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Sample records for aberrant gene silencing

  1. DNA methyltransferase 1 mediated aberrant methylation and silencing of SHP-1 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghua; Liu, Xuedong; Guo, Xiufeng; Liu, Xiao; Luo, Jianmin

    2017-07-01

    Extensive studies on SHP-1 protein and SHP-1 mRNA revealed that the diminishment or abolishment of the expression of SHP-1 in leukemias/lymphomas was due to aberrant promoter methylation. Thus far, the mechanism of epigenetic silencing of the SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase gene that occurs in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells remains poorly understood. The expressions of the target molecules were determined by quantitative real time PCR and western blot, respectively. Bisulfite sequencing PCR was used to detect methylation status of DNA CpG. The lentiviral vectors were applied to modify gene expression. In the present study, we found that the promoter 2 of SHP-1 gene is located between positions from -577bp to +300bp, and 22 CpG sites contained in positions -353bp∼+182bp are aberrantly methylated in K562 cells. In vitro, we demonstrated that DNMT1 silencing induced demethylation of the 22 CpG sites located in the SHP-1 promoter and re-expression of SHP-1 gene in K562 cells. Moreover, we proved that the expression levels of DNMT1 and SHP-1 mRNA and protein were negatively correlated in K562 cells and BM aspirates mononuclear cells from CML patients. Collectively, these results indicate that DNMT1 mediates aberrant methylation and silencing of SHP-1 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, and provide a novel therapeutic target for CML. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of lysine-specific demethylase 1 by polyamine analogues results in reexpression of aberrantly silenced genes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Greene, Eriko; Murray Stewart, Tracy; Goodwin, Andrew C; Baylin, Stephen B; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2007-05-08

    Epigenetic chromatin modification is a major regulator of eukaryotic gene expression, and aberrant epigenetic silencing of gene expression contributes to tumorigenesis. Histone modifications include acetylation, phosphorylation, and methylation, resulting in a combination of histone marks known collectively as the histone code. The chromatin marks at a given promoter determine, in part, whether specific promoters are in an open/active conformation or closed/repressed conformation. Dimethyl-lysine 4 histone H3 (H3K4me2) is a transcription-activating chromatin mark at gene promoters, and demethylation of this mark by the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), a homologue of polyamine oxidases, may broadly repress gene expression. We now report that novel biguanide and bisguanidine polyamine analogues are potent inhibitors of LSD1. These analogues inhibit LSD1 in human colon carcinoma cells and affect a reexpression of multiple, aberrantly silenced genes important in the development of colon cancer, including members of the secreted frizzle-related proteins (SFRPs) and the GATA family of transcription factors. Furthermore, we demonstrate by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis that the reexpression is concurrent with increased H3K4me2 and acetyl-H3K9 marks, decreased H3K9me1 and H3K9me2 repressive marks. We thus define important new agents for reversing aberrant repression of gene transcription.

  3. Oligoamine analogues in combination with 2-difluoromethylornithine synergistically induce re-expression of aberrantly silenced tumour-suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu; Steinbergs, Nora; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Marton, Laurence J.; Casero, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing is an important mechanism in the initiation and progression of cancer. Abnormal DNA CpG island hypermethylation and histone modifications are involved in aberrant silencing of tumour-suppressor genes. LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1) was the first enzyme identified to specifically demethylate H3K4 (Lys4 of histone H3). Methylated H3K4 is an important mark associated with transcriptional activation. The flavin adenine dinucleotide-binding amine oxidase domain of LSD1 is homologous with two polyamine oxidases, SMO (spermine oxidase) and APAO (N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase). We have demonstrated previously that long-chain polyamine analogues, the oligoamines, are inhibitors of LSD1. In the present paper we report the synergistic effects of specific oligoamines in combination with DFMO (2-difluoromethylornithine), an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, in human colorectal cancer cells. DFMO treatment depletes natural polyamines and increases the uptake of exogenous polyamines. The combination of oligoamines and DFMO results in a synergistic re-expression of aberrantly silenced tumour-suppressor genes, including SFRP2 (secreted frizzled-related protein 2), which encodes a Wnt signalling pathway antagonist and plays an anti-tumorigenic role in colorectal cancer. The treatment-induced re-expression of SFRP2 is associated with increased H3K4me2 (di-methyl H3K4) in the gene promoter. The combination of LSD1-inhibiting oligoamines and DFMO represents a novel approach to epigenetic therapy of cancer. PMID:22132744

  4. Oligoamine analogues in combination with 2-difluoromethylornithine synergistically induce re-expression of aberrantly silenced tumour-suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Steinbergs, Nora; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Marton, Laurence J; Casero, Robert A

    2012-03-15

    Epigenetic gene silencing is an important mechanism in the initiation and progression of cancer. Abnormal DNA CpG island hypermethylation and histone modifications are involved in aberrant silencing of tumour-suppressor genes. LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1) was the first enzyme identified to specifically demethylate H3K4 (Lys(4) of histone H3). Methylated H3K4 is an important mark associated with transcriptional activation. The flavin adenine dinucleotide-binding amine oxidase domain of LSD1 is homologous with two polyamine oxidases, SMO (spermine oxidase) and APAO (N(1)-acetylpolyamine oxidase). We have demonstrated previously that long-chain polyamine analogues, the oligoamines, are inhibitors of LSD1. In the present paper we report the synergistic effects of specific oligoamines in combination with DFMO (2-difluoromethylornithine), an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, in human colorectal cancer cells. DFMO treatment depletes natural polyamines and increases the uptake of exogenous polyamines. The combination of oligoamines and DFMO results in a synergistic re-expression of aberrantly silenced tumour-suppressor genes, including SFRP2 (secreted frizzled-related protein 2), which encodes a Wnt signalling pathway antagonist and plays an anti-tumorigenic role in colorectal cancer. The treatment-induced re-expression of SFRP2 is associated with increased H3K4me2 (di-methyl H3K4) in the gene promoter. The combination of LSD1-inhibiting oligoamines and DFMO represents a novel approach to epigenetic therapy of cancer.

  5. Aberrant silencing of the endocrine peptide gene tachykinin-1 in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    David, Stefan; Kan, Takatsugu; Cheng, Yulan; Agarwal, Rachana; Jin, Zhe; Mori, Yuriko

    2009-01-16

    Tachykinin-1 (TAC1) is the precursor protein for neuroendocrine peptides, including substance P, and is centrally involved in gastric secretion, motility, mucosal immunity, and cell proliferation. Here we report aberrant silencing of TAC1 in gastric cancer (GC) by promoter hypermethylation. TAC1 methylation and mRNA expression in 47 primary GCs and 41 noncancerous gastric mucosae (NLs) were analyzed by utilizing real-time quantitative PCR-based assays. TAC1 methylation was more prevalent in GCs than in NLs: 21 (45%) of 47 GCs versus 6 (15%) of 41 NLs (p < 0.01). Microsatellite instability was also associated with TAC1 methylation in GCs. There was no significant association between TAC1 methylation and age, gender, stage, histological differentiation, or the presence of Helicobacter pylori. TAC1 mRNA was markedly downregulated in GCs relative to NLs. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine-induced demethylation of the TAC1 promoter resulted in TAC1 mRNA upregulation. Further studies are indicated to elucidate the functional involvement of TAC1 in gastric carcinogenesis.

  6. Aberrant silencing of the CpG island-containing human O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase gene is associated with the loss of nucleosome-like positioning.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, S A; Graunke, D M; Pieper, R O

    1997-01-01

    Tumor-associated aberrant silencing of CpG island-containing genes has been correlated with increased cytosine methylation, a "closed" chromatin structure, and exclusion of transcription factor binding in the CpG island/promoter regions of affected genes. Given the lack of understanding of what constitutes a closed chromatin structure in CpG islands, however, it has been difficult to assess the relationship among cytosine methylation, chromatin structure, and inappropriate gene silencing. In this study, nuclease accessibility analysis was used to more clearly define the chromatin structure in the CpG island of the human O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. Chromatin structure was then related to in vivo DNA-protein interactions and cytosine methylation status of the MGMT CpG island in human glioma cells varying in MGMT expression. The results of these studies indicated that the "open" chromatin structure associated with the MGMT CpG island in MGMT+ cells consisted of an approximately 250-bp transcription factor-binding, nuclease-accessible, nucleosome-free region of DNA, whose formation was associated with at least four flanking, precisely positioned nucleosome-like structures. In MGMT- cells, this precise nucleosomal array was lost and was replaced by randomly positioned nucleosomes (i.e., the closed chromatin structure), regardless of whether methylation of the CpG island was spread over the entire island or limited to regions outside the transcription factor binding region. These results suggest that CpG islands facilitate the expression of housekeeping genes by facilitating nucleosomal positioning and that the conditions that alter the formation of this array (such as perhaps methylation) may indirectly affect CpG island-containing gene expression. PMID:9315639

  7. Aberrantly Silenced Promoters Retain a Persistent Memory of the Silenced State After Long-Term Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Oyer, Jon A.; Yates, Phillip A.; Godsey, Sarah; Turker, Mitchell S.

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of aberrant DNA methylation-associated silencing is reversibility. However, long-term stability of reactivated promoters has not been explored. To examine this issue, spontaneous reactivant clones were isolated from mouse embryonal carcinoma cells bearing aberrantly silenced Aprt alleles and re-silencing frequencies were determined as long as three months after reactivation occurred. Despite continuous selection for expression of the reactivated Aprt alleles, exceptionally high spontaneous re-silencing frequencies were observed. A DNA methylation analysis demonstrated retention of sporadic methylation of CpG sites in a protected region of the Aprt promoter in many reactivant alleles suggesting a role for these methylated sites in the re-silencing process. In contrast, a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis for methyl-H3K4, acetyl-H3K9, and dimethyl-H3K9 levels failed to reveal a specific histone modification that could explain high frequency re-silencing. These results demonstrate that aberrantly silenced and reactivated promoters retain a persistent memory of having undergone the silencing process and suggest the failure to eliminate all CpG methylation as a potential contributing mechanism. PMID:21035468

  8. Transcriptional gene silencing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.

    2016-01-01

    It has been over a decade since the first observation that small non-coding RNAs can functionally modulate epigenetic states in human cells to achieve functional transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). TGS is mechanistically distinct from the RNA interference (RNAi) gene-silencing pathway. TGS can result in long-term stable epigenetic modifications to gene expression that can be passed on to daughter cells during cell division, whereas RNAi does not. Early studies of TGS have been largely overlooked, overshadowed by subsequent discoveries of small RNA-directed post-TGS and RNAi. A reappraisal of early work has been brought about by recent findings in human cells where endogenous long non-coding RNAs function to regulate the epigenome. There are distinct and common overlaps between the proteins involved in small and long non-coding RNA transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, suggesting that the early studies using small non-coding RNAs to modulate transcription were making use of a previously unrecognized endogenous mechanism of RNA-directed gene regulation. Here we review how non-coding RNA plays a role in regulation of transcription and epigenetic gene silencing in human cells by revisiting these earlier studies and the mechanistic insights gained to date. We also provide a list of mammalian genes that have been shown to be transcriptionally regulated by non-coding RNAs. Lastly, we explore how TGS may serve as the basis for development of future therapeutic agents. PMID:27060137

  9. A Combinatorial Approach of Gene Silencing and Expression Profiling in Deciphering the Roles of Prion and Auxiliary Molecules in Aberrant Prion Replication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    neurologically normal and show resistant to scrapie infection than their wild-type counterparts, suggesting that disease progression may be rate...and newly identified targets in order to mitigate the aberrant prion replication. Scrapie infected neuroblastoma cells were cultured following standard...components of prion-based diseases. Prion null mice are fertile, neurologically normal and show resistant to scrapie infection than their wild-type

  10. Aberrant methylation accounts for cell adhesion-related gene silencing during 3-methylcholanthrene and diethylnitrosamine induced multistep rat lung carcinogenesis associated with overexpression of DNA methyltransferases 1 and 3a

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wenbin; Cui Zhihong; Ao Lin; Zhou Ziyuan; Zhou Yanhong; Yuan Xiaoyan; Xiang Yunlong; Liu Jinyi Cao Jia

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the significance of alterations in cell adhesion-related genes methylation during lung multistep carcinogenesis induced by the genotoxic carcinogens 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), tissue samples microdissected from MCA/DEN-induced rat lung carcinogenesis model were subjected to methylation-specific PCR to evaluate the DNA methylation status of CADM1, TIMP3, E-cadherin and N-cadherin. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine protein expression of CADM1, TIMP3, N-cadherin and the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) 1, 3a and 3b. E-cadherin hypermethylation was not detected in any tissue. CADM1, TIMP3 and N-cadherin hypermethylation was correlated with the loss of their protein expression during the progression of pathologic lesions. The prevalence of DNA methylation of at least one gene and the average number of methylated genes increased with the histological progression. DNMT1 and DNMT3a protein expression increased progressively during the stages of lung carcinogenesis, whereas DNMT3b overexpression was only found in several samples. Furthermore, DNMT1 protein expression levels were correlated with CADM1 methylation, and DNMT3a protein expression levels were correlated with CADM1, TIMP3 and N-cadherin methylation. The average number of methylated genes during carcinogenesis was significantly correlated with DNMT1 and DNMT3a protein expression levels. Moreover, mRNA expression of CADM1 significantly increased after treatment with DNMT inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine in CADM1-methylated primary tumor cell lines. Our findings suggest that an accumulation of hypermethylation accounts for cell adhesion-related gene silencing is associated with dynamic changes in the progression of MCA/DEN-induced rat lung carcinogenesis. We suggest that DNMT1 and DNMT3a protein overexpression may be responsible for this aberrant DNA methylation.

  11. Nickel and Epigenetic Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Shamy, Magdy; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    Insoluble nickel compounds are well-established human carcinogens. Occupational exposure to these compounds leads to increased incidence of lung and nasal cancer in nickel refinery workers. Apart from its weak mutagenic activity and hypoxia mimicking effect there is mounting experimental evidence indicating that epigenetic alteration plays an important role in nickel-induced carcinogenesis. Multiple epigenetic mechanisms have been identified to mediate nickel-induced gene silencing. Nickel ion is able to induce heterochromatinization by binding to DNA-histone complexes and initiating chromatin condensation. The enzymes required for establishing or removing epigenetic marks can be targeted by nickel, leading to altered DNA methylation and histone modification landscapes. The current review will focus on the epigenetic changes that contribute to nickel-induced gene silencing. PMID:24705264

  12. Posttranscriptional gene silencing in nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Paul; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pontes, Olga; Vitins, Alexa; Pikaard, Craig; Mroczka, Andrew; Wagner, Nicholas; Voelker, Toni

    2011-01-01

    In plants, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) with sequence homology to transcribed regions of genes can guide the sequence-specific degradation of corresponding mRNAs, leading to posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS). The current consensus is that siRNA-mediated PTGS occurs primarily in the cytoplasm where target mRNAs are localized and translated into proteins. However, expression of an inverted-repeat double-stranded RNA corresponding to the soybean FAD2-1A desaturase intron is sufficient to silence FAD2-1, implicating nuclear precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) rather than cytosolic mRNA as the target of PTGS. Silencing FAD2-1 using intronic or 3′-UTR sequences does not affect transcription rates of the target genes but results in the strong reduction of target transcript levels in the nucleus. Moreover, siRNAs corresponding to pre-mRNA–specific sequences accumulate in the nucleus. In Arabidopsis, we find that two enzymes involved in PTGS, Dicer-like 4 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6, are localized in the nucleus. Collectively, these results demonstrate that siRNA-directed RNA degradation can take place in the nucleus, suggesting the need for a more complex view of the subcellular compartmentation of PTGS in plants. PMID:21173264

  13. Advances in plant gene silencing methods.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prachi; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms of transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene silencing pathways in plants over the past decades has led to development of tools and methods for silencing a target gene in various plant species. In this review chapter, both the recent understanding of molecular basis of gene silencing pathways and advances in various widely used gene silencing methods are compiled. We also discuss the salient features of the different methods like RNA interference (RNAi) and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and highlight their advantages and disadvantages. Gene silencing technology is constantly progressing as reflected by rapidly emerging new methods. A succinct discussion on the recently developed methods like microRNA-mediated virus-induced gene silencing (MIR-VIGS) and microRNA-induced gene silencing (MIGS) is also provided. One major bottleneck in gene silencing approaches has been the associated off-target silencing. The other hurdle has been the lack of a universal approach that can be applied to all plants. For example, we face hurdles like incompatibility of VIGS vectors with the host and inability to use MIGS for plant species which are not easily transformable. However, the overwhelming research in this direction reflects the scope for overcoming the short comings of gene silencing technology.

  14. Characteristics of post-transcriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Chicas, A; Macino, G

    2001-11-01

    A number of gene silencing phenomena that inactivate genes at the post-transcriptional level have been identified. Due to its potential for studying gene function, post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has become an intense area of research. In this review we describe the different means of inducing PTGS and discuss the possible biological roles of these artificially induced phenomena. We also discuss other features of PTGS such as the mechanism of mRNA degradation, the nature of the silencing signal and the mechanism of PTGS inhibition by viral proteins.

  15. Characteristics of post-transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Chicas, Agustin; Macino, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    A number of gene silencing phenomena that inactivate genes at the post-transcriptional level have been identified. Due to its potential for studying gene function, post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has become an intense area of research. In this review we describe the different means of inducing PTGS and discuss the possible biological roles of these artificially induced phenomena. We also discuss other features of PTGS such as the mechanism of mRNA degradation, the nature of the silencing signal and the mechanism of PTGS inhibition by viral proteins. PMID:11713190

  16. RNAi induced gene silencing in crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Subodh Kumar

    2010-12-01

    The RNA silencing is one of the innovative and efficient molecular biology tools to harness the down-regulation of expression of gene(s) specifically. To accomplish such selective modification of gene expression of a particular trait, homology dependent gene silencing uses a stunning variety of gene silencing viz. co-suppression, post-transcriptional gene silencing, virus-induced gene silencing etc. This family of diverse molecular phenomena has a common exciting feature of gene silencing which is collectively called RNA interference abbreviated to as RNAi. This molecular phenomenon has become a focal point of plant biology and medical research throughout the world. As a result, this technology has turned out to be a powerful tool in understanding the function of individual gene and has ultimately led to the tremendous use in crop improvement. This review article illustrates the application of RNAi in a broad area of crop improvement where this technology has been successfully used. It also provides historical perspective of RNAi discovery and its contemporary phenomena, mechanism of RNAi pathway.

  17. Personalized gene silencing therapeutics for Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Kay, C; Skotte, N H; Southwell, A L; Hayden, M R

    2014-07-01

    Gene silencing offers a novel therapeutic strategy for dominant genetic disorders. In specific diseases, selective silencing of only one copy of a gene may be advantageous over non-selective silencing of both copies. Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). Silencing both expanded and normal copies of HTT may be therapeutically beneficial, but preservation of normal HTT expression is preferred. Allele-specific methods can selectively silence the mutant HTT transcript by targeting either the expanded CAG repeat or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium with the expansion. Both approaches require personalized treatment strategies based on patient genotypes. We compare the prospect of safe treatment of HD by CAG- and SNP-specific silencing approaches and review HD population genetics used to guide target identification in the patient population. Clinical implementation of allele-specific HTT silencing faces challenges common to personalized genetic medicine, requiring novel solutions from clinical scientists and regulatory authorities.

  18. Homology-dependent Gene Silencing in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Françoise; Vayssié, Laurence; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Madeddu, Luisa

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection at high copy number of plasmids containing only the coding region of a gene into the Paramecium somatic macronucleus led to a marked reduction in the expression of the corresponding endogenous gene(s). The silencing effect, which is stably maintained throughout vegetative growth, has been observed for all Paramecium genes examined so far: a single-copy gene (ND7), as well as members of multigene families (centrin genes and trichocyst matrix protein genes) in which all closely related paralogous genes appeared to be affected. This phenomenon may be related to posttranscriptional gene silencing in transgenic plants and quelling in Neurospora and allows the efficient creation of specific mutant phenotypes thus providing a potentially powerful tool to study gene function in Paramecium. For the two multigene families that encode proteins that coassemble to build up complex subcellular structures the analysis presented herein provides the first experimental evidence that the members of these gene families are not functionally redundant. PMID:9529389

  19. Applying gene silencing technology to contraception

    PubMed Central

    Dissen, Gregory A.; Lomniczi, Alejandro; Boudreau, Ryan L.; Chen, Yong Hong; Davidson, Beverly L.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2013-01-01

    Contents Population control of feral animals is often difficult, as it can be dangerous for the animals, labor intensive, and expensive. Therefore, a useful tool for control of animal populations would be a nonsurgical method to induce sterility. Our laboratories utilize methods aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A useful framework for design of a new approach will be the combination of these methods with the intended goal to produce a technique that can be used to noninvasively sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed it has to meet several conditions: The target gene must be essential for fertility; the method must include a mechanism to effectively and specifically silence the gene of interest; the method of delivering the silencing agent must be minimally invasive, and finally, the silencing effect must be sustained for the lifespan of the target species, so that expansion of the population can be effectively prevented. In this article we discuss our work to develop gene silencing technology to induce sterility; we will use examples of our previous studies demonstrating that this approach is viable. These studies include: a) the use of viral vectors able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to the regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction, and b) experiments with viral vectors that are able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:23279544

  20. Targeted Gene Silencing to Induce Permanent Sterility

    PubMed Central

    Dissen, Gregory A.; Lomniczi, Alejandro; Boudreau, Ryan L.; Chen, Yong Hong; Davidson, Beverly L.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2012-01-01

    Contents A nonsurgical method to induce sterility would be a useful tool to control feral populations of animals. Our laboratories have experience with approaches aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A combination/modification of these methods may provide a useful framework for the design of approaches that can be used to sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed it has to meet several conditions: It needs to target a gene essential for fertility. It must involve a method that can selectively silence the gene of interest. It also needs to deliver the silencing agent via a minimally invasive method. Finally, the silencing effect needs to be sustained for many years, so that expansion of the targeted population can be effectively prevented. In this article we discuss this subject and provide a succinct account of our previous experience with: a) molecular reagents able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction, and b) molecular reagents able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:22827375

  1. Evolution and Functional Trajectory of Sir1 in Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Ellahi, Aisha

    2016-01-01

    We used the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii to examine the evolution of Sir-based silencing, focusing on Sir1, silencers, the molecular topography of silenced chromatin, and the roles of SIR and RNA interference (RNAi) genes in T. delbrueckii. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq) analysis of Sir proteins in T. delbrueckii revealed a different topography of chromatin at the HML and HMR loci than was observed in S. cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae Sir1, enriched at the silencers of HMLα and HMRa, was absent from telomeres and did not repress subtelomeric genes. In contrast to S. cerevisiae SIR1's partially dispensable role in silencing, the T. delbrueckii SIR1 paralog KOS3 was essential for silencing. KOS3 was also found at telomeres with T. delbrueckii Sir2 (Td-Sir2) and Td-Sir4 and repressed subtelomeric genes. Silencer mapping in T. delbrueckii revealed single silencers at HML and HMR, bound by Td-Kos3, Td-Sir2, and Td-Sir4. The KOS3 gene mapped near HMR, and its expression was regulated by Sir-based silencing, providing feedback regulation of a silencing protein by silencing. In contrast to the prominent role of Sir proteins in silencing, T. delbrueckii RNAi genes AGO1 and DCR1 did not function in heterochromatin formation. These results highlighted the shifting role of silencing genes and the diverse chromatin architectures underlying heterochromatin. PMID:26811328

  2. Evolution and Functional Trajectory of Sir1 in Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Ellahi, Aisha; Rine, Jasper

    2016-01-25

    We used the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii to examine the evolution of Sir-based silencing, focusing on Sir1, silencers, the molecular topography of silenced chromatin, and the roles of SIR and RNA interference (RNAi) genes in T. delbrueckii. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq) analysis of Sir proteins in T. delbrueckii revealed a different topography of chromatin at the HML and HMR loci than was observed in S. cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae Sir1, enriched at the silencers of HMLα and HMR A: , was absent from telomeres and did not repress subtelomeric genes. In contrast to S. cerevisiae SIR1's partially dispensable role in silencing, the T. delbrueckii SIR1 paralog KOS3 was essential for silencing. KOS3 was also found at telomeres with T. delbrueckii Sir2 (Td-Sir2) and Td-Sir4 and repressed subtelomeric genes. Silencer mapping in T. delbrueckii revealed single silencers at HML and HMR, bound by Td-Kos3, Td-Sir2, and Td-Sir4. The KOS3 gene mapped near HMR, and its expression was regulated by Sir-based silencing, providing feedback regulation of a silencing protein by silencing. In contrast to the prominent role of Sir proteins in silencing, T. delbrueckii RNAi genes AGO1 and DCR1 did not function in heterochromatin formation. These results highlighted the shifting role of silencing genes and the diverse chromatin architectures underlying heterochromatin. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Silencing of Repetitive DNA Is Controlled by a Member of an Unusual Caenorhabditis elegans Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Díaz, Eduardo; Stefanakis, Nikolaos; Carrera, Inés; Glenwinkel, Lori; Wang, Guoqiang; Driscoll, Monica; Hobert, Oliver

    2017-08-11

    Repetitive DNA sequences are subject to gene silencing in various animal species. Under specific circumstances repetitive DNA sequences can escape such silencing. For example, when exogenously added, extrachromosomal DNA sequences that are stably inherited in multicopy repetitive arrays in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are frequently silenced in the germline, whereas such silencing often does not occur in the soma. This indicates that somatic cells might utilize factors that prevent repetitive DNA silencing. Indeed, such "anti-silencing" factors have been revealed through genetic screens that identified mutant loci in which repetitive transgenic arrays are aberrantly silenced in the soma. We describe here a novel locus, pals-22 (for protein containing ALS2CR12 signature), required to prevent silencing of repetitive transgenes in neurons and other somatic tissue types. pals-22 deficiency also severely impacts animal vigor and confers phenotypes reminiscent of accelerated aging. We find that pals-22 is a member of a large family of divergent genes (39 members), defined by homology to the ALS2CR12 protein family. While gene family members are highly divergent, they show striking patterns of chromosomal clustering. The family expansion appears C. elegans-specific and has not occurred to the same extent in other nematode species for which genome sequences are available. The transgene silencing phenotype observed upon loss of PALS-22 protein depends on the biogenesis of small RNAs, since silencing is abolished in the RNAi defective mutant rde-4, suggesting that pals-22 might regulate RNAi-dependent silencing in different somatic cell types. We speculate that the pals gene family may be part of a species-specific cellular defense mechanism. Copyright © 2017, Genetics.

  4. Virus-Induced gene silencing in ornamental plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  5. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Ornametal Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  6. Eos mediates Foxp3-dependent gene silencing in CD4+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fan; Yu, Hong; Dang, Eric V; Barbi, Joseph; Pan, Xiaoyu; Grosso, Joseph F; Jinasena, Dinili; Sharma, Sudarshana M; McCadden, Erin M; Getnet, Derese; Drake, Charles G; Liu, Jun O; Ostrowski, Michael C; Pardoll, Drew M

    2009-08-28

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis by suppressing aberrant or excessive immune responses. The core genetic program of Tregs and their ability to suppress pathologic immune responses depends on the transcription factor Foxp3. Despite progress in understanding mechanisms of Foxp3-dependent gene activation, the molecular mechanism of Foxp3-dependent gene repression remains largely unknown. We identified Eos, a zinc-finger transcription factor of the Ikaros family, as a critical mediator of Foxp3-dependent gene silencing in Tregs. Eos interacts directly with Foxp3 and induces chromatin modifications that result in gene silencing in Tregs. Silencing of Eos in Tregs abrogates their ability to suppress immune responses and endows them with partial effector function, thus demonstrating the critical role that Eos plays in Treg programming.

  7. Polycomb group protein gene silencing, non-coding RNA, stem cells, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gieni, Randall S; Hendzel, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Epigenetic programming is an important facet of biology, controlling gene expression patterns and the choice between developmental pathways. The Polycomb group proteins (PcGs) silence gene expression, allowing cells to both acquire and maintain identity. PcG silencing is important for stemness, X chromosome inactivation (XCI), genomic imprinting, and the abnormally silenced genes in cancers. Stem and cancer cells commonly share gene expression patterns, regulatory mechanisms, and signalling pathways. Many microRNA species have oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity, and disruptions in these networks are common in cancer; however, long non-coding (nc)RNA species are also important. Many of these directly guide PcG deposition and gene silencing at the HOX locus, during XCI, and in examples of genomic imprinting. Since inappropriate HOX expression and loss of genomic imprinting are hallmarks of cancer, disruption of long ncRNA-mediated PcG silencing likely has a role in oncogenesis. Aberrant silencing of coding and non-coding loci is critical for both the genesis and progression of cancers. In addition, PcGs are commonly abnormally overexpressed years prior to cancer pathology, making early PcG targeted therapy an option to reverse tumor formation, someday replacing the blunt instrument of eradication in the cancer therapy arsenal.

  8. Evaluating the ability of the barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing system to simultaneously silence two wheat genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an important tool for rapid assessment of gene function in plants. The ability of the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus (BSMV) VIGS system to simultaneously silence two genes was assessed by comparing the extent of down-regulation of the wheat PDS and SGT1 genes afte...

  9. Evaluating the Ability of the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing System to Simultaneously Silence Two Wheat Genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an important tool for rapid assessment of gene function in plants. The ability of the Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) VIGS system to simultaneously silence two genes was assessed by comparing the extent of down-regulation of the wheat PDS and SGT1 genes afte...

  10. The transglutaminase 2 gene is aberrantly hypermethylated in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Lisa M.; Schooler, Kevin P.; Ai, Lingbao; Klop, Corinne; Qiu, Jingxin; Robertson, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that catalyzes protein/protein crosslinking. Because extracellular TG2 crosslinks components of the extracellular matrix, TG2 is thought to function as a suppressor of cellular invasion. We have recently uncovered that the TG2 gene (TGM2) is a target for epigenetic silencing in breast cancer, highlighting a molecular mechanism that drives reduced TG2 expression, and this aberrant molecular event may contribute to invasiveness in this tumor type. Because tumor invasiveness is a primary determinant of brain tumor aggressiveness, we sought to determine if TGM2 is targeted for epigenetic silencing in glioma. Analysis of TGM2 gene methylation in a panel of cultured human glioma cells indicated that the 5′ flanking region of the TGM2 gene is hypermethylated and that this feature is associated with reduced TG2 expression as judged by immunoblotting. Further, culturing glioma cells in the presence of the global DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A resulted in re-expression of TG2 in these lines. In primary brain tumors we observed that the TGM2 promoter is commonly hypermethylated and that this feature is a cancer-associated phenomenon. Using publically available databases, TG2 expression in gliomas was found to vary widely, with many tumors showing overexpression or underexpression of this gene. Since overexpression of TG2 leads to resistance to doxorubicin through the ectopic activation of NFκB, we sought to examine the effects of recombinant TG2 expression in glioma cells treated with commonly used brain tumor therapeutics. We observed that in addition to doxorubicin, TG2 expression drove resistance to CCNU; however, TG2 expression did not alter sensitivity to other drugs tested. Finally, a catalytically null mutant of TG2 was also able to support doxorubicin resistance in glioma cells indicating that transglutaminase activity is not necessary

  11. Silencing of toxic gene expression by Fis

    PubMed Central

    Karambelkar, Shweta; Swapna, Ganduri; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria and bacteriophages have evolved DNA modification as a strategy to protect their genomes. Mom protein of bacteriophage Mu modifies the phage DNA, rendering it refractile to numerous restriction enzymes and in turn enabling the phage to successfully invade a variety of hosts. A strong fortification, a combined activity of the phage and host factors, prevents untimely expression of mom and associated toxic effects. Here, we identify the bacterial chromatin architectural protein Fis as an additional player in this crowded regulatory cascade. Both in vivo and in vitro studies described here indicate that Fis acts as a transcriptional repressor of mom promoter. Further, our data shows that Fis mediates its repressive effect by denying access to RNA polymerase at mom promoter. We propose that a combined repressive effect of Fis and previously characterized negative regulatory factors could be responsible to keep the gene silenced most of the time. We thus present a new facet of Fis function in Mu biology. In addition to bringing about overall downregulation of Mu genome, it also ensures silencing of the advantageous but potentially lethal mom gene. PMID:22287621

  12. On the Mechanism of Gene Silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Steakley, David Lee; Rine, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms have been proposed for gene silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ranging from steric occlusion of DNA binding proteins from their recognition sequences in silenced chromatin to a specific block in the formation of the preinitiation complex to a block in transcriptional elongation. This study provided strong support for the steric occlusion mechanism by the discovery that RNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7 could be substantially blocked from transcribing from its cognate promoter when embedded in silenced chromatin. Moreover, unlike previous suggestions, we found no evidence for stalled RNA polymerase II within silenced chromatin. The effectiveness of the Sir protein–based silencing mechanism to block transcription activated by Gal4 at promoters in the domain of silenced chromatin was marginal, yet it improved when tested against mutant forms of the Gal4 protein, highlighting a role for specific activators in their sensitivity to gene silencing. PMID:26082137

  13. Bioinformatics tools for achieving better gene silencing in plants.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Firoz; Dai, Xinbin; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is one of the most popular and effective molecular technologies for knocking down the expression of an individual gene of interest in living organisms. Yet the technology still faces the major issue of nonspecific gene silencing, which can compromise gene functional characterization and the interpretation of phenotypes associated with individual gene knockdown. Designing an effective and target-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) for induction of RNAi is therefore the major challenge in RNAi-based gene silencing. A 'good' siRNA molecule must possess three key features: (a) the ability to specifically silence an individual gene of interest, (b) little or no effect on the expressions of unintended siRNA gene targets (off-target genes), and (c) no cell toxicity. Although several siRNA design and analysis algorithms have been developed, only a few of them are specifically focused on gene silencing in plants. Furthermore, current algorithms lack a comprehensive consideration of siRNA specificity, efficacy, and nontoxicity in siRNA design, mainly due to lack of integration of all known rules that govern different steps in the RNAi pathway. In this review, we first describe popular RNAi methods that have been used for gene silencing in plants and their serious limitations regarding gene-silencing potency and specificity. We then present novel, rationale-based strategies in combination with computational and experimental approaches to induce potent, specific, and nontoxic gene silencing in plants.

  14. Systemic siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Duxbury, Mark S.; Matros, Evan; Ito, Hiromichi; Zinner, Michael J.; Ashley, Stanley W.; Whang, Edward E.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: RNA interference (RNAi), mediated by small interfering RNA (siRNA), silences genes with a high degree of specificity and potentially represents a general approach for molecularly targeted anticancer therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of systemically administered siRNA to silence gene expression in vivo and to assess the effect of this approach on tumor growth using a murine pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenograft model. Summary Background Data: Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is widely overexpressed in human gastrointestinal cancer. Overexpression of CEACAM6 promotes cell survival under anchorage independent conditions, a characteristic associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis. Methods: CEACAM6 expression was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot. Mice (n = 10/group) were subcutaneously xenografted with 2 × 106 BxPC3 cells (which inherently overexpress CEACAM6). Tumor growth, CEACAM6 expression, cellular proliferation (Ki-67 immunohistochemistry), apoptosis, angiogenesis (CD34 immunohistochemistry), and survival were compared for mice administered either systemic CEACAM6-specific or control single-base mismatch siRNA over 6 weeks, following orthotopic tumor implantation. Results: Treatment with CEACAM6-specific siRNA suppressed primary tumor growth by 68% versus control siRNA (P < 0.05) and was associated with a decreased proliferating cell index, impaired angiogenesis and increased apoptosis in the xenografted tumors. CEACAM6-specific siRNA completely inhibited metastasis (0% of mice versus 60%, P < 0.05) and significantly improved survival, without apparent toxicity. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate the efficacy of systemically administered siRNA as a therapeutic modality in experimental pancreatic cancer. This novel therapeutic strategy may be applicable to a broad range of cancers and warrants investigation in patients with refractory disease. PMID

  15. New Construct Approaches for Efficient Gene Silencing in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hua; Chretien, Robert; Ye, Jingsong; Rommens, Caius M.

    2006-01-01

    An important component of conventional sense, antisense, and double-strand RNA-based gene silencing constructs is the transcriptional terminator. Here, we show that this regulatory element becomes obsolete when gene fragments are positioned between two oppositely oriented and functionally active promoters. The resulting convergent transcription triggers gene silencing that is at least as effective as unidirectional promoter-to-terminator transcription. In addition to short, variably sized, and nonpolyadenylated RNAs, terminator-free cassette produced rare, longer transcripts that reach into the flanking promoter. These read-through products did not influence the efficacy and expression levels of the neighboring hygromycin phosphotransferase gene. Replacement of gene fragments by promoter-derived sequences further increased the extent of gene silencing. This finding indicates that genomic DNA may be a more efficient target for gene silencing than gene transcripts. PMID:16766670

  16. Aberrant methylation-mediated silencing of microRNAs contributes to HPV-induced anchorage independence

    PubMed Central

    Wilting, Saskia M.; Boon, Debby; Sørgård, Hanne; Lando, Malin; Snoek, Barbara C.; van Wieringen, Wessel N.; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Lyng, Heidi; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Steenbergen, Renske D.M.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer and a subset of anogenital and head-and-neck carcinomas are caused by high-risk types of the human papillomavirus (hrHPV). During hrHPV-induced malignant transformation keratinocytes become able to grow anchorage independently, a tumorigenic trait at least partly associated with inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. We used hrHPV-containing keratinocytes to investigate the role of DNA methylation-mediated silencing of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the acquisition of anchorage independence. Anchorage dependent (n=11) and independent passages (n=19) of 4 hrHPV-immortalized keratinocyte cell lines were treated with 2′-deoxy-5-azacytidine (DAC). Genome-wide miRNA expression profiles before and after treatment were compared to identify miRNAs silenced by methylation. Bisulfite sequencing and methylation-specific PCR showed increased methylation of hsa-mir-129-2/-137/-935/-3663/-3665 and -4281 in anchorage independent HPV-transformed keratinocytes and cervical cancer cell lines. Mature miRNAs derived from hsa-mir-129-2/-137/-3663 and -3665 showed functional relevance as they decreased anchorage independence in cervical cancer cell lines. Cervical (pre)cancerous lesions demonstrated increased methylation of hsa-mir-129-2/-935/-3663/-3665 and -4281, underlining the clinical relevance of our findings. In conclusion, methylation-mediated silencing of tumor suppressive miRNAs contributes to acquisition of an anchorage independent phenotype. This study further substantiates the importance of miRNAs during early stages of carcinogenesis and underlines their potential as both disease markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27270309

  17. Global identification of genes targeted by DNMT3b for epigenetic silencing in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Teneng, I; Tellez, C S; Picchi, M A; Klinge, D M; Yingling, C M; Snider, A M; Liu, Y; Belinsky, S A

    2015-01-29

    The maintenance cytosine DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 and de novo methyltransferase DNMT3b cooperate to establish aberrant DNA methylation and chromatin complexes to repress gene transcription during cancer development. The expression of DNMT3b was constitutively increased 5-20-fold in hTERT/CDK4-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) before treatment with low doses of tobacco carcinogens. Overexpression of DNMT3b increased and accelerated carcinogen-induced transformation. Genome-wide profiling of transformed HBECs identified 143 DNMT3b-target genes, many of which were transcriptionally regulated by the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) complex and silenced through aberrant methylation in non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. Two genes studied in detail, MAL and OLIG2, were silenced during transformation, initially through enrichment for H3K27me3 and H3K9me2, commonly methylated in lung cancer, and exert tumor suppressor effects in vivo through modulating cancer-related pathways. Re-expression of MAL and OLIG2 to physiological levels dramatically reduced the growth of lung tumor xenografts. Our results identify a key role for DNMT3b in the earliest stages of initiation and provide a comprehensive catalog of genes targeted for silencing by this methyltransferase in non-small-cell lung cancer.

  18. Novel Sexual-Cycle-Specific Gene Silencing in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Wioletta; Miller, Karen Y.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel sexual-cycle-specific gene-silencing system in the genetic model Aspergillus nidulans. Duplication of the mating type matAHMG gene in this haploid organism triggers Mat-induced silencing (MatIS) of both endogenous and transgenic matA genes, eliminates function of the encoded SRY structural ortholog, and results in formation of barren fruiting bodies. MatIS is spatiotemporally restricted to the prezygotic stage of the sexual cycle and does not interfere with vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, differentiation of early sexual tissues, or fruiting body development. MatIS is reversible upon deletion of the matA transgene. In contrast to other sex-specific silencing phenomena, MatIS silencing has nearly 100% efficiency and appears to be independent of homologous duplicated DNA segments. Remarkably, transgene-derived matA RNA might be sufficient to induce MatIS. A unique feature of MatIS is that RNA-mediated silencing is RNA interference/Argonaute-independent and is restricted to the nucleus having the duplicated gene. The silencing phenomenon is recessive and does not spread between nuclei within the common cytoplasm of a multinucleate heterokaryon. Gene silencing induced by matA gene duplication emerges as a specific feature associated with matAHMG regulation during sexual development. PMID:23341415

  19. Novel sexual-cycle-specific gene silencing in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Wioletta; Miller, Karen Y; Miller, Bruce L

    2013-04-01

    We report a novel sexual-cycle-specific gene-silencing system in the genetic model Aspergillus nidulans. Duplication of the mating type matA(HMG) gene in this haploid organism triggers Mat-induced silencing (MatIS) of both endogenous and transgenic matA genes, eliminates function of the encoded SRY structural ortholog, and results in formation of barren fruiting bodies. MatIS is spatiotemporally restricted to the prezygotic stage of the sexual cycle and does not interfere with vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, differentiation of early sexual tissues, or fruiting body development. MatIS is reversible upon deletion of the matA transgene. In contrast to other sex-specific silencing phenomena, MatIS silencing has nearly 100% efficiency and appears to be independent of homologous duplicated DNA segments. Remarkably, transgene-derived matA RNA might be sufficient to induce MatIS. A unique feature of MatIS is that RNA-mediated silencing is RNA interference/Argonaute-independent and is restricted to the nucleus having the duplicated gene. The silencing phenomenon is recessive and does not spread between nuclei within the common cytoplasm of a multinucleate heterokaryon. Gene silencing induced by matA gene duplication emerges as a specific feature associated with matA(HMG) regulation during sexual development.

  20. Gold Nanobeacons for Tracking Gene Silencing in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Milton; Carvalho, Lara; Silva, Joana; Saúde, Leonor; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro V

    2017-01-11

    The use of gold nanoparticles for effective gene silencing has demonstrated its potential as a tool for gene expression experiments and for the treatment of several diseases. Here, we used a gold nanobeacon designed to specifically silence the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) mRNA in embryos of a fli-EGFP transgenic zebrafish line, while simultaneously allowing the tracking and localization of the silencing events via the beacon's emission. Fluorescence imaging measurements demonstrated a decrease of the EGFP emission with a concomitant increase in the fluorescence of the Au-nanobeacon. Furthermore, microinjection of the Au-nanobeacon led to a negligible difference in mortality and malformations in comparison to the free oligonucleotide, indicating that this system is a biocompatible platform for the administration of gene silencing moieties. Together, these data illustrate the potential of Au-nanobeacons as tools for in vivo zebrafish gene modulation with low toxicity which may be used towards any gene of interest.

  1. Connections between Epigenetic Gene Silencing and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Timothy J.; Wallrath, Lori L.

