. This system is based on the Streptomyces coelicolor Pip repressor, the Streptomyces pristinaespiralis ptr promoter and the inducer pristinamycin I. By cloning in an integrative plasmid the ptr promoter upstream of the lacZ reporter gene and the pip gene under the control of a constitutive mycobacterial promoter, we demonstrated that the ptr promoter activity increased up to 50-fold in Mycobacterium smegmatis and up to 400-fold in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in dependence on pristinamycin I concentration, and that the promoter was fully repressed in the absence of the inducer. Three mycobacterial genes were cloned under pptr-Pip control, both in sense and antisense direction; both proteins and antisense RNAs could be over-expressed, the antisenses causing a partial reduction of the amount of the targeted proteins. This system was used to obtain two M. tuberculosis conditional mutants in the fadD32 and pknB genes: the mutant strains grew only in the presence of the inducer pristinamycin I. Thus it showed to be an effective inducible system in mycobacteria. PMID:19428723

  7. TBR1 regulates autism risk genes in the developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Notwell, James H; Heavner, Whitney E; Darbandi, Siavash Fazel; Katzman, Sol; McKenna, William L; Ortiz-Londono, Christian F; Tastad, David; Eckler, Matthew J; Rubenstein, John L R; McConnell, Susan K; Chen, Bin; Bejerano, Gill

    2016-08-01

    Exome sequencing studies have identified multiple genes harboring de novo loss-of-function (LoF) variants in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including TBR1, a master regulator of cortical development. We performed ChIP-seq for TBR1 during mouse cortical neurogenesis and show that TBR1-bound regions are enriched adjacent to ASD genes. ASD genes were also enriched among genes that are differentially expressed in Tbr1 knockouts, which together with the ChIP-seq data, suggests direct transcriptional regulation. Of the nine ASD genes examined, seven were misexpressed in the cortices of Tbr1 knockout mice, including six with increased expression in the deep cortical layers. ASD genes with adjacent cortical TBR1 ChIP-seq peaks also showed unusually low levels of LoF mutations in a reference human population and among Icelanders. We then leveraged TBR1 binding to identify an appealing subset of candidate ASD genes. Our findings highlight a TBR1-regulated network of ASD genes in the developing neocortex that are relatively intolerant to LoF mutations, indicating that these genes may play critical roles in normal cortical development. PMID:27325115

  8. Cigarette Smoking, BPDE-DNA Adducts, and Aberrant Promoter Methylations of Tumor Suppressor Genes (TSGs) in NSCLC from Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongtang; Xu, Peiwei; Liu, Xinneng; Zhang, Chunye; Tan, Cong; Chen, Chunmei; Sun, Xiaoyu; Xu, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is related to the genetic and epigenetic factors. The goal of this study was to determine association of cigarette smoking and BPDE-DNA adducts with promoter methylations of several genes in NSCLC. Methylation of the promoters of p16, RARβ, DAPK, MGMT, and TIMP-3 genes of tumor tissues from 199 lung cancer patients was analyzed with methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and BPDE-DNA adduct level in lung cancer tissue was obtained by ELISA. Level of BPDE-DNA adduct increased significantly in males, aged people (over 60 years), and smokers; however, no significant difference was found while comparing the BPDE-DNA adduct levels among different tumor types, locations, and stages. Cigarette smoking was also associated with increased BPDE-DNA adducts level (OR = 2.43, p > .05) and increased methylation level in at least 1 gene (OR = 5.22, p < .01), both in dose-response manner. Similarly, cigarette smoking also significantly increase the risk of p16 or DAPK methylation (OR = 3.02, p < .05 for p16, and 3.66, p < .05 for DAPK). The highest risk of BPDE-DNA adducts was detected among individuals with cigarette smoking for more than 40 pack-years (OR = 4.21, p < .01). Furthermore, the present study did not show that BPDE-DNA adducts are significantly associated with abnormal TSGs methylations in NSCLC, including SCC and AdO, respectively. Conclusively, cigarette smoking is significantly associated with the increase of BPDE-DNA adduct level, promoter hypermethylation of p16 and DAPK genes, while BPDE-DNA adduct was not significantly related to abnormal promoter hypermethylation in TSGs, suggesting that BPDE-DNA adducts and TSGs methylations play independent roles in NSCLC.

  9. Cigarette Smoking, BPDE-DNA Adducts, and Aberrant Promoter Methylations of Tumor Suppressor Genes (TSGs) in NSCLC from Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongtang; Xu, Peiwei; Liu, Xinneng; Zhang, Chunye; Tan, Cong; Chen, Chunmei; Sun, Xiaoyu; Xu, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is related to the genetic and epigenetic factors. The goal of this study was to determine association of cigarette smoking and BPDE-DNA adducts with promoter methylations of several genes in NSCLC. Methylation of the promoters of p16, RARβ, DAPK, MGMT, and TIMP-3 genes of tumor tissues from 199 lung cancer patients was analyzed with methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and BPDE-DNA adduct level in lung cancer tissue was obtained by ELISA. Level of BPDE-DNA adduct increased significantly in males, aged people (over 60 years), and smokers; however, no significant difference was found while comparing the BPDE-DNA adduct levels among different tumor types, locations, and stages. Cigarette smoking was also associated with increased BPDE-DNA adducts level (OR = 2.43, p > .05) and increased methylation level in at least 1 gene (OR = 5.22, p < .01), both in dose-response manner. Similarly, cigarette smoking also significantly increase the risk of p16 or DAPK methylation (OR = 3.02, p < .05 for p16, and 3.66, p < .05 for DAPK). The highest risk of BPDE-DNA adducts was detected among individuals with cigarette smoking for more than 40 pack-years (OR = 4.21, p < .01). Furthermore, the present study did not show that BPDE-DNA adducts are significantly associated with abnormal TSGs methylations in NSCLC, including SCC and AdO, respectively. Conclusively, cigarette smoking is significantly associated with the increase of BPDE-DNA adduct level, promoter hypermethylation of p16 and DAPK genes, while BPDE-DNA adduct was not significantly related to abnormal promoter hypermethylation in TSGs, suggesting that BPDE-DNA adducts and TSGs methylations play independent roles in NSCLC. PMID:27042875

  10. Plant defense genes are regulated by ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, J.R.; Davis, R.W.

    1987-08-01

    One of the earliest detectable events during plant-pathogen interaction is a rapid increase in ethylene biosynthesis. This gaseous plant stress hormone may be a signal for plants to activate defense mechanisms against invading pathogens such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The effect of ethylene on four plant genes involved in three separate plant defense response pathways was examined; these included (i and ii) genes that encode L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4-coumarate:CoA ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.2.1.12), enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway, (iii) the gene encoding chalcone synthase, an enzyme of the flavonoid glycoside pathway, and (iv) the genes encoding hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein, a major protein component(s) of plant cell walls. Blot hybridization analysis of mRNA from ethylene-treated carrot roots reveals marked increases in the levels of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase mRNA, 4-coumarate CoA ligase mRNA, chalcone synthase mRNA, and certain hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein transcripts. The effect of ethylene on hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNA accumulation was different from that of wounding. Ethylene induces two hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNAs (1.8 and 4.0 kilobases), whereas wounding of carrot root leads to accumulation of an additional hydroxyproline-rich mRNA (1.5 kilobases). These results indicate that at least two distinct signals, ethylene and a wound signal, can affect the expression of plant defense-response genes.

  11. Cost benefit theory and optimal design of gene regulation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2007-12-01

    Cells respond to the environment by regulating the expression of genes according to environmental signals. The relation between the input signal level and the expression of the gene is called the gene regulation function. It is of interest to understand the shape of a gene regulation function in terms of the environment in which it has evolved and the basic constraints of biological systems. Here we address this by presenting a cost-benefit theory for gene regulation functions that takes into account temporally varying inputs in the environment and stochastic noise in the biological components. We apply this theory to the well-studied lac operon of E. coli. The present theory explains the shape of this regulation function in terms of temporal variation of the input signals, and of minimizing the deleterious effect of cell-cell variability in regulatory protein levels. We also apply the theory to understand the evolutionary tradeoffs in setting the number of regulatory proteins and for selection of feed-forward loops in genetic circuits. The present cost-benefit theory can be used to understand the shape of other gene regulatory functions in terms of environment and noise constraints.

  12. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  13. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression in Yersinia Species

    PubMed Central

    Schiano, Chelsea A.; Lathem, Wyndham W.

    2012-01-01

    Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host. PMID:23162797

  14. Mechanism of Gene Regulation by a Staphylococcus aureus Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Chatterjee, Som S.; Villaruz, Amer E.; Dickey, Seth W.; Tan, Vee Y.; Chen, Yan; Sturdevant, Daniel E.; Ricklefs, Stacy M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The virulence of many bacterial pathogens, including the important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, depends on the secretion of frequently large amounts of toxins. Toxin production involves the need for the bacteria to make physiological adjustments for energy conservation. While toxins are primarily targets of gene regulation, such changes may be accomplished by regulatory functions of the toxins themselves. However, mechanisms by which toxins regulate gene expression have remained poorly understood. We show here that the staphylococcal phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) toxins have gene regulatory functions that, in particular, include inducing expression of their own transport system by direct interference with a GntR-type repressor protein. This capacity was most pronounced in PSMs with low cytolytic capacity, demonstrating functional specification among closely related members of that toxin family during evolution. Our study presents a molecular mechanism of gene regulation by a bacterial toxin that adapts bacterial physiology to enhanced toxin production. PMID:27795396

  15. Intrinsic limits to gene regulation by global crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Tamar; Prizak, Roshan; Guet, Călin C.; Barton, Nicholas H.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation relies on the specificity of transcription factor (TF)–DNA interactions. Limited specificity may lead to crosstalk: a regulatory state in which a gene is either incorrectly activated due to noncognate TF–DNA interactions or remains erroneously inactive. As each TF can have numerous interactions with noncognate cis-regulatory elements, crosstalk is inherently a global problem, yet has previously not been studied as such. We construct a theoretical framework to analyse the effects of global crosstalk on gene regulation. We find that crosstalk presents a significant challenge for organisms with low-specificity TFs, such as metazoans. Crosstalk is not easily mitigated by known regulatory schemes acting at equilibrium, including variants of cooperativity and combinatorial regulation. Our results suggest that crosstalk imposes a previously unexplored global constraint on the functioning and evolution of regulatory networks, which is qualitatively distinct from the known constraints that act at the level of individual gene regulatory elements. PMID:27489144

  16. B-RAF mutation and accumulated gene methylation in aberrant crypt foci (ACF), sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P) and cancer in SSA/P

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, A; Okamoto, K; Fujino, Y; Nakagawa, T; Muguruma, N; Sannomiya, K; Mitsui, Y; Takaoka, T; Kitamura, S; Miyamoto, H; Okahisa, T; Fujimori, T; Imoto, I; Takayama, T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps) are a putative precursor of colon cancer with microsatellite instability (MSI). However, the developmental mechanism of SSA/P remains unknown. We performed genetic analysis and genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in aberrant crypt foci (ACF), SSA/P, and cancer in SSA/P specimens to show a close association between ACF and the SSA/P-cancer sequence. We also evaluated the prevalence and number of ACF in SSA/P patients. Methods: ACF in the right-side colon were observed in 36 patients with SSA/Ps alone, 2 with cancers in SSA/P, and 20 normal subjects and biopsied under magnifying endoscopy. B-RAF mutation and MSI were analysed by PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR–SSCP, respectively, in 15 ACF, 20 SSA/P, and 2 cancer specimens. DNA methylation array analysis of seven ACF, seven SSA/P, and two cancer in SSA/P specimens was performed using the microarray-based integrated analysis of methylation by isochizomers (MIAMI) method. Results: B-RAF mutations were frequently detected in ACF, SSA/P, and cancer in SSA/P tissues. The number of methylated genes increased significantly in the order of ACFgenes in SSA/P were PQLC1, HDHD3, RASL10B, FLI1, GJA3, and SLC26A2. Some of these genes were methylated in ACF, whereas all genes were methylated in cancers. Immunohistochemistry revealed their silenced expression. Microsatellite instability and MLH1 methylation were observed only in cancer. The prevalence and number of ACF were significantly higher in SSA/P patients than in normal subjects. A significant correlation was seen between the numbers of SSA/P and ACF in SSA/P patients. Conclusions: Our results suggest that ACF are precursor lesions of the SSA/P-cancer sequence in patients with SSA/P, where ACF arise by B-RAF mutation and methylation of some of the six identified genes and develop into SSA/Ps through accumulated methylation of these genes. PMID

  17. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  18. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    PubMed

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  19. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E.; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  20. Identification of genes directly regulated by the oncogene ZNF217using ChIP-chip assays.

    SciTech Connect

    Krig, S.R.; Jin, V.X.; Bieda, M.C.; O'geen, H.; Yaswen, P.; Green, R.; Farnham, P.J.

    2007-01-26

    It has been proposed that ZNF217, which is amplified at 20q13 in various tumors, plays a key role during neoplastic transformation. ZNF217 has been purified in complexes that contain repressor proteins such as CtBP2, suggesting that it acts as a transcriptional repressor. However, the function of ZNF217 has not been well characterized due to a lack of known target genes. Using a global chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip approach, we identified thousands of ZNF217 binding sites in three tumor cell lines (MCF7, SW480, and Ntera2). Further analysis of ZNF217 in Ntera2 cells showed that many promoters are bound by ZNF217 and CtBP2 and that a subset of these promoters are activated upon removal of ZNF217. Thus, our in vivo studies corroborate the in vitro biochemical analyses of ZNF217-containing complexes and support the hypothesis that ZNF217 functions as a transcriptional repressor. Gene ontology analysis showed that ZNF217 targets in Ntera2 cells are involved in organ development, suggesting that one function of ZNF217 may be to repress differentiation. Accordingly we show that differentiation of Ntera2 cells with retinoic acid led to down-regulation of ZNF217. Our identification of thousands of ZNF217 target genes will enable further studies of the consequences of aberrant expression of ZNF217 during neoplastic transformation.

  1. Modeling Gene Regulation in Liver Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. Poor understanding of the mechanisms underlying HCC prevents early detection and leads to high mortality. We developed a random forest model that incorporates copy-number variation, DNA methylation, transcription factor, and microRNA binding information as features to predict gene expression in HCC. Our model achieved a highly significant correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Furthermore, we identified potential regulators of gene expression in HCC. Many of these regulators have been previously found to be associated with cancer and are differentially expressed in HCC. We also evaluated our predicted target sets for these regulators by making comparison with experimental results. Lastly, we found that the transcription factor E2F6, one of the candidate regulators inferred by our model, is predictive of survival rate in HCC. Results of this study will provide directions for future prospective studies in HCC.

  2. A genomic screen for long noncoding RNA genes epigenetically silenced by aberrant DNA methylation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumegawa, Kohei; Maruyama, Reo; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Ashida, Masami; Kitajima, Hiroshi; Tsuyada, Akihiro; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kai, Masahiro; Yamano, Hiro-o; Sugai, Tamotsu; Tokino, Takashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Imai, Kohzoh; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as key components in multiple cellular processes, although their physiological and pathological functions are not fully understood. To identify cancer-related lncRNAs, we screened for those that are epigenetically silenced in colorectal cancer (CRC). Through a genome-wide analysis of histone modifications in CRC cells, we found that the transcription start sites (TSSs) of 1,027 lncRNA genes acquired trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) after DNA demethylation. Integrative analysis of chromatin signatures and the DNA methylome revealed that the promoter CpG islands (CGIs) of 66 lncRNA genes contained cancer-specific methylation. By validating the expression and methylation of lncRNA genes in CRC cells, we ultimately identified 20 lncRNAs, including ZNF582-AS1, as targets of epigenetic silencing in CRC. ZNF582-AS1 is frequently methylated in CRC cell lines (87.5%), primary CRCs (77.2%), colorectal adenomas (44.7%) and advanced adenomas (87.8%), suggesting that this methylation is an early event during colorectal tumorigenesis. Methylation of ZNF582-AS1 is associated with poor survival of CRC patients, and ectopic expression of ZNF582-AS1 suppressed colony formation by CRC cells. Our findings offer insight into the association between epigenetic alterations and lncRNA dysregulation in cancer and suggest that ZNF582-AS1 may be a novel tumor-suppressive lncRNA. PMID:27215978

  3. Aberrant DNA Methylation in Keratoacanthoma

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratoacanthoma (KA) is a self-limiting epidermal tumor for which histopathological examination sometimes suggests malignancy. Based on inconsistent clinical views, KA can be regarded as both a benign tumor and a variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Aberrant DNA methylation frequently occurs in malignant tumors but it scarcely occurs in benign tumors. Whether aberrant methylation occurs in KA has not been previously examined. Objective The aim is to elucidate whether aberrant methylation of CpG islands (CGI) containing a high density of cytosine-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) sites occurs in KA. Methods Five SCC cell lines, two cultured samples of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), 18 clinical SCC samples, and 21 clinical KA samples were analyzed with Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips, quantitative real-time methylation-specific PCR (RT-MSP) and/or bisulfite sequencing. Results Genome-wide analyses of NHEK, KA, and SCC indicated that there was a greater number of aberrantly hypermethylated CGIs in SCC than in KA and there were aberrantly hypermethylated CGIs which are common in both. Among the common hypermethylated CGIs, RT-MSP and bisulfite sequencing targeting CGIs located on CCDC17, PVR, and MAP3K11 gene bodies also showed that methylation levels were significantly higher in KA than in normal epidermis. Statistical analyses suggested that the methylation level of CGI located on PVR in SCC might be correlated to lymph node metastasis (P = 0.013, Mann-Whitney U test) and that the methylation level of CGI in MAP3K11 in KA might be correlated to age (P = 0.031, linear regression analysis). Conclusion Aberrant DNA methylation occurs in KA. PMID:27788211

  4. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  5. DNA Methylation is Developmentally Regulated for Genes Essential for Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Alyssa A.; Lin, Mingyan; Lister, Rolanda L.; Maslov, Alex A.; Wang, Yidong; Suzuki, Masako; Wu, Bingruo; Greally, John M.; Zheng, Deyou; Zhou, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism altering gene expression in development and disease. However, its role in the regulation of gene expression during heart development is incompletely understood. The aim of this study is to reveal DNA methylation in mouse embryonic hearts and its role in regulating gene expression during heart development. Methods and Results We performed the genome‐wide DNA methylation profiling of mouse embryonic hearts using methyl‐sensitive, tiny fragment enrichment/massively parallel sequencing to determine methylation levels at ACGT sites. The results showed that while global methylation of 1.64 million ACGT sites in developing hearts remains stable between embryonic day (E) 11.5 and E14.5, a small fraction (2901) of them exhibit differential methylation. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that these sites are enriched at genes involved in heart development. Quantitative real‐time PCR analysis of 350 genes with differential DNA methylation showed that the expression of 181 genes is developmentally regulated, and 79 genes have correlative changes between methylation and expression, including hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2). Required for heart valve formation, Has2 expression in the developing heart valves is downregulated at E14.5, accompanied with increased DNA methylation in its enhancer. Genetic knockout further showed that the downregulation of Has2 expression is dependent on DNA methyltransferase 3b, which is co‐expressed with Has2 in the forming heart valve region, indicating that the DNA methylation change may contribute to the Has2 enhancer's regulating function. Conclusions DNA methylation is developmentally regulated for genes essential to heart development, and abnormal DNA methylation may contribute to congenital heart disease. PMID:24947998

  6. [Novel phosphate regulating genes and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kenichi; Ito, Mikiko; Segawa, Hiroko

    2005-05-01

    The hormones currently believe to influence inorganic phosphate (Pi) metabolism are parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the active metabolite to vitamin D. A new class of phosphate-regulating factors, collectively known as the phosphatonins have been shown to be associated with the hypophosphatemic diseases. The reabsorption of Pi in the kidney is a major determinant of the plasma Pi level. Reabsorption is largely regulated by the type II a sodium-dependent Pi cotransporter (NPT2a) that is expressed in renal proximal tubular cells. Phosphatonins cause Pi wasting by controlling the amount of NPT2a on the apical surface of the proximal tubular cell. A recent finding indicates that mutations in NPT2a can contribute to nephrolithiasis and osteoporosis in humans and suggests that changes in NPT2a levels may also cause other human disease. We discuss the roles of phosphatonins and NPT2a in bone formation. PMID:15876740

  7. Detection of aberrant methylation of a six-gene panel in serum DNA for diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ming; Yin, Huizi; Li, Junnan; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Dong; Su, Yonghui; Niu, Ming; Zhong, Zhenbin; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Xianyu; Kang, Wenli; Pang, Da

    2016-04-01

    Detection of breast cancer at an early stage is the key for successful treatment and improvement of outcome. However the limitations of mammography are well recognized, especially for those women with premenopausal breast cancer. Novel approaches to breast cancer screening are necessary, especially in the developing world where mammography is not feasible. In this study, we examined the promoter methylation of six genes (SFN, P16, hMLH1, HOXD13, PCDHGB7 and RASSF1a) in circulating free DNA (cfDNA) extracted from serum. We used a high-throughput DNA methylation assay (MethyLight) to examine serum from 749 cases including breast cancer patients, patients with benign breast diseases and healthy women. The six-gene methylation panel test achieved 79.6% and 82.4% sensitivity with a specificity of 72.4% and 78.1% in diagnosis of breast cancer when compared with healthy and benign disease controls, respectively. Moreover, the methylation panel positive group showed significant differences in the following independent variables: (a) involvement of family history of tumors; (b) a low proliferative index, ki-67; (c) high ratios in luminal subtypes. Additionally the panel also complemented some breast cancer cases which were neglected by mammography or ultrasound. These data suggest that epigenetic markers in serum have potential for diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:26918343

  8. Detection of aberrant methylation of a six-gene panel in serum DNA for diagnosis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junnan; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Dong; Su, Yonghui; Niu, Ming; Zhong, Zhenbin; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Xianyu; Kang, Wenli; Pang, Da

    2016-01-01

    Detection of breast cancer at an early stage is the key for successful treatment and improvement of outcome. However the limitations of mammography are well recognized, especially for those women with premenopausal breast cancer. Novel approaches to breast cancer screening are necessary, especially in the developing world where mammography is not feasible. In this study, we examined the promoter methylation of six genes (SFN, P16, hMLH1, HOXD13, PCDHGB7 and RASSF1a) in circulating free DNA (cfDNA) extracted from serum. We used a high-throughput DNA methylation assay (MethyLight) to examine serum from 749 cases including breast cancer patients, patients with benign breast diseases and healthy women. The six-gene methylation panel test achieved 79.6% and 82.4% sensitivity with a specificity of 72.4% and 78.1% in diagnosis of breast cancer when compared with healthy and benign disease controls, respectively. Moreover, the methylation panel positive group showed significant differences in the following independent variables: (a) involvement of family history of tumors; (b) a low proliferative index, ki-67; (c) high ratios in luminal subtypes. Additionally the panel also complemented some breast cancer cases which were neglected by mammography or ultrasound. These data suggest that epigenetic markers in serum have potential for diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:26918343

  9. Detection of aberrant methylation of a six-gene panel in serum DNA for diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ming; Yin, Huizi; Li, Junnan; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Dong; Su, Yonghui; Niu, Ming; Zhong, Zhenbin; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Xianyu; Kang, Wenli; Pang, Da

    2016-04-01

    Detection of breast cancer at an early stage is the key for successful treatment and improvement of outcome. However the limitations of mammography are well recognized, especially for those women with premenopausal breast cancer. Novel approaches to breast cancer screening are necessary, especially in the developing world where mammography is not feasible. In this study, we examined the promoter methylation of six genes (SFN, P16, hMLH1, HOXD13, PCDHGB7 and RASSF1a) in circulating free DNA (cfDNA) extracted from serum. We used a high-throughput DNA methylation assay (MethyLight) to examine serum from 749 cases including breast cancer patients, patients with benign breast diseases and healthy women. The six-gene methylation panel test achieved 79.6% and 82.4% sensitivity with a specificity of 72.4% and 78.1% in diagnosis of breast cancer when compared with healthy and benign disease controls, respectively. Moreover, the methylation panel positive group showed significant differences in the following independent variables: (a) involvement of family history of tumors; (b) a low proliferative index, ki-67; (c) high ratios in luminal subtypes. Additionally the panel also complemented some breast cancer cases which were neglected by mammography or ultrasound. These data suggest that epigenetic markers in serum have potential for diagnosis of breast cancer.

  10. Defective pigment granule biogenesis and aberrant behavior caused by mutations in the Drosophila AP-3beta adaptin gene ruby.

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, D; Poeck, B; Roth, H; Ernst, R; Keller, A; Porsch, M; Strauss, R; Pflugfelder, G O

    2000-01-01

    Lysosomal protein trafficking is a fundamental process conserved from yeast to humans. This conservation extends to lysosome-like organelles such as mammalian melanosomes and insect eye pigment granules. Recently, eye and coat color mutations in mouse (mocha and pearl) and Drosophila (garnet and carmine) were shown to affect subunits of the heterotetrameric adaptor protein complex AP-3 involved in vesicle trafficking. Here we demonstrate that the Drosophila eye color mutant ruby is defective in the AP-3beta subunit gene. ruby expression was found in retinal pigment and photoreceptor cells and in the developing central nervous system. ruby mutations lead to a decreased number and altered size of pigment granules in various cell types in and adjacent to the retina. Humans with lesions in the related AP-3betaA gene suffer from Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, which is caused by defects in a number of lysosome-related organelles. Hermansky-Pudlak patients have a reduced skin pigmentation and suffer from internal bleeding, pulmonary fibrosis, and visual system malfunction. The Drosophila AP-3beta adaptin also appears to be involved in processes other than eye pigment granule biogenesis because all ruby allele combinations tested exhibited defective behavior in a visual fixation paradigm. PMID:10790396

  11. Spatial organization of genes as a component of regulated expression

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Dave A.

    2009-01-01

    The DNA of living cells is highly compacted. Inherent in this spatial constraint is the need for cells to organize individual genetic loci so as to facilitate orderly retrieval of information. Complex genetic regulatory mechanisms are crucial to all organisms, and it is becoming increasingly evident that spatial organization of genes is one very important mode of regulation for many groups of genes. In eukaryotic nuclei, it appears not only that DNA is organized in three-dimensional space but also that this organization is dynamic and interactive with the transcriptional state of the genes. Spatial organization occurs throughout evolution and with genes transcribed by all classes of RNA polymerases in all eukaryotic nuclei, from yeast to human. There is an increasing body of work examining the ways in which this organization and consequent regulation are accomplished. In this review, we discuss the diverse strategies that cells use to preferentially localize various classes of genes. PMID:19727792

  12. Divergence of gene regulation through chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms that modify genome structures to give birth and death to alleles are still not well understood. To investigate the causative chromosomal rearrangements, we took advantage of the allelic diversity of the duplicated p1 and p2 genes in maize. Both genes encode a transcription factor involved in maysin synthesis, which confers resistance to corn earworm. However, p1 also controls accumulation of reddish pigments in floral tissues and has therefore acquired a new function after gene duplication. p1 alleles vary in their tissue-specific expression, which is indicated in their allele designation: the first suffix refers to red or white pericarp pigmentation and the second to red or white glume pigmentation. Results Comparing chromosomal regions comprising p1-ww[4Co63], P1-rw1077 and P1-rr4B2 alleles with that of the reference genome, P1-wr[B73], enabled us to reconstruct additive events of transposition, chromosome breaks and repairs, and recombination that resulted in phenotypic variation and chimeric regulatory signals. The p1-ww[4Co63] null allele is probably derived from P1-wr[B73] by unequal crossover between large flanking sequences. A transposon insertion in a P1-wr-like allele and NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) could have resulted in the formation of the P1-rw1077 allele. A second NHEJ event, followed by unequal crossover, probably led to the duplication of an enhancer region, creating the P1-rr4B2 allele. Moreover, a rather dynamic picture emerged in the use of polyadenylation signals by different p1 alleles. Interestingly, p1 alleles can be placed on both sides of a large retrotransposon cluster through recombination, while functional p2 alleles have only been found proximal to the cluster. Conclusions Allelic diversity of the p locus exemplifies how gene duplications promote phenotypic variability through composite regulatory signals. Transposition events increase the level of genomic complexity based not only on

  13. A Missense Change in the ATG4D Gene Links Aberrant Autophagy to a Neurodegenerative Vacuolar Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kyöstilä, Kaisa; Syrjä, Pernilla; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Chandrasekar, Gayathri; Jokinen, Tarja S.; Seppälä, Eija H.; Becker, Doreen; Drögemüller, Michaela; Dietschi, Elisabeth; Drögemüller, Cord; Lang, Johann; Steffen, Frank; Rohdin, Cecilia; Jäderlund, Karin H.; Lappalainen, Anu K.; Hahn, Kerstin; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Henke, Diana; Oevermann, Anna; Kere, Juha; Lohi, Hannes; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    Inherited neurodegenerative disorders are debilitating diseases that occur across different species. We have performed clinical, pathological and genetic studies to characterize a novel canine neurodegenerative disease present in the Lagotto Romagnolo dog breed. Affected dogs suffer from progressive cerebellar ataxia, sometimes accompanied by episodic nystagmus and behavioral changes. Histological examination revealed unique pathological changes, including profound neuronal cytoplasmic vacuolization in the nervous system, as well as spheroid formation and cytoplasmic aggregation of vacuoles in secretory epithelial tissues and mesenchymal cells. Genetic analyses uncovered a missense change, c.1288G>A; p.A430T, in the autophagy-related ATG4D gene on canine chromosome 20 with a highly significant disease association (p = 3.8 x 10-136) in a cohort of more than 2300 Lagotto Romagnolo dogs. ATG4D encodes a poorly characterized cysteine protease belonging to the macroautophagy pathway. Accordingly, our histological analyses indicated altered autophagic flux in affected tissues. The knockdown of the zebrafish homologue atg4da resulted in a widespread developmental disturbance and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Our study describes a previously unknown canine neurological disease with particular pathological features and implicates the ATG4D protein as an important autophagy mediator in neuronal homeostasis. The canine phenotype serves as a model to delineate the disease-causing pathological mechanism(s) and ATG4D function, and can also be used to explore treatment options. Furthermore, our results reveal a novel candidate gene for human neurodegeneration and enable the development of a genetic test for veterinary diagnostic and breeding purposes. PMID:25875846

  14. Aberrant Autolysosomal Regulation Is Linked to The Induction of Embryonic Senescence: Differential Roles of Beclin 1 and p53 in Vertebrate Spns1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Lian, Shanshan; Qi, Jie; Bayliss, Peter E.; Carr, Christopher E.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Guha, Sujay; Kobler, Patrick; Catz, Sergio D.; Gill, Matthew; Jia, Kailiang; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Kishi, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Spinster (Spin) in Drosophila or Spinster homolog 1 (Spns1) in vertebrates is a putative lysosomal H+-carbohydrate transporter, which functions at a late stage of autophagy. The Spin/Spns1 defect induces aberrant autolysosome formation that leads to embryonic senescence and accelerated aging symptoms, but little is known about the mechanisms leading to the pathogenesis in vivo. Beclin 1 and p53 are two pivotal tumor suppressors that are critically involved in the autophagic process and its regulation. Using zebrafish as a genetic model, we show that Beclin 1 suppression ameliorates Spns1 loss-mediated senescence as well as autophagic impairment, whereas unexpectedly p53 deficit exacerbates both of these characteristics. We demonstrate that ‘basal p53’ activity plays a certain protective role(s) against the Spns1 defect-induced senescence via suppressing autophagy, lysosomal biogenesis, and subsequent autolysosomal formation and maturation, and that p53 loss can counteract the effect of Beclin 1 suppression to rescue the Spns1 defect. By contrast, in response to DNA damage, ‘activated p53’ showed an apparent enhancement of the Spns1-deficient phenotype, by inducing both autophagy and apoptosis. Moreover, we found that a chemical and genetic blockage of lysosomal acidification and biogenesis mediated by the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase, as well as of subsequent autophagosome-lysosome fusion, prevents the appearance of the hallmarks caused by the Spns1 deficiency, irrespective of the basal p53 state. Thus, these results provide evidence that Spns1 operates during autophagy and senescence differentially with Beclin 1 and p53. PMID:24967584

  15. Identification of the NAC1-regulated genes in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min; Wu, Ren-Chin; Herlinger, Alice L; Yap, Kailee; Kim, Jung-Won; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1), encoded by the NACC1 gene, is a transcription co-regulator that plays a multifaceted role in promoting tumorigenesis. However, the NAC1-regulated transcriptome has not been comprehensively defined. In this study, we compared the global gene expression profiles of NAC1-overexpressing SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells and NAC1-knockdown SKOV3 cells. We found that NAC1 knockdown was associated with up-regulation of apoptotic genes and down-regulation of genes involved in cell movement, proliferation, Notch signaling, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Among NAC1-regulated genes, FOXQ1 was further characterized because it is involved in cell motility and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. NAC1 knockdown decreased FOXQ1 expression and promoter activity. Similarly, inactivation of NAC1 by expression of a dominant-negative construct of NAC1 suppressed FOXQ1 expression. Ectopic expression of NAC1 in NACC1 null cells induced FOXQ1 expression. NAC1 knockdown resulted in decreased cell motility and invasion, whereas constitutive expression of FOXQ1 rescued motility in cells after NAC1 silencing. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed a significant co-up-regulation of NAC1 and FOXQ1 in ovarian carcinoma tissues. On the basis of transcription profiling, we report a group of NAC1-regulated genes that may participate in multiple cancer-related pathways. We further demonstrate that NAC1 is essential and sufficient for activation of FOXQ1 transcription and that the role of NAC1 in cell motility is mediated, at least in part, by FOXQ1.