    2007-01-01

    Alterations in epigenetic gene regulation are associated with human disease. Here, we discuss connections between DNA methylation and histone methylation, providing examples in which defects in these processes are linked with disease. Mutations in genes encoding DNA methyltransferases and proteins that bind methylated cytosine residues cause changes in gene expression and alterations in the patterns of DNA methylation. These changes are associated with cancer and congenital diseases due to defects in imprinting. Gene silencing is also controlled through histone methylation. Altered levels of methyltransferases that modify lysine 27 of histone H3 (K27H3) and lysine 9 of histone H3 (K9H3) correlate with changes in Rb signaling and disruption of the cell cycle in cancer cells. The K27H3 mark recruits a Polycomb complex that is involved in regulating stem cell pluripotency, silencing of developmentally regulated genes, and controlling cancer progression. The K9H3 methyl mark recruits HP1, a structural protein that plays a role in heterochromatin formation, gene silencing, and viral latency. Cells exhibiting altered levels of HP1 are predicted to show a loss of silencing at genes regulating cancer progression. Gene silencing through K27H3 and K9H3 can involve histone deacetylation and DNA methylation, suggesting cross talk between epigenetic silencing systems through direct interactions among the various players. The reversible nature of these epigenetic modifications offers therapeutic possibilities for a wide spectrum of disease. PMID:17306846

  2. Target Genes of Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor Are Abnormally Up-Regulated in Human Myotilinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barrachina, Marta; Moreno, Jesús; Juvés, Salvador; Moreno, Dolores; Olivé, Montse; Ferrer, Isidre

    2007-01-01

    Myotilinopathy is a subgroup of myofibrillar myopathies caused by mutations in the myotilin gene in which there is aggregation of abnormal cytoskeletal proteins and ubiquitin. We report here on the accumulation of neuron-related proteins such as ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1), synaptosomal-associated protein 25, synaptophysin, and α-internexin in aberrant protein aggregates in myotilinopathy. We have determined that the neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF)/RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST), a transcription factor expressed in non-neuronal tissues repressing the expression of several neuronal genes, is reduced in myotilinopathies. Moreover, NRSF transfection reduces UCHL1, synaptosomal-associated protein 25, synaptophysin, and α-internexin mRNA levels in DMS53 cells, whereas short interferring NRSF transfection increases UCHL1 and synaptophysin mRNA levels in U87-MG cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays have shown that NRSF interacts with the UCHL1 promoter in U87-MG and HeLa cells. In silico analysis of the UCHL1 gene promoter sequence using the MatInspector software has predicted three potential neuron-restrictive silencer elements (NRSEs): NRSE1 located in the complementary DNA chain and NRSE2 and NRSE3 in intron 1, in the coding and complementary chains, respectively. Together, these findings show, for the first time, abnormal regulation of NRSF/REST as a mechanism associated with the aberrant expression of selected neuron-related proteins, which in turn accumulate in abnormal protein aggregates, in myotilinopathy. PMID:17823282

  3. Transcriptional Gene Silencing Maintained by OTS1 SUMO Protease Requires a DNA-Dependent Polymerase V-Dependent Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Yan, Xiaojing; Zhao, Yiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The expression of genes with aberrant structure is prevented at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation levels. Aberrant gene silencing at the posttranscriptional level is well studied; however, it is not well understood how aberrant genes are silenced at the transcriptional level. In this study, through genetic screening a transgenic report line that harbors an aberrant gene (35S-LUC, lacking 3′-untranslated region [3′-UTR]) and lacks luciferase (LUC) activity, we identify that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease OTS1 gene is required for maintaining the silence of the reporter 35S-LUC and an endogenous mutator-like element MULE-F19G14 at the transcriptional level, which requires DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Pol) V and DDR complex, but not Pol IV. The increased transcripts in ots1 mutants are terminated by the 3′-UTRs of downstream genes. In addition to ots1 mutations, mutations in several known or putative SUMO proteases and two SUMO E3 ligases, SIZ1 and MMS21, have similar effects on this silencing regulation. Taken together, our results reveal that the enzymes involved in the SUMOylation process restrain aberrant gene transcription by using a downstream gene 3′-UTR, and this regulation requires a functional Pol V-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PMID:27852949

  4. Homology-dependent gene silencing and host defense in plants.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Marjori A; Aufsatz, Werner; Kanno, Tatsuo; Mette, M Florian; Matzke, Antonius J M

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of transgene silencing phenomena in plants and other organisms have revealed the existence of epigenetic silencing mechanisms that are based on recognition of nucleic acid sequence homology at either the DNA or RNA level. Common triggers of homology-dependent gene silencing include inverted DNA repeats and double-stranded RNA, a versatile silencing molecule that can induce both degradation of homologous RNA in the cytoplasm and methylation of homologous DNA sequences in the nucleus. Inverted repeats might be frequently associated with silencing because they can potentially interact in cis and in trans to trigger DNA methylation via homologous DNA pairing, or they can be transcribed to produce double-stranded RNA. Homology-dependent gene silencing mechanisms are ideally suited for countering natural parasitic sequences such as transposable elements and viruses, which are usually present in multiple copies and/or produce double-stranded RNA during replication. These silencing mechanisms can thus be regarded as host defense strategies to foreign or invasive nucleic acids. The high content of transposable elements and, in some cases, endogenous viruses in many plant genomes suggests that host defenses do not always prevail over invasive sequences. During evolution, slightly faulty genome defense responses probably allowed transposable elements and viral sequences to accumulate gradually in host chromosomes and to invade host genes. Possible beneficial consequences of this "foreign" DNA buildup include the establishment of genome defense-derived epigenetic control mechanisms for regulating host gene expression and acquired hereditary immunity to some viruses.

  5. Developing Gene Silencing for the Study and Treatment of Dystonia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0282 TITLE: Developing Gene Silencing for the Study and Treatment of Dystonia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Pedro Gonzalez...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Developing Gene Silencing for the Study and Treatment of Dystonia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0282 5c...cause abnormal twisting postures. DYT1 dystonia is an autosomal dominant disease with onset of dystonia during childhood . The most common early onset

  6. Human factors and pathways essential for mediating epigenetic gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Poleshko, Andrey; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Shalginskikh, Natalia; Pecherskaya, Anna; Einarson, Margret B; Marie Skalka, Anna; Katz, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    Cellular identity in both normal and disease processes is determined by programmed epigenetic activation or silencing of specific gene subsets. Here, we have used human cells harboring epigenetically silent GFP-reporter genes to perform a genome-wide siRNA knockdown screen for the identification of cellular factors that are required to maintain epigenetic gene silencing. This unbiased screen interrogated 21,121 genes, and we identified and validated a set of 128 protein factors. This set showed enrichment for functional categories, and protein-protein interactions. Among this set were known epigenetic silencing factors, factors with no previously identified role in epigenetic gene silencing, as well as unstudied factors. The set included non-nuclear factors, for example, components of the integrin-adhesome. A key finding was that the E1 and E2 enzymes of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) pathway (SAE1, SAE2/UBA2, UBC9/UBE2I) are essential for maintenance of epigenetic silencing. This work provides the first genome-wide functional view of human factors that mediate epigenetic gene silencing. The screen output identifies novel epigenetic factors, networks, and mechanisms, and provides a set of candidate targets for epigenetic therapy and cellular reprogramming.

  7. Epigenetic silencing of the NR4A3 tumor suppressor, by aberrant JAK/STAT signaling, predicts prognosis in gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chung-Min; Chang, Liang-Yu; Lin, Shu-Hui; Chou, Jian-Liang; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Zeng, Li-Han; Chuang, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Dittner, Claudia; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Jora M. J.; Huang, Yao-Ting; Ng, Enders K. W.; Cheng, Alfred S. L.; Wu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Jiayuh; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chan, Michael W. Y.

    2016-08-01

    While aberrant JAK/STAT signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer (GC), its effects on epigenetic alterations of its transcriptional targets remains unclear. In this study, by expression microarrays coupled with bioinformatic analyses, we identified a putative STAT3 target gene, NR4A3 that was downregulated in MKN28 GC daughter cells overexpressing a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant (S16), as compared to an empty vector control (C9). Bisulphite pyrosequencing and demethylation treatment showed that NR4A3 was epigenetically silenced by promoter DNA methylation in S16 and other GC cell lines including AGS cells, showing constitutive activation of STAT3. Subsequent experiments revealed that NR4A3 promoter binding by STAT3 might repress its transcription. Long-term depletion of STAT3 derepressed NR4A3 expression, by promoter demethylation, in AGS GC cells. NR4A3 re-expression in GC cell lines sensitized the cells to cisplatin, and inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, in an animal model. Clinically, GC patients with high NR4A3 methylation, or lower NR4A3 protein expression, had significantly shorter overall survival. Intriguingly, STAT3 activation significantly associated only with NR4A3 methylation in low-stage patient samples. Taken together, aberrant JAK/STAT3 signaling epigenetically silences a potential tumor suppressor, NR4A3, in gastric cancer, plausibly representing a reliable biomarker for gastric cancer prognosis.

  8. Epigenetic silencing of the NR4A3 tumor suppressor, by aberrant JAK/STAT signaling, predicts prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chung-Min; Chang, Liang-Yu; Lin, Shu-Hui; Chou, Jian-Liang; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Zeng, Li-Han; Chuang, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Dittner, Claudia; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Jora M. J.; Huang, Yao-Ting; Ng, Enders K. W.; Cheng, Alfred S. L.; Wu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Jiayuh; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chan, Michael W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    While aberrant JAK/STAT signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer (GC), its effects on epigenetic alterations of its transcriptional targets remains unclear. In this study, by expression microarrays coupled with bioinformatic analyses, we identified a putative STAT3 target gene, NR4A3 that was downregulated in MKN28 GC daughter cells overexpressing a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant (S16), as compared to an empty vector control (C9). Bisulphite pyrosequencing and demethylation treatment showed that NR4A3 was epigenetically silenced by promoter DNA methylation in S16 and other GC cell lines including AGS cells, showing constitutive activation of STAT3. Subsequent experiments revealed that NR4A3 promoter binding by STAT3 might repress its transcription. Long-term depletion of STAT3 derepressed NR4A3 expression, by promoter demethylation, in AGS GC cells. NR4A3 re-expression in GC cell lines sensitized the cells to cisplatin, and inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, in an animal model. Clinically, GC patients with high NR4A3 methylation, or lower NR4A3 protein expression, had significantly shorter overall survival. Intriguingly, STAT3 activation significantly associated only with NR4A3 methylation in low-stage patient samples. Taken together, aberrant JAK/STAT3 signaling epigenetically silences a potential tumor suppressor, NR4A3, in gastric cancer, plausibly representing a reliable biomarker for gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:27528092

  9. The Arabidopsis HOMOLOGY-DEPENDENT GENE SILENCING1 Gene Codes for an S-Adenosyl-l-Homocysteine Hydrolase Required for DNA Methylation-Dependent Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Pedro S.C.F.; Sheikh, Mazhar; Melchiorre, Rosalba; Fagard, Mathilde; Boutet, Stéphanie; Loach, Rebecca; Moffatt, Barbara; Wagner, Conrad; Vaucheret, Hervé; Furner, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Genes introduced into higher plant genomes can become silent (gene silencing) and/or cause silencing of homologous genes at unlinked sites (homology-dependent gene silencing or HDG silencing). Mutations of the HOMOLOGY-DEPENDENT GENE SILENCING1 (HOG1) locus relieve transcriptional gene silencing and methylation-dependent HDG silencing and result in genome-wide demethylation. The hog1 mutant plants also grow slowly and have low fertility and reduced seed germination. Three independent mutants of HOG1 were each found to have point mutations at the 3′ end of a gene coding for S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH) hydrolase, and hog1-1 plants show reduced SAH hydrolase activity. A transposon (hog1-4) and a T-DNA tag (hog1-5) in the HOG1 gene each behaved as zygotic embryo lethal mutants and could not be made homozygous. The results suggest that the homozygous hog1 point mutants are leaky and result in genome demethylation and poor growth and that homozygous insertion mutations result in zygotic lethality. Complementation of the hog1-1 point mutation with a T-DNA containing the gene coding for SAH hydrolase restored gene silencing, HDG silencing, DNA methylation, fast growth, and normal seed viability. The same T-DNA also complemented the zygotic embryo lethal phenotype of the hog1-4 tagged mutant. A model relating the HOG1 gene, DNA methylation, and methylation-dependent HDG silencing is presented. PMID:15659630

  10. TRB3 Gene Silencing Alleviates Diabetic Cardiomyopathy in a Type 2 Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ti, Yun; Xie, Guo-lu; Wang, Zhi-hao; Bi, Xiao-lei; Ding, Wen-yuan; Wang, Jia; Jiang, Gui-hua; Bu, Pei-li; Zhang, Yun; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Tribbles 3 (TRB3) is associated with insulin resistance, an important trigger in the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). We sought to determine whether TRB3 plays a major role in modulating DCM and the mechanisms involved. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin. We evaluated the characteristics of type 2 DCM by serial echocardiography and metabolite tests, Western blot analysis for TRB3 expression, and histopathologic analyses of cardiomyocyte density, lipids accumulation, cardiac inflammation, and fibrosis area. We then used gene silencing to investigate the role of TRB3 in the pathophysiologic features of DCM. RESULTS Rats with DCM showed severe insulin resistance, left ventricular dysfunction, aberrant lipids deposition, cardiac inflammation, fibrosis, and TRB3 overexpression. We found that the silencing of TRB3 ameliorated metabolic disturbance and insulin resistance; myocardial hypertrophy, lipids accumulation, inflammation, fibrosis, and elevated collagen I-to-III content ratio in DCM rats were significantly decreased. These anatomic findings were accompanied by significant improvements in cardiac function. Furthermore, with TRB3 gene silencing, the inhibited phosphorylation of Akt was restored and the increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 and Jun NH2-terminal kinase in DCM was significantly decreased. Conclusions. TRB3 gene silencing may exert a protective effect on DCM by improving selective insulin resistance, implicating its potential role for treatment of human DCM. PMID:21933987

  11. Construction and application of a gene silencing system using a dual promoter silencing vector in Hypsizygus marmoreus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinjing; Chen, Hui; Chen, Mingjie; Wang, Hong; Song, Xiaoxia; Feng, Zhiyong

    2017-01-01

    As efficient reverse genetic tools are lacking, molecular genetics research has been limited in Hypsizygus marmoreus. In this study, we firstly constructed a gene-silencing method using a dual promoter vector (DPV) which was driven by gpd and 35 S promoters. The DPV was introduced into H. marmoreus via a simple electroporation procedure and the highest silenced rate of ura3 gene was 76.6%, indicating that the DPV might be suitable for gene silencing in basidiomycete. In this silencing system, the endogenous orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase gene (ura3) was used as a selectable marker. Besides, we also constructed another silencing system which could silence the ura3 and other genes (lcc1 encoded laccase1) together in H. marmoreus, and named it as co-silencing system. In the co-silenced transformants, we found that the mycelia were thinner and the growth was slower than in the wild-type and control2 strains, which was accordant with the previous study of lcc1 gene, indicating that the selective efficiency of the RNAi-mediated silencing of several genes might be increased by co-silencing ura3. The development of this molecular tool might improve functional studies of multiple genes in the basidiomycete H. marmoreus and also provide a reference for studies of other basidiomycetes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Host-induced silencing of Fusarium culmorum genes protects wheat from infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanxin; Kastner, Christine; Nowara, Daniela; Oliveira-Garcia, Ely; Rutten, Twan; Zhao, Yusheng; Deising, Holger B.; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Plants producing antisense or double-stranded RNA molecules that target specific genes of eukaryotic pests or pathogens can become protected from their attack. This beneficial effect was also reported for plant–fungus interactions and is believed to reflect uptake of the RNAs by the fungus via an as yet unknown mechanism, followed by target gene silencing. Here we report that wheat plants pre-infected with Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) strains containing antisense sequences against target genes of the Fusarium head blight (FHB) fungus F. culmorum caused a reduction of corresponding transcript levels in the pathogen and reduced disease symptoms. Stable transgenic wheat plants carrying an RNAi hairpin construct against the β-1, 3-glucan synthase gene FcGls1 of F. culmorum or a triple combination of FcGls1 with two additional, pre-tested target genes also showed enhanced FHB resistance in leaf and spike inoculation assays under greenhouse and near-field conditions, respectively. Microscopic evaluation of F. culmorum development in plants transiently or stably expressing FcGls1 silencing constructs revealed aberrant, swollen fungal hyphae, indicating severe hyphal cell wall defects. The results lead us to propose host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) as a plant protection approach that may also be applicable to highly FHB-susceptible wheat genotypes. PMID:27540093

  13. Local infiltration of high- and low-molecular-weight RNA from silenced sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants triggers post-transcriptional gene silencing in non-silenced plants.

    PubMed

    Hewezi, Tarek; Alibert, Gilbert; Kallerhoff, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Using grafting procedures, we have characterized post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in transgenic sunflower expressing beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity. Silencing was observed as early as 2 weeks after grafting of non-silenced scions on to silenced rootstock. Transmission of the systemic signal occurs solely from stock to scion, is independent of the physiological age of the rootstock and is not heritable. Furthermore, we report, for the first time in plants, an easy and low-cost method of activating RNA silencing by infiltration of purified RNA from silenced plants. Local application of total RNA derived from silenced sunflower plants to leaves of non-silenced plants induces PTGS in newly developed leaves above the point of infiltration, as shown by reduced GUS activity and mRNA levels. Silenced plants contain 21-23-nucleotide RNAs hybridizing to transgene target sequences, in contrast with leaves of non-silenced plants. However, de novo production of GUS-specific short RNA in non-silenced plants can be activated by leaf infiltration of low-molecular-weight RNAs isolated from leaves of silenced plants. Significant levels were detected as early as 2 weeks after infiltration, peaked at 3 weeks and declined 5 weeks after infiltration. Our results provide evidence that RNA infiltration in sunflower induces transient silencing and is not transmitted to offspring. This approach could be of major use in dissecting the mechanisms involved in PTGS.

  14. In vivo chromatin accessibility correlates with gene silencing in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, A; Dura, J M

    1998-01-01

    Gene silencing by heterochromatin is a well-known phenomenon that, in Drosophila, is called position effect variegation (PEV). The long-held hypothesis that this gene silencing is associated with an altered chromatin structure received direct support only recently. Another gene-silencing phenomenon in Drosophila, although similar in its phenotype of variegation, has been shown to be associated with euchromatic sequences and is dependent on developmental regulators of the Polycomb group (Pc-G) of gene products. One model proposes that the Pc-G products may cause a local heterochromatinization that maintains a repressed state of transcription of their target genes. Here, we test these models by measuring the accessibility of white or miniwhite sequences, in different contexts, to the Escherichia coli dam DNA methyltransferase in vivo. We present evidence that PEV and Pc-G-mediated repression mechanisms, although based on different protein factors, may indeed involve similar higher-order chromatin structure. PMID:9832530

  15. Polycomb CBX7 Promotes Initiation of Heritable Repression of Genes Frequently Silenced with Cancer Specific DNA Hypermethylation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Helai P.; Cai, Yi; McGarvey, Kelly M.; Easwaran, Hariharan; Van Neste, Leander; Ohm, Joyce E.; O’Hagan, Heather M.; Baylin, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of genes in association with aberrant promoter DNA hypermethylation has emerged as a significant mechanism in the development of human cancers. Such genes are also often targets of the Polycomb group repressive complexes in embryonic cells. The Polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 2 has been best studied in this regard. We now examine a link between PRC1 and cancer specific gene silencing. Here we show a novel and direct association between a constituent of the PRC1 complex, CBX7, with gene repression and promoter DNA hypermethylation of genes frequently silenced in cancer. CBX7 is able to complex with DNA methyltransferase enzymes leading us to explore a role for CBX7 in maintenance and initiation of gene silencing. Knockdown of CBX7 was unable to relieve suppression of deeply silenced genes in cancer cells, however, in embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells, CBX7 can initiate stable repression of genes that are frequently silenced in adult cancers. Furthermore, we are able to observe assembly of DNA methyltransferases at CBX7 target gene promoters. Sustained expression of CBX7 in EC cells confers a growth advantage and resistance to retinoic acid induced differentiation. In this setting, especially, there is increased promoter DNA hypermethylation for many genes by analysis of specific genes as well as through epigenomic studies. Our results allow us to propose a potential mechanism, through assembly of novel repressive complexes, by which the Pc component of PRC1 can promote the initiation of epigenetic changes involving abnormal DNA hypermethylation of genes frequently silenced in adult cancers. PMID:19602592

  16. Virus-induced gene silencing in diverse maize lines using the Brome Mosaic virus-based silencing vector

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a widely used tool for gene function studies in many plant species, though its use in monocots has been limited. Using a Brome mosaic virus (BMV) vector designed to silence the maize phytoene desaturase gene, a genetically diverse set of maize inbred lines was ...

  17. MORC Family ATPases Required for Heterochromatin Condensation and Gene Silencing#

    PubMed Central

    Moissiard, Guillaume; Cokus, Shawn J.; Cary, Joshua; Feng, Suhua; Billi, Allison C.; Stroud, Hume; Husmann, Dylan; Zhan, Ye; Lajoie, Bryan R.; McCord, Rachel Patton; Hale, Christopher J.; Feng, Wei; Michaels, Scott D.; Frand, Alison R.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Dekker, Job; Kim, John K.; Jacobsen, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) and DNA repeats are commonly targeted by DNA and histone methylation to achieve epigenetic gene silencing. We isolated mutations in two Arabidopsis genes, AtMORC1 and AtMORC6, which cause de-repression of DNA-methylated genes and TEs, but no losses of DNA or histone methylation. AtMORC1 and AtMORC6 are members of the conserved Microrchidia (MORC) adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) family, predicted to catalyze alterations in chromosome superstructure. The atmorc1 and atmorc6 mutants show decondensation of pericentromeric heterochromatin, increased interaction of pericentromeric regions with the rest of the genome, and transcriptional defects that are largely restricted to loci residing in pericentromeric regions. Knockdown of the single MORC homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans also impairs transgene silencing. We propose that the MORC ATPases are conserved regulators of gene silencing in eukaryotes. PMID:22555433

  18. RNA editing regulates transposon-mediated heterochromatic gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Savva, Yiannis A; Jepson, James E C; Chang, Yao-Jen; Whitaker, Rachel; Jones, Brian C; St Laurent, Georges; Tackett, Michael R; Kapranov, Philipp; Jiang, Nan; Du, Guyu; Helfand, Stephen L; Reenan, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Heterochromatin formation drives epigenetic mechanisms associated with silenced gene expression. Repressive heterochromatin is established through the RNA interference pathway, triggered by double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) that can be modified via RNA editing. However, the biological consequences of such modifications remain enigmatic. Here we show that RNA editing regulates heterochromatic gene silencing in Drosophila. We utilize the binding activity of an RNA-editing enzyme to visualize the in vivo production of a long dsRNA trigger mediated by Hoppel transposable elements. Using homologous recombination, we delete this trigger, dramatically altering heterochromatic gene silencing and chromatin architecture. Furthermore, we show that the trigger RNA is edited and that dADAR serves as a key regulator of chromatin state. Additionally, dADAR auto-editing generates a natural suppressor of gene silencing. Lastly, systemic differences in RNA editing activity generates interindividual variation in silencing state within a population. Our data reveal a global role for RNA editing in regulating gene expression.

  19. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in barley seedling leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is one of the most potent reverse genetics technologies for gene functional characterization. This method exploits a dsRNA-mediated antiviral defense mechanism in plants. Using this method allows researchers to generate rapid phenotypic data in a relatively rapid ...

  20. Virus induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis gene homologues in wheat identify genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat, functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for wheat breeding. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited tra...

  1. Deletion and aberrant CpG island methylation of Caspase 8 gene in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Pilar; Bello, M Josefa; Inda, M Mar; Alonso, M Eva; Arjona, Dolores; Amiñoso, Cinthia; Lopez-Marin, Isabel; de Campos, Jose M; Sarasa, Jose L; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2004-09-01

    Aberrant methylation of promoter CpG islands in human genes is an alternative genetic inactivation mechanism that contributes to the development of human tumors. Nevertheless, few studies have analyzed methylation in medulloblastomas. We determined the frequency of aberrant CpG island methylation for Caspase 8 (CASP8) in a group of 24 medulloblastomas arising in 8 adult and 16 pediatric patients. Complete methylation of CASP8 was found in 15 tumors (62%) and one case displayed hemimethylation. Three samples amplified neither of the two primer sets for methylated or unmethylated alleles, suggesting that genomic deletion occurred in the 5' flanking region of CASP8. Our findings suggest that methylation commonly contributes to CASP8 silencing in medulloblastomas and that homozygous deletion or severe sequence changes involving the promoter region may be another mechanism leading to CASP8 inactivation in this neoplasm.

  2. Post-transcriptional gene silencing activity of human GIGYF2.

    PubMed

    Kryszke, Marie-Hélène; Adjeriou, Badia; Liang, Feifei; Chen, Hong; Dautry, François

    2016-07-01

    In mammalian post-transcriptional gene silencing, the Argonaute protein AGO2 indirectly recruits translation inhibitors, deadenylase complexes, and decapping factors to microRNA-targeted mRNAs, thereby repressing mRNA translation and accelerating mRNA decay. However, the exact composition and assembly pathway of the microRNA-induced silencing complex are not completely elucidated. As the GYF domain of human GIGYF2 was shown to bind AGO2 in pulldown experiments, we wondered whether GIGYF2 could be a novel protein component of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Here we show that full-length GIGYF2 coimmunoprecipitates with AGO2 in human cells, and demonstrate that, upon tethering to a reporter mRNA, GIGYF2 exhibits strong, dose-dependent silencing activity, involving both mRNA destabilization and translational repression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Aberrant JAK/STAT Signaling Suppresses TFF1 and TFF2 through Epigenetic Silencing of GATA6 in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Shyong; Wei, Kuo-Liang; Chou, Jian-Liang; Lu, Chung-Kuang; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Jora M. J.; Deng, Yi-Fang; Hsu, Wan-Ting; Wang, Hui-Min David; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Li, Chin; Chan, Michael W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling is crucial to the development of gastric cancer. In this study, we examined the role of STAT3 in the expression and methylation of its targets in gastric cancer patients. Results from RNA sequencing identified an inverse correlation between the expression of STAT3 and GATA6 in 23 pairs of gastric cancer patient samples. We discovered that the expression of GATA6 is epigenetically silenced through promoter methylation in gastric cancer cell lines. Interestingly, the inhibition of STAT3 using a novel STAT3 inhibitor restored the expression of GATA6 and its targets, trefoil factors 1 and 2 (TFF1/2). Moreover, disruption of STAT3 binding to GATA6 promoter by small hairpin RNA restored GATA6 expression in AGS cells. A clinically significant correlation was also observed between the expression of GATA6 and TFF1/2 among tissue samples from 60 gastric cancer patients. Finally, bisulfite pyrosequencing revealed GATA6 methylation in 65% (39/60) of the patients, and those with higher GATA6 methylation tended to have shorter overall survival. In conclusion, we demonstrated that aberrant JAK/STAT signaling suppresses TFF1/2 partially through the epigenetic silencing of GATA6. Therapeutic intervention of STAT3 in reversing the epigenetic status of GATA6 could benefit the treatment of gastric cancer and is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27598141

  4. Structure and Gene-Silencing Mechanisms of Small Noncoding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chia-Ying; Rana, Tariq M.

    Small (19-31-nucleotides) noncoding RNAs were identified in the past 10 years for their distinct function in gene silencing. The best known gene-silencing phenomenon, RNA interference (RNAi), is triggered in a sequence-specific manner by endogenously produced or exogenously introduced small doubled-stranded RNAs. As knowledge of the structure and function of the RNAi machinery has expanded, this phenomenon has become a powerful tool for biochemical research; it has enormous potential for therapeutics. This chapter summarizes significant aspects of three major classes of small noncoding, regulatory RNAs: small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Here, we focus on the biogenesis of these small RNAs, their structural features and coupled effectors as well as the mechanisms of each small regulatory RNA pathway which reveal fascinating ways by which gene silencing is controlled and fine-tuned at an epigenetic level.

  5. Gene Silencing in Crustaceans: From Basic Research to Biotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Sagi, Amir; Manor, Rivka; Ventura, Tomer

    2013-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) is gaining momentum for crustaceans, both in basic research and for commercial development. RNAi has proven instrumental in a growing number of crustacean species, revealing the functionality of novel crustacean genes essential among others to development, growth, metabolism and reproduction. Extensive studies have also been done on silencing of viral transcripts in crustaceans, contributing to the understanding of the defense mechanisms of crustaceans and strategies employed by viruses to overcome these. The first practical use of gene silencing in aquaculture industry has been recently achieved, through manipulation of a crustacean insulin-like androgenic gland hormone. This review summarizes the advancements in the use of RNAi in crustaceans, and assesses the advantages of this method, as well as the current hurdles that hinder its large-scale practice. PMID:24705266

  6. Phenotypic diversification by gene silencing in Phytophthora plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Asman, Anna Km; Jahan, Sultana N; Avrova, Anna O; Whisson, Stephen C; Dixelius, Christina

    2013-11-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have enabled generation of unprecedented information on genome content and organization. Eukaryote genomes in particular may contain large populations of transposable elements (TEs) and other repeated sequences. Active TEs can result in insertional mutations, altered transcription levels and ectopic recombination of DNA. The genome of the oomycete plant pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, contains vast numbers of TE sequences. There are also hundreds of predicted disease-promoting effector proteins, predominantly located in TE-rich genomic regions. Expansion of effector gene families is also a genomic signature of related oomycetes such as P. sojae. Deep sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs) from P. infestans has identified sRNAs derived from all families of transposons, highlighting the importance of RNA silencing for maintaining these genomic invaders in an inactive form. Small RNAs were also identified from specific effector encoding genes, possibly leading to RNA silencing of these genes and variation in pathogenicity and virulence toward plant resistance genes. Similar findings have also recently been made for the distantly related species, P. sojae. Small RNA "hotspots" originating from arrays of amplified gene sequences, or from genes displaying overlapping antisense transcription, were also identified in P. infestans. These findings suggest a major role for RNA silencing processes in the adaptability and diversification of these economically important plant pathogens. Here we review the latest progress and understanding of gene silencing in oomycetes with emphasis on transposable elements and sRNA-associated events.

  7. Silencers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurze, U.; Riedel, E.

    Large size silencers are attached to the intake and exhaust of large industrial plants, e.g. forced ventilation systems for mining industry, intake of cooling towers (Fig. 11.1) or flue gas stacks of power plants to protect the neighbourhood from plant noise. Large silencers are also required for ventilation openings of rooms with high internal sound pressure levels, e.g. industrial production halls or subway ventilation ducts.

  8. Antiviral treatment strategies based on gene silencing and genome editing.

    PubMed

    Badia, Roger; Ballana, Ester; Esté, José A; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva

    2017-06-01

    The ability of some viruses to establish latently infected chronic reservoirs that escape to immune control becomes a major roadblock that impedes the cure of these infections. Therefore, new alternatives are needed to pursuit the eradication of viral persistent infections. Gene silencing technologies are in constant evolution and provide an outstanding sequence specificity that allows targeting any coding sequence of interest. Here we provide an overview of the development of gene silencing technologies ranging from initially RNA interference to the recently developed CRISPR/Cas9 and their potential as new antiviral strategies focusing on the eradication of HIV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Virus-induced gene silencing in Rauwolfia species.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Cyrielle; Lafontaine, Florent; Sepúlveda, Liuda Johana; Carqueijeiro, Ines; Courtois, Martine; Lanoue, Arnaud; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Besseau, Sébastien; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Papon, Nicolas; Atehortúa, Lucia; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Clastre, Marc; St-Pierre, Benoit; Oudin, Audrey; Courdavault, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    Elucidation of the monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis has recently progressed in Apocynaceae through the concomitant development of transcriptomic analyses and reverse genetic approaches performed by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). While most of these tools have been primarily adapted for the Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), the VIGS procedure has scarcely been used on other Apocynaceae species. For instance, Rauwolfia sp. constitutes a unique source of specific and valuable monoterpene indole alkaloids such as the hypertensive reserpine but are also well recognized models for studying alkaloid metabolism, and as such would benefit from an efficient VIGS procedure. By taking advantage of a recent modification in the inoculation method of the Tobacco rattle virus vectors via particle bombardment, we demonstrated that the biolistic-mediated VIGS approach can be readily used to silence genes in both Rauwolfia tetraphylla and Rauwolfia serpentina. After establishing the bombardment conditions minimizing injuries to the transformed plantlets, gene downregulation efficiency was evaluated at approximately a 70% expression decrease in both species by silencing the phytoene desaturase encoding gene. Such a gene silencing approach will thus constitute a critical tool to identify and characterize genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis in both of these prominent Rauwolfia species.

  10. Strain Specific Factors Control Effector Gene Silencing in Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sirjana Devi; Chapman, Patrick; Zhang, Yun; Gijzen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Phytophthora sojae avirulence gene Avr3a encodes an effector that is capable of triggering immunity on soybean plants carrying the resistance gene Rps3a. P. sojae strains that express Avr3a are avirulent to Rps3a plants, while strains that do not are virulent. To study the inheritance of Avr3a expression and virulence towards Rps3a, genetic crosses and self-fertilizations were performed. A cross between P. sojae strains ACR10 X P7076 causes transgenerational gene silencing of Avr3a allele, and this effect is meiotically stable up to the F5 generation. However, test-crosses of F1 progeny (ACR10 X P7076) with strain P6497 result in the release of silencing of Avr3a. Expression of Avr3a in the progeny is variable and correlates with the phenotypic penetrance of the avirulence trait. The F1 progeny from a direct cross of P6497 X ACR10 segregate for inheritance for Avr3a expression, a result that could not be explained by parental imprinting or heterozygosity. Analysis of small RNA arising from the Avr3a gene sequence in the parental strains and hybrid progeny suggests that the presence of small RNA is necessary but not sufficient for gene silencing. Overall, we conclude that inheritance of the Avr3a gene silenced phenotype relies on factors that are variable among P. sojae strains. PMID:26930612

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitors reverse gene silencing in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Herman, David; Jenssen, Kai; Burnett, Ryan; Soragni, Elisabetta; Perlman, Susan L; Gottesfeld, Joel M

    2006-10-01

    Expansion of GAA x TTC triplets within an intron in FXN (the gene encoding frataxin) leads to transcription silencing, forming the molecular basis for the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich's ataxia. Gene silencing at expanded FXN alleles is accompanied by hypoacetylation of histones H3 and H4 and trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys9, observations that are consistent with a heterochromatin-mediated repression mechanism. We describe the synthesis and characterization of a class of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors that reverse FXN silencing in primary lymphocytes from individuals with Friedreich's ataxia. We show that these molecules directly affect the histones associated with FXN, increasing acetylation at particular lysine residues on histones H3 and H4 (H3K14, H4K5 and H4K12). This class of HDAC inhibitors may yield therapeutics for Friedreich's ataxia.

  12. Down-Regulation of Gene Expression by RNA-Induced Gene Silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travella, Silvia; Keller, Beat

    Down-regulation of endogenous genes via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a key to the characterization of gene function in plants. Many RNA-based silencing mechanisms such as post-transcriptional gene silencing, co-suppression, quelling, and RNA interference (RNAi) have been discovered among species of different kingdoms (plants, fungi, and animals). One of the most interesting discoveries was RNAi, a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism initiated by the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), homologous in sequence to the silenced gene, which triggers degradation of mRNA. Infection of plants with modified viruses can also induce RNA silencing and is referred to as virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In contrast to insertional mutagenesis, these emerging new reverse genetic approaches represent a powerful tool for exploring gene function and for manipulating gene expression experimentally in cereal species such as barley and wheat. We examined how RNAi and VIGS have been used to assess gene function in barley and wheat, including molecular mechanisms involved in the process and available methodological elements, such as vectors, inoculation procedures, and analysis of silenced phenotypes.

  13. A stem cell-like chromatin pattern may predispose tumor suppressor genes to DNA hypermethylation and heritable silencing.

    PubMed

    Ohm, Joyce E; McGarvey, Kelly M; Yu, Xiaobing; Cheng, Linzhao; Schuebel, Kornel E; Cope, Leslie; Mohammad, Helai P; Chen, Wei; Daniel, Vincent C; Yu, Wayne; Berman, David M; Jenuwein, Thomas; Pruitt, Kevin; Sharkis, Saul J; Watkins, D Neil; Herman, James G; Baylin, Stephen B

    2007-02-01

    Adult cancers may derive from stem or early progenitor cells. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression is essential for normal function of these early cells but is highly abnormal in cancers, which often show aberrant promoter CpG island hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes and pro-differentiation factors. We find that for such genes, both normal and malignant embryonic cells generally lack the hypermethylation of DNA found in adult cancers. In embryonic stem cells, these genes are held in a 'transcription-ready' state mediated by a 'bivalent' promoter chromatin pattern consisting of the repressive mark, histone H3 methylated at Lys27 (H3K27) by Polycomb group proteins, plus the active mark, methylated H3K4. However, embryonic carcinoma cells add two key repressive marks, dimethylated H3K9 and trimethylated H3K9, both associated with DNA hypermethylation in adult cancers. We hypothesize that cell chromatin patterns and transient silencing of these important regulatory genes in stem or progenitor cells may leave these genes vulnerable to aberrant DNA hypermethylation and heritable gene silencing during tumor initiation and progression.

  14. Gold Nanobeacons for Tracking Gene Silencing in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Milton; Carvalho, Lara; Silva, Joana; Saúde, Leonor; Fernandes, Alexandra R.; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2017-01-01

    The use of gold nanoparticles for effective gene silencing has demonstrated its potential as a tool for gene expression experiments and for the treatment of several diseases. Here, we used a gold nanobeacon designed to specifically silence the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) mRNA in embryos of a fli-EGFP transgenic zebrafish line, while simultaneously allowing the tracking and localization of the silencing events via the beacon’s emission. Fluorescence imaging measurements demonstrated a decrease of the EGFP emission with a concomitant increase in the fluorescence of the Au-nanobeacon. Furthermore, microinjection of the Au-nanobeacon led to a negligible difference in mortality and malformations in comparison to the free oligonucleotide, indicating that this system is a biocompatible platform for the administration of gene silencing moieties. Together, these data illustrate the potential of Au-nanobeacons as tools for in vivo zebrafish gene modulation with low toxicity which may be used towards any gene of interest. PMID:28336844

  15. [Therapeutic effect of focal adhesion kinase gene silence on leukemia].

    PubMed

    Xu, Lü-Hong; Fang, Jian-Pei; Weng, Wen-Jun; Xu, Hong-Gui; Zhang, Ya-Ting

    2011-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) gene silence on leukemia cell growth, leukemogenesis and efficacy of chemotherapy drug. Vector containing lentiviral-FAK-shRNA was constructed and transfected into BCR/ABL-BaF3 leukemic cells, the cell growth and apoptosis were detected in vitro. The effect of FAK shRNA on leukemogenesis was studied in a murine model with leukemia. The apoptosis of leukemia cells and survival of leukemic mice treated by FAK shRNA combined with drug STI571 were monitored. The results showed that FAK gene expression was knocked down by lentiviral-FAK-shRNA. FAK gene silencing inhibited leukemia cell growth in vitro. The apoptosis test results showed that the percentages of Annexin V(+) cells in vector control group and FAK shRNA group were (3.46 ± 0.56)% and (7.3 ± 0.79)%, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The mice in vector control group died at day 21 to 27, while the mice in FAK shRNA group died between day 52 and 60, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Moreover, FAK gene silence combined with drug STI571 could enhance the apoptosis of leukemia cells and prolong survival time of leukemic mice. It is concluded that FAK gene silence inhibits leukemogenesis and promotes efficacy of chemotherapy drug on leukemia cells, indicating FAK gene silence may be considered as a new therapeutic strategy for leukemia.

  16. Aberrant gene expression in deceased transgenic cloned calves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wang, S H; Dai, Y P; Li, N

    2009-05-01

    Several transgenic cloned species have been obtained; however, the efficiency of transgenic cloning remains very low, even lower than cloning. Many experiments have demonstrated abnormal growth and development, and inappropriate gene expression in cloned animals. In this study, we examined the expression of 19 development-related genes in lungs of three normal controls and three aberrant transgenic cloned calves. Results showed in transgenic cloned calves, 84.2% genes had decreased expression levels, however, 5.3% genes had increased levels. This study suggests transgenic cloning and the aberrant expression would cause abnormal growth and development in transgenic cloned calves. To our knowledge, this is the first time that gene expression was examined in transgenic cloned cattle. These findings may have some implications in understanding the low efficiency of the transgenic cloning.

  17. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and introduced alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs) in a gene delivery process termed impalefection. The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. 24 hours after nanofiber-mediated delivery, 53.1% 10.4% of the cells that expressed the yfp marker gene were also fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  18. GENE SILENCING. Epigenetic silencing by the HUSH complex mediates position-effect variegation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Tchasovnikarova, Iva A; Timms, Richard T; Matheson, Nicholas J; Wals, Kim; Antrobus, Robin; Göttgens, Berthold; Dougan, Gordon; Dawson, Mark A; Lehner, Paul J

    2015-06-26

    Forward genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster for modifiers of position-effect variegation have revealed the basis of much of our understanding of heterochromatin. We took an analogous approach to identify genes required for epigenetic repression in human cells. A nonlethal forward genetic screen in near-haploid KBM7 cells identified the HUSH (human silencing hub) complex, comprising three poorly characterized proteins, TASOR, MPP8, and periphilin; this complex is absent from Drosophila but is conserved from fish to humans. Loss of HUSH components resulted in decreased H3K9me3 both at endogenous genomic loci and at retroviruses integrated into heterochromatin. Our results suggest that the HUSH complex is recruited to genomic loci rich in H3K9me3, where subsequent recruitment of the methyltransferase SETDB1 is required for further H3K9me3 deposition to maintain transcriptional silencing.

  19. Polycomb-Mediated Gene Silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwan; Sung, Sibum

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are conserved chromatin regulators involved in the control of key developmental programs in eukaryotes. They collectively provide the transcriptional memory unique to each cell identity by maintaining transcriptional states of developmental genes. PcG proteins form multi-protein complexes, known as Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) and Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). PRC1 and PRC2 contribute to the stable gene silencing in part through catalyzing covalent histone modifications. Components of PRC1 and PRC2 are well conserved from plants to animals. PcG-mediated gene silencing has been extensively investigated in efforts to understand molecular mechanisms underlying developmental programs in eukaryotes. Here, we describe our current knowledge on PcG-mediated gene repression which dictates developmental programs by dynamic layers of regulatory activities, with an emphasis given to the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:25410906

  20. Aucsia gene silencing causes parthenocarpic fruit development in tomato.

    PubMed

    Molesini, Barbara; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Rotino, Giuseppe Leonardo; Dani, Valeria; Spena, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    In angiosperms, auxin phytohormones play a crucial regulatory role in fruit initiation. The expression of auxin biosynthesis genes in ovules and placenta results in uncoupling of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit development from fertilization with production of parthenocarpic fruits. We have identified two newly described genes, named Aucsia genes, which are differentially expressed in auxin-synthesis (DefH9-iaaM) parthenocarpic tomato flower buds. The two tomato Aucsia genes encode 53-amino-acid-long peptides. We show, by RNA interference-mediated gene suppression, that Aucsia genes are involved in both reproductive and vegetative plant development. Aucsia-silenced tomato plants exhibited auxin-related phenotypes such as parthenocarpic fruit development, leaf fusions, and reflexed leaves. Auxin-induced rhizogenesis in cotyledon explants and polar auxin transport in roots were reduced in Aucsia-silenced plants compared with wild-type plants. In addition, Aucsia-silenced plants showed an increased sensitivity to 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. We further prove that total indole-3-acetic acid content was increased in preanthesis Aucsia-silenced flower buds. Thus, the data presented demonstrate that Aucsia genes encode a novel family of plant peptides that control fruit initiation and affect other auxin-related biological processes in tomato. Aucsia homologous genes are present in both chlorophytes and streptophytes, and the encoded peptides are distinguished by a 16-amino-acid-long (PYSGXSTLALVARXSA) AUCSIA motif, a lysine-rich carboxyl-terminal region, and a conserved tyrosine-based endocytic sorting motif.

  1. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  2. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Biankin, Andrew V.; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David K.; Wilson, Peter J.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K.; Cowley, Mark J.; Gardiner, Brooke B.; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Gill, Anthony J.; Pinho, Andreia V.; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J. Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R. Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L.; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D.; Colvin, Emily K.; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Humphrey, Emily S.; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T.; Chantrill, Lorraine A.; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Kench, James G.; Lovell, Jessica A.; Daly, Roger J.; Merrett, Neil D.; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M.; Fisher, William E.; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Hodges, Sally E.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R.; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J.; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E.; Yung, Christina K.; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Morgan, Richard A.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A.; Mann, Karen M.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Adams, David J.; Largaespada, David A.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Rust, Alistair G.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Tuveson, David A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Wheeler, David A.; Pearson, John V.; McPherson, John D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:23103869

  3. Virus-induced gene silencing of fiber-related genes in cotton.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, John R; Haigler, Candace H; Robertson, Dominique Niki

    2015-01-01

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) is a useful method for transient downregulation of gene expression in crop plants. The geminivirus Cotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV) has been modified to serve as a VIGS vector for persistent gene silencing in cotton. Here the use of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is described as a marker for identifying silenced tissues in reproductive tissues, a procedure that requires the use of transgenic plants. Suggestions are given for isolating and cloning combinations of target and marker sequences so that the total length of inserted foreign DNA is between 500 and 750 bp. Using this strategy, extensive silencing is achieved with only 200-400 bp of sequence homologous to an endogenous gene, reducing the possibility of off-target silencing. Cotyledons can be inoculated using either the gene gun or Agrobacterium and will continue to show silencing throughout fruit and fiber development. CLCrV is not transmitted through seed, and VIGS is limited to genes expressed in the maternally derived seed coat and fiber in the developing seed. This complicates the use of GFP as a marker for VIGS because cotton fibers must be separated from unsilenced tissue in the seed to determine if they are silenced. Nevertheless, fibers from a large number of seeds can be rapidly screened following placement into 96-well plates. Methods for quantifying the extent of silencing using semiquantitative RT-PCR are given.