  16. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone: gene evolution, expression, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Belsham, Denise D; Lovejoy, David A

    2005-01-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene is a superb example of the diverse regulation that is required to maintain the function of an evolutionarily conserved and fundamental gene. Because reproductive capacity is critical to the survival of the species, physiological homeostasis dictates optimal conditions for reproductive success, and any perturbation from this balance may affect GnRH expression. These disturbances may include alterations in signals dictated by stress, nutritional imbalance, body weight, and neurological problems; therefore, changes in other neuroendocrine systems may directly influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis through direct regulation of GnRH. Thus, to maintain optimal reproductive capacity, the regulation of the GnRH gene is tightly constrained by a number of diverse signaling pathways and neuromodulators. In this review, we summarize what is currently known of GnRH gene structure, the location and function of the two isoforms of the GnRH gene, some of the many hormones and neuromodulators found to affect GnRH expression, and the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of the GnRH gene. We also discuss the latest models used to study the transcriptional regulation of the GnRH gene, from cell models to evolving in vivo technologies. Although we have come a long way in the last two decades toward uncovering the intricacies behind the control of the GnRH neuron, there remain vast distances to cover before direct therapeutic manipulation of the GnRH gene to control reproductive competence is possible.

  17. All-optical regulation of gene expression in targeted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Liu, Dayong; Lan, Bei; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-06-01

    Controllable gene expression is always a challenge and of great significance to biomedical research and clinical applications. Recently, various approaches based on extra-engineered light-sensitive proteins have been developed to provide optogenetic actuators for gene expression. Complicated biomedical techniques including exogenous genes engineering, transfection, and material delivery are needed. Here we present an all-optical method to regulate gene expression in targeted cells. Intrinsic or exogenous genes can be activated by a Ca2+-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) driven by a short flash of femtosecond-laser irradiation. When applied to mesenchymal stem cells, expression of a differentiation regulator Osterix can be activated by this method to potentially induce differentiation of them. A laser-induced ``Ca2+-comb'' (LiCCo) by multi-time laser exposure is further developed to enhance gene expression efficiency. This noninvasive method hence provides an encouraging advance of gene expression regulation, with promising potential of applying in cell biology and stem-cell science.

  18. Epigenetics, cellular memory and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, Steven; Greally, John M

    2016-07-25

    The field described as 'epigenetics' has captured the imagination of scientists and the lay public. Advances in our understanding of chromatin and gene regulatory mechanisms have had impact on drug development, fueling excitement in the lay public about the prospects of applying this knowledge to address health issues. However, when describing these scientific advances as 'epigenetic', we encounter the problem that this term means different things to different people, starting within the scientific community and amplified in the popular press. To help researchers understand some of the misconceptions in the field and to communicate the science accurately to each other and the lay audience, here we review the basis for many of the assumptions made about what are currently referred to as epigenetic processes. PMID:27458904

  19. Drosophila rosA gene, which when mutant causes aberrant photoreceptor oscillation, encodes a novel neurotransmitter transporter homologue.

    PubMed

    Burg, M G; Geng, C; Guan, Y; Koliantz, G; Pak, W L

    1996-12-01

    The Drosophila receptor oscillation A (rosA) mutations, which cause electroretinogram (ERG) defects, including oscillations, were localized to the 24F4-25A2 region of chromosome 2L. Genomic fragments from this region, isolated from bacteriophage P1 clones, included those that detect transcriptional defects in rosA mutants in RNA blot experiments. One of these genomic fragments was used to screen a head cDNA library. The largest cDNA clone (3.6 kb) isolated was shown to rescue a rosA mutant in P element-germline transformation experiments. The ROSA protein deduced from the open reading frame in the 3.6 kb rosA cDNA is 943 amino acids long and is 36-41% identical to members of the superfamily of Na+/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters, with no indication of higher sequence identity to any one subgroup within the superfamily. RNA blot experiments revealed multiple transcripts in various developmental stages, the most abundant one being a 3.7 kb transcript, particularly in the adult head. Tissue in situ experiments identified the rosA transcript to be localized to many tissues, with higher levels of hybridization in the nervous system and digestive tract. The results demonstrate that the rosA gene encodes a novel Na+/Cl(-)-dependent transporter important for normal response properties of the photoreceptor.

  20. Influence of gene copy number on self-regulated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jędrak, Jakub; Ochab-Marcinek, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Using an analytically solvable stochastic model, we study the properties of a simple genetic circuit consisting of multiple copies of a self-regulating gene. We analyse how the variation in gene copy number and the mutations changing the auto-regulation strength affect the steady-state distribution of protein concentration. We predict that one-reporter assay, an experimental method where the extrinsic noise level is inferred from the comparison of expression variance of a single and duplicated reporter gene, may give an incorrect estimation of the extrinsic noise contribution when applied to self-regulating genes. We also show that an imperfect duplication of an auto-activated gene, changing the regulation strength of one of the copies, may lead to a hybrid, binary+graded response of these genes to external signal. The analysis of relative changes in mean gene expression before and after duplication suggests that evolutionary accumulation of gene duplications may, at a given mean burst size, non-trivially depend on the inherent noisiness of a given gene, quantified by the inverse of the maximal mean frequency of bursts. Moreover, we find that the dependence of gene expression noise on gene copy number and auto-regulation strength may qualitatively differ, e.g. in monotonicity, depending on whether the noise is measured by Fano factor or coefficient of variation. Thus, experimentally-based hypotheses linking gene expression noise and evolutionary optimisation in the context of gene copy number variation may be ambiguous as they are dependent on the particular function chosen to quantify noise. PMID:27528448

  1. Toehold Switches: De-Novo-Designed Regulators of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Green, Alexander A.; Silver, Pamela A.; Collins, James J.; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Efforts to construct synthetic networks in living cells have been hindered by the limited number of regulatory components that provide wide dynamic range and low crosstalk. Here, we report a new class of de-novo-designed prokaryotic riboregulators called toehold switches that activate gene expression in response to cognate RNAs with arbitrary sequences. Toehold switches provide a high level of orthogonality and can be forward-engineered to provide average dynamic range above 400. We show that switches can be integrated into the genome to regulate endogenous genes and use them as sensors that respond to endogenous RNAs. We exploit the orthogonality of toehold switches to regulate 12 genes independently and to construct a genetic circuit that evaluates 4-input AND logic. Toehold switches, with their wide dynamic range, orthogonality, and programmability, represent a versatile and powerful platform for regulation of translation, offering diverse applications in molecular biology, synthetic biology, and biotechnology. PMID:25417166

  2. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  3. Let there be light: Regulation of gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Godoy Herz, Micaela A; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression regulation relies on a variety of molecular mechanisms affecting different steps of a messenger RNA (mRNA) life: transcription, processing, splicing, alternative splicing, transport, translation, storage and decay. Light induces massive reprogramming of gene expression in plants. Differences in alternative splicing patterns in response to environmental stimuli suggest that alternative splicing plays an important role in plant adaptation to changing life conditions. In a recent publication, our laboratories showed that light regulates alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes encoding proteins involved in RNA processing by chloroplast retrograde signals. The light effect on alternative splicing is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. These results point at alternative splicing regulation by retrograde signals as an important mechanism for plant adaptation to their environment. PMID:25590224

  4. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  5. Chromatin Remodeling Inactivates Activity Genes and Regulates Neural Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kelly K.; Hemberg, Martin; Reddy, Naveen C.; Cho, Ha Y.; Guthrie, Arden N.; Oldenborg, Anna; Heiney, Shane A.; Ohmae, Shogo; Medina, Javier F.; Holy, Timothy E.; Bonni, Azad

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcription influences neuronal connectivity, but the roles and mechanisms of inactivation of activity-dependent genes have remained poorly understood. Genome-wide analyses in the mouse cerebellum revealed that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex deposits the histone variant H2A.z at promoters of activity-dependent genes, thereby triggering their inactivation. Purification of translating mRNAs from synchronously developing granule neurons (Sync-TRAP) showed that conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 impairs inactivation of activity-dependent genes when neurons undergo dendrite pruning. Chd4 knockout or expression of NuRD-regulated activity genes impairs dendrite pruning. Imaging of behaving mice revealed hyperresponsivity of granule neurons to sensorimotor stimuli upon Chd4 knockout. Our findings define an epigenetic mechanism that inactivates activity-dependent transcription and regulates dendrite patterning and sensorimotor encoding in the brain. PMID:27418512

  6. Cloning-free regulated monitoring of reporter and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    al-Haj, Latifa; Al-Ahmadi, Wijdan; Al-Saif, Maher; Demirkaya, Omer; Khabar, Khalid SA

    2009-01-01

    Background The majority of the promoters, their regulatory elements, and their variations in the human genome remain unknown. Reporter gene technology for transcriptional activity is a widely used tool for the study of promoter structure, gene regulation, and signaling pathways. Construction of transcriptional reporter vectors, including use of cis-acting sequences, requires cloning and time-demanding manipulations, particularly with introduced mutations. Results In this report, we describe a cloning-free strategy to generate transcriptionally-controllable linear reporter constructs. This approach was applied in common transcriptional models of inflammatory response and the interferon system. In addition, it was used to delineate minimal transcriptional activity of selected ribosomal protein promoters. The approach was tested for conversion of genes into TetO-inducible/repressible expression cassettes. Conclusion The simple introduction and tuning of any transcriptional control in the linear DNA product renders promoter activation and regulated gene studies simple and versatile. PMID:19267938

  7. Methylation of microRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development in andromonoecious poplar.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Ci, Dong; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies showed sex-specific DNA methylation and expression of candidate genes in bisexual flowers of andromonoecious poplar, but the regulatory relationship between methylation and microRNAs (miRNAs) remains unclear. To investigate whether the methylation of miRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development, the methylome, microRNA, and transcriptome were examined in female and male flowers of andromonoecious poplar. 27 636 methylated coding genes and 113 methylated miRNA genes were identified. In the coding genes, 64.5% of the methylated reads mapped to the gene body region; by contrast, 60.7% of methylated reads in miRNA genes mainly mapped in the 5' and 3' flanking regions. CHH methylation showed the highest methylation levels and CHG showed the lowest methylation levels. Correlation analysis showed a significant, negative, strand-specific correlation of methylation and miRNA gene expression (r=0.79, P <0.05). The methylated miRNA genes included eight long miRNAs (lmiRNAs) of 24 nucleotides and 11 miRNAs related to flower development. miRNA172b might play an important role in the regulation of bisexual flower development-related gene expression in andromonoecious poplar, via modification of methylation. Gynomonoecious, female, and male poplars were used to validate the methylation patterns of the miRNA172b gene, implying that hyper-methylation in andromonoecious and gynomonoecious poplar might function as an important regulator in bisexual flower development. Our data provide a useful resource for the study of flower development in poplar and improve our understanding of the effect of epigenetic regulation on genes other than protein-coding genes.

  8. Methylation of microRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development in andromonoecious poplar

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Ci, Dong; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed sex-specific DNA methylation and expression of candidate genes in bisexual flowers of andromonoecious poplar, but the regulatory relationship between methylation and microRNAs (miRNAs) remains unclear. To investigate whether the methylation of miRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development, the methylome, microRNA, and transcriptome were examined in female and male flowers of andromonoecious poplar. 27 636 methylated coding genes and 113 methylated miRNA genes were identified. In the coding genes, 64.5% of the methylated reads mapped to the gene body region; by contrast, 60.7% of methylated reads in miRNA genes mainly mapped in the 5′ and 3′ flanking regions. CHH methylation showed the highest methylation levels and CHG showed the lowest methylation levels. Correlation analysis showed a significant, negative, strand-specific correlation of methylation and miRNA gene expression (r=0.79, P <0.05). The methylated miRNA genes included eight long miRNAs (lmiRNAs) of 24 nucleotides and 11 miRNAs related to flower development. miRNA172b might play an important role in the regulation of bisexual flower development-related gene expression in andromonoecious poplar, via modification of methylation. Gynomonoecious, female, and male poplars were used to validate the methylation patterns of the miRNA172b gene, implying that hyper-methylation in andromonoecious and gynomonoecious poplar might function as an important regulator in bisexual flower development. Our data provide a useful resource for the study of flower development in poplar and improve our understanding of the effect of epigenetic regulation on genes other than protein-coding genes. PMID:25617468

  9. The mechanisms regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in hippocampus during systemic inflammatory response: The effect on inflammatory gene expression.

    PubMed

    Czapski, Grzegorz A; Gąssowska, Magdalena; Wilkaniec, Anna; Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Strosznajder, Joanna B; Adamczyk, Agata

    2016-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is critical for nervous system's development and function, and its aberrant activation contributes to pathomechanism of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. It was recently suggested that Cdk5 may participate in regulation of inflammatory signalling. The aim of this study was to analyse the mechanisms involved in regulating Cdk5 activity in the brain during systemic inflammatory response (SIR) as well as the involvement of Cdk5 in controlling the expression of inflammatory genes. Genetic and biochemical alterations in hippocampus were analysed 3 and 12 h after intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide. We observed an increase in both Cdk5 gene expression and protein level. Moreover, phosphorylation of Cdk5 on Ser159 was significantly enhanced. Also transcription of Cdk5-regulatory protein (p35/Cdk5r1) was augmented, and the level of p25, calpain-dependent cleavage product of p35, was increased. All these results demonstrated rapid activation of Cdk5 in the brain during SIR. Hyperactivity of Cdk5 contributed to enhanced phosphorylation of tau and glycogen synthase kinase 3β. Inhibition of Cdk5 with Roscovitine reduced activation of NF-κB and expression of inflammation-related genes, demonstrating the critical role of Cdk5 in regulation of gene transcription during SIR.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of human thromboxane synthase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.D.; Baek, S.J.; Fleischer, T

    1994-09-01

    The human thromboxane synthase (TS) gene encodes a microsomal enzyme catalyzing the conversion of prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A{sub 2}(TxA{sub 2}), a potent inducer of vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. A deficiency in platelet TS activity results in bleeding disorders, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Increased TxA{sub 2} has been associated with many pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis in sickle cell patients. Since the formation of TxA{sub 2} is dependent upon TS, the regulation of TS gene expression may presumably play a crucial role in vivo. Abrogation of the regulatory mechanism in TS gene expression might contribute, in part, to the above clinical manifestations. To gain insight into TS gene regulation, a 1.7 kb promoter of the human TS gene was cloned and sequenced. RNase protection assay and 5{prime} RACE protocols were used to map the transcription initiation site to nucleotide A, 30 bp downstream from a canonical TATA box. Several transcription factor binding sites, including AP-1, PU.1, and PEA3, were identified within this sequence. Transient expression studies in HL-60 cells transfected with constructs containing various lengths (0.2 to 5.5 kb) of the TS promoter/luciferase fusion gene indicated the presence of multiple repressor elements within the 5.5 kb TS promoter. However, a lineage-specific up-regulation of TS gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells induced by TPA to differentiate along the macrophage lineage. The increase in TS transcription was not detectable until 36 hr after addition of the inducer. These results suggest that expression of the human TS gene may be regulated by a mechanism involving repression and derepression of the TS promoter.

  11. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Saha, Tusar T; Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation-regulated mainly by HR3-occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  12. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Saha, Tusar T; Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation-regulated mainly by HR3-occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  13. A genome landscape of SRSF3-regulated splicing events and gene expression in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells

    PubMed Central

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Jia, Rong; Yang, Yanqin; Zhu, Jun; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Alternative RNA splicing is an essential process to yield proteomic diversity in eukaryotic cells, and aberrant splicing is often associated with numerous human diseases and cancers. We recently described serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3 or SRp20) being a proto-oncogene. However, the SRSF3-regulated splicing events responsible for its oncogenic activities remain largely unknown. By global profiling of the SRSF3-regulated splicing events in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells, we found that SRSF3 regulates the expression of 60 genes including ERRFI1, ANXA1 and TGFB2, and 182 splicing events in 164 genes, including EP300, PUS3, CLINT1, PKP4, KIF23, CHK1, SMC2, CKLF, MAP4, MBNL1, MELK, DDX5, PABPC1, MAP4K4, Sp1 and SRSF1, which are primarily associated with cell proliferation or cell cycle. Two SRSF3-binding motifs, CCAGC(G)C and A(G)CAGCA, are enriched to the alternative exons. An SRSF3-binding site in the EP300 exon 14 is essential for exon 14 inclusion. We found that the expression of SRSF1 and SRSF3 are mutually dependent and coexpressed in normal and tumor tissues/cells. SRSF3 also significantly regulates the expression of at least 20 miRNAs, including a subset of oncogenic or tumor suppressive miRNAs. These data indicate that SRSF3 affects a global change of gene expression to maintain cell homeostasis. PMID:26704980

  14. A genome landscape of SRSF3-regulated splicing events and gene expression in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Jia, Rong; Yang, Yanqin; Zhu, Jun; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2016-02-29

    Alternative RNA splicing is an essential process to yield proteomic diversity in eukaryotic cells, and aberrant splicing is often associated with numerous human diseases and cancers. We recently described serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3 or SRp20) being a proto-oncogene. However, the SRSF3-regulated splicing events responsible for its oncogenic activities remain largely unknown. By global profiling of the SRSF3-regulated splicing events in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells, we found that SRSF3 regulates the expression of 60 genes including ERRFI1, ANXA1 and TGFB2, and 182 splicing events in 164 genes, including EP300, PUS3, CLINT1, PKP4, KIF23, CHK1, SMC2, CKLF, MAP4, MBNL1, MELK, DDX5, PABPC1, MAP4K4, Sp1 and SRSF1, which are primarily associated with cell proliferation or cell cycle. Two SRSF3-binding motifs, CCAGC(G)C and A(G)CAGCA, are enriched to the alternative exons. An SRSF3-binding site in the EP300 exon 14 is essential for exon 14 inclusion. We found that the expression of SRSF1 and SRSF3 are mutually dependent and coexpressed in normal and tumor tissues/cells. SRSF3 also significantly regulates the expression of at least 20 miRNAs, including a subset of oncogenic or tumor suppressive miRNAs. These data indicate that SRSF3 affects a global change of gene expression to maintain cell homeostasis.

  15. Role of iron in regulation of virulence genes.

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, C M; Calderwood, S B

    1993-01-01

    The abilities of bacterial pathogens to adapt to the environment within the host are essential to their virulence. Microorganisms have adapted to the iron limitation present in mammalian hosts by evolving diverse mechanisms for the assimilation of iron sufficient for growth. In addition, many bacterial pathogens have used the low concentration of iron present in the host as an important signal to enhance the expression of a wide variety of bacterial toxins and other virulence determinants. The molecular basis of coordinate regulation by iron has been most thoroughly studied in Escherichia coli. In this organism, coordinate regulation of gene expression by iron depends on the regulatory gene, fur. Regulation of gene expression by iron in a number of pathogenic organisms is coordinated by proteins homologous to the Fur protein of E. coli. Additional regulatory proteins may be superimposed on the Fur repressor to provide the fine-tuning necessary for the precise regulation of individual virulence genes in response to iron and other environmental signals. Studies of the mechanisms of regulation of iron acquisition systems and virulence determinants by iron should lead to a better understanding of the adaptive response of bacteria to the low-iron environment of the host and its importance in virulence. PMID:8472246

  16. Identification of Fur-regulated genes in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haraszthy, Violet I; Jordan, Shawn F; Zambon, Joseph J

    2006-03-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an oral pathogen that causes aggressive periodontitis as well as sometimes life-threatening, extra-oral infections. Iron regulation is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections and, consistent with this hypothesis, the fur gene has recently been identified and characterized in A. actinomycetemcomitans. In this study, 14 putatively Fur-regulated genes were identified by Fur titration assay (Furta) in A. actinomycetemcomitans, including afuA, dgt, eno, hemA, tbpA, recO and yfe - some of which are known to be Fur regulated in other species. A fur mutant A. actinomycetemcomitans strain was created by selecting for manganese resistance in order to study the Fur regulon. Comparisons between the fur gene sequences revealed that nucleotide 66 changed from C in the wild-type to T in the mutant strain, changing leucine to isoleucine. The fur mutant strain expressed a nonfunctional Fur protein as determined by Escherichia coli-based ferric uptake assays and Western blotting. It was also more sensitive to acid stress and expressed higher levels of minC than the wild-type strain. minC, which inhibits cell division in other bacterial species and whose regulation by iron has not been previously described, was found to be Fur regulated in A. actinomycetemcomitans by Furta, by gel shift assays, and by RT-qPCR assays for gene expression. PMID:16514158

  17. ULTRAPETALA trxG genes interact with KANADI transcription factor genes to regulate Aradopsis Gynoecium patterning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organ formation relies upon precise patterns of gene expression that are under tight spatial and temporal regulation. Transcription patterns are specified by several cellular processes during development, including chromatin remodeling, but little is known about how chromatin remodeling factors cont...

  18. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  19. Computational Genomics: From Genome Sequence To Global Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao

    2000-03-01

    As various genome projects are shifting to the post-sequencing phase, it becomes a big challenge to analyze the sequence data and extract biological information using computational tools. In the past, computational genomics has mainly focused on finding new genes and mapping out their biological functions. With the rapid accumulation of experimental data on genome-wide gene activities, it is now possible to understand how genes are regulated on a genomic scale. A major mechanism for gene regulation is to control the level of transcription, which is achieved by regulatory proteins that bind to short DNA sequences - the regulatory elements. We have developed a new approach to identifying regulatory elements in genomes. The approach formalizes how one would proceed to decipher a ``text'' consisting of a long string of letters written in an unknown language that did not delineate words. The algorithm is based on a statistical mechanics model in which the sequence is segmented probabilistically into ``words'' and a ``dictionary'' of ``words'' is built concurrently. For the control regions in the yeast genome, we built a ``dictionary'' of about one thousand words which includes many known as well as putative regulatory elements. I will discuss how we can use this dictionary to search for genes that are likely to be regulated in a similar fashion and to analyze gene expression data generated from DNA micro-array experiments.

  20. GLK gene pairs regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

    PubMed

    Fitter, David W; Martin, David J; Copley, Martin J; Scotland, Robert W; Langdale, Jane A

    2002-09-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is a complex process that requires close co-ordination between two genomes. Many of the proteins that accumulate in the chloroplast are encoded by the nuclear genome, and the developmental transition from proplastid to chloroplast is regulated by nuclear genes. Here we show that a pair of Golden 2-like (GLK) genes regulates chloroplast development in Arabidopsis. The GLK proteins are members of the GARP superfamily of transcription factors, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that the maize, rice and Arabidopsis GLK gene pairs comprise a distinct group within the GARP superfamily. Further phylogenetic analysis suggests that the gene pairs arose through separate duplication events in the monocot and dicot lineages. As in rice, AtGLK1 and AtGLK2 are expressed in partially overlapping domains in photosynthetic tissue. Insertion mutants demonstrate that this expression pattern reflects a degree of functional redundancy as single mutants display normal phenotypes in most photosynthetic tissues. However, double mutants are pale green in all photosynthetic tissues and chloroplasts exhibit a reduction in granal thylakoids. Products of several genes involved in light harvesting also accumulate at reduced levels in double mutant chloroplasts. GLK genes therefore regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

  1. Denitrification Genes Regulate Brucella Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seung-Hun; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Splitter, Gary A.; Shapleigh, James P.

    2004-01-01

    Brucella is the causative agent of the zoonotic disease brucellosis, which is endemic in many parts of the world. Genome sequencing of B. suis and B. melitensis revealed that both are complete denitrifiers. To learn more about the role of denitrification in these animal pathogens, a study of the role of denitrification in the closely related B. neotomae was undertaken. In contrast to B. suis and B. melitensis, it was found that B. neotomae is a partial denitrifier that can reduce nitrate to nitrite but no further. Examination of the B. neotomae genome showed that a deletion in the denitrification gene cluster resulted in complete loss of nirV and the partial deletion of nirK and nnrA. Even though the nor operon is intact, a norC-lacZ promoter fusion was not expressed in B. neotomae. However, the norC-lacZ fusion was expressed in the related denitrifier Agrobacterium tumefaciens, suggesting that the lack of expression in B. neotomae is due to inactivation of NnrA. A narK-lacZ promoter fusion was found to exhibit nitrate-dependent expression consistent with the partial denitrifier phenotype. Complementation of the deleted region in B. neotomae by using nirK, nirV, and nnrA from B. melitensis restored the ability of B. neotomae to reduce nitrite. There was a significant difference in the death of IRF-1−/− mice when infected with B. neotomae containing nirK, nirV, and nnrA and those infected with wild-type B. neotomae. The wild-type strain killed all the infected mice, whereas most of the mice infected with B. neotomae containing nirK, nirV, and nnrA survived. PMID:15342571

  2. Global identification of target genes regulated by APETALA3 and PISTILLATA floral homeotic gene action.

    PubMed

    Zik, Moriyah; Irish, Vivian F

    2003-01-01

    Identifying the genes regulated by the floral homeotic genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to petal and stamen formation. We have used microarray analysis to conduct a broad survey of genes whose expression is affected by AP3 and PI activity. DNA microarrays consisting of 9216 Arabidopsis ESTs were screened with probes corresponding to mRNAs from different mutant and transgenic lines that misexpress AP3 and/or PI. The microarray results were further confirmed by RNA gel blot analyses. Our results suggest that AP3 and PI regulate a relatively small number of genes, implying that many genes used in petal and stamen development are not tissue specific and likely have roles in other processes as well. We recovered genes similar to previously identified petal- and stamen-expressed genes as well as genes that were not implicated previously in petal and stamen development. A very low percentage of the genes recovered encoded transcription factors. This finding suggests that AP3 and PI act relatively directly to regulate the genes required for the basic cellular processes responsible for petal and stamen morphogenesis.

  3. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of

  4. Regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nancy M.; Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) genes are regulated at the level of transcription. Recent studies have shown that chromatin modification is critical for efficient transcription of these genes, and a number of chromatin modifying complexes recruited to MHC-II genes have been described. The MHC-II genes are segregated from each other by a series of chromatin elements, termed MHC-II insulators. Interactions between MHC-insulators and the promoters of MHC-II genes are mediated by the insulator factor CCCTC-binding protein and are critical for efficient expression. This regulatory mechanism provides a novel view of how the entire MHC-II locus is assembled architecturally and can be coordinately controlled. PMID:20970972

  5. Epigenetic regulation of cardiac myofibril gene expression during heart development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weian; Liu, Lingjuan; Pan, Bo; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Jing; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Tian, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac gene expression regulation is controlled not only by genetic factors but also by environmental, i.e., epigenetic factors. Several environmental toxic effects such as oxidative stress and ischemia can result in abnormal myofibril gene expression during heart development. Troponin, one of the regulatory myofibril proteins in the heart, is a well-known model in study of cardiac gene regulation during the development. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated that fetal form troponin I (ssTnI) expression in the heart is partially regulated by hormones, such as thyroid hormone. In the present study, we have explored the epigenetic role of histone modification in the regulation of ssTnI expression. Mouse hearts were collected at different time of heart development, i.e., embryonic day 15.5, postnatal day 1, day 7, day 14 and day 21. Levels of histone H3 acetylation (acH3) and histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me(3)) were detected using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in slow upstream regulatory element (SURE) domain (TnI slow upstream regulatory element), 300-bp proximal upstream domain and the first intron of ssTnI gene, which are recognized as critical regions for ssTnI regulation. We found that the levels of acH3 on the SURE region were gradually decreased, corresponding to a similar decrease of ssTnI expression in the heart, whereas the levels of H3K9me(3) in the first intron of ssTnI gene were gradually increased. Our results indicate that both histone acetylation and methylation are involved in the epigenetic regulation of ssTnI expression in the heart during the development, which are the targets for environmental factors.

  6. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  7. Regulation of human autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene translation by miR-220b.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tomohito; Noguchi, Yukiko; Shindo, Mieko; Morita, Yoshifumi; Oda, Yoshie; Yoshida, Eiko; Hamada, Hiroko; Harada, Mine; Shiokawa, Yuichi; Nishida, Takahiro; Tominaga, Ryuji; Kikushige, Yoshikane; Akashi, Koichi; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Tanaka, Yuka; Umemura, Tsukuru; Taniguchi, Taketoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Takashi; Mitsuyama, Masao; Kurisaki, Hironori; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Nagafuchi, Seiho

    2013-11-01

    Although mutations of autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene are responsible for autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), presenting a wide spectrum of many characteristic and non-characteristic clinical features, some patients lack AIRE gene mutations. Therefore, something other than a mutation, such as dysregulation of AIRE gene, may be a causal factor for APECED or its related diseases. However, regulatory mechanisms for AIRE gene expression and/or translation have still remained elusive. We found that IL-2-stimulated CD4(+) T (IL-2T) cells showed a high expression of AIRE gene, but very low AIRE protein production, while Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B (EBV-B) cells express both AIRE gene and AIRE protein. By using microarray analysis, we could identify miR-220b as a possible regulatory mechanism for AIRE gene translation in IL-2T cells. Here we report that miR-220b significantly reduced the expression of AIRE protein in AIRE gene with 3'UTR region transfected 293T cells, whereas no alteration of AIRE protein production was observed in the open reading frame of AIRE gene alone transfected cells. In addition, anti-miR-220b reversed the inhibitory function of miR-220b for the expression of AIRE protein in AIRE gene with 3'UTR region transfected cells. Moreover, when AIRE gene transfected cells with mutated 3'UTR were transfected with miR-220b, no reduction of AIRE protein production was observed. Taken together, it was concluded that miR-220b inhibited the AIRE gene translation through the 3'UTR region of AIRE gene, indicating that miR-220b could serve as a regulator for human AIRE gene translation.

  8. Querying Co-regulated Genes on Diverse Gene Expression Datasets Via Biclustering.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Mehmet; Küçüktunç, Onur; Eren, Kemal; Bozdağ, Doruk; Kaya, Kamer; Çatalyürek, Ümit V

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development and increasing popularity of gene expression microarrays have resulted in a number of studies on the discovery of co-regulated genes. One important way of discovering such co-regulations is the query-based search since gene co-expressions may indicate a shared role in a biological process. Although there exist promising query-driven search methods adapting clustering, they fail to capture many genes that function in the same biological pathway because microarray datasets are fraught with spurious samples or samples of diverse origin, or the pathways might be regulated under only a subset of samples. On the other hand, a class of clustering algorithms known as biclustering algorithms which simultaneously cluster both the items and their features are useful while analyzing gene expression data, or any data in which items are related in only a subset of their samples. This means that genes need not be related in all samples to be clustered together. Because many genes only interact under specific circumstances, biclustering may recover the relationships that traditional clustering algorithms can easily miss. In this chapter, we briefly summarize the literature using biclustering for querying co-regulated genes. Then we present a novel biclustering approach and evaluate its performance by a thorough experimental analysis.

  9. Inhibitory effect of Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus carrying P53 gene against gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Sun, Bin; An, Ni; Tan, Weifeng; Cao, Lu; Luo, Xiangji; Yu, Yong; Feng, Feiling; Li, Bin; Wu, Mengchao; Su, Changqing; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy has become an important strategy for treatment of malignancies, but problems remains concerning the low gene transferring efficiency, poor transgene expression and limited targeting specific tumors, which have greatly hampered the clinical application of tumor gene therapy. Gallbladder cancer is characterized by rapid progress, poor prognosis, and aberrantly high expression of Survivin. In the present study, we used a human tumor-specific Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus vector carrying P53 gene, whose anti-cancer effect has been widely confirmed, to construct a wide spectrum, specific, safe, effective gene-viral therapy system, AdSurp-P53. Examining expression of enhanced green fluorecent protein (EGFP), E1A and the target gene P53 in the oncolytic adenovirus system validated that Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus had high proliferation activity and high P53 expression in Survivin-positive gallbladder cancer cells. Our in vitro cytotoxicity experiment demonstrated that AdSurp-P53 possessed a stronger cytotoxic effect against gallbladder cancer cells and hepatic cancer cells. The survival rate of EH-GB1 cells was lower than 40% after infection of AdSurp-P53 at multiplicity of infection (MOI) = 1 pfu/cell, while the rate was higher than 90% after infection of Ad-P53 at the same MOI, demonstrating that AdSurp-P53 has a potent cytotoxicity against EH-GB1 cells. The tumor growth was greatly inhibited in nude mice bearing EH-GB1 xenografts when the total dose of AdSurp-P53 was 1 × 10(9) pfu, and terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) revealed that the apoptotic rate of cancer cells was (33.4 ± 8.4)%. This oncolytic adenovirus system overcomes the long-standing shortcomings of gene therapy: poor transgene expression and targeting of only specific tumors, with its therapeutic effect better than the traditional Ad-P53 therapy regimen already on market; our system might be used for patients with advanced gallbladder cancer and

  10. NF-Y transcriptionally regulates the Drosophila p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Tue, Nguyen Trong; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2011-02-15

    The p53 protein is important in multicellular organisms, where it regulates the cell cycle and thus functions as a tumor suppressor that contributes to preventing cancer. However, molecular regulation of p53 gene expression is not fully understood. NF-YA is a subunit of the NF-Y trimeric complex, a transcription factor that binds to CCAAT motifs in the promoter regions of a variety of genes playing key roles in cell cycle regulation. We have identified four potential Drosophila NF-Y (dNF-Y)-binding sites located in the 5'-flanking region of the Drosophila p53 (dmp53) gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using anti-dNF-YA antibodies confirmed that dNF-YA binds specifically to the genomic region containing CCAAT boxes in the dmp53 gene promoter in vivo. Furthermore, the thorax disclosed phenotype of dNF-YA knockdown flies can be enhanced by dmp53 mutation. In addition, the level of dmp53 mRNA was found to be decreased in the dNF-YA knockdown cells and transient expression of the luciferase gene revealed that wild-type dmp53 gene promoter activity is much stronger than mutated promoter activity in S2 cells. The requirement of CCAAT boxes for dmp53 promoter activity was further confirmed by expression of EGFP in various tissues from transgenic flies carrying wild-type and CCAAT box-mutated versions of dmp53 promoter-GFP fusion genes. These results taken together indicate that dNF-Y is necessary for dmp53 gene promoter activity.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Norwitz, E R; Jeong, K H; Chin, W W

    1999-01-01

    GnRH plays a critical role in regulating mammalian reproductive development and function. At the level of the anterior pituitary, GnRH binds to the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) on the cell surface of pituitary gonadotropes. Here, it activates intracellular signal transduction pathways to effect both the synthesis and intermittent release of the gonadotropins LH and FSH. These hormones then enter the systemic circulation to regulate gonadal function, including steroid hormone synthesis and gametogenesis. The response of pituitary gonadotropes to GnRH correlates directly with the concentration of GnRHR on the cell surface, which is mediated, at least in part, at the level of gene expression. A number of endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors are known to regulate GnRHR gene expression. This article reviews in detail the role of the GnRHR in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the factors mediating expression of this gene. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate transcription of the GnRHR gene will further our knowledge about the role of this receptor in mammalian reproductive physiology in health and disease.