  4. Virus-induced gene silencing in eggplant (Solanum melongena).

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiping; Fu, Daqi; Zhu, Benzhong; Yan, Huaxue; Shen, Xiaoying; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhu, Yi; Luo, Yunbo

    2012-06-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena) is an economically important vegetable requiring investigation into its various genomic functions. The current limitation in the investigation of genomic function in eggplant is the lack of effective tools available for conducting functional assays. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has played a critical role in the functional genetic analyses. In this paper, TRV-mediated VIGS was successfully elicited in eggplant. We first cloned the CDS sequence of PDS (PHYTOENE DESATURASE) in eggplant and then silenced the PDS gene. Photo-bleaching was shown on the newly-developed leaves four weeks after agroinoculation, indicating that VIGS can be used to silence genes in eggplant. To further illustrate the reliability of VIGS in eggplant, we selected Chl H, Su and CLA1 as reporters to elicit VIGS using the high-pressure spray method. Suppression of Chl H and Su led to yellow leaves, while the depletion of CLA1 resulted in albino. In conclusion, four genes, PDS, Chl H, Su (Sulfur), CLA1, were down-regulated significantly by VIGS, indicating that the VIGS system can be successfully applied in eggplant and is a reliable tool for the study of gene function. © 2012 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Tissue homogeneity requires inhibition of unequal gene silencing during development

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hai H.; Looney, Monika; Strauss, Benjamin; Bloodgood, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms can generate and maintain homogenous populations of cells that make up individual tissues. However, cellular processes that can disrupt homogeneity and how organisms overcome such disruption are unknown. We found that ∼100-fold differences in expression from a repetitive DNA transgene can occur between intestinal cells in Caenorhabditis elegans. These differences are caused by gene silencing in some cells and are actively suppressed by parental and zygotic factors such as the conserved exonuclease ERI-1. If unsuppressed, silencing can spread between some cells in embryos but can be repeat specific and independent of other homologous loci within each cell. Silencing can persist through DNA replication and nuclear divisions, disrupting uniform gene expression in developed animals. Analysis at single-cell resolution suggests that differences between cells arise during early cell divisions upon unequal segregation of an initiator of silencing. Our results suggest that organisms with high repetitive DNA content, which include humans, could use similar developmental mechanisms to achieve and maintain tissue homogeneity. PMID:27458132

  6. Whole genome DNA methylation: beyond genes silencing

    PubMed Central

    Tirado-Magallanes, Roberto; Rebbani, Khadija; Lim, Ricky; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Benoukraf, Touati

    2017-01-01

    The combination of DNA bisulfite treatment with high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled investigation of genome-wide DNA methylation at near base pair level resolution, far beyond that of the kilobase-long canonical CpG islands that initially revealed the biological relevance of this covalent DNA modification. The latest high-resolution studies have revealed a role for very punctual DNA methylation in chromatin plasticity, gene regulation and splicing. Here, we aim to outline the major biological consequences of DNA methylation recently discovered. We also discuss the necessity of tuning DNA methylation resolution into an adequate scale to ease the integration of the methylome information with other chromatin features and transcription events such as gene expression, nucleosome positioning, transcription factors binding dynamic, gene splicing and genomic imprinting. Finally, our review sheds light on DNA methylation heterogeneity in cell population and the different approaches used for its assessment, including the contribution of single cell DNA analysis technology. PMID:27895318

  7. Bioreducible polymers for gene silencing and delivery.

    PubMed

    Son, Sejin; Namgung, Ran; Kim, Jihoon; Singha, Kaushik; Kim, Won Jong

    2012-07-17

    Polymeric gene delivery vectors show great potential for the construction of the ideal gene delivery system. These systems harness their ability to incorporate versatile functional traits to overcome most impediments encountered in gene delivery: from the initial complexation to their target-specific release of the therapeutic nucleic acids at the cytosol. Among the numerous multifunctional polymers that have been designed and evaluated as gene delivery vectors, polymers with redox-sensitive (or bioreducible) functional domains have gained great attention in terms of their structural and functional traits. The redox environment plays a pivotal role in sustaining cellular homeostasis and natural redox potential gradients exist between extra- and intracellular space and between the exterior and interior of subcellular organelles. In some cases, researchers have designed the polymeric delivery vectors to exploit these gradients. For example, researchers have taken advantage of the high redox potential gradient between oxidizing extracellular space and the reducing environment of cytosolic compartments by integrating disulfide bonds into the polymer structure. Such polymers retain their cargo in the extracellular space but selectively release the therapeutic nucleic acids in the reducing space within the cytosol. Furthermore, bioreducible polymers form stable complex with nucleic acids, and researchers can fabricate these structures to impart several important features such as site-, timing-, and duration period-specific gene expression. Additionally, the introduction of disulfide bonds within these polymers promotes their biodegradability and limits their cytotoxicity. Many approaches have demonstrated the versatility of bioreducible gene delivery, but the underlying biological rationale of these systems remains poorly understood. The process of disulfide reduction depends on multiple variables in the cellular redox environment. Therefore, the quest to unravel various

  8. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Yiu Huen; Dogruluk, Turgut; Tedeschi, Philip M.; Wardwell-Ozgo, Joanna; Lu, Hengyu; Espitia, Maribel; Nair, Nikitha; Minelli, Rosalba; Chong, Zechen; Chen, Fengju; Chang, Qing Edward; Dennison, Jennifer B.; Dogruluk, Armel; Li, Min; Ying, Haoqiang; Bertino, Joseph R.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Ittmann, Michael; Kerrigan, John; Chen, Ken; Creighton, Chad J.; Eterovic, Karina; Mills, Gordon B.; Scott, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This approach reveals oncogenic activity for rare gene aberrations in genes including NAD Kinase (NADK), which regulates NADP(H) homeostasis and cellular redox state. We further validate mutant NADK, whose expression provides gain-of-function enzymatic activity leading to a reduction in cellular reactive oxygen species and tumorigenesis, and show that depletion of wild-type NADK in PDAC cell lines attenuates cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that annotating rare aberrations can reveal important cancer signalling pathways representing additional therapeutic targets. PMID:26806015

  9. Post-transcriptional gene silencing of the p23 silencing suppressor of Citrus tristeza virus confers resistance to the virus in transgenic Mexican lime.

    PubMed

    Fagoaga, Carmen; López, Carmelo; de Mendoza, Alfonso Hermoso; Moreno, Pedro; Navarro, Luis; Flores, Ricardo; Peña, Leandro

    2006-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that most Mexican limes (Citrus aurantifolia (Christ.) Swing.) expressing the p23 gene of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) exhibit aberrations resembling viral leaf symptoms. Here we report that five independent transgenic lines having normal phenotype displayed characteristics typical of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS): multiple copies of the transgene, low levels of the corresponding mRNA, methylation of the silenced transgene, and accumulation of p23-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). When graft- or aphid-inoculated with CTV, some propagations of these silenced lines were immune: they neither expressed symptoms nor accumulated virions and viral RNA as estimated by DAS-ELISA and Northern blot hybridization, respectively. Other propagations were moderately resistant because they became infected later and showed attenuated symptoms compared to controls. The susceptible propagations, in addition to symptom expression and elevated virus titer, accumulated p23-specific siRNAs at levels significantly higher than immune or non-inoculated propagations, and showed transgene demethylation. This variable response among clonal transformants indicates that factors other than the genetic background of the transgenic plants play a key role in PTGS-mediated resistance.

  10. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and delivered alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using impalefection on spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs). The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. Following impalefection and tetracycline induction, 53.1% 10.4% of impalefected cells were fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  11. Bacterial Cellular Engineering by Genome Editing and Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing is an important technology for bacterial cellular engineering, which is commonly conducted by homologous recombination-based procedures, including gene knockout (disruption), knock-in (insertion), and allelic exchange. In addition, some new recombination-independent approaches have emerged that utilize catalytic RNAs, artificial nucleases, nucleic acid analogs, and peptide nucleic acids. Apart from these methods, which directly modify the genomic structure, an alternative approach is to conditionally modify the gene expression profile at the posttranscriptional level without altering the genomes. This is performed by expressing antisense RNAs to knock down (silence) target mRNAs in vivo. This review describes the features and recent advances on methods used in genomic engineering and silencing technologies that are advantageously used for bacterial cellular engineering. PMID:24552876

  12. Endogenous Targets of Transcriptional Gene Silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Steimer, Andrea; Amedeo, Paolo; Afsar, Karin; Fransz, Paul; Scheid, Ortrun Mittelsten; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2000-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) frequently inactivates foreign genes integrated into plant genomes but very likely also suppresses an unknown subset of chromosomal information. Accordingly, RNA analysis of mutants impaired in silencing should uncover endogenous targets of this epigenetic regulation. We compared transcripts from wild-type Arabidopsis carrying a silent transgene with RNA from an isogenic transgene-expressing TGS mutant. Two cDNA clones were identified representing endogenous RNA expressed only in the mutant. The synthesis of these RNAs was found to be released in several mutants affected in TGS, implying that TGS in general and not a particular mutation controls the transcriptional activity of their templates. Detailed analysis revealed that the two clones are part of longer transcripts termed TSI (for transcriptionally silent information). Two major classes of related TSI transcripts were found in a mutant cDNA library. They are synthesized from repeats present in heterochromatic pericentromeric regions of Arabidopsis chromosomes. These repeats share sequence homology with the 3′ terminal part of the putative retrotransposon Athila. However, the transcriptional activation does not include the transposon itself and does not promote its movement. There is no evidence for a general release of silencing from retroelements. Thus, foreign genes in plants encounter the epigenetic control normally directed, at least in part, toward a subset of pericentromeric repeats. PMID:10899982

  13. Epigenetic Silencing of Plasmodium falciparum Genes Linked to Erythrocyte Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Alfred; Carret, Celine; Kaneko, Osamu; Yim Lim, Brian Y. S.; Ivens, Alasdair; Holder, Anthony A

    2007-01-01

    The process of erythrocyte invasion by merozoites of Plasmodium falciparum involves multiple steps, including the formation of a moving junction between parasite and host cell, and it is characterised by the redundancy of many of the receptor–ligand interactions involved. Several parasite proteins that interact with erythrocyte receptors or participate in other steps of invasion are encoded by small subtelomerically located gene families of four to seven members. We report here that members of the eba, rhoph1/clag, acbp, and pfRh multigene families exist in either an active or a silenced state. In the case of two members of the rhoph1/clag family, clag3.1 and clag3.2, expression was mutually exclusive. Silencing was clonally transmitted and occurred in the absence of detectable DNA alterations, suggesting that it is epigenetic. This was demonstrated for eba-140. Our data demonstrate that variant or mutually exclusive expression and epigenetic silencing in Plasmodium are not unique to genes such as var, which encode proteins that are exported to the surface of the erythrocyte, but also occur for genes involved in host cell invasion. Clonal variant expression of invasion-related ligands increases the flexibility of the parasite to adapt to its human host. PMID:17676953

  14. Altered promoter nucleosome positioning is an early event in gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Hesson, Luke B; Sloane, Mathew A; Wong, Jason Wh; Nunez, Andrea C; Srivastava, Sameer; Ng, Benedict; Hawkins, Nicholas J; Bourke, Michael J; Ward, Robyn L

    2014-10-01

    Gene silencing in cancer frequently involves hypermethylation and dense nucleosome occupancy across promoter regions. How a promoter transitions to this silent state is unclear. Using colorectal adenomas, we investigated nucleosome positioning, DNA methylation, and gene expression in the early stages of gene silencing. Genome-wide gene expression correlated with highly positioned nucleosomes upstream and downstream of a nucleosome-depleted transcription start site (TSS). Hypermethylated promoters displayed increased nucleosome occupancy, specifically at the TSS. We investigated 2 genes, CDH1 and CDKN2B, which were silenced in adenomas but lacked promoter hypermethylation. Instead, silencing correlated with loss of nucleosomes from the -2 position upstream of the TSS relative to normal mucosa. In contrast, permanent CDH1 silencing in carcinoma cells was characterized by promoter hypermethylation and dense nucleosome occupancy. Our findings suggest that silenced genes transition through an intermediary stage involving altered promoter nucleosome positioning, before permanent silencing by hypermethylation and dense nucleosome occupancy.

  15. Oligonucleotide conjugates - Candidates for gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Evans, James C; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-10-01

    The potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of oligonucleotides (ONs) have attracted great attention in recent years. The capability of ONs to selectively inhibit target genes through antisense and RNA interference mechanisms, without causing un-intended sideeffects has led them to be investigated for various biomedical applications, especially for the treatment of viral diseases and cancer. In recent years, many researchers have focused on enhancing the stability and target specificity of ONs by encapsulating/complexing them with polymers or lipid chains to formulate nanoparticles/nanocomplexes/micelles. Also, chemical modification of nucleic acids has emerged as an alternative to impart stability to ONs against nucleases and other degrading enzymes and proteins found in blood. In addition to chemically modifying the nucleic acids directly, another strategy that has emerged, involves conjugating polymers/peptide/aptamers/antibodies/proteins, preferably to the sense strand (3'end) of siRNAs. Conjugation to the siRNA not only enhances the stability and targeting specificity of the siRNA, but also allows for the development of self-administering siRNA formulations, with a much smaller size than what is usually observed for nanoparticle (∼200nm). This review concentrates mainly on approaches and studies involving ON-conjugates for biomedical applications.

  16. Efficient Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Solanum rostratum

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lan-Huan; Wang, Rui-Heng; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Luo, Yun-Bo; Fu, Da-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Solanum rostratum is a “super weed” that grows fast, is widespread, and produces the toxin solanine, which is harmful to both humans and other animals. To our knowledge, no study has focused on its molecular biology owing to the lack of available transgenic methods and sequence information for S. rostratum. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants; therefore, in the present study, we aimed to establish tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-derived VIGS in S. rostratum. The genes for phytoene desaturase (PDS) and Chlorophyll H subunit (ChlH) of magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase were cloned from S. rostratum and used as reporters of gene silencing. It was shown that high-efficiency VIGS can be achieved in the leaves, flowers, and fruit of S. rostratum. Moreover, based on our comparison of three different types of infection methods, true leaf infection was found to be more efficient than cotyledon and sprout infiltration in long-term VIGS in multiple plant organs. In conclusion, the VIGS technology and tomato genomic sequences can be used in the future to study gene function in S. rostratum. PMID:27258320

  17. Characterization of Arabidopsis Genes Involved in Gene Silencing. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, S. R.

    1999-02-05

    Enhancer of gene silencing 1 (egs1) is an Arabidopsis mutant that enhances post-transcriptional gene silencing of the rolB gene introduced by genetic engineering (transgene). The goal of our proposal was cloning EGS1 based on its map position. Although we screened more than 2000 chromosomes for recombination, we were unable to get closer than 2 cM to the gene. We experienced an unexpected tendency of the post-transcriptionally silenced transgene to switch to a more stable silenced state. This made it impossible to select egs1 homozygotes for map based cloning. This forced us to reconsider our cloning strategy. One possibility would have been to use a different transgene as the target of gene silencing. We tested two other transgenes. Both encoded proteins unrelated to the first but they were all expressed from the same type of promoter and they all had a similar tendency to become post-transcriptionally silenced. After screening over 80 F2 segregants from each cross between our egs1 mutant and Arabidopsis of the same ecotype homozygous for the new transgene, we were disappointed to find that the egs1 mutation did not enhance post-transcription silencing of the two new genes. In 80 plants we expected to have between 4 and 6 plants that were homozygous for the transgene and for the mutant egs1 allele. If egs1 mutations could enhance gene silencing of the new transgene, these plants would not express it. However all the double homozygotes still expressed the transgene. Therefore, we could not change the target transgene for mapping. This was the state of the cloning at the time for renewal of the grant in 1999. Because the selection of new meaningful recombinant plants had become extremely inefficient using the original rolB transgene, we abandoned the attempt at map based cloning and did not apply for further funding.

  18. Functional genomic analysis of cotton genes with agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiquan; Shan, Libo

    2013-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is one of the most agronomically important crops worldwide for its unique textile fiber production and serving as food and feed stock. Molecular breeding and genetic engineering of useful genes into cotton have emerged as advanced approaches to improve cotton yield, fiber quality, and resistance to various stresses. However, the understanding of gene functions and regulations in cotton is largely hindered by the limited molecular and biochemical tools. Here, we describe the method of an Agrobacterium infiltration-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) assay to transiently silence endogenous genes in cotton at 2-week-old seedling stage. The genes of interest could be readily silenced with a consistently high efficiency. To monitor gene silencing efficiency, we have cloned cotton GrCla1 from G. raimondii, a homolog gene of Arabidopsis Cloroplastos alterados 1 (AtCla1) involved in chloroplast development, and inserted into a tobacco rattle virus (TRV) binary vector pYL156. Silencing of GrCla1 results in albino phenotype on the newly emerging leaves, serving as a visual marker for silencing efficiency. To further explore the possibility of using VIGS assay to reveal the essential genes mediating disease resistance to Verticillium dahliae, a fungal pathogen causing severe Verticillium wilt in cotton, we developed a seedling infection assay to inoculate cotton seedlings when the genes of interest are silenced by VIGS. The method we describe here could be further explored for functional genomic analysis of cotton genes involved in development and various biotic and abiotic stresses.

  19. A dual gene-silencing vector system for monocot and dicot plants.

    PubMed

    Liou, Ming-Ru; Huang, Ying-Wen; Hu, Chung-Chi; Lin, Na-Sheng; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2014-04-01

    Plant virus-based gene-silencing vectors have been extensively and successfully used to elucidate functional genomics in plants. However, only limited virus-induced gene-silencing (VIGS) vectors can be used in both monocot and dicot plants. Here, we established a dual gene-silencing vector system based on Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) and its satellite RNA (satBaMV). Both BaMV and satBaMV vectors could effectively silence endogenous genes in Nicotiana benthamiana and Brachypodium distachyon. The satBaMV vector could also silence the green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene in GFP transgenic N. benthamiana. GFP transgenic plants co-agro-inoculated with BaMV and satBaMV vectors carrying sulphur and GFP genes, respectively, could simultaneously silence both genes. Moreover, the silenced plants could still survive with the silencing of genes essential for plant development such as heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and Hsp70. In addition, the satBaMV- but not BaMV-based vector could enhance gene-silencing efficiency in newly emerging leaves of N. benthamiana deficient in RNA-dependant RNA polymerase 6. The dual gene-silencing vector system of BaMV and satBaMV provides a novel tool for comparative functional studies in monocot and dicot plants. © 2013 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Virus-Induced Silencing of a Plant Cellulose Synthase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Rachel A.; Gibeaut, David M.; Bacic, Antony; Findlay, Kim; Roberts, Keith; Hamilton, Andrew; Baulcombe, David C.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2000-01-01

    Specific cDNA fragments corresponding to putative cellulose synthase genes (CesA) were inserted into potato virus X vectors for functional analysis in Nicotiana benthamiana by using virus-induced gene silencing. Plants infected with one group of cDNAs had much shorter internode lengths, small leaves, and a “dwarf” phenotype. Consistent with a loss of cell wall cellulose, abnormally large and in many cases spherical cells ballooned from the undersurfaces of leaves, particularly in regions adjacent to vascular tissues. Linkage analyses of wall polysaccharides prepared from infected leaves revealed a 25% decrease in cellulose content. Transcript levels for at least one member of the CesA cellulose synthase gene family were lower in infected plants. The decrease in cellulose content in cell walls was offset by an increase in homogalacturonan, in which the degree of esterification of carboxyl groups decreased from ∼50 to ∼33%. The results suggest that feedback loops interconnect the cellular machinery controlling cellulose and pectin biosynthesis. On the basis of the phenotypic features of the infected plants, changes in wall composition, and the reduced abundance of CesA mRNA, we concluded that the cDNA fragments silenced one or more cellulose synthase genes. PMID:10810144

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing in transgenic plants: transgene silencing and reactivation associate with two patterns of transgene body methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingmin; San León, David; Delgadillo, Ma Otilia; García, Juan Antonio; Simón-Mateo, Carmen

    2014-08-01

    We used bisulfite sequencing to study the methylation of a viral transgene whose expression was silenced upon plum pox virus infection of the transgenic plant and its subsequent recovery as a consequence of so-called virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). VIGS was associated with a general increase in the accumulation of small RNAs corresponding to the coding region of the viral transgene. After VIGS, the transgene promoter was not methylated and the coding region showed uneven methylation, with the 5' end being mostly unmethylated in the recovered tissue or mainly methylated at CG sites in regenerated silenced plants. The methylation increased towards the 3' end, which showed dense methylation in all three contexts (CG, CHG and CHH). This methylation pattern and the corresponding silenced status were maintained after plant regeneration from recovered silenced tissue and did not spread into the promoter region, but were not inherited in the sexual offspring. Instead, a new pattern of methylation was observed in the progeny plants consisting of disappearance of the CHH methylation, similar CHG methylation at the 3' end, and an overall increase in CG methylation in the 5' end. The latter epigenetic state was inherited over several generations and did not correlate with transgene silencing and hence virus resistance. These results suggest that the widespread CG methylation pattern found in body gene bodies located in euchromatic regions of plant genomes may reflect an older silencing event, and most likely these genes are no longer silenced. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Technical advances in trigger-induced RNA interference gene silencing in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Foda, Bardees M; Suresh, Susmitha; Singh, Upinder

    2016-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica has a robust endogenous RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. There are abundant 27 nucleotide (nt) anti-sense small RNAs (AS sRNAs) that target genes for silencing and the genome encodes many genes involved in the RNAi pathway such as Argonaute proteins. Importantly, an E. histolytica gene with numerous AS sRNAs can function as a "trigger" to induce silencing of a gene that is fused to the trigger. Thus, the amebic RNAi pathway regulates gene expression relevant to amebic biology and has additionally been harnessed as a tool for genetic manipulation. In this study we have further improved the trigger-induced gene silencing method. We demonstrate that rather than using the full-length gene, a short portion of the coding region fused to a trigger is sufficient to induce silencing; the first 537 bp of the E. histolytica rhomboid gene (EhROM1) fused in-frame to the trigger was sufficient to silence EhROM1. We also demonstrated that the trigger method could silence two amebic genes concomitantly; fusion of the coding regions of EhROM1 and transcription factor, EhMyb, in-frame to a trigger gene resulted in both genes being silenced. Alternatively, two genes can be silenced sequentially: EhROM1-silenced parasites with no drug selection plasmid were transfected with trigger-EhMyb, resulting in parasites with both EhROM1 and EhMyb silenced. With all approaches tested, the trigger-mediated silencing was substantive and silencing was maintained despite loss of the G418 selectable marker. All gene silencing was associated with generation of AS sRNAs to the silenced gene. We tested the reversibility of the trigger system using inhibitors of histone modifications but found that the silencing was highly stable. This work represents a technical advance in the trigger gene silencing method in E. histolytica. Approaches that readily silence multiple genes add significantly to the genetic toolkit available to the ameba research community.

  3. Aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-related genes in giant breast fibroadenoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Giant fibroadenoma is an uncommon variant of benign breast lesions. Aberrant methylation of CpG islands in promoter regions is known to be involved in the silencing of genes (for example, tumor-suppressor genes) and appears to be an early event in the etiology of breast carcinogenesis. Only hypermethylation of p16INK4a has been reported in non-giant breast fibroadenoma. In this particular case, there are no previously published data on epigenetic alterations in giant fibroadenomas. Our previous results, based on the analysis of 49 cancer-related CpG islands have confirmed that the aberrant methylation is specific to malignant breast tumors and that it is completely absent in normal breast tissue and breast fibroadenomas. Case presentation A 13-year-old Hispanic girl was referred after she had noted a progressive development of a mass in her left breast. On physical examination, a 10 × 10 cm lump was detected and axillary lymph nodes were not enlarged. After surgical removal the lump was diagnosed as a giant fibroadenoma. Because of the high growth rate of this benign tumor, we decided to analyze the methylation status of 49 CpG islands related to cell growth control. We have identified the methylation of five cancer-related CpG islands in the giant fibroadenoma tissue: ESR1, MGMT, WT-1, BRCA2 and CD44. Conclusion In this case report we show for the first time the methylation analysis of a giant fibroadenoma. The detection of methylation of these five cancer-related regions indicates substantial epigenomic differences with non-giant fibroadenomas. Epigenetic alterations could explain the higher growth rate of this tumor. Our data contribute to the growing knowledge of aberrant methylation in breast diseases. In this particular case, there exist no previous data regarding the role of methylation in giant fibroadenomas, considered by definition as a benign breast lesion. PMID:22011321

  4. Dendrimeric siRNA for Efficient Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheol Am; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Lee, Hyukjin; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2015-06-01

    Programmable molecular self-assembly of siRNA molecules provides precisely controlled generation of dendrimeric siRNA nanostructures. The second-generation dendrimers of siRNA can be effectively complexed with a low-molecular-weight, cationic polymer (poly(β-amino ester), PBAE) to generate stable nanostructures about 160 nm in diameter via strong electrostatic interactions. Condensation and gene silencing efficiencies increase with the increased generation of siRNA dendrimers due to a high charge density and structural flexibility.

  5. Noise and correlations in genes silenced by small RNA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Terence; Levine, Erel

    2006-03-01

    Many small regulatory RNAs have been identified in prokaryotes and eukaryotes in recent years. In many cases, RNA regulation is found in critical pathways. These include stress response and quorum sensing pathways in bacteria, and cell differentiation and programmed cell death in eukaryotes. In many cases, regulation by small RNA is used in switching off a response program as long as it is not required, allowing for a fast switching on when necessary. Clearly, accidental execution of such a program may bare grave consequences on the cell, and should be avoided. Here we analyze a stochastic model for gene regulation by the most abundant class of small RNA in bacteria. This class of small RNAs acts by base pairing with target mRNAs, silencing its translation and actively promoting its degradation. Importantly, the small RNA molecule is not recycled. Our model suggests that genes silenced by sRNA exhibits smooth noise, as opposed to the bursty noise characteristic to genes repressed at the level of transcription, with coupling between intrinsic noise and global, extrinsic fluctuations. In addition, we investigate how noise propagates through the indirect coupling between different targets of the same sRNA. These features are discussed in the context of circuits exhibiting multi-stability, where protein bursts have strong implications on spontaneous switching.

  6. Downregulation of plant genes with miRNA-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    de Felippes, Felipe Fenselau

    2013-01-01

    In plants, some microRNAs (miRNAs) can trigger the production of secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from their targets. miRNA-induced gene silencing (MIGS) exploits this unique feature to efficiently downregulate gene expression. The simple flanking of a sequence of interest with the target site for the miR173 (an miRNA able to trigger transitivity) is sufficient to start the production of secondary siRNAs and, consequently, silencing of the target gene. This technique can be easily adapted to promote gene silencing of more than one gene, even with those that share no sequence similarities. This chapter describes the necessary steps for designing and implementing the use of MIGS in plants.

  7. Transient Silencing of DNA Repair Genes Improves Targeted Gene Integration in the Filamentous Fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Chum, Pak Yang; Schmidt, Georg; Saloheimo, Markku; Landowski, Christopher P

    2017-08-01

    Trichoderma reesei is a filamentous fungus that is used worldwide to produce industrial enzymes. Industrial strains have traditionally been created though systematic strain improvement using mutagenesis and screening approaches. It is also desirable to specifically manipulate the genes of the organism to further improve and to modify the strain. Targeted integration in filamentous fungi is typically hampered by very low frequencies of homologous recombination. To address this limitation, we have developed a simple transient method for silencing genes in T. reesei Using gene-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeted to mus53, we could achieve up to 90% knockdown of mus53 mRNA. As a practical example, we demonstrated that transient silencing of DNA repair genes significantly improved homologous integration of DNA at a specific locus in a standard protoplast transformation. The best transient silencing of mus53 with siRNAs in protoplasts could achieve up to 59% marker gene integration.IMPORTANCE The previous solution for improving targeted integration efficiency has been deleting nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair genes. However, deleting these important repair genes may lead to unintended consequences for genomic stability and could lead to the accumulation of spontaneous mutations. Our method of transiently silencing NHEJ repair pathway genes allows recovery of their important repair functions. Here we report a silencing approach for improving targeted DNA integration in filamentous fungi. Furthermore, our transient silencing method is a truly flexible approach that is capable of knocking down the expression of a target gene in growing mycelial cultures, which could facilitate the broad study of gene functions in T. reesei. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Aberrant methylation of the specific CpG island portion regulates cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in human gastric carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hur, Keun; Song, Sang Hyun; Lee, Hye Seung; Ho Kim, Woo; Bang, Yung-Jue; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2003-10-24

    Although it has been well established that overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) favors tumorigenesis and metastasis, the molecular mechanism that regulates Cox-2 expression has not been well defined in gastric carcinoma. Aberrant methylation of the CpG island is known to be one of the powerful mechanisms for the suppression of gene expression, and usually, CpG islands are very rich in promoter region and exon-1 region. But, it is controversial whether Cox-2 gene expression is regulated by methylation of promoter region or exon-1 region. In this study, we examined whether the hyper-methylation mediated transcriptional silencing of Cox-2 also occurred in human gastric carcinoma tissues and which portion of CpG island methylation is important in Cox-2 gene expression. Genomic DNAs from human gastric carcinoma tissues were treated with three methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes and then Southern blot analysis was performed. Out of 30 primary gastric tumor samples, 26 cases (86.6%) showed overexpression of Cox-2. Four cases (13.3%) with relatively decreased Cox-2 gene expression were associated with the presence of aberrant methylation of Cox-2 CpG island. We also found that methylation of promoter region and not exon-1 region is related with the transcriptional silencing of Cox-2 in gastric carcinoma cancer by detailed methylation mapping using bisulfite sequencing analysis. Our results suggest that the DNA methylation-mediated transcriptional silencing of Cox-2 is a predominant mechanism for the down-regulation of Cox-2 expression in human gastric carcinoma. Furthermore, the results suggest that methylation of not exon-1 region but promoter region is important to regulation of Cox-2 gene expression.

  9. Aberrant expression of homeobox gene SIX1 in Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A.F.

    2015-01-01

    In Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) we recently identified deregulated expression of homeobox genes MSX1 and OTX2 which are physiologically involved in development of the embryonal neural plate border region. Here, we examined in HL homeobox gene SIX1 an additional regulator of this embryonal region mediating differentiation of placodal precursors. SIX1 was aberrantly activated in 12 % of HL patient samples in silico, indicating a pathological role in a subset of this B-cell malignancy. In addition, SIX1 expression was detected in HL cell lines which were used as models to reveal upstream factors and target genes of this basic developmental regulator. We detected increased copy numbers of the SIX1 locus at chromosome 14q23 correlating with enhanced expression while chromosomal translocations were absent. Moreover, comparative expression profiling data and pertinent gene modulation experiments indicated that the WNT-signalling pathway and transcription factor MEF2C regulate SIX1 expression. Genes encoding the transcription factors GATA2, GATA3, MSX1 and SPIB – all basic lymphoid regulators - were identified as targets of SIX1 in HL. In addition, cofactors EYA1 and TLE4, respectively, contrastingly mediated activation and suppression of SIX1 target gene expression. Thus, the protein domain interfaces may represent therapeutic targets in SIX1-positive HL subsets. Collectively, our data reveal a gene regulatory network with SIX1 centrally deregulating lymphoid differentiation and support concordance of lymphopoiesis/lymphomagenesis and developmental processes in the neural plate border region. PMID:26473286

  10. Redundancy of the two dicer genes in transgene-induced posttranscriptional gene silencing in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Catalanotto, Caterina; Pallotta, Massimiliano; ReFalo, Paul; Sachs, Matthew S; Vayssie, Laurence; Macino, Giuseppe; Cogoni, Carlo

    2004-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) in animals, cosuppression in plants, and quelling in fungi are homology-dependent gene silencing mechanisms in which the introduction of either double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) or transgenes induces sequence-specific mRNA degradation. These phenomena share a common genetic and mechanistic basis. The accumulation of short interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules that guide sequence-specific mRNA degradation is a common feature in both silencing mechanisms, as is the component of the RNase complex involved in mRNA cleavage. During RNAi in animal cells, dsRNA is processed into siRNA by an RNase III enzyme called Dicer. Here we show that elimination of the activity of two Dicer-like genes by mutation in the fungus Neurospora crassa eliminates transgene-induced gene silencing (quelling) and the processing of dsRNA to an siRNA form. The two Dicer-like genes appear redundant because single mutants are quelling proficient. This first demonstration of the involvement of Dicer in gene silencing induced by transgenes supports a model by which a dsRNA produced by the activity of cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases on transgenic transcripts is an essential intermediate of silencing.

  11. Pharmacologic Unmasking of Epigenetically Silenced Genes in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Park, Hannah Lui; Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul; Kim, Myoung Sook; Liu, Junwei; Argani, Pedram; Westra, William; Van Criekinge, Wim; Sidransky, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of several known or putative tumor suppressor genes occurs frequently during the pathogenesis of various cancers including breast cancer. Many epigenetically inactivated genes involved in breast cancer development remain to be identified. Therefore, in this study we used a pharmacologic unmasking approach in breast cancer cell lines with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) followed by microarray expression analysis to identify epigenetically inactivated genes in breast cancer. Experimental Design Breast cancer cell lines were treated with 5-aza-dC followed by microarray analysis to identify epigenetically inactivated genes in breast cancer. We then used bisulfite DNA sequencing, conventional methylation-specific PCR, and quantitative fluorogenic real-time methylation-specific PCR to confirm cancer-specific methylation in novel genes. Results Forty-nine genes were up-regulated in breast cancer cells lines after 5-aza-dC treatment, as determined by microarray analysis. Five genes (MAL, FKBP4, VGF, OGDHL, and KIF1A) showed cancer-specific methylation in breast tissues. Methylation of at least two was found at high frequency only in breast cancers (40 of 40) as compared with normal breast tissue (0 of 10; P < 0.0001, Fisher’s exact test). Conclusions This study identified new cancer-specific methylated genes to help elucidate the biology of breast cancer and as candidate diagnostic markers for the disease. PMID:19228724

  12. Pharmacologic unmasking of epigenetically silenced genes in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Park, Hannah Lui; Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul; Kim, Myoung Sook; Liu, Junwei; Argani, Pedram; Westra, William; Van Criekinge, Wim; Sidransky, David

    2009-02-15

    Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of several known or putative tumor suppressor genes occurs frequently during the pathogenesis of various cancers including breast cancer. Many epigenetically inactivated genes involved in breast cancer development remain to be identified. Therefore, in this study we used a pharmacologic unmasking approach in breast cancer cell lines with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) followed by microarray expression analysis to identify epigenetically inactivated genes in breast cancer. Breast cancer cell lines were treated with 5-aza-dC followed by microarray analysis to identify epigenetically inactivated genes in breast cancer. We then used bisulfite DNA sequencing, conventional methylation-specific PCR, and quantitative fluorogenic real-time methylation-specific PCR to confirm cancer-specific methylation in novel genes. Forty-nine genes were up-regulated in breast cancer cells lines after 5-aza-dC treatment, as determined by microarray analysis. Five genes (MAL, FKBP4, VGF, OGDHL, and KIF1A) showed cancer-specific methylation in breast tissues. Methylation of at least two was found at high frequency only in breast cancers (40 of 40) as compared with normal breast tissue (0 of 10; P<0.0001, Fisher's exact test). This study identified new cancer-specific methylated genes to help elucidate the biology of breast cancer and as candidate diagnostic markers for the disease.

  13. The Impact of Gene Silencing on Horizontal Gene Transfer and Bacterial Evolution.

    PubMed

    Navarre, W W

    2016-01-01

    The H-NS family of DNA-binding proteins is the subject of intense study due to its important roles in the regulation of horizontally acquired genes critical for virulence, antibiotic resistance, and metabolism. Xenogeneic silencing proteins, typified by the H-NS protein of Escherichia coli, specifically target and downregulate expression from AT-rich genes by selectively recognizing specific structural features unique to the AT-rich minor groove. In doing so, these proteins facilitate bacterial evolution; enabling these cells to engage in horizontal gene transfer while buffering potential any detrimental fitness consequences that may result from it. Xenogeneic silencing and counter-silencing explain how bacterial cells can evolve effective gene regulatory strategies in the face of rampant gene gain and loss and it has extended our understanding of bacterial gene regulation beyond the classic operon model. Here we review the structures and mechanisms of xenogeneic silencers as well as their impact on bacterial evolution. Several H-NS-like proteins appear to play a role in facilitating gene transfer by other mechanisms including by regulating transposition, conjugation, and participating in the activation of virulence loci like the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island of pathogenic strains of E. coli. Evidence suggests that the critical determinants that dictate whether an H-NS-like protein will be a silencer or will perform a different function do not lie in the DNA-binding domain but, rather, in the domains that control oligomerization. This suggests that H-NS-like proteins are transcription factors that both recognize and alter the shape of DNA to exert specific effects that include but are not limited to gene silencing. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  14. Silencing of the PiAvr3a effector-encoding gene from Phytophthora infestans by transcriptional fusion to a short interspersed element.

    PubMed

    Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Tian, Zhendong; Avrova, Anna O; Savenkov, Eugene I; Dixelius, Christina; Whisson, Stephen C

    2011-12-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the notorious oomycete causing late blight of potato and tomato. A large proportion of the P. infestans genome is composed of transposable elements, the activity of which may be controlled by RNA silencing. Accumulation of small RNAs is one of the hallmarks of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate the presence of small RNAs corresponding to the sequence of a short interspersed retrotransposable element (SINE) suggesting that small RNAs might be involved in silencing of SINEs in P. infestans. This notion was exploited to develop novel tools for gene silencing in P. infestans by engineering transcriptional fusions of the PiAvr3a gene, encoding an RXLR avirulence effector, to the infSINEm retroelement. Transgenic P. infestans lines expressing either 5'-infSINEm::PiAvr3a-3' or 5'-PiAvr3a::SINEm-3' chimeric transcripts initially exhibited partial silencing of PiAvr3a. Over time, PiAvr3a either recovered wild type transcript levels in some lines, or became fully silenced in others. Introduction of an inverted repeat construct was also successful in yielding P. infestans transgenic lines silenced for PiAvr3a. In contrast, constructs expressing antisense or aberrant RNA transcripts failed to initiate silencing of PiAvr3a. Lines exhibiting the most effective silencing of PiAvr3a were either weakly or non-pathogenic on susceptible potato cv. Bintje. This study expands the repertoire of reverse genetics tools available for P. infestans research, and provides insights into a possible mode of variation in effector expression through spread of silencing from adjacent retroelements. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Flexible tools for gene expression and silencing in tomato.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ana I; Viron, Nicolas; Alhagdow, Moftah; Karimi, Mansour; Jones, Matthew; Amsellem, Ziva; Sicard, Adrien; Czerednik, Anna; Angenent, Gerco; Grierson, Donald; May, Sean; Seymour, Graham; Eshed, Yuval; Lemaire-Chamley, Martine; Rothan, Christophe; Hilson, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    As a genetic platform, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) benefits from rich germplasm collections and ease of cultivation and transformation that enable the analysis of biological processes impossible to investigate in other model species. To facilitate the assembly of an open genetic toolbox designed to study Solanaceae, we initiated a joint collection of publicly available gene manipulation tools. We focused on the characterization of promoters expressed at defined time windows during fruit development, for the regulated expression or silencing of genes of interest. Five promoter sequences were captured as entry clones compatible with the versatile MultiSite Gateway format: PPC2, PG, TPRP, and IMA from tomato and CRC from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Corresponding transcriptional fusions were made with the GUS gene, a nuclear-localized GUS-GFP reporter, and the chimeric LhG4 transcription factor. The activity of the promoters during fruit development and in fruit tissues was confirmed in transgenic tomato lines. Novel Gateway destination vectors were generated for the transcription of artificial microRNA (amiRNA) precursors and hairpin RNAs under the control of these promoters, with schemes only involving Gateway BP and LR Clonase reactions. Efficient silencing of the endogenous phytoene desaturase gene was demonstrated in transgenic tomato lines producing a matching amiRNA under the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S or PPC2 promoter. Lastly, taking advantage of the pOP/LhG4 two-component system, we found that well-characterized flower-specific Arabidopsis promoters drive the expression of reporters in patterns generally compatible with heterologous expression. Tomato lines and plasmids will be distributed through a new Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre service unit dedicated to Solanaceae resources.

  16. Artificial trans-acting siRNAs confer consistent and effective gene silencing.

    PubMed

    de la Luz Gutiérrez-Nava, Maria; Aukerman, Milo J; Sakai, Hajime; Tingey, Scott V; Williams, Robert W

    2008-06-01

    Manipulating gene expression is critical to exploring gene function and a useful tool for altering commercial traits. Techniques such as hairpin-based RNA interference, virus-induced gene silencing, and artificial microRNAs take advantage of endogenous posttranscriptional gene silencing pathways to block translation of designated transcripts. Here we present a novel gene silencing method utilizing artificial trans-acting small interfering RNAs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Replacing the endogenous small interfering RNAs encoded in the TAS1c gene with sequences from the FAD2 gene silenced FAD2 activity to levels comparable to the fad2-1 null allele in nearly all transgenic events. Interestingly, exchanging the endogenous miR173 target sequence in TAS1c with an miR167 target sequence led to variable, inefficient silencing of FAD2, suggesting a specific requirement for the miR173 trigger for production of small interfering RNAs from the TAS1c locus.

  17. Successive silencing of tandem reporter genes in potato (Solanum tuberosum) over 5 years of vegetative propagation.

    PubMed

    Nocarova, Eva; Opatrny, Zdenek; Fischer, Lukas

    2010-10-01

    Transgenic plants represent an excellent tool for experimental plant biology and are an important component of modern agriculture. Fully understanding the stability of transgene expression is critical in this regard. Most changes in transgene expression occur soon after transformation and thus unwanted lines can be discarded easily; however, transgenes can be silenced long after their integration. To study the long-term changes in transgene expression in potato (Solanum tuberosum), the activity of two reporter genes, encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), was monitored in a set of 17 transgenic lines over 5 years of vegetative propagation in vitro. A decrease in transgene expression was observed mainly in lines with higher initial GFP expression and a greater number of T-DNA insertions. Complete silencing of the reporter genes was observed in four lines (nearly 25 %), all of which successively silenced the two reporter genes, indicating an interconnection between their silencing. The loss of GFP fluorescence always preceded the loss of kanamycin resistance. Treatment with the demethylation drug 5-azacytidine indicated that silencing of the NPTII gene, but probably not of GFP, occurred directly at the transcriptional level. Successive silencing of the two reporter genes was also reproduced in lines with reactivated expression of previously silenced transgenes. We suggest a hypothetical mechanism involving the successive silencing of the two reporter genes that involves the switch of GFP silencing from the post-transcriptional to transcriptional level and subsequent spreading of methylation to the NPTII gene.

  18. RNA silencing as a tool to uncover gene function and engineer novel traits in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Megumi; Kanazawa, Akira

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing refers collectively to diverse RNA-mediated pathways of nucleotide-sequence-specific inhibition of gene expression. It has been used to analyze gene function and engineer novel traits in various organisms. Here, we review the application of RNA silencing in soybean. To produce soybean lines, in which a particular gene is stably silenced, researchers have frequently used a transgene that transcribes inverted repeats of a target gene segment. Suppression of gene expression in developing soybean embryos has been one of the main focuses of metabolic engineering using transgene-induced silencing. Plants that have enhanced resistance against diseases caused by viruses or cyst nematode have also been produced. Meanwhile, Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation has been used to induce RNA silencing in roots, which enabled analysis of the roles of gene products in nodulation or disease resistance. RNA silencing has also been induced using viral vectors, which is particularly useful for gene function analysis. So far, three viral vectors for virus-induced gene silencing have been developed for soybean. One of the features of the soybean genome is the presence of a large number of duplicated genes. Potential use of RNA silencing technology in combination with forward genetic approaches for analyzing duplicated genes is discussed. PMID:23136487

  19. Robust gene silencing mediated by antisense small RNAs in the pathogenic protist Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Morf, Laura; Pearson, Richard J.; Wang, Angelia S.; Singh, Upinder

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference uses small RNAs (sRNA), which target genes for sequence-specific silencing. The parasite Entamoeba histolytica contains an abundant repertoire of 27 nt antisense (AS) sRNA with 5′-polyphosphate termini, but their roles in regulating gene expression have not been well established. We demonstrate that a gene-coding region to which large numbers of AS sRNAs map can serve as a ‘trigger’ and silence the gene fused to it. Silencing is mediated by generation of AS sRNAs with 5′-polyphosphate termini that have sequence specificity to the fused gene. The mechanism of silencing is independent of the placement of the trigger relative to the silenced gene but is dependent on the sRNA concentration to the trigger. Silencing requires transcription of the trigger-gene fusion and is maintained despite loss of the trigger plasmid. We used this approach to silence multiple amebic genes, including an E. histolytica Myb gene, which is upregulated during oxidative stress response. Silencing of the EhMyb gene decreased parasite viability under oxidative stress conditions. Thus, we have developed a new tool for genetic manipulation in E. histolytica with many advantages over currently available technologies. Additionally, these data shed mechanistic insights into a eukaryotic RNA interference pathway with many novel aspects. PMID:23935116

  20. Genomic Aberrations Frequently Alter Chromatin Regulatory Genes in Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F.; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C. David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ~8 Mb segment at 3p21.1–p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (~23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (~40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. PMID:27072194

  1. Transcriptional gene silencing as a tool for uncovering gene function in maize.

    PubMed

    Cigan, A Mark; Unger-Wallace, Erica; Haug-Collet, Kristin

    2005-09-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing has broad applications for studying gene function in planta. In maize, a large number of genes have been identified as tassel-preferred in their expression pattern, both by traditional genetic methods and by recent high-throughput expression profiling platforms. Approaches using RNA suppression may provide a rapid alternative means to identify genes directly related to pollen development in maize. The male fertility gene Ms45 and several anther-expressed genes of unknown function were used to evaluate the efficacy of generating male-sterile plants by transcriptional gene silencing. A high frequency of male-sterile plants was obtained by constitutively expressing inverted repeats (IR) of the Ms45 promoter. These sterile plants lacked MS45 mRNA due to transcriptional inactivity of the target promoter. Moreover, fertility was restored to these promoter IR-containing plants by expressing the Ms45 coding region using heterologous promoters. Transcriptional silencing of other anther-expressed genes also significantly affected male fertility phenotypes and led to increased methylation of the target promoter DNA sequences. These studies provide evidence of disruption of gene activity in monocots by RNA interference constructs directed against either native or transformed promoter regions. This approach not only enables the correlation of monocot anther-expressed genes with functions that are important for reproduction in maize, but may also provide a tool for studying gene function and identifying regulatory components unique to transcriptional gene control.

  2. Changing Hydrozoan Bauplans by Silencing Hox-Like Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Wolfgang; Schierwater, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory genes of the Antp class have been a major factor for the invention and radiation of animal bauplans. One of the most diverse animal phyla are the Cnidaria, which are close to the root of metazoan life and which often appear in two distinct generations and a remarkable variety of body forms. Hox-like genes have been known to be involved in axial patterning in the Cnidaria and have been suspected to play roles in the genetic control of many of the observed bauplan changes. Unfortunately RNAi mediated gene silencing studies have not been satisfactory for marine invertebrate organisms thus far. No direct evidence supporting Hox-like gene induced bauplan changes in cnidarians have been documented as of yet. Herein, we report a protocol for RNAi transfection of marine invertebrates and demonstrate that knock downs of Hox-like genes in Cnidaria create substantial bauplan alterations, including the formation of multiple oral poles (“heads”) by Cnox-2 and Cnox-3 inhibition, deformation of the main body axis by Cnox-5 inhibition and duplication of tentacles by Cnox-1 inhibition. All phenotypes observed in the course of the RNAi studies were identical to those obtained by morpholino antisense oligo experiments and are reminiscent of macroevolutionary bauplan changes. The reported protocol will allow routine RNAi studies in marine invertebrates to be established. PMID:17668071

  3. A role for mammalian Sin3 in permanent gene silencing.

    PubMed

    van Oevelen, Chris; Wang, Jinhua; Asp, Patrik; Yan, Qin; Kaelin, William G; Kluger, Yuval; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2008-11-07

    The multisubunit Sin3 corepressor complex regulates gene transcription through deacetylation of nucleosomes. However, the full range of Sin3 activities and targets is not well understood. Here, we have investigated genome-wide binding of mouse Sin3 and RBP2 as well as histone modifications and nucleosome positioning as a function of myogenic differentiation. Remarkably, we find that Sin3 complexes spread immediately downstream of the transcription start site on repressed and transcribed genes during differentiation. We show that RBP2 is part of a Sin3 complex and that on a subset of E2F4 target genes, the coordinated activity of Sin3 and RBP2 leads to deacetylation, demethylation, and repositioning of nucleosomes. Our work provides evidence for coordinated binding of Sin3, chromatin modifications, and chromatin remodeling within discrete regulatory regions, suggesting a model in which spreading of Sin3 binding is ultimately linked to permanent gene silencing on a subset of E2F4 target genes.

  4. A role for mammalian Sin3 in permanent gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    van Oevelen, Chris; Wang, Jinhua; Asp, Patrik; Yan, Qin; Kaelin, William G.; Kluger, Yuval; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2011-01-01

    Summary The multi-subunit Sin3 co-repressor complex regulates gene transcription through deacetylation of nucleosomes. However, the full range of Sin3 activities and targets is not well understood. Here, we have investigated genome-wide binding of mouse Sin3 and RBP2 as well as histone modifications and nucleosome positioning as a function of myogenic differentiation. Remarkably, we find that Sin3 complexes spread immediately downstream of the transcription start site on repressed and transcribed genes during differentiation. We show that RBP2 is part of a Sin3 complex, and on a subset of E2F4 target genes, the coordinated activity of Sin3 and RBP2 leads to deacetylation, demethylation, and repositioning of nucleosomes. Our work provides evidence for coordinated binding of Sin3, chromatin modifications, and chromatin remodeling within discrete regulatory regions, suggesting a model in which spreading of Sin3 binding is ultimately linked to permanent gene silencing on a subset of E2F4 target genes. PMID:18995834

  5. Gene duplication, silencing and expression alteration govern the molecular evolution of PRC2 genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Furihata, Hazuka Y; Suenaga, Kazuya; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Takanori; Kawabe, Akira

    2016-10-13

    PRC2 genes were analyzed for their number of gene duplications, dN/dS ratios and expression patterns among Brassicaceae and Gramineae species. Although both amino acid sequences and copy number of the PRC2 genes were generally well conserved in both Brassicaceae and Gramineae species, we observed that some rapidly evolving genes experienced duplications and expression pattern changes. After multiple duplication events, all but one or two of the duplicated copies tend to be silenced. Silenced copies were reactivated in the endosperm and showed ectopic expression in developing seeds. The results indicated that rapid evolution of some PRC2 genes is initially caused by a relaxation of selective constraint following the gene duplication events. Several loci could become maternally expressed imprinted genes and acquired functional roles in the endosperm.

  6. Nucleoprotein filament formation is the structural basis for bacterial protein H-NS gene silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ci Ji; Lee, Sin Yi; Kenney, Linda J.; Yan, Jie

    2012-07-01

    H-NS is an abundant nucleoid-associated protein in bacteria that globally silences genes, including horizontally-acquired genes related to pathogenesis. Although it has been shown that H-NS has multiple modes of DNA-binding, which mode is employed in gene silencing is still unclear. Here, we report that in H-NS mutants that are unable to silence genes, are unable to form a rigid H-NS nucleoprotein filament. These results indicate that the H-NS nucleoprotein filament is crucial for its gene silencing function, and serves as the fundamental structural basis for gene silencing by H-NS and likely other H-NS-like bacterial proteins.

  7. RNAi pathway genes are resistant to small RNA mediated gene silencing in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Pompey, Justine M; Morf, Laura; Singh, Upinder

    2014-01-01

    The RNA interference pathway in the protist Entamoeba histolytica plays important roles in permanent gene silencing as well as in the regulation of virulence determinants. Recently, a novel RNA interference (RNAi)-based silencing technique was developed in this parasite that uses a gene endogenously silenced by small RNAs as a "trigger" to induce silencing of other genes that are fused to it. Fusion to a trigger gene induces the production of gene-specific antisense small RNAs, resulting in robust and permanent silencing of the cognate gene. This approach has silenced multiple genes including those involved in virulence and transcriptional regulation. We now demonstrate that all tested genes of the amebic RNAi pathway are unable to be silenced using the trigger approach, including Argonaute genes (Ago2-1, Ago2-2, and Ago2-3), RNaseIII, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). In all situations (except for RdRP), fusion to a trigger successfully induces production of gene-specific antisense small RNAs to the cognate gene. These small RNAs are capable of silencing a target gene in trans, indicating that they are functional; despite this, however, they cannot silence the RNAi pathway genes. Interestingly, when a trigger is fused to RdRP, small RNA induction to RdRP does not occur, a unique phenotype hinting that either RdRP is highly resistant to being a target of small RNAs or that small RNA generation may be controlled by RdRP. The inability of the small RNA pathway to silence RNAi genes in E. histolytica, despite the generation of functional small RNAs to these loci suggest that epigenetic factors may protect certain genomic loci and thus determine susceptibility to small RNA mediated silencing.

  8. RNAi Pathway Genes Are Resistant to Small RNA Mediated Gene Silencing in the Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Pompey, Justine M.; Morf, Laura; Singh, Upinder

    2014-01-01

    The RNA interference pathway in the protist Entamoeba histolytica plays important roles in permanent gene silencing as well as in the regulation of virulence determinants. Recently, a novel RNA interference (RNAi)-based silencing technique was developed in this parasite that uses a gene endogenously silenced by small RNAs as a “trigger” to induce silencing of other genes that are fused to it. Fusion to a trigger gene induces the production of gene-specific antisense small RNAs, resulting in robust and permanent silencing of the cognate gene. This approach has silenced multiple genes including those involved in virulence and transcriptional regulation. We now demonstrate that all tested genes of the amebic RNAi pathway are unable to be silenced using the trigger approach, including Argonaute genes (Ago2-1, Ago2-2, and Ago2-3), RNaseIII, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). In all situations (except for RdRP), fusion to a trigger successfully induces production of gene-specific antisense small RNAs to the cognate gene. These small RNAs are capable of silencing a target gene in trans, indicating that they are functional; despite this, however, they cannot silence the RNAi pathway genes. Interestingly, when a trigger is fused to RdRP, small RNA induction to RdRP does not occur, a unique phenotype hinting that either RdRP is highly resistant to being a target of small RNAs or that small RNA generation may be controlled by RdRP. The inability of the small RNA pathway to silence RNAi genes in E. histolytica, despite the generation of functional small RNAs to these loci suggest that epigenetic factors may protect certain genomic loci and thus determine susceptibility to small RNA mediated silencing. PMID:25198343

  9. Reactivation of developmentally silenced globin genes by forced chromatin looping

    PubMed Central

    Krivega, Ivan; Breda, Laura; Motta, Irene; Jahn, Kristen S.; Reik, Andreas; Gregory, Philip D.; Rivella, Stefano; Dean, Ann; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Distal enhancers commonly contact target promoters via chromatin looping. In erythroid cells, the locus control region (LCR) contacts β-type globin genes in a developmental stage-specific manner to stimulate transcription. Previously, we induced LCR-promoter looping by tethering the self-association domain (SA) of Ldb1 to the β-globin promoter via artificial zinc fingers. Here, we show that targeting the SA to a developmentally silenced embryonic globin gene in adult murine erythroblasts triggered its transcriptional reactivation. This activity depended on the LCR, consistent with an LCR-promoter looping mechanism. Strikingly, targeting SA to the fetal γ-globin promoter in primary adult human erythroblasts increased γ-globin promoter-LCR contacts, stimulating transcription to approximately 85% of total β-globin synthesis with a reciprocal reduction in adult β-globin expression. Our findings demonstrate that forced chromatin looping can override a stringent developmental gene expression program and suggest a novel approach to control the balance of globin gene transcription for therapeutic applications. PMID:25126789

  10. Inheritable Silencing of Endogenous Genes by Hit-and-Run Targeted Epigenetic Editing.

    PubMed

    Amabile, Angelo; Migliara, Alessandro; Capasso, Paola; Biffi, Mauro; Cittaro, Davide; Naldini, Luigi; Lombardo, Angelo

    2016-09-22

    Gene silencing is instrumental to interrogate gene function and holds promise for therapeutic applications. Here, we repurpose the endogenous retroviruses' silencing machinery of embryonic stem cells to stably silence three highly expressed genes in somatic cells by epigenetics. This was achieved by transiently expressing combinations of engineered transcriptional repressors that bind to and synergize at the target locus to instruct repressive histone marks and de novo DNA methylation, thus ensuring long-term memory of the repressive epigenetic state. Silencing was highly specific, as shown by genome-wide analyses, sharply confined to the targeted locus without spreading to nearby genes, resistant to activation induced by cytokine stimulation, and relieved only by targeted DNA demethylation. We demonstrate the portability of this technology by multiplex gene silencing, adopting different DNA binding platforms and interrogating thousands of genomic loci in different cell types, including primary T lymphocytes. Targeted epigenome editing might have broad application in research and medicine.

  11. RNA interference is ineffective as a routine method for gene silencing in chick embryos as monitored by fgf8 silencing

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The in vivo accessibility of the chick embryo makes it a favoured model system for experimental developmental biology. Although the range of available techniques now extends to miss-expression of genes through in ovo electroporation, it remains difficult to knock out individual gene expression. Recently, the possibility of silencing gene expression by RNAi in chick embryos has been reported. However, published studies show only discrete quantitative differences in the expression of the endogenous targeted genes and unclear morphological alterations. To elucidate whether the tools currently available are adequate to silence gene expression sufficiently to produce a clear and specific null-like mutant phenotype, we have performed several experiments with different molecules that trigger RNAi: dsRNA, siRNA, and shRNA produced from a plasmid coexpressing green fluorescent protein as an internal marker. Focussing on fgf8 expression in the developing isthmus, we show that no morphological defects are observed, and that fgf8 expression is neither silenced in embryos microinjected with dsRNA nor in embryos microinjected and electroporated with a pool of siRNAs. Moreover, fgf8 expression was not significantly silenced in most isthmic cells transformed with a plasmid producing engineered shRNAs to fgf8. We also show that siRNA molecules do not spread significantly from cell to cell as reported for invertebrates, suggesting the existence of molecular differences between different model systems that may explain the different responses to RNAi. Although our results are basically in agreement with previously reported studies, we suggest, in contrast to them, that with currently available tools and techniques the number of cells in which fgf8 gene expression is decreased, if any, is not sufficient to generate a detectable mutant phenotype, thus making RNAi useless as a routine method for functional gene analysis in chick embryos. PMID:15951844

  12. Simple gene silencing using the trans-acting siRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Thomas B; Lawler, Noah J; LaFayette, Peter R; Vodkin, Lila O; Parrott, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    In plants, particular micro-RNAs (miRNAs) induce the production of a class of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) called trans-acting siRNA (ta-siRNA) that lead to gene silencing. A single miRNA target is sufficient for the production of ta-siRNAs, which target can be incorporated into a vector to induce the production of siRNAs, and ultimately gene silencing. The term miRNA-induced gene silencing (MIGS) has been used to describe such vector systems in Arabidopsis. Several ta-siRNA loci have been identified in soybean, but, prior to this work, few of the inducing miRNAs have been experimentally validated, much less used to silence genes. Nine ta-siRNA loci and their respective miRNA targets were identified, and the abundance of the inducing miRNAs varies dramatically in different tissues. The miRNA targets were experimentally verified by silencing a transgenic GFP gene and two endogenous genes in hairy roots and transgenic plants. Small RNAs were produced in patterns consistent with the utilization of the ta-siRNA pathway. A side-by-side experiment demonstrated that MIGS is as effective at inducing gene silencing as traditional hairpin vectors in soybean hairy roots. Soybean plants transformed with MIGS vectors produced siRNAs and silencing was observed in the T1 generation. These results complement previous reports in Arabidopsis by demonstrating that MIGS is an efficient way to produce siRNAs and induce gene silencing in other species, as shown with soybean. The miRNA targets identified here are simple to incorporate into silencing vectors and offer an effective and efficient alternative to other gene silencing strategies.

  13. Trans-Reactivation: A New Epigenetic Phenomenon Underlying Transcriptional Reactivation of Silenced Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Ingrassia, Antonia M. R.; Pavesi, Giulio; Corona, Davide F. V.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the role played by cellular RNA pools produced by homologous genomic loci in defining the transcriptional state of a silenced gene, we tested the effect of non-functional alleles of the white gene in the presence of a functional copy of white, silenced by heterochromatin. We found that non-functional alleles of white, unable to produce a coding transcript, could reactivate in trans the expression of a wild type copy of the same gene silenced by heterochromatin. This new epigenetic phenomenon of transcriptional trans-reactivation is heritable, relies on the presence of homologous RNA’s and is affected by mutations in genes involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing. Our data suggest a general new unexpected level of gene expression control mediated by homologous RNA molecules in the context of heterochromatic genes. PMID:26292210

  14. Artificial microRNA mediated gene silencing in plants: progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Manish; Sharma, Deepika; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Homology based gene silencing has emerged as a convenient approach for repressing expression of genes in order to study their functions. For this purpose, several antisense or small interfering RNA based gene silencing techniques have been frequently employed in plant research. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) mediated gene silencing represents one of such techniques which can utilize as a potential tool in functional genomics. Similar to microRNAs, amiRNAs are single-stranded, approximately 21 nt long, and designed by replacing the mature miRNA sequences of duplex within pre-miRNAs. These amiRNAs are processed via small RNA biogenesis and silencing machinery and deregulate target expression. Holding to various refinements, amiRNA technology offers several advantages over other gene silencing methods. This is a powerful and robust tool, and could be applied to unravel new insight of metabolic pathways and gene functions across the various disciplines as well as in translating observations for improving favourable traits in plants. This review highlights general background of small RNAs, improvements made in RNAi based gene silencing, implications of amiRNA in gene silencing, and describes future themes for improving value of this technology in plant science.

  15. Genes duplicated by polyploidy show unequal contributions to the transcriptome and organ-specific reciprocal silencing

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Keith L.; Cronn, Richard; Percifield, Ryan; Wendel, Jonathan F.

    2003-01-01

    Most eukaryotes have genomes that exhibit high levels of gene redundancy, much of which seems to have arisen from one or more cycles of genome doubling. Polyploidy has been particularly prominent during flowering plant evolution, yielding duplicated genes (homoeologs) whose expression may be retained or lost either as an immediate consequence of polyploidization or on an evolutionary timescale. Expression of 40 homoeologous gene pairs was assayed by cDNA-single-stranded conformation polymorphism in natural (1- to 2-million-yr-old) and synthetic tetraploid cotton (Gossypium) to determine whether homoeologous gene pairs are expressed at equal levels after polyploid formation. Silencing or unequal expression of one homoeolog was documented for 10 of 40 genes examined in ovules of Gossypium hirsutum. Assays of homoeolog expression in 10 organs revealed variable expression levels and silencing, depending on the gene and organ examined. Remarkably, silencing and biased expression of some gene pairs are reciprocal and developmentally regulated, with one homoeolog showing silencing in some organs and the other being silenced in other organs, suggesting rapid subfunctionalization. Duplicate gene expression was examined in additional natural polyploids to characterize the pace at which expression alteration evolves. Analysis of a synthetic tetraploid revealed homoeolog expression and silencing patterns that sometimes mirrored those of the natural tetraploid. Both long-term and immediate responses to polyploidization were implicated. Data suggest that some silencing events are epigenetically induced during the allopolyploidization process. PMID:12665616

  16. Methylation-mediated gene silencing as biomarkers of gastric cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Tanaka, Tomokazu; Kitajima, Yoshihiko; Noshiro, Hirokazu; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    Despite a decline in the overall incidence of gastric cancer (GC), the disease remains the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide and is thus a significant global health problem. The best means of improving the survival of GC patients is to screen for and treat early lesions. However, GC is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is associated with a poor prognosis. Current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have not been successful in decreasing the global burden of the disease; therefore, the identification of reliable biomarkers for an early diagnosis, predictive markers of recurrence and survival and markers of drug sensitivity and/or resistance is urgently needed. The initiation and progression of GC depends not only on genetic alterations but also epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation and histone modification. Aberrant DNA methylation is the most well-defined epigenetic change in human cancers and is associated with inappropriate gene silencing. Therefore, an increasing number of genes methylated at the promoter region have been targeted as possible biomarkers for different purposes, including early detection, classification, the assessment of the tumor prognosis, the development of therapeutic strategies and patient follow-up. This review article summarizes the current understanding and recent evidence regarding DNA methylation markers in GC with a focus on the clinical potential of these markers. PMID:25232236

  17. A microRNA embedded AAV alpha-synuclein gene silencing vector for dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Khodr, Christina E.; Sapru, Mohan K.; Pedapati, Jyothi; Bohn, Martha C.

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (SNCA), an abundantly expressed presynaptic protein, is implicated in Parkinson disease (PD). Since over-expression of human SNCA (hSNCA) leads to death of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in human, rodent and fly brain, hSNCA gene silencing may reduce levels of toxic forms of SNCA and ameliorate degeneration of DA neurons in PD. To begin to develop a gene therapy for PD based on hSNCA gene silencing, two AAV gene silencing vectors were designed, and tested for efficiency and specificity of silencing, as well as toxicity in vitro. The same hSNCA silencing sequence (shRNA) was used in both vectors, but in one vector, the shRNA was embedded in a microRNA backbone and driven by a pol II promoter, and in the other the shRNA was not embedded in a microRNA and was driven by a pol III promoter. Both vectors silenced hSNCA to the same extent in 293T cells transfected with hSNCA. In DA PC12 cells, neither vector decreased expression of rat SNCA, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT) or the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT). However, the mir30 embedded vector was significantly less toxic to both PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells. Our in vitro data suggest that this miRNA-embedded silencing vector may be ideal for chronic in vivo SNCA gene silencing in DA neurons. PMID:21338582

  18. Genomic analysis reveals epistatic silencing of "expensive" genes in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Rajalakshmi; Chandraprakash, Deepti; Krishnamurthi, Revathy; Singh, Parul; Scolari, Vittore F; Krishna, Sandeep; Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2013-08-01

    A barrier for horizontal gene transfer is high gene expression, which is metabolically expensive. Silencing of horizontally-acquired genes in the bacterium Escherichia coli is caused by the global transcriptional repressor H-NS. The activity of H-NS is enhanced or diminished by other proteins including its homologue StpA, and Hha and YdgT. The interconnections of H-NS with these regulators and their role in silencing gene expression in E. coli are not well understood on a genomic scale. In this study, we use transcriptome sequencing to show that there is a bi-layered gene silencing system - involving the homologous H-NS and StpA - operating on horizontally-acquired genes among others. We show that H-NS-repressed genes belong to two types, termed "epistatic" and "unilateral". In the absence of H-NS, the expression of "epistatically controlled genes" is repressed by StpA, whereas that of "unilaterally controlled genes" is not. Epistatic genes show a higher tendency to be non-essential and recently acquired, when compared to unilateral genes. Epistatic genes reach much higher expression levels than unilateral genes in the absence of the silencing system. Finally, epistatic genes contain more high affinity H-NS binding motifs than unilateral genes. Therefore, both the DNA binding sites of H-NS as well as the function of StpA as a backup system might be selected for silencing highly transcribable genes.

  19. Silencing structural and nonstructural genes in baculovirus by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Flores-Jasso, C Fabian; Valdes, Victor Julian; Sampieri, Alicia; Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Recillas-Targa, Felix; Vaca, Luis

    2004-06-01

    We review several aspects of RNAi and gene silencing with baculovirus. We show that the potency of RNAi in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf21) insect cells correlates well with the efficiency of transfection of the siRNA. Using a fluorescein-labeled siRNA we found that the siRNA localized in areas surrounding the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Both long (700 nucleotides long) and small ( approximately 25 nucleotides long) interfering RNAs were equally effective in initiating RNA interference (RNAi), and the duration of the interfering effect was indistinguishable. Even though RNAi in Sf21 cells is very effective, in vitro experiments show that these cells fragment the long dsRNA into siRNA poorly, when compared to HEK cells. Finally, we show that in vivo inhibition of baculovirus infection with dsRNA homologous to genes that are essential for baculovirus infectivity depends strongly on the amount of dsRNA used in the assays. Five hundred nanogram of dsRNA directly injected into the haemolymph of insects prevent animal death to over 95%. In control experiments, over 96% of insects not injected with dsRNA or injected with an irrelevant dsRNA died within a week. These results demonstrate the efficiency of dsRNA for in vivo prevention of a viral infection by virus that is very cytotoxic and lytic in animals.

  20. Mechanisms guiding Polycomb activities during gene silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    He, Chongsheng; Huang, Hai; Xu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins act in an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic pathway that regulates chromatin structures in plants and animals, repressing many developmentally important genes by modifying histones. PcG proteins can form at least two multiprotein complexes: Polycomb Repressive Complexes 1 and 2 (PRC1 and PRC2, respectively). The functions of Arabidopsis thaliana PRCs have been characterized in multiple stages of development and have diverse roles in response to environmental stimuli. Recently, the mechanism that precisely regulates Arabidopsis PcG activity was extensively studied. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries in the regulations of PcG at the three different layers: the recruitment of PRCs to specific target loci, the polyubiquitination and degradation of PRC2, and the antagonism of PRC2 activity by the Trithorax group proteins. Current knowledge indicates that the powerful activity of the PcG pathway is strictly controlled for specific silencing of target genes during plant development and in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:24312106

  1. GeneBreak: detection of recurrent DNA copy number aberration-associated chromosomal breakpoints within genes.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Evert; van Lieshout, Stef; Rausch, Christian; Ylstra, Bauke; van de Wiel, Mark A; Meijer, Gerrit A; Fijneman, Remond J A; Abeln, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    Development of cancer is driven by somatic alterations, including numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations. Currently, several computational methods are available and are widely applied to detect numerical copy number aberrations (CNAs) of chromosomal segments in tumor genomes. However, there is lack of computational methods that systematically detect structural chromosomal aberrations by virtue of the genomic location of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks and identify genes that appear non-randomly affected by chromosomal breakpoints across (large) series of tumor samples. 'GeneBreak' is developed to systematically identify genes recurrently affected by the genomic location of chromosomal CNA-associated breaks by a genome-wide approach, which can be applied to DNA copy number data obtained by array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) or by (low-pass) whole genome sequencing (WGS). First, 'GeneBreak' collects the genomic locations of chromosomal CNA-associated breaks that were previously pinpointed by the segmentation algorithm that was applied to obtain CNA profiles. Next, a tailored annotation approach for breakpoint-to-gene mapping is implemented. Finally, dedicated cohort-based statistics is incorporated with correction for covariates that influence the probability to be a breakpoint gene. In addition, multiple testing correction is integrated to reveal recurrent breakpoint events. This easy-to-use algorithm, 'GeneBreak', is implemented in R ( www.cran.r-project.org) and is available from Bioconductor ( www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/GeneBreak.html).

  2. Identification of novel pepper genes involved in Bax- or INF1-mediated cell death responses by high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hee; Kim, Young Cheol; Choi, Doil; Park, Jeong Mee

    2013-11-19

    Hot pepper is one of the economically important crops in Asia. A large number of gene sequences, including expressed sequence tag (EST) and genomic sequences are publicly available. However, it is still a daunting task to determine gene function due to difficulties in genetic modification of a pepper plants. Here, we show the application of the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) repression for the study of 459 pepper ESTs selected as non-host pathogen-induced cell death responsive genes from pepper microarray experiments in Nicotiana benthamiana. Developmental abnormalities in N. benthamiana plants are observed in the 32 (7%) pepper ESTs-silenced plants. Aberrant morphological phenotypes largely comprised of three groups: stunted, abnormal leaf, and dead. In addition, by employing the combination of VIGS and Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays, we identified novel pepper ESTs that involved in Bax or INF1-mediated cell death responses. Silencing of seven pepper ESTs homologs suppressed Bax or INF1-induced cell death, five of which suppressed both cell death responses in N. benthamiana. The genes represented by these five ESTs encode putative proteins with functions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and lipid signaling. The genes represented by the other two pepper ESTs showing only Bax-mediated cell death inhibition encode a CCCH-type zinc finger protein containing an ankyrin-repeat domain and a probable calcium-binding protein, CML30-like. Taken together, we effectively isolated novel pepper clones that are involved in hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death using VIGS, and identified silenced clones that have different responses to Bax and INF1 exposure, indicating separate signaling pathways for Bax- and INF1-mediated cell death.

  3. Identification of Novel Pepper Genes Involved in Bax- or INF1-Mediated Cell Death Responses by High-Throughput Virus-Induced Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hee; Kim, Young Cheol; Choi, Doil; Park, Jeong Mee

    2013-01-01

    Hot pepper is one of the economically important crops in Asia. A large number of gene sequences, including expressed sequence tag (EST) and genomic sequences are publicly available. However, it is still a daunting task to determine gene function due to difficulties in genetic modification of a pepper plants. Here, we show the application of the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) repression for the study of 459 pepper ESTs selected as non-host pathogen-induced cell death responsive genes from pepper microarray experiments in Nicotiana benthamiana. Developmental abnormalities in N. benthamiana plants are observed in the 32 (7%) pepper ESTs-silenced plants. Aberrant morphological phenotypes largely comprised of three groups: stunted, abnormal leaf, and dead. In addition, by employing the combination of VIGS and Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays, we identified novel pepper ESTs that involved in Bax or INF1-mediated cell death responses. Silencing of seven pepper ESTs homologs suppressed Bax or INF1-induced cell death, five of which suppressed both cell death responses in N. benthamiana. The genes represented by these five ESTs encode putative proteins with functions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and lipid signaling. The genes represented by the other two pepper ESTs showing only Bax-mediated cell death inhibition encode a CCCH-type zinc finger protein containing an ankyrin-repeat domain and a probable calcium-binding protein, CML30-like. Taken together, we effectively isolated novel pepper clones that are involved in hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death using VIGS, and identified silenced clones that have different responses to Bax and INF1 exposure, indicating separate signaling pathways for Bax- and INF1-mediated cell death. PMID:24256816

  4. Improved Antisense Oligonucleotide Design to Suppress Aberrant SMN2 Gene Transcript Processing: Towards a Treatment for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mitrpant, Chalermchai; Porensky, Paul; Zhou, Haiyan; Price, Loren; Muntoni, Francesco; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by loss of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, resulting in reduced SMN protein. Humans possess the additional SMN2 gene (or genes) that does produce low level of full length SMN, but cannot adequately compensate for loss of SMN1 due to aberrant splicing. The majority of SMN2 gene transcripts lack exon 7 and the resultant SMNΔ7 mRNA is translated into an unstable and non-functional protein. Splice intervention therapies to promote exon 7 retention and increase amounts of full-length SMN2 transcript offer great potential as a treatment for SMA patients. Several splice silencing motifs in SMN2 have been identified as potential targets for antisense oligonucleotide mediated splice modification. A strong splice silencer is located downstream of exon 7 in SMN2 intron 7. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting this motif promoted SMN2 exon 7 retention in the mature SMN2 transcripts, with increased SMN expression detected in SMA fibroblasts. We report here systematic optimisation of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMO) that promote exon 7 retention to levels that rescued the phenotype in a severe mouse model of SMA after intracerebroventricular delivery. Furthermore, the PMO gives the longest survival reported to date after a single dosing by ICV. PMID:23630626

  5. Virus-induced gene silencing in cultivated cotton (Gossypium spp.) using Tobacco rattle virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study described here has optimized the conditions for virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) in three cultivated cotton species (Gossypium hirsutum, G. arboreum and G. herbaceum) using a Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) vector. The system was used to silence the homolog of the Arabidopsis thaliana chloro...

  6. Investigating Gene Function in Cereal Rust Fungi by Plant-Mediated Virus-Induced Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Vinay; Bakkeren, Guus

    2017-01-01

    Cereal rust fungi are destructive pathogens, threatening grain production worldwide. Targeted breeding for resistance utilizing host resistance genes has been effective. However, breakdown of resistance occurs frequently and continued efforts are needed to understand how these fungi overcome resistance and to expand the range of available resistance genes. Whole genome sequencing, transcriptomic and proteomic studies followed by genome-wide computational and comparative analyses have identified large repertoire of genes in rust fungi among which are candidates predicted to code for pathogenicity and virulence factors. Some of these genes represent defence triggering avirulence effectors. However, functions of most genes still needs to be assessed to understand the biology of these obligate biotrophic pathogens. Since genetic manipulations such as gene deletion and genetic transformation are not yet feasible in rust fungi, performing functional gene studies is challenging. Recently, Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) has emerged as a useful tool to characterize gene function in rust fungi while infecting and growing in host plants. We utilized Barley stripe mosaic virus-mediated virus induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) to induce HIGS of candidate rust fungal genes in the wheat host to determine their role in plant-fungal interactions. Here, we describe the methods for using BSMV-VIGS in wheat for functional genomics study in cereal rust fungi.

  7. H2A.Z Maintenance During Mitosis Reveals Nucleosome Shifting on Mitotically Silenced Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Theresa K.; Miranda, Tina Branscombe; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Lin, Joy C.; Tanay, Amos; Jones, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Profound chromatin changes occur during mitosis to allow for gene silencing and chromosome segregation followed by re-activation of memorized transcription states in daughter cells. Using genome-wide sequencing, we found H2A.Z containing +1 nucleosomes of active genes shift upstream to occupy TSSs during mitosis, significantly reducing nucleosome-depleted regions. Single molecule analysis confirmed nucleosome shifting and demonstrated that mitotic shifting is specific to active genes that are silenced during mitosis and thus is not seen on promoters, which are silenced by methylation or mitotically expressed genes. Using the GRP78 promoter as a model, we found H3K4 tri-methylation is also maintained while other indicators of active chromatin are lost and expression is decreased. These key changes provide a potential mechanism for rapid silencing and re-activation of genes during the cell cycle. PMID:20864037

  8. DNA methylation and histone modifications cause silencing of Wnt antagonist gene in human renal cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Ken; Hirata, Hiroshi; Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2008-08-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2) is a negative modulator of the Wingless-type (Wnt) signaling pathway, and shown to be inactivated in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the molecular mechanism of silencing of sFRP2 is not fully understood. Our study was designed to elucidate the silencing mechanism of sFRP2 in RCC. Expression of sFRP2 was examined in 20 pairs of primary cancers by immunohistochemistry. Kidney cell lines (HK-2, Caki-1, Caki-2, A-498 and ACHN) were analyzed for sFRP2 expression using real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The methylation status at 46 CpG sites of the 2 CpG islands in the sFRP2 promoter was characterized by bisulfite DNA sequencing. Histone modifications were assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using antibodies against AcH3, AcH4, H3K4 and H3K9. sFRP2 was frequently repressed in primary cancers and in RCC cells. The majority of sFRP2 negative cells had a methylated promoter. Meanwhile, sFRP2 expression was repressed by a hypomethylated promoter in Caki-1 cells, and these cells had a repressive histone modification at the promoter. In Caki-1 cells, sFRP2 was reactivated by trichostatin A (TSA). Repressive histone modifications were also observed in RCC cells with hypermethylated promoters, but sFRP2 was reactivated only by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) and not by TSA. However, the activation of the silenced sFRP2 gene could be achieved in all cells using a combination of DAC and TSA. This is the first report indicating that aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications work together to silence the sFRP2 gene in RCC cells.

  9. Antisense transcription licenses nascent transcripts to mediate transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yunkun; Cheng, Jiasen; Sun, Xianyun; Zhou, Zhipeng; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, antisense transcription can regulate sense transcription by induction of epigenetic modifications. We showed previously that antisense transcription triggers Dicer-independent siRNA (disiRNA) production and disiRNA locus DNA methylation (DLDM) in Neurospora crassa. Here we show that the conserved exonuclease ERI-1 (enhanced RNAi-1) is a critical component in this process. Antisense transcription and ERI-1 binding to target RNAs are necessary and sufficient to trigger DLDM. Convergent transcription causes stalling of RNA polymerase II during transcription, which permits ERI-1 to bind nascent RNAs in the nucleus and recruit a histone methyltransferase complex that catalyzes chromatin modifications. Furthermore, we show that, in the cytoplasm, ERI-1 targets hundreds of transcripts from loci without antisense transcription to regulate RNA stability. Together, our results demonstrate a critical role for transcription kinetics in long noncoding RNA-mediated epigenetic modifications and identify ERI-1 as an important regulator of cotranscriptional gene silencing and post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. PMID:27856616

  10. DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide for highly efficient gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Nishina, Kazutaka; Piao, Wenying; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Sujino, Yumiko; Nishina, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Keiko; Yoshioka, Kotaro; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Baba, Takeshi; Ono, Fumiko; Miyata, Kanjiro; Miyake, Koichi; Seth, Punit P.; Low, Audrey; Yoshida, Masayuki; Bennett, C. Frank; Kataoka, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Obika, Satoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are recognized therapeutic agents for the modulation of specific genes at the post-transcriptional level. Similar to any medical drugs, there are opportunities to improve their efficacy and safety. Here we develop a short DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide (HDO) with a structure different from double-stranded RNA used for short interfering RNA and single-stranded DNA used for ASO. A DNA/locked nucleotide acid gapmer duplex with an α-tocopherol-conjugated complementary RNA (Toc-HDO) is significantly more potent at reducing the expression of the targeted mRNA in liver compared with the parent single-stranded gapmer ASO. Toc-HDO also improves the phenotype in disease models more effectively. In addition, the high potency of Toc-HDO results in a reduction of liver dysfunction observed in the parent ASO at a similar silencing effect. HDO technology offers a novel concept of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and the development of this molecular design opens a new therapeutic field. PMID:26258894

  11. Efficient virus-induced gene silencing in plants using a modified geminivirus DNA1 component.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changjun; Xie, Yan; Zhou, Xueping

    2009-04-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is currently recognized as a powerful reverse genetics tool for application in functional genomics. DNA1, a satellite-like and single-stranded DNA molecule associated with begomoviruses (Family Geminiviridae), has been shown to replicate autonomously but requires the helper virus for its dissemination. We developed a VIGS vector based on the DNA1 component of tobacco curly shoot virus (TbCSV), a monopartite begomovirus, by inserting a multiple cloning site between the replication-associated protein open reading frame and the A-rich region for subsequent insertion of DNA fragments of genes targeted for silencing. When a host gene (sulphur, Su) or transgene (green fluorescent protein, GFP) was inserted into the modified DNA1 vector and co-agroinoculated with TbCSV, efficient silencing of the cognate gene was observed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. More interestingly, we demonstrated that this modified DNA1 could effectively suppress GFP in transgenic N. benthamiana or endogenous Su in tobacco plants when co-agroinoculated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), another monopartite begomovirus that does not induce any viral symptoms. A gene-silencing system in Nicotiana spp., Solanum lycopersicum and Petunia hybrida plants was then established using TYLCCNV and the modified DNA1 vector. The system can be used to silence genes involved in meristem and flower development. The modified DNA1 vector was used to silence the AtTOM homologous genes (NbTOM1 and NbTOM3) in N. benthamiana. Silencing of NbTOM1 or NbTOM3 can reduce tobamovirus multiplication to a lower level, and silencing of both genes simultaneously can completely inhibit tobamovirus multiplication. Previous studies have reported that DNA1 is associated with both monopartite and bipartite begomoviruses, as well as curtoviruses. This vector system can therefore be applied for the study, analysis and discovery of gene function in a variety of important crop plants.

  12. The Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein SmD1 Interplays with Splicing, RNA Quality Control, and Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Elvira-Matelot, Emilie; Bardou, Florian; Ariel, Federico; Jauvion, Vincent; Bouteiller, Nathalie; Le Masson, Ivan; Cao, Jun; Crespi, Martin D; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2016-02-01

    RNA quality control (RQC) eliminates aberrant RNAs based on their atypical structure, whereas posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) eliminates both aberrant and functional RNAs through the sequence-specific action of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The Arabidopsis thaliana mutant smd1b was identified in a genetic screen for PTGS deficiency, revealing the involvement of SmD1, a component of the Smith (Sm) complex, in PTGS. The smd1a and smd1b single mutants are viable, but the smd1a smd1b double mutant is embryo-lethal, indicating that SmD1 function is essential. SmD1b resides in nucleoli and nucleoplasmic speckles, colocalizing with the splicing-related factor SR34. Consistent with this, the smd1b mutant exhibits intron retention at certain endogenous mRNAs. SmD1 binds to RNAs transcribed from silenced transgenes but not nonsilenced ones, indicating a direct role in PTGS. Yet, mutations in the RQC factors UPFRAMESHIFT3, EXORIBONUCLEASE2 (XRN2), XRN3, and XRN4 restore PTGS in smd1b, indicating that SmD1 is not essential for but rather facilitates PTGS. Moreover, the smd1b mtr4 double mutant is embryo-lethal, suggesting that SmD1 is essential for mRNA TRANSPORT REGULATOR4-dependent RQC. These results indicate that SmD1 interplays with splicing, RQC, and PTGS. We propose that SmD1 facilitates PTGS by protecting transgene-derived aberrant RNAs from degradation by RQC in the nucleus, allowing sufficient amounts to enter cytoplasmic siRNA bodies to activate PTGS.

  13. Aberrant DNA methylation-induced gene inactivation is associated with the diagnosis and/or therapy of T-cell leukemias.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Young; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Man; Lee, Minyoung; Kim, Eun Ju

    2016-08-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes is known to play an important role in the development of many tumors, and aberrant DNA hypermethylation was recently identified in hematologic malignancies, where it is thought to hold relevance in leukemogenesis. Here, we report that there are differences in the DNA methylation patterns seen in normal peripheral blood and two T-cell leukemia cell lines. We identify nine genes (CLEC4E, CR1, DBC1, EPO, HAL-DOA, IGF2, IL12B, ITGA1, and LMX1B) that are significantly hypermethylated in T-cell leukemias cell lines, and suggest that aberrant hypermethylation of these normally unmethylated genes may induce their transcriptional and expressional silencing. Furthermore, we observed that the expression levels of DNMT1 and DNMT3a were significantly decreased by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC), which is a demethylation agent known to deplete DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) in leukemia cancer cells and restore the expression levels of their target genes in Jurkat cells. This result suggests that the overexpression of DNMTs could contribute to the development of T-cell leukemias by inducing hypermethylation of the target genes. Together, our results show that aberrant hypermethylation is an important molecular mechanism in the progression of T-cell leukemias, and thus could prove useful as a prognostic and/or diagnostic marker. Moreover, 5-Aza-dC might be a promising candidate for the treatment of T-cell leukemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Protective effect of caffeine against high sugar-induced transcription of microRNAs and consequent gene silencing: a study using lenses of galactosemic mice.

    PubMed

    Varma, Shambhu D; Kovtun, Svitlana

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that caffeine prevents the formation of cataracts induced by a high-galactose diet and consequent oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate if this protective effect is reflected in the attenuation of the transcription of microRNAs (miRNAs) known to induce apoptosis and cell death by gene silencing. Young CD-1 mice were fed either a normal laboratory diet or a diet containing 25% galactose with or without 1% caffeine. One week later, the animals were euthanized, and the lenses isolated and promptly processed for RNA isolation and subsequent preparation of cDNAs by reverse transcriptase reaction. Mature miRNA (miR)-specific cDNAs were then quantified with PCR in a 96-well microRNA-specific cassette using an ABI7900HT PCR machine. As expected from previous studies, the lenses were positive for all 84 miRs corresponding to the miRNA probes present in the cassette wells. However, the levels of at least 19 miRs were significantly elevated in galactosemic lenses compared to those in the normal lenses. The majority are proapoptotic. Such elevation was inhibited by caffeine. This has been demonstrated for the first time. Since aberrant elevation of miRNAs silences various genes and consequently deactivates protein translation, and since caffeine downregulates such aberration, the beneficial effect of caffeine could be attributed to its ability to suppress elevation of toxic miRs and consequent gene silencing.

  15. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Suppresses RNA-Induced Gene Silencing in Mammalian Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zetang; Zhu, Yali; Bisaro, David M.; Parris, Deborah S.

    2009-01-01

    RNA-induced silencing is a potent innate antiviral defense strategy in plants, and suppression of silencing is a hallmark of pathogenic plant viruses. However, the impact of silencing as a mammalian antiviral defense mechanism and the ability of mammalian viruses to suppress silencing in natural host cells have remained controversial. The ability of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to suppress silencing was examined in a transient expression system that employed an imperfect hairpin to target degradation of transcripts encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). HSV-1 infection suppressed EGFP-specific silencing as demonstrated by increased EGFP mRNA levels and an increase in the EGFP mRNA half-life. The increase in EGFP mRNA stability occurred despite the well-characterized host macromolecular shutoff functions of HSV-1 that globally destabilize mRNAs. Moreover, mutant viruses defective in these functions increased the stability of EGFP mRNA even more than did the wild-type virus in silenced cells compared to results in control cells. The importance of RNA silencing to HSV-1 replication was confirmed by a significantly enhanced virus burst size in cells in which silencing was knocked down with small inhibitory RNAs directed to Argonaute 2, an integral component of the silencing complex. Given that HSV-1 encodes several microRNAs, it is possible that a dynamic equilibrium exists between silencing and silencing suppression that is capable of modulating viral gene expression to promote replication, to evade host defenses, and/or to promote latency. PMID:19369325

  16. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Julia V.; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown. PMID:26275310

  17. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation.

    PubMed

    Kirov, Julia V; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A J; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K; Lloyd, K C Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown.

  18. Development of RNA Interference Trigger-Mediated Gene Silencing in Entamoeba invadens

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Susmitha; Ehrenkaufer, Gretchen; Zhang, Hanbang

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan parasite, is an important human pathogen and a leading parasitic cause of death. The organism has two life cycle stages, trophozoites, which are responsible for tissue invasion, and cysts, which are involved in pathogen transmission. Entamoeba invadens is the model system to study Entamoeba developmental biology, as high-grade regulated encystation and excystation are readily achievable. However, the lack of gene-silencing tools in E. invadens has limited the molecular studies that can be performed. Using the endogenous RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in Entamoeba, we developed an RNAi-based trigger gene-silencing approach in E. invadens. We demonstrate that a gene's coding region that has abundant antisense small RNAs (sRNAs) can trigger silencing of a gene that is fused to it. The trigger fusion leads to the generation of abundant antisense sRNAs that map to the target gene, with silencing occurring independently of trigger location at the 5′ or 3′ end of a gene. Gene silencing is stably maintained during development, including encystation and excystation. We have used this approach to successfully silence two E. invadens genes: a putative rhomboid protease gene and a SHAQKY family Myb gene. The Myb gene is upregulated during oxidative stress and development, and its downregulation led, as predicted, to decreased viability under oxidative stress and decreased cyst formation. Thus, the RNAi trigger silencing method can be used to successfully investigate the molecular functions of genes in E. invadens. Dissection of the molecular basis of Entamoeba stage conversion is now possible, representing an important technical advance for the system. PMID:26787723

  19. Development of RNA Interference Trigger-Mediated Gene Silencing in Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Susmitha; Ehrenkaufer, Gretchen; Zhang, Hanbang; Singh, Upinder

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan parasite, is an important human pathogen and a leading parasitic cause of death. The organism has two life cycle stages, trophozoites, which are responsible for tissue invasion, and cysts, which are involved in pathogen transmission. Entamoeba invadens is the model system to study Entamoeba developmental biology, as high-grade regulated encystation and excystation are readily achievable. However, the lack of gene-silencing tools in E. invadens has limited the molecular studies that can be performed. Using the endogenous RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in Entamoeba, we developed an RNAi-based trigger gene-silencing approach inE. invadens We demonstrate that a gene's coding region that has abundant antisense small RNAs (sRNAs) can trigger silencing of a gene that is fused to it. The trigger fusion leads to the generation of abundant antisense sRNAs that map to the target gene, with silencing occurring independently of trigger location at the 5' or 3' end of a gene. Gene silencing is stably maintained during development, including encystation and excystation. We have used this approach to successfully silence two E. invadens genes: a putative rhomboid protease gene and a SHAQKY family Myb gene. The Myb gene is upregulated during oxidative stress and development, and its downregulation led, as predicted, to decreased viability under oxidative stress and decreased cyst formation. Thus, the RNAi trigger silencing method can be used to successfully investigate the molecular functions of genes inE. invadens Dissection of the molecular basis of Entamoeba stage conversion is now possible, representing an important technical advance for the system. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Gene silencing triggered by non-LTR retrotransposons in the female germline of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Stéphanie; Chambeyron, Séverine; Bucheton, Alain; Busseau, Isabelle

    2003-01-01

    Several studies have recently shown that the activity of some eukaryotic transposable elements is sensitive to the presence of homologous transgenes, suggesting the involvement of homology-dependent gene-silencing mechanisms in their regulation. Here we provide data indicating that two non-LTR retrotransposons of Drosophila melanogaster are themselves natural triggers of homology-dependent gene silencing. We show that, in the female germline of D. melanogaster, fragments from the R1 or from the I retrotransposons can mediate silencing of chimeric transcription units into which they are inserted. This silencing is probably mediated by sequence identity with endogenous copies of the retrotransposons because it does not occur with a fragment from the divergent R1 elements of Bombyx mori, and, when a fragment of I is used, it occurs only in females containing functional copies of the I element. This silencing is not accompanied by cosuppression of the endogenous gene homologous to the chimeric transcription unit, which contrasts to some other silencing mechanisms in Drosophila. These observations suggest that in the female germline of D. melanogaster the R1 and I retrotransposons may self-regulate their own activity and their copy number by triggering homology-dependent gene silencing. PMID:12807773

  1. EZH2 mediates epigenetic silencing of neuroblastoma suppressor genes CASZ1, CLU, RUNX3 and NGFR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunxi; Liu, Zhihui; Woo, Chan-Wook; Li, Zhijie; Wang, Lifeng; Wei, Jun S.; Marquez, Victor E.; Bates, Susan E.; Jin, Qihuang; Khan, Javed; Ge, Kai; Thiele, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor with an undifferentiated status and generally poor prognosis, but the basis for these characteristics remains unknown. In this study, we show that upregulation of the Polycomb complex histone methytransferase EZH2, which limits differentiation in many tissues, is critical to maintain the undifferentiated state and poor prognostic status of NB by epigenetic repression of multiple tumor suppressor genes. We identified this role for EZH2 by examining the regulation of CASZ1, a recently identified NB tumor suppressor gene whose ectopic restoration inhibits NB cell growth and induces differentiation. Reducing EZH2 expression by RNAi-mediated knockdown or pharmacological inhibiton with 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) increased CASZ1 expression, inhibited NB cell growth and induced neurite extension. Similarly, EZH2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) displayed 3-fold higher levels of CASZ1 mRNA compared to EZH2+/+ MEFs. In cells with increased expression of CASZ1, treatment with HDAC inhibitors decreased expression of EZH2 and the Polycomb complex component SUZ12. Under steady-state conditions H3K27me3 and PRC2 components bound to the CASZ1 gene were enriched, but this enrichment was decreased after HDAC inhibitor treatment. We determined that the tumor suppressors CLU, NGFR and RUNX3 were also directly repressed by EZH2 like CASZ1 in NB cells. Together, our findings establish that aberrant upregulation of EZH2 in NB cells silences several tumor suppressors, which contribute to the genesis and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype of NB tumors. PMID:22068036

  2. [A Betasatellite-Encoded Protein Regulates Key Components of Gene Silencing System in Plants].