  12. Regulation of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brown, T A; Evangelista, C; Trumpower, B L

    1995-12-01

    Selection for mutants which release glucose repression of the CYB2 gene was used to identify genes which regulate repression of mitochondrial biogenesis. We have identified two of these as the previously described GRR1/CAT80 and ROX3 genes. Mutations in these genes not only release glucose repression of CYB2 but also generally release respiration of the mutants from glucose repression. In addition, both mutants are partially defective in CYB2 expression when grown on nonfermentable carbon sources, indicating a positive regulatory role as well. ROX3 was cloned by complementation of a glucose-inducible flocculating phenotype of an amber mutant and has been mapped as a new leftmost marker on chromosome 2. The ROX3 mutant has only a modest defect in glucose repression of GAL1 but is substantially compromised in galactose induction of GAL1 expression. This mutant also has increased SUC2 expression on nonrepressing carbon sources. We have also characterized the regulation of CYB2 in strains carrying null mutation in two other glucose repression genes, HXK2 and SSN6, and show that HXK2 is a negative regulator of CYB2, whereas SSN6 appears to be a positive effector of CYB2 expression.

  13. Phosphate regulation of gene expression in Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, L L; Silverman, M

    1987-01-01

    The synthesis of a major outer membrane protein, OmpP, in Vibrio parahaemolyticus was induced by growth in media deficient in phosphate. The gene, ompP, encoding this protein was cloned. Synthesis of OmpP in Escherichia coli was regulated by the availability of phosphate, and this control required the function of pho regulatory genes of E. coli. Analysis of gene fusion strains constructed by mutagenesis with transposon mini-Mulux revealed that ompP was transcriptionally regulated in V. parahaemolyticus. Impaired growth of a strain with an ompP defect was observed in media which contained large linear polyphosphates as the phosphate source. This and other evidence suggested that OmpP functions as a porin channel for the entry of phosphate into the cell. A number of other proteins or activities were induced by phosphate limitation including hemolysin, phospholipase C, and phosphatase activities. A regulatory locus controlling expression of phosphate-regulated genes was identified and cloned. This regulatory locus cloned from V. parahaemolyticus was shown to complement E. coli strains with defects in pho regulatory genes. Images PMID:3038839

  14. Transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin genes in chicken bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang In; Jang, Hyun June; Jeon, Mi-hyang; Lee, Mi Ock; Kim, Jeom Sun; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Byun, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of vertebrate-specific immune molecules with an evolutionarily conserved gene structure. We analyzed the expression patterns of cathelicidin genes (CAMP, CATH3, and CATHB1) in chicken bone marrow cells (BMCs) and chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). We found that CAMP and CATHB1 were significantly up-regulated in BMCs, whereas the expression of CATH3 did not differ significantly between BMCs and CEFs. To study the mechanism underlying the up-regulation of cathelicidin genes in BMCs, we predicted the transcription factors (TFs) that bind to the 5'-flanking regions of cathelicidin genes. CEBPA, EBF1, HES1, MSX1, and ZIC3 were up-regulated in BMCs compared to CEFs. Subsequently, when a siRNA-mediated knockdown assay was performed for MSX1, the expression of CAMP and CATHB1 was decreased in BMCs. We also showed that the transcriptional activity of the CAMP promoter was decreased by mutation of the MSX1-binding sites present within the 5'-flanking region of CAMP. These results increase our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling cathelicidin genes in BMCs.

  15. Cortical spreading depression and gene regulation: relevance to migraine.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Rajani; Cui, Lisa; Yong, Chi; Bowyer, Susan; Klein, Robert M; Welch, K M A; Berman, Nancy E J

    2002-04-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) may be the underlying mechanism of migraine aura. The role of CSD in initiating a migraine headache remains to be determined, but it might involve specific changes in gene expression in the brain. To examine these changes, four episodes of CSD at 5-minute intervals were induced in the mouse brain by application of 300mM KCl, and gene expression was examined 2 hours later using cDNA array and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Controls consisted of groups that received anesthesia only, attachment of recording electrodes only, and application of 0.9% NaCl. Of the over 1,180 genes examined in our experiments, those consistently regulated by CSD included vasoactive peptides; the vasodilator atrial natriuretic peptide was induced by CSD, while the vasoconstrictor neuropeptide Y was downregulated. Other genes specifically regulated by CSD were involved in oxidative stress responses (major prion protein, glutathione-S-transferase-5, and apolipoprotein E). L-type calcium channel mRNA was upregulated. In summary, CSD regulates genes that are intrinsic to its propagation, that identify accompanying vascular responses as a potential source of pain, and that protect against its potential pathological consequences. We believe these observations have strong relevance to the mechanisms of migraine and its outcomes.

  16. Androgen-induced Rhox homeobox genes modulate the expression of AR-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiying; Dandekar, Dineshkumar; O'Shaughnessy, Peter J; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2010-01-01

    Rhox5, the founding member of the reproductive homeobox on the X chromosome (Rhox) gene cluster, encodes a homeodomain-containing transcription factor that is selectively expressed in Sertoli cells, where it promotes the survival of male germ cells. To identify Rhox5-regulated genes, we generated 15P-1 Sertoli cell clones expressing physiological levels of Rhox5 from a stably transfected expression vector. Microarray analysis identified many genes altered in expression in response to Rhox5, including those encoding proteins controlling cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, metabolism, and cell-cell interactions. Fifteen of these Rhox5-regulated genes were chosen for further analysis. Analysis of Rhox5-null male mice indicated that at least nine of these are Rhox5-regulated in the testes in vivo. Many of them have distinct postnatal expression patterns and are regulated by Rhox5 at different postnatal time points. Most of them are expressed in Sertoli cells, indicating that they are candidates to be directly regulated by Rhox5. Transfection analysis with expression vectors encoding different mouse and human Rhox family members revealed that the regulatory response of a subset of these Rhox5-regulated genes is both conserved and redundant. Given that Rhox5 depends on androgen receptor (AR) for expression in Sertoli cells, we examined whether some Rhox5-regulated genes are also regulated by AR. We provide several lines of evidence that this is the case, leading us to propose that RHOX5 serves as a key intermediate transcription factor that directs some of the actions of AR in the testes.

  17. Light-Inducible Gene Regulation with Engineered Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of light-inducible protein-protein interactions with gene regulation systems has enabled the control of gene expression with light. In particular, heterodimer protein pairs from plants can be used to engineer a gene regulation system in mammalian cells that is reversible, repeatable, tunable, controllable in a spatiotemporal manner, and targetable to any DNA sequence. This system, Light-Inducible Transcription using Engineered Zinc finger proteins (LITEZ), is based on the blue light-induced interaction of GIGANTEA and the LOV domain of FKF1 that drives the localization of a transcriptional activator to the DNA-binding site of a highly customizable engineered zinc finger protein. This chapter provides methods for modifying LITEZ to target new DNA sequences, engineering a programmable LED array to illuminate cell cultures, and using the modified LITEZ system to achieve spatiotemporal control of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24718797

  18. Regulation of Cell and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chu; Wang, Po-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Chih; Lin, Chien-Liang; Tai, Hsuen-Yung; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Chiang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the rapid and mature development of emerging biotechnology in the fields of cell culture, cell preservation, and recombinant DNA technology, more and more cell or gene medicinal therapy products have been approved for marketing, to treat serious diseases which have been challenging to treat with current medical practice or medicine. This chapter will briefly introduce the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) and elaborate regulation of cell and gene therapy medicinal products in Taiwan, including regulatory history evolution, current regulatory framework, application and review procedures, and relevant jurisdictional issues. Under the promise of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products, it is expected the regulation and environment will be more flexible, streamlining the process of the marketing approval of new emerging cell or gene therapy medicinal products and providing diverse treatment options for physicians and patients.

  19. Self-targeting by CRISPR: gene regulation or autoimmunity?

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Adi; Keren, Leeat; Wurtzel, Omri; Amitai, Gil; Sorek, Rotem

    2010-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas is a recently discovered prokaryotic immune system, which is based on small RNAs (“spacers”) that restrict phage and plasmid infection. It has been hypothesized that CRISPRs can also regulate self gene expression by utilizing spacers that target self genes. By analyzing CRISPRs from 330 organisms we found that one in every 250 spacers is self targeting, and that such self-targeting occurs in 18% of all CRISPR-bearing organisms. However, complete lack of conservation across species, combined with abundance of degraded repeats near self-targeting spacers, suggests that self-targeting is a consequence of autoimmunity rather than gene regulation. We propose that accidental incorporation of self nucleic-acids by CRISPR can incur an autoimmune fitness cost, which may explain the abundance of degraded CRISPR systems across prokaryotes. PMID:20598393

  20. Hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shu-Ching; Claffey, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying oxygen sensing in mammalian cells has been extensively investigated in the areas of glucose transport, glycolysis, erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and catecholamine metabolism. Expression of functionally operative representative proteins in these specific areas, such as the glucose transporter 1, glycolytic enzymes, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor and tyrosine hydroxylase are all induced by hypoxia. Recent studies demonstrated that both transcriptional activation and post-transcriptional mechanisms are important to the hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression. In this article, the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors involved in the transcriptional activation of gene expression will be reviewed. In addition, the mechanisms of post-transcriptional mRNA stabilization will also be addressed. We will discuss whether these two processes of regulation of hypoxia-responsive genes are mechanistically linked and co-operative in nature. PMID:10319016

  1. Early development of Moniliophthora perniciosa basidiomata and developmentally regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The hemibiotrophic fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa is the causal agent of Witches' broom, a disease of Theobroma cacao. The pathogen life cycle ends with the production of basidiocarps in dead tissues of the infected host. This structure generates millions of basidiospores that reinfect young tissues of the same or other plants. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying the sexual phase of this fungus may help develop chemical, biological or genetic strategies to control the disease. Results Mycelium was morphologically analyzed prior to emergence of basidiomata by stereomicroscopy, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The morphological changes in the mycelium before fructification show a pattern similar to other members of the order Agaricales. Changes and appearance of hyphae forming a surface layer by fusion were correlated with primordia emergence. The stages of hyphal nodules, aggregation, initial primordium and differentiated primordium were detected. The morphological analysis also allowed conclusions on morphogenetic aspects. To analyze the genes involved in basidiomata development, the expression of some selected EST genes from a non-normalized cDNA library, representative of the fruiting stage of M. perniciosa, was evaluated. A macroarray analysis was performed with 192 selected clones and hybridized with two distinct RNA pools extracted from mycelium in different phases of basidiomata formation. This analysis showed two groups of up and down-regulated genes in primordial phases of mycelia. Hydrophobin coding, glucose transporter, Rho-GEF, Rheb, extensin precursor and cytochrome p450 monooxygenase genes were grouped among the up-regulated. In the down-regulated group relevant genes clustered coding calmodulin, lanosterol 14 alpha demethylase and PIM1. In addition, 12 genes with more detailed expression profiles were analyzed by RT-qPCR. One aegerolysin gene had a peak of expression in mycelium with primordia and a

  2. Nongenic transcription, gene regulation and action at a distance.

    PubMed

    Cook, Peter R

    2003-11-15

    In eukaryotes, motifs such as silencers, enhancers and locus control regions act over thousands of base pairs to regulate adjacent genes; insulators limit such effects, and barriers confine repressive heterochromatin to particular chromosomal segments. Recent results show that many of these motifs are nongenic transcription units, and two of them directly contact their targets lying further down the chromosome to loop the intervening DNA: the barriers (scs and scs') flanking the 87A7 heat-shock locus in the fly contact each other, and a locus control region touches the beta-globin gene in the mouse. I hypothesize that the act of transcription underlies the function of these regulators; active polymerizing complexes tend to cluster into 'factories' and this facilitates molecular contact between the transcribed regulator and its distant (and transcribed) target. PMID:14576342

  3. RBM20, a gene for hereditary cardiomyopathy, regulates titin splicing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Greaser, Marion L.; Radke, Michael H.; Liss, Martin; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Maatz, Henrike; Schulz, Herbert; Li, Shijun; Parrish, Amanda M.; Dauksaite, Vita; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Klaassen, Sabine; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Hacker, Timothy A.; Saupe, Kurt W.; Dec, G. William; Ellinor, Patrick T.; MacRae, Calum A.; Spallek, Bastian; Fischer, Robert; Perrot, Andreas; Özcelik, Cemil; Saar, Kathrin; Hubner, Norbert; Gotthardt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in the adaptation of cardiac function exemplified by the isoform switch of titin, which adjusts ventricular filling. We previously identified a rat strain deficient in titin splicing. Using genetic mapping, we found a loss-of-function mutation in RBM20 as the underlying cause for the pathological titin isoform expression. Mutations in human RBM20 have previously been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. We showed that the phenotype of Rbm20 deficient rats resembles the human pathology. Deep sequencing of the human and rat cardiac transcriptome revealed an RBM20 dependent regulation of alternative splicing. Additionally to titin we identified a set of 30 genes with conserved regulation between human and rat. This network is enriched for genes previously linked to cardiomyopathy, ion-homeostasis, and sarcomere biology. Our studies emphasize the importance of posttranscriptional regulation in cardiac function and provide mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:22466703

  4. Aberration corrected emittance exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (rf) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by multiple orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dogleg emittance exchange setup with a five cell rf deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of an EEX line with emittances differing by four orders of magnitude, i.e., an initial transverse emittance of 1 pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of 10 nm-rad.

  5. Identification of Master Regulator Genes in Human Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Sawle, A D; Kebschull, M; Demmer, R T; Papapanou, P N

    2016-08-01

    Analytic approaches confined to fold-change comparisons of gene expression patterns between states of health and disease are unable to distinguish between primary causal disease drivers and secondary noncausal events. Genome-wide reverse engineering approaches can facilitate the identification of candidate genes that may distinguish between causal and associative interactions and may account for the emergence or maintenance of pathologic phenotypes. In this work, we used the algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (ARACNE) to analyze a large gene expression profile data set (313 gingival tissue samples from a cross-sectional study of 120 periodontitis patients) obtained from clinically healthy (n = 70) or periodontitis-affected (n = 243) gingival sites. The generated transcriptional regulatory network of the gingival interactome was subsequently interrogated with the master regulator inference algorithm (MARINA) and gene expression signature data from healthy and periodontitis-affected gingiva. Our analyses identified 41 consensus master regulator genes (MRs), the regulons of which comprised between 25 and 833 genes. Regulons of 7 MRs (HCLS1, ZNF823, XBP1, ZNF750, RORA, TFAP2C, and ZNF57) included >500 genes each. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated differential expression of these regulons in gingival health versus disease with a type 1 error between 2% and 0.5% and with >80% of the regulon genes in the leading edge. Ingenuity pathway analysis showed significant enrichment of 36 regulons for several pathways, while 6 regulons (those of MRs HCLS1, IKZF3, ETS1, NHLH2, POU2F2, and VAV1) were enriched for >10 pathways. Pathways related to immune system signaling and development were the ones most frequently enriched across all regulons. The unbiased analysis of genome-wide regulatory networks can enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of human periodontitis and, after appropriate validation, ultimately identify target molecules of

  6. Living without Oxygen: Anoxia-Responsive Gene Expression and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Larade, Kevin; Storey, Kenneth B

    2009-04-01

    Many species of marine mollusks demonstrate exceptional capacities for long term survival without oxygen. Analysis of gene expression under anoxic conditions, including the subsequent translational responses, allows examination of the functional mechanisms that support and regulate natural anaerobiosis and permit noninjurious transitions between aerobic and anoxic states. Identification of stress-specific gene expression can provide important insights into the metabolic adaptations that are needed for anoxia tolerance, with potential applications to anoxia-intolerant systems. Various methods are available to do this, including high throughput microarray screening and construction and screening of cDNA libraries. Anoxia-responsive genes have been identified in mollusks; some have known functions in other organisms but were not previously linked with anoxia survival. In other cases, completely novel anoxia-responsive genes have been discovered, some that show known motifs or domains that hint at function. Selected genes are expressed at different times over an anoxia-recovery time course with their transcription and translation being actively regulated to ensure protein expression at the optimal time. An examination of transcript status over the course of anoxia exposure and subsequent aerobic recovery identifies genes, and the proteins that they encode, that enhance cell survival under oxygen-limited conditions. Analysis of data generated from non-mainstream model systems allows for insight into the response by cells to anoxia stress. PMID:19794879

  7. Inference of gene regulation functions from dynamic transcriptome data

    PubMed Central

    Hillenbrand, Patrick; Maier, Kerstin C; Cramer, Patrick; Gerland, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    To quantify gene regulation, a function is required that relates transcription factor binding to DNA (input) to the rate of mRNA synthesis from a target gene (output). Such a ‘gene regulation function’ (GRF) generally cannot be measured because the experimental titration of inputs and simultaneous readout of outputs is difficult. Here we show that GRFs may instead be inferred from natural changes in cellular gene expression, as exemplified for the cell cycle in the yeast S. cerevisiae. We develop this inference approach based on a time series of mRNA synthesis rates from a synchronized population of cells observed over three cell cycles. We first estimate the functional form of how input transcription factors determine mRNA output and then derive GRFs for target genes in the CLB2 gene cluster that are expressed during G2/M phase. Systematic analysis of additional GRFs suggests a network architecture that rationalizes transcriptional cell cycle oscillations. We find that a transcription factor network alone can produce oscillations in mRNA expression, but that additional input from cyclin oscillations is required to arrive at the native behaviour of the cell cycle oscillator. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12188.001 PMID:27652904

  8. The regulation of gene expression in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Allen F; Ikeda, Ryoukichi; Masuda, Masatsugu

    2015-11-01

    No genes have been discovered for which expression is limited only to inner ear hair cells. This is hardly surprising, since the number of mammalian genes is estimated to be 20-25,000, and each gene typically performs many tasks in various locations. Many genes are expressed in inner ear sensory cells and not in other cells of the labyrinth. However, these genes are also expressed in other locations, often in other sensory or neuronal cell types. How gene transcription is directed specifically to hair cells is unclear. Key transcription factors that act during development can specify cell phenotypes, and the hair cell is no exception. The transcription factor ATOH1 is well known for its ability to transform nonsensory cells of the developing inner ear into hair cells. And yet, ATOH1 also specifies different sensory cells at other locations, neuronal phenotypes in the brain, and epithelial cells in the gut. How it specifies hair cells in the inner ear, but alternate cell types in other locations, is not known. Studies of regulatory DNA and transcription factors are revealing mechanisms that direct gene expression to hair cells, and that determine the hair cell identity. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is known about such gene regulation in this key auditory and vestibular cell type.

  9. Transcriptome profiling reveals roles of meristem regulators and polarity genes during fruit trichome development in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunhua; Liu, Meiling; Jiang, Li; Liu, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Jianyu; Yan, Shuangshuang; Yang, Sen; Ren, Huazhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    Trichomes are epidermal hair-like structures that function in plant defence against biotic and abiotic stresses. Extensive studies have been performed on foliar trichomes development in Arabidopsis and tomato, but the molecular mechanism of fruit trichome formation remains elusive. Cucumber fruit is covered with trichomes (spines) that directly affect the appearance and quality of cucumber products. Here, we characterized the fruit spine development in wild-type (WT) cucumber and a spontaneous mutant, tiny branched hair (tbh). Our data showed that the cucumber trichome was multicellular and non-glandular, with malformed organelles and no endoreduplication. Fruit spine development was generally homogenous and marked by a rapid base expansion stage. Trichomes in the tbh mutant were tiny and branched, with increased density and aberrant cell shape. Transcriptome profiling indicated that meristem-related genes were highly enriched in the upregulated genes in the tbh versus the WT, as well as in WT spines after versus before base expansion, and that polarity regulators were greatly induced during spine base expansion. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR and in situ hybridization confirmed the differential expression of CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON3 (CUC3) and SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) during spine development. Therefore, cucumber trichomes are morphologically different from those of Arabidopsis and tomato, and their development may be regulated by a distinct pathway involving meristem genes and polarity regulators. PMID:24962999

  10. Transcriptome profiling reveals roles of meristem regulators and polarity genes during fruit trichome development in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhua; Liu, Meiling; Jiang, Li; Liu, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Jianyu; Yan, Shuangshuang; Yang, Sen; Ren, Huazhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2014-09-01

    Trichomes are epidermal hair-like structures that function in plant defence against biotic and abiotic stresses. Extensive studies have been performed on foliar trichomes development in Arabidopsis and tomato, but the molecular mechanism of fruit trichome formation remains elusive. Cucumber fruit is covered with trichomes (spines) that directly affect the appearance and quality of cucumber products. Here, we characterized the fruit spine development in wild-type (WT) cucumber and a spontaneous mutant, tiny branched hair (tbh). Our data showed that the cucumber trichome was multicellular and non-glandular, with malformed organelles and no endoreduplication. Fruit spine development was generally homogenous and marked by a rapid base expansion stage. Trichomes in the tbh mutant were tiny and branched, with increased density and aberrant cell shape. Transcriptome profiling indicated that meristem-related genes were highly enriched in the upregulated genes in the tbh versus the WT, as well as in WT spines after versus before base expansion, and that polarity regulators were greatly induced during spine base expansion. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR and in situ hybridization confirmed the differential expression of CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON3 (CUC3) and SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) during spine development. Therefore, cucumber trichomes are morphologically different from those of Arabidopsis and tomato, and their development may be regulated by a distinct pathway involving meristem genes and polarity regulators.

  11. [Comparative investigation of structural and gene somatic mutations in workers of nuclear chemical plants. I. A study of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations].

    PubMed

    Sevan'kaev, A V; Shkavrova, T G; Potetnia, O I; Mikhaĭlova, G F; Tsepenko, V V; Golub, E V; Khvostunov, I K; Saenko, A S; Gasteva, G N; Nugis, V Iu; Molokanov, A A

    2005-01-01

    A study of frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in 50 workers of nuclear chemical plants in remote period after beginning or finishing professional contact with ionizing radiation was carried out. 14 persons from this cohort were mainly whole-body exposed to external gamma-rays and 36 were exposed to combined external and internal radiation from incorporated Pu nuclides. In results of this irradiating practically every subject had a chronical radiation sickness. In the 1-st group the frequency of unstable aberrations varied from 0.2 to 3.6 per 100 cells and exceeded reliably control level in 5 persons. In the 2-nd group the frequency of unstable aberrations varied from 0 to 11.6 per 100 cells and exceeded reliably control level in 20 examined workers. The FISH study of frequency of stable aberrations was performed in 13 subjects who were exposed to combined external and internal radiation. Total frequency of complete and incomplete translocations varied from 0.6 to 18.5 aberrations per genome per 100 cells and reliable exceeded control level in 9 subjects. Non-random participation in exchange rearrangements (translocations) was revealed for used set of chromosomes (2, 3 and 8).

  12. PIAS1 Regulates Breast Tumorigenesis through Selective Epigenetic Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Tahk, Samuel; Yee, Kathleen M.; Yang, Randy; Yang, Yonghui; Mackie, Ryan; Hsu, Cary; Chernishof, Vasili; O'Brien, Neil; Jin, Yusheng; Fan, Guoping; Lane, Timothy F.; Rao, Jianyu; Slamon, Dennis; Shuai, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing by histone modifications and DNA methylation is essential for cancer development. The molecular mechanism that promotes selective epigenetic changes during tumorigenesis is not understood. We report here that the PIAS1 SUMO ligase is involved in the progression of breast tumorigenesis. Elevated PIAS1 expression was observed in breast tumor samples. PIAS1 knockdown in breast cancer cells reduced the subpopulation of tumor-initiating cells, and inhibited breast tumor growth in vivo. PIAS1 acts by delineating histone modifications and DNA methylation to silence the expression of a subset of clinically relevant genes, including breast cancer DNA methylation signature genes such as cyclin D2 and estrogen receptor, and breast tumor suppressor WNT5A. Our studies identify a novel epigenetic mechanism that regulates breast tumorigenesis through selective gene silencing. PMID:24586797

  13. From amplification to gene in thyroid cancer: A high-resolution mapped bacterial-artificial-chromosome resource for cancer chromosome aberrations guides gene discovery after comparative genome hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.N.; Gonsky, R.; Korenberg, J.R.; Knauf, J.A.; Fagin, J.A.; Chissoe, S.

    1998-08-01

    Chromosome rearrangements associated with neoplasms provide a rich resource for definition of the pathways of tumorigenesis. The power of comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to identify novel genes depends on the existence of suitable markers, which are lacking throughout most of the genome. The authors now report a general approach that translates CGH data into higher-resolution genomic-clone data that are then used to define the genes located in aneuploid regions. They used CGH to study 33 thyroid-tumor DNAs and two tumor-cell-line DNAs. The results revealed amplifications of chromosome band 2p21, with less-intense amplification on 2p13, 19q13.1, and 1p36 and with least-intense amplification on 1p34, 1q42, 5q31, 5q33-34, 9q32-34, and 14q32. To define the 2p21 region amplified, a dense array of 373 FISH-mapped chromosome 2 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) was constructed, and 87 of these were hybridized to a tumor-cell line. Four BACs carried genomic DNA that was amplified in these cells. The maximum amplified region was narrowed to 3--6 Mb by multicolor FISH with the flanking BACs, and the minimum amplicon size was defined by a contig of 420 kb. Sequence analysis of the amplified BAC 1D9 revealed a fragment of the gene, encoding protein kinase C epsilon (PKC{epsilon}), that was then shown to be amplified and rearranged in tumor cells. In summary, CGH combined with a dense mapped resource of BACs and large-scale sequencing has led directly to the definition of PKC{epsilon} as a previously unmapped candidate gene involved in thyroid tumorigenesis.

  14. The LexA regulated genes of the Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The SOS response including two main proteins LexA and RecA, maintains the integrity of bacterial genomes after DNA damage due to metabolic or environmental assaults. Additionally, derepression of LexA-regulated genes can result in mutations, genetic exchange and expression of virulence factors. Here we describe the first comprehensive description of the in silico LexA regulon in Clostridium difficile, an important human pathogen. Results We grouped thirty C. difficile strains from different ribotypes and toxinotypes into three clusters according to lexA gene/protein variability. We applied in silico analysis coupled to surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) and determined 16 LexA binding sites in C. difficile. Our data indicate that strains within the cluster, as defined by LexA variability, harbour several specific LexA regulon genes. In addition to core SOS genes: lexA, recA, ruvCA and uvrBA, we identified a LexA binding site on the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) and in the putative promoter region of several genes involved in housekeeping, sporulation and antibiotic resistance. Conclusions Results presented here suggest that in C. difficile LexA is not merely a regulator of the DNA damage response genes but also controls the expression of dozen genes involved in various other biological functions. Our in vitro results indicate that in C. difficile inactivation of LexA repressor depends on repressor`s dissociation from the operators. We report that the repressor`s dissociation rates from operators differentiate, thus the determined LexA-DNA dissociation constants imply on the timing of SOS gene expression in C. difficile. PMID:24713082

  15. Intron retention-dependent gene regulation in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hilarion, Sara; Paulet, Damien; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Hon, Chung-Chau; Lechat, Pierre; Mogensen, Estelle; Moyrand, Frédérique; Proux, Caroline; Barboux, Rony; Bussotti, Giovanni; Hwang, Jungwook; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Janbon, Guilhem

    2016-01-01

    The biological impact of alternative splicing is poorly understood in fungi, although recent studies have shown that these microorganisms are usually intron-rich. In this study, we re-annotated the genome of C. neoformans var. neoformans using RNA-Seq data. Comparison with C. neoformans var. grubii revealed that more than 99% of ORF-introns are in the same exact position in the two varieties whereas UTR-introns are much less evolutionary conserved. We also confirmed that alternative splicing is very common in C. neoformans, affecting nearly all expressed genes. We also observed specific regulation of alternative splicing by environmental cues in this yeast. However, alternative splicing does not appear to be an efficient method to diversify the C. neoformans proteome. Instead, our data suggest the existence of an intron retention-dependent mechanism of gene expression regulation that is not dependent on NMD. This regulatory process represents an additional layer of gene expression regulation in fungi and provides a mechanism to tune gene expression levels in response to any environmental modification. PMID:27577684

  16. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  17. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  18. Intron retention-dependent gene regulation in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hilarion, Sara; Paulet, Damien; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Hon, Chung-Chau; Lechat, Pierre; Mogensen, Estelle; Moyrand, Frédérique; Proux, Caroline; Barboux, Rony; Bussotti, Giovanni; Hwang, Jungwook; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Janbon, Guilhem

    2016-01-01

    The biological impact of alternative splicing is poorly understood in fungi, although recent studies have shown that these microorganisms are usually intron-rich. In this study, we re-annotated the genome of C. neoformans var. neoformans using RNA-Seq data. Comparison with C. neoformans var. grubii revealed that more than 99% of ORF-introns are in the same exact position in the two varieties whereas UTR-introns are much less evolutionary conserved. We also confirmed that alternative splicing is very common in C. neoformans, affecting nearly all expressed genes. We also observed specific regulation of alternative splicing by environmental cues in this yeast. However, alternative splicing does not appear to be an efficient method to diversify the C. neoformans proteome. Instead, our data suggest the existence of an intron retention-dependent mechanism of gene expression regulation that is not dependent on NMD. This regulatory process represents an additional layer of gene expression regulation in fungi and provides a mechanism to tune gene expression levels in response to any environmental modification. PMID:27577684

  19. Combinatorial gene regulation by modulation of relative pulse timing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Sohn, Chang Ho; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Cai, Long; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of individual living cells have revealed that many transcription factors activate in dynamic, and often stochastic, pulses within the same cell. However, it has remained unclear whether cells might modulate the relative timing of these pulses to control gene expression. Here, using quantitative single-cell time-lapse imaging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the pulsatile transcription factors Msn2 and Mig1 combinatorially regulate their target genes through modulation of their relative pulse timing. The activator Msn2 and repressor Mig1 pulsed in either a temporally overlapping or non-overlapping manner during their transient response to different inputs, with only the non-overlapping dynamics efficiently activating target gene expression. Similarly, under constant environmental conditions, where Msn2 and Mig1 exhibit sporadic pulsing, glucose concentration modulated the temporal overlap between pulses of the two factors. Together, these results reveal a time-based mode of combinatorial gene regulation. Regulation through relative signal timing is common in engineering and neurobiology, and these results suggest that it could also function broadly within the signaling and regulatory systems of the cell. PMID:26466562

  20. Reconstructing a network of stress-response regulators via dynamic system modeling of gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2008-02-10

    Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs) that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene's expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA) to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specific stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably sufficient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  1. Tight junctions and the regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Balda, Maria S; Matter, Karl

    2009-04-01

    Cell adhesion is a key regulator of cell differentiation. Cell interactions with neighboring cells and the extracellular matrix regulate gene expression, cell proliferation, polarity and apoptosis. Apical cell-cell junctions participate in these processes using different types of proteins, some of them exhibit nuclear and junctional localization and are called NACos for Nuclear Adhesion Complexes. Tight junctions are one type of such cell-cell junctions and several signaling complexes have been identified to associate with them. In general, expression of tight junction components suppresses proliferation to allow differentiation in a coordinated manner with adherens junctions and extracellular matrix adhesion. These tight junction components have been shown to affect several signaling and transcriptional pathways, and changes in the expression of tight junction proteins are associated with several disease conditions, such as cancer. Here, we will review how tight junction proteins participate in the regulation of gene expression and cell proliferation, as well as how they are regulated themselves by different mechanisms involved in gene expression and cell differentiation.

  2. Regulation of icaR gene expression in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Kevin M; Humphreys, Hilary; O'Gara, James P

    2002-11-01

    LightCycler and conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to examine regulation of icaR, which encodes a repressor of the Staphylococcus epidermidis ica operon. Varying concentrations of NaCl and ethanol activated ica but only high levels of both compounds repressed icaR transcription. Activation of ica by subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline, which was strain-dependent, was also associated with icaR repression. In an ICAR::Em mutant, NaCl but not ethanol activated ica whereas both compounds repressed icaR expression indicating that environmental regulation of the icaR gene is IcaR-independent. Apparently ethanol signals exclusively through IcaR to activate ica and regulates IcaR at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. NaCl also regulates icaR expression but in addition can activate ica via an icaR-independent pathway.