    PubMed

    Eini, O

    2017-01-01

    Small circular single-stranded DNA satellites, called betasatellites, have been found in association with some monopartite begomovirus infections. The Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMuB) is known to influence symptom induction in cotton leaf curl disease. CLCuMuB contains a single gene, βC1, whose product is a pathogenicity determinant and a suppressor of RNA silencing. Although induction of RNA silencing by RNA and DNA viruses has been well documented in plants, the interactions between betasatellites and the host's silencing machinery remain poorly understood. In this study, the transgenic expression of βC1 from CLCuMuB in Arabidopsis thaliana plants produced severe developmental abnormalities, which resembled those produced by mutations in the key genes of the gene silencing pathway. Analysis of transgenic plants expressing CLCuMuB βC1 using real-time PCR showed that the expression levels of both AGO1 and DCL1 genes were significantly increased. In contrast, the expression of HEN1 gene in the βC1-expressing leaf tissues was similar to that of wild-type plants. The CLCuMuB βC1 protein was found to physically interact with the AGO1 protein in a yeast two-hybrid system. It is possible that specific targeting of the gene silencing key components by the CLCuMuB βC1 inhibits the RNA silencing-based host defence.

  3. Cationic liposome–nucleic acid complexes for gene delivery and gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Ewert, Kai K.; Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Leal, Cecília

    2014-01-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are studied worldwide as carriers of DNA and short interfering RNA (siRNA) for gene delivery and gene silencing, and related clinical trials are ongoing. Optimization of transfection efficiency and silencing efficiency by cationic liposome carriers requires a comprehensive understanding of the structures of CL–nucleic acid complexes and the nature of their interactions with cell membranes as well as events leading to release of active nucleic acids within the cytoplasm. Synchrotron x-ray scattering has revealed that CL–nucleic acid complexes spontaneously assemble into distinct liquid crystalline phases including the lamellar, inverse hexagonal, hexagonal, and gyroid cubic phases, and fluorescence microscopy has revealed CL–DNA pathways and interactions with cells. The combining of custom synthesis with characterization techniques and gene expression and silencing assays has begun to unveil structure–function relations in vitro. As a recent example, this review will briefly describe experiments with surface-functionalized PEGylated CL–DNA nanoparticles. The functionalization, which is achieved through custom synthesis, is intended to address and overcome cell targeting and endosomal escape barriers to nucleic acid delivery faced by PEGylated nanoparticles designed for in vivo applications. PMID:25587216

  4. Gene silencing and gene expression in phytopathogenic fungi using a plant virus vector

    PubMed Central

    Mascia, Tiziana; Nigro, Franco; Abdallah, Alì; Ferrara, Massimo; De Stradis, Angelo; Faedda, Roberto; Palukaitis, Peter; Gallitelli, Donato

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach for elucidating gene functions in a variety of organisms, including phytopathogenic fungi. In such fungi, RNAi has been induced by expressing hairpin RNAs delivered through plasmids, sequences integrated in fungal or plant genomes, or by RNAi generated in planta by a plant virus infection. All these approaches have some drawbacks ranging from instability of hairpin constructs in fungal cells to difficulties in preparing and handling transgenic plants to silence homologous sequences in fungi grown on these plants. Here we show that RNAi can be expressed in the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum (strain C71) by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) without a plant intermediate, but by using the direct infection of a recombinant virus vector based on the plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). We provide evidence that a wild-type isolate of TMV is able to enter C71 cells grown in liquid medium, replicate, and persist therein. With a similar approach, a recombinant TMV vector carrying a gene for the ectopic expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) induced the stable silencing of the GFP in the C. acutatum transformant line 10 expressing GFP derived from C71. The TMV-based vector also enabled C. acutatum to transiently express exogenous GFP up to six subcultures and for at least 2 mo after infection, without the need to develop transformation technology. With these characteristics, we anticipate this approach will find wider application as a tool in functional genomics of filamentous fungi. PMID:24594602

  5. Highly efficient gene silencing using perfect complementary artificial miRNA targeting AP1 or heteromeric artificial miRNA targeting AP1 and CAL genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene silencing is a useful technique for elucidating biological function of genes by knocking down their expression. Recently developed artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) exploit an endogenous gene silencing mechanism that processes natural miRNA precursors to small silencing RNAs that target transcript...

  6. Optimizing virus-induced gene silencing efficiency with Cymbidium mosaic virus in Phalaenopsis flower.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a good way to study floral gene functions of orchids, especially those with a long life cycle. To explore the applicability and improve viral silencing efficiency for application of Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV)-induced gene silencing, we examined several variables, including the optimal length of the DNA fragment, the effect of developmental maturation status of inflorescence, and suitable inoculation sites. A CymMV-based VIGS system can be used with orchids to silence genes including PeUFGT3, PeMADS5 and PeMADS6 and induce prominent phenotypes with silencing efficiency up to 95.8% reduction. The DNA fragment size used for silencing can be as small as 78-85 bp and still reach 61.5-95.8% reduction. The effect of cDNA location as a target in VIGS varies among genes because of non-target gene influence when using the 5' terminus of the coding region of both PeMADS5 and PeMADS6. Use of VIGS to knock down a B-class MADS-box gene (PeMADS6) in orchids with different maturation status of inflorescence allowed for observing discernable knockdown phenotypes in flowers. Furthermore, silencing effects with Agro-infiltration did not differ with both leaf and inflorescence injections, but injection in the leaf saved time and produced less damage to plants. We propose an optimized approach for VIGS using CymMV as a silencing vector for floral functional genomics in Phalaenopsis orchid with Agro-infiltration: (1) DNA fragment length about 80 bp, (2) a more mature status of inflorescence and (3) leaf injection.

  7. Conversion of a gene-specific repressor to a regional silencer

    PubMed Central

    Rine, Laura N. Rusché and Jasper

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gene silencing at the HMR and HML loci is normally dependent on Sir2p, Sir3p, and Sir4p, which are structural components of silenced chromatin. Sir2p is a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase required for silencing. Silencing can be restored in cells lacking Sir proteins by a dominant mutation in SUM1, which normally acts as a mitotic repressor of meiotic genes. This study found that mutant Sum1-1p, but not wild-type Sum1p, associated directly with HM loci. The origin recognition complex (ORC) was required for Sum1-1p-mediated silencing, and mutations in ORC genes reduced association of Sum1-1p with the HM loci. Sum1-1p-mediated silencing also depended on HST1, a paralog of SIR2. Both Sum1-1p and wild-type Sum1p interacted with Hst1p in coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Therefore, the SUM1-1 mutation did not change the affinity of Sum1p for Hst1p, but rather relocalized Sum1p to the HM loci. Sum1-1–Hst1p action led to hypoacetylation of the nucleosomes at HM loci. Thus, Sum1-1p and Hst1p could substitute for Sir proteins to achieve silencing through formation of a compositionally distinct type of heterochromatin. PMID:11316790

  8. Multiple small RNA pathways regulate the silencing of repeated and foreign genes in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sylvia E.J.; Pan, Qi; Breen, Peter C.; Qi, Yan; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Chi; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Gene segments from other organisms, such as viruses, are detected as foreign and targeted for silencing by RNAi pathways. A deep-sequencing map of the small RNA response to repeated transgenes introduced to Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that specific segments are targeted by siRNAs. Silencing of the foreign gene segments depends on an antiviral response that involves changes in active and silent chromatin modifications and altered levels of antisense siRNAs. Distinct Argonaute proteins target foreign genes for silencing or protection against silencing. We used a repeated transgene in a genome-wide screen to identify gene disruptions that enhance silencing of foreign genetic elements and identified 69 genes. These genes cluster in four groups based on overlapping sets of coexpressed genes, including a group of germline-expressed genes that are likely coregulated by the E2F transcription factor. Many of the gene inactivations enhance exogenous RNAi. About half of the 69 genes have roles in endogenous RNAi pathways that regulate diverse processes, including silencing of duplicated genes and transposons and chromosome segregation. Of these newly identified genes, several are required for siRNA biogenesis or stability in the oocyte-specific ERGO-1 pathway, including eri-12, encoding an interactor of the RNAi-defective protein RDE-10, and ntl-9/CNOT9, one of several CCR4/NOT complex genes that we identified. The conserved ARF-like small GTPase ARL-8 is required specifically for primary siRNA biogenesis or stability in the sperm-specific ALG-3/4 endogenous RNAi pathway. PMID:24352423

  9. Multiple small RNA pathways regulate the silencing of repeated and foreign genes in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sylvia E J; Pan, Qi; Breen, Peter C; Qi, Yan; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Chi; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-12-15

    Gene segments from other organisms, such as viruses, are detected as foreign and targeted for silencing by RNAi pathways. A deep-sequencing map of the small RNA response to repeated transgenes introduced to Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that specific segments are targeted by siRNAs. Silencing of the foreign gene segments depends on an antiviral response that involves changes in active and silent chromatin modifications and altered levels of antisense siRNAs. Distinct Argonaute proteins target foreign genes for silencing or protection against silencing. We used a repeated transgene in a genome-wide screen to identify gene disruptions that enhance silencing of foreign genetic elements and identified 69 genes. These genes cluster in four groups based on overlapping sets of coexpressed genes, including a group of germline-expressed genes that are likely coregulated by the E2F transcription factor. Many of the gene inactivations enhance exogenous RNAi. About half of the 69 genes have roles in endogenous RNAi pathways that regulate diverse processes, including silencing of duplicated genes and transposons and chromosome segregation. Of these newly identified genes, several are required for siRNA biogenesis or stability in the oocyte-specific ERGO-1 pathway, including eri-12, encoding an interactor of the RNAi-defective protein RDE-10, and ntl-9/CNOT9, one of several CCR4/NOT complex genes that we identified. The conserved ARF-like small GTPase ARL-8 is required specifically for primary siRNA biogenesis or stability in the sperm-specific ALG-3/4 endogenous RNAi pathway.

  10. The neuron-restrictive silencer element: A dual enhancer/silencer crucial for patterned expression of a nicotinic receptor gene in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Bessis, Alain; Champtiaux, Nicolas; Chatelin, Laurent; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    1997-01-01

    The neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) has been identified in several neuronal genes and confers neuron specificity by silencing transcription in nonneuronal cells. NRSE is present in the promoter of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β2-subunit gene that determines its neuron-specific expression in the nervous system. Using transgenic mice, we show that NRSE may either silence or enhance transcription depending on the cellular context within the nervous system. In vitro in neuronal cells, NRSE activates transcription of synthetic promoters when located downstream in the 5′ untranslated region, or at less than 50 bp upstream from the TATA box, but switches to a silencer when located further upstream. In contrast, in nonneuronal cells NRSE always functions as a silencer. Antisense RNA inhibition shows that the NRSE-binding protein REST contributes to the activation of transcription in neuronal cells. PMID:9159173

  11. Functional analyses of cellulose synthase genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum) by virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Chantreau, Maxime; Chabbert, Brigitte; Billiard, Sylvain; Hawkins, Simon; Neutelings, Godfrey

    2015-12-01

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum) bast fibres are located in the stem cortex where they play an important role in mechanical support. They contain high amounts of cellulose and so are used for linen textiles and in the composite industry. In this study, we screened the annotated flax genome and identified 14 distinct cellulose synthase (CESA) genes using orthologous sequences previously identified. Transcriptomics of 'primary cell wall' and 'secondary cell wall' flax CESA genes showed that some were preferentially expressed in different organs and stem tissues providing clues as to their biological role(s) in planta. The development for the first time in flax of a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach was used to functionally evaluate the biological role of different CESA genes in stem tissues. Quantification of transcript accumulation showed that in many cases, silencing not only affected targeted CESA clades, but also had an impact on other CESA genes. Whatever the targeted clade, inactivation by VIGS affected plant growth. In contrast, only clade 1- and clade 6-targeted plants showed modifications in outer-stem tissue organization and secondary cell wall formation. In these plants, bast fibre number and structure were severely impacted, suggesting that the targeted genes may play an important role in the establishment of the fibre cell wall. Our results provide new fundamental information about cellulose biosynthesis in flax that should facilitate future plant improvement/engineering.

  12. Chromosome-specific NOR inactivation explains selective rRNA gene silencing and dosage control in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Mohannath, Gireesha; Blevins, Todd; Pontvianne, Frederic; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, scores of excess ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are silenced by repressive chromatin modifications. Given the near sequence identity of rRNA genes within a species, it is unclear how specific rRNA genes are reproducibly chosen for silencing. Using Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype (strain) Col-0, a systematic search identified sequence polymorphisms that differ between active and developmentally silenced rRNA gene subtypes. Recombinant inbred mapping populations derived from three different ecotype crosses were then used to map the chromosomal locations of silenced and active RNA gene subtypes. Importantly, silenced and active rRNA gene subtypes are not intermingled. All silenced rRNA gene subtypes mapped to the nucleolus organizer region (NOR) on chromosome 2 (NOR2). All active rRNA gene subtypes mapped to NOR4. Using an engineered A. thaliana line in which a portion of Col-0 chromosome 4 was replaced by sequences of another ecotype, we show that a major rRNA gene subtype silenced at NOR2 is active when introgressed into the genome at NOR4. Collectively, these results reveal that selective rRNA gene silencing is not regulated gene by gene based on mechanisms dependent on subtle gene sequence variation. Instead, we propose that a subchromosomal silencing mechanism operates on a multimegabase scale to inactivate NOR2. PMID:26744421

  13. Chromosome-specific NOR inactivation explains selective rRNA gene silencing and dosage control in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Mohannath, Gireesha; Blevins, Todd; Pontvianne, Frederic; Pikaard, Craig S

    2016-01-15

    In eukaryotes, scores of excess ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are silenced by repressive chromatin modifications. Given the near sequence identity of rRNA genes within a species, it is unclear how specific rRNA genes are reproducibly chosen for silencing. Using Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype (strain) Col-0, a systematic search identified sequence polymorphisms that differ between active and developmentally silenced rRNA gene subtypes. Recombinant inbred mapping populations derived from three different ecotype crosses were then used to map the chromosomal locations of silenced and active RNA gene subtypes. Importantly, silenced and active rRNA gene subtypes are not intermingled. All silenced rRNA gene subtypes mapped to the nucleolus organizer region (NOR) on chromosome 2 (NOR2). All active rRNA gene subtypes mapped to NOR4. Using an engineered A. thaliana line in which a portion of Col-0 chromosome 4 was replaced by sequences of another ecotype, we show that a major rRNA gene subtype silenced at NOR2 is active when introgressed into the genome at NOR4. Collectively, these results reveal that selective rRNA gene silencing is not regulated gene by gene based on mechanisms dependent on subtle gene sequence variation. Instead, we propose that a subchromosomal silencing mechanism operates on a multimegabase scale to inactivate NOR2. © 2016 Chandrasekhara et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. Alzheimer's disease shares gene expression aberrations with purinergic dysregulation of HPRT deficiency (Lesch-Nyhan disease).

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Hyuk; Friedmann, Theodore

    2015-03-17

    Transcriptomic studies of murine D3 embryonic stem (ES) cells deficient in the purinergic biosynthetic function hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and undergoing dopaminergic neuronal differentiation has demonstrated a marked shift from neuronal to glial gene expression and aberrant expression of multiple genes also known to be aberrantly expressed in Alzheimer's and other CNS disorders. Such genetic dysregulations may indicate some shared pathogenic metabolic mechanisms in diverse CNS diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of promising host-induced silencing targets among genes preferentially transcribed in haustoria of Puccinia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Expression of dsRNA fragments of rust pathogen genes in wheat seedlings through the barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) based host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) system can reduce the expression of the corresponding genes in the rust fungus. The highest levels of suppression have generally been observe...

  16. TRV Based Virus Induced Gene Silencing in Gladiolus (Gladiolus grandiflorus L.), A Monocotyledonous Ornamental Plant

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has not yet successfully been used as a tool for gene functional analysis in non-grass monocotyledonous geophytes. We therefore tested VIGS in gladiolus (Gladiolus grandiflora L) using a Tobacco Rattle Virus (TRV) vector containing a fragment of the gladiolus gene...

  17. The Paf1 complex represses small RNA-mediated epigenetic gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Flury, Valentin; Stadler, Michael Beda; Batki, Julia; Bühler, Marc

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to the ability of exogenously introduced double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to silence expression of homologous sequences. Silencing is initiated when the enzyme Dicer processes the dsRNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Small RNA molecules are incorporated into Argonaute protein-containing effector complexes, which they guide to complementary targets to mediate different types of gene silencing, specifically post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and chromatin-dependent gene silencing1. Although endogenous small RNAs play critical roles in chromatin-mediated processes across kingdoms, efforts to initiate chromatin modifications in trans by using siRNAs have been inherently difficult to achieve in all eukaryotic cells. Using fission yeast, we show that RNAi-directed heterochromatin formation is negatively controlled by the highly conserved RNA polymerase-associated factor 1 complex (Paf1C). Temporary expression of a synthetic hairpin RNA in Paf1C mutants triggers stable heterochromatin formation at homologous loci, effectively silencing genes in trans. This repressed state is propagated across generations by continual production of secondary siRNAs, independently of the synthetic hairpin RNA. Our data support a model where Paf1C prevents targeting of nascent transcripts by the siRNA-containing RNA-induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complex and thereby epigenetic gene silencing, by promoting efficient transcription termination and rapid release of the RNA from the site of transcription. We show that although compromised transcription termination is sufficient to initiate the formation of bi-stable heterochromatin by trans-acting siRNAs, impairment of both transcription termination and nascent transcript release is imperative to confer stability to the repressed state. Our work uncovers a novel mechanism for small RNA- mediated epigenome regulation and highlights fundamental roles for Paf1C and the RNAi machinery in building

  18. The Paf1 complex represses small-RNA-mediated epigenetic gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Katarzyna Maria; Shimada, Yukiko; Flury, Valentin; Stadler, Michael Beda; Batki, Julia; Bühler, Marc

    2015-04-09

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to the ability of exogenously introduced double-stranded RNA to silence expression of homologous sequences. Silencing is initiated when the enzyme Dicer processes the double-stranded RNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Small RNA molecules are incorporated into Argonaute-protein-containing effector complexes, which they guide to complementary targets to mediate different types of gene silencing, specifically post-transcriptional gene silencing and chromatin-dependent gene silencing. Although endogenous small RNAs have crucial roles in chromatin-mediated processes across kingdoms, efforts to initiate chromatin modifications in trans by using siRNAs have been inherently difficult to achieve in all eukaryotic cells. Using fission yeast, here we show that RNAi-directed heterochromatin formation is negatively controlled by the highly conserved RNA polymerase-associated factor 1 complex (Paf1C). Temporary expression of a synthetic hairpin RNA in Paf1C mutants triggers stable heterochromatin formation at homologous loci, effectively silencing genes in trans. This repressed state is propagated across generations by the continual production of secondary siRNAs, independently of the synthetic hairpin RNA. Our data support a model in which Paf1C prevents targeting of nascent transcripts by the siRNA-containing RNA-induced transcriptional silencing complex and thereby epigenetic gene silencing, by promoting efficient transcription termination and rapid release of the RNA from the site of transcription. We show that although compromised transcription termination is sufficient to initiate the formation of bi-stable heterochromatin by trans-acting siRNAs, impairment of both transcription termination and nascent transcript release is imperative to confer stability to the repressed state. Our work uncovers a novel mechanism for small-RNA-mediated epigenome regulation and highlights fundamental roles for Paf1C and the RNAi machinery in building

  19. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Cultivated Cotton (Gossypium spp.) Using Tobacco Rattle Virus.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Roma; Shafiq, Muhammad; Mansoor, Shahid; Briddon, Rob W; Scheffler, Brian E; Scheffler, Jodi; Amin, Imran

    2016-01-01

    The study described here has optimized the conditions for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in three cultivated cotton species (Gossypium hirsutum, G. arboreum, and G. herbaceum) using a Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) vector. The system was used to silence the homolog of the Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplastos alterados 1 (AtCLA1) gene, involved in chloroplast development, in G. herbaceum, G. arboreum, and six commercial G. hirsutum cultivars. All plants inoculated with the TRV vector to silence CLA1 developed a typical albino phenotype indicative of silencing this gene. Although silencing in G. herbaceum and G. arboreum was complete, silencing efficiency differed for each G. hirsutum cultivar. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR showed a reduction in mRNA levels of the CLA1 homolog in all three species, with the highest efficiency (lowest CLA1 mRNA levels) in G. arboreum followed by G. herbaceum and G. hirsutum. The results indicate that TRV is a useful vector for VIGS in Gossypium species. However, selection of host cultivar is important. With the genome sequences of several cotton species recently becoming publicly available, this system has the potential to provide a very powerful tool for the rapid, large-scale reverse-genetic analysis of genes in Gossypium spp.

  20. Silencing of the FRO1 gene and its effects on iron partition in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Gama, Florinda; Saavedra, Teresa; Dandlen, Susana; de Varennes, Amarilis; Correia, Pedro J; Pestana, Maribela; Nolasco, Gustavo

    2017-03-06

    To evaluate the dynamic role of the ferric-chelate reductase enzyme (FCR) and to identify possible pathways of regulation of its activity in different plant organs an investigation was conducted by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) using tobacco rattle virus (TRV) to silence the ferric reductase oxidase gene (FRO1) that encodes the FCR enzyme. Half of Nicotiana benthamiana plants received the VIGS vector and the rest remained as control. Four treatments were imposed: two levels of Fe in the nutrient solution (0 or 2.5 μM of Fe), each one with silenced or non-silenced (VIGS-0; VIGS-2.5) plants. Plants grown without iron (0; VIGS-0) developed typical symptoms of iron deficiency in the youngest leaves. To prove that FRO1 silencing had occurred, resupply of Fe (R) was done by adding 2.5 μM of Fe to the nutrient solution in a subset of chlorotic plants (0-R; VIGS-R). Twelve days after resupply, 0-R plants had recovered from Fe deficiency while plants containing the VIGS vector (VIGS-R) remained chlorotic and both FRO1 gene expression and FCR activity were considerably reduced, consequently preventing Fe uptake. With the VIGS technique we were able to silence the FRO1 gene in N. benthamiana and point out its importance in chlorophyll synthesis and Fe partition.

  1. Silencing near tRNA genes is nucleosome-mediated and distinct from boundary element function

    PubMed Central

    Good, Paul D.; Kendall, Ann; Ignatz-Hoover, James; Miller, Erin L.; Pai, Dave A.; Rivera, Sara R.; Carrick, Brian; Engelke, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) genes and other RNA polymerase III transcription units are dispersed in high copy throughout nuclear genomes, and can antagonize RNA polymerase II transcription in their immediate chromosomal locus. Previous work in Saccharomyces cerevisiae found that this local silencing required subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes near the nucleolus. Here we show that the silencing also requires nucleosome participation, though the nature of the nucleosome interaction appears distinct from other forms of transcriptional silencing. Analysis of an extensive library of histone amino acid substitutions finds a large number of residues that affect the silencing, both in the histone N-terminal tails and on the nucleosome disk surface. The residues on the disk surfaces involved are largely distinct from those affecting other regulatory phenomena. Consistent with the large number of histone residues affecting tgm silencing, survey of chromatin modification mutations shows that several enzymes known to affect nucleosome modification and positioning are also required. The enzymes include an Rpd3 deacetylase complex, Hos1 deacetylase, Glc7 phosphatase, and the RSC nucleosome remodeling activity, but not multiple other activities required for other silencing forms or boundary element function at tRNA gene loci. Models for communication between the tRNA gene transcription complexes and local chromatin are discussed. PMID:23707796

  2. Silencing near tRNA genes is nucleosome-mediated and distinct from boundary element function.

    PubMed

    Good, Paul D; Kendall, Ann; Ignatz-Hoover, James; Miller, Erin L; Pai, Dave A; Rivera, Sara R; Carrick, Brian; Engelke, David R

    2013-08-15

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) genes and other RNA polymerase III transcription units are dispersed in high copy throughout nuclear genomes, and can antagonize RNA polymerase II transcription in their immediate chromosomal locus. Previous work in Saccharomyces cerevisiae found that this local silencing required subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes near the nucleolus. Here we show that the silencing also requires nucleosome participation, though the nature of the nucleosome interaction appears distinct from other forms of transcriptional silencing. Analysis of an extensive library of histone amino acid substitutions finds a large number of residues that affect the silencing, both in the histone N-terminal tails and on the nucleosome disk surface. The residues on the disk surfaces involved are largely distinct from those affecting other regulatory phenomena. Consistent with the large number of histone residues affecting tgm silencing, survey of chromatin modification mutations shows that several enzymes known to affect nucleosome modification and positioning are also required. The enzymes include an Rpd3 deacetylase complex, Hos1 deacetylase, Glc7 phosphatase, and the RSC nucleosome remodeling activity, but not multiple other activities required for other silencing forms or boundary element function at tRNA gene loci. Models for communication between the tRNA gene transcription complexes and local chromatin are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Checks and balances between cohesin and polycomb in gene silencing and transcription.

    PubMed

    Dorsett, Dale; Kassis, Judith A

    2014-06-02

    The cohesin protein complex was discovered for its roles in sister chromatid cohesion and segregation, and the Polycomb group (PcG) proteins for their roles in epigenetic gene silencing during development. Cohesin also controls gene transcription via multiple mechanisms. Genetic and molecular evidence from Drosophila argue that cohesin and the PRC1 PcG complex interact to control transcription of many active genes that are critical for development, and that via these interactions cohesin also controls the availability of PRC1 for gene silencing.

  4. Artificial trans-Acting siRNAs Confer Consistent and Effective Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    de la Luz Gutiérrez-Nava, Maria; Aukerman, Milo J.; Sakai, Hajime; Tingey, Scott V.; Williams, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Manipulating gene expression is critical to exploring gene function and a useful tool for altering commercial traits. Techniques such as hairpin-based RNA interference, virus-induced gene silencing, and artificial microRNAs take advantage of endogenous posttranscriptional gene silencing pathways to block translation of designated transcripts. Here we present a novel gene silencing method utilizing artificial trans-acting small interfering RNAs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Replacing the endogenous small interfering RNAs encoded in the TAS1c gene with sequences from the FAD2 gene silenced FAD2 activity to levels comparable to the fad2-1 null allele in nearly all transgenic events. Interestingly, exchanging the endogenous miR173 target sequence in TAS1c with an miR167 target sequence led to variable, inefficient silencing of FAD2, suggesting a specific requirement for the miR173 trigger for production of small interfering RNAs from the TAS1c locus. PMID:18441221

  5. Chemical induction of hairpin RNAi molecules to silence vital genes in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siming; Yoder, John I

    2016-11-29

    Understanding the functions encoded by plant genes can be facilitated by reducing transcript levels by hairpin RNA (hpRNA) mediated silencing. A bottleneck to this technology occurs when a gene encodes a phenotype that is necessary for cell viability and silencing the gene inhibits transformation. Here we compared the use of two chemically inducible plant promoter systems to drive hpRNA mediated gene silencing in transgenic, hairy roots. We cloned the gene encoding the Yellow Fluorescence Protein (YFP) into the dexamethasone inducible vector pOpOff2 and into the estradiol induced vector pER8. We then cloned a hpRNA targeting YFP under the regulation of the inducible promoters, transformed Medicago truncatula roots, and quantified YFP fluorescence and mRNA levels. YFP fluorescence was normal in pOpOff2 transformed roots without dexamethasone but was reduced with dexamethasone treatment. Interestingly, dexamethasone removal did not reverse YFP inhibition. YFP expression in roots transformed with pER8 was low even in the absence of inducer. We used the dexamethasone system to silence acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene and observed prolific root growth when this construct was transformed into Medicago until dexamethasone was applied. Our study shows that dexamethasone inducibility can be useful to silence vital genes in transgenic roots.

  6. Chemical induction of hairpin RNAi molecules to silence vital genes in plant roots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Siming; Yoder, John I.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the functions encoded by plant genes can be facilitated by reducing transcript levels by hairpin RNA (hpRNA) mediated silencing. A bottleneck to this technology occurs when a gene encodes a phenotype that is necessary for cell viability and silencing the gene inhibits transformation. Here we compared the use of two chemically inducible plant promoter systems to drive hpRNA mediated gene silencing in transgenic, hairy roots. We cloned the gene encoding the Yellow Fluorescence Protein (YFP) into the dexamethasone inducible vector pOpOff2 and into the estradiol induced vector pER8. We then cloned a hpRNA targeting YFP under the regulation of the inducible promoters, transformed Medicago truncatula roots, and quantified YFP fluorescence and mRNA levels. YFP fluorescence was normal in pOpOff2 transformed roots without dexamethasone but was reduced with dexamethasone treatment. Interestingly, dexamethasone removal did not reverse YFP inhibition. YFP expression in roots transformed with pER8 was low even in the absence of inducer. We used the dexamethasone system to silence acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene and observed prolific root growth when this construct was transformed into Medicago until dexamethasone was applied. Our study shows that dexamethasone inducibility can be useful to silence vital genes in transgenic roots. PMID:27898105

  7. Silencing the ecdysone synthesis and signaling pathway genes disrupts nymphal development in the whitefly.

    PubMed

    Luan, Jun-Bo; Ghanim, Murad; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Czosnek, Henryk

    2013-08-01

    Sap-sucking insects are important pests in agriculture and good models to study insect biology. The role of ecdysone pathway genes in the life history of this group of insects is largely unknown likely due to a lack of efficient gene silencing methods allowing functional genetic analyses. Here, we developed a new and high throughput method to silence whitefly genes using a leaf-mediated dsRNA feeding method. We have applied this method to explore the roles of genes within the molting hormone-ecdysone synthesis and signaling pathway for the survival, reproduction and development of whiteflies. Silencing of genes in the ecdysone pathway had a limited effect on the survival and fecundity of adult whiteflies. However, gene silencing reduced survival and delayed development of the whitefly during nymphal stages. These data suggest that the silencing method developed here provides a useful tool for functional gene discovery studies of sap-sucking insects, and further indicate the potential of regulating the ecdysone pathway in whitefly control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Gold nanorod--siRNA induces efficient in vivo gene silencing in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bonoiu, Adela C; Bergey, Earl J; Ding, Hong; Hu, Rui; Kumar, Rajiv; Yong, Ken-Tye; Prasad, Paras N; Mahajan, Supriya; Picchione, Kelly E; Bhattacharjee, Arin; Ignatowski, Tracey A

    2011-06-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs), cellular imaging nanoprobes, have been used for drug delivery therapy to immunologically privileged regions in the brain. We demonstrate that nanoplexes formed by electrostatic binding between negatively charged RNA and positively charged GNRs, silence the expression of the target housekeeping gene, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) within the CA1 hippocampal region of the rat brain, without showing cytotoxicity. Fluorescence imaging with siRNA(Cy3)GAPDH and dark-field imaging using plasmonic enhanced scattering from GNRs were used to monitor the distribution of the nanoplexes within different neuronal cell types present in the targeted hippocampal region. Our results show robust nanoplex uptake and slow release of the fluorescent gene silencer with significant impact on the suppression of GAPDH gene expression (70% gene silencing, >10 days postinjection). The observed gene knockdown using nanoplexes in targeted regions of the brain opens a new era of drug treatment for neurological disorders.

  9. Gold Nanorod-siRNA Induces Efficient In Vivo Gene Silencing in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bonoiu, Adela C.; Bergey, Earl J.; Ding, Hong; Hu, Rui; Kumar, Rajiv; Yong, Ken-Tye; Prasad, Paras N.; Mahajan, Supriya; Picchione, Kelly E.; Bhattacharjee, Arin; Ignatowski, Tracey A.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs), cellular imaging nanoprobes, have been used for drug delivery therapy to immunologically privileged regions in the brain. We demonstrate that nanoplexes formed by electrostatic binding between negatively charged RNA and positively charged GNRs, silence the expression of the target housekeeping gene, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) within the CA1 hippocampal region of the rat brain, without showing cytotoxicity. Fluorescence imaging with siRNACy3GAPDH and dark field imaging using plasmonic enhanced scattering from GNRs were used to monitor the distribution of the nanoplexes within different neuronal cell types present in the targeted hippocampal region. Our results show robust nanoplex uptake and slow release of the fluorescent gene silencer with significant impact on suppression of GAPDH gene expression (70% gene silencing, >10 days post-injection). The observed gene knockdown using nanoplexes in targeted regions of the brain opens a new era of drug treatment for neurological disorders. PMID:21718174

  10. Sex-specific silencing of X-linked genes by Xist RNA.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Srimonta; Maclary, Emily; Hinten, Michael; Kalantry, Sundeep

    2016-01-19

    X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is thought to catalyze silencing of X-linked genes in cis during X-chromosome inactivation, which equalizes X-linked gene dosage between male and female mammals. To test the impact of Xist RNA on X-linked gene silencing, we ectopically induced endogenous Xist by ablating the antisense repressor Tsix in mice. We find that ectopic Xist RNA induction and subsequent X-linked gene silencing is sex specific in embryos and in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). A higher frequency of X(ΔTsix)Y male cells displayed ectopic Xist RNA coating compared with X(ΔTsix)X female cells. This increase reflected the inability of X(ΔTsix)Y cells to efficiently silence X-linked genes compared with X(ΔTsix)X cells, despite equivalent Xist RNA induction and coating. Silencing of genes on both Xs resulted in significantly reduced proliferation and increased cell death in X(ΔTsix)X female cells relative to X(ΔTsix)Y male cells. Thus, whereas Xist RNA can inactivate the X chromosome in females it may not do so in males. We further found comparable silencing in differentiating X(ΔTsix)Y and 39,X(ΔTsix) (X(ΔTsix)O) ESCs, excluding the Y chromosome and instead implicating the X-chromosome dose as the source of the sex-specific differences. Because X(ΔTsix)X female embryonic epiblast cells and EpiSCs harbor an inactivated X chromosome prior to ectopic inactivation of the active X(ΔTsix) X chromosome, we propose that the increased expression of one or more X-inactivation escapees activates Xist and, separately, helps trigger X-linked gene silencing.

  11. Sex-specific silencing of X-linked genes by Xist RNA

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Srimonta; Maclary, Emily; Hinten, Michael; Kalantry, Sundeep

    2016-01-01

    X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is thought to catalyze silencing of X-linked genes in cis during X-chromosome inactivation, which equalizes X-linked gene dosage between male and female mammals. To test the impact of Xist RNA on X-linked gene silencing, we ectopically induced endogenous Xist by ablating the antisense repressor Tsix in mice. We find that ectopic Xist RNA induction and subsequent X-linked gene silencing is sex specific in embryos and in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). A higher frequency of XΔTsixY male cells displayed ectopic Xist RNA coating compared with XΔTsixX female cells. This increase reflected the inability of XΔTsixY cells to efficiently silence X-linked genes compared with XΔTsixX cells, despite equivalent Xist RNA induction and coating. Silencing of genes on both Xs resulted in significantly reduced proliferation and increased cell death in XΔTsixX female cells relative to XΔTsixY male cells. Thus, whereas Xist RNA can inactivate the X chromosome in females it may not do so in males. We further found comparable silencing in differentiating XΔTsixY and 39,XΔTsix (XΔTsixO) ESCs, excluding the Y chromosome and instead implicating the X-chromosome dose as the source of the sex-specific differences. Because XΔTsixX female embryonic epiblast cells and EpiSCs harbor an inactivated X chromosome prior to ectopic inactivation of the active XΔTsix X chromosome, we propose that the increased expression of one or more X-inactivation escapees activates Xist and, separately, helps trigger X-linked gene silencing. PMID:26739568

  12. Aberrant gene expression in organs of bovine clones that die within two days after birth.

    PubMed

    Li, Shijie; Li, Yanxin; Du, Weihua; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Shuyang; Dai, Yunping; Zhao, Chunjiang; Li, Ning

    2005-02-01

    Cloning by somatic nuclear transfer is an inefficient process in which some of the cloned animals die shortly after birth and display organ abnormalities. In an effort to determine the possible genetic causes of neonatal death and organ abnormalities, we used real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to examine expression patterns of eight developmentally important genes (PCAF, Xist, FGFR2, PDGFRa, FGF10, BMP4, Hsp70.1, and VEGF) in six organs (heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and brain) of both cloned bovines that died soon after birth (n=9) and normal control calves produced by artificial insemination. In somatic cloning of cattle, fibroblasts have often been used for doner nuclei, and the effect of the age of the fibroblast donor cells on gene expression profiles was investigated. Aberrant expressions of seven genes were found in these clones. The majority of aberrantly expressed genes were common in clones derived from adult fibroblast (AF) and in clones derived from fetal fibroblast (FF) compared to controls, whereas some genes were dysregulated either in AF cell-derived or in FF cell-derived clones. For the studied genes, kidney was the organ least affected by gene dysregulation, and heart was the organ most affected, in which five genes were aberrant. Most dysregulations (12 of 19) were up-regulation, but PDGFRa only showed down-regulation. VEGF, BMP-4, PCAF, and Hsp70.1 were extremely dysregulated, whereas the other four genes had a low level of gene dysregulation. Our results suggest that the aberrant gene expression occurred in most tissues of cloned bovines that died soon after birth. For each specific gene, aberrant expression resulting from nuclear transfer was tissue-specific. Because these genes play important roles in embryo development and organogenesis, the aberrant transcription patterns detected in these clones may contribute to the defects of organs reported in neonatal death of clones.

  13. Aberrant CpG methylation of the TFAP2A gene constitutes a mechanism for loss of TFAP2A expression in human metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, Andrea R; Vorrink, Sabine U; Hudachek, Danielle R; Cramer-Morales, Kimberly; Milhem, Mohammed M; Cornell, Robert A; Domann, Frederick E

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a deadly treatment-resistant form of skin cancer whose global incidence is on the rise. During melanocyte transformation and melanoma progression the expression profile of many genes changes. Among these, a gene implicated in several steps of melanocyte development, TFAP2A, is frequently silenced; however, the molecular mechanism of TFAP2A silencing in human melanoma remains unknown. In this study, we measured TFAP2A mRNA expression in primary human melanocytes compared to 11 human melanoma samples by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In addition, we assessed CpG DNA methylation of the TFAP2A promoter in these samples using bisulfite sequencing. Compared to primary melanocytes, which showed high TFAP2A mRNA expression and no promoter methylation, human melanoma samples showed decreased TFAP2A mRNA expression and increased promoter methylation. We further show that increased CpG methylation correlates with decreased TFAP2A mRNA expression. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, we further identified TFAP2A as a gene displaying among the most decreased expression in stage 4 melanomas vs. non-stage 4 melanomas, and whose CpG methylation was frequently associated with lack of mRNA expression. Based on our data, we conclude that TFAP2A expression in human melanomas can be silenced by aberrant CpG methylation of the TFAP2A promoter. We have identified aberrant CpG DNA methylation as an epigenetic mark associated with TFAP2A silencing in human melanoma that could have significant implications for the therapy of human melanoma using epigenetic modifying drugs. PMID:25625848

  14. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Manmathan, Harish; Shaner, Dale; Snelling, Jacob; Tisserat, Ned; Lapitan, Nora

    2013-03-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected for VIGS experiments in wheat. These include Era1 (enhanced response to abscisic acid), Cyp707a (ABA 8'-hydroxylase), and Sal1 (inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase). Gene homologues for these three genes were identified in wheat and cloned in the viral vector barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) in the antisense direction, followed by rub inoculation of BSMV viral RNA transcripts onto wheat plants. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that VIGS-treated wheat plants had significant reductions in target gene transcripts. When VIGS-treated plants generated for Era1 and Sal1 were subjected to limiting water conditions, they showed increased relative water content, improved water use efficiency, reduced gas exchange, and better vigour compared to water-stressed control plants inoculated with RNA from the empty viral vector (BSMV0). In comparison, the Cyp707a-silenced plants showed no improvement over BSMV0-inoculated plants under limited water condition. These results indicate that Era1 and Sal1 play important roles in conferring drought tolerance in wheat. Other traits affected by Era1 silencing were also studied. Delayed seed germination in Era1-silenced plants suggests this gene may be a useful target for developing resistance to pre-harvest sprouting.

  15. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lapitan, Nora

    2013-01-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected for VIGS experiments in wheat. These include Era1 (enhanced response to abscisic acid), Cyp707a (ABA 8’-hydroxylase), and Sal1 (inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase). Gene homologues for these three genes were identified in wheat and cloned in the viral vector barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) in the antisense direction, followed by rub inoculation of BSMV viral RNA transcripts onto wheat plants. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that VIGS-treated wheat plants had significant reductions in target gene transcripts. When VIGS-treated plants generated for Era1 and Sal1 were subjected to limiting water conditions, they showed increased relative water content, improved water use efficiency, reduced gas exchange, and better vigour compared to water-stressed control plants inoculated with RNA from the empty viral vector (BSMV0). In comparison, the Cyp707a-silenced plants showed no improvement over BSMV0-inoculated plants under limited water condition. These results indicate that Era1 and Sal1 play important roles in conferring drought tolerance in wheat. Other traits affected by Era1 silencing were also studied. Delayed seed germination in Era1-silenced plants suggests this gene may be a useful target for developing resistance to pre-harvest sprouting. PMID:23364940

  16. Foxtail Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Monocot Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Xie, Ke; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Chen, Tianyuan; Li, Huangai; Wei, Xiang; Diao, Xianmin; Hong, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technique to study gene function in plants. However, very few VIGS vectors are available for monocot plants. Here we report that Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV) can be engineered as an effective VIGS system to induce efficient silencing of endogenous genes in monocot plants including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica). This is evidenced by FoMV-based silencing of phytoene desaturase (PDS) and magnesium chelatase in barley, of PDS and Cloroplastos alterados1 in foxtail millet and wheat, and of an additional gene IspH in foxtail millet. Silencing of these genes resulted in photobleached or chlorosis phenotypes in barley, wheat, and foxtail millet. Furthermore, our FoMV-based gene silencing is the first VIGS system reported for foxtail millet, an important C4 model plant. It may provide an efficient toolbox for high-throughput functional genomics in economically important monocot crops. PMID:27225900

  17. Phenotype-based clustering of glycosylation-related genes by RNAi-mediated gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Hino, Miki; Yoshida, Hideki; Ichimiya, Tomomi; Sakamura, Sho; Maeda, Megumi; Kimura, Yoshinobu; Sasaki, Norihiko; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Kinoshita-Toyoda, Akiko; Toyoda, Hidenao; Ueda, Ryu; Nishihara, Shoko; Goto, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Glycan structures are synthesized by a series of reactions conducted by glycosylation-related (GR) proteins such as glycosyltransferases, glycan-modifying enzymes, and nucleotide-sugar transporters. For example, the common core region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is sequentially synthesized by peptide-O-xylosyltransferase, β1,4-galactosyltransferase I, β1,3-galactosyltransferase II, and β1,3-glucuronyltransferase. This raises the possibility that functional impairment of GR proteins involved in synthesis of the same glycan might result in the same phenotypic abnormality. To examine this possibility, comprehensive silencing of genes encoding GR and proteoglycan core proteins was conducted in Drosophila. Drosophila GR candidate genes (125) were classified into five functional groups for synthesis of GAGs, N-linked, O-linked, Notch-related, and unknown glycans. Spatiotemporally regulated silencing caused a range of malformed phenotypes that fell into three types: extra veins, thick veins, and depigmentation. The clustered phenotypes reflected the biosynthetic pathways of GAGs, Fringe-dependent glycan on Notch, and glycans placed at or near nonreducing ends (herein termed terminal domains of glycans). Based on the phenotypic clustering, CG33145 was predicted to be involved in formation of terminal domains. Our further analysis showed that CG33145 exhibited galactosyltransferase activity in synthesis of terminal N-linked glycans. Phenotypic clustering, therefore, has potential for the functional prediction of novel GR genes. © 2015 The Authors. Genes to Cells published by Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Mod5 protein binds to tRNA gene complexes and affects local transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Pai, Dave A.; Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Wozniak, Glenn G.; Good, Paul D.; Miller, Erin L.; McLeod, Ian X.; Yates, John R.; Hopper, Anita K.; Engelke, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The tRNA gene-mediated (tgm) silencing of RNA polymerase II promoters is dependent on subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes, but genetic analysis shows that the silencing requires additional mechanisms. We have identified proteins that bind tRNA gene transcription complexes and are required for tgm silencing but not required for gene clustering. One of the proteins, Mod5, is a tRNA modifying enzyme that adds an N6-isopentenyl adenosine modification at position 37 on a small number of tRNAs in the cytoplasm, although a subpopulation of Mod5 is also found in the nucleus. Recent publications have also shown that Mod5 has tumor suppressor characteristics in humans as well as confers drug resistance through prion-like misfolding in yeast. Here, we show that a subpopulation of Mod5 associates with tRNA gene complexes in the nucleolus. This association occurs and is required for tgm silencing regardless of whether the pre-tRNA transcripts are substrates for Mod5 modification. In addition, Mod5 is bound to nuclear pre-tRNA transcripts, although they are not substrates for the A37 modification. Lastly, we show that truncation of the tRNA transcript to remove the normal tRNA structure also alleviates silencing, suggesting that synthesis of intact pre-tRNAs is required for the silencing mechanism. These results are discussed in light of recent results showing that silencing near tRNA genes also requires chromatin modification. PMID:23898186

  19. Mod5 protein binds to tRNA gene complexes and affects local transcriptional silencing.

    PubMed

    Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Pai, Dave A; Haeusler, Rebecca A; Wozniak, Glenn G; Good, Paul D; Miller, Erin L; McLeod, Ian X; Yates, John R; Hopper, Anita K; Engelke, David R

    2013-08-13

    The tRNA gene-mediated (tgm) silencing of RNA polymerase II promoters is dependent on subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes, but genetic analysis shows that the silencing requires additional mechanisms. We have identified proteins that bind tRNA gene transcription complexes and are required for tgm silencing but not required for gene clustering. One of the proteins, Mod5, is a tRNA modifying enzyme that adds an N6-isopentenyl adenosine modification at position 37 on a small number of tRNAs in the cytoplasm, although a subpopulation of Mod5 is also found in the nucleus. Recent publications have also shown that Mod5 has tumor suppressor characteristics in humans as well as confers drug resistance through prion-like misfolding in yeast. Here, we show that a subpopulation of Mod5 associates with tRNA gene complexes in the nucleolus. This association occurs and is required for tgm silencing regardless of whether the pre-tRNA transcripts are substrates for Mod5 modification. In addition, Mod5 is bound to nuclear pre-tRNA transcripts, although they are not substrates for the A37 modification. Lastly, we show that truncation of the tRNA transcript to remove the normal tRNA structure also alleviates silencing, suggesting that synthesis of intact pre-tRNAs is required for the silencing mechanism. These results are discussed in light of recent results showing that silencing near tRNA genes also requires chromatin modification.

  20. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy.

  1. Silencing of Essential Genes within a Highly Coordinated Operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hohmeier, Angela; Stone, Timothy C.; Offord, Victoria; Sarabia, Francisco; Garcia-Ruiz, Cristina; Good, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Essential bacterial genes located within operons are particularly challenging to study independently because of coordinated gene expression and the nonviability of knockout mutants. Essentiality scores for many operon genes remain uncertain. Antisense RNA (asRNA) silencing or in-frame gene disruption of genes may help establish essentiality but can lead to polar effects on genes downstream or upstream of the target gene. Here, the Escherichia coli ribF-ileS-lspA-fkpB-ispH operon was used to evaluate the possibility of independently studying an essential gene using expressed asRNA and target gene overexpression to deregulate coupled expression. The gene requirement for growth in conditional silencing strains was determined by the relationship of target mRNA reduction with growth inhibition as the minimum transcript level required for 50% growth (MTL50). Mupirocin and globomycin, the protein inhibitors of IleS and LspA, respectively, were used in sensitization assays of strains containing both asRNA-expressing and open reading frame-expressing plasmids to examine deregulation of the overlapping ileS-lspA genes. We found upstream and downstream polar silencing effects when either ileS or lspA was silenced, indicating coupled expression. Weighted MTL50 values (means and standard deviations) of ribF, ileS, and lspA were 0.65 ± 0.18, 0.64 ± 0.06, and 0.76 ± 0.10, respectively. However, they were not significantly different (P = 0.71 by weighted one-way analysis of variance). The gene requirement for ispH could not be determined due to insufficient growth reduction. Mupirocin and globomycin sensitization experiments indicated that ileS-lspA expression could not be decoupled. The results highlight the inherent challenges associated with genetic analyses of operons; however, coupling of essential genes may provide opportunities to improve RNA-silencing antimicrobials. PMID:26070674

  2. RNAi mediated gene silencing against betasatellite associated with Croton yellow vein mosaic begomovirus.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Anurag Kumar; Marwal, Avinash; Nehra, Chitra; Choudhary, Devendra Kumar; Sharma, Pradeep; Gaur, Rajarshi Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Plant viruses encode suppressors of posttranscriptional gene silencing, an adaptive antiviral defense responses that confines virus infection. Previously, we identified single-stranded DNA satellite (also known as DNA-β) of ~1,350 nucleotides in length associated with Croton yellow vein mosaic begomovirus (CYVMV) in croton plants. The expression of genes from DNA-β requires the begomovirus for packaged, replication, insect transmission and movement in plants. The present study demonstrates the effect of the βC1 gene on the silencing pathway as analysed by using both transgenic systems and transient Agrobacterium tumefaciens based delivery. Plants that carry an intron-hairpin construct covering the βC1 gene accumulated cognate small-interfering RNAs and remained symptom-free after exposure to CYVMV and its satellite. These results suggest that βC1 interferes with silencing mechanism.

  3. Photochemically induced gene silencing using small interfering RNA molecules in combination with lipid carriers.

    PubMed

    Bøe, S; Longva, A S; Hovig, E

    2007-01-01

    Novel strategies for efficient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules with a potential for targeting are required for development of RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutics. Here, we present a strategy that is based on delivery of siRNA molecules through the endocytic pathway, in order to develop a method for site-specific gene silencing. To achieve this, we combined the use of cationic lipids and photochemical internalization (PCI). Using the human S100A4 gene as a model system, we obtained potent gene silencing in four tested human cancer cell lines following PCI induction when using the cationic lipid jetSI-ENDO. Gene silencing was shown at both the RNA and protein levels, with no observed PCI toxicity when using the jetSI reagent and an optimized PCI protocol. This novel induction method opens for in vivo site-specific delivery of siRNA molecules toward a sequence of interest.

  4. Silencing of the SlNAP7 gene influences plastid development and lycopene accumulation in tomato.

    PubMed

    Fu, Da-Qi; Meng, Lan-Huan; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Yan, Hua-Xue; Luo, Yun-Bo

    2016-12-08

    Ripening is an important stage of fruit development. To screen the genes associated with pigment formation in tomato fruit, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library was constructed by using tomato fruit in the green ripe and break ripe stages, and 129 differential genes were obtained. Using redness as a screening marker, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of the differential genes was performed with a sprout vacuum-infiltration system (SVI). The results showed that silencing the SlNAP7 gene affected the chloroplast development of tomato leaves, manifesting as a photo-bleaching phenotype, and silenced fruit significantly affected the accumulation of lycopene, manifested as a yellow phenotype. In our study, we found that silencing the SlNAP7 gene downregulates the expression of the POR and PORA genes and destroys the normal development of the chloroplast. The expression of related genes included in the lycopene biosynthesis pathway was not significantly changed, but lycopene accumulation was significantly reduced in tomato fruit. Perhaps it was caused by the destruction of the chromoplast, which leads to the oxidation of lycopene. The results show that the SlNAP7 gene influences chloroplast development and lycopene accumulation in tomato.

  5. Silencing of the SlNAP7 gene influences plastid development and lycopene accumulation in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Da-Qi; Meng, Lan-Huan; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Yan, Hua-Xue; Luo, Yun-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Ripening is an important stage of fruit development. To screen the genes associated with pigment formation in tomato fruit, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library was constructed by using tomato fruit in the green ripe and break ripe stages, and 129 differential genes were obtained. Using redness as a screening marker, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of the differential genes was performed with a sprout vacuum-infiltration system (SVI). The results showed that silencing the SlNAP7 gene affected the chloroplast development of tomato leaves, manifesting as a photo-bleaching phenotype, and silenced fruit significantly affected the accumulation of lycopene, manifested as a yellow phenotype. In our study, we found that silencing the SlNAP7 gene downregulates the expression of the POR and PORA genes and destroys the normal development of the chloroplast. The expression of related genes included in the lycopene biosynthesis pathway was not significantly changed, but lycopene accumulation was significantly reduced in tomato fruit. Perhaps it was caused by the destruction of the chromoplast, which leads to the oxidation of lycopene. The results show that the SlNAP7 gene influences chloroplast development and lycopene accumulation in tomato. PMID:27929131

  6. Silencing of the SlNAP7 gene influences plastid development and lycopene accumulation in tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Da-Qi; Meng, Lan-Huan; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Yan, Hua-Xue; Luo, Yun-Bo

    2016-12-01

    Ripening is an important stage of fruit development. To screen the genes associated with pigment formation in tomato fruit, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library was constructed by using tomato fruit in the green ripe and break ripe stages, and 129 differential genes were obtained. Using redness as a screening marker, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of the differential genes was performed with a sprout vacuum-infiltration system (SVI). The results showed that silencing the SlNAP7 gene affected the chloroplast development of tomato leaves, manifesting as a photo-bleaching phenotype, and silenced fruit significantly affected the accumulation of lycopene, manifested as a yellow phenotype. In our study, we found that silencing the SlNAP7 gene downregulates the expression of the POR and PORA genes and destroys the normal development of the chloroplast. The expression of related genes included in the lycopene biosynthesis pathway was not significantly changed, but lycopene accumulation was significantly reduced in tomato fruit. Perhaps it was caused by the destruction of the chromoplast, which leads to the oxidation of lycopene. The results show that the SlNAP7 gene influences chloroplast development and lycopene accumulation in tomato.

  7. Development of Agrobacterium-Mediated Virus-Induced Gene Silencing and Performance Evaluation of Four Marker Genes in Gossypium barbadense

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jinhuan; Zhu, Yue; Li, Qing; Liu, Jinzhi; Tian, Yingchuan; Liu, Yule; Wu, Jiahe

    2013-01-01

    Gossypiumbarbadense is a cultivated cotton species and possesses many desirable traits, including high fiber quality and resistance to pathogens, especially Verticilliumdahliae (a devastating pathogen of Gossypium hirsutum, the main cultivated species). These elite traits are difficult to be introduced into G. hirsutum through classical breeding methods. In addition, genetic transformation of G. barbadense has not been successfully performed. It is therefore important to develop methods for evaluating the function and molecular mechanism of genes in G. barbadense. In this study, we had successfully introduced a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system into three cultivars of G. barbadense by inserting marker genes into the tobacco rattle virus (TRV) vector. After we optimized the VIGS conditions, including light intensity, photoperiod, seedling age and Agrobacterium strain, 100% of plants agroinfiltrated with the GaPDS silencing vector showed white colored leaves. Three other marker genes, GaCLA1, GaANS and GaANR, were employed to further test this VIGS system in G. barbadense. The transcript levels of the endogenous genes in the silenced plants were reduced by more than 99% compared to control plants; these plants presented phenotypic symptoms 2 weeks after inoculation. We introduced a fusing sequence fragment of GaPDS and GaANR gene silencing vectors into a single plant, which resulted in both photobleaching and brownish coloration. The extent of silencing in plants agroinfiltrated with fusing two-gene-silencing vector was consistent with plants harboring a single gene silencing vector. The development of this VIGS system should promote analysis of gene function in G. barbadense, and help to contribute desirable traits for breeding of G. barbadense and G. hirsutum. PMID:24023833

  8. Development of Agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing and performance evaluation of four marker genes in Gossypium barbadense.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jinhuan; Zhu, Yue; Li, Qing; Liu, Jinzhi; Tian, Yingchuan; Liu, Yule; Wu, Jiahe

    2013-01-01

    Gossypiumbarbadense is a cultivated cotton species and possesses many desirable traits, including high fiber quality and resistance to pathogens, especially Verticilliumdahliae (a devastating pathogen of Gossypium hirsutum, the main cultivated species). These elite traits are difficult to be introduced into G. hirsutum through classical breeding methods. In addition, genetic transformation of G. barbadense has not been successfully performed. It is therefore important to develop methods for evaluating the function and molecular mechanism of genes in G. barbadense. In this study, we had successfully introduced a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system into three cultivars of G. barbadense by inserting marker genes into the tobacco rattle virus (TRV) vector. After we optimized the VIGS conditions, including light intensity, photoperiod, seedling age and Agrobacterium strain, 100% of plants agroinfiltrated with the GaPDS silencing vector showed white colored leaves. Three other marker genes, GaCLA1, GaANS and GaANR, were employed to further test this VIGS system in G. barbadense. The transcript levels of the endogenous genes in the silenced plants were reduced by more than 99% compared to control plants; these plants presented phenotypic symptoms 2 weeks after inoculation. We introduced a fusing sequence fragment of GaPDS and GaANR gene silencing vectors into a single plant, which resulted in both photobleaching and brownish coloration. The extent of silencing in plants agroinfiltrated with fusing two-gene-silencing vector was consistent with plants harboring a single gene silencing vector. The development of this VIGS system should promote analysis of gene function in G. barbadense, and help to contribute desirable traits for breeding of G. barbadense and G. hirsutum.

  9. [The analysis of rbcS gene function by post-transcription gene silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Fu; Ma, Peng-Da; Wang, Ren-Hou; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Bao; Wang, Xing-Zhi

    2005-06-01

    A system of virus-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing for studying rbcS gene function was established and optimized using tobacco rattle virus vector and Nicotiana benthamiana as experimental materiaes. The following analyses were conducted: phenotypic characterization of rbcS gene silenced plants, transcription levels of rbcS gene by RT-PCR; protein levels of rbcS by the antibodies of rbcS and rbcL and photosynthetic pigments wntents in rbcS silenced plants by HPLC method. The results showed that the seedlings at 21-24-day-old and Agrobacterium concentration at OD600 = 1-1.5 gave the best results for gene silencing. The expression level of rbcL was very likely regulated by rbcS, and rbcS gene did not relate to the collection of photosynthetic energy. Probability analysis showed that the tobacco rattle virus vector system is a useful and effective technique to study rbcS gene function via post-transcriptional gene silencing.

  10. Aberrant TGFβ/SMAD4 signaling contributes to epigenetic silencing of a putative tumor suppressor, RunX1T1 in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chen, Tze-Ho; Yang, Hui-Wen; Chou, Jian-Liang; Chen, Lin-Yu; Yeh, Chia-Ming; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Lin, Ru-Inn; Su, Her-Young; Chen, Gary C W; Deatherage, Daniel E; Huang, Yi-Wen; Yan, Pearlly S; Lin, Huey-Jen; Nephew, Kenneth P; Huang, Tim H-M; Lai, Hung-Cheng; Chan, Michael W Y

    2011-06-01

    Aberrant TGFβ signaling pathway may alter the expression of down-stream targets and promotes ovarian carcinogenesis. However, the mechanism of this impairment is not fully understood. Our previous study has identified RunX1T1 as a putative SMAD4 target in an immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cell line, IOSE. In this study, we report that transcription of RunX1T1 was confirmed to be positively regulated by SMAD4 in IOSE cells and epigenetically silenced in a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines by promoter hypermethylation and histone methylation at H3 lysine 9. SMAD4 depletion increased repressive histone modifications of RunX1T1 promoter without affecting promoter methylation in IOSE cells. Epigenetic treatment can restore RunX1T1 expression by reversing its epigenetic status in MCP3 ovarian cancer cells. When transiently treated with a demethylating agent, the expression of RunX1T1 was partially restored in MCP3 cells, but gradual re-silencing through promoter re-methylation was observed after the treatment. Interestingly, SMAD4 knockdown accelerated this re-silencing process, suggesting that normal TGF-beta signaling is essential for the maintenance of RunX1T1 expression. In vivo analysis confirmed that hypermethylation of RunX1T1 was detected in 35.7% (34/95) of ovarian tumors with high clinical stages (P=0.035) and in 83% (5/6) of primary ovarian cancer-initiating cells. Additionally, concurrent methylation of RunX1T1 and another SMAD4 target, FBXO32 which was previously found to be hypermethylated in ovarian cancer was observed in this same sample cohort (P< 0.05). Restoration of RunX1T1 inhibited cancer cell growth. Taken together, dysregulated TGFβ/SMAD4 signaling may lead to epigenetic silencing of a putative tumor suppressor, RunX1T1, during ovarian carcinogenesis.

  11. Cationic liposome–nucleic acid nanoparticle assemblies with applications in gene delivery and gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ramsey N.

    2016-01-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are synthetic carriers of nucleic acids in gene delivery and gene silencing therapeutics. The introduction will describe the structures of distinct liquid crystalline phases of CL–nucleic acid complexes, which were revealed in earlier synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. When mixed with plasmid DNA, CLs containing lipids with distinct shapes spontaneously undergo topological transitions into self-assembled lamellar, inverse hexagonal, and hexagonal CL–DNA phases. CLs containing cubic phase lipids are observed to readily mix with short interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules creating double gyroid CL–siRNA phases for gene silencing. Custom synthesis of multivalent lipids and a range of novel polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipids with attached targeting ligands and hydrolysable moieties have led to functionalized equilibrium nanoparticles (NPs) optimized for cell targeting, uptake or endosomal escape. Very recent experiments are described with surface-functionalized PEGylated CL–DNA NPs, including fluorescence microscopy colocalization with members of the Rab family of GTPases, which directly reveal interactions with cell membranes and NP pathways. In vitro optimization of CL–DNA and CL–siRNA NPs with relevant primary cancer cells is expected to impact nucleic acid therapeutics in vivo. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation’. PMID:27298431

  12. Virus-induced gene silencing and transient gene expression in soybean using Bean pod mottle virus infectious clones

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful and rapid approach for determining the functions of plant genes. The basis of VIGS is that a viral genome is engineered so that it can carry fragments of plant genes, typically in the 200-300 base pair size range. The recombinant viruses are used to ...

  13. Lipid-like nanomaterials for simultaneous gene expression and silencing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yizhou; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Alabi, Christopher A; Khan, Omar F; Veiseh, Omid; Dorkin, J Robert; Sirirungruang, Sasilada; Yin, Hao; Tang, Benjamin C; Pelet, Jeisa M; Chen, Delai; Gu, Zhen; Xue, Yuan; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-09-01

    New lipid-like nanomaterials are developed to simultaneously regulate expression of multiple genes. Self-assembled nanoparticles are capable of efficiently encapsulating pDNA and siRNA. These nanoparticles are shown to induce simultaneous gene expression and silencing both in vitro and in vivo. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Lipid-like Nanomaterials for simultaneous gene expression and silencing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yizhou; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A.; Alabi, Christopher A.; Khan, Omar F.; Veiseh, Omid; Dorkin, J. Robert; Sirirungruang, Sasilada; Yin, Hao; Tang, Benjamin C.; Pelet, Jeisa M.; Chen, Delai; Gu, Zhen; Xue, Yuan; Langer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    New lipid-like nanomaterials were developed to simultaneously regulate expression of multiple genes. Self-assembled nanoparticles are capable of efficiently encapsulating pDNA and siRNA. These nanoparticles were shown to induce simultaneous gene expression and silencing both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24623658

  15. Artificial micro RNA (amiRNA) induced gene silencing in alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene silencing is a powerful technique that allows the study of the function of specific genes by selectively reducing their transcription. Several different approaches can be used; however, they all have in common the artificial generation of single-stranded small RNAs that are utilized by the endo...

  16. Aberrant CBFA2T3B gene promoter methylation in breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Anthony J; Gardner, Alison E; McKenzie, Olivia LD; Callen, David F; Sutherland, Grant R; Kremmidiotis, Gabriel

    2004-01-01

    Background The CBFA2T3 locus located on the human chromosome region 16q24.3 is frequently deleted in breast tumors. CBFA2T3 gene expression levels are aberrant in breast tumor cell lines and the CBFA2T3B isoform is a potential tumor suppressor gene. In the absence of identified mutations to further support a role for this gene in tumorigenesis, we explored whether the CBFA2T3B promoter region is aberrantly methylated and whether this correlates with expression. Results Aberrant hypo and hypermethylation of the CBFA2T3B promoter was detected in breast tumor cell lines and primary breast tumor samples relative to methylation index interquartile ranges in normal breast counterpart and normal whole blood samples. A statistically significant inverse correlation between aberrant CBFA2T3B promoter methylation and gene expression was established. Conclusion CBFA2T3B is a potential breast tumor suppressor gene affected by aberrant promoter methylation and gene expression. The methylation levels were quantitated using a second-round real-time methylation-specific PCR assay. The detection of both hypo and hypermethylation is a technicality regarding the methylation methodology. PMID:15301688

  17. RNA Quality Control as a Key to Suppressing RNA Silencing of Endogenous Genes in Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-06-06

    RNA quality control of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of eukaryotic gene expression and often relies on exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional transcripts. In parallel, exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs are degraded through RNA silencing, which is a genome defense mechanism used by many eukaryotes. In plants, RNA silencing is triggered by the production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASEs (RDRs) and proceeds through small interfering (si) RNA-directed, ARGONAUTE (AGO)-mediated cleavage of homologous transcripts. Many studies revealed that plants avert inappropriate posttranscriptional gene silencing of endogenous coding genes by using RNA surveillance mechanisms as a safeguard to protect their transcriptome profiles. The tug of war between RNA surveillance and RNA silencing ensures the appropriate partitioning of endogenous RNA substrates among these degradation pathways. Here we review recent advances on RNA quality control and its role in the suppression of RNA silencing at endogenous genes and discuss the mechanisms underlying the crosstalk among these pathways.

  18. Rationale for developing new virus vectors to analyze gene function in grasses through virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Ramanna, Hema; Ding, Xin Shun; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    The exploding availability of genome and EST-based sequences from grasses requires a technology that allows rapid functional analysis of the multitude of genes that these resources provide. There are several techniques available to determine a gene's function. For gene knockdown studies, silencing through RNAi is a powerful tool. Gene silencing can be accomplished through stable transformation or transient expression of a fragment of a target gene sequence. Stable transformation in rice, maize, and a few other species, although routine, remains a relatively low-throughput process. Transformation in other grass species is difficult and labor-intensive. Therefore, transient gene silencing methods including Agrobacterium-mediated and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) have great potential for researchers studying gene function in grasses. VIGS in grasses already has been used to determine the function of genes during pathogen challenge and plant development. It also can be used in moderate-throughput reverse genetics screens to determine gene function. However, the number of viruses modified to serve as silencing vectors in grasses is limited, and the silencing phenotype induced by these vectors is not optimal: the phenotype being transient and with moderate penetration throughout the tissue. Here, we review the most recent information available for VIGS in grasses and summarize the strengths and weaknesses in current virus-grass host systems. We describe ways to improve current virus vectors and the potential of other grass-infecting viruses for VIGS studies. This work is necessary because VIGS for the foreseeable future remains a higher throughput and more rapid system to evaluate gene function than stable transformation.

  19. An update on RNA interference-mediated gene silencing in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yi-Jie; Zhang, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Based on our previous review, this article presents the new progress in RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing in cancer therapy, and reviews the hurdles and how they might be overcome. RNAi-mediated gene silencing approaches have been demonstrated in humans, and ongoing clinical trials hold promise for treating cancer or providing alternatives to traditional chemotherapies. Here we describe the broad range of approaches to achieve targeted gene silencing for cancer therapy, discuss the progress made in developing RNAi as therapeutics for cancer and highlight challenges and emerging solutions associated with its clinical development. Although the field of RNAi-based cancer therapy is still an emerging one, we have yet to get solutions for overcoming all obstacles associated with its clinical development. The current rapid advances in development of new targeted delivery strategies and noninvasive imaging methods will be big steps to explore RNAi as a new and potent clinical modality in humans.

  20. RAP1 is essential for silencing telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Figueiredo, Luisa M; Espinal, Amin; Okubo, Eiji; Li, Bibo

    2009-04-03

    Trypanosoma brucei expresses variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes in a strictly monoallelic fashion in its mammalian hosts, but it is unclear how this important virulence mechanism is enforced. Telomere position effect, an epigenetic phenomenon, has been proposed to play a critical role in VSG regulation, yet no telomeric protein has been identified whose disruption led to VSG derepression. We now identify tbRAP1 as an intrinsic component of the T. brucei telomere complex and a major regulator for silencing VSG expression sites (ESs). Knockdown of tbRAP1 led to derepression of all VSGs in silent ESs, but not VSGs located elsewhere, and resulted in stronger derepression of genes located within 10 kb from telomeres than genes located further upstream. This graduated silencing pattern suggests that telomere integrity plays a key role in tbRAP1-dependent silencing and VSG regulation.

  1. V2 from a curtovirus is a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Luna, Ana P; Rodríguez-Negrete, Edgar A; Morilla, Gabriel; Wang, Liping; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Castillo, Araceli G; Bejarano, Eduardo R

    2017-10-01

    The suppression of gene silencing is a key mechanism for the success of viral infection in plants. DNA viruses from the Geminiviridae family encode several proteins that suppress transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing (TGS/PTGS). In Begomovirus, the most abundant genus of this family, three out of six genome-encoded proteins, namely C2, C4 and V2, have been shown to suppress PTGS, with V2 being the strongest PTGS suppressor in transient assays. Beet curly top virus (BCTV), the model species for the Curtovirus genus, is able to infect the widest range of plants among geminiviruses. In this genus, only one protein, C2/L2, has been described as inhibiting PTGS. We show here that, despite the lack of sequence homology with its begomoviral counterpart, BCTV V2 acts as a potent PTGS suppressor, possibly by impairing the RDR6 (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6)/suppressor of gene silencing 3 (SGS3) pathway.

  2. Sequence homology requirements for transcriptional silencing of 35S transgenes and post-transcriptional silencing of nitrite reductase (trans)genes by the tobacco 271 locus.

    PubMed

    Thierry, D; Vaucheret, H

    1996-12-01

    The transgene locus of the tobacco plant 271 (271 locus) is located on a telomere and consists of multiple copies of a plasmid carrying an NptII marker gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 19S promoter and the leaf-specific nitrite reductase Nii1 cDNA cloned in the antisense orientation under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. Previous analysis of gene expression in leaves has shown that this locus triggers both post-transcriptional silencing of the host leaf-specific Nii genes and transcriptional silencing of transgenes driven by the 19S or 35S promoter irrespective of their coding sequence and of their location in the genome. In this paper we show that silencing of transgenes carrying Nii1 sequences occurs irrespective of the promoter driving their expression and of their location within the genome. This phenomenon occurs in roots as well as in leaves although root Nii genes share only 84% identity with leaf-specific Nii1 sequences carried by the 271 locus. Conversely, transgenes carrying the bean Nii gene (which shares 76% identity with the tobacco Nii1 gene) escape silencing by the 271 locus. We also show that transgenes driven by the figwort mosaic virus 34S promoter (which shares 63% identity with the 35S promoter) also escape silencing by the 271 locus. Taken together, these results indicate that a high degree of sequence similarity is required between the sequences of the silencing locus and of the target (trans)genes for both transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing.

  3. Host-Induced Gene Silencing of Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae Pathogenicity Genes Mediated by the Brome Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Zhu, Jian; Liu, Zhixue; Wang, Zhengyi; Zhou, Cheng; Wang, Hong

    2017-09-26

    Magnaportheoryzae is a devastating plant pathogen, which has a detrimental impact on rice production worldwide. Despite its agronomical importance, some newly-emerging pathotypes often overcome race-specific disease resistance rapidly. It is thus desirable to develop a novel strategy for the long-lasting resistance of rice plants to ever-changing fungal pathogens. Brome mosaic virus (BMV)-induced RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a useful tool to study host-resistance genes for rice blast protection. Planta-generated silencing of targeted genes inside biotrophic pathogens can be achieved by expression of M.oryzae-derived gene fragments in the BMV-mediated gene silencing system, a technique termed host-induced gene silencing (HIGS). In this study, the effectiveness of BMV-mediated HIGS in M.oryzae was examined by targeting three predicted pathogenicity genes, MoABC1,MoMAC1 and MoPMK1. Systemic generation of fungal gene-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules induced by inoculation of BMV viral vectors inhibited disease development and reduced the transcription of targeted fungal genes after subsequent M.oryzae inoculation. Combined introduction of fungal gene sequences in sense and antisense orientation mediated by the BMV silencing vectors significantly enhanced the efficiency of this host-generated trans-specific RNAi, implying that these fungal genes played crucial roles in pathogenicity. Collectively, our results indicated that BMV-HIGS system was a great strategy for protecting host plants against the invasion of pathogenic fungi.

  4. ABERRANT PROMOTER METHYLATION OF MULTIPLE GENES IN SPUTUM FROM INDIVIDUALS EXPOSED TO SMOKY COAL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aberrant methylation in the promoter region of cancer-related genes leads to gene transcriptional inactivation and plays an integral role in lung tumorigenesis. Recent studies demonstrated that promoter methylation was detected not only in lung tumors from patients with lung canc...

  5. ABERRANT PROMOTER METHYLATION OF MULTIPLE GENES IN SPUTUM FROM INDIVIDUALS EXPOSED TO SMOKY COAL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aberrant methylation in the promoter region of cancer-related genes leads to gene transcriptional inactivation and plays an integral role in lung tumorigenesis. Recent studies demonstrated that promoter methylation was detected not only in lung tumors from patients with lung canc...

  6. Inverted-repeat DNA: a new gene-silencing tool for seed lipid modification.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Green, A; Stoutjesdijk, P; Liu, Q

    2000-12-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has been successfully used to modify seed lipids in oilseed crops like soybean, canola and sunflower. Conventionally, PTGS has been induced by transforming the plants with either antisense or co-suppression constructs targeted against key seed lipid biosynthesis genes. A major drawback of this approach has been the recovery of only a modest proportion of silenced individuals from large populations of transgenic plants. In this report we show that inverted-repeat DNA constructs containing an intron encoding RNA with a hairpin structure can induce PTGS with very high frequency.

  7. Epigenetic gene silencing in cancer - a mechanism for early oncogenic pathway addiction?

    PubMed

    Baylin, Stephen B; Ohm, Joyce E

    2006-02-01

    Chromatin alterations have been associated with all stages of tumour formation and progression. The best characterized are epigenetically mediated transcriptional-silencing events that are associated with increases in DNA methylation - particularly at promoter regions of genes that regulate important cell functions. Recent evidence indicates that epigenetic changes might 'addict' cancer cells to altered signal-transduction pathways during the early stages of tumour development. Dependence on these pathways for cell proliferation or survival allows them to acquire genetic mutations in the same pathways, providing the cell with selective advantages that promote tumour progression. Strategies to reverse epigenetic gene silencing might therefore be useful in cancer prevention and therapy.

  8. Chromatin immunoprecipitation microarrays for identification of genes silenced by histone H3 lysine 9 methylation.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yutaka; Shen, Lanlan; Yan, Pearlly S; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2004-05-11

    Switching from acetylation to methylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (K9) has recently been shown to contribute to euchromatin gene silencing. To identify genes silenced by K9 modifications, we probed a human CpG island microarray with DNA obtained by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in a cancer cell line using an anti-H3-K9 methylated antibody or an anti-H3-K9 acetylated antibody. Of the 27 clones with the highest signal ratio of K9 methylation over acetylation (Me/Ac), 13 contained repetitive sequences. Among 14 nonrepetitive clones, we identified 11 genes (seven known and four previously undescribed), one EST, and two unknown fragments. Using ChIP-PCR, all 18 examined clones showed higher ratios of H3-K9 Me/Ac than the active gene control, P21, thus confirming the microarray data. In addition, we found a strong correlation between the K9 Me/Ac ratio and CpG island DNA methylation (R = 0.92, P < 0.01), and five of seven genes examined (megalin, thrombospondin-4, KR18, latrophilin-3, and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase P101 subunit) showed lack of expression by RT-PCR and reactivation by DNA methylation and/or histone deacetylase inhibition, suggesting that these genes are true targets of silencing through histone modifications. All five genes also showed significant DNA methylation in a cell line panel and in primary colon cancers. Our data suggest that CpG island microarray coupled with ChIP can identify novel targets of gene silencing in cancer. This unbiased approach confirms the tight coupling between DNA methylation and histone modifications in cancer and could be used to probe gene silencing in nonneoplastic conditions as well.

  9. Klotho gene silencing promotes pathology in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wehling-Henricks, Michelle; Li, Zhenzhi; Lindsey, Catherine; Wang, Ying; Welc, Steven S; Ramos, Julian N; Khanlou, Négar; Kuro-O, Makoto; Tidball, James G

    2016-06-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal muscle disease involving progressive loss of muscle regenerative capacity and increased fibrosis. We tested whether epigenetic silencing of the klotho gene occurs in the mdx mouse model of DMD and whether klotho silencing is an important feature of the disease. Our findings show that klotho undergoes muscle-specific silencing at the acute onset of mdx pathology. Klotho experiences increased methylation of CpG sites in its promoter region, which is associated with gene silencing, and increases in a repressive histone mark, H3K9me2. Expression of a klotho transgene in mdx mice restored their longevity, reduced muscle wasting, improved function and greatly increased the pool of muscle-resident stem cells required for regeneration. Reductions of fibrosis in late, progressive stages of the mdx pathology achieved by transgene expression were paralleled by reduced expression of Wnt target genes (axin-2), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) and collagens types 1 and 3, indicating that Klotho inhibition of the profibrotic Wnt/TGFβ axis underlies its anti-fibrotic effect in aging, dystrophic muscle. Thus, epigenetic silencing of klotho during muscular dystrophy contributes substantially to lost regenerative capacity and increased fibrosis of dystrophic muscle during late progressive stages of the disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Host-delivered RNAi: an effective strategy to silence genes in plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Fairbairn, David J; Cavallaro, Antonino S; Bernard, Margaret; Mahalinga-Iyer, Janani; Graham, Michael W; Botella, José R

    2007-11-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are obligate, sedentary endoparasites that infect many plant species causing large economic losses worldwide. Available nematicides are being banned due to their toxicity or ozone-depleting properties and alternative control strategies are urgently required. We have produced transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing different dsRNA hairpin structures targeting a root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne javanica) putative transcription factor, MjTis11. We provide evidence that MjTis11 was consistently silenced in nematodes feeding on the roots of transgenic plants. The observed silencing was specific for MjTis11, with other sequence-unrelated genes being unaffected in the nematodes. Those transgenic plants able to induce silencing of MjTis11, also showed the presence of small interfering RNAs. Even though down-regulation of MjTis11 did not result in a lethal phenotype, this study demonstrates the feasibility of silencing root-knot nematode genes by expressing dsRNA in the host plant. Host-delivered RNA interference-triggered (HD-RNAi) silencing of parasite genes provides a novel disease resistance strategy with wide biotechnological applications. The potential of HD-RNAi is not restricted to parasitic nematodes but could be adapted to control other plant-feeding pests.

  11. Development of a virus induced gene silencing vector from a legumes infecting tobamovirus.

    PubMed

    Várallyay, Eva; Lichner, Zsuzsanna; Sáfrány, Judit; Havelda, Z; Salamon, P; Bisztray, Gy; Burgyán, J

    2010-12-01

    Medicago truncatula, the model plant of legumes, is well characterized, but there is only a little knowledge about it as a viral host. Viral vectors can be used for expressing foreign genes or for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), what is a fast and powerful tool to determine gene functions in plants. Viral vectors effective on Nicotiana benthamiana have been constructed from a number of viruses, however, only few of them were effective in other plants. A Tobamovirus, Sunnhemp mosaic virus (SHMV) systemically infects Medicago truncatula without causing severe symptoms. To set up a viral vector for Medicago truncatula, we prepared an infectious cDNA clone of SHMV. We constructed two VIGS vectors differing in the promoter element to drive foreign gene expression. The vectors were effective both in the expression and in the silencing of a transgene Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and in silencing of an endogenous gene Phytoene desaturase (PDS) on N. benthamiana. Still only one of the vectors was able to successfully silence the endogenous Chlorata 42 gene in M. truncatula.

  12. Gene silencing by DNA methylation and dual inheritance in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Paulin, R P; Ho, T; Balzer, H J; Holliday, R

    1998-06-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells strain D422, which has one copy of the adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) gene, were permeabilized by electroporation and treated with 5-methyl deoxycytidine triphosphate. Cells with a silenced APRT gene were selected on 2, 6-diaminopurine. Colonies were isolated and shown to be reactivated to APRT+ by 5-aza-cytidine and by selection in medium containing adenine, aminopterin and thymidine. Genomic DNA was prepared from eight isolates of independent origin and subjected to bisulphite treatment. This deaminates cytosine to uracil in single-stranded DNA but does not deaminate 5-methyl cytosine. PCR, cloning and sequencing revealed the methylation pattern of CpG doublets in the promoter region of the APRT- gene, whereas the active APRT gene had nonmethylated DNA. CHO strain K1, which has two copies of the APRT+ gene, could also be silenced by the same procedure but at a lower frequency. The availability of the 5-methyl dCTP-induced silencing, 5-aza-CR and a standard mutagen, ethyl methane sulphonate, makes it possible to follow concomitantly the inheritance of active, mutant or silenced gene copies. This analysis demonstrates "dual inheritance" at the APRT locus in CHO cells.

  13. [Effects of Sam68 gene silence on proliferation of acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Juan; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Hai-Rui; Wang, Jian; Lin, Ya-Ni; Pang, Tian-Xiang; Li, Qing-Hua

    2014-08-01

    This study was purpose to investigate the effect of Sam68 gene silence on proliferation of human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat. The sequence of shRNA targeting the site 531-552 of Sam68 mRNA was designed and chemically synthesized, then a single-vector lentiviral, Tet-inducible shRNA-Sam68 system (pLKO-Tet-On) was constructed; next the Jurkat cells were infected with lentivirus to create stable cell clones with regulatable Sam68 gene expression. The inhibitory efficiency of Sam68 gene was assayed by Real-time PCR and Western blot; the cell activity of Jurkat cells was detected with MTT assay; the change of colony forming potential of Jurkat cells was analyzed by colony forming test; the cell cycle distribution was tested by flow cytometry. The results indicated that the expression of Sam68 in experimental cells was statistically decreased as compared with that of the control cells; the cells activity and colony forming capacity of the Jurkat cells with Sam68 gene silence were significantly inhibited; with Sam68 gene silencing, the percentage of S phase cells was significantly increased, while the percentage of G2 phase cells was significantly decreased. It is concluded that the silencing Sam68 gene using shRNA interference can effectively inhibit the proliferation of human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat.

  14. Tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2014-07-01

    Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is widely used in various plant species to downregulate the expression of a target plant gene. TRV is a bipartite, positive-strand RNA virus with the TRV1 and TRV2 genomes. To induce post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), the TRV2 genome is genetically modified to carry a fragment of the target gene and delivered into the plant (along with the TRV1 genome) by agroinoculation. TRV1- and TRV2-carrying Agrobacterium strains are then co-inoculated into 3-week-old plant leaves by one of three methods: a needleless syringe, the agrodrench method or by pricking with a toothpick. Target gene silencing occurs in the newly developed noninoculated leaves within 2-3 weeks of TRV inoculation. The TRV-VIGS protocol described here takes only 4 weeks to implement, and it is faster and easier to perform than other gene silencing techniques that are currently available. Although we use Nicotiana benthamiana as an example, the protocol is adaptable to other plant species.

  15. Selection of optimal combinations of target genes for therapeutic multi-gene silencing based on miRNA co-regulation.

    PubMed

    Malek, A; Gyorffy, B; Catapano, C V; Schäfer, R

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic gene silencing is a promising approach for treatment of cancer. Despite substantial efforts, however, only few such therapeutic methods have been clinically tested. The heterogeneity in gene expression profiles among malignant tissues and the dynamic control of gene expression in individual tumors makes identifying universal and effective targets a challenge. Further development of gene silencing therapy requires new approaches to comprehend and manage gene expression in cancer cells. In this study, we proposed and evaluated experimentally a new approach to design multi-gene silencing therapy. Using a simplified model of gene expression control, we show that genes commonly regulated by the same microRNA represent optimal combinations of targets for small hairpin RNA/small interfering RNA-based gene silencing. The proposed method of target gene selection and co-silencing can be explored as an algorithm for personalized cancer gene therapy.

  16. Systemic gene silencing in plants triggered by fluorescent nanoparticle-delivered double-stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Ding, Lian; He, Bicheng; Shen, Jie; Xu, Zejun; Yin, Meizhen; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2014-08-01

    A cationic fluorescence nanoparticle efficiently enters plants with high transfection efficacy. Applying a mixture of G2/dsRNA to the model plant, Arabidopsis root, leads to significant reduction in the expression of important developmental genes and results in apparent phenotypes. This study reports a non-viral gene nanocarrier which triggers gene silencing in plants and leads to systemic phenotypes.A cationic fluorescence nanoparticle efficiently enters plants with high transfection efficacy. Applying a mixture of G2/dsRNA to the model plant, Arabidopsis root, leads to significant reduction in the expression of important developmental genes and results in apparent phenotypes. This study reports a non-viral gene nanocarrier which triggers gene silencing in plants and leads to systemic phenotypes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03481c

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of meiotic genes by a nuclear RNA silencing complex

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Emily D.; Braun, Craig R.; Gygi, Steven P.; Moazed, Danesh

    2014-01-01

    RNA is a central component of gene-silencing pathways that regulate diverse cellular processes. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an RNA-based mechanism represses meiotic gene expression during vegetative growth. This pathway depends on the zinc finger protein Red1, which is required to degrade meiotic mRNAs as well as to target histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation, a repressive chromatin mark, to a subset of meiotic genes. However, the mechanism of Red1 function is unknown. Here we use affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify a Red1-containing nuclear RNA silencing (NURS) complex. In addition to Red1, this complex includes the Mtl1, Red5, Ars2, Rmn1, and Iss10 proteins and associates with several other complexes that are involved in either signaling or mediating RNA silencing. By analyzing the effects of gene knockouts and inducible knockdown alleles, we show that NURS subunits regulate RNA degradation and H3K9 methylation at meiotic genes. We also identify roles for individual NURS subunits in interactions with Mmi1, an RNA-binding protein that marks meiotic RNAs for destruction, and the nuclear exosome RNA degradation complex. Finally, we show that the levels of H3K9 methylation at meiotic genes are not sufficient to restrict RNA polymerase II access or repress gene expression during vegetative growth. Our results demonstrate that Red1 partners with other proteins to silence meiotic gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Conservation of a NURS-like complex in human cells suggests that this pathway plays an ancient and fundamental role in RNA silencing. PMID:24713849

  18. Conditional gene silencing of multiple genes with antisense RNAs and generation of a mutator strain of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we describe a method of simultaneous conditional gene silencing of up to four genes in Escherichia coli by using antisense RNAs. We used antisense RNAs with paired termini, which carried flanking inverted repeats to create paired double-stranded RNA termini; these RNAs have been proven to have high silencing efficacy. To express antisense RNAs, we constructed four IPTG-inducible vectors carrying different but compatible replication origins. When the lacZ antisense RNA was expressed using these vectors, lacZ expression was successfully silenced by all the vectors, but the expression level of the antisense RNA and silencing efficacy differed depending on the used vectors. All the vectors were co-transformable; the antisense RNAs against lacZ, ackA, pta and pepN were co-expressed, and silencing of all the target genes was confirmed. Furthermore, when antisense RNAs were targeted to the mutator genes mutS, mutD (dnaQ) and ndk, which are involved in DNA replication or DNA mismatch repair, spontaneous mutation frequencies increased over 2000-fold. The resulting mutator strain is useful for random mutagenesis of plasmids. The method provides a robust tool for investigating functional relationships between multiple genes or altering cell phenotypes for biotechnological and industrial applications. PMID:19515932

  19. dsRNA-induced gene silencing in Moniliophthora perniciosa, the causal agent of witches' broom disease of cacao.

    PubMed

    Caribé dos Santos, A C; Sena, J A L; Santos, S C; Dias, C V; Pirovani, C P; Pungartnik, C; Valle, R R; Cascardo, J C M; Vincentz, M

    2009-11-01

    The genome sequence of the hemibiotrophic fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa revealed genes possibly participating in the RNAi machinery. Therefore, studies were performed in order to investigate the efficiency of gene silencing by dsRNA. We showed that the reporter gfp gene stably introduced into the fungus genome can be silenced by transfection of in vitro synthesized gfpdsRNA. In addition, successful dsRNA-induced silencing of endogenous genes coding for hydrophobins and a peroxiredoxin were also achieved. All genes showed a silencing efficiency ranging from 18% to 98% when compared to controls even 28d after dsRNA treatment, suggesting systemic silencing. Reduction of GFP fluorescence, peroxidase activity levels and survival responses to H(2)O(2) were consistent with the reduction of GFP and peroxidase mRNA levels, respectively. dsRNA transformation of M. perniciosa is shown here to efficiently promote genetic knockdown and can thus be used to assess gene function in this pathogen.