  3. Regulation of icaR gene expression in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Kevin M; Humphreys, Hilary; O'Gara, James P

    2002-11-01

    LightCycler and conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to examine regulation of icaR, which encodes a repressor of the Staphylococcus epidermidis ica operon. Varying concentrations of NaCl and ethanol activated ica but only high levels of both compounds repressed icaR transcription. Activation of ica by subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline, which was strain-dependent, was also associated with icaR repression. In an ICAR::Em mutant, NaCl but not ethanol activated ica whereas both compounds repressed icaR expression indicating that environmental regulation of the icaR gene is IcaR-independent. Apparently ethanol signals exclusively through IcaR to activate ica and regulates IcaR at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. NaCl also regulates icaR expression but in addition can activate ica via an icaR-independent pathway. PMID:12435499

  4. Carbon Catabolite Repression Regulates Glyoxylate Cycle Gene Expression in Cucumber.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, I. A.; Denby, K. J.; Leaver, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously proposed that metabolic status is important in the regulation of cucumber malate synthase (MS) and isocitrate lyase (ICL) gene expression during plant development. In this article, we used a cell culture system to demonstrate that intracellular metabolic status does influence expression of both of these genes. Starvation of cucumber cell cultures resulted in the coordinate induction of the expression of MS and ICL genes, and this effect was reversed when sucrose was returned to the culture media. The induction of gene expression was closely correlated with a drop in intracellular sucrose, glucose, and fructose below threshold concentrations, but it was not correlated with a decrease in respiration rate. Glucose, fructose, or raffinose in the culture media also resulted in repression of MS and ICL. Both 2-deoxyglucose and mannose, which are phosphorylated by hexokinase but not further metabolized, specifically repressed MS and ICL gene expression relative to a third glyoxylate cycle gene, malate dehydrogenase. However, the addition of 3-methylglucose, an analog of glucose that is not phosphorylated, did not result in repression of either MS or ICL. It is proposed that the signal giving rise to a change in gene expression originates from the intracellular concentration of hexose sugars or the flux of hexose sugars into glycolysis. PMID:12244257

  5. Structure and regulation of the murine gamma-casein gene.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Andreas F

    2002-12-12

    The murine casein locus consists of five genes, which are coordinately regulated during mammary development. The levels of casein-specific mRNAs in mammary epithelial cells increase during the second half of pregnancy and remain high during lactation. The murine gamma-casein gene, which corresponds to the alphaS2-casein gene in ruminants, was isolated from a mouse bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library (strain 129SV). The gene contains 14 exons, which are distributed over 14 kb of DNA sequence. The expression pattern of the murine gamma-casein gene mimics that of the neighbouring beta-casein gene in terms of developmental induction in vivo. In cell culture, both the beta- and gamma-casein promoter are synergistically induced by prolactin and glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid induction is critically dependent on prolactin-mediated activation of STAT5 in both promoters. Several consensus STAT5 binding sites were identified in the gamma-casein promoter, some of which may have an additive effect on prolactin induction. mRNA levels of gamma- and beta-casein are similar in lactating mammary tissue. However, promoter segments derived from the gamma-casein gene are significantly less active in cell culture than comparable fragments of the beta-casein promoter. Promoter hybrids between the gamma- and beta-casein promoters revealed that the critical sequences which are responsible for the different in vitro activity are located in a short promoter proximal region.

  6. Complex structure and regulation of the ABP/SHBG gene.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D R; Sullivan, P M; Wang, Y M; Millhorn, D E; Bayliss, D M

    1991-01-01

    Extracellular androgen-binding proteins (ABPs) are thought to modulate the regulatory functions of androgens and the trans-acting nuclear androgen receptor. Testicular ABP and plasma sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which is produced in the liver, are encoded by the same gene. We report here that the ABP/SHBG gene is also expressed in fetal rat liver and adult brain. Immunoreactive ABP was localized in the brain and fetal liver and mRNAs were identified in both tissues by northern blot hybridization. Analysis of brain and fetal liver cDNA clones revealed alternatively processed RNAs with sequence characteristics suggesting the encoded proteins could act as competitors of ABP/SHBG binding to cell surface receptors. One cDNA represented a fused transcript of the ABP/SHBG gene and the histidine decarboxylase gene that was apparently formed by a trans-splicing process. Gene sequencing experiments indicate that tissue-specific ABP/SHBG gene promoter-enhancer elements are utilized in testis, brain and fetal liver. These data demonstrate that the structure, RNA transcript processing and likely regulation of the ABP/SHBG gene are very complex. PMID:1958575

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of YWHAZ, the Gene Encoding 14-3-3ζ

    PubMed Central

    Kasinski, Andrea; Dong, Xueyuan; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Boss, Jeremy; Fu, Haian

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant expression of oncogenic 14-3-3 proteins is correlated with poor survival of cancer patients. While the underlying mechanism of the abnormal expression in tumors remains elusive for the six oncogenic 14-3-3 isoforms; the potential involvement of a transcriptional component has been suggested. Unfortunately, little experimental data has been reported to support this hypothesis. In this study we describe the genetic structure of YWHAZ, the gene encoding 14-3-3ζ, including the identification of previously unreported transcript variants. In total, five transcript variants were revealed and their expressions confirmed in a panel of cell lines. Expressed sequence tag (EST) database mining and in vitro rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) confirmed that one variant, 1c, represents >80% of the expressed transcripts, which is also the most efficiently translated. An analysis of the proximal promoter of this variant revealed a functional Cyclic-AMP Response Element (CRE). Factors that bound to the CRE element were recognized through fractionation and subsequent EMSAs. This analysis identified CREB and ATF-1 as the trans-interacting factors. Cell-based assays confirm that ATF-1, and to a lesser extent CREB, bind the endogenous YWHAZ promoter especially under TNF-α stimulating conditions. In support of a role of ATF-1 in the regulation of YWHAZ, silencing of ATF-1 resulted in a marked reduction in two of the five YWHAZ transcripts. These data suggest a novel mechanism for the transcriptional regulation of a major pro-survival gene, YWHAZ, by ATF-1. PMID:24690670

  8. Common genes regulate food and ethanol intake in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Morgan L; Lamina, Omoteniola; Hogan, Kerry E; Kliethermes, Christopher L

    2016-06-01

    The abuse liability of alcohol (ethanol) is believed to result in part from its actions on neurobiological substrates that underlie the motivation toward food and other natural reinforcers, and a growing body of evidence indicates that these substrates are broadly conserved among animal phyla. Understanding the extent to which the substrates regulating ethanol and food intake overlap is an important step toward developing therapeutics that selectively reduce ethanol intake. In the current experiments, we measured food and ethanol intake in Recombinant Inbred (RI) lines of Drosophila melanogaster using several assays, and then calculated genetic correlations to estimate the degree to which common genes might underlie behavior in these assays. We found that food intake and ethanol intake as measured in the capillary assay are genetically correlated traits in D. melanogaster, as well as in a panel of 11 Drosophila species that we tested subsequently. RI line differences in food intake in a dyed food assay were genetically unrelated to ethanol intake in the capillary assay or to ethanol preference measured using an olfactory trap apparatus. Using publicly available gene expression data, we found that expression profiles across the RI lines of a number of genes (including the D2-like dopamine receptor, DOPA decarboxylase, and fruitless) correlated with the RI line differences in food and ethanol intake we measured, while the expression profiles of other genes, including NPF, and the NPF and 5-HT2 receptors, correlated only with ethanol intake or preference. Our results suggest that food and ethanol intake are regulated by some common genes in Drosophila, but that other genes regulate ethanol intake independently of food intake. These results have implications toward the development of therapeutics that preferentially reduce ethanol intake. PMID:27286934

  9. Cloning and regulation of the rat mdr2 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P C; Thorgeirsson, S S; Silverman, J A

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned the complete cDNA encoding the rat mdr2 gene by a combination of library screening and the polymerase chain reaction. The sequence of rat mdr2 cDNA is highly similar to other members of the mdr gene family but the initiation of transcription, tissue distribution and regulation of expression of rat mdr2 diverge from the other isoforms. Primer extension analysis showed rat mdr2 mRNA to have a major transcription start point at -277 and a minor one at approximately -518. We constructed gene specific probes for rat mdr2 and mdr1b and compared the expression patterns of these two genes. The highest expression of mdr2 mRNA was in the muscle, heart, liver and spleen. Both mdr2 and 1b mRNA levels were elevated in the livers of rats treated with CCl4 or following partial hepatectomies although the time course of induction of each gene differed. Mdr1b increased by 12 to 24 hours while mdr2 did not increase until 48 hours. Treatment of isolated hepatocytes or RC3 cells with cycloheximide did not effect mdr2 mRNA. In contrast, mdr1b expression was increased. These data suggest that rat mdr2, unlike mdr1b, is not regulated by a negative trans-acting protein factor. Images PMID:8103593

  10. Epigenetic aberrations and therapeutic implications in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Atsushi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ito, Motokazu; Motomura, Kazuya; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Jun

    2010-06-01

    Almost all cancer cells have multiple epigenetic abnormalities, which combine with genetic changes to affect many cellular processes, including cell proliferation and invasion, by silencing tumor-suppressor genes. In this review, we focus on the epigenetic mechanisms of DNA hypomethylation and CpG island hypermethylation in gliomas. Aberrant hypermethylation in promoter CpG islands has been recognized as a key mechanism involved in the silencing of cancer-associated genes and occurs at genes with diverse functions related to tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Such promoter hypermethylation can modulate the sensitivity of glioblastomas to drugs and radiotherapy. As an example, the methylation of the O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is a specific predictive biomarker of tumor responsiveness to chemotherapy with alkylating agents. Further, we reviewed reports on pyrosequencing - a simple technique for the accurate and quantitative analysis of DNA methylation. We believe that the quantification of MGMT methylation by pyrosequencing might enable the selection of patients who are most likely to benefit from chemotherapy. Finally, we also evaluated the potential of de novo NY-ESO-1, the most immunogenic cancer/testis antigen (CTA) discovered thus far, as an immunotherapy target. The use of potent epigenetics-based therapy for cancer cells might restore the abnormally regulated epigenomes to a more normal state through epigenetic reprogramming. Thus, epigenetic therapy may be a promising and potent treatment for human neoplasia.

  11. SNHG16 is regulated by the Wnt pathway in colorectal cancer and affects genes involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; True, Kirsten; Hamilton, Mark P; Nielsen, Morten M; Damas, Nkerorema D; Damgaard, Christian K; Ongen, Halit; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Bramsen, Jesper B; Pedersen, Jakob S; Lund, Anders H; Vang, Søren; Stribolt, Katrine; Madsen, Mogens R; Laurberg, Søren; McGuire, Sean E; Ørntoft, Torben F; Andersen, Claus L

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer where they have been shown to act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. RNA profiling of 314 colorectal adenomas/adenocarcinomas and 292 adjacent normal colon mucosa samples using RNA-sequencing demonstrated that the snoRNA host gene 16 (SNHG16) is significantly up-regulated in adenomas and all stages of CRC. SNHG16 expression was positively correlated to the expression of Wnt-regulated transcription factors, including ASCL2, ETS2, and c-Myc. In vitro abrogation of Wnt signaling in CRC cells reduced the expression of SNHG16 indicating that SNHG16 is regulated by the Wnt pathway. Silencing of SNHG16 resulted in reduced viability, increased apoptotic cell death and impaired cell migration. The SNHG16 silencing particularly affected expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. A connection between SNHG16 and genes involved in lipid metabolism was also observed in clinical tumors. Argonaute CrossLinking and ImmunoPrecipitation (AGO-CLIP) demonstrated that SNHG16 heavily binds AGO and has 27 AGO/miRNA target sites along its length, indicating that SNHG16 may act as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) "sponging" miRNAs off their cognate targets. Most interestingly, half of the miRNA families with high confidence targets on SNHG16 also target the 3'UTR of Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase (SCD). SCD is involved in lipid metabolism and is down-regulated upon SNHG16 silencing. In conclusion, up-regulation of SNHG16 is a frequent event in CRC, likely caused by deregulated Wnt signaling. In vitro analyses demonstrate that SNHG16 may play an oncogenic role in CRC and that it affects genes involved in lipid metabolism, possible through ceRNA related mechanisms.

  12. Irx7, a Smarca4-regulated gene for retinal differentiation, regulates other genes controlled by Smarca4 in zebrafish retinas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqing; Bonilla, Sylvia; Chong, Leelyn; Leung, Yuk Fai

    2013-01-01

    The iroquois 7 (irx7) in zebrafish encodes a homeodomain transcription factor (TF) in the retinal differentiation network regulated by smarca4, a component of chromatin remodeling complex. The function of Irx7 on retinal development has recently been revealed by antisense morpholino knockdown experiments. In particular, the normal expression of irx7 in the inner nuclear layer (INL) is essential for the differentiation of cells in the INL and the outer nuclear layer (ONL), as well as the dendritic projection of GCs into the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Irx7 also exerts its effect on retinal differentiation through activating the expression of TFs that specify various retinal cell types. However, the relationship between irx7 and the other Smarca4-regulated genes for retinal differentiation was not clear. This study reports an investigation of the regulatory role of irx7 on 13 genes including aanat2, barhl2, bhlhe22, cdh11, ckmt1, gnat1, irx4a, ndrg1a, nme2l, pbx1a, rcv1, robo2 and tfap2a. These genes were originally used in a study that characterized the cellular expression pattern of Smarca4-regulated genes and had a diverse expression pattern in the retina. Their expression in the normal wild-type (WT), Irx7-knockdown and the injection control embryos was characterized by in situ hybridization at 52h post-fertilization (hpf). This is the stage when irx7's expression level is the highest in the developing retinas. The results indicate that the expression of 11 of the 13 genes was reduced and one was overexpressed in the Irx7-knockdown retinas. Consistent with a previous report, one of these 13 genes was not expressed in the retina. Among the 12 Irx7-regulated genes, 11 had an expression change in the Irx7-knockdown retinas similar to that in the smarca4 retinas, indicating that Smarca4 regulates the expression of these 11 genes at least in part through irx7. Interestingly, bhlhe22 was only over-expressed in the Irx7-knockdown but not the smarca4 retinas. These

  13. Genes regulated by AoXlnR, the xylanolytic and cellulolytic transcriptional regulator, in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yuji; Sano, Motoaki; Kanamaru, Kyoko; Ko, Taro; Takeuchi, Michio; Kato, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2009-11-01

    XlnR is a Zn(II)2Cys6 transcriptional activator of xylanolytic and cellulolytic genes in Aspergillus. Overexpression of the aoxlnR gene in Aspergillus oryzae (A. oryzae xlnR gene) resulted in elevated xylanolytic and cellulolytic activities in the culture supernatant, in which nearly 40 secreted proteins were detected by two-dimensional electrophoresis. DNA microarray analysis to identify the transcriptional targets of AoXlnR led to the identification of 75 genes that showed more than fivefold increase in their expression in the AoXlnR overproducer than in the disruptant. Of these, 32 genes were predicted to encode a glycoside hydrolase, highlighting the biotechnological importance of AoXlnR in biomass degradation. The 75 genes included the genes previously identified as AoXlnR targets (xynF1, xynF3, xynG2, xylA, celA, celB, celC, and celD). Thirty-six genes were predicted to be extracellular, which was consistent with the number of proteins secreted, and 61 genes possessed putative XlnR-binding sites (5'-GGCTAA-3', 5'-GGCTAG-3', and 5'-GGCTGA-3') in their promoter regions. Functional annotation of the genes revealed that AoXlnR regulated the expression of hydrolytic genes for degradation of beta-1,4-xylan, arabinoxylan, cellulose, and xyloglucan and of catabolic genes for the conversion of D-xylose to xylulose-5-phosphate. In addition, genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase and L-arabinitol-4- dehydrogenase involved in D-glucose and L-arabinose catabolism also appeared to be targets of AoXlnR.

  14. The uteroglobin gene region: hormonal regulation, repetitive elements and complete nucleotide sequence of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Suske, G; Wenz, M; Cato, A C; Beato, M

    1983-01-01

    Differential uteroglobin induction represents an appropriate model for the molecular analysis of the mechanism by which steroid hormones control gene expression in mammals. We have analyzed the structure and hormonal regulation of a 35 Kb region of genomic DNA in which the uteroglobin gene is located. The complete sequence of 3,700 nucleotides including the uteroglobin gene and its flanking regions has been determined, and the limits of the gene established by S1 nuclease mapping. Several regions containing repeated sequences were mapped by blot hybridization, one of which is located within the large intron in the uteroglobin gene. Analysis of the RNAs extracted from endometrium, lung and liver, after treatment with estrogen and/or progesterone shows that within the 35 Kb region, the uteroglobin gene is the only DNA segment whose transcription into stable RNA is induced by progesterone. Images PMID:6304644

  15. Zebrafish rest regulates developmental gene expression but not neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kok, Fatma O; Taibi, Andrew; Wanner, Sarah J; Xie, Xiayang; Moravec, Cara E; Love, Crystal E; Prince, Victoria E; Mumm, Jeff S; Sirotkin, Howard I

    2012-10-01

    The transcriptional repressor Rest (Nrsf) recruits chromatin-modifying complexes to RE1 'silencer elements', which are associated with hundreds of neural genes. However, the requirement for Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation of embryonic development and cell fate is poorly understood. Conflicting views of the role of Rest in controlling cell fate have emerged from recent studies. To address these controversies, we examined the developmental requirement for Rest in zebrafish using zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene targeting. We discovered that germ layer specification progresses normally in rest mutants despite derepression of target genes during embryogenesis. This analysis provides the first evidence that maternal rest is essential for repression of target genes during blastula stages. Surprisingly, neurogenesis proceeds largely normally in rest mutants, although abnormalities are observed within the nervous system, including defects in oligodendrocyte precursor cell development and a partial loss of facial branchiomotor neuron migration. Mutants progress normally through embryogenesis but many die as larvae (after 12 days). However, some homozygotes reach adulthood and are viable. We utilized an RE1/NRSE transgenic reporter system to dynamically monitor Rest activity. This analysis revealed that Rest is required to repress gene expression in mesodermal derivatives including muscle and notochord, as well as within the nervous system. Finally, we demonstrated that Rest is required for long-term repression of target genes in non-neural tissues in adult zebrafish. Our results point to a broad role for Rest in fine-tuning neural gene expression, rather than as a widespread regulator of neurogenesis or cell fate. PMID:22951640

  16. Regulation of the protocadherin Celsr3 gene and its role in globus pallidus development and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhilian; Guo, Ya; Tang, Yuanxiao; Xu, Quan; Li, Baojie; Wu, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The globus pallidus (GP) is a central component of basal ganglia whose malfunctions cause a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders as well as cognitive impairments in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Here we report that the protocadherin gene Celsr3 is regulated by the insulator CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and the repressor neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF, also known as REST) and is required for the development and connectivity of GP. Specifically, CTCF/cohesin and NRSF inhibit the expression of Celsr3 through specific binding to its promoter. In addition, we found that the Celsr3 promoter interacts with CTCF/cohesin-occupied neighboring promoters. In Celsr3 knockout mice, we found that the ventral GP is occupied by aberrant calbindin-positive cholinergic neurons ectopic from the nucleus basalis of Meynert. Furthermore, the guidepost cells for thalamocortical axonal development are missing in the caudal GP. Finally, axonal connections of GP with striatum, subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and raphe are compromised. These data reveal the essential role of Celsr3 in GP development in the basal forebrain and shed light on the mechanisms of the axonal defects caused by the Celsr3 deletion. PMID:25113559

  17. Regulation of the Protocadherin Celsr3 Gene and Its Role in Globus Pallidus Development and Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhilian; Guo, Ya; Tang, Yuanxiao; Xu, Quan; Li, Baojie

    2014-01-01

    The globus pallidus (GP) is a central component of basal ganglia whose malfunctions cause a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders as well as cognitive impairments in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Here we report that the protocadherin gene Celsr3 is regulated by the insulator CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and the repressor neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF, also known as REST) and is required for the development and connectivity of GP. Specifically, CTCF/cohesin and NRSF inhibit the expression of Celsr3 through specific binding to its promoter. In addition, we found that the Celsr3 promoter interacts with CTCF/cohesin-occupied neighboring promoters. In Celsr3 knockout mice, we found that the ventral GP is occupied by aberrant calbindin-positive cholinergic neurons ectopic from the nucleus basalis of Meynert. Furthermore, the guidepost cells for thalamocortical axonal development are missing in the caudal GP. Finally, axonal connections of GP with striatum, subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and raphe are compromised. These data reveal the essential role of Celsr3 in GP development in the basal forebrain and shed light on the mechanisms of the axonal defects caused by the Celsr3 deletion. PMID:25113559

  18. Using riboswitches to regulate gene expression and define gene function in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Van Vlack, Erik R; Seeliger, Jessica C

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria include both environmental species and many pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an intracellular pathogen that is the causative agent of tuberculosis in humans. Inducible gene expression is a powerful tool for examining gene function and essentiality, both in in vitro culture and in host cell infections. The theophylline-inducible artificial riboswitch has recently emerged as an alternative to protein repressor-based systems. The riboswitch is translationally regulated and is combined with a mycobacterial promoter that provides transcriptional control. We here provide methods used by our laboratory to characterize the riboswitch response to theophylline in reporter strains, recombinant organisms containing riboswitch-regulated endogenous genes, and in host cell infections. These protocols should facilitate the application of both existing and novel artificial riboswitches to the exploration of gene function in mycobacteria. PMID:25605389

  19. [Insect antimicrobial peptides: structures, properties and gene regulation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Peng; Lai, Ren

    2010-02-01

    Insect antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important group of insect innate immunity effectors. Insect AMPs are cationic and contain less than 100 amino acid residues. According to structure, insect AMPs can be divided into a limited number of families. The diverse antimicrobial spectrum of insect AMPs may indicate different modes of action. Research on the model organism Drosophila indicate that insect AMPs gene regulation involves multiple signaling pathways and a large number of signaling molecules.

  20. Abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of Arabidopsis SR protein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Tiago M D; Carvalho, Raquel F; Richardson, Dale N; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  1. Structure and regulation of the Asr gene family in banana.

    PubMed

    Henry, Isabelle M; Carpentier, Sebastien C; Pampurova, Suzana; Van Hoylandt, Anais; Panis, Bart; Swennen, Rony; Remy, Serge

    2011-10-01

    Abscisic acid, stress, ripening proteins (ASR) are a family of plant-specific small hydrophilic proteins. Studies in various plant species have highlighted their role in increased resistance to abiotic stress, including drought, but their specific function remains unknown. As a first step toward their potential use in crop improvement, we investigated the structure and regulation of the Asr gene family in Musa species (bananas and plantains). We determined that the Musa Asr gene family contained at least four members, all of which exhibited the typical two exons, one intron structure of Asr genes and the "ABA/WDS" (abscisic acid/water deficit stress) domain characteristic of Asr genes. Phylogenetic analyses determined that the Musa Asr genes were closely related to each other, probably as the product of recent duplication events. For two of the four members, two versions corresponding to the two sub-genomes of Musa, acuminata and balbisiana were identified. Gene expression and protein analyses were performed and Asr expression could be detected in meristem cultures, root, pseudostem, leaf and cormus. In meristem cultures, mAsr1 and mAsr3 were induced by osmotic stress and wounding, while mAsr3 and mAsr4 were induced by exposure to ABA. mASR3 exhibited the most variation both in terms of amino acid sequence and expression pattern, making it the most promising candidate for further functional study and use in crop improvement. PMID:21630042

  2. Tools for regulated gene expression in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Rochaix, Jean-David; Surzycki, Raymond; Ramundo, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a very attractive model system for chloroplast genetic engineering. Algae can be transformed readily at the chloroplast level through bombardment of cells with a gene gun, and transformants can be selected using antibiotic resistance or phototrophic growth. An inducible chloroplast gene expression system could be very useful for several reasons. First, it could be used to elucidate the function of essential chloroplast genes required for cell growth and survival. Second, it could be very helpful for expressing proteins which are toxic to the algal cells. Third, it would allow for the reversible depletion of photosynthetic complexes thus making it possible to study their biogenesis in a controlled fashion. Fourth, it opens promising possibilities for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas. Here we describe an inducible/repressible chloroplast gene expression system in Chlamydomonas in which the copper-regulated Cyc6 promoter drives the expression of the nuclear Nac2 gene encoding a protein which is targeted to the chloroplast where it acts specifically on the chloroplast psbD 5'-untranslated region and is required for the stable accumulation of the psbD mRNA and photosystem II. The system can be used for any chloroplast gene or transgene by placing it under the control of the psbD 5'-untranslated region. PMID:24599871

  3. Genes regulating touch cell development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Du, H; Chalfie, M

    2001-01-01

    To identify genes regulating the development of the six touch receptor neurons, we screened the F(2) progeny of mutated animals expressing an integrated mec-2::gfp transgene that is expressed mainly in these touch cells. From 2638 mutated haploid genomes, we obtained 11 mutations representing 11 genes that affected the production, migration, or outgrowth of the touch cells. Eight of these mutations were in known genes, and 2 defined new genes (mig-21 and vab-15). The mig-21 mutation is the first known to affect the asymmetry of the migrations of Q neuroblasts, the cells that give rise to two of the six touch cells. vab-15 is a msh-like homeobox gene that appears to be needed for the proper production of touch cell precursors, since vab-15 animals lacked the four more posterior touch cells. The remaining touch cells (the ALM cells) were present but mispositioned. A similar touch cell phenotype is produced by mutations in lin-32. A more severe phenotype; i.e., animals often lacked ALM cells, was seen in lin-32 vab-15 double mutants, suggesting that these genes acted redundantly in ALM differentiation. In addition to the touch cell abnormalities, vab-15 animals variably exhibit embryonic or larval lethality, cell degenerations, malformation of the posterior body, uncoordinated movement, and defective egg laying. PMID:11333230

  4. Abscisic Acid (ABA) Regulation of Arabidopsis SR Protein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Tiago M. D.; Carvalho, Raquel F.; Richardson, Dale N.; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  5. Transcriptional regulation of genes related to progesterone production.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ishikane, Shin; Kawabe, Shinya; Umezawa, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones are synthesized from cholesterol in various tissues, mainly in the adrenal glands and gonads. Because these lipid-soluble steroid hormones immediately diffuse through the cells in which they are produced, their secretion directly reflects the activity of the genes related to their production. Progesterone is important not only for luteinization and maintenance of pregnancy, but also as a substrate for most other steroids. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerase (3β-HSD) are well-known proteins essential for progesterone production. In addition to them, glutathione S-transferase A1-1 and A3-3 are shown to exert Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerization activity to produce progesterone in a cooperative fashion with 3β-HSD. 5-Aminolevulinic acid synthase 1, ferredoxin 1, and ferredoxin reductase also play a role in steroidogenesis as accessory factors. Members of the nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) family (steroidogenic factor 1 and liver receptor homolog 1) play a crucial role in the transcriptional regulation of these genes. The NR5A family activates these genes by binding to NR5A responsive elements present within their promoter regions, as well as to the elements far from their promoters. In addition, various NR5A-interacting proteins including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (DAX-1), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) are involved in the transcription of NR5A target genes and regulate the transcription either positively or negatively under both basal and tropic hormone-stimulated conditions. In this review, we describe the transcriptional regulation of genes related to progesterone production. PMID:26135521

  6. mRNA modifications: Dynamic regulators of gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of a gene is a tightly regulated process and is exerted by a myriad of different mechanisms. Recently, RNA modifications located in coding sequences of mRNAs, have been identified as potential regulators of gene expression. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C), pseudouridine (Ψ) and N1-methyladenosine (m1A) have been found within open reading frames of mRNAs. The presence of these mRNA modifications has been implicated to modulate the fate of an mRNA, ranging from maturation to its translation and even degradation. However, many aspects concerning the biological functions of mRNA modifications remain elusive. Recently, systematic in vitro studies allowed a first glimpse of the direct interplay of mRNA modifications and the efficiency and fidelity of ribosomal translation. It thereby became evident that the effects of mRNA modifications were, astonishingly versatile, depending on the type, position or sequence context. The incorporation of a single modification could either prematurely terminate protein synthesis, reduce the peptide yield or alter the amino acid sequence identity. These results implicate that mRNA modifications are a powerful mechanism to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. PMID:27351916

  7. Inducible gene expression and environmentally regulated genes in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kok, J

    1996-10-01

    Relatively recently, a number of genes and operons have been identified in lactic acid bacteria that are inducible and respond to environmental factors. Some of these genes/operons had been isolated and analysed because of their importance in the fermentation industry and, consequently, their transcription was studied and found to be regulatable. Examples are the lactose operon, the operon for nisin production, and genes in the proteolytic pathway of Lactococcus lactis, as well as xylose metabolism in Lactobacillus pentosus. Some other operons were specifically targetted with the aim to compare their mode of regulation with known regulatory mechanisms in other well-studied bacteria. These studies, dealing with the biosynthesis of histidine, tryptophan, and of the branched chain amino acids in L. lactis, have given new insights in gene regulation and in the occurrence of auxotrophy in these bacteria. Also, nucleotide sequence analyses of a number of lactococcal bacteriophages was recently initiated to, among other things, specifically learn more about regulation of the phage life cycle. Yet another approach in the analysis of regulated genes is the 'random' selection of genetic elements that respond to environmental stimuli and the first of such sequences from lactic acid bacteria have been identified and characterized. The potential of these regulatory elements in fundamental research and practical (industrial) applications will be discussed.

  8. slo K+ channel gene regulation mediates rapid drug tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzi, Alfredo; Al-Hasan, Yazan M.; Larios, Leo E.; Bohm, Rudolf A.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2004-12-01

    Changes in neural activity caused by exposure to drugs may trigger homeostatic mechanisms that attempt to restore normal neural excitability. In Drosophila, a single sedation with the anesthetic benzyl alcohol changes the expression of the slo K+ channel gene and induces rapid drug tolerance. We demonstrate linkage between these two phenomena by using a mutation and a transgene. A mutation that eliminates slo expression prevents tolerance, whereas expression from an inducible slo transgene mimics tolerance in naïve animals. The behavioral response to benzyl alcohol can be separated into an initial phase of hyperkinesis and a subsequent phase of sedation. The hyperkinetic phase causes a drop in slo gene expression and makes animals more sensitive to benzyl alcohol. It is the sedative phase that stimulates slo gene expression and induces tolerance. We demonstrate that the expression level of slo is a predictor of drug sensitivity. drug abuse | potassium channel | transcription regulation

  9. Virulence Gene Regulation by l-Arabinose in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    López-Garrido, Javier; Puerta-Fernández, Elena; Cota, Ignacio; Casadesús, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of the intestinal epithelium is a critical step in Salmonella enterica infection and requires functions encoded in the gene cluster known as Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1). Expression of SPI-1 genes is repressed by l-arabinose, and not by other pentoses. Transport of l-arabinose is necessary to repress SPI-1; however, repression is independent of l-arabinose metabolism and of the l-arabinose-responsive regulator AraC. SPI-1 repression by l-arabinose is exerted at a single target, HilD, and the mechanism appears to be post-translational. As a consequence of SPI-1 repression, l-arabinose reduces translocation of SPI-1 effectors to epithelial cells and decreases Salmonella invasion in vitro. These observations reveal a hitherto unknown role of l-arabinose in gene expression control and raise the possibility that Salmonella may use L-arabinose as an environmental signal. PMID:25991823

  10. Methods and compositions for regulating gene expression in plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beachy, Roger N. (Inventor); Luis, Maria Isabel Ordiz (Inventor); Dai, Shunhong (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Novel chimeric plant promoter sequences are provided, together with plant gene expression cassettes comprising such sequences. In certain preferred embodiments, the chimeric plant promoters comprise the BoxII cis element and/or derivatives thereof. In addition, novel transcription factors are provided, together with nucleic acid sequences encoding such transcription factors and plant gene expression cassettes comprising such nucleic acid sequences. In certain preferred embodiments, the novel transcription factors comprise the acidic domain, or fragments thereof, of the RF2a transcription factor. Methods for using the chimeric plant promoter sequences and novel transcription factors in regulating the expression of at least one gene of interest are provided, together with transgenic plants comprising such chimeric plant promoter sequences and novel transcription factors.

  11. Virulence Gene Regulation by L-Arabinose in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    López-Garrido, Javier; Puerta-Fernández, Elena; Cota, Ignacio; Casadesús, Josep

    2015-07-01

    Invasion of the intestinal epithelium is a critical step in Salmonella enterica infection and requires functions encoded in the gene cluster known as Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1). Expression of SPI-1 genes is repressed by L-arabinose, and not by other pentoses. Transport of L-arabinose is necessary to repress SPI-1; however, repression is independent of L-arabinose metabolism and of the L-arabinose-responsive regulator AraC. SPI-1 repression by L-arabinose is exerted at a single target, HilD, and the mechanism appears to be post-translational. As a consequence of SPI-1 repression, l-arabinose reduces translocation of SPI-1 effectors to epithelial cells and decreases Salmonella invasion in vitro. These observations reveal a hitherto unknown role of L-arabinose in gene expression control and raise the possibility that Salmonella may use L-arabinose as an environmental signal.

  12. Globalisation reaches gene regulation: the case for vertebrate limb development.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Aimée

    2005-08-01

    Analysis of key regulators of vertebrate limb development has revealed that the cis-regulatory regions controlling their expression are often located several hundred kilobases upstream of the transcription units. These far up- or down-stream cis-regulatory regions tend to reside within rather large, functionally and structurally unrelated genes. Molecular analysis is beginning to reveal the complexity of these large genomic landscapes, which control the co-expression of clusters of diverse genes by this novel type of long-range and globally acting cis-regulatory region. An increasing number of spontaneous mutations in vertebrates, including humans, are being discovered inactivating or altering such global control regions. Thereby, the functions of a seemingly distant but essential gene are disrupted rather than the closest.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yta7 regulates histone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gradolatto, Angeline; Rogers, Richard S; Lavender, Heather; Taverna, Sean D; Allis, C David; Aitchison, John D; Tackett, Alan J

    2008-05-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yta7 protein is a component of a nucleosome bound protein complex that maintains distinct transcriptional zones of chromatin. We previously found that one protein copurifying with Yta7 is the yFACT member Spt16. Epistasis analyses revealed a link between Yta7, Spt16, and other previously identified members of the histone regulatory pathway. In concurrence, Yta7 was found to regulate histone gene transcription in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. Association at the histone gene loci appeared to occur through binding of the bromodomain-like region of Yta7 with the N-terminal tail of histone H3. Our work suggests a mechanism in which Yta7 is localized to chromatin to establish regions of transcriptional silencing, and that one facet of this cellular mechanism is to modulate transcription of histone genes.