  20. Agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing assay in cotton.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiquan; Britt, Robert C; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2011-08-20

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is one of the most important crops worldwide. Considerable efforts have been made on molecular breeding of new varieties. The large-scale gene functional analysis in cotton has been lagged behind most of the modern plant species, likely due to its large size of genome, gene duplication and polyploidy, long growth cycle and recalcitrance to genetic transformation(1). To facilitate high throughput functional genetic/genomic study in cotton, we attempt to develop rapid and efficient transient assays to assess cotton gene functions. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technique that was developed based on the host Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing (PTGS) to repress viral proliferation(2,3). Agrobacterium-mediated VIGS has been successfully applied in a wide range of dicots species such as Solanaceae, Arabidopsis and legume species, and monocots species including barley, wheat and maize, for various functional genomic studies(3,4). As this rapid and efficient approach avoids plant transformation and overcomes functional redundancy, it is particularly attractive and suitable for functional genomic study in crop species like cotton not amenable for transformation. In this study, we report the detailed protocol of Agrobacterium-mediated VIGS system in cotton. Among the several viral VIGS vectors, the tobacco rattle virus (TRV) invades a wide range of hosts and is able to spread vigorously throughout the entire plant yet produce mild symptoms on the hosts5. To monitor the silencing efficiency, GrCLA1, a homolog gene of Arabidopsis Cloroplastos alterados 1 gene (AtCLA1) in cotton, has been cloned and inserted into the VIGS binary vector pYL156. CLA1 gene is involved in chloroplast development(6), and previous studies have shown that loss-of-function of AtCLA1 resulted in an albino phenotype on true leaves(7), providing an excellent visual marker for silencing efficiency. At approximately two weeks post Agrobacterium infiltration

  1. Patented applications of gene silencing in plants: manipulation of traits and phytopathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Fernandez, Ruben

    2010-11-01

    RNA silencing is the name of a broad family of phenomena including RNA interference (RNAi) in animals and basal eukaryotes, quelling in fungi and posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in plants. PTGS is a fertile research field and since its discovery many applications have been developed related to plant breeding. This minireview summarizes those patents which apply engineered gene silencing to specific problems. The range of inventions is divided in two main sections: manipulation of traits and resistance to phytopathogens and pests. Subtopics like manipulation of tolerances to abiotic stress, alteration of lignin, biofactories, alkaloids biosynthesis and flowering time fall within the first section, and introduction of resistances to insects, nematodes, bacteria, virus and fungi can be found within the second one.

  2. A high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing protocol identifies genes involved in multi-stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the function of a particular gene under various stresses is important for engineering plants for broad-spectrum stress tolerance. Although virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been used to characterize genes involved in abiotic stress tolerance, currently available gene silencing and stress imposition methodology at the whole plant level is not suitable for high-throughput functional analyses of genes. This demands a robust and reliable methodology for characterizing genes involved in abiotic and multi-stress tolerance. Results Our methodology employs VIGS-based gene silencing in leaf disks combined with simple stress imposition and effect quantification methodologies for easy and faster characterization of genes involved in abiotic and multi-stress tolerance. By subjecting leaf disks from gene-silenced plants to various abiotic stresses and inoculating silenced plants with various pathogens, we show the involvement of several genes for multi-stress tolerance. In addition, we demonstrate that VIGS can be used to characterize genes involved in thermotolerance. Our results also showed the functional relevance of NtEDS1 in abiotic stress, NbRBX1 and NbCTR1 in oxidative stress; NtRAR1 and NtNPR1 in salinity stress; NbSOS1 and NbHSP101 in biotic stress; and NtEDS1, NbETR1, NbWRKY2 and NbMYC2 in thermotolerance. Conclusions In addition to widening the application of VIGS, we developed a robust, easy and high-throughput methodology for functional characterization of genes involved in multi-stress tolerance. PMID:24289810

  3. A high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing protocol identifies genes involved in multi-stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Senthil-kumar, Muthappa; Udayakumar, Makarla; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the function of a particular gene under various stresses is important for engineering plants for broad-spectrum stress tolerance. Although virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been used to characterize genes involved in abiotic stress tolerance, currently available gene silencing and stress imposition methodology at the whole plant level is not suitable for high-throughput functional analyses of genes. This demands a robust and reliable methodology for characterizing genes involved in abiotic and multi-stress tolerance. Our methodology employs VIGS-based gene silencing in leaf disks combined with simple stress imposition and effect quantification methodologies for easy and faster characterization of genes involved in abiotic and multi-stress tolerance. By subjecting leaf disks from gene-silenced plants to various abiotic stresses and inoculating silenced plants with various pathogens, we show the involvement of several genes for multi-stress tolerance. In addition, we demonstrate that VIGS can be used to characterize genes involved in thermotolerance. Our results also showed the functional relevance of NtEDS1 in abiotic stress, NbRBX1 and NbCTR1 in oxidative stress; NtRAR1 and NtNPR1 in salinity stress; NbSOS1 and NbHSP101 in biotic stress; and NtEDS1, NbETR1, NbWRKY2 and NbMYC2 in thermotolerance. In addition to widening the application of VIGS, we developed a robust, easy and high-throughput methodology for functional characterization of genes involved in multi-stress tolerance.

  4. RNA interference as a gene silencing tool to control Tuta absoluta in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Camargo, Roberto A; Barbosa, Guilherme O; Possignolo, Isabella Presotto; Peres, Lazaro E P; Lam, Eric; Lima, Joni E; Figueira, Antonio; Marques-Souza, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), a gene-silencing mechanism that involves providing double-stranded RNA molecules that match a specific target gene sequence, is now widely used in functional genetic studies. The potential application of RNAi-mediated control of agricultural insect pests has rapidly become evident. The production of transgenic plants expressing dsRNA molecules that target essential insect genes could provide a means of specific gene silencing in larvae that feed on these plants, resulting in larval phenotypes that range from loss of appetite to death. In this report, we show that the tomato leafminer ( Tuta absoluta ), a major threat to commercial tomato production, can be targeted by RNAi. We selected two target genes (Vacuolar ATPase-A and Arginine kinase) based on the RNAi response reported for these genes in other pest species. In view of the lack of an artificial diet for T. absoluta, we used two approaches to deliver dsRNA into tomato leaflets. The first approach was based on the uptake of dsRNA by leaflets and the second was based on "in planta-induced transient gene silencing" (PITGS), a well-established method for silencing plant genes, used here for the first time to deliver in planta-transcribed dsRNA to target insect genes. Tuta absoluta larvae that fed on leaves containing dsRNA of the target genes showed an ∼60% reduction in target gene transcript accumulation, an increase in larval mortality and less leaf damage. We then generated transgenic 'Micro-Tom' tomato plants that expressed hairpin sequences for both genes and observed a reduction in foliar damage by T. absoluta in these plants. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of RNAi as an alternative method for controlling this critical tomato pest.

  5. Identification of promising host-induced silencing targets among genes preferentially transcribed in haustoria of Puccinia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chuntao; Downey, Samantha I; Klages-Mundt, Naeh L; Ramachandran, Sowmya; Chen, Xianming; Szabo, Les J; Pumphrey, Michael; Hulbert, Scot H

    2015-08-05

    The cereal rust fungi are destructive pathogens that affect grain production worldwide. Although the genomic and transcript sequences for three Puccinia species that attack wheat have been released, the functions of large repertories of genes from Puccinia still need to be addressed to understand the infection process of these obligate parasites. Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) has emerged a useful tool to examine the importance of rust fungus genes while growing within host plants. In this study, HIGS was used to test genes from Puccinia with transcripts enriched in haustoria for their ability to interfere with full development of the rust fungi. Approximately 1200 haustoria enriched genes from Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) were identified by comparative RNA sequencing. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) constructs with fragments of 86 Puccinia genes, were tested for their ability to interfere with full development of these rust fungi. Most of the genes tested had no noticeable effects, but 10 reduced Pgt development after co-inoculation with the gene VIGS constructs and Pgt. These included a predicted glycolytic enzyme, two other proteins that are probably secreted and involved in carbohydrate or sugar metabolism, a protein involved in thiazol biosynthesis, a protein involved in auxin biosynthesis, an amino acid permease, two hypothetical proteins with no conserved domains, a predicted small secreted protein and another protein predicted to be secreted with similarity to bacterial proteins involved in membrane transport. Transient silencing of four of these genes reduced development of P. striiformis (Pst), and three of also caused reduction of P. triticina (Pt) development. Partial suppression of transcripts involved in a large variety of biological processes in haustoria cells of Puccinia rusts can disrupt their development. Silencing of three genes resulted in suppression of all three rust diseases indicating that it may be possible to engineer

  6. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana. PMID:27493613

  7. Transcriptome analyses and virus induced gene silencing identify genes in the Rpp4-mediated Asian soybean rust resistance pathway

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rpp4 (Resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi 4) confers resistance to P. pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust (ASR). By combining expression profiling and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS), we are developing a genetic framework for Rpp4-mediated resistance. We measured gene expression i...

  8. Modification of Seed Oil Composition in Arabidopsis by Artificial microRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Belide, Srinivas; Petrie, James Robertson; Shrestha, Pushkar; Singh, Surinder Pal

    2012-01-01

    Various post transcriptional gene silencing strategies have been developed and exploited to study gene function or engineer disease resistance. The recently developed artificial microRNA strategy is an alternative method of effectively silencing target genes. The Δ12-desaturase (FAD2), Fatty acid elongase (FAE1), and Fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase B (FATB) were targeted with amiR159b-based constructs in Arabidopsisthaliana to evaluate changes in oil composition when expressed with the seed-specific Brassica napus truncated napin (FP1) promoter. Fatty acid profiles from transgenic homozygous seeds reveal that the targeted genes were silenced. The down-regulation of the AtFAD-2 gene substantially increased oleic acid from the normal levels of ∼15% to as high as 63.3 and reduced total PUFA content (18:2(Δ9,12) + 18:3(Δ9,12,15) + 20:2(Δ11,14) + 20:3(Δ11,14,17)) from 46.8 to 4.8%. Δ12-desaturase activity was reduced to levels as low as those in the null fad-2-1 and fad-2-2 mutants. Silencing of the FAE1 gene resulted in the reduction of eicosenoic acid (20:1(Δ11)) to 1.9 from 15.4% and silencing of FATB resulted in the reduction of palmitic acid (16:0) to 4.4% from 8.0%. Reduction in FATB activity is comparable with a FATB knock-out mutant. These results demonstrate for the first time amiR159b constructs targeted against three endogenous seed-expressed genes are clearly able to down-regulate and generate genotypic changes that are inherited stably over three generations.

  9. Modification of Seed Oil Composition in Arabidopsis by Artificial microRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Belide, Srinivas; Petrie, James Robertson; Shrestha, Pushkar; Singh, Surinder Pal

    2012-01-01

    Various post transcriptional gene silencing strategies have been developed and exploited to study gene function or engineer disease resistance. The recently developed artificial microRNA strategy is an alternative method of effectively silencing target genes. The Δ12-desaturase (FAD2), Fatty acid elongase (FAE1), and Fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase B (FATB) were targeted with amiR159b-based constructs in Arabidopsis thaliana to evaluate changes in oil composition when expressed with the seed-specific Brassica napus truncated napin (FP1) promoter. Fatty acid profiles from transgenic homozygous seeds reveal that the targeted genes were silenced. The down-regulation of the AtFAD-2 gene substantially increased oleic acid from the normal levels of ∼15% to as high as 63.3 and reduced total PUFA content (18:2Δ9,12 + 18:3Δ9,12,15 + 20:2Δ11,14 + 20:3Δ11,14,17) from 46.8 to 4.8%. Δ12-desaturase activity was reduced to levels as low as those in the null fad-2-1 and fad-2-2 mutants. Silencing of the FAE1 gene resulted in the reduction of eicosenoic acid (20:1Δ11) to 1.9 from 15.4% and silencing of FATB resulted in the reduction of palmitic acid (16:0) to 4.4% from 8.0%. Reduction in FATB activity is comparable with a FATB knock-out mutant. These results demonstrate for the first time amiR159b constructs targeted against three endogenous seed-expressed genes are clearly able to down-regulate and generate genotypic changes that are inherited stably over three generations. PMID:22866055

  10. High molecular weight RNAs and small interfering RNAs induce systemic posttranscriptional gene silencing in plants

    PubMed Central

    Klahre, Ulrich; Crété, Patrice; Leuenberger, Sabrina A.; Iglesias, Victor A.; Meins, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in transgenic plants is an epigenetic form of RNA degradation related to PTGS and RNA interference (RNAi) in fungi and animals. Evidence suggests that transgene loci and RNA viruses can generate double-stranded RNAs similar in sequence to the transcribed region of target genes, which then undergo endonucleolytic cleavage to generate small interfering RNAs (siRNA) that promote degradation of cognate RNAs. The silent state in transgenic plants and in Caenorhabditis elegans can spread systemically, implying that mobile silencing signals exist. Neither the chemical nature of these signals nor their exact source in the PTGS pathway is known. Here, we use a positive marker system and real-time monitoring of green fluorescent protein expression to show that large sense, antisense, and double-stranded RNAs as well as double-stranded siRNAs delivered biolistically into plant cells trigger silencing capable of spreading locally and systemically. Systemically silenced leaves show greatly reduced levels of target RNA and accumulate siRNAs, confirming that RNA can induce systemic PTGS. The induced siRNAs represent parts of the target RNA that are outside of the region of homology with the triggering siRNA. Our results imply that siRNAs themselves or intermediates induced by siRNAs could comprise silencing signals and that these signals induce self-amplifying production of siRNAs. PMID:12181491

  11. Virus-induced multiple gene silencing to study redundant metabolic pathways in plants: silencing the starch degradation pathway in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    George, Gavin M; Bauer, Rolene; Blennow, Andreas; Kossmann, Jens; Lloyd, James R

    2012-07-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a rapid technique that allows for specific and reproducible post-transcriptional degradation of targeted mRNA. The method has been proven efficient for suppression of expression of many single enzymes. The metabolic networks of plants, however, often contain isoenzymes and gene families that are able to compensate for a mutation and mask the development of a silencing phenotype. Here, we show the application of multiple gene VIGS repression for the study of these redundant biological pathways. Several genes in the starch degradation pathway [disproportionating enzyme 1; (DPE1), disproportionating enzyme 2 (DPE2), and GWD] were silenced. The functionally distinct DPE enzymes are present in alternate routes for sugar export to the cytoplasm and result in an increase in starch production when silenced individually. Simultaneous silencing of DPE1 and DPE2 in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in a near complete suppression in starch and accumulation of malto-oligosaccharides. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The Silencing of CCND2 by Promoter Aberrant Methylation in Renal Cell Cancer and Analysis of the Correlation between CCND2 Methylation Status and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Cui, Yun; Zhang, Lian; Sheng, Jindong; Yang, Yang; Kuang, Guanyu; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Qian; Jin, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D2 (CCND2) is a member of the D-type cyclins, which plays a pivotal role in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and malignant transformation. However, its expression status and relative regulation mechanism remains unclear in renal cell cancer (RCC). In our study, the mRNA expression level of CCND2 is down-regulated in 22/23 paired RCC tissues (p<0.05). In addition, its protein expression level is also decreased in 43/43 RCC tumor tissues compared with its corresponding non-malignant tissues (p<0.001). We further detected that CCND2 was down-regulated or silenced in 6/7 RCC cell lines, but expressed in “normal” human proximal tubular (HK-2) cell line. Subsequently, MSP and BGS results showed that the methylation status in CCND2 promoter region is closely associated with its expression level in RCC cell lines. Treatment with 5-Aza with or without TSA restored CCND2 expression in several methylated RCC cell lines. Among the 102 RCC tumors, methylation of CCND2 was detected in 29/102 (28%) cases. Only 2/23 (8.7%) adjacent non-malignant tissues showed methylation. We then analyzed the correlation of clinical features and its promoter methylation. Collectively, our data suggested that loss of CCND2 expression is closely associated with the promoter aberrant methylation. PMID:27583477

  13. Systematic knockdown of morphine pathway enzymes in opium poppy using virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Wijekoon, Champa P; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-03-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) remains the sole commercial source for several pharmaceutical alkaloids including the narcotic analgesics codeine and morphine, and the semi-synthetic drugs oxycodone, buprenorphine and naltrexone. Although most of the biosynthetic genes have been identified, the post-transcriptional regulation of the morphinan alkaloid pathway has not been determined. We have used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) as a functional genomics tool to investigate the regulation of morphine biosynthesis via a systematic reduction in enzyme levels responsible for the final six steps in the pathway. Specific gene silencing was confirmed at the transcript level by real-time quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction), and at the protein level by immunoblot analysis using antibodies raised against salutaridine synthase (SalSyn), salutaridine reductase (SalR), salutaridine 7-O-acetyltransferase (SalAT), thebaine 6-O-demethylase (T6ODM), codeinone reductase (COR), and codeine O-demethylase (CODM). In some cases, silencing a specific biosynthetic gene resulted in a predictable accumulation of the substrate for the corresponding enzyme. Reduced SalSyn, SalR, T6ODM and CODM protein levels correlated with lower morphine levels and a substantial increase in the accumulation of reticuline, salutaridine, thebaine and codeine, respectively. In contrast, the silencing of genes encoding SalAT and COR resulted in the accumulation of salutaridine and reticuline, respectively, which are not the corresponding enzymatic substrates. The silencing of alkaloid biosynthetic genes using VIGS confirms the physiological function of enzymes previously characterized in vitro, provides insight into the biochemical regulation of morphine biosynthesis, and demonstrates the immense potential for metabolic engineering in opium poppy.

  14. A key role for EZH2 in epigenetic silencing of HOX genes in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kanduri, Meena; Sander, Birgitta; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Papakonstantinou, Nikos; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar; Rosenquist, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The chromatin modifier EZH2 is overexpressed and associated with inferior outcome in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Recently, we demonstrated preferential DNA methylation of HOX genes in MCL compared with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), despite these genes not being expressed in either entity. Since EZH2 has been shown to regulate HOX gene expression, to gain further insight into its possible role in differential silencing of HOX genes in MCL vs. CLL, we performed detailed epigenetic characterization using representative cell lines and primary samples. We observed significant overexpression of EZH2 in MCL vs. CLL. Chromatin immune precipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that EZH2 catalyzed repressive H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), which was sufficient to silence HOX genes in CLL, whereas in MCL H3K27me3 is accompanied by DNA methylation for a more stable repression. More importantly, hypermethylation of the HOX genes in MCL resulted from EZH2 overexpression and subsequent recruitment of the DNA methylation machinery onto HOX gene promoters. The importance of EZH2 upregulation in this process was further underscored by siRNA transfection and EZH2 inhibitor experiments. Altogether, these observations implicate EZH2 in the long-term silencing of HOX genes in MCL, and allude to its potential as a therapeutic target with clinical impact.

  15. Host-Induced Silencing of Pathogenicity Genes Enhances Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum Wilt in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Poonam; Jyoti, Poonam; Kapoor, Priya; Sharma, Vandana; Shanmugam, V; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a novel approach of controlling vascular wilt in tomato by RNAi expression directed to pathogenicity genes of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Vascular wilt of tomato caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici leads to qualitative and quantitative loss of the crop. Limitation in the existing control measures necessitates the development of alternative strategies to increase resistance in the plants against pathogens. Recent findings paved way to RNAi, as a promising method for silencing of pathogenicity genes in fungus and provided effective resistance against fungal pathogens. Here, two important pathogenicity genes FOW2, a Zn(II)2Cys6 family putative transcription regulator, and chsV, a putative myosin motor and a chitin synthase domain, were used for host-induced gene silencing through hairpinRNA cassettes of these genes against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. HairpinRNAs were assembled in appropriate binary vectors and transformed into tomato plant targeting FOW2 and chsV genes, for two highly pathogenic strains of Fusarium oxysporum viz. TOFOL-IHBT and TOFOL-IVRI. Transgenic tomatoes were analyzed for possible attainment of resistance in transgenic lines against fungal infection. Eight transgenic lines expressing hairpinRNA cassettes showed trivial disease symptoms after 6-8 weeks of infection. Hence, the host-induced posttranscriptional gene silencing of pathogenicity genes in transgenic tomato plants has enhanced their resistance to vascular wilt disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum.

  16. DNA-intercalators Causing Rapid Re-expression of Methylated and Silenced Genes in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Zulfiquer; Healey, Megan A.; Lee, Calvin; Poh, Weijie; Yerram, Sashidhar R.; Patel, Kalpesh; Azad, Nilofer S.; Herman, James G.; Kern, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic inactivation of tumor-suppressor and other regulatory genes plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Transcriptional silencing is often maintained by DNA methyl transferase (DNMT)-mediated hypermethylation of CpG islands in promoter DNA. Nucleoside analogs including azacytidine and decitabine have been used to inhibit DNMT and re-activate genes, and are clinically used. Their shortcomings include a short half-life and a slow onset of action due to required nucleotide incorporation during DNA replication, which may limit clinical utility. It might be useful to begin to identify lead compounds having novel properties, specifically distinct and fast-acting gene desilencing. We previously identified chemicals augmenting gene expression in multiple reporter systems. We now report that a subset of these compounds that includes quinacrine re-expresses epigenetically silenced genes implicated in carcinogenesis. p16, TFPI2, the cadherins E-cadherin and CDH13, and the secreted frizzle-related proteins (SFRPs) SFRP1 and SFRP5 were desilenced in cancer cell lines. These lead compounds were fast-acting: re-expression occurred by 12-24 hours. Reactivation of silenced genes was accompanied by depletion of DNMT1 at the promoters of activated genes and demethylation of DNA. A model compound, 5175328, induced changes more rapidly than decitabine. These gene desilencing agents belonged to a class of acridine compounds, intercalated into DNA, and inhibited DNMT1 activity in vitro. Although to define the mechanism would be outside the scope of this initial report, this class may re-activate silenced genes in part by intercalating into DNA and subsequently inhibiting full DNMT1 activity. Rapid mechanisms for chemical desilencing of methylated genes therefore exist. PMID:23593653

  17. Gene Silencing in Adult Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes Through Oral Delivery of Double-Stranded RNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    inspired by the success of Remebee in targeting the virus impli- cated in colony collapse disorder in honeybees (Maori et al. 2009; Hunter et al. 2010...invasive method for silencing gene transcription in honeybees maintained under natural conditions. Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 39, 157–160. Patrick ML

  18. Gene silencing associated with SWI/SNF complex loss during NSCLC development.

    PubMed

    Song, Shujie; Walter, Vonn; Karaca, Mehmet; Li, Ying; Bartlett, Christopher S; Smiraglia, Dominic J; Serber, Daniel; Sproul, Christopher D; Plass, Christoph; Zhang, Jiren; Hayes, D Neil; Zheng, Yanfang; Weissman, Bernard E

    2014-04-01

    The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex regulates gene expression and alters chromatin structures in an ATP-dependent manner. Recent sequencing efforts have shown mutations in BRG1 (SMARCA4), one of two mutually exclusive ATPase subunits in the complex, in a significant number of human lung tumor cell lines and primary non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) clinical specimens. To determine how BRG1 loss fuels tumor progression in NSCLC, molecular profiling was performed after restoration of BRG1 expression or treatment with a histone deacetylase inhibitor or a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor in a BRG1-deficient NSCLC cells. Importantly, validation studies from multiple cell lines revealed that BRG1 reexpression led to substantial changes in the expression of CDH1, CDH3, EHF, and RRAD that commonly undergo silencing by other epigenetic mechanisms during NSCLC development. Furthermore, treatment with DNMT inhibitors did not restore expression of these transcripts, indicating that this common mechanism of gene silencing did not account for their loss of expression. Collectively, BRG1 loss is an important mechanism for the epigenetic silencing of target genes during NSCLC development. Inactivation of the SWI/SNF complex provides a novel mechanism to induce gene silencing during NSCLC development. Mol Cancer Res; 12(4); 560-70. ©2014 AACR.

  19. RNAi-mediated gene silencing as a principle of action of venoms and poisons.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tiago Campos; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural phenomenon in which double-stranded RNA molecules (dsRNAs) promote silencing of genes with similar sequence. It is noteworthy that in some instances the effects of gene silencing are similar to those caused by venoms and natural poisons (e.g., hemorrhage and low blood pressure). This observation raises the possibility that venomous/poisonous species in fact produce dsRNAs in their venoms/poisons and leading to the deleterious effects in the victim by RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Two approaches could be used to test this hypothesis, first, the neutralization of the dsRNAs and comparing to a non-treated venom sample; and second, to identify the dsRNA present in the venom and attempt to artificially reproduce its effects in the laboratory. In addition, we present three innovative treatment strategies for accidental interactions with venomous or poisonous species. RNAi has several roles in biological systems: gene regulation, antiviral defense, transposon silencing and heterochromatin formation. The hypothesis presented here provides a new role: a natural attack mechanism.

  20. Protective effect of caffeine against high sugar-induced transcription of microRNAs and consequent gene silencing: A study using lenses of galactosemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kovtun, Svitlana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have shown that caffeine prevents the formation of cataracts induced by a high-galactose diet and consequent oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate if this protective effect is reflected in the attenuation of the transcription of microRNAs (miRNAs) known to induce apoptosis and cell death by gene silencing. Methods Young CD-1 mice were fed either a normal laboratory diet or a diet containing 25% galactose with or without 1% caffeine. One week later, the animals were euthanized, and the lenses isolated and promptly processed for RNA isolation and subsequent preparation of cDNAs by reverse transcriptase reaction. Mature miRNA (miR)-specific cDNAs were then quantified with PCR in a 96-well microRNA-specific cassette using an ABI7900HT PCR machine. Results As expected from previous studies, the lenses were positive for all 84 miRs corresponding to the miRNA probes present in the cassette wells. However, the levels of at least 19 miRs were significantly elevated in galactosemic lenses compared to those in the normal lenses. The majority are proapoptotic. Such elevation was inhibited by caffeine. This has been demonstrated for the first time. Conclusions Since aberrant elevation of miRNAs silences various genes and consequently deactivates protein translation, and since caffeine downregulates such aberration, the beneficial effect of caffeine could be attributed to its ability to suppress elevation of toxic miRs and consequent gene silencing. PMID:23441122

  1. Deciphering causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions in NCI-60 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer cells harbor a large number of molecular alterations such as mutations, amplifications and deletions on DNA sequences and epigenetic changes on DNA methylations. These aberrations may dysregulate gene expressions, which in turn drive the malignancy of tumors. Deciphering the causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms of clinical phenotypes. Results In this work, we proposed a computational method to reconstruct association modules containing driver aberrations, passenger mRNA or microRNA expressions, and putative regulators that mediate the effects from drivers to passengers. By applying the module-finding algorithm to the integrated datasets of NCI-60 cancer cell lines, we found that gene expressions were driven by diverse molecular aberrations including chromosomal segments' copy number variations, gene mutations and DNA methylations, microRNA expressions, and the expressions of transcription factors. In-silico validation indicated that passenger genes were enriched with the regulator binding motifs, functional categories or pathways where the drivers were involved, and co-citations with the driver/regulator genes. Moreover, 6 of 11 predicted MYB targets were down-regulated in an MYB-siRNA treated leukemia cell line. In addition, microRNA expressions were driven by distinct mechanisms from mRNA expressions. Conclusions The results provide rich mechanistic information regarding molecular aberrations and gene expressions in cancer genomes. This kind of integrative analysis will become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in the era of personalized medicine. PMID:22051105

  2. Templated assembly of albumin-based nanoparticles for simultaneous gene silencing and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Damien; Affolter-Zbaraszczuk, Christine; Barthès, Julien; Cui, Jiwei; Caruso, Frank; Baumert, Thomas F; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Ogier, Joelle; Meyer, Florent

    2014-10-21

    In this article, we address the design of innovative human serum albumin (HSA)-based nanoparticles loaded with silencing RNA and grafted with gadolinium complexes having average sizes ranging from ca. 50 to 150 nm according to the siRNA/HSA composition. The non-covalent siRNA/HSA assembly is formed on isobutyramide-modified mesoporous silica and the self-supported HSA-based nanoparticles are obtained following the silica template dissolution. These original protein particles provide simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and cellular in vitro gene silencing.

  3. Gene silencing using a heat-inducible RNAi system in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Masclaux, Frédéric; Charpenteau, Martine; Takahashi, Taku; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Galaud, Jean-Philippe

    2004-08-20

    Controlling gene expression during plant development is an efficient tool to explore gene function. In this paper, we describe a gene expression system driven by a heat-shock gene promoter (HSP18.2), to trigger the expression of an intron-containing inverted-repeat. RNA interference became a powerful way for gene functional analysis by reverse genetic approaches. However, constitutive gene silencing cannot be used with genes involved in fundamental processes such as embryo viability. Inducible promoters provide an alternative approach for temporal and spatial gene expression control and we described here a new system, complementary to those using chemical gene inducers. To evaluate the efficiency of this system, RNA corresponding to the phytoene desaturase gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was used as a reporter gene in transgenic plants and a comparative study was performed using either the CaMV35S constitutive promoter or the HSP18.2 inducible promoter.

  4. Development and application of an efficient virus-induced gene silencing system in Nicotiana tabacum using geminivirus alphasatellite*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chang-jun; Zhang, Tong; Li, Fang-fang; Zhang, Xin-yue; Zhou, Xue-ping

    2011-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed technique for characterizing the function of plant genes by gene transcript suppression and is increasingly used to generate transient loss-of-function assays. Here we report that the 2mDNA1, a geminivirus satellite vector, can induce efficient gene silencing in Nicotiana tabacum with Tobacco curly shoot virus. We have successfully silenced the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene in GUS transgenic N. tabacum plants and the sulphur desaturase (Su) gene in five different N. tabacum cultivars. These pronounced and severe silencing phenotypes are persistent and ubiquitous. Once initiated in seedlings, the silencing phenotype lasted for the entire life span of the plants and silencing could be induced in a variety of tissues and organs including leaf, shoot, stem, root, and flower, and achieved at any growth stage. This system works well between 18–32 °C. We also silenced the NtEDS1 gene and demonstrated that NtEDS1 is essential for N gene mediated resistance against Tobacco mosaic virus in N. tabacum. The above results indicate that this system has great potential as a versatile VIGS system for routine functional analysis of genes in N. tabacum. PMID:21265040

  5. Role of Arabidopsis AGO6 in siRNA accumulation, DNA methylation and transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xianwu; Zhu, Jianhua; Kapoor, Avnish; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2007-01-01

    Argonautes (AGOs) are conserved proteins that contain an RNA-binding PAZ domain and an RNase H-like PIWI domain. In Arabidopsis, except for AGO1, AGO4 and AGO7, the roles of seven other AGOs in gene silencing are not known. We found that a mutation in AGO6 partially suppresses transcriptional gene silencing in the DNA demethylase mutant ros1-1. In ago6-1ros1-1 plants, RD29A promoter short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are less abundant, and cytosine methylation at both transgenic and endogenous RD29A promoters is reduced, compared to that in ros1-1. Interestingly, the ago4-1 mutation has a stronger suppression of the transcriptional silencing phenotype of ros1-1 mutant. Analysis of cytosine methylation at the endogenous MEA-ISR, AtREP2 and SIMPLEHAT2 loci revealed that the CpNpG and asymmetric methylation levels are lower in either of the ago6-1 and ago4-1 single mutants than those in the wild type, and the levels are the lowest in the ago6-1ago4-1 double mutant. These results suggest that AGO6 is important for the accumulation of specific heterochromatin-related siRNAs, and for DNA methylation and transcriptional gene silencing, this function is partly redundant with AGO4. PMID:17332757

  6. RNA Quality Control as a Key to Suppressing RNA Silencing of Endogenous Genes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    RNA quality control of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of eukaryotic gene expression and often relies on exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional transcripts. In parallel, exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs are degraded through RNA silencing, which is a genome defense mechanism used by many eukaryotes. In plants, RNA silencing is triggered by the production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASEs (RDRs) and proceeds through small interfering (si) RNA-directed, ARGONAUTE (AGO)-mediated cleavage of homologous transcripts. Many studies revealed that plants avert inappropriate PTGS of endogenous coding genes by using RNA surveillance mechanisms as a safeguard to protect their transcriptome. The tug-of-war between RNA surveillance and RNA silencing ensures the appropriate partitioning of endogenous RNA substrates among these degradation pathways. Here we review recent advances on RNA quality control and its role in the suppression of RNA silencing at endogenous genes and discuss the mechanisms underlying the crosstalk among these pathways. PMID:27045817

  7. Graft-accelerated virus-induced gene silencing facilitates functional genomics in rose flowers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huijun; Shi, Shaochuan; Ma, Nan; Cao, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Hao; Qiu, Xianqin; Wang, Qigang; Jian, Hongying; Zhou, Ningning; Zhang, Zhao; Tang, Kaixue

    2017-09-12

    Rose has emerged as a model ornamental plant for studies of flower development, senescence, and morphology, as well as the metabolism of floral fragrances and colors. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has long since been used in functional genomics studies of rose by vacuum infiltration of cuttings or seedlings with an Agrobacterium suspension carrying TRV-derived vectors. However, VIGS in rose flowers remains a challenge because of its low efficiency and long time to silencing. Here we present a novel and rapid VIGS method that can be used to analyze gene function in rose, called 'graft-accelerated VIGS', where axillary sprouts are cut off the rose plant and vacuum infiltrated with Agrobacterium. The inoculated scions are then grafted back onto the plants to flower and silencing phenotypes can be observed within five weeks post infiltration. Using this new method, we successfully silenced the expression of the RhDFR1, RhAG, and RhNUDX1 in rose flowers, and affected their color, petal number, as well as fragrance, respectively. This grafting method will facilitate high-throughput functional analysis of genes in rose flowers. Importantly, it may also be applied to other woody species that are not currently amenable to VIGS by conventional leaf or plantlet/seedling infiltration methods. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. TMV induces RNA decay pathways to modulate gene silencing and disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Conti, Gabriela; Zavallo, Diego; Venturuzzi, Andrea L; Rodriguez, Maria C; Crespi, Martin; Asurmendi, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    RNA decay pathways comprise a combination of RNA degradation mechanisms that are implicated in gene expression, development and defense responses in eukaryotes. These mechanisms are known as the RNA Quality Control or RQC pathways. In plants, another important RNA degradation mechanism is the post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mediated by small RNAs (siRNAs). Notably, the RQC pathway antagonizes PTGS by preventing the entry of dysfunctional mRNAs into the silencing pathway to avoid global degradation of mRNA by siRNAs. Viral transcripts must evade RNA degrading mechanisms, thus viruses encode PTGS suppressor proteins to counteract viral RNA silencing. Here, we demonstrate that tobacco plants infected with TMV and transgenic lines expressing TMV MP and CP (coat protein) proteins (which are not linked to the suppression of silencing) display increased transcriptional levels of RNA decay genes. These plants also showed accumulation of cytoplasmic RNA granules with altered structure, increased rates of RNA decay for transgenes and defective transgene PTGS amplification. Furthermore, knockdown of RRP41 or RRP43 RNA exosome components led to lower levels of TMV accumulation with milder symptoms after infection, several developmental defects and miRNA deregulation. Thus, we propose that TMV proteins induce RNA decay pathways (in particular exosome components) to impair antiviral PTGS and this defensive mechanism would constitute an additional counter-defense strategy that lead to disease symptoms. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Aquaporin-4 gene silencing protects injured neurons after early cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhan-ping; Lu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 regulates water molecule channels and is important in tissue regulation and water transportation in the brain. Upregulation of aquaporin-4 expression is closely related to cellular edema after early cerebral infarction. Cellular edema and aquaporin-4 expression can be determined by measuring cerebral infarct area and apparent diffusion coefficient using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). We examined the effects of silencing aquaporin-4 on cerebral infarction. Rat models of cerebral infarction were established by occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery and siRNA-aquaporin-4 was immediately injected via the right basal ganglia. In control animals, the area of high signal intensity and relative apparent diffusion coefficient value on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and DWI gradually increased within 0.5–6 hours after cerebral infarction. After aquaporin-4 gene silencing, the area of high signal intensity on T2WI and DWI reduced, relative apparent diffusion coefficient value was increased, and cellular edema was obviously alleviated. At 6 hours after cerebral infarction, the apparent diffusion coefficient value was similar between treatment and model groups, but angioedema was still obvious in the treatment group. These results indicate that aquaporin-4 gene silencing can effectively relieve cellular edema after early cerebral infarction; and when conducted accurately and on time, the diffusion coefficient value and the area of high signal intensity on T2WI and DWI can reflect therapeutic effects of aquaporin-4 gene silencing on cellular edema. PMID:26330830

  10. Transcriptional gene silencing by Arabidopsis microrchidia homologues involves the formation of heteromers.

    PubMed

    Moissiard, Guillaume; Bischof, Sylvain; Husmann, Dylan; Pastor, William A; Hale, Christopher J; Yen, Linda; Stroud, Hume; Papikian, Ashot; Vashisht, Ajay A; Wohlschlegel, James A; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2014-05-20

    Epigenetic gene silencing is of central importance to maintain genome integrity and is mediated by an elaborate interplay between DNA methylation, histone posttranslational modifications, and chromatin remodeling complexes. DNA methylation and repressive histone marks usually correlate with transcriptionally silent heterochromatin, however there are exceptions to this relationship. In Arabidopsis, mutation of Morpheus Molecule 1 (MOM1) causes transcriptional derepression of heterochromatin independently of changes in DNA methylation. More recently, two Arabidopsis homologues of mouse microrchidia (MORC) genes have also been implicated in gene silencing and heterochromatin condensation without altering genome-wide DNA methylation patterns. In this study, we show that Arabidopsis microrchidia (AtMORC6) physically interacts with AtMORC1 and with its close homologue, AtMORC2, in two mutually exclusive protein complexes. RNA-sequencing analyses of high-order mutants indicate that AtMORC1 and AtMORC2 act redundantly to repress a common set of loci. We also examined genetic interactions between AtMORC6 and MOM1 pathways. Although AtMORC6 and MOM1 control the silencing of a very similar set of genomic loci, we observed synergistic transcriptional regulation in the mom1/atmorc6 double mutant, suggesting that these epigenetic regulators act mainly by different silencing mechanisms.

  11. A functional genomics method for assaying gene function in phytopathogenic fungi through host-induced gene silencing mediated by agroinfiltration.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Vinay; McCallum, Brent; Bakkeren, Guus

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid growth of genomic information, there is an increasing demand for efficient analysis tools to study the function of predicted genes coded in genomes. Agroinfiltration, the delivery of gene constructs into plant cells by Agrobacterium tumefaciens infiltrated into leaves, is one such versatile, simple, and rapid technique that is increasingly used for transient gene expression assay in plants. In this chapter, we focus on the use of agroinfiltration as a functional genomics research tool in molecular plant pathology. Specifically, we describe in detail its use in expressing phytopathogenic fungal gene sequences in a host plant to induce RNA silencing of corresponding genes inside the pathogen, a method which has been termed host-induced gene silencing (HIGS). We target the fungal pathogen Puccinia triticina which causes leaf rust on its wheat host, but the method is applicable to a variety of pathosystems.

  12. Silencing of Essential Genes within a Highly Coordinated Operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goh, Shan; Hohmeier, Angela; Stone, Timothy C; Offord, Victoria; Sarabia, Francisco; Garcia-Ruiz, Cristina; Good, Liam

    2015-08-15

    Essential bacterial genes located within operons are particularly challenging to study independently because of coordinated gene expression and the nonviability of knockout mutants. Essentiality scores for many operon genes remain uncertain. Antisense RNA (asRNA) silencing or in-frame gene disruption of genes may help establish essentiality but can lead to polar effects on genes downstream or upstream of the target gene. Here, the Escherichia coli ribF-ileS-lspA-fkpB-ispH operon was used to evaluate the possibility of independently studying an essential gene using expressed asRNA and target gene overexpression to deregulate coupled expression. The gene requirement for growth in conditional silencing strains was determined by the relationship of target mRNA reduction with growth inhibition as the minimum transcript level required for 50% growth (MTL50). Mupirocin and globomycin, the protein inhibitors of IleS and LspA, respectively, were used in sensitization assays of strains containing both asRNA-expressing and open reading frame-expressing plasmids to examine deregulation of the overlapping ileS-lspA genes. We found upstream and downstream polar silencing effects when either ileS or lspA was silenced, indicating coupled expression. Weighted MTL50 values (means and standard deviations) of ribF, ileS, and lspA were 0.65 ± 0.18, 0.64 ± 0.06, and 0.76 ± 0.10, respectively. However, they were not significantly different (P = 0.71 by weighted one-way analysis of variance). The gene requirement for ispH could not be determined due to insufficient growth reduction. Mupirocin and globomycin sensitization experiments indicated that ileS-lspA expression could not be decoupled. The results highlight the inherent challenges associated with genetic analyses of operons; however, coupling of essential genes may provide opportunities to improve RNA-silencing antimicrobials. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Synthetic versions of firefly luciferase and Renilla luciferase reporter genes that resist transgene silencing in sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Down-regulation or silencing of transgene expression can be a major hurdle to both molecular studies and biotechnology applications in many plant species. Sugarcane is particularly effective at silencing introduced transgenes, including reporter genes such as the firefly luciferase gene. Synthesizing transgene coding sequences optimized for usage in the host plant is one method of enhancing transgene expression and stability. Using specified design rules we have synthesised new coding sequences for both the firefly luciferase and Renilla luciferase reporter genes. We have tested these optimized versions for enhanced levels of luciferase activity and for increased steady state luciferase mRNA levels in sugarcane. Results The synthetic firefly luciferase (luc*) and Renilla luciferase (Renluc*) coding sequences have elevated G + C contents in line with sugarcane codon usage, but maintain 75% identity to the native firefly or Renilla luciferase nucleotide sequences and 100% identity to the protein coding sequences. Under the control of the maize pUbi promoter, the synthetic luc* and Renluc* genes yielded 60x and 15x higher luciferase activity respectively, over the native firefly and Renilla luciferase genes in transient assays on sugarcane suspension cell cultures. Using a novel transient assay in sugarcane suspension cells combining co-bombardment and qRT-PCR, we showed that synthetic luc* and Renluc* genes generate increased transcript levels compared to the native firefly and Renilla luciferase genes. In stable transgenic lines, the luc* transgene generated significantly higher levels of expression than the native firefly luciferase transgene. The fold difference in expression was highest in the youngest tissues. Conclusions We developed synthetic versions of both the firefly and Renilla luciferase reporter genes that resist transgene silencing in sugarcane. These transgenes will be particularly useful for evaluating the expression patterns conferred

  14. Exonuclease-mediated degradation of nascent RNA silences genes linked to severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Siegel, T Nicolai; Martins, Rafael M; Wang, Fei; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi; Cheng, Xiu; Jiang, Lubin; Hon, Chung-Chau; Scheidig-Benatar, Christine; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Turner, Louise; Jensen, Anja T R; Claes, Aurelie; Guizetti, Julien; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Scherf, Artur

    2014-09-18

    Antigenic variation of the Plasmodium falciparum multicopy var gene family enables parasite evasion of immune destruction by host antibodies. Expression of a particular var subgroup, termed upsA, is linked to the obstruction of blood vessels in the brain and to the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria. The mechanism determining upsA activation remains unknown. Here we show that an entirely new type of gene silencing mechanism involving an exonuclease-mediated degradation of nascent RNA controls the silencing of genes linked to severe malaria. We identify a novel chromatin-associated exoribonuclease, termed PfRNase II, that controls the silencing of upsA var genes by marking their transcription start site and intron-promoter regions leading to short-lived cryptic RNA. Parasites carrying a deficient PfRNase II gene produce full-length upsA var transcripts and intron-derived antisense long non-coding RNA. The presence of stable upsA var transcripts overcomes monoallelic expression, resulting in the simultaneous expression of both upsA and upsC type PfEMP1 proteins on the surface of individual infected red blood cells. In addition, we observe an inverse relationship between transcript levels of PfRNase II and upsA-type var genes in parasites from severe malaria patients, implying a crucial role of PfRNase II in severe malaria. Our results uncover a previously unknown type of post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism in malaria parasites with repercussions for other organisms. Additionally, the identification of RNase II as a parasite protein controlling the expression of virulence genes involved in pathogenesis in patients with severe malaria may provide new strategies for reducing malaria mortality.

  15. Aucsia Gene Silencing Causes Parthenocarpic Fruit Development in Tomato[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Molesini, Barbara; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Rotino, Giuseppe Leonardo; Dani, Valeria; Spena, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    In angiosperms, auxin phytohormones play a crucial regulatory role in fruit initiation. The expression of auxin biosynthesis genes in ovules and placenta results in uncoupling of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit development from fertilization with production of parthenocarpic fruits. We have identified two newly described genes, named Aucsia genes, which are differentially expressed in auxin-synthesis (DefH9-iaaM) parthenocarpic tomato flower buds. The two tomato Aucsia genes encode 53-amino-acid-long peptides. We show, by RNA interference-mediated gene suppression, that Aucsia genes are involved in both reproductive and vegetative plant development. Aucsia-silenced tomato plants exhibited auxin-related phenotypes such as parthenocarpic fruit development, leaf fusions, and reflexed leaves. Auxin-induced rhizogenesis in cotyledon explants and polar auxin transport in roots were reduced in Aucsia-silenced plants compared with wild-type plants. In addition, Aucsia-silenced plants showed an increased sensitivity to 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. We further prove that total indole-3-acetic acid content was increased in preanthesis Aucsia-silenced flower buds. Thus, the data presented demonstrate that Aucsia genes encode a novel family of plant peptides that control fruit initiation and affect other auxin-related biological processes in tomato. Aucsia homologous genes are present in both chlorophytes and streptophytes, and the encoded peptides are distinguished by a 16-amino-acid-long (PYSGXSTLALVARXSA) AUCSIA motif, a lysine-rich carboxyl-terminal region, and a conserved tyrosine-based endocytic sorting motif. PMID:18987210

  16. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of p16 gene in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhuo-ying; Tang, Liang-dan; Zhou, Qin; Xiao, Lin; Cao, Yi

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the loss of function of the p16INK4A gene is mainly caused by the hypermethylation of p16 gene promoter; however, whether or not it is associated with the incidence of endometrial carcinoma (EC) remains unclear. In the current study, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the effects of p16 gene promoter hypermethylation on the incidence of EC. Detailed research publications were searched from Embase, PubMed, and ISI Web of Knowledge for composition in English or Chinese. The pooled data were collected and analyzed by Review Manager 5.2. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated and summarized respectively. Six eligible studies, including 261 patients were selected and analyzed. The pooled OR was 0.42, test for overall effect, Z = 10.19, P < 0.0001, indicating that p16 gene promoter hypermethylation was significantly correlated with the EC patients. The results of our study strongly suggest that p16 gene promoter hypermethylation is correlated with an increased risk of EC. P16 gene promoter hypermethylation plays a critical role in endometrial carcinogenesis.

  17. The role of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transgenic plants to reduce gene silencing phenomena.

    PubMed

    El-Shemy, Hany A; Khalafalla, Mutasim M; Ishimoto, Masao

    2009-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of jellyfish (Aequorea victoria) has significant advantages over other reporter genes, because expression can be detected in living cells without any substrates. Recently, epigenetic phenomena are important to consider in plant biotechnology experiments for elucidate unknown mechanism. Therefore, soybean immature cotyledons were generated embryogenesis cells and engineered with two different gene constructs (pHV and pHVS) using gene gun method. Both constructs contain a gene conferring resistance to hygromycin (hpt) as a selective marker and a modified glycinin (11S globulin) gene (V3-1) as a target. However, sGFP(S65T) as a reporter gene was used only in pHVS as a reporter gene for study the relation between using sGFP(S65T) and gene silencing phenomena. Fluorescence microscopic was used for screening after the selection of hygromycin, identified clearly the expression of sGFP(S65T) in the transformed soybean embryos bombarded with the pHVS construct. Protein analysis was used to detect gene expression overall seeds using SDS-PAGE. Percentage of gene down regulation was highly in pHV construct compared with pHVS. Thus, sGFP(S65T ) as a reporter gene in vector system may be play useful role for transgenic evaluation and avoid gene silencing in plants for the benefit of plant transformation system.

  18. Phenotyping of VIGS-mediated gene silencing in rice using a vector derived from a DNA virus.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ravi; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2017-07-01

    Target genes in rice can be optimally silenced if inserted in antisense or hairpin orientation in the RTBV-derived VIGS vector and plants grown at 28 °C and 80% humidity after inoculation. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a method used to transiently silence genes in dicot as well as monocot plants. For the important monocot species rice, the Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV)-derived VIGS system (RTBV-VIGS), which uses agroinoculation to initiate silencing, has not been standardized for optimal use. Here, using RTBV-VIGS, three sets of conditions were tested to achieve optimal silencing of the rice marker gene phytoene desaturase (pds). The effect of orientation of the insert in the RTBV-VIGS plasmid (sense, antisense and hairpin) on the silencing of the target gene was then evaluated using rice magnesium chelatase subunit H (chlH). Finally, the rice Xa21 gene, conferring resistance against bacterial leaf blight disease (BLB) was silenced using RTBV-VIGS system. In each case, real-time PCR-based assessment indicated approximately 40-80% fall in the accumulation levels of the transcripts of pds, chlH and Xa21. In the case of pds, the appearance of white streaks in the emerging leaves, and for chlH, chlorophyll levels and F v/F m ratio were assessed as phenotypes for silencing. For Xa21, the resistance levels to BLB were assessed by measuring the lesion length and the percent diseased areas of leaves, following challenge inoculation with Xanthomonas oryzae. In each case, the RTBV-MVIGS system gave rise to a discernible phenotype indicating the silencing of the respective target gene using condition III (temperature 28 °C, humidity 80% and 1 mM MES and 20 µM acetosyringone in secondary agrobacterium culture), which revealed the robustness of this gene silencing system for rice.

  19. From DNA Copy Number to Gene Expression: Local aberrations, Trisomies and Monosomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Tal

    The goal of my PhD research was to study the effect of DNA copy number changes on gene expression. DNA copy number aberrations may be local, encompassing several genes, or on the level of an entire chromosome, such as trisomy and monosomy. The main dataset I studied was of Glioblastoma, obtained in the framework of a collaboration, but I worked also with public datasets of cancer and Down's Syndrome. The molecular basis of expression changes in Glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumors in adults. In collaboration with Prof. Hegi (CHUV, Switzerland), we analyzed a rich Glioblastoma dataset including clinical information, DNA copy number (array CGH) and expression profiles. We explored the correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression at the level of chromosomal arms and local genomic aberrations. We detected known amplification and over expression of oncogenes, as well as deletion and down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. We exploited that information to map alterations of pathways that are known to be disrupted in Glioblastoma, and tried to characterize samples that have no known alteration in any of the studied pathways. Identifying local DNA aberrations of biological significance. Many types of tumors exhibit chromosomal losses or gains and local amplifications and deletions. A region that is aberrant in many tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, is more likely to be clinically relevant, and not just a by-product of genetic instability. We developed a novel method that defines and prioritizes aberrations by formalizing these intuitions. The method scores each aberration by the fraction of patients harboring it, its length and its amplitude, and assesses the significance of the score by comparing it to a null distribution obtained by permutations. This approach detects genetic locations that are significantly aberrant, generating a 'genomic aberration profile' for each sample. The 'genomic

  20. Folic acid rivals methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene-silencing effect on MEPM cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wen-Lin; Wu, Min; Shi, Bing

    2006-11-01

    It's clear that environmental factors play a role in the aetiology of orofacial clefting (OFC) and an important area of future research will be to unravel interactions that occur between candidate genes and environmental factors during early development of the embryo. Periconceptional folic acid supplementation may reduce the risk of OFC. Polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene reduce availability of 5-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the predominant circulating form of folic acid. To determine the effect of MTHFR gene mutation on murine embryonic palatal mesenchymal (MEPM) cells and the interaction with folic acid supplement, we used RNAi study in the primary cultures of MEPM cells. The cells of MTHFR gene silencing grew slower and the apoptosis cell number was more than the cells of control. Supplement with 20 microg/ml folic acid was the best to preventing teratogenic effect of MTHFR gene silencing. By flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle, results were shown that the MEPM cells were retarded in G(0)/G(1) after MTHFR gene silencing. While using 20 microg/ml folic acid supplements could make cell transit the G(1)/S restriction point and the cells growth was close to normal level.

  1. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yu; Zhang, Chunquan; Kernodle, Bliss M; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yu; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Hill, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  3. Disruption of Rpp1-mediated soybean rust immunity by virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Bret; Campbell, Kimberly B; McMahon, Michael B; Luster, Douglas G

    2013-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi, a fungus that causes rust disease on soybean, has potential to impart significant yield loss and disrupt food security and animal feed production. Rpp1 is a soybean gene that confers immunity to soybean rust, and it is important to understand how it regulates the soybean defense system and to use this knowledge to protect commercial crops. It was previously discovered that some soybean proteins resembling transcription factors accumulate in the nucleus of Rpp1 soybeans. To determine if they contribute to immunity, Bean pod mottle virus was used to attenuate or silence the expression of their genes. Rpp1 plants subjected to virus-induced gene silencing exhibited reduced amounts of RNA for 5 of the tested genes, and the plants developed rust-like symptoms after subsequent inoculation with fungal spores. Symptoms were associated with the accumulation of rust fungal RNA and protein. Silenced plants also had reduced amounts of RNA for the soybean Myb84 transcription factor and soybean isoflavone O-methyltransferase, both of which are important to phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and lignin formation, crucial components of rust resistance. These results help resolve some of the genes that contribute to Rpp1-mediated immunity and improve upon the knowledge of the soybean defense system. It is possible that these genes could be manipulated to enhance rust resistance in otherwise susceptible soybean cultivars.

  4. Can silencing of transposons contribute to variation in effector gene expression in Phytophthora infestans?

    PubMed

    Whisson, Stephen; Vetukuri, Ramesh; Avrova, Anna; Dixelius, Christina

    2012-03-01

    Transposable elements are ubiquitous residents in eukaryotic genomes. Often considered to be genomic parasites, they can lead to dramatic changes in genome organization, gene expression, and gene evolution. The oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has evolved a genome organization where core biology genes are predominantly located in genome regions that have relatively few resident transposons. In contrast, disease effector-encoding genes are most frequently located in rapidly evolving genomic regions that are rich in transposons. P. infestans, as a eukaryote, likely uses RNA silencing to minimize the activity of transposons. We have shown that fusion of a short interspersed element (SINE) to an effector gene in P. infestans leads to the silencing of both the introduced fusion and endogenous homologous sequences. This is also likely to occur naturally in the genome of P. infestans, as transcriptional inactivation of effectors is known to occur, and over half of the translocated "RXLR class" of effectors are located within 2 kb of transposon sequences in the P. infestans genome. In this commentary, we review the diverse transposon inventory of P. infestans, its control by RNA silencing, and consequences for expression modulation of nearby effector genes in this economically important plant pathogen.

  5. Mediator links epigenetic silencing of neuronal gene expression with x-linked mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Zhou, Haiying; Esteve, Pierre-Olivier; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Kim, Seokjoong; Xu, Xuan; Joseph, Sumy M; Friez, Michael J; Schwartz, Charles E; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Boyer, Thomas G

    2008-08-08

    Mediator occupies a central role in RNA polymerase II transcription as a sensor, integrator, and processor of regulatory signals that converge on protein-coding gene promoters. Compared to its role in gene activation, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms and biological implications of Mediator as a transducer of repressive signals. Here we describe a protein interaction network required for extraneuronal gene silencing comprising Mediator, G9a histone methyltransferase, and the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST; also known as neuron restrictive silencer factor, NRSF). We show that the MED12 interface in Mediator links REST with G9a-dependent histone H3K9 dimethylation to suppress neuronal genes in nonneuronal cells. Notably, missense mutations in MED12 causing the X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) disorders FG syndrome and Lujan syndrome disrupt its REST corepressor function. These findings implicate Mediator in epigenetic restriction of neuronal gene expression to the nervous system and suggest a pathologic basis for MED12-associated XLMR involving impaired REST-dependent neuronal gene regulation.

  6. Disruption of Rpp1-mediated soybean rust immunity by virus-induced gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Bret; Campbell, Kimberly B; McMahon, Michael B; Luster, Douglas G

    2013-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi, a fungus that causes rust disease on soybean, has potential to impart significant yield loss and disrupt food security and animal feed production. Rpp1 is a soybean gene that confers immunity to soybean rust, and it is important to understand how it regulates the soybean defense system and to use this knowledge to protect commercial crops. It was previously discovered that some soybean proteins resembling transcription factors accumulate in the nucleus of Rpp1 soybeans. To determine if they contribute to immunity, Bean pod mottle virus was used to attenuate or silence the expression of their genes. Rpp1 plants subjected to virus-induced gene silencing exhibited reduced amounts of RNA for 5 of the tested genes, and the plants developed rust-like symptoms after subsequent inoculation with fungal spores. Symptoms were associated with the accumulation of rust fungal RNA and protein. Silenced plants also had reduced amounts of RNA for the soybean Myb84 transcription factor and soybean isoflavone O-methyltransferase, both of which are important to phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and lignin formation, crucial components of rust resistance. These results help resolve some of the genes that contribute to Rpp1-mediated immunity and improve upon the knowledge of the soybean defense system. It is possible that these genes could be manipulated to enhance rust resistance in otherwise susceptible soybean cultivars. PMID:24401541

  7. Mechanisms of epigenetic silencing of the Rassf1a gene during estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis in ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Starlard-Davenport, Athena; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P; James, Smitha R; Karpf, Adam R; Latendresse, John R; Beland, Frederick A; Pogribny, Igor P

    2010-03-01

    Breast cancer, the most common malignancy in women, emerges through a multistep process, encompassing the progressive sequential evolution of morphologically distinct stages from a normal cell to hyperplasia (with and without atypia), carcinoma in situ, invasive carcinoma and metastasis. The success of treatment of breast cancer could be greatly improved by the detection at early stages of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in breast carcinogenesis in Augustus and Copenhagen-Irish female rats, a cross between the ACI strains, induced by continuous exposure to 17beta-estradiol. The results of our study demonstrate that early stages of estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis are characterized by altered global DNA methylation, aberrant expression of proteins responsible for the proper maintenance of DNA methylation pattern and epigenetic silencing of the critical Rassf1a (Ras-association domain family 1, isoform A) tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, transcriptional repression of the Rassf1a gene in mammary glands during early stages of breast carcinogenesis was associated with an increase in trimethylation of histones H3 lysine 9 and H3 lysine 27 and de novo CpG island methylation and at the Rassf1a promoter and first exon. In conclusion, we demonstrate that epigenetic alterations precede formation of preneoplastic lesions indicating the significance of epigenetic events in induction of oncogenic pathways in early stages of carcinogenesis.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of histone modifications by ChIP-chip to identify silenced genes in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinjiang; Liu, Jian; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Chundong; Dai, Dongqiu

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to identify novel histone modification markers in gastric cancer (GC) by chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray (ChIP-chip) analysis and to determine whether these markers were able to discriminate between normal and GC cells. We also tested for correlations with DNA methylation. We probed a human CpG island microarray with DNA from a GC cell line (MKN45) by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). ChIP-reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to validate the microarray results. Additionally, mRNA expression levels and the DNA methylation of potential target genes were evaluated by RT-qPCR and methylation-specific PCR (MSP). The moults showed that 134 genes exhibited the highest signal-to-noise ratio of H3-K9 trimethylation over acetylation and 46 genes exhibited the highest signal-to-noise ratio of H3-K9 trimethylation over H3-K4 trimethylation in MKN45 cells. The ChIP-qPCR results agreed with those obtained from the ChIP-chip analysis. Aberrant DNA methylation status and mRNA expression levels were also identified for selected genes (PSD, SMARCC1 and Vps37A) in the GC cell lines. The results suggest that CpG island microarray coupled with ChIP (ChIP-chip) can identify novel targets of gene silencing in GC. Additionally, ChIP-chip is the best approach for assessing the genome-wide status of epigenetic regulation, which may allow for a broader genomic understanding compared to the knowledge that has been accumulated from single-gene studies.

  9. Diverse gene-silencing mechanisms with distinct requirements for RNA polymerase subunits in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Amy E; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; McGinnis, Karen M

    2014-11-01

    In Zea mays, transcriptional regulation of the b1 (booster1) gene requires a distal enhancer and MEDIATOR OF PARAMUTATION1 (MOP1), MOP2, and MOP3 proteins orthologous to Arabidopsis components of the RNA-dependent DNA methylation pathway. We compared the genetic requirements for MOP1, MOP2, and MOP3 for endogenous gene silencing by two hairpin transgenes with inverted repeats of the a1 (anthocyaninless1) gene promoter (a1pIR) and the b1 gene enhancer (b1IR), respectively. The a1pIR transgene induced silencing of endogenous A1 in mop1-1 and mop3-1, but not in Mop2-1 homozygous plants. This finding suggests that transgene-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) circumvented the requirement for MOP1, a predicted RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and MOP3, the predicted largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV). Because the Arabidopsis protein orthologous to MOP2 is the second largest subunit of Pol IV and V, our results may indicate that hairpin-induced siRNAs cannot bypass the requirement for the predicted scaffolding activity of Pol V. In contrast to a1pIR, the b1IR transgene silenced endogenous B1 in all three homozygous mutant genotypes--mop1-1, Mop2-1, and mop3-1--suggesting that transgene mediated b1 silencing did not involve MOP2-containing Pol V complexes. Based on the combined results for a1, b1, and three previously described loci, we propose a speculative hypothesis of locus-specific deployment of Pol II, MOP2-containing Pol V, or alternative versions of Pol V with second largest subunits other than MOP2 to explain the mechanistic differences in silencing at specific loci, including one example associated with paramutation. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Diverse Gene-Silencing Mechanisms with Distinct Requirements for RNA Polymerase Subunits in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Amy E.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; McGinnis, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    In Zea mays, transcriptional regulation of the b1 (booster1) gene requires a distal enhancer and MEDIATOR OF PARAMUTATION1 (MOP1), MOP2, and MOP3 proteins orthologous to Arabidopsis components of the RNA-dependent DNA methylation pathway. We compared the genetic requirements for MOP1, MOP2, and MOP3 for endogenous gene silencing by two hairpin transgenes with inverted repeats of the a1 (anthocyaninless1) gene promoter (a1pIR) and the b1 gene enhancer (b1IR), respectively. The a1pIR transgene induced silencing of endogenous A1 in mop1-1 and mop3-1, but not in Mop2-1 homozygous plants. This finding suggests that transgene-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) circumvented the requirement for MOP1, a predicted RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and MOP3, the predicted largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV). Because the Arabidopsis protein orthologous to MOP2 is the second largest subunit of Pol IV and V, our results may indicate that hairpin-induced siRNAs cannot bypass the requirement for the predicted scaffolding activity of Pol V. In contrast to a1pIR, the b1IR transgene silenced endogenous B1 in all three homozygous mutant genotypes—mop1-1, Mop2-1, and mop3-1—suggesting that transgene mediated b1 silencing did not involve MOP2-containing Pol V complexes. Based on the combined results for a1, b1, and three previously described loci, we propose a speculative hypothesis of locus-specific deployment of Pol II, MOP2-containing Pol V, or alternative versions of Pol V with second largest subunits other than MOP2 to explain the mechanistic differences in silencing at specific loci, including one example associated with paramutation. PMID:25164883

  11. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes expressed in root, leaf, and meiotic tissues of wheat.

    PubMed

    Bennypaul, Harvinder S; Mutti, Jasdeep S; Rustgi, Sachin; Kumar, Neeraj; Okubara, Patricia A; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2012-03-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV)-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an effective strategy for rapid functional analysis of genes in wheat leaves, but its utility to transiently express genes, and silencing in other tissues including root, flower, and developing grains, has not been demonstrated in monocots. We monitored green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression to demonstrate the utility of BSMV as a transient expression vector and silenced genes in various wheat tissues to expand VIGS utility to characterize tissue-specific genes. An antisense construct designed for coronatine insensitive1 (COI1) showed an 85% decrease in COI1 transcript level in roots accompanied by a 26% reduction in root length. Similarly, silencing of seed-specific granule-bound starch synthase by antisense and hairpin constructs resulted in up to 82% reduction in amylose content of the developing grains. VIGS of meiosis-specific genes demonstrated by silencing wheat homologue of disrupted meiosis cDNA1 (DMC1) by an antisense construct resulted in a 75-80% reduction in DMC1 transcript level accompanied by an average of 37.2 univalents at metaphase I. The virus-based transient GFP expression was observed in the leaf, phloem, and root cortex at 10-17 days post-inoculation. A novel observation was made that 8-11% of the first selfed generation progeny showed VIGS inheritance and that this proportion increased to 53-72% in the second and to 90-100% in the third generations. No viral symptoms were observed in the progeny, making it possible to study agronomic traits by VIGS. VIGS inheritance is particularly useful to study genes expressing during seed germination or other stages of early plant growth.

  12. Expression of RNA-interference/antisense transgenes by the cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing strategy to study gene functions in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Dagang; Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-03-03

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice.

  13. Expression of RNA-Interference/Antisense Transgenes by the Cognate Promoters of Target Genes Is a Better Gene-Silencing Strategy to Study Gene Functions in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-01-01

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice. PMID:21408609

  14. Silencing of aphid genes by dsRNA feeding from plants.

    PubMed

    Pitino, Marco; Coleman, Alexander D; Maffei, Massimo E; Ridout, Christopher J; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a valuable reverse genetics tool to study gene function in various organisms, including hemipteran insects such as aphids. Previous work has shown that RNAi-mediated knockdown of pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genes can be achieved through direct injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small-interfering RNAs (siRNA) into the pea aphid hemolymph or by feeding these insects on artificial diets containing the small RNAs. In this study, we have developed the plant-mediated RNAi technology for aphids to allow for gene silencing in the aphid natural environment and minimize handling of these insects during experiments. The green peach aphid M. persicae was selected because it has a broad plant host range that includes the model plants Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana for which transgenic materials can relatively quickly be generated. We targeted M. persicae Rack1, which is predominantly expressed in the gut, and M. persicae C002 (MpC002), which is predominantly expressed in the salivary glands. The aphids were fed on N. benthamiana leaf disks transiently producing dsRNA corresponding to these genes and on A. thaliana plants stably producing the dsRNAs. MpC002 and Rack-1 expression were knocked down by up to 60% on transgenic N. benthamiana and A. thaliana. Moreover, silenced M. persicae produced less progeny consistent with these genes having essential functions. Similar levels of gene silencing were achieved in our plant-mediated RNAi approach and published silencing methods for aphids. Furthermore, the N. benthamiana leaf disk assay can be developed into a screen to assess which genes are essential for aphid survival on plants. Our results also demonstrate the feasibility of the plant-mediated RNAi approach for aphid control.

  15. RNA interference as a gene silencing tool to control Tuta absoluta in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Roberto A.; Barbosa, Guilherme O.; Possignolo, Isabella Presotto; Peres, Lazaro E. P.; Lam, Eric; Lima, Joni E.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), a gene-silencing mechanism that involves providing double-stranded RNA molecules that match a specific target gene sequence, is now widely used in functional genetic studies. The potential application of RNAi-mediated control of agricultural insect pests has rapidly become evident. The production of transgenic plants expressing dsRNA molecules that target essential insect genes could provide a means of specific gene silencing in larvae that feed on these plants, resulting in larval phenotypes that range from loss of appetite to death. In this report, we show that the tomato leafminer (Tuta absoluta), a major threat to commercial tomato production, can be targeted by RNAi. We selected two target genes (Vacuolar ATPase-A and Arginine kinase) based on the RNAi response reported for these genes in other pest species. In view of the lack of an artificial diet for T. absoluta, we used two approaches to deliver dsRNA into tomato leaflets. The first approach was based on the uptake of dsRNA by leaflets and the second was based on “in planta-induced transient gene silencing” (PITGS), a well-established method for silencing plant genes, used here for the first time to deliver in planta-transcribed dsRNA to target insect genes. Tuta absoluta larvae that fed on leaves containing dsRNA of the target genes showed an ∼60% reduction in target gene transcript accumulation, an increase in larval mortality and less leaf damage. We then generated transgenic ‘Micro-Tom’ tomato plants that expressed hairpin sequences for both genes and observed a reduction in foliar damage by T. absoluta in these plants. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of RNAi as an alternative method for controlling this critical tomato pest. PMID:27994959

  16. Aberrant rel/nfkb genes and activity in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Rayet, B; Gélinas, C

    1999-11-22

    Rel/NF-kappaB transcription factors are key regulators of immune, inflammatory and acute phase responses and are also implicated in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Remarkable progress has been made in understanding the signal transduction pathways that lead to the activation of Rel/NF-kappaB factors and the consequent induction of gene expression. Evidence linking deregulated Rel/NF-kappaB activity to oncogenesis in mammalian systems has emerged in recent years, consistent with the acute oncogenicity of the viral oncoprotein v-Rel in animal models. Chromosomal amplification, overexpression and rearrangement of genes coding for Rel/NF-kappaB factors have been noted in many human hematopoietic and solid tumors. Persistent nuclear NF-kappaB activity was also described in several human cancer cell types, as a result of constitutive activation of upstream signaling kinases or mutations inactivating inhibitory IkappaB subunits. Studies point to a correlation between the activation of cellular gene expression by Rel/NF-kappaB factors and their participation in the malignant process. Experiments implicating NF-kappaB in the control of the apoptotic response also support a role in oncogenesis and in the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapy. This review focuses on the status of the rel, nfkb and ikb genes and their activity in human tumors and their association with the onset or progression of malignancies.

  17. Position-Effect Variegation, Heterochromatin Formation, and Gene Silencing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Elgin, Sarah C.R.; Reuter, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    Position-effect variegation (PEV) results when a gene normally in euchromatin is juxtaposed with heterochromatin by rearrangement or transposition. When heterochromatin packaging spreads across the heterochromatin/euchromatin border, it causes transcriptional silencing in a stochastic pattern. PEV is intensely studied in Drosophila using the white gene. Screens for dominant mutations that suppress or enhance white variegation have identified many conserved epigenetic factors, including the histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase SU(VAR)3-9. Heterochromatin protein HP1a binds H3K9me2/3 and interacts with SU(VAR)3-9, creating a core memory system. Genetic, molecular, and biochemical analysis of PEV in Drosophila has contributed many key findings concerning establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin with concomitant gene silencing. PMID:23906716

  18. X chromosome inactivation: new players in the initiation of gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ines; Heard, Edith

    2017-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a dosage compensation process that was adopted by female mammals to balance gene dosage between XX females and XY males. XCI starts with the upregulation of the non-coding RNA Xist, after which most X-linked genes are silenced and acquire a repressive chromatin state. Even though the chromatin marks of the inactive X have been fairly well described, the mechanisms responsible for the initiation of XCI remain largely unknown. In this review, we discuss recent developments that revealed unexpected factors playing a role in XCI and that might be of crucial importance to understand the mechanisms responsible for the very first steps of this chromosome-wide gene-silencing event. PMID:28408975

  19. Development of high oleic oil crop platform in flax through RNAi-mediated multiple FAD2 gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yurong; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Dribnenki, Paul; Singh, Surinder; Green, Allan

    2015-04-01

    Simultaneous gene silencing of both FAD2 genes in high linoleic acid flax leads to high level of oleic acid, which is stable across multiple generations. High oleic oil is one of the preferred traits in oil crop engineering due to its stability and multiple applications as an industrial feedstock. Flax possesses two isoforms of FAD2 enzymes that desaturate monounsaturated oleic acid to polyunsaturated linoleic acid. These two enzymes are encoded by two FAD2 genes. By simultaneous gene silencing both FAD2 genes in high linoleic acid flax, Linola, high level of oleic acid up to 80% was achieved in 69 silencing lines. The high oleic trait was stable across multiple generations with oleic acid reaching up to 77% in homozygote T3 progeny. The RNAi-mediated gene-silencing approach generated high oleic linseed oil, as well as a high oleic platform that can be exploited for further fatty acid engineering.

  20. Effects of silencing key genes in the capsanthin biosynthetic pathway on fruit color of detached pepper fruits.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shi-Lin; Li, Li; Chai, Wei-Guo; Shah, Syed Noor Muhammad; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2014-11-18

    There are many varieties of carotenoids in pepper fruits. Capsanthin is a red carotenoid that gives mature pepper fruits their red color. The red color in pepper fruits is regulated mainly by the genes capsanthin/capsorubin synthase(Ccs), phytoene synthase(Psy), lycopene-β-cyclase(Lcyb) and β-carotene hydroxylase(Crtz). There has been very limited research work related to the development and change in the red color during fruit formation and when a certain gene or several genes are deleted. In this paper, we constructed viral vectors, using the tobacco rattle virus (TRV), to carry the target gene to infect detached pepper fruits, and observed the fruits' color change. We used real-time quantitative PCR to analyze the gene silencing efficiency. At the same time, HPLC was used to determine the content of capsanthin and carotenoids that are associated with capsanthin synthesis when key genes in the pepper fruits were silenced. These genes (Ccs, Psy, Lcyb and Crtz) were individually silenced through virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) technology, and pepper fruits from red fruit cultivars showed an orange or yellow color. When several genes were silenced simultaneously, the fruit also did not show the normal red color. Gene expression analysis by real-time quantitative PCR showed 70-80% efficiency of target gene silencing when using the VIGS method. HPLC analysis showed that the contents of carotenoids associated with capsanthin synthesis (e.g. β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin or zeaxanthin) were decreased in varying degrees when silencing a gene or several genes together, however, the content of capsanthin reduced significantly. The synthesis of capsanthin was influenced either directly or indirectly when any key gene was silenced. The influence of the target genes on color changes in pepper fruits was confirmed via the targeted silencing of them. VIGS was a good method to study the molecular mechanism of pepper fruit color formation. By using virus induced gene

  1. HIGS: host-induced gene silencing in the obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen Blumeria graminis.

    PubMed

    Nowara, Daniela; Gay, Alexandra; Lacomme, Christophe; Shaw, Jane; Ridout, Christopher; Douchkov, Dimitar; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Powdery mildew fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that only grow on living hosts and cause damage in thousands of plant species. Despite their agronomical importance, little direct functional evidence for genes of pathogenicity and virulence is currently available because mutagenesis and transformation protocols are lacking. Here, we show that the accumulation in barley (Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) of double-stranded or antisense RNA targeting fungal transcripts affects the development of the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis. Proof of concept for host-induced gene silencing was obtained by silencing the effector gene Avra10, which resulted in reduced fungal development in the absence, but not in the presence, of the matching resistance gene Mla10. The fungus could be rescued from the silencing of Avra10 by the transient expression of a synthetic gene that was resistant to RNA interference (RNAi) due to silent point mutations. The results suggest traffic of RNA molecules from host plants into B. graminis and may lead to an RNAi-based crop protection strategy against fungal pathogens.

  2. Host-induced gene silencing compromises Verticillium wilt in tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yin; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2016-10-17

    Verticillium wilt, caused by soil-borne fungi of the genus Verticillium, is an economically important disease that affects a wide range of host plants. Unfortunately, host resistance against Verticillium wilts is not available for many plant species, and the disease is notoriously difficult to combat. Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) is an RNA interference (RNAi)-based process in which small RNAs are produced by the host plant to target parasite transcripts. HIGS has emerged as a promising strategy for the improvement of plant resistance against pathogens by silencing genes that are essential for these pathogens. Here, we assessed whether HIGS can be utilized to suppress Verticillium wilt disease by silencing three previously identified virulence genes of V. dahliae (encoding Ave1, Sge1 and NLP1) through the host plants tomato and Arabidopsis. In transient assays, tomato plants were agroinfiltrated with Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) constructs to target V. dahliae transcripts. Subsequent V. dahliae inoculation revealed the suppression of Verticillium wilt disease on treatment with only one of the three TRV constructs. Next, expression of RNAi constructs targeting transcripts of the same three V. dahliae virulence genes was pursued in stable transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants. In this host, V. dahliae inoculation revealed reduced Verticillium wilt disease in two of the three targets. Thus, our study suggests that, depending on the target gene chosen, HIGS against V. dahliae is operational in tomato and A. thaliana plants and may be exploited to engineer resistance in Verticillium wilt-susceptible crops.

  3. Efficiency of gene silencing in Arabidopsis: direct inverted repeats vs. transitive RNAi vectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Filichkin, Sergei A; DiFazio, Steven P; Brunner, Amy M; Davis, John M; Yang, Zamin Koo; Kalluri, Udaya C; Arias, Renee S; Etherington, Elizabeth; Tuskan, Gerald A; Strauss, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of RNA interference (RNAi) in Arabidopsis using transitive and homologous inverted repeat (hIR) vectors. hIR constructs carry self-complementary intron-spliced fragments of the target gene whereas transitive vectors have the target sequence fragment adjacent to an intron-spliced, inverted repeat of heterologous origin. Both transitive and hIR constructs facilitated specific and heritable silencing in the three genes studied (AP1, ETTIN and TTG1). Both types of vectors produced a phenotypic series that phenocopied reduction of function mutants for the respective target gene. The hIR yielded up to fourfold higher proportions of events with strongly manifested reduction of function phenotypes compared to transitive RNAi. We further investigated the efficiency and potential off-target effects of AP1 silencing by both types of vectors using genome-scale microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR. The depletion of AP1 transcripts coincided with reduction of function phenotypic changes among both hIR and transitive lines and also showed similar expression patterns among differentially regulated genes. We did not detect significant silencing directed against homologous potential off-target genes when constructs were designed with minimal sequence similarity. Both hIR and transitive methods are useful tools in plant biotechnology and genomics. The choice of vector will depend on specific objectives such as cloning throughput, number of events and degree of suppression required.

  4. Silencing of the pentose phosphate pathway genes influences DNA replication in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fornalewicz, Karolina; Wieczorek, Aneta; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Łyżeń, Robert

    2017-09-05

    Previous reports and our recently published data indicated that some enzymes of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle can affect the genome replication process by changing either the efficiency or timing of DNA synthesis in human normal cells. Both these pathways are connected with the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP pathway). The PPP pathway supports cell growth by generating energy and precursors for nucleotides and amino acids. Therefore, we asked if silencing of genes coding for enzymes involved in the pentose phosphate pathway may also affect the control of DNA replication in human fibroblasts. Particular genes coding for PPP pathway enzymes were partially silenced with specific siRNAs. Such cells remained viable. We found that silencing of the H6PD, PRPS1, RPE genes caused less efficient enterance to the S phase and decrease in efficiency of DNA synthesis. On the other hand, in cells treated with siRNA against G6PD, RBKS and TALDO genes, the fraction of cells entering the S phase was increased. However, only in the case of G6PD and TALDO, the ratio of BrdU incorporation to DNA was significantly changed. The presented results together with our previously published studies illustrate the complexity of the influence of genes coding for central carbon metabolism on the control of DNA replication in human fibroblasts, and indicate which of them are especially important in this process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Characterization of virus-induced gene silencing in tobacco plants infected with apple latent spherical virus.

    PubMed

    Yaegashi, H; Yamatsuta, T; Takahashi, T; Li, C; Isogai, M; Kobori, T; Ohki, S; Yoshikawa, N

    2007-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-ALSV) was used for analysis of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in tobacco plants expressing GFP (GFP-tobacco). In GFP-tobacco inoculated with GFP-ALSV, small dark spots appeared on inoculated leaves at 5 days post-inoculation (dpi), then expanded, and finally covered the whole area of the leaves after 12 dpi. Most of the fluorescence of upper leaves above the 12th true leaf disappeared at 21 dpi. Thus, GFP-ALSV infection efficiently triggered VIGS of a transgene (GFP gene) in tobacco plants. Analysis of GFP-silenced leaves showed that viral RNAs and proteins accumulated in all leaves where most GFP mRNA had been degraded. The siRNAs derived from ALSV-RNAs were not detected in samples from which siRNA of GFP mRNA could be easily detected. Direct tissue blot analysis showed that the spread of GFP-ALSV always preceded the induction of VIGS in infected leaves of GFP-tobacco. GFP leaf patch tests using Nicotiana benthamiana line 16c showed that Vp20, one of the three capsid proteins, is a silencing suppressor which interferes with systemic silencing.

  6. Templated assembly of albumin-based nanoparticles for simultaneous gene silencing and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Damien; Affolter-Zbaraszczuk, Christine; Barthès, Julien; Cui, Jiwei; Caruso, Frank; Baumert, Thomas F.; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Ogier, Joelle; Meyer, Florent

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we address the design of innovative human serum albumin (HSA)-based nanoparticles loaded with silencing RNA and grafted with gadolinium complexes having average sizes ranging from ca. 50 to 150 nm according to the siRNA/HSA composition. The non-covalent siRNA/HSA assembly is formed on isobutyramide-modified mesoporous silica and the self-supported HSA-based nanoparticles are obtained following the silica template dissolution. These original protein particles provide simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and cellular in vitro gene silencing.In this article, we address the design of innovative human serum albumin (HSA)-based nanoparticles loaded with silencing RNA and grafted with gadolinium complexes having average sizes ranging from ca. 50 to 150 nm according to the siRNA/HSA composition. The non-covalent siRNA/HSA assembly is formed on isobutyramide-modified mesoporous silica and the self-supported HSA-based nanoparticles are obtained following the silica template dissolution. These original protein particles provide simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and cellular in vitro gene silencing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and supporting Fig. S1-S4. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02623c

  7. Gene copy silencing and DNA methylation in natural and artificially produced allopolyploid fish.

    PubMed

    Matos, Isa M N; Coelho, Maria M; Schartl, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    Allelic silencing is an important mechanism for coping with gene dosage changes in polyploid organisms that is well known in allopolyploid plants. Only recently, it was shown in the allotriploid fish Squalius alburnoides that this process also occurs in vertebrates. However, it is still unknown whether this silencing mechanism is common to other allopolyploid fish, and which mechanisms might be responsible for allelic silencing. We addressed these questions in a comparative study between Squalius alburnoides and another allopolyploid complex, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa). We examined the allelic expression patterns for three target genes in four somatic tissues of natural allo-anorthoploids and laboratory-produced tri-genomic hybrids of S. alburnoides and P. formosa. Also, for both complexes, we evaluated the correlation between total DNA methylation level and the ploidy status and genomic composition of the individuals. We found that allelic silencing also occurs in other allopolyploid organisms besides the single one that was previously known. We found and discuss disparities within and between the two considered complexes concerning the pattern of allele-specific expression and DNA methylation levels. Disparities might be due to intrinsic characteristics of each genome involved in the hybridization process. Our findings also support the idea that long-term evolutionary processes have an effect on the allele expression patterns and possibly also on DNA methylation levels. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. An efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector for maize functional genomics research.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Yang, Xinxin; Wang, Nian; Liu, Xuedong; Nelson, Richard S; Li, Weimin; Fan, Zaifeng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Maize is a major crop whose rich genetic diversity provides an advanced resource for genetic research. However, a tool for rapid transient gene function analysis in maize that may be utilized in most maize cultivars has been lacking, resulting in reliance on time-consuming stable transformation and mutation studies to obtain answers. We developed an efficient virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for maize based on a naturally maize-infecting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) strain, ZMBJ-CMV. An infectious clone of ZMBJ-CMV was constructed, and a vascular puncture inoculation method utilizing Agrobacterium was optimized to improve its utility for CMV infection of maize. ZMBJ-CMV was then modified to function as a VIGS vector. The ZMBJ-CMV vector induced mild to moderate symptoms in many maize lines, making it useful for gene function studies in critically important maize cultivars, such as the sequenced reference inbred line B73. Using this CMV VIGS system, expression of two endogenous genes, ZmPDS and ZmIspH, was found to be decreased by 75% and 78%, respectively, compared with non-silenced tissue. Inserts with lengths of 100-300 bp produced the most complete transcriptional and visual silencing phenotypes. Moreover, genes related to autophagy, ZmATG3 and ZmATG8a, were also silenced, and it was found that they function in leaf starch degradation. These results indicate that our ZMBJ-CMV VIGS vector provides a tool for rapid and efficient gene function studies in maize. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The distribution of repressive histone modifications on silenced FMR1 alleles provides clues to the mechanism of gene silencing in fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Daman; Usdin, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and the most common known cause of autism. Most cases of FXS result from the expansion of a CGG·CCG repeat in the 5′ UTR of the FMR1 gene that leads to gene silencing. It has previously been shown that silenced alleles are associated with histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Me2) and H3 trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3K27Me3), modified histones typical of developmentally repressed genes. We show here that these alleles are also associated with elevated levels of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Me3) and histone H4 trimethylated at lysine 20 (H4K20Me3). All four of these modified histones are present on exon 1 of silenced alleles at levels comparable to that seen on pericentric heterochromatin. The two groups of histone modifications show a different distribution on fragile X alleles: H3K9Me2 and H3K27Me3 have a broad distribution, whereas H3K9Me3 and H4K20Me3 have a more focal distribution with the highest level of these marks being present in the vicinity of the repeat. This suggests that the trigger for gene silencing may be local to the repeat itself and perhaps involves a mechanism similar to that involved in the formation of pericentric heterochromatin. PMID:20843831

  10. The distribution of repressive histone modifications on silenced FMR1 alleles provides clues to the mechanism of gene silencing in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Daman; Usdin, Karen

    2010-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and the most common known cause of autism. Most cases of FXS result from the expansion of a CGG·CCG repeat in the 5' UTR of the FMR1 gene that leads to gene silencing. It has previously been shown that silenced alleles are associated with histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Me2) and H3 trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3K27Me3), modified histones typical of developmentally repressed genes. We show here that these alleles are also associated with elevated levels of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Me3) and histone H4 trimethylated at lysine 20 (H4K20Me3). All four of these modified histones are present on exon 1 of silenced alleles at levels comparable to that seen on pericentric heterochromatin. The two groups of histone modifications show a different distribution on fragile X alleles: H3K9Me2 and H3K27Me3 have a broad distribution, whereas H3K9Me3 and H4K20Me3 have a more focal distribution with the highest level of these marks being present in the vicinity of the repeat. This suggests that the trigger for gene silencing may be local to the repeat itself and perhaps involves a mechanism similar to that involved in the formation of pericentric heterochromatin.

  11. Glycolic Acid Silences Inflammasome Complex Genes, NLRC4 and ASC, by Inducing DNA Methylation in HaCaT Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheau-Chung; Yeh, Jih-I; Hung, Sung-Jen; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Liu, Fu-Tong; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2016-03-01

    AHAs (α-hydroxy acids), including glycolic acid (GA), have been widely used in cosmetic products and superficial chemical peels. Inflammasome complex has been shown to play critical roles in inflammatory pathways in human keratinocytes. However, the anti-inflammatory mechanism of GA is still unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the expression of the inflammasome complex and epigenetic modification to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of GA in HaCaT cells. We evaluated NLRP3, NLRC4, AIM2, and ASC inflammasome complex gene expression on real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methylation changes were detected in these genes following treatment with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) with or without the addition of GA using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). GA inhibited the expressions of these inflammasome complex genes, and the decreases in the expressions of mRNA were reversed by 5-Aza treatment. Methylation was detected in NLRC4 and ASC on MSP, but not in NLRP3 or AIM2. GA decreased NLRC4 and ASC gene expression by increasing not only DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT-3B) protein level, but also total DNMT activity. Furthermore, silencing of DNMT-3B (shDNMT-3B) increased the expressions of NLRC4 and ASC. Our data demonstrated that GA treatment induces hypermethylation of promoters of NLRC4 and ASC genes, which may subsequently lead to the hindering of the assembly of the inflammasome complex in HaCaT cells. These results highlight the anti-inflammatory potential of GA-containing cosmetic agents in human skin cells and demonstrate for the first time the role of aberrant hypermethylation in this process.

  12. Nuclear RNAi contributes to the silencing of off-target genes and repetitive sequences in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xufei; Xu, Fei; Mao, Hui; Ji, Jiaojiao; Yin, Meng; Feng, Xuezhu; Guang, Shouhong

    2014-05-01

    Small RNAs recognize, bind, and regulate other complementary cellular RNAs. The introduction of small RNAs to eukaryotic cells frequently results in unintended silencing of related, but not identical, RNAs: a process termed off-target gene silencing. Off-target gene silencing is one of the major concerns during the application of small RNA-based technologies for gene discovery and the treatment of human disease. Off-target gene silencing is commonly thought to be due to inherent biochemical limitations of the RNAi machinery. Here we show that following the introduction of exogenous sources of double-stranded RNA, the nuclear RNAi pathway, but not its cytoplasmic counterparts, is the primary source of off-target silencing in Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition, we show that during the normal course of growth and development the nuclear RNAi pathway regulates repetitive gene families. Therefore, we speculate that RNAi off-target effects might not be "mistakes" but rather an intentional and genetically programmed aspect of small RNA-mediated gene silencing, which might allow small RNAs to silence rapidly evolving parasitic nucleic acids. Finally, reducing off-target effects by manipulating the nuclear RNAi pathway in vivo might improve the efficacy of small RNA-based technologies.

  13. Copy number loss or silencing of apoptosis-effector genes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mauro, James A; Butler, Shanitra N; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo a variety of DNA copy number gains and losses (CNV), raising two important questions related to cancer development: (i) Which genes are affected? (ii) And how do CNVs, that do not represent complete deletions but do represent gene-dosage alterations, impact cancer cell functions? Recent studies have indicated that CNVs in cancer can impact genes for regulatory proteins long known to be associated with cancer development, but less is understood about CNVs affecting effector genes. Also, we have recently indicated the likely importance of transcription factor binding site (TFBS) copies in effector genes, in regulating the transition from a proliferative to an apoptotic state. Here we report data-mining analyses that indicate that copies of apoptosis-effector genes are commonly lost in cancer development, in comparison to proliferation-effector genes, and when not, apoptosis effector genes have silenced chromatin structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional gene silencing mediated by chitosan/siRNA nanocomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, A. M.; Su, D.; Che, O.; Li, W. S.; Sun, L.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Yang, B.; Xu, F.

    2009-10-01

    Chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles to knock down FHL2 gene expression were reported in this work. The physicochemical properties such as particle size, surface charge, morphology and complex stability of chitosan nanoparticle-incorporated siRNA were evaluated. Nanoparticles which were formulated with chitosan/siRNA exhibited irregular, lamellar and dendritic structures with a hydrodynamic radius size of about 148 nm and net positive charges with zeta-potential value of 58.5 mV. The knockdown effect of the chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles on gene expression in FHL2 over-expressed human colorectal cancer Lovo cells was investigated. The result showed that FHL2 siRNA formulated within chitosan nanoparticles could knock down about 69.6% FHL2 gene expression, which is very similar to the 68.8% reduced gene expression when siRNA was transfected with liposome Lipofectamine. Western analysis further showed significant FHL-2 protein expression reduced by the chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. The results also showed that blocking FHL2 expression by siRNA could also inhibit the growth and proliferation of human colorectal cancer Lovo cells. The current results demonstrated that chitosan-based siRNA nanoparticles were a very efficient delivery system for siRNA in vivo as previously reported.

  15. The insulation of genes from external enhancers and silencing chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Burgess-Beusse, Bonnie; Farrell, Catherine; Gaszner, Miklos; Litt, Michael; Mutskov, Vesco; Recillas-Targa, Felix; Simpson, Melanie; West, Adam; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Insulators