  14. Gene regulation networks generate diverse pigmentation patterns in plants.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nick W; Davies, Kevin M; Schwinn, Kathy E

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of pigmentation patterns observed in plants occurs due to the spatial distribution and accumulation of colored compounds, which may also be associated with structural changes to the tissue. Anthocyanins are flavonoids that provide red/purple/blue coloration to plants, often forming complex patterns such as spots, stripes, and vein-associated pigmentation, particularly in flowers. These patterns are determined by the activity of MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes, which activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, resulting in anthocyanin pigment accumulation. Recently, we established that the MBW complex controlling anthocyanin synthesis acts within a gene regulation network that is conserved within at least the Eudicots. This network involves hierarchy, reinforcement, and feedback mechanisms that allow for stringent and responsive regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. The gene network and mobile nature of the WDR and R3-MYB proteins provide exciting new opportunities to explore the basis of pigmentation patterning, and to investigate the evolutionary history of the MBW components in land plants.

  15. Minireview: mechanisms of growth hormone-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Chia, Dennis J

    2014-07-01

    GH exerts a diverse array of physiological actions that include prominent roles in growth and metabolism, with a major contribution via stimulating IGF-1 synthesis. GH achieves its effects by influencing gene expression profiles, and Igf1 is a key transcriptional target of GH signaling in liver and other tissues. This review examines the mechanisms of GH-mediated gene regulation that begin with signal transduction pathways activated downstream of the GH receptor and continue with chromatin events at target genes and additionally encompasses the topics of negative regulation and cross talk with other cellular inputs. The transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b, is regarded as the major signaling pathway by which GH achieves its physiological effects, including in stimulating Igf1 gene transcription in liver. Recent studies exploring the mechanisms of how activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b accomplishes this are highlighted, which begin to characterize epigenetic features at regulatory domains of the Igf1 locus. Further research in this field offers promise to better understand the GH-IGF-1 axis in normal physiology and disease and to identify strategies to manipulate the axis to improve human health.

  16. MTA3 regulates CGB5 and Snail genes in trophoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Miyazaki, Jun; Nishizawa, Haruki; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Leach, Richard; Wang, Kai

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Impaired MTA3, raised CGB5 and Snail expression are associated with preeclampsia. •Knock-down of MTA3 causes up-regulation of CGB5 and Snail genes in BeWo cells. •MTA3 occupies CGB5 and Snail gene promoters in BeWo cells. -- Abstract: Secreted by the placental trophoblast, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important hormone during pregnancy and is required for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that dys-regulation of hCG expression is associated with preeclampsia. However, the exact relationship between altered hCG levels and development of preeclampsia is unknown. Metastasis associated protein 3 (MTA3), a chromatin remodeling protein, is abundantly expressed in the placental trophoblasts, but its function is unknown. In breast cancer, MTA3 has been shown to repress the expression of Snail and cell migration. However, whether MTA3 acts similarly in the trophoblast has not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the role of MTA3 in regulating the hCG β-subunit gene (gene name: CGB5) and Snail expression in the trophoblast cell line, BeWo, as well as its relevance to the high hCG expression levels seen in preeclampsia. First, we investigated MTA3 expression in preeclamptic placenta as compared to normal control placenta via gene expression microarray and qRT-PCR and found that MTA3 was significantly down-regulated, whereas both CGB5 and Snail were up-regulated in preeclamptic placenta. Secondly, we knocked down MTA3 gene in trophoblast cell line BeWo and found Snail and hCG were both up-regulated, suggesting that MTA3 represses Snail and hCG gene expression in trophoblasts. Next, we cloned the CGB5 and Snail promoters into the pGL3-basic vector individually and found that silencing of MTA3 by siRNA resulted in an increase of both CGB5 and Snail promoter activities. To confirm that this MTA3 inhibition is a direct effect, we performed a chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) assay and found that MTA3

  17. Social regulation of gene expression in human leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steve W; Hawkley, Louise C; Arevalo, Jesusa M; Sung, Caroline Y; Rose, Robert M; Cacioppo, John T

    2007-01-01

    Background Social environmental influences on human health are well established in the epidemiology literature, but their functional genomic mechanisms are unclear. The present study analyzed genome-wide transcriptional activity in people who chronically experienced high versus low levels of subjective social isolation (loneliness) to assess alterations in the activity of transcription control pathways that might contribute to increased adverse health outcomes in social isolates. Results DNA microarray analysis identified 209 genes that were differentially expressed in circulating leukocytes from 14 high- versus low-lonely individuals, including up-regulation of genes involved in immune activation, transcription control, and cell proliferation, and down-regulation of genes supporting mature B lymphocyte function and type I interferon response. Promoter-based bioinformatic analyses showed under-expression of genes bearing anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid response elements (GREs; p = 0.032) and over-expression of genes bearing response elements for pro-inflammatory NF-κB/Rel transcription factors (p = 0.011). This reciprocal shift in pro- and anti-inflammatory signaling was not attributable to differences in circulating cortisol levels, or to other demographic, psychological, or medical characteristics. Additional transcription control pathways showing differential activity in bioinformatic analyses included the CREB/ATF, JAK/STAT, IRF1, C/EBP, Oct, and GATA pathways. Conclusion These data provide the first indication that human genome-wide transcriptional activity is altered in association with a social epidemiological risk factor. Impaired transcription of glucocorticoid response genes and increased activity of pro-inflammatory transcription control pathways provide a functional genomic explanation for elevated risk of inflammatory disease in individuals who experience chronically high levels of subjective social isolation. PMID:17854483

  18. Estrogen regulation of the avian transferrin gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, R E; Idzerda, R L; Brinster, R L; McKnight, G S

    1986-01-01

    The intact chicken transferrin gene was microinjected into fertilized mouse eggs, and the resulting transgenic animals were used to produce lines of mice containing integrated copies of the chicken gene. The levels of expression of the chicken gene were quantitated in various tissues, and the response of the gene to estrogen stimulation was measured after chronic or acute estrogen exposure. Two of the three mouse lines studied maintained stable levels of expression in successive generations of offspring, and the third line had two- to threefold-higher levels in offspring than in the original parent. In the third line, the original transgenic parent was found to be a mosaic. The chicken transferrin gene was expressed at 10- to 20-fold-higher levels in liver than in any other tissue; however, the levels of chicken transferrin mRNA in kidney were higher than expected, indicating that the tissue specificity was only partial. In all three lines, the foreign gene was induced by estrogen administration. After 10 days of estrogen administration, there was a twofold increase in both transferrin mRNA and transcription of the chicken transferrin gene. A single injection of estradiol led to a fourfold increase in transferrin mRNA synthesis at 4h. As a control the levels of mouse albumin were measured, and both the level of albumin mRNA and its rate of transcription declined about twofold after estrogen administration. Our results indicate that the intact chicken gene with 2.2 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence contains signals for both tissue specificity and steroid regulation that can be recognized in mice. Images PMID:3785157

  19. RNA-seq analysis of prostate cancer in the Chinese population identifies recurrent gene fusions, cancer-associated long noncoding RNAs and aberrant alternative splicings

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shancheng; Peng, Zhiyu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Yu, Yongwei; Yin, Changjun; Gao, Xin; Cui, Zilian; Zhang, Jibin; Yi, Kang; Xu, Weidong; Chen, Chao; Wang, Fubo; Guo, Xinwu; Lu, Ji; Yang, Jun; Wei, Min; Tian, Zhijian; Guan, Yinghui; Tang, Liang; Xu, Chuanliang; Wang, Linhui; Gao, Xu; Tian, Wei; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Sun, Yinghao

    2012-01-01

    There are remarkable disparities among patients of different races with prostate cancer; however, the mechanism underlying this difference remains unclear. Here, we present a comprehensive landscape of the transcriptome profiles of 14 primary prostate cancers and their paired normal counterparts from the Chinese population using RNA-seq, revealing tremendous diversity across prostate cancer transcriptomes with respect to gene fusions, long noncoding RNAs (long ncRNA), alternative splicing and somatic mutations. Three of the 14 tumors (21.4%) harbored a TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, and the low prevalence of this fusion in Chinese patients was further confirmed in an additional tumor set (10/54=18.5%). Notably, two novel gene fusions, CTAGE5-KHDRBS3 (20/54=37%) and USP9Y-TTTY15 (19/54=35.2%), occurred frequently in our patient cohort. Further systematic transcriptional profiling identified numerous long ncRNAs that were differentially expressed in the tumors. An analysis of the correlation between expression of long ncRNA and genes suggested that long ncRNAs may have functions beyond transcriptional regulation. This study yielded new insights into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer in the Chinese population. PMID:22349460

  20. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  1. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid regulation of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D; Jump, D B

    1994-01-01

    We have known for nearly 30 years that dietary polyenoic (n-6) and (n-3) fatty acids potentially inhibit hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis. The teleological explanation for this unique action of PUFAs resides in their ability to suppress the synthesis of (n-9) fatty acids. By inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis, dietary PUFAs reduce the availability of substrate for delta 9 desaturase (7, 22, 34, 36) and in turn reduce the availability of (n-9) fatty acids for incorporation into plasma membranes. In this way, essential biological processes dependent on essential fatty acids (e.g. reproduction and trans-dermal water loss) continue to operate normally. Therefore, if essential fatty acid intake did not regulate (n-9) fatty acid synthesis, the survival of the organism would be threatened. During the past 20 years, we have gradually elucidated the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which dietary PUFAs modulate fatty acid biosynthesis and (n-9) fatty acid availability. Central to this mechanism has been our ability to determine that dietary PUFAs regulate the transcription of genes coding for lipogenic enzymes (12, 40). The potential mechanisms by which PUFAs govern gene transcription are numerous, and it is unlikely that any one mechanism can fully elucidate the nuclear actions of PUFA. The difficulty in providing a unifying hypothesis at this time stems from: (a) the many metabolic routes taken by PUFAs upon entering the hepatocyte (Figure 1); and (b) the lack of identity of a specific PUFA-regulated trans-acting factor. However, the studies described above indicate that macronutrients, like PUFA, are not only utilized as fuel and structural components of cells, but also serve as important mediators of gene expression (12, 14, 40). As regulators of gene expression, PUFAs (or metabolites) are thought to affect the activity of transcription factors, which in turn target key cis-linked elements associated with specific genes. Whether this targeting involves DNA

  2. Detection and sequence analysis of accessory gene regulator genes of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chitra, M. Ananda; Jayanthy, C.; Nagarajan, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP) is the major pathogenic species of dogs involved in a wide variety of skin and soft tissue infections. The accessory gene regulator (agr) locus of Staphylococcus aureus has been extensively studied, and it influences the expression of many virulence genes. It encodes a two-component signal transduction system that leads to down-regulation of surface proteins and up-regulation of secreted proteins during in vitro growth of S. aureus. The objective of this study was to detect and sequence analyzing the AgrA, B, and D of SP isolated from canine skin infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have isolated and identified SP from canine pyoderma and otitis cases by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Primers for SP agrA and agrBD genes were designed using online primer designing software and BLAST searched for its specificity. Amplification of the agr genes was carried out for 53 isolates of SP by PCR and sequencing of agrA, B, and D were carried out for five isolates and analyzed using DNAstar and Mega5.2 software. Results: A total of 53 (59%) SP isolates were obtained from 90 samples. 15 isolates (28%) were confirmed to be methicillin-resistant SP (MRSP) with the detection of the mecA gene. Accessory gene regulator A, B, and D genes were detected in all the SP isolates. Complete nucleotide sequences of the above three genes for five isolates were submitted to GenBank, and their accession numbers are from KJ133557 to KJ133571. AgrA amino acid sequence analysis showed that it is mainly made of alpha-helices and is hydrophilic in nature. AgrB is a transmembrane protein, and AgrD encodes the precursor of the autoinducing peptide (AIP). Sequencing of the agrD gene revealed that the 5 canine SP strains tested could be divided into three Agr specificity groups (RIPTSTGFF, KIPTSTGFF, and RIPISTGFF) based on the putative AIP produced by each strain. The AIP of

  3. Sugar regulation of harvest-related genes in asparagus.

    PubMed

    Davies, K M; Seelye, J F; Irving, D E; Borst, W M; Hurst, P L; King, G A

    1996-07-01

    The signals controlling the abundance of transcripts up-regulated (pTIP27, pTIP31, and pTIP32) or down-regulated (pTIP20 and pTIP21) after harvest in asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) spears were examined. pTIP27 and pTIP31 are known to encode asparagine synthetase (AS) and a beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) homolog, respectively. The nucleotide sequences of pTIP20, pTIP21, and pTIP32 were determined, and they encode histone 3, histone 2B, and an unknown product, respectively. Changes in respiration, soluble sugars, and abundance of the five mRNAs were similar in the tips stored as 30-mm lengths or as part of 180-mm spears. We previously hypothesized that sugars may regulate the level of AS transcripts in asparagus tissue. Asparagus cell cultures were used to test the role of sugar status may regulate the level of AS transcripts in asparagus tissue. Asparagus cell cultures were used to test the role of sugar status in regulating gene expression. Transcript abundance for AS, beta-gal, and pTIP32 was low in cells in sugar-containing medium but increased within 12 h after transferring cells to a sugar-free medium. Histone 3 and histone 2B transcripts were, in general, abundant in cells on sugar-containing medium but declined in abundance when transferred to sugar-free medium. When cells were returned to sugar-containing medium the abundance of transcripts for histone 3 and histone 2B increased, whereas that for AS, beta-gal, and pTIP32 decreased. Soluble sugar levels are known to decline rapidly in the tips of harvested spears. Metabolic regulation by sugar status may have a major influence on gene expression in asparagus spears and other tissue after harvest. PMID:8754687

  4. Sugar regulation of harvest-related genes in asparagus.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, K M; Seelye, J F; Irving, D E; Borst, W M; Hurst, P L; King, G A

    1996-01-01

    The signals controlling the abundance of transcripts up-regulated (pTIP27, pTIP31, and pTIP32) or down-regulated (pTIP20 and pTIP21) after harvest in asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) spears were examined. pTIP27 and pTIP31 are known to encode asparagine synthetase (AS) and a beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) homolog, respectively. The nucleotide sequences of pTIP20, pTIP21, and pTIP32 were determined, and they encode histone 3, histone 2B, and an unknown product, respectively. Changes in respiration, soluble sugars, and abundance of the five mRNAs were similar in the tips stored as 30-mm lengths or as part of 180-mm spears. We previously hypothesized that sugars may regulate the level of AS transcripts in asparagus tissue. Asparagus cell cultures were used to test the role of sugar status may regulate the level of AS transcripts in asparagus tissue. Asparagus cell cultures were used to test the role of sugar status in regulating gene expression. Transcript abundance for AS, beta-gal, and pTIP32 was low in cells in sugar-containing medium but increased within 12 h after transferring cells to a sugar-free medium. Histone 3 and histone 2B transcripts were, in general, abundant in cells on sugar-containing medium but declined in abundance when transferred to sugar-free medium. When cells were returned to sugar-containing medium the abundance of transcripts for histone 3 and histone 2B increased, whereas that for AS, beta-gal, and pTIP32 decreased. Soluble sugar levels are known to decline rapidly in the tips of harvested spears. Metabolic regulation by sugar status may have a major influence on gene expression in asparagus spears and other tissue after harvest. PMID:8754687

  5. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value < 10e−16), which highlights their importance in T1D. Functional annotation of T1D genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune-mediated processes (p-value < 10e−6). We also identified eight T1D genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures by IRAlus within the 3'UTRs of T1D genes. We propose that IRAlus might be involved in regulating the expression levels of the host T1D genes. PMID:26184322

  6. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-07-13

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value < 10e-16), which highlights their importance in T1D. Functional annotation of T1D genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune-mediated processes (p-value < 10e-6). We also identified eight T1D genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures by IRAlus within the 3'UTRs of T1D genes. We propose that IRAlus might be involved in regulating the expression levels of the host T1D genes.

  7. Using variability in gene expression as a tool for studying gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Padovan-Merhar, Olivia; Raj, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of quantitative tools for measuring gene expression in single cells, researchers have made the discovery that in many contexts, messenger RNA and protein levels can vary widely from cell to cell, often because of inherently stochastic events associated with gene expression. The study of this cellular individuality has become a field of study in its own right, characterized by a blend of technological development, theoretical analysis, and, more recently, applications to biological phenomena. In this review, we focus on the use of the variability inherent to gene expression as a tool to understand gene regulation. We discuss the use of variability as a natural systems-level perturbation, its use in quantitatively characterizing the biological processes underlying transcription, and its application to the discovery of new gene regulatory interactions. We believe that use of variability can provide new biological insights into different aspects of transcriptional control and can provide a powerful complementary approach to that of existing techniques.

  8. Role of p53 codon 72 polymorphism in chromosomal aberrations and mitotic index in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Akbaş, H.; Yalcin, K.; Isi, H.; Tekes, S.; Atay, A.E.; Akkus, Z.; Budak, T.

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms of the p53 gene, which participates in DNA repair, can affect the functioning of the p53 protein. The Arg and Pro variants in p53 codon 72 were shown to have different regulation properties of p53-dependent DNA repair target genes that can affect various levels of cytogenetic aberrations in chronic hepatitis B patients. The present study aimed to examine the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and the mitotic index in patients with chronic hepatitis B and their possible association with p53 gene exon 4 codon 72 Arg72Pro (Ex4+119 G>C; rs1042522) polymorphism. Fifty-eight patients with chronic hepatitis B and 30 healthy individuals were genotyped in terms of the p53 gene codon 72 Arg72Pro polymorphism by PCR-RFLP. A 72-h cell culture was performed on the same individuals and evaluated in terms of chromosomal aberrations and mitotic index. A high frequency of chromosomal aberrations and low mitotic index were detected in the patient group compared to the control group. A higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations was detected in both the patient and the control groups with a homozygous proline genotype (13 patients, 3 control subjects) compared to patients and controls with other genotypes [Arg/Pro (38 patients, 20 control subjects) and Arg/Arg (7 patients, 7 control subjects)]. We observed an increased frequency of cytogenetic aberrations in patients with chronic hepatitis B. In addition, a higher frequency of cytogenetic aberrations was observed in p53 variants having the homozygous proline genotype compared to variants having other genotypes both in patients and healthy individuals. PMID:22892830

  9. Differentially regulated gene expression associated with hepatitis C virus clearance

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Carolyn Z.; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Wei, Peng; Shah, Dimpy P.; Volcik, Kelly A.

    2013-01-01

    Human chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections pose a significant public health threat, necessitating the development of novel treatments and vaccines. HCV infections range from spontaneous resolution to end-stage liver disease. Approximately 10–30 % of HCV infections undergo spontaneous resolution independent of treatment by yet-to-be-defined mechanisms. These individuals test positive for anti-HCV antibodies in the absence of detectable viral serum RNA. To identify genes associated with HCV clearance, this study compared gene expression profiles between current drug users chronically infected with HCV and drug users who cleared their HCV infection. This analysis identified 91 differentially regulated (up- or downregulated by twofold or more) genes potentially associated with HCV clearance. The majority of genes identified were associated with immune function, with the remaining genes categorized either as cancer related or ‘other’. Identification of factors and pathways that may influence virus clearance will be essential to the development of novel treatment strategies. PMID:23152368

  10. Negative Regulation of Phosphate Starvation-Induced Genes1

    PubMed Central

    Mukatira, Uthappa T.; Liu, Chunming; Varadarajan, Deepa K.; Raghothama, Kashchandra G.

    2001-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) deficiency is a major nutritional problem faced by plants in many agro-ecosystems. This deficiency results in altered gene expression leading to physiological and morphological changes in plants. Altered gene expression is presumed to be due to interaction of regulatory sequences (cis-elements) present in the promoters with DNA binding factors (trans-factors). In this study, we analyzed the expression and DNA-protein interaction of promoter regions of Pi starvation-induced genes AtPT2 and TPSI1. AtPT2 encodes the high-affinity Pi transporter in Arabidopsis, whereas TPSI1 codes for a novel gene induced in the Pi-starved tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Expression of AtPT2 was induced rapidly under Pi deficiency and increased with decreasing concentrations of Pi. Abiotic stresses except Pi starvation had no affect on the expression of TPSI1. DNA mobility-shift assays indicated that specific sequences of AtPT2 and TPSI1 promoter interact with nuclear protein factors. Two regions of AtPT2 and TPSI1 promoters specifically bound nuclear protein factors from Pi-sufficient plants. Interestingly, the DNA binding activity disappeared during Pi starvation, leading to the hypothesis that Pi starvation-induced genes may be under negative regulation. PMID:11743129

  11. Neuregulin-regulated gene expression in mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Amin, Dhara N; Tuck, David; Stern, David F

    2005-09-10

    Recent studies have suggested that autocrine production of Neuregulin (NRG), a growth factor that activates members of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/ErbB family of proto-oncogenes, is sufficient for breast tumor initiation and progression. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms regulating these events, we undertook a global analysis of genes regulated by NRG in luminal mammary epithelial cell lines. Gene expression profiling of estrogen receptor-positive T47D cells exposed to NRG-1 revealed both previously identified and novel targets of NRG activation. Profiling of other estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and SUM44, yielded a group of twenty-one genes whose transcripts are upregulated by NRG in all three lines tested. The NRG targets are FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog B, Early growth response 1, v-jun avian sarcoma virus 17 oncogene homolog, Activating transcription factor 3, Homo sapiens cDNA FLJ31636 fis, Jun B proto-oncogene, Forkhead box C1, Platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1, NADPH-dependent retinol dehydrogenase/reductase, Dual specificity phosphatase 5, NGF inducible protein TIS21, Connective tissue growth factor, Jun D proto-oncogene, Serum response factor, Cullin 1, v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene, Transient receptor potential channel 1, Low density lipoprotein receptor, Transforming growth factor beta 1, Nucleoporin 88 kDa, and Pleckstrin homology-like domain A1. Since NRG activation of these cells induces resistance to anti-hormonal therapy, the identified genes may provide clues to molecular events regulating mammary tumor progression and hormone independence.

  12. Structural Mechanisms of Peptide Recognition and Allosteric Modulation of Gene Regulation by the RRNPP Family of Quorum-Sensing Regulators.

    PubMed

    Do, Hackwon; Kumaraswami, Muthiah

    2016-07-17

    The members of RRNPP family of bacterial regulators sense population density-specific secreted oligopeptides and modulate the expression of genes involved in cellular processes, such as sporulation, competence, virulence, biofilm formation, conjugative plasmid transfer and antibiotic resistance. Signaling by RRNPP regulators include several steps: generation and secretion of the signaling oligopeptides, re-internalization of the signaling molecules into the cytoplasm, signal sensing by the cytosolic RRNPP regulators, signal-specific allosteric structural changes in the regulators, and interaction of the regulators with their respective regulatory target and gene regulation. The recently determined structures of the RRNPP regulators provide insight into the mechanistic aspects for several steps in this signaling circuit. In this review, we discuss the structural principles underlying peptide specificity, regulatory target recognition, and ligand-induced allostery in RRNPP regulators and its impact on gene regulation. Despite the conserved tertiary structure of these regulators, structural analyses revealed unexpected diversity in the mechanism of activation and molecular strategies that couple the peptide-induced allostery to gene regulation. Although these structural studies provide a sophisticated understanding of gene regulation by RRNPP regulators, much needs to be learned regarding the target DNA binding by yet-to-be characterized RNPP regulators and the several aspects of signaling by Rgg regulators. PMID:27283781

  13. A plant gene up-regulated at rust infection sites.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Michael A; Roberts, James K; Mitchell, Heidi J; Zhang, Ren; Lawrence, Gregory J; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Pryor, Tony J

    2002-05-01

    Expression of the fis1 gene from flax (Linum usitatissimum) is induced by a compatible rust (Melampsora lini) infection. Infection of transgenic plants containing a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene under the control of the fis1 promoter showed that induction is highly localized to those leaf mesophyll cells within and immediately surrounding rust infection sites. The level of induction reflects the extent of fungal growth. In a strong resistance reaction, such as the hypersensitive fleck mediated by the L6 resistance gene, there is very little fungal growth and a microscopic level of GUS expression. Partially resistant flax leaves show levels of GUS expression that were intermediate to the level observed in the fully susceptible infection. Sequence and deletion analysis using both transient Agrobacterium tumefaciens expression and stable transformation assays have shown that the rust-inducible fis1 promoter is contained within a 580-bp fragment. Homologs of fis1 were identified in expressed sequence tag databases of a range of plant species including dicots, monocots, and a gymnosperm. Homologous genes isolated from maize (Zea mays; mis1), barley (Hordeum vulgare; bis1), wheat (Triticum aestivum; wis1), and Arabidopsis encode proteins that are highly similar (76%-82%) to the FIS1 protein. The Arabidopsis homologue has been reported to encode a delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase that is involved in the catabolism of proline to glutamate. RNA-blot analysis showed that mis1 in maize and the bis1 homolog in barley are both up-regulated by a compatible infection with the corresponding species-specific rust. The rust-induced genes homologous to fis1 are present in many plants. The promoters of these genes have potential roles for the engineering of synthetic rust resistance genes by targeting transgene expression to the sites of rust infection.

  14. Regulation of collagen I gene expression by ras.

    PubMed Central

    Slack, J L; Parker, M I; Robinson, V R; Bornstein, P

    1992-01-01

    Although transformation of rodent fibroblasts can lead to dramatic changes in expression of extracellular matrix genes, the molecular basis and physiological significance of these changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism(s) by which ras affects expression of the genes encoding type I collagen. Levels of both alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) collagen mRNAs were markedly reduced in Rat 1 fibroblasts overexpressing either the N-rasLys-61 or the Ha-rasVal-12 oncogene. In fibroblasts conditionally transformed with N-rasLys-61, alpha 1(I) transcript levels began to decline within 8 h of ras induction and reached 1 to 5% of control levels after 96 h. In contrast, overexpression of normal ras p21 had no effect on alpha 1(I) or alpha 2(I) mRNA levels. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that the transcription rates of both the alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) genes were significantly reduced in ras-transformed cells compared with those in parental cells. In addition, the alpha 1(I) transcript was less stable in transformed cells. Chimeric plasmids containing up to 3.6 kb of alpha 1(I) 5'-flanking DNA and up to 2.3 kb of the 3'-flanking region were expressed at equivalent levels in both normal and ras-transformed fibroblasts. However, a cosmid clone containing the entire mouse alpha 1(I) gene, including 3.7 kb of 5'- and 4 kb of 3'-flanking DNA, was expressed at reduced levels in fibroblasts overexpressing oncogenic ras. We conclude that oncogenic ras regulates the type I collagen genes at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels and that this effect, at least for the alpha 1(I) gene, may be mediated by sequences located either within the body of the gene itself or in the distal 3'-flanking region. Images PMID:1406656

  15. hSETD1A regulates Wnt target genes and controls tumor growth of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Salz, Tal; Li, Guangyao; Kaye, Frederic; Zhou, Lei; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2014-02-01

    hSETD1A is a member of the trithorax (TrxG) family of histone methyltransferases (HMT) that methylate H3K4 at promoters of active genes. Although misregulation of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) family proteins has been associated with acute leukemia, the role of hSETD1A in cancer remains unknown. In this study, we report that hSETD1A and its associated H3K4me3 are upregulated in human colorectal cancer cells and patient samples. Depletion of hSETD1A inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth, colony formation, and tumor engraftment. Genome-wide expression profiling of colorectal cancer cells reveals that approximately 50% of Wnt/β-catenin target genes are affected by the hSETD1A knockdown. We further demonstrate that hSETD1A is recruited to promoters of those Wnt signaling target genes through its interaction with β-catenin, a master regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway. The recruitment of the hSETD1A HMT complex confers promoter-associated H3K4me3 that leads to assembly of transcription preinitiation complex and transcriptional activation. Furthermore, the expression levels of hSETD1A are positively correlated with H3K4me3 enrichment at the promoters of Wnt/β-catenin target genes and the aberrant activation of these genes in human colorectal cancer. These results provide new biologic and mechanistic insights into the cooperative role of hSETD1A and β-catenin in regulation of Wnt target genes as well as in colorectal cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24247718

  16. ARID3B Directly Regulates Ovarian Cancer Promoting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander; Gellerman, Katrina; Hallas, William Morgan; Joseph, Stancy; Yang, Chao; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein AT-Rich Interactive Domain 3B (ARID3B) is elevated in ovarian cancer and increases tumor growth in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer. However, relatively little is known about ARID3B's function. In this study we perform the first genome wide screen for ARID3B direct target genes and ARID3B regulated pathways. We identified and confirmed numerous ARID3B target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Using motif-finding algorithms, we characterized a binding site for ARID3B, which is similar to the previously known site for the ARID3B paralogue ARID3A. Functionality of this predicted site was demonstrated by ChIP analysis. We next demonstrated that ARID3B induces expression of its targets in ovarian cancer cell lines. We validated that ARID3B binds to an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) enhancer and increases mRNA expression. ARID3B also binds to the promoter of Wnt5A and its receptor FZD5. FZD5 is highly expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, and is upregulated by exogenous ARID3B. Both ARID3B and FZD5 expression increase adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen IV, fibronectin and vitronectin. ARID3B-increased adhesion to collagens II and IV require FZD5. This study directly demonstrates that ARID3B binds target genes in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in increased gene expression. Furthermore, our data indicate that ARID3B regulation of direct target genes in the Wnt pathway promotes adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26121572

  17. Computational Design of Artificial RNA Molecules for Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Laganà, Alessandro; Veneziano, Dario; Russo, Francesco; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba; Croce, Carlo Maria; Ferro, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for the regulation of gene expression. Small exogenous noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as siRNA and shRNA are the active silencing agents, intended to target and cleave complementary mRNAs in a specific way. They are widely and successfully employed in functional studies, and several ongoing and already completed siRNA-based clinical trials suggest encouraging results in the regulation of overexpressed genes in disease. siRNAs share many aspects of their biogenesis and function with miRNAs, small ncRNA molecules transcribed from endogenous genes which are able to repress the expression of target mRNAs by either inhibiting their translation or promoting their degradation. Although siRNA and artificial miRNA molecules can significantly reduce the expression of overexpressed target genes, cancer and other diseases can also be triggered or sustained by upregulated miRNAs. Thus, in the past recent years, molecular tools for miRNA silencing, such as antagomiRs and miRNA sponges, have been developed. These molecules have shown their efficacy in the derepression of genes downregulated by overexpressed miRNAs. In particular, while a single antagomiR is able to inhibit a single complementary miRNA, an artificial sponge construct usually contains one or more binding sites for one or more miRNAs and functions by competing with the natural targets of these miRNAs. As a consequence, natural miRNA targets are reexpressed at their physiological level. In this chapter we review the most successful methods for the computational design of siRNAs, antagomiRs, and miRNA sponges and describe the most popular tools that implement them. PMID:25577393

  18. Riboswitch-Mediated Gene Regulation: Novel RNA Architectures Dictate Gene Expression Responses.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Anna V; Henkin, Tina M

    2016-09-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that act on the mRNA with which they are cotranscribed to modulate expression of that mRNA. These elements are widely found in bacteria, where they have a broad impact on gene expression. The defining feature of riboswitches is that they directly recognize a physiological signal, and the resulting shift in RNA structure affects gene regulation. The majority of riboswitches respond to cellular metabolites, often in a feedback loop to repress synthesis of the enzymes used to produce the metabolite. Related elements respond to the aminoacylation status of a specific tRNA or to a physical parameter, such as temperature or pH. Recent studies have identified new classes of riboswitches and have revealed new insights into the molecular mechanisms of signal recognition and gene regulation. Application of structural and biophysical approaches has complemented previous genetic and biochemical studies, yielding new information about how different riboswitches operate. PMID:27607554

  19. Expression and regulation of CCN genes in murine osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Muriel S; Gazzerro, Elizabetta; Rydziel, Sheila; Canalis, Ernesto

    2006-05-01

    Members of the CCN family of genes include cysteine-rich 61 (CYR61), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV), and Wnt-induced secreted proteins (WISP) 1, 2 and 3. CCN proteins play a role in cell differentiation and function, but their expression and function in skeletal tissue is partially understood. We examined the expression and regulation of CCN genes in primary cultures of murine osteoblasts treated with transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, or cortisol. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of CYR61, CTGF, NOV, and WISP 1 and 2 transcripts in murine osteoblasts, but not WISP 3 transcripts. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that TGF beta, BMP-2, and cortisol increased CYR61 and CTGF mRNA and protein levels. TGF beta decreased NOV and increased WISP 2 mRNA and protein levels, and TGF beta and BMP-2 increased, whereas cortisol decreased WISP 1 mRNA and protein levels. Nuclear run-on assays revealed that TGF beta, BMP-2 and cortisol enhanced CYR61 and CTGF transcription, TGF beta and BMP-2 induced and cortisol suppressed WISP 1, and TGF beta induced WISP 2 transcription. Suppression of NOV transcription could not be detected due to low control levels. In conclusion, five of the six known CCN genes are expressed by osteoblasts and their transcription is regulated by TGF beta, BMP-2 and cortisol.

  20. Regulation of virulence gene expression in pathogenic Listeria.

    PubMed

    Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Ripio, M T; Vázquez-Boland, J A

    1996-06-01

    Dynamic interactions between host and pathogen are characteristic of infections caused by intracellular bacteria. This has favoured the evolution of highly effective control systems by which these pathogens regulate the expression of different virulence factors during sequential steps of the infection process. In the case of the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, these steps involve internalization by eukaryotic cells, lysis of the resulting phagosome, replication as well as movement within the host cytoplasm, direct cell-to-cell spread, and subsequent lysis of a double-membrane vacuole when entering neighbouring cells. Virulence factors which are involved in each of these steps have been identified and the expression of these factors is subject to a co-ordinate and differential control exerted by the major listerial virulence regulator PrfA. This protein belongs to the Crp/Fnr-family of transcriptional activators and recognizes specific target sequences in promoter regions of several listerial virulence genes. Differential expression of these genes during sequential steps of the infection seems to be at least partially mediated by different binding affinities of PrfA to its target sequences. Activity of PrfA-dependent genes and of prfA itself is under the control of several environmental variables which are used by the pathogen to recognize its transition from the free environment into a eukaryotic host.

  1. Neighboring Gene Regulation by Antisense Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Victoria E.; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation—pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional—through DNA–RNA, RNA–RNA or protein–RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. PMID:25654223

  2. Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD16.

    PubMed Central

    Bang, D D; Timmermans, V; Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1995-01-01

    The RAD16 gene product has been shown to be essential for the repair of the silenced mating type loci [Bang et al. (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 3925-3931]. More recently we demonstrated that the RAD16 and RAD7 proteins are also required for repair of non-transcribed strands of active genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Waters et al. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 239, 28-32]. We have studied the regulation of the RAD16 gene and found that the RAD16 transcript levels increased up to 7-fold upon UV irradiation. Heat shock at 42 degrees C also results in elevated levels of RAD16 mRNA. In sporulating MAT alpha/MATa diploid cells RAD16 mRNA is also induced. The basal level of the RAD16 transcript is constant during the mitotic cell cycle. G1-arrested cells show normal induction of RAD16 mRNA upon UV irradiation demonstrating that the induction is not a secondary consequence of G2 cell cycle arrest following UV irradiation. However, in cells arrested in G1 the induction of RAD16 mRNA after UV irradiation is not followed by a rapid decline as occurs in normal growing cells suggesting that the down regulation of RAD16 transcription is dependent on progression into the cell cycle. Images PMID:7784171

  3. Synthetic RNAs for Gene Regulation: Design Principles and Computational Tools

    PubMed Central

    Laganà, Alessandro; Shasha, Dennis; Croce, Carlo Maria

    2014-01-01

    The use of synthetic non-coding RNAs for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has not only become a standard laboratory tool for gene functional studies but it has also opened up new perspectives in the design of new and potentially promising therapeutic strategies. Bioinformatics has provided researchers with a variety of tools for the design, the analysis, and the evaluation of RNAi agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA), short-hairpin RNA (shRNA), artificial microRNA (a-miR), and microRNA sponges. More recently, a new system for genome engineering based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), was shown to have the potential to also regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in a more specific way. In this mini review, we present RNAi and CRISPRi design principles and discuss the advantages and limitations of the current design approaches. PMID:25566532

  4. Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD16.

    PubMed

    Bang, D D; Timmermans, V; Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1995-05-25

    The RAD16 gene product has been shown to be essential for the repair of the silenced mating type loci [Bang et al. (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 3925-3931]. More recently we demonstrated that the RAD16 and RAD7 proteins are also required for repair of non-transcribed strands of active genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Waters et al. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 239, 28-32]. We have studied the regulation of the RAD16 gene and found that the RAD16 transcript levels increased up to 7-fold upon UV irradiation. Heat shock at 42 degrees C also results in elevated levels of RAD16 mRNA. In sporulating MAT alpha/MATa diploid cells RAD16 mRNA is also induced. The basal level of the RAD16 transcript is constant during the mitotic cell cycle. G1-arrested cells show normal induction of RAD16 mRNA upon UV irradiation demonstrating that the induction is not a secondary consequence of G2 cell cycle arrest following UV irradiation. However, in cells arrested in G1 the induction of RAD16 mRNA after UV irradiation is not followed by a rapid decline as occurs in normal growing cells suggesting that the down regulation of RAD16 transcription is dependent on progression into the cell cycle.

  5. Endosymbiotic gene transfer and transcriptional regulation of transferred genes in Paulinella chromatophora.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Eva C M; Vogel, Heiko; Groth, Marco; Grossman, Arthur R; Melkonian, Michael; Glöckner, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Paulinella chromatophora is a cercozoan amoeba that contains "chromatophores," which are photosynthetic inclusions of cyanobacterial origin. The recent discovery that chromatophores evolved independently of plastids, underwent major genome reduction, and transferred at least two genes to the host nucleus has highlighted P. chromatophora as a model to infer early steps in the evolution of photosynthetic organelles. However, owing to the paucity of nuclear genome sequence data, the extent of endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) and host symbiont regulation are currently unknown. A combination of 454 and Illumina next generation sequencing enabled us to generate a comprehensive reference transcriptome data set for P. chromatophora on which we mapped short Illumina cDNA reads generated from cultures from the dark and light phases of a diel cycle. Combined with extensive phylogenetic analyses of the deduced protein sequences, these data revealed that 1) about 0.3-0.8% of the nuclear genes were obtained by EGT compared with 11-14% in the Plantae, 2) transferred genes show a distinct bias in that many encode small proteins involved in photosynthesis and photoacclimation, 3) host cells established control over expression of transferred genes, and 4) not only EGT, but to a minor extent also horizontal gene transfer from organisms that presumably served as food sources, helped to shape the nuclear genome of P. chromatophora. The identification of a significant number of transferred genes involved in photosynthesis and photoacclimation of thylakoid membranes as well as the observed transcriptional regulation of these genes strongly implies import of the encoded gene products into chromatophores, a feature previously thought to be restricted to canonical organelles. Thus, a possible mechanism by which P. chromatophora exerts control over the performance of its newly acquired photosynthetic organelle may involve controlling the expression of nuclear-encoded chromatophore

  6. The Discoidin I Gene Family of Dictyostelium Discoideum Is Linked to Genes Regulating Its Expression

    PubMed Central

    Welker, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The discoidin I protein has been studied extensively as a marker of early development in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. However, like most other developmentally regulated proteins in this system, no reliable information was available on the linkage of the discoidin genes to other known genes. Analysis of the linkage of the discoidin I genes by use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealed that all three discoidin I genes as well as a pseudogene are located on linkage group II. This evidence is consistent with the discoidin I genes forming a gene cluster that may be under the control of a single regulatory element. The discoidin I genes are linked to three genetic loci (disA, motA, daxA) that affect the expression of the discoidin I protein. Linkage of the gene family members to regulatory loci may be important in the coordinate maintenance of the gene family and regulatory loci. A duplication affecting the entire discoidin gene family is also linked to group II; this appears to be a small tandem duplication. This duplication was mapped using a DNA polymorphism generated by insertion of the Tdd-3 mobile genetic element into a Tdd-2 element flanking the γ gene. A probe for Tdd-2 identified a restriction fragment length polymorphism in strain AX3K that was consistent with generation by a previously proposed Tdd-3 insertion event. A putative duplication or rearrangement of a second Tdd-2 element on linkage group IV of strain AX3K was also identified. This is the first linkage information available for mobile genetic elements in D. discoideum. PMID:3402731

  7. Regulation of gonadotropin gene expression by Mullerian inhibiting substance.

    PubMed

    Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y; O'Neill, Francis H; Norwitz, Errol R; Kaiser, Ursula B; Teixeira, Jose

    2003-08-01

    In addition to its role in causing Müllerian duct regression, Müllerian inhibiting substance (MIS) is implicated in the regulation of steroidogenesis, breast and prostate growth, and ovarian follicle recruitment, all of which are processes controlled or influenced by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Whereas the direct effect of MIS on gonadal, prostate, and breast cells is under investigation, the ability of MIS to modulate pituitary function, thereby affecting those tissues indirectly, has not yet been studied. Using LbetaT2 cells, a murine gonadotrope-derived cell line, we have evaluated the effects of MIS on the expression of the gonadotropin genes. We show that both LbetaT2 cells and adult rat pituitaries express MIS type II receptor (MISRII) mRNA. Within 2 h, follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit (FSHbeta) mRNA levels are significantly induced by addition of MIS to LbetaT2 cells and remain elevated through 8 h of treatment. Transcriptional activation of both the FSHbeta and luteinizing hormone beta subunit (LHbeta) gene promoters was observed by MIS, which enhances the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist on the FSHbeta gene promoter and synergizes with the GnRH agonist to stimulate LHbeta gene promoter activity. Addition of MIS to LbetaT2 cells stimulates the activity of the rat LHbeta gene promoter with as little as 1 microg/ml and in a dose-dependent manner. These studies report both MISRII expression in rat pituitary cells and a gonadotrope-derived cell line and MIS-mediated activation of LHbeta and FSHbeta gene expression, and suggest that MIS may modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis at more than one level.

  8. MTA3 regulates CGB5 and Snail genes in trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Miyazaki, Jun; Nishizawa, Haruki; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Leach, Richard; Wang, Kai

    2013-04-19

    Secreted by the placental trophoblast, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important hormone during pregnancy and is required for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that dys-regulation of hCG expression is associated with preeclampsia. However, the exact relationship between altered hCG levels and development of preeclampsia is unknown. Metastasis associated protein 3 (MTA3), a chromatin remodeling protein, is abundantly expressed in the placental trophoblasts, but its function is unknown. In breast cancer, MTA3 has been shown to repress the expression of Snail and cell migration. However, whether MTA3 acts similarly in the trophoblast has not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the role of MTA3 in regulating the hCG β-subunit gene (gene name: CGB5) and Snail expression in the trophoblast cell line, BeWo, as well as its relevance to the high hCG expression levels seen in preeclampsia. First, we investigated MTA3 expression in preeclamptic placenta as compared to normal control placenta via gene expression microarray and qRT-PCR and found that MTA3 was significantly down-regulated, whereas both CGB5 and Snail were up-regulated in preeclamptic placenta. Secondly, we knocked down MTA3 gene in trophoblast cell line BeWo and found Snail and hCG were both up-regulated, suggesting that MTA3 represses Snail and hCG gene expression in trophoblasts. Next, we cloned the CGB5 and Snail promoters into the pGL3-basic vector individually and found that silencing of MTA3 by siRNA resulted in an increase of both CGB5 and Snail promoter activities. To confirm that this MTA3 inhibition is a direct effect, we performed a chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) assay and found that MTA3 occupied the proximal promoter regions of both Snail and hCG within BeWo cells. Furthermore, we examined MTA3 expression in placental trophoblast by immunohistochemistry and found that MTA3 expression was higher in villous cytotrophoblasts versus

  9. Coherent organization in gene regulation: a study on six networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aral, Neşe; Kabakçıoğlu, Alkan

    2016-04-01

    Structural and dynamical fingerprints of evolutionary optimization in biological networks are still unclear. Here we analyze the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks responsible for the regulation of cell cycle and cell differentiation in three organisms or cell types each, and show that they follow a version of Hebb's rule which we have termed coherence. More precisely, we find that simultaneously expressed genes with a common target are less likely to act antagonistically at the attractors of the regulatory dynamics. We then investigate the dependence of coherence on structural parameters, such as the mean number of inputs per node and the activatory/repressory interaction ratio, as well as on dynamically determined quantities, such as the basin size and the number of expressed genes.

  10. Amino acid recognition and gene regulation by riboswitches

    PubMed Central

    Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2012-01-01

    Riboswitches specifically control expression of genes predominantly involved in biosynthesis, catabolism and transport of various cellular metabolites in organisms from all three kingdoms of life. Amongst many classes of identified riboswitches, two riboswitches respond to amino acids lysine and glycine to date. Though these riboswitches recognize small compounds, they both belong to the largest riboswitches and have unique structural and functional characteristics. In this review, we attempt to characterize molecular recognition principles employed by amino acid-responsive riboswitches to selectively bind their cognate ligands and to effectively perform a gene regulation function. We summarize up-to-date biochemical and genetic data available for the lysine and glycine riboswitches and correlate these results with recent high-resolution structural information obtained for the lysine riboswitch. We also discuss the contribution of lysine riboswitches to antibiotic resistance and outline potential applications of riboswitches in biotechnology and medicine. PMID:19619684

  11. Ribozymes, riboswitches and beyond: regulation of gene expression without proteins

    PubMed Central

    Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Although various functions of RNA are carried out in conjunction with proteins, some catalytic RNAs, or ribozymes, which contribute to a range of cellular processes, require little or no assistance from proteins. Furthermore, the discovery of metabolite-sensing riboswitches and other types of RNA sensors has revealed RNA-based mechanisms that cells use to regulate gene expression in response to internal and external changes. Structural studies have shown how these RNAs can carry out a range of functions. In addition, the contribution of ribozymes and riboswitches to gene expression is being revealed as far more widespread than was previously appreciated. These findings have implications for understanding how cellular functions might have evolved from RNA-based origins. PMID:17846637

  12. Molecular immunology--gene regulation and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, John

    2002-09-10

    Research on 'molecular immunology-gene regulation and signal transduction' in veterinary species is relatively new. The reason for its novelty is that until recently there have been very few tools with which we can work. Over the last 10 years the veterinary immunology community has succeeded in generating panels of defined monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and cloned genes that has enabled such work to be started. More recently, quantitative, high-resolution analytical tools for veterinary species have begun to be developed; some of these are specific for veterinary species and others have been adapted from human or rodent systems. Of the species-specific tools that have recently been developed perhaps the most widely used are the immunoassays for cytokines, RNAase protection assays (RPAs) and in the near future oligonucleotide and EST-based microarrays. This presentation will describe some of these assays and discuss their relative advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Genes Regulating Epithelial Polarity Are Critical Suppressors of Esophageal Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Min; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Li-Li; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an aggressive disease featured by early lymphatic and hematogenous dissemination, and is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The proper formation of apicobasal polarity is essential for normal epithelium physiology and tissue homeostasis, while loss of polarity is a hallmark of cancer development including esophageal oncogenesis. In this review, we summarized the stages of esophageal cancer development associated with the loss or deregulation of epithelial cell apicobasal polarity. Loss of epithelial apicobasal polarity exerts an indispensable role in the initiation of esophageal oncogenesis, tumor progression, and the advancement of tumors from benign to malignant. In particular, we reviewed the involvement of several critical genes, including Lkb1, claudin-4, claudin-7, Par3, Lgl1, E-cadherin, and the Scnn1 gene family. Understanding the role of apicobasal regulators may lead to new paradigms for treatment of esophageal tumors, including improvement of prognostication, early diagnosis, and individually tailored therapeutic interventions in esophageal oncology. PMID:26185530

  14. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  15. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Alexandre F.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  16. Light regulation of gene expression in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, E.M.; Silverthorne, J.

    1985-01-01

    In this review areas of currently active research are considered which have demonstrated that a plant's response to light involves changes in the expression of specific genes at the level of RNA. The regulation of gene expression by phytochrome and the UV-sensitive photoreceptor have been studied most extensively at the molecular level, and this review particularly focuses on such studies in higher plants. Some of the observations made on the differences in gene expression between light-grown and dark-grown plants are also included, although the photoreceptor(s) responsible for the differences may not have been ascertained. In some of these cases, phytochrome involvement has been or may be demonstrated in later studies, while in others the observed differences may be a result of the action of other photoreceptors or of multiple light-affected processes. One such process is the development of chloroplasts, a major developmental step triggered by light in angiosperms. In addition, many of the genes whose expression is changed by light and which have been studied at a molecular level encode chloroplast proteins. 156 references.

  17. Regulation of global gene expression and cell proliferation by APP

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Si; Xu, Qin; Zou, Haiyan; Zhou, Weihui; Cai, Fang; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Patients with DS display growth retardation and inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology, including neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. The expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is increased in both DS and AD patients. To reveal the function of APP and elucidate the pathogenic role of increased APP expression in DS and AD, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray method in human cells overexpressing APP. A set of genes are significantly altered, which are involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 signaling. We found that overexpression of APP inhibits cell proliferation. Furthermore, we confirmed that the downregulation of two validated genes, PSMA5 and PSMB7, inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting that the downregulation of PSMA5 and PSMB7 is involved in APP-induced cell proliferation impairment. Taken together, this study suggests that APP regulates global gene expression and increased APP expression inhibits cell proliferation. Our study provides a novel insight that APP overexpression may contribute to the growth impairment in DS patients and promote AD pathogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation including neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. PMID:26936520

  18. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alexandre F; Hornos, José Eduardo M; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  19. Pitx2 Regulates Procollagen Lysyl Hydroxylase (Plod) Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hjalt, Tord A.; Amendt, Brad A.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2001-01-01

    The Rieger syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by ocular, craniofacial, and umbilical defects. Patients have mutations in PITX2, a paired-bicoid homeobox gene, also involved in left/right polarity determination. In this study we have identified a family of genes for enzymes responsible for hydroxylizing lysines in collagens as one group of likely cognate targets of PITX2 transcriptional regulation. The mouse procollagen lysyl hydroxylase (Plod)-2 gene was enriched for by chromatin precipitation using a PITX2/Pitx2-specific antibody. Plod-2, as well as the human PLOD-1 promoters, contains multiple bicoid (PITX2) binding elements. We show these elements to bind PITX2 specifically in vitro. The PLOD-1 promoter induces the expression of a luciferase reporter gene in the presence of PITX2 in cotransfection experiments. The Rieger syndrome causing PITX2 mutant T68P fails to induce PLOD-1–luciferase. Mutations and rearrangements in PLOD-1 are known to be prevalent in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliosis type (type VI [EDVI]). Several of the same organ systems are involved in Rieger syndrome and EDVI. PMID:11157981

  20. Circuit-level input integration in bacterial gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Espinar, Lorena; Dies, Marta; Cagatay, Tolga; Süel, Gürol M; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2013-04-23

    Gene regulatory circuits can receive multiple simultaneous inputs, which can enter the system through different locations. It is thus necessary to establish how these genetic circuits integrate multiple inputs as a function of their relative entry points. Here, we use the dynamic circuit regulating competence for DNA uptake in Bacillus subtilis as a model system to investigate this issue. Specifically, we map the response of single cells in vivo to a combination of (i) a chemical signal controlling the constitutive expression of key competence genes, and (ii) a genetic perturbation in the form of copy number variation of one of these genes, which mimics the level of stress signals sensed by the bacteria. Quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy shows that a variety of dynamical behaviors can be reached by the combination of the two inputs. Additionally, the integration depends strongly on the relative locations where the two perturbations enter the circuit. Specifically, when the two inputs act upon different circuit elements, their integration generates novel dynamical behavior, whereas inputs affecting the same element do not. An in silico bidimensional bifurcation analysis of a mathematical model of the circuit offers good quantitative agreement with the experimental observations, and sheds light on the dynamical mechanisms leading to the different integrated responses exhibited by the gene regulatory circuit.

  1. Identification of genes regulated by UV/salicylic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Watson, C.; Milton, J.; Oryhon, J.; Salbego, D.; Milosavljevic, A.; Woloschak, G. E.; CuraGen Corp.

    2000-02-01

    Purpose : Previous work from the authors' group and others has demonstrated that some of the effects of UV irradiation on gene expression are modulated in response to the addition of salicylic acid to irradiated cells. The presumed effector molecule responsible for this modulation is NF-kappaB. In the experiments described here, differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify those cDNAs that are differentially modulated by UV radiation with and without the addition of salicylic acid. Materials and methods : Differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify differentially expressed genes. Results : Eight such cDNAs are presented: lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-beta), nuclear encoded mitochondrial NADH ubiquinone reductase 24kDa (NDUFV2), elongation initiation factor 4B (eIF4B), nuclear dots protein SP100, nuclear encoded mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor (IF1), a cDNA similar to a subunit of yeast CCAAT transcription factor HAP5, and two expressed sequence tags (AA187906 and AA513156). Conclusions : Sequences of four of these genes contained NF-kappaB DNA binding sites of the type that may attract transrepressor p55/p55 NF-kappaB homodimers. Down-regulation of these genes upon UV irradiation may contribute to increased cell survival via suppression of p53 independent apoptosis.

  2. MicroRNA-regulated viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Anja; Fechner, Henry

    2016-05-20

    Safe and effective gene therapy approaches require targeted tissue-specific transfer of a therapeutic transgene. Besides traditional approaches, such as transcriptional and transductional targeting, microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional suppression of transgene expression has been emerging as powerful new technology to increase the specificity of vector-mediated transgene expression. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs and often expressed in a tissue-, lineage-, activation- or differentiation-specific pattern. They typically regulate gene expression by binding to imperfectly complementary sequences in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To control exogenous transgene expression, tandem repeats of artificial microRNA target sites are usually incorporated into the 3' UTR of the transgene expression cassette, leading to subsequent degradation of transgene mRNA in cells expressing the corresponding microRNA. This targeting strategy, first shown for lentiviral vectors in antigen presenting cells, has now been used for tissue-specific expression of vector-encoded therapeutic transgenes, to reduce immune response against the transgene, to control virus tropism for oncolytic virotherapy, to increase safety of live attenuated virus vaccines and to identify and select cell subsets for pluripotent stem cell therapies, respectively. This review provides an introduction into the technical mechanism underlying microRNA-regulation, highlights new developments in this field and gives an overview of applications of microRNA-regulated viral vectors for cardiac, suicide gene cancer and hematopoietic stem cell therapy, as well as for treatment of neurological and eye diseases. PMID:27226955

  3. Epigenetic Gene Regulation in Stem Cells and Correlation to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Lesley A.; Crea, Francesco; Farrar, W. L.

    2009-01-01

    Through the classic study of genetics, much has been learned about the regulation and progression of human disease. Specifically, cancer has been defined as a disease driven by genetic alterations, including mutations in tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes, as well as chromosomal abnormalities. However, the study of normal human development has identified that in addition to classical genetics, regulation of gene expression is also modified by ‘epigenetic’ alterations including chromatin remodeling and histone variants, DNA methylation, the regulation of polycomb group proteins and the epigenetic function of non-coding RNA. These changes are modifications inherited both during meiosis and mitosis, yet they do not result in alterations of the actual DNA sequence. A number of biological questions are directly influenced by epigenetics, such as how does a cell know when to divide, differentiate or remain quiescent, and more importantly, what happens when these pathways become altered? Do these alterations lead to the development and/or progression of cancer? This review will focus on summarizing the limited current literature involving epigenetic alterations in the context of human cancer stems cells (CSCs). The extent to which epigenetic changes define cell fate, identity, and phenotype are still under intense investigation, and many questions remain largely unanswered. Before discussing epigenetic gene silencing in CSCs, the different classifications of stem cells and their properties will be introduced. This will be followed by an introduction to the different epigenetic mechanisms Finally, there will be a discussion of the current knowledge of epigenetic modifications in stem cells, specifically what is known from rodent systems and established cancer cell lines, and how they are leading us to understand human stem cells. PMID:19443100

  4. Lipocalin 2: a new mechanoresponding gene regulating bone homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rucci, Nadia; Capulli, Mattia; Piperni, Sara Gemini; Cappariello, Alfredo; Lau, Patrick; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Heer, Martina; Teti, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical loading represents a crucial factor in the regulation of skeletal homeostasis. Its reduction causes loss of bone mass, eventually leading to osteoporosis. In a previous global transcriptome analysis performed in mouse calvarial osteoblasts subjected to simulated microgravity, the most upregulated gene compared to unit gravity condition was Lcn2, encoding the adipokine Lipocalin 2 (LCN2), whose function in bone metabolism is poorly known. To investigate the mechanoresponding properties of LCN2, we evaluated LCN2 levels in sera of healthy volunteers subjected to bed rest, and found a significant time-dependent increase of this adipokine compared to time 0. We then evaluated the in vivo LCN2 regulation in mice subjected to experimentally-induced mechanical unloading by (1) tail suspension, (2) muscle paralysis by botulin toxin A (Botox), or (3) genetically-induced muscular dystrophy (MDX mice), and observed that Lcn2 expression was upregulated in the long bones of all of them, whereas physical exercise counteracted this increase. Mechanistically, in primary osteoblasts transfected with LCN2-expression-vector (OBs-Lcn2) we observed that Runx2 and its downstream genes, Osterix and Alp, were transcriptionally downregulated, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was less prominent versus empty-vector transduced osteoblasts (OBs-empty). OBs-Lcn2 also exhibited an increase of the Rankl/Opg ratio and IL-6 mRNA, suggesting that LCN2 could link poor differentiation of osteoblasts to enhanced osteoclast stimulation. In fact, incubation of purified mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells with conditioned media from OBs-Lcn2 cultures, or their coculture with OBs-Lcn2, improved osteoclastogenesis compared to OBs-empty, whereas treatment with recombinant LCN2 had no effect. In conclusion, our data indicate that LCN2 is a novel osteoblast mechanoresponding gene and that its regulation could be central to the pathological response of the bone tissue to low mechanical forces.

  5. MicroRNA-regulated viral vectors for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Fechner, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Safe and effective gene therapy approaches require targeted tissue-specific transfer of a therapeutic transgene. Besides traditional approaches, such as transcriptional and transductional targeting, microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional suppression of transgene expression has been emerging as powerful new technology to increase the specificity of vector-mediated transgene expression. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs and often expressed in a tissue-, lineage-, activation- or differentiation-specific pattern. They typically regulate gene expression by binding to imperfectly complementary sequences in the 3’ untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To control exogenous transgene expression, tandem repeats of artificial microRNA target sites are usually incorporated into the 3’ UTR of the transgene expression cassette, leading to subsequent degradation of transgene mRNA in cells expressing the corresponding microRNA. This targeting strategy, first shown for lentiviral vectors in antigen presenting cells, has now been used for tissue-specific expression of vector-encoded therapeutic transgenes, to reduce immune response against the transgene, to control virus tropism for oncolytic virotherapy, to increase safety of live attenuated virus vaccines and to identify and select cell subsets for pluripotent stem cell therapies, respectively. This review provides an introduction into the technical mechanism underlying microRNA-regulation, highlights new developments in this field and gives an overview of applications of microRNA-regulated viral vectors for cardiac, suicide gene cancer and hematopoietic stem cell therapy, as well as for treatment of neurological and eye diseases. PMID:27226955

  6. Aberrant Promoter Methylation at CpG Cytosines Induce the Upregulation of the E2F5 Gene in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Arshad; Ullah, Farman; Ali, Irum Sabir; Faraz, Ahmad; Khan, Mumtaz; Shah, Syed Tahir Ali; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The promoter methylation status of cell cycle regulatory genes plays a crucial role in the regulation of the eukaryotic cell cycle. CpG cytosines are actively subjected to methylation during tumorigenesis, resulting in gain/loss of function. E2F5 gene has growth repressive activities; various studies suggest its involvement in tumorigenesis. This study aims to investigate the epigenetic regulation of E2F5 in breast cancer to better understand tumor biology. Methods The promoter methylation status of 50 breast tumor tissues and adjacent normal control tissues was analyzed. mRNA expression was determined using SYBR® green quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and methylation-specific PCR was performed for bisulfite-modified genomic DNA using E2F5-specific primers to assess promoter methylation. Data was statistically analyzed. Results Significant (p<0.001) upregulation was observed in E2F5 expression among tumor tissues, relative to the control group. These samples were hypo-methylated at the E2F5 promoter region in the tumor tissues, compared to the control. Change in the methylation status (Δmeth) was significantly lower (p=0.022) in the tumor samples, indicating possible involvement in tumorigenesis. Patients at the postmenopausal stage showed higher methylation (75%) than those at the premenopausal stage (23.1%). Interestingly, methylation levels gradually increased from the early to the advanced stages of the disease (p<0.001), which suggests a putative role of E2F5 methylation in disease progression that can significantly modulate tumor biology at more advanced stage and at postmenopausal age (Pearson's r=0.99 and 0.86, respectively). Among tissues with different histological status, methylation frequency was higher in invasive lobular carcinoma (80.0%), followed by invasive ductal carcinoma (46.7%) and ductal carcinoma in situ (20.0%). Conclusion Methylation is an important epigenetic factor that might be involved in the upregulation of E2F5

  7. Alternative polyadenylation and gene expression regulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Xing, Denghui; Li, Qingshun Quinn

    2011-01-01

    Functioning as an essential step of pre-mRNA processing, polyadenylation has been realized in recent years to play an important regulatory role during eukaryotic gene expression. Such regulation occurs mostly through the use of alternative polyadenylation (APA) sites and generates different transcripts with altered coding capacity for proteins and/or RNA. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie APAs are poorly understood. Besides APA cases demonstrated in animal embryo development, cancers, and other diseases, there are a number of APA examples reported in plants. The best-known ones are related to flowering time control pathways and stress responses. Genome-wide studies have revealed that plants use APA extensively to generate diversity in their transcriptomes. Although each transcript produced by RNA polymerase II has a poly(A) tail, over 50% of plant genes studied possess multiple APA sites in their transcripts. The signals defining poly(A) sites in plants were mostly studied through classical genetic means. Our understanding of these poly(A) signals is enhanced by the tallies of whole plant transcriptomes. The profiles of these signals have been used to build computer models that can predict poly(A) sites in newly sequenced genomes, potential APA sites in genes of interest, and/or to identify, and then mutate, unwanted poly(A) sites in target transgenes to facilitate crop improvements. In this review, we provide readers an update on recent research advances that shed light on the understanding of polyadenylation, APA, and its role in gene expression regulation in plants.

  8. Epigenetic Regulation of Virulence Gene Expression in Parasitic Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Duraisingh, Manoj T; Horn, David

    2016-05-11

    Protozoan parasites colonize numerous metazoan hosts and insect vectors through their life cycles, with the need to respond quickly and reversibly while encountering diverse and often hostile ecological niches. To succeed, parasites must also persist within individuals until transmission between hosts is achieved. Several parasitic protozoa cause a huge burden of disease in humans and livestock, and here we focus on the parasites that cause malaria and African trypanosomiasis. Efforts to understand how these pathogens adapt to survive in varied host environments, cause disease, and transmit between hosts have revealed a wealth of epigenetic phenomena. Epigenetic switching mechanisms appear to be ideally suited for the regulation of clonal antigenic variation underlying successful parasitism. We review the molecular players and complex mechanistic layers that mediate the epigenetic regulation of virulence gene expression. Understanding epigenetic processes will aid the development of antiparasitic therapeutics. PMID:27173931

  9. Monomeric Bistability and the Role of Autoloops in Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Ricard

    2009-01-01

    Genetic toggle switches are widespread in gene regulatory networks (GRN). Bistability, namely the ability to choose among two different stable states, is an essential feature of switching and memory devices. Cells have many regulatory circuits able to provide bistability that endow a cell with efficient and reliable switching between different physiological modes of operation. It is often assumed that negative feedbacks with cooperative binding (i.e. the formation of dimers or multimers) are a prerequisite for bistability. Here we analyze the relation between bistability in GRN under monomeric regulation and the role of autoloops under a deterministic setting. Using a simple geometric argument, we show analytically that bistability can also emerge without multimeric regulation, provided that at least one regulatory autoloop is present. PMID:19404388

  10. Gene Regulation and Quality Control in Murine Polyomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Gordon G.

    2016-01-01

    Murine polyomavirus (MPyV) infects mouse cells and is highly oncogenic in immunocompromised hosts and in other rodents. Its genome is a small, circular DNA molecule of just over 5000 base pairs and it encodes only seven polypeptides. While seemingly simply organized, this virus has adopted an unusual genome structure and some unusual uses of cellular quality control pathways that, together, allow an amazingly complex and varied pattern of gene regulation. In this review we discuss how MPyV leverages these various pathways to control its life cycle. PMID:27763514

  11. The molecular clock regulates circadian transcription of tissue factor gene.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohkura, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and mortality. We found that the circadian expression of TF mRNA, which peaked at the day to night transition (activity onset), was damped in the liver of Clock mutant mice. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type or Clock mutant mice showed that CLOCK is involved in transcription of the TF gene. Furthermore, the results of real-time luciferase reporter experiments revealed that the circadian expression of TF mRNA is regulated by clock molecules through a cell-autonomous mechanism via an E-box element located in the promoter region.

  12. Impaired Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Regulation in Response to Ionizing Radiation in Human Fibroblast Cells with Individual Knock-down of 25 Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish; Jeevarajan, Antony; Pierson, Duane; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have demonstrated that genes with upregulated expression induced by IR may play important roles in DNA damage sensing, cell cycle checkpoint and chromosomal repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR and its impact on cytogenetic responses to ionizing radiation has not been systematically studied. In our present study, the expression of 25 genes selected based on their transcriptional changes in response to IR or from their known DNA repair roles were individually knocked down by siRNA transfection in human fibroblast cells. Chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) formation were measured as the cytogenetic endpoints. Our results showed that the yield of MN and/or CA formation were significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes that included Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway; XPA in the NER pathway; RPA1 in the MMR pathway; RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes including MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, and SESN1 and SUMO1 showed significant inhibition of cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, p21 and MLH1 expression resulted in both enhanced cell cycle progression and significantly higher yield of cytogenetic damage, indicating the involvement of these gene products in both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Of these 11 genes that affected the cytogenetic response, 9 were up-regulated in the cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulating the biological consequences after IR. Failure to express these IR-responsive genes, such as by gene mutation, could seriously change the outcome of the post IR scenario and lead to carcinogenesis.

  13. In silico analysis of miRNA-mediated gene regulation in OCA and OA genes.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Balu; Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-12-01

    Albinism is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder due to low secretion of melanin. The oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and ocular albinism (OA) genes are responsible for melanin production and also act as a potential targets for miRNAs. The role of miRNA is to inhibit the protein synthesis partially or completely by binding with the 3'UTR of the mRNA thus regulating gene expression. In this analysis, we predicted the genetic variation that occurred in 3'UTR of the transcript which can be a reason for low melanin production thus causing albinism. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3'UTR cause more new binding sites for miRNA which binds with mRNA which leads to inhibit the translation process either partially or completely. The SNPs in the mRNA of OCA and OA genes can create new binding sites for miRNA which may control the gene expression and lead to hypopigmentation. We have developed a computational procedure to determine the SNPs in the 3'UTR region of mRNA of OCA (TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2) and OA (GPR143) genes which will be a potential cause for albinism. We identified 37 SNPs in five genes that are predicted to create 87 new binding sites on mRNA, which may lead to abrogation of the translation process. Expression analysis confirms that these genes are highly expressed in skin and eye regions. It is well supported by enrichment analysis that these genes are mainly involved in eye pigmentation and melanin biosynthesis process. The network analysis also shows how the genes are interacting and expressing in a complex network. This insight provides clue to wet-lab researches to understand the expression pattern of OCA and OA genes and binding phenomenon of mRNA and miRNA upon mutation, which is responsible for inhibition of translation process at genomic levels. PMID:25060099

  14. Neuronal identity genes regulated by super-enhancers are preferentially down-regulated in the striatum of Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Achour, Mayada; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Keime, Céline; Parmentier, Frédéric; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence; Néri, Christian; Davidson, Irwin; Merienne, Karine

    2015-06-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with extensive down-regulation of genes controlling neuronal function, particularly in the striatum. Whether altered epigenetic regulation underlies transcriptional defects in HD is unclear. Integrating RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) and chromatin-immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq), we show that down-regulated genes in HD mouse striatum associate with selective decrease in H3K27ac, a mark of active enhancers, and RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII). In addition, we reveal that decreased genes in HD mouse striatum display a specific epigenetic signature, characterized by high levels and broad patterns of H3K27ac and RNAPII. Our results indicate that this signature is that of super-enhancers, a category of broad enhancers regulating genes defining tissue identity and function. Specifically, we reveal that striatal super-enhancers display extensive H3K27 acetylation within gene bodies, drive transcription characterized by low levels of paused RNAPII, regulate neuronal function genes and are enriched in binding motifs for Gata transcription factors, such as Gata2 regulating striatal identity genes. Together, our results provide evidence for preferential down-regulation of genes controlled by super-enhancers in HD striatum and indicate that enhancer topography is a major parameter determining the propensity of a gene to be deregulated in a neurodegenerative disease.

  15. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Geoffrey N; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2-7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes-promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation-as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the "tumor suppressor" activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2-the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR-the calciostat-is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level. PMID:27679579

  16. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2–7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes—promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation—as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the “tumor suppressor” activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2—the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR—the calciostat—is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level. PMID:27679579

  17. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2–7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes—promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation—as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the “tumor suppressor” activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2—the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR—the calciostat—is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level.

  18. Rhythmic changes in colonic motility are regulated by period genes.

    PubMed

    Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A; Shahinian, Vahakn B; Cornélissen, Germaine; Halberg, Franz; Bostwick, Jonathon; Timm, John; Bartell, Paul A; Cassone, Vincent M

    2010-02-01

    Human bowel movements usually occur during the day and seldom during the night, suggesting a role for a biological clock in the regulation of colonic motility. Research has unveiled molecular and physiological mechanisms for biological clock function in the brain; less is known about peripheral rhythmicity. This study aimed to determine whether clock genes such as period 1 (per1) and period2 (per2) modulate rhythmic changes in colonic motility. Organ bath studies, intracolonic pressure measurements, and stool studies were used to examine measures of colonic motility in wild-type and per1per2 double-knockout mice. To further examine the mechanism underlying rhythmic changes in circular muscle contractility, additional studies were completed in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) knockout mice. Intracolonic pressure changes and stool output in vivo, and colonic circular muscle contractility ex vivo, are rhythmic with greatest activity at the start of night in nocturnal wild-type mice. In contrast, rhythmicity in these measures was absent in per1per2 double-knockout mice. Rhythmicity was also abolished in colonic circular muscle contractility of wild-type mice in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and in nNOS knockout mice. These findings suggest that rhythms in colonic motility are regulated by both clock genes and a nNOS-mediated inhibitory process and suggest a connection between these two mechanisms.

  19. Rhythmic changes in colonic motility are regulated by period genes.

    PubMed

    Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A; Shahinian, Vahakn B; Cornélissen, Germaine; Halberg, Franz; Bostwick, Jonathon; Timm, John; Bartell, Paul A; Cassone, Vincent M

    2010-02-01

    Human bowel movements usually occur during the day and seldom during the night, suggesting a role for a biological clock in the regulation of colonic motility. Research has unveiled molecular and physiological mechanisms for biological clock function in the brain; less is known about peripheral rhythmicity. This study aimed to determine whether clock genes such as period 1 (per1) and period2 (per2) modulate rhythmic changes in colonic motility. Organ bath studies, intracolonic pressure measurements, and stool studies were used to examine measures of colonic motility in wild-type and per1per2 double-knockout mice. To further examine the mechanism underlying rhythmic changes in circular muscle contractility, additional studies were completed in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) knockout mice. Intracolonic pressure changes and stool output in vivo, and colonic circular muscle contractility ex vivo, are rhythmic with greatest activity at the start of night in nocturnal wild-type mice. In contrast, rhythmicity in these measures was absent in per1per2 double-knockout mice. Rhythmicity was also abolished in colonic circular muscle contractility of wild-type mice in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and in nNOS knockout mice. These findings suggest that rhythms in colonic motility are regulated by both clock genes and a nNOS-mediated inhibitory process and suggest a connection between these two mechanisms. PMID:19926812

  20. Rhythmic changes in colonic motility are regulated by period genes

    PubMed Central

    Shahinian, Vahakn B.; Cornélissen, Germaine; Halberg, Franz; Bostwick, Jonathon; Timm, John; Bartell, Paul A.; Cassone, Vincent M.

    2010-01-01

    Human bowel movements usually occur during the day and seldom during the night, suggesting a role for a biological clock in the regulation of colonic motility. Research has unveiled molecular and physiological mechanisms for biological clock function in the brain; less is known about peripheral rhythmicity. This study aimed to determine whether clock genes such as period 1 (per1) and period2 (per2) modulate rhythmic changes in colonic motility. Organ bath studies, intracolonic pressure measurements, and stool studies were used to examine measures of colonic motility in wild-type and per1per2 double-knockout mice. To further examine the mechanism underlying rhythmic changes in circular muscle contractility, additional studies were completed in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) knockout mice. Intracolonic pressure changes and stool output in vivo, and colonic circular muscle contractility ex vivo, are rhythmic with greatest activity at the start of night in nocturnal wild-type mice. In contrast, rhythmicity in these measures was absent in per1per2 double-knockout mice. Rhythmicity was also abolished in colonic circular muscle contractility of wild-type mice in the presence of Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and in nNOS knockout mice. These findings suggest that rhythms in colonic motility are regulated by both clock genes and a nNOS-mediated inhibitory process and suggest a connection between these two mechanisms. PMID:19926812

  1. Thiol-Based Redox Switches and Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cysteine is notable among the universal, proteinogenic amino acids for its facile redox chemistry. Cysteine thiolates are readily modified by reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive electrophilic species (RES), and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Although thiol switches are commonly triggered by disulfide bond formation, they can also be controlled by S-thiolation, S-alkylation, or modification by RNS. Thiol-based switches are common in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and activate functions that detoxify reactive species and restore thiol homeostasis while repressing functions that would be deleterious if expressed under oxidizing conditions. Here, we provide an overview of the best-understood examples of thiol-based redox switches that affect gene expression. Intra- or intermolecular disulfide bond formation serves as a direct regulatory switch for several bacterial transcription factors (OxyR, OhrR/2-Cys, Spx, YodB, CrtJ, and CprK) and indirectly regulates others (the RsrA anti-σ factor and RegB sensory histidine kinase). In eukaryotes, thiol-based switches control the yeast Yap1p transcription factor, the Nrf2/Keap1 electrophile and oxidative stress response, and the Chlamydomonas NAB1 translational repressor. Collectively, these regulators reveal a remarkable range of chemical modifications exploited by Cys residues to effect changes in gene expression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1049—1063. PMID:20626317

  2. Molecular Basis of Gene-Gene Interaction: Cyclic Cross-Regulation of Gene Expression and Post-GWAS Gene-Gene Interaction Involved in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chengqi; Zhang, Hongfu; Lu, Qiulun; Chang, Le; Wang, Fan; Wang, Pengxia; Zhang, Rongfeng; Hu, Zhenkun; Song, Qixue; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Cong; Li, Sisi; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yang, Qin; Yin, Dan; Wang, Xiaojing; Si, Wenxia; Li, Xiuchun; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Dan; Huang, Yuan; Luo, Chunyan; Li, Jia; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Jing; Wang, Longfei; Wang, Li; Han, Meng; Ye, Jian; Chen, Feifei; Liu, Jingqiu; Liu, Ying; Wu, Gang; Yang, Bo; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yuhua; Wu, Yanxia; Ke, Tie; Chen, Qiuyun; Tu, Xin; Elston, Robert; Rao, Shaoqi; Yang, Yanzong; Xia, Yunlong; Wang, Qing K.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia at the clinic. Recent GWAS identified several variants associated with AF, but they account for <10% of heritability. Gene-gene interaction is assumed to account for a significant portion of missing heritability. Among GWAS loci for AF, only three were replicated in the Chinese Han population, including SNP rs2106261 (G/A substitution) in ZFHX3, rs2200733 (C/T substitution) near PITX2c, and rs3807989 (A/G substitution) in CAV1. Thus, we analyzed the interaction among these three AF loci. We demonstrated significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 in three independent populations and combined population with 2,020 cases/5,315 controls. Compared to non-risk genotype GGCC, two-locus risk genotype AATT showed the highest odds ratio in three independent populations and the combined population (OR=5.36 (95% CI 3.87-7.43), P=8.00×10-24). The OR of 5.36 for AATT was significantly higher than the combined OR of 3.31 for both GGTT and AACC, suggesting a synergistic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) analysis also revealed significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 when exposed two copies of risk alleles (RERI=2.87, P<1.00×10-4) or exposed to one additional copy of risk allele (RERI=1.29, P<1.00×10-4). The INTERSNP program identified significant genotypic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 under an additive by additive model (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.74-0.97, P=0.02). Mechanistically, PITX2c negatively regulates expression of miR-1, which negatively regulates expression of ZFHX3, resulting in a positive regulation of ZFHX3 by PITX2c; ZFHX3 positively regulates expression of PITX2C, resulting in a cyclic loop of cross-regulation between ZFHX3 and PITX2c. Both ZFHX3 and PITX2c regulate expression of NPPA, TBX5 and NKX2.5. These results suggest that cyclic cross-regulation of gene expression is a molecular basis for gene-gene

  3. Androgens Regulate Gene Expression in Avian Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Barske, Julia; Du, Sienmi; Day, Lainy B.; Schlinger, Barney A.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR) are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus), zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus). Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird’s body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T) up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca2+ cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction. PMID:23284699

  4. Epigenetic regulation of inflammatory gene expression in macrophages by selenium.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Vivek; Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Liao, Chang; Kaushal, Naveen; Carlson, Bradley A; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2015-02-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins by histone acetyltransferases plays a pivotal role in the expression of proinflammatory genes. Given the importance of dietary selenium in mitigating inflammation, we hypothesized that selenium supplementation may regulate inflammatory gene expression at the epigenetic level. The effect of selenium towards histone acetylation was examined in both in vitro and in vivo models of inflammation by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and immunoblotting. Our results indicated that selenium supplementation, as selenite, decreased acetylation of histone H4 at K12 and K16 in COX-2 and TNFα promoters, and of the p65 subunit of the redox sensitive transcription factor NFκB in primary and immortalized macrophages. On the other hand, selenomethionine had a much weaker effect. Selenite treatment of HIV-1-infected human monocytes also significantly decreased the acetylation of H4 at K12 and K16 on the HIV-1 promoter, supporting the down-regulation of proviral expression by selenium. A similar decrease in histone acetylation was also seen in the colonic extracts of mice treated with dextran sodium sulfate that correlated well with the levels of selenium in the diet. Bone-marrow-derived macrophages from Trsp(fl/fl)Cre(LysM) mice that lack expression of selenoproteins in macrophages confirmed the important role of selenoproteins in the inhibition of histone H4 acetylation. Our studies suggest that the ability of selenoproteins to skew the metabolism of arachidonic acid contributes, in part, to their ability to inhibit histone acetylation. In summary, our studies suggest a new role for selenoproteins in the epigenetic modulation of proinflammatory genes.

  5. Androgens regulate gene expression in avian skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Barske, Julia; Du, Sienmi; Day, Lainy B; Schlinger, Barney A

    2012-01-01

    Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR) are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus), zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus). Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird's body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T) up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca(2+) cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction. PMID:23284699

  6. Staphylococcus aureus CodY Negatively Regulates Virulence Gene Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte D.; Sadykov, Marat R.; Luong, Thanh T.; Lee, Chia; Somerville, Greg A.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2008-01-01

    CodY is a global regulatory protein that was first discovered in Bacillus subtilis, where it couples gene expression to changes in the pools of critical metabolites through its activation by GTP and branched-chain amino acids. Homologs of CodY can be found encoded in the genomes of nearly all low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus. The introduction of a codY-null mutation into two S. aureus clinical isolates, SA564 and UAMS-1, through allelic replacement, resulted in the overexpression of several virulence genes. The mutant strains had higher levels of hemolytic activity toward rabbit erythrocytes in their culture fluid, produced more polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), and formed more robust biofilms than did their isogenic parent strains. These phenotypes were associated with derepressed levels of RNA for the hemolytic alpha-toxin (hla), the accessory gene regulator (agr) (RNAII and RNAIII/hld), and the operon responsible for the production of PIA (icaADBC). These data suggest that CodY represses, either directly or indirectly, the synthesis of a number of virulence factors of S. aureus. PMID:18156263

  7. Screening for gene regulation mutants by bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Stevenson, Becky; Lee, Byeong-ha; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-07-09

    Because plants cannot move, they have evolved complex sensing and response systems to cope with the physical environment. Adverse environmental conditions, such as those causing abiotic stress, often cause significant losses in crop productivity and quality. Because of a paucity of well-defined visible phenotypes, conventional genetic screens have not been very successful in isolating abiotic stress signal transduction mutants of plants. Here, we describe a reporter gene-based strategy to screen for mutants affected in abiotic stress-regulated gene transcription. Our genetic screen uses the firefly luciferase reporter gene driven by the cold, drought, salt, and abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive RD29A promoter (RD29A::LUC). Arabidopsis plants transformed with the RD29A::LUC reporter emit bioluminescence in response to cold, drought, salt, or ABA treatment. After mutagenesis of these plants with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), mutants can be screened from the M2 population by monitoring the level of stress-inducible bioluminescence with a high-throughput, low-light imaging system. This protocol describes in detail the procedures for this luciferase reporter-based genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants defective in abiotic stress signaling.

  8. Astrocyte elevated gene-1 regulates hepatocellular carcinoma development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byoung Kwon; Emdad, Luni; Su, Zao-zhong; Villanueva, Augusto; Chiang, Derek Y.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.; Mills, Alan Scott; Waxman, Samuel; Fisher, Robert A.; Llovet, Josep M.; Fisher, Paul B.; Sarkar, Devanand

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly aggressive vascular cancer characterized by diverse etiology, activation of multiple signal transduction pathways, and various gene mutations. Here, we have determined a specific role for astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG1) in HCC pathogenesis. Expression of AEG1 was extremely low in human hepatocytes, but its levels were significantly increased in human HCC. Stable overexpression of AEG1 converted nontumorigenic human HCC cells into highly aggressive vascular tumors, and inhibition of AEG1 abrogated tumorigenesis by aggressive HCC cells in a xenograft model of nude mice. In human HCC, AEG1 overexpression was associated with elevated copy numbers. Microarray analysis revealed that AEG1 modulated the expression of genes associated with invasion, metastasis, chemoresistance, angiogenesis, and senescence. AEG1 also was found to activate Wnt/β-catenin signaling via ERK42/44 activation and upregulated lymphoid-enhancing factor 1/T cell factor 1 (LEF1/TCF1), the ultimate executor of the Wnt pathway, important for HCC progression. Inhibition studies further demonstrated that activation of Wnt signaling played a key role in mediating AEG1 function. AEG1 also activated the NF-κB pathway, which may play a role in the chronic inflammatory changes preceding HCC development. These data indicate that AEG1 plays a central role in regulating diverse aspects of HCC pathogenesis. Targeted inhibition of AEG1 might lead to the shutdown of key elemental characteristics of HCC and could lead to an effective therapeutic strategy for HCC. PMID:19221438

  9. Regulation of targeted gene repair by intrinsic cellular processes.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Julia U; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kmiec, Eric B

    2009-02-01

    Targeted gene alteration (TGA) is a strategy for correcting single base mutations in the DNA of human cells that cause inherited disorders. TGA aims to reverse a phenotype by repairing the mutant base within the chromosome itself, avoiding the introduction of exogenous genes. The process of how to accurately repair a genetic mutation is elucidated through the use of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) that can enter the cell and migrate to the nucleus. These specifically designed ODNs hybridize to the target sequence and act as a beacon for nucleotide exchange. The key to this reaction is the frequency with which the base is corrected; this will determine whether the approach becomes clinically relevant or not. Over the course of the last five years, workers have been uncovering the role played by the cells in regulating the gene repair process. In this essay, we discuss how the impact of the cell on TGA has evolved through the years and illustrate ways that inherent cellular pathways could be used to enhance TGA activity. We also describe the cost to cell metabolism and survival when certain processes are altered to achieve a higher frequency of repair.

  10. RAV genes: regulation of floral induction and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Matías-Hernández, Luis; Aguilar-Jaramillo, Andrea E.; Marín-González, Esther; Suárez-López, Paula; Pelaz, Soraya

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcription factors of the RAV (RELATED TO ABI3 AND VP1) family are plant-specific and possess two DNA-binding domains. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the family comprises six members, including TEMPRANILLO 1 (TEM1) and TEM2. Arabidopsis RAV1 and TEM1 have been shown to bind bipartite DNA sequences, with the consensus motif C(A/C/G)ACA(N)2–8(C/A/T)ACCTG. Through direct binding to DNA, RAV proteins act as transcriptional repressors, probably in complexes with other co-repressors. Scope and Conclusions In this review, a summary is given of current knowledge of the regulation and function of RAV genes in diverse plant species, paying particular attention to their roles in the control of flowering in arabidopsis. TEM1 and TEM2 delay flowering by repressing the production of two florigenic molecules, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and gibberellins. In this way, TEM1 and TEM2 prevent precocious flowering and postpone floral induction until the plant has accumulated enough reserves or has reached a growth stage that ensures survival of the progeny. Recent results indicate that TEM1 and TEM2 are regulated by genes acting in several flowering pathways, suggesting that TEMs may integrate information from diverse pathways. However, flowering is not the only process controlled by RAV proteins. Family members are involved in other aspects of plant development, such as bud outgrowth in trees and leaf senescence, and possibly in general growth regulation. In addition, they respond to pathogen infections and abiotic stresses, including cold, dehydration, high salinity and osmotic stress. PMID:24812253

  11. Pitx2, an Atrial Fibrillation Predisposition Gene, Directly Regulates Ion Transport and Intercalated Disc Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ye; Zhang, Min; Li, Lele; Bai, Yan; Zhou, Yuefang; Moon, Anne M.; Kaminski, Henry J.; Martin, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pitx2 is the homeobox gene located in proximity to the human 4q25 familial atrial fibrillation locus. When deleted in the mouse germline, Pitx2 haploinsufficiency predisposes to pacing induced atrial fibrillation indicating that reduced Pitx2 promotes an arrhythmogenic substrate. Previous work focused on Pitx2 developmental functions that predispose to atrial fibrillation. Although Pitx2 is expressed in postnatal left atrium, it is unknown whether Pitx2 has distinct postnatal and developmental functions. Methods and Results To investigate Pitx2 postnatal function, we conditionally inactivated Pitx2 in the postnatal atrium while leaving its developmental function intact. Unstressed adult Pitx2 homozygous mutant mice display variable R-R interval with diminished P-wave amplitude characteristic of sinus node dysfunction, an atrial fibrillation risk factor in human patients. An integrated genomics approach in the adult heart revealed Pitx2 target genes encoding cell junction proteins, ion channels, and critical transcriptional regulators. Importantly, many Pitx2 target genes have been implicated in human atrial fibrillation by genome wide association studies. Immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy studies in adult Pitx2 mutant mice revealed structural remodeling of the intercalated disc characteristic of human atrial fibrillation patients. Conclusions Our findings, revealing that Pitx2 has genetically separable postnatal and developmental functions, unveil direct Pitx2 target genes that include channel and calcium handling genes as well as genes that stabilize the intercalated disc in postnatal atrium. PMID:24395921

  12. Human Specific Regulation of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Cheng, De; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase, regulated primarily by the transcription of its catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), is critical for controlling cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis by maintaining telomere length. Although there is a high conservation between human and mouse TERT genes, the regulation of their transcription is significantly different in these two species. Whereas mTERT expression is widely detected in adult mice, hTERT is expressed at extremely low levels in most adult human tissues and cells. As a result, mice do not exhibit telomere-mediated replicative aging, but telomere shortening is a critical factor of human aging and its stabilization is essential for cancer development in humans. The chromatin environment and epigenetic modifications of the hTERT locus, the binding of transcriptional factors to its promoter, and recruitment of nucleosome modifying complexes all play essential roles in restricting its transcription in different cell types. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of TERT regulation in human and mouse tissues and cells, and during cancer development. PMID:27367732

  13. Whole gene family expression and drought stress regulation of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Alexandersson, Erik; Fraysse, Laure; Sjövall-Larsen, Sara; Gustavsson, Sofia; Fellert, Maria; Karlsson, Maria; Johanson, Urban; Kjellbom, Per

    2005-10-01

    Since many aquaporins (AQPs) act as water channels, they are thought to play an important role in plant water relations. It is therefore of interest to study the expression patterns of AQP isoforms in order to further elucidate their involvement in plant water transport. We have monitored the expression patterns of all 35 Arabidopsis AQPs in leaves, roots and flowers by cDNA microarrays, specially designed for AQPs, and by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (Q-RT-PCR). This showed that many AQPs are pre-dominantly expressed in either root or flower organs, whereas no AQP isoform seem to be leaf specific. Looking at the AQP subfamilies, most plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and some tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) have a high level of expression, while NOD26-like proteins (NIPs) are present at a much lower level. In addition, we show that PIP transcripts are generally down-regulated upon gradual drought stress in leaves, with the exception of AtPIP1;4 and AtPIP2;5, which are up-regulated. AtPIP2;6 and AtSIP1;1 are constitutively expressed and not significantly affected by the drought stress. The transcriptional down-regulation of PIP genes upon drought stress could also be observed on the protein level. PMID:16235111

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  15. Genes encoding members of the JAK-STAT pathway or epigenetic regulators are recurrently mutated in T-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    López, Cristina; Bergmann, Anke K; Paul, Ulrike; Murga Penas, Eva M; Nagel, Inga; Betts, Matthew J; Johansson, Patricia; Ritgen, Matthias; Baumann, Tycho; Aymerich, Marta; Jayne, Sandrine; Russell, Robert B; Campo, Elias; Dyer, Martin J S; Dürig, Jan; Siebert, Reiner

    2016-04-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia (T-PLL) is an aggressive leukaemia. The primary genetic alteration in T-PLL are the inv(14)(q11q32)/t(14;14)(q11;q32) leading to TRD/TRA-TCL1A fusion, or the t(X;14)(q28;q11) associated with TRD/TRA-MTCP1 fusion. However, additional cooperating abnormalities are necessary for emergence of the full neoplastic phenotype. Though the pattern of secondary chromosomal aberrations is remarkably conserved, targets of the changes are largely unknown. We analysed a cohort of 43 well-characterized T-PLL for hotspot mutations in the genes JAK3, STAT5B and RHOA. Additionally, we selected a subset of 23 T-PLL cases for mutational screening of 54 genes known to be recurrently mutated in T-cell and other haematological neoplasms. Activating mutations in the investigated regions of the JAK3 and STAT5B genes were detected in 30% (13/43) and 21% (8/39) of the cases, respectively, and were mutually exclusive. Further, we identified mutations in the genes encoding the epigenetic regulators EZH2 in 13% (3/23), TET2 in 17% (4/23) and BCOR in 9% (2/23) of the cases. We confirmed that the JAK-STAT pathway is a major mutational target, and identified epigenetic regulators recurrently mutated in T-PLL. These findings complement the mutational spectrum of secondary aberrations in T-PLL and underscore the potential therapeutical relevance of epigenetic regulators in T-PLL.

  16. Genes encoding members of the JAK-STAT pathway or epigenetic regulators are recurrently mutated in T-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    López, Cristina; Bergmann, Anke K; Paul, Ulrike; Murga Penas, Eva M; Nagel, Inga; Betts, Matthew J; Johansson, Patricia; Ritgen, Matthias; Baumann, Tycho; Aymerich, Marta; Jayne, Sandrine; Russell, Robert B; Campo, Elias; Dyer, Martin J S; Dürig, Jan; Siebert, Reiner

    2016-04-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia (T-PLL) is an aggressive leukaemia. The primary genetic alteration in T-PLL are the inv(14)(q11q32)/t(14;14)(q11;q32) leading to TRD/TRA-TCL1A fusion, or the t(X;14)(q28;q11) associated with TRD/TRA-MTCP1 fusion. However, additional cooperating abnormalities are necessary for emergence of the full neoplastic phenotype. Though the pattern of secondary chromosomal aberrations is remarkably conserved, targets of the changes are largely unknown. We analysed a cohort of 43 well-characterized T-PLL for hotspot mutations in the genes JAK3, STAT5B and RHOA. Additionally, we selected a subset of 23 T-PLL cases for mutational screening of 54 genes known to be recurrently mutated in T-cell and other haematological neoplasms. Activating mutations in the investigated regions of the JAK3 and STAT5B genes were detected in 30% (13/43) and 21% (8/39) of the cases, respectively, and were mutually exclusive. Further, we identified mutations in the genes encoding the epigenetic regulators EZH2 in 13% (3/23), TET2 in 17% (4/23) and BCOR in 9% (2/23) of the cases. We confirmed that the JAK-STAT pathway is a major mutational target, and identified epigenetic regulators recurrently mutated in T-PLL. These findings complement the mutational spectrum of secondary aberrations in T-PLL and underscore the potential therapeutical relevance of epigenetic regulators in T-PLL. PMID:26917488

  17. Soybean seed lectin gene and flanking nonseed protein genes are developmentally regulated in transformed tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Okamuro, J K; Jofuku, K D; Goldberg, R B

    1986-01-01

    We introduced a 17.1-kilobase soybean DNA fragment containing the lectin gene and at least four nonseed protein genes into the tobacco genome. As in soybean plants, lectin mRNA is present in tobacco seeds, accumulates and decays during tobacco seed development, and is translated into a protein that accumulates prior to dormancy. Each soybean nonseed protein mRNA is present in tobacco leaves, roots, stems, and seeds at levels similar to that found in soybean plants. We conclude that a differentially expressed soybean gene cluster is correctly regulated in transformed tobacco plants and that sequences controlling their expression are recognized by regulatory factors present in tobacco cells. Images PMID:3464951

  18. Gene expression of ecdysteroid-regulated gene E74 of the honeybee in ovary and brain.

    PubMed

    Paul, R K; Takeuchi, H; Matsuo, Y; Kubo, T

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate studies of hormonal control in the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.), a cDNA for a honeybee homologue of the ecdysteroid-regulated gene E74 (AmE74) was isolated and its expression was analysed. Northern blot analysis indicated strong expression in the adult queen abdomen, and no significant expression in the adult drone and worker abdomens. In situ hybridization demonstrated that this gene was expressed selectively in the ovary and gut in the queen abdomen. Furthermore, this gene was also expressed selectively in subsets of mushroom body interneurones in the brain of the adult worker bees. These findings suggest that AmE74 is involved in neural function as well as in reproduction in adult honeybees.

  19. Redox control of p53 in the transcriptional regulation of TGF-β1 target genes through SMAD cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, Jessica M; Samarakoon, Rohan; Meldrum, Kirstan K; Higgins, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) regulates the tissue response to injury and is the principal driver of excessive scarring leading to fibrosis and eventual organ failure. The TGF-β1 effectors SMAD3 and p53 are major contributors to disease progression. While SMAD3 is an established pro-fibrotic factor, the role of p53 in the TGF-β1-induced fibrotic program is not clear. p53 gene silencing, genetic ablation/subsequent rescue, and pharmacological inhibition confirmed that p53 was required for expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major TGF-β1 target gene and a key causative element in fibrotic disorders. TGF-β1 regulated p53 activity by stimulating p53(Ser15 and 9) phosphorylation and acetylation, promoting interactions with activated SMADs and subsequent binding of p53/SMAD3 to the PAI-1 promoter in HK-2 human renal tubular epithelial cells and HaCaT human keratinocytes. Immunohistochemistry revealed prominent co-induction of SMAD3, p53 and PAI-1 in the tubular epithelium of the obstructed kidney consistent with a potential in vivo role for p53 and SMADs in TGF-β1-driven renal fibrosis. TGF-β1-initiated phosphorylation of p53(Ser15) and up-regulation of expression of several pro-fibrotic genes, moreover, was dependent on the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). shRNA silencing of the p22(Phox) subunit of NADP(H) oxidases in HK-2 cells partially attenuated (over 50%) p53(Ser15) phosphorylation and PAI-1 induction. These studies highlight the role of free radicals in p53 activation and subsequent pro-fibrotic reprogramming by TGF-β1 via the SMAD3-p53 transcriptional axis. Present findings provide a rationale for therapeutic targeting of SMAD3-p53 in aberrant TGF-β1 signaling associated with renal fibrosis.

  20. DNA methylation and differential gene regulation in photoreceptor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Farinelli, P; Perera, A; Arango-Gonzalez, B; Trifunovic, D; Wagner, M; Carell, T; Biel, M; Zrenner, E; Michalakis, S; Paquet-Durand, F; Ekström, P A R

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) defines a group of inherited degenerative retinal diseases causing progressive loss of photoreceptors. To this day, RP is still untreatable and rational treatment development will require a thorough understanding of the underlying cell death mechanisms. Methylation of the DNA base cytosine by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is an important epigenetic factor regulating gene expression, cell differentiation, cell death, and survival. Previous studies suggested an involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in RP, and in this study, increased cytosine methylation was detected in dying photoreceptors in the rd1, rd2, P23H, and S334ter rodent models for RP. Ultrastructural analysis of photoreceptor nuclear morphology in the rd1 mouse model for RP revealed a severely altered chromatin structure during retinal degeneration that coincided with an increased expression of the DNMT isozyme DNMT3a. To identify disease-specific differentially methylated DNA regions (DMRs) on a genomic level, we immunoprecipitated methylated DNA fragments and subsequently analyzed them with a targeted microarray. Genome-wide comparison of DMRs between rd1 and wild-type retina revealed hypermethylation of genes involved in cell death and survival as well as cell morphology and nervous system development. When correlating DMRs with gene expression data, we found that hypermethylation occurred alongside transcriptional repression. Consistently, motif analysis showed that binding sites of several important transcription factors for retinal physiology were hypermethylated in the mutant model, which also correlated with transcriptional silencing of their respective target genes. Finally, inhibition of DNMTs in rd1 organotypic retinal explants using decitabine resulted in a substantial reduction of photoreceptor cell death, suggesting inhibition of DNA methylation as a potential novel treatment in RP. PMID:25476906

  1. Gene Expression Dosage Regulation in an Allopolyploid Fish

    PubMed Central

    Matos, I; Machado, M. P.; Schartl, M.; Coelho, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    How allopolyploids are able not only to cope but profit from their condition is a question that remains elusive, but is of great importance within the context of successful allopolyploid evolution. One outstanding example of successful allopolyploidy is the endemic Iberian cyprinid Squalius alburnoides. Previously, based on the evaluation of a few genes, it was reported that the transcription levels between diploid and triploid S. alburnoides were similar. If this phenomenon occurs on a full genomic scale, a wide functional ‘‘diploidization’’ could be related to the success of these polyploids. We generated RNA-seq data from whole juvenile fish and from adult livers, to perform the first comparative quantitative transcriptomic analysis between diploid and triploid individuals of a vertebrate allopolyploid. Together with an assay to estimate relative expression per cell, it was possible to infer the relative sizes of transcriptomes. This showed that diploid and triploid S. alburnoides hybrids have similar liver transcriptome sizes. This in turn made it valid to directly compare the S. alburnoides RNA-seq transcript data sets and obtain a profile of dosage responses across the S. alburnoides transcriptome. We found that 64% of transcripts in juveniles’ samples and 44% in liver samples differed less than twofold between diploid and triploid hybrids (similar expression). Yet, respectively 29% and 15% of transcripts presented accurate dosage compensation (PAA/PA expression ratio of 1 instead of 1.5). Therefore, an exact functional diploidization of the triploid genome does not occur, but a significant down regulation of gene expression in triploids was observed. However, for those genes with similar expression levels between diploids and triploids, expression is not globally strictly proportional to gene dosage nor is it set to a perfect diploid level. This quantitative expression flexibility may be a strong contributor to overcome the genomic shock, and be an

  2. Nature and regulation of pistil-expressed genes in tomato.

    PubMed

    Milligan, S B; Gasser, C S

    1995-07-01

    The specialized reproductive functions of angiosperm pistils are dependent in part upon the regulated activation of numerous genes expressed predominantly in this organ system. To better understand the nature of these pistil-predominant gene products we have analyzed seven cDNA clones isolated from tomato pistils through differential hybridization screening. Six of the seven cDNAs represent sequences previously undescribed in tomato, each having a unique pistil- and/or floral-predominant expression pattern. The putative protein products encoded by six of the cDNAs have been identified by their similarity to sequences in the database of previously sequenced genes, with a seventh sequence having no significant similarity with any previously reported sequence. Three of the putative proteins appear to be targeted to the endomembrane system and include an endo-beta-1,4-glucanase which is expressed exclusively in pistils at early stages of development, and proteins similar in sequence to gamma-thionin and miraculin which are expressed in immature pistils and stamens, and in either sepals or petals, respectively. Two other clones, similar in sequence to each other, were expressed primarily in immature pistils and stamens and encode distinct proteins with similarity to leucine aminopeptidases. An additional clone, which encodes a protein similar in sequence to the enzyme hyoscyamine 6-beta-hydroxylase and to other members of the family of Fe2+/ascorbate-dependent oxidases, was expressed at high levels in pistils, stamens and sepals, and at detectable levels in some vegetative organs. Together, these observations provide new insight into the nature and possible functional roles of genes expressed during reproductive development. PMID:7647301

  3. Regulation of the Wilms' tumor gene during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Del Rio-Tsonis, K; Covarrubias, L; Kent, J; Hastie, N D; Tsonis, P A

    1996-12-01

    Spermatogenesis is the process by which male germ cells develop and mature, a pathway that includes a transition from a mitotic to a meiotic cell cycle. Throughout this pathway, the germ cells are in close contact with their nurturing cells, the Sertoli cells. Sertoli-germ cell interactions are difficult to study in mammals due to the complex cellular organization of their seminiferous tubules. The urodele amphibian testis, however, provides a unique system to study the process of germ cell maturation; it is organized in a gradient-like cystic structure, in which synchronized germ cells can be found within the same cyst. The Wilms' tumor gene (WT1) has been shown to be an essential gene for the formation of the gonads in mice, and it has been implicated in a variety of differentiation processes. The WT1 gene is thus a good candidate for the study of the differentiation processes involved in the maturation of the male germ cells. By using a probe for the urodele WT1 homologue in in situ hybridization studies, as well as an antibody against the WT1 protein in immunohistochemistry studies, we determined that WT1 gene expression in Sertoli cells depends on the stage of maturation of the associated germ cell. Thus, WT1 mRNA was detected only in Sertoli cells of cysts that contained early spermatogonia. No mRNA expression was observed in cysts containing late spermatogonia, germ cells undergoing meiosis, or germ cells going through spermiogenesis. Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed that WT1 protein was strongly expressed in Sertoli cells associated with early spermatogonia but not in late ones. The protein was also found in Sertoli cells associated with germ cells that undergo the subsequent stages of meiosis and spermiogenesis. These results suggest that WT1 could be involved in the regulation by Sertoli cells of germ cell maturation and possibly in the progression from a mitotic to a meiotic cell cycle. PMID:8950512

  4. Identification of microRNA-regulated gene networks by expression analysis of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Gennarino, Vincenzo Alessandro; D'Angelo, Giovanni; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Fernandez, Serena; Russolillo, Giorgio; Sanges, Remo; Mutarelli, Margherita; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Ballabio, Andrea; Verde, Pasquale; Sardiello, Marco; Banfi, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and transcription factors control eukaryotic cell proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism through their specific gene regulatory networks. However, differently from transcription factors, our understanding of the processes regulated by miRNAs is currently limited. Here, we introduce gene network analysis as a new means for gaining insight into miRNA biology. A systematic analysis of all human miRNAs based on Co-expression Meta-analysis of miRNA Targets (CoMeTa) assigns high-resolution biological functions to miRNAs and provides a comprehensive, genome-scale analysis of human miRNA regulatory networks. Moreover, gene cotargeting analyses show that miRNAs synergistically regulate cohorts of genes that participate in similar processes. We experimentally validate the CoMeTa procedure through focusing on three poorly characterized miRNAs, miR-519d/190/340, which CoMeTa predicts to be associated with the TGFβ pathway. Using lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells as a model system, we show that miR-519d and miR-190 inhibit, while miR-340 enhances TGFβ signaling and its effects on cell proliferation, morphology, and scattering. Based on these findings, we formalize and propose co-expression analysis as a general paradigm for second-generation procedures to recognize bona fide targets and infer biological roles and network communities of miRNAs. PMID:22345618

  5. A gene expression signature associated with “K-Ras addiction” reveals regulators of EMT and tumor cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anurag; Greninger, Patricia; Rhodes, Daniel; Koopman, Louise; Violette, Sheila; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Settleman, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY K-Ras mutations occur frequently in epithelial cancers. Using shRNAs to deplete K-Ras in lung and pancreatic cancer cell lines harboring K-Ras mutations, two classes were identified—lines that do or do not require K-Ras to maintain viability. Comparing these two classes of cancer cells revealed a gene expression signature in K-Ras-dependent cells, associated with a well-differentiated epithelial phenotype, which was also seen in primary tumors. Several of these genes encode pharmacologically tractable proteins, such as Syk and Ron kinases and integrin beta6, depletion of which induces epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) and apoptosis specifically in K-Ras-dependent cells. These findings indicate that epithelial differentiation and tumor cell viability are associated, and that EMT regulators in “K-Ras-addicted” cancers represent candidate therapeutic targets. SIGNIFICANCE K-Ras is the most frequently mutated oncogene in solid tumors and when aberrantly activated, is a potent tumor initiator. However, the identification of the critical effectors of K-Ras-mediated tumorigenesis and the development of clinically effective therapeutic strategies in this setting remain challenging. We have found that cancer cell lines harboring K-Ras mutations can be broadly classified into K-Ras-dependent and K-Ras-independent groups. By establishing a gene expression signature that can distinguish these two groups, we identified genes that are specifically up-regulated in K-Ras-dependent cells and are required for their viability. Therefore, the K-Ras dependency signature has revealed several potential therapeutic targets in a subset of otherwise pharmacologically intractable human cancers. PMID:19477428

  6. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  7. The Drosophila planar polarity gene multiple wing hairs directly regulates the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuheng; Schafer, Dorothy A; Adler, Paul N

    2015-07-15

    The evolutionarily conserved frizzled/starry night (fz/stan) pathway regulates planar cell polarity (PCP) in vertebrates and invertebrates. This pathway has been extensively studied in the Drosophila wing, where it is manifested by an array of distally pointing cuticular hairs. Using in vivo imaging we found that, early in hair growth, cells have multiple actin bundles and hairs that subsequently fuse into a single growing hair. The downstream PCP gene multiple wing hairs (mwh) plays a key role in this process and acts to antagonize the actin cytoskeleton. In mwh mutants hair initiation is not limited to a small region at the distal edge of pupal wing cells as in wild type, resulting in multiple hairs with aberrant polarity. Extra actin bundles/hairs are formed and do not completely fuse, in contrast to wild type. As development proceeded additional hairs continued to form, further increasing hair number. We identified a fragment of Mwh with in vivo rescue activity and that bound and bundled F-actin filaments and inhibited actin polymerization in in vitro actin assays. The loss of these activities can explain the mwh mutant phenotype. Our data suggest a model whereby, prior to hair initiation, proximally localized Mwh inhibits actin polymerization resulting in polarized activation of the cytoskeleton and hair formation on the distal side of wing cells. During hair growth Mwh is found in growing hairs, where we suggest it functions to promote the fusion of actin bundles and inhibit the formation of additional actin bundles that could lead to extra hairs.

  8. PHF8 and REST/NRSF co-occupy gene promoters to regulate proximal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Lin, Xueqiu; Wang, Su; Wang, Chenfei; Wang, Qixuan; Duan, Xikun; Lu, Peng; Wang, Qian; Wang, Chengyang; Liu, X Shirley; Huang, Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin regulators play an important role in the development of human diseases. In this study, we focused on Plant Homeo Domain Finger protein 8 (PHF8), a chromatin regulator that has attracted special concern recently. PHF8 is a histone lysine demethylase ubiquitously expressed in nuclei. Mutations of PHF8 are associated with X-linked mental retardation. It usually functions as a transcriptional co-activator by associating with H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II. We found that PHF8 may associate with another regulator, REST/NRSF, predominately at promoter regions via studying several published PHF8 chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) datasets. Our analysis suggested that PHF8 not only activates but may also repress gene expression. PMID:24852203

  9. Regulation of Plastid Gene Expression during Photooxidative Stress 1

    PubMed Central

    Tonkyn, John C.; Deng, Xing-Wang; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    1992-01-01

    We have used the carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor norflurazon to study the relationship between chloroplast and nuclear gene expression and the mechanisms by which plastid mRNA accumulation is regulated in response to photooxidative stress. By treating 4-week-old hydroponic spinach plants (Spinacea oleracea), we were able to determine the response at two distinct stages of chloroplast development. For all parameters studied, differences were found between the norflurazon-treated young and mature leaves. Young leaves lost essentially all pigment content in the presence of norflurazon, whereas mature leaves retained more than 60% of their chlorophyll and carotenoids. The accumulation of plastid mRNA was determined for several genes, and we found a decrease in mRNA levels for all genes except psbA in herbicide-treated young leaves. For genes such as atpB, psbB, and psaA, there was a corresponding change in the relative level of transcription, but for psbA and rbcL, transcription and mRNA accumulation were uncoupled. In norflurazon-treated mature leaves, all plastid mRNAs except psaA accumulated to normal levels, and transcription levels were either normal or higher than corresponding controls. This led to the conclusion that plastid mRNA accumulation is regulated both transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally in response to photooxidative stress. Although direct photooxidative damage is confined to the plastid and peroxisome, there is a feedback of information controlling the transcription of nuclear-encoded plastid proteins. Considerable evidence has accumulated implicating a “plastid factor” in this control. Therefore, the expression of several nuclear-encoded plastid proteins and the corresponding mRNAs were determined. Although the levels of both the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and the light harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein and corresponding mRNAs were reduced, a 28-kilodalton chloroplast RNA-binding protein and

  10. Arabidopsis DAYU/ABERRANT PEROXISOME MORPHOLOGY9 is a key regulator of peroxisome biogenesis and plays critical roles during pollen maturation and germination in planta.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Ran; Li, Hong-Ju; Yuan, Li; Liu, Man; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2014-02-01

    Pollen undergo a maturation process to sustain pollen viability and prepare them for germination. Molecular mechanisms controlling these processes remain largely unknown. Here, we report an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, dayu (dau), which impairs pollen maturation and in vivo germination. Molecular analysis indicated that DAU encodes the peroxisomal membrane protein ABERRANT PEROXISOME MORPHOLOGY9 (APEM9). DAU is transiently expressed from bicellular pollen to mature pollen during male gametogenesis. DAU interacts with peroxisomal membrane proteins PEROXIN13 (PEX13) and PEX16 in planta. Consistently, both peroxisome biogenesis and peroxisome protein import are impaired in dau pollen. In addition, the jasmonic acid (JA) level is significantly decreased in dau pollen, and the dau mutant phenotype is partially rescued by exogenous application of JA, indicating that the male sterility is mainly due to JA deficiency. In addition, the phenotypic survey of peroxin mutants indicates that the PEXs most likely play different roles in pollen germination. Taken together, these data indicate that DAU/APEM9 plays critical roles in peroxisome biogenesis and function, which is essential for JA production and pollen maturation and germination.

  11. Nitric oxide suppresses tumor cell migration through N-Myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) expression: role of chelatable iron.

    PubMed

    Hickok, Jason R; Sahni, Sumit; Mikhed, Yuliya; Bonini, Marcelo G; Thomas, Douglas D

    2011-12-01

    N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a ubiquitous cellular protein that is up-regulated under a multitude of stress and growth-regulatory conditions. Although the exact cellular functions of this protein have not been elucidated, mutations in this gene or aberrant expression of this protein have been linked to both tumor suppressive and oncogenic phenotypes. Previous reports have demonstrated that NDRG1 is strongly up-regulated by chemical iron chelators and hypoxia, yet its regulation by the free radical nitric oxide ((•)NO) has never been demonstrated. Herein, we examine the chemical biology that confers NDRG1 responsiveness at the mRNA and protein levels to (•)NO. We demonstrate that the interaction of (•)NO with the chelatable iron pool (CIP) and the appearance of dinitrosyliron complexes (DNIC) are key determinants. Using HCC 1806 triple negative breast cancer cells, we find that NDRG1 is up-regulated by physiological (•)NO concentrations in a dose- and time-dependant manner. Tumor cell migration was suppressed by NDRG1 expression and we excluded the involvement of HIF-1α, sGC, N-Myc, and c-Myc as upstream regulatory targets of (•)NO. Augmenting the chelatable iron pool abolished (•)NO-mediated NDRG1 expression and the associated phenotypic effects. These data, in summary, reveal a link between (•)NO, chelatable iron, and regulation of NDRG1 expression and signaling in tumor cells.

  12. Regulation and Function of Adult Neurogenesis. From Genes to Cognition

    DOE PAGES

    Aimone, J. B.; Li, Y.; Lee, S. W.; Clemenson, G. D.; Deng, W.; Gage, F. H.

    2014-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. Our review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages ofmore » maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. Furthermore, the increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders.« less

  13. Regulation and Function of Adult Neurogenesis: From Genes to Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, James B.; Li, Yan; Lee, Star W.; Clemenson, Gregory D.; Deng, Wei; Gage, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. This review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages of maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. The increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders. PMID:25287858

  14. Regulation and Function of Adult Neurogenesis. From Genes to Cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Aimone, J. B.; Li, Y.; Lee, S. W.; Clemenson, G. D.; Deng, W.; Gage, F. H.

    2014-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. Our review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages of maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. Furthermore, the increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders.

  15. An overview of ABC and SLC drug transporter gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiu-Xia; Hu, Hai-Hong; Zhou, Quan; Yu, Ai-Ming; Zeng, Su

    2013-02-01

    Membrane transporters play a significant role in drug absorption, distribution and excretion, and they consequently affect the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of a drug. Under certain circumstances, such as pathological processes or exposure to certain substances, the expression of drug transporters is modified in cells. Change in transporter expression and function may affect cellular drug disposition resulting in different drug responses. This raises a number of questions such as which drugs are likely to modulate the expression of drug transporters, what factors support this process, and which transporters are influenced in a particular situation. In this paper, we summarize recent findings to find an answer to these questions. Particularly, we present an overview of the transcription factors involved in the regulation of a given drug transporter, the signaling transduction pathways that contribute to drug transporter gene expression, and xenobiotics and endobiotics that initiate the processes.

  16. Regulation of gene expression by hypoxia: a molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Shull, G E; Dedman, J R; Millhorn, D E

    1997-11-01

    Oxygen is a strict requirement for cell function. The cellular mechanisms by which organisms detect and respond to changes in oxygen tension remain a major unanswered question in pulmonary physiology. Part of the difficulty in addressing this question is due to the limited scope of experiments that can be performed in vivo. In the past few years, several laboratories have begun to make progress in this area, using a variety of cell culture model systems and sophisticated genetic manipulations. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of regulation of gene expression by hypoxia, and describe novel experimental approaches that promise to broaden our understanding of how cells and whole organisms respond to alterations in O2 tension. PMID:9407603

  17. Multiple dimensions of epigenetic gene regulation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum: gene regulation via histone modifications, nucleosome positioning and nuclear architecture in P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Ay, Ferhat; Bunnik, Evelien M; Varoquaux, Nelle; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William Stafford; Le Roch, Karine G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the most deadly human malarial parasite, responsible for an estimated 207 million cases of disease and 627,000 deaths in 2012. Recent studies reveal that the parasite actively regulates a large fraction of its genes throughout its replicative cycle inside human red blood cells and that epigenetics plays an important role in this precise gene regulation. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of three aspects of epigenetic regulation in P. falciparum: changes in histone modifications, nucleosome occupancy and the three-dimensional genome structure. We compare these three aspects of the P. falciparum epigenome to those of other eukaryotes, and show that large-scale compartmentalization is particularly important in determining histone decomposition and gene regulation in P. falciparum. We conclude by presenting a gene regulation model for P. falciparum that combines the described epigenetic factors, and by discussing the implications of this model for the future of malaria research.

  18. Phase from chromatic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Waller, Laura; Kou, Shan Shan; Sheppard, Colin J R; Barbastathis, George

    2010-10-25

    We show that phase objects may be computed accurately from a single color image in a brightfield microscope, with no hardware modification. Our technique uses the chromatic aberration that is inherent to every lens-based imaging system as a phase contrast mechanism. This leads to a simple and inexpensive way of achieving single-shot quantitative phase recovery by a modified Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) solution, allowing real-time phase imaging in a traditional microscope. PMID:21164620

  19. [Regulation pattern of the FRUITFULL (FUL) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana].

    PubMed

    Chu, Tingting; Xie, Hua; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rongcai

    2010-11-01

    FRUITFULL (FUL) is an MADS box gene that functions early in controlling flowering time, meristem identity and cauline leaf morphology and later in carpel and fruit development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to clarify the regulation of FUL expression the upstream regulatory region, -2148 bp - +96 bp and the first intron of the FUL gene were cloned, and vectors with a series of deletion of FUL promoter, and the ones fused with the first intron were constructed. Vectors harboring the fusion of cis-acting elements with the constitutive promoters of TUBULIN and ACTIN were also constructed. Beta-Glucuronidase activity assays of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed that two cis-elements were involved in the repression of FUL expression, with one of the two being probably the binding site of the transcriptional factor AP1. And the two CArG boxes played a important role in FUL initiation particularly. Furthermore, the first intron of FUL was shown to participate in the development of carpel and stamen as an enhancer.

  20. Hedgehog signaling regulates gene expression in planarian glia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Irving E; Lapan, Sylvain W; Scimone, M Lucila; Clandinin, Thomas R; Reddien, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is critical for vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) development, but its role in CNS biology in other organisms is poorly characterized. In the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, hedgehog (hh) is expressed in medial cephalic ganglia neurons, suggesting a possible role in CNS maintenance or regeneration. We performed RNA sequencing of planarian brain tissue following RNAi of hh and patched (ptc), which encodes the Hh receptor. Two misregulated genes, intermediate filament-1 (if-1) and calamari (cali), were expressed in a previously unidentified non-neural CNS cell type. These cells expressed orthologs of astrocyte-associated genes involved in neurotransmitter uptake and metabolism, and extended processes enveloping regions of high synapse concentration. We propose that these cells are planarian glia. Planarian glia were distributed broadly, but only expressed if-1 and cali in the neuropil near hh+ neurons. Planarian glia and their regulation by Hedgehog signaling present a novel tractable system for dissection of glia biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16996.001 PMID:27612382

  1. Coenzyme Recognition and Gene Regulation by a Flavin Mononucleotide Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of several protein cofactors is subject to feedback regulation by riboswitches. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-specific riboswitches also known as RFN elements, direct expression of bacterial genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and related compounds. Here we present the crystal structures of the Fusobacterium nucleatum riboswitch bound to FMN, riboflavin and antibiotic roseoflavin. The FMN riboswitch structure, centred on an FMN-bound six-stem junction, does not fold by collinear stacking of adjacent helices, typical for folding of large RNAs. Rather, it adopts a butterfly-like scaffold, stapled together by opposingly directed but nearly identically folded peripheral domains. FMN is positioned asymmetrically within the junctional site and is specifically bound to RNA through interactions with the isoalloxazine ring chromophore and direct and Mg{sup 2+}-mediated contacts with the phosphate moiety. Our structural data, complemented by binding and footprinting experiments, imply a largely pre-folded tertiary RNA architecture and FMN recognition mediated by conformational transitions within the junctional binding pocket. The inherent plasticity of the FMN-binding pocket and the availability of large openings make the riboswitch an attractive target for structure-based design of FMN-like antimicrobial compounds. Our studies also explain the effects of spontaneous and antibiotic-induced deregulatory mutations and provided molecular insights into FMN-based control of gene expression in normal and riboflavin-overproducing bacterial strains.

  2. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations in Bahrain.

    PubMed

    Eskandarani, H A

    2002-12-01

    A genotypic study was undertaken to characterize the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations (CFTR) in the Bahraini cystic fibrosis (CF) population using a polymerase chain reaction-based direct gene test to search for 15 common CF mutations amongst Arabs. During the period October 2000 to May 2001, 19 patients (12 males and seven females; aged at time of study between 4 months and 14 years with a mean age of 5.4 +/- 4.3 years) from 13 families were recruited in the study. Patients were diagnosed as having CF, based on a typical clinical picture and sweat chloride levels > 60 mmol/l and were screened for CFTR mutations. The rate of consanguinity among the families was 77 per cent. Eight mutations were detected in 21 of the 26 alleles examined. The overall detection rate was approximately 81 per cent. The allele frequency of the eight mutations was estimated to be approximately 73 per cent. There was no specific phenotypic pattern that correlated with a specific genotype. All families except two were of Bahraini origin. Of the eight mutations detected, four were common among Bahrainis (2043delG > 548A --> T > 4041C --> G = deltaF508, in order of decreasing frequency), accounting for 66 per cent of the Bahraini CF alleles. However, we also detected four different heterozygous mutations, namely: 1161delC, 1756G -->T, 3120 + 1G --> A, and 3661A --> T, accounting for 16 per cent of the Bahraini CF alleles.

  3. Macromolecular Crowding as a Regulator of Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Hiroaki; Putzel, Gregory Garbès; Backman, Vadim; Szleifer, Igal

    2014-01-01

    Studies of macromolecular crowding have shown its important effects on molecular transport and interactions in living cells. Less clear is the effect of crowding when its influence is incorporated into a complex network of interactions. Here, we explore the effects of crowding in the cell nucleus on a model of gene transcription as a network of reactions involving transcription factors, RNA polymerases, and DNA binding sites for these proteins. The novelty of our approach is that we determine the effects of crowding on the rates of these reactions using Brownian dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, allowing us to integrate molecular-scale information, such as the shapes and sizes of each molecular species, into the rate equations of the model. The steady-state cytoplasmic mRNA concentration shows several regimes with qualitatively different dependences on the volume fraction, ϕ, of crowding agents in the nucleus, including a broad range of parameter values where it depends nonmonotonically on ϕ, with maximum mRNA production occurring at a physiologically relevant value. The extent of this crowding dependence can be modulated by a variety of means, suggesting that the transcriptional output of a gene can be regulated jointly by the local level of macromolecular crowding in the nucleus, together with the local concentrations of polymerases and DNA-binding proteins, as well as other properties of the gene’s physical environment. PMID:24739179

  4. Interpathway regulation of the TRP4 gene of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Braus, G; Mösch, H U; Vogel, K; Hinnen, A; Hütter, R

    1989-01-01

    Two regulatory proteins, PHO2 and the general control regulator GCN4, bind in vitro to the promoter of the tryptophan biosynthetic TRP4 gene; the TRP4 gene product catalyses the phosphoribosylation of anthranilate. PHO2 binds specifically to the TRP4 promoter, but does not bind to any other TRP promoter. PHO2 and GCN4 proteins bind in a mutually exclusive manner to the same sequence, UAS1, one of two GCN4 binding sites in the TRP4 promoter. UAS1 is the major site for GCN4-dependent TRP4 activation. The second GCN4 binding site, UAS2, interacts with GCN4 alone. PHO2 binding interferes with the general control response of TRP4 under low phosphate conditions and simultaneous amino acid starvation and thus the PHO2 regulatory protein connects phosphate metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis in yeast. The GCN4 protein mediates the response of the transcriptional apparatus to the environmental signal 'amino acid limitation', while PHO2 seems to be the phosphate sensor that adjusts the response to the availability of phosphate precursors. Images PMID:2656261

  5. Jarid2 and PRC2, partners in regulating gene expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Margueron, Raphael; Ku, Manching; Chambon, Pierre; Bernstein, Bradley E; Reinberg, Danny

    2010-02-15

    The Polycomb group proteins foster gene repression profiles required for proper development and unimpaired adulthood, and comprise the components of the Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) including the histone H3 Lys 27 (H3K27) methyltransferase Ezh2. How mammalian PRC2 accesses chromatin is unclear. We found that Jarid2 associates with PRC2 and stimulates its enzymatic activity in vitro. Jarid2 contains a Jumonji C domain, but is devoid of detectable histone demethylase activity. Instead, its artificial recruitment to a promoter in vivo resulted in corecruitment of PRC2 with resultant increased levels of di- and trimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27me2/3). Jarid2 colocalizes with Ezh2 and MTF2, a homolog of Drosophila Pcl, at endogenous genes in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Jarid2 can bind DNA and its recruitment in ES cells is interdependent with that of PRC2, as Jarid2 knockdown reduced PRC2 at its target promoters, and ES cells devoid of the PRC2 component EED are deficient in Jarid2 promoter access. In addition to the well-documented defects in embryonic viability upon down-regulation of Jarid2, ES cell differentiation is impaired, as is Oct4 silencing.

  6. Regulation of cytochrome P-450Ia1 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kamps, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism by which cytochrome P-450IA1 gene expression is induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and various polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins involves an intracellular protein known as the Ah receptor. Within the past few years, a second protein has been identified which binds to certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) but not to the receptor ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD). The protein, named the 4S PAH binding protein, has been reported to bind to a site on the DNA in the 5{prime} regulatory region for the cytochrome P-450IA1 gene. This finding led to the hypothesis that the 4S PAH binding protein may be involved in the trans-regulation of this gene. The work presented in this manuscript addressed this hypothesis by (1) screening animals and cell lines for the presence or absence of the Ah receptor and 4S PAH binding protein, (2) screening polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to identify ligands which specifically bind only the 4S protein, (3) determining dose-response curves for TCDD and 4S protein specific ligands in mammalian cell lines, (4) co-administering a 4S binding protein ligand and TCDD in mammalian cell lines to determine the effects of the 4S protein-ligand complex on TCDD-induced cytochrome P-450IA1 expression, and (5) co-administering TCDD and 6-methyl 1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (MCDF), a compound reported to be an antagonist of TCDD-induced benzo(a)pyrene-3-hydroxylase (AHH) activity, to determine whether antagonism occurs at the transcriptional level. The results of gradient assays show that the Ah receptor and the 4S binding protein were expressed in the rat strains which were studied. In the cell lines, H4IIE cells (rat hepatoma expressed only the receptor whereas Hepa1c1c7 cells mouse hepatoma) expressed both proteins.

  7. The SCL gene product: a positive regulator of erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Aplan, P D; Nakahara, K; Orkin, S H; Kirsch, I R

    1992-01-01

    The SCL (tal-1, TCL5) gene is a member of the basic domain, helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class of putative transcription factors. We found that (i) the SCL promoter for exon Ia contains a potential recognition site for GATA-binding transcription factors, (ii) SCL mRNA is expressed in all erythroid tissues and cell lines examined, and (iii) SCL mRNA increases upon induced differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells, and inferred that SCL may play a physiologic role in erythroid differentiation. We used gel shift and transfection assays to demonstrate that the GATA motif in the SCL promoter binds GATA-1 (and GATA-2), and also mediates transcriptional transactivation. To identify a role for SCL in erythroid differentiation, we generated stable transfectants of MEL and K562 (a human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line that can differentiate along the erythroid pathway) cells overexpressing wild-type, antisense or mutant SCL cDNA. Increasing the level of SCL expression in two independent MEL lines (F4-6 and C19, a 745 derivative) and K562 cells increased the rate of spontaneous (i.e. in the absence of inducer) erythroid differentiation. Conversely, induced differentiation was inhibited in MEL transfectants expressing either antisense SCL cDNA or a mutant SCL lacking the basic domain. Our experiments suggest that the SCL gene can be a target for the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 and that the SCL gene product serves as a positive regulator of erythroid differentiation. Images PMID:1396592

  8. Epigenetic Regulation of Inflammatory Gene Expression in Macrophages by Selenium

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vivek; Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Liao, Chang; Kaushal, Naveen; Carlson, Bradley A.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins by histone acetyltransferases plays a pivotal role in the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Given the importance of dietary selenium in mitigating inflammation, we hypothesized that selenium supplementation may regulate inflammatory gene expression at the epigenetic level. The effect of selenium towards histone acetylation was examined in both in vitro and in vivo models of inflammation by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and immunoblotting. Our results indicated that selenium supplementation, as selenite, decreased acetylation of histone H4 at K12 and K16 in COX-2 and TNF promoters, and of the p65 subunit of the redox sensitive transcription factor NFκB in primary and immortalized macrophages. On the other hand, selenomethionine had a much weaker effect. Selenite treatment of HIV-1 infected human monocytes also significantly decreased the acetylation of H4 at K12 and K16 on the HIV-1 promoter, supporting the downregulation of proviral expression by selenium. A similar decrease in histone acetylation was also seen in the colonic extracts of mice treated with dextran sodium sulfate that correlated well with the levels of selenium in the diet. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from Trspfl/flCreLysM mice that lack expression of selenoproteins in macrophages confirmed the important role of selenoproteins in the inhibition of histone H4 acetylation. Our studies suggest that the ability of selenoproteins to skew the metabolism of arachidonic acid to contribute, in part, to their ability to inhibit histone acetylation. In summary, our studies suggest a new role for selenoproteins in the epigenetic modulation of pro-inflammatory genes. PMID:25458528

  9. Amyloid protein-mediated differential DNA methylation status regulates gene expression in Alzheimer's disease model cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Eun Nam; Ahn Jo, Sangmee; Oh, Seikwan; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in Alzheimer's disease model cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated analysis of CpG methylation and mRNA expression profiles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identify three Swedish mutant target genes; CTIF, NXT2 and DDR2 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Swedish mutation on alteration of DNA methylation and gene expression. -- Abstract: The Swedish mutation of amyloid precursor protein (APP-sw) has been reported to dramatically increase beta amyloid production through aberrant cleavage at the beta secretase site, causing early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). DNA methylation has been reported to be associated with AD pathogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanism of APP-sw-mediated epigenetic alterations in AD pathogenesis remains largely unknown. We analyzed genome-wide interplay between promoter CpG DNA methylation and gene expression in an APP-sw-expressing AD model cell line. To identify genes whose expression was regulated by DNA methylation status, we performed integrated analysis of CpG methylation and mRNA expression profiles, and identified three target genes of the APP-sw mutant; hypomethylated CTIF (CBP80/CBP20-dependent translation initiation factor) and NXT2 (nuclear exporting factor 2), and hypermethylated DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2). Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2 Prime -deoxycytidine restored mRNA expression of these three genes, implying methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation. The profound alteration in the methylation status was detected at the -435, -295, and -271 CpG sites of CTIF, and at the -505 to -341 region in the promoter of DDR2. In the promoter region of NXT2, only one CpG site located at -432 was differentially unmethylated in APP-sw cells. Thus, we demonstrated the effect of the APP-sw mutation on alteration of DNA methylation and subsequent gene expression. This epigenetic regulatory mechanism may

  10. Co-modulation analysis of gene regulation in breast cancer reveals complex interplay between ESR1 and ERBB2 genes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Gene regulation is dynamic across cellular conditions and disease subtypes. From the aspect of regulation under modulation, regulation strength between a pair of genes can be modulated by (dependent on) expression abundance of another gene (modulator gene). Previous studies have demonstrated the involvement of genes modulated by single modulator genes in cancers, including breast cancer. However, analysis of multi-modulator co-modulation that can further delineate the landscape of complex gene regulation is, to our knowledge, unexplored previously. In the present study we aim to explore the joint effects of multiple modulator genes in modulating global gene regulation and dissect the biological functions in breast cancer. Results To carry out the analysis, we proposed the Covariability-based Multiple Regression (CoMRe) method. The method is mainly built on a multiple regression model that takes expression levels of multiple modulators as inputs and regulation strength between genes as output. Pairs of genes were divided into groups based on their co-modulation patterns. Analyzing gene expression profiles from 286 breast cancer patients, CoMRe investigated ten candidate modulator genes that interacted and jointly determined global gene regulation. Among the candidate modulators, ESR1, ERBB2, and ADAM12 were found modulating the most numbers of gene pairs. The largest group of gene pairs was composed of ones that were modulated by merely ESR1. Functional annotation revealed that the group was significantly related to tumorigenesis and estrogen signaling in breast cancer. ESR1−ERBB2 co-modulation was the largest group modulated by more than one modulators. Similarly, the group was functionally associated with hormone stimulus, suggesting that functions of the two modulators are performed, at least partially, through modulation. The findings were validated in majorities of patients (> 99%) of two independent breast cancer datasets. Conclusions We have

  11. Regulation of gene expression in vertebrate skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Carvajal, Jaime J. Rigby, Peter W.J.

    2010-11-01

    During embryonic development the integration of numerous synergistic signalling pathways turns a single cell into a multicellular organism with specialized cell types and highly structured, organized tissues. To achieve this, cells must grow, proliferate, differentiate and die according to their spatiotemporal position. Unravelling the mechanisms by which a cell adopts the correct fate in response to its local environment remains one of the fundamental goals of biological research. In vertebrates skeletal myogenesis is coordinated by the activation of the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) in response to signals that are interpreted by their associated regulatory elements in different precursor cells during development. The MRFs trigger a cascade of transcription factors and downstream structural genes, ultimately resulting in the generation of one of the fundamental histotypes. In this review we discuss the regulation of the different MRFs in relation to their position in the myogenic cascade, the changes in the general transcriptional machinery during muscle differentiation and the emerging importance of miRNA regulation in skeletal myogenesis.

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  13. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G

    2016-01-29

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentally-dynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ∼50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclear-localized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. We conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease.

  14. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2015-11-03

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentallydynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ~50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclearlocalized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. Finally, we conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease.

  15. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentally-dynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ∼50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclear-localized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. We conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease. PMID:26531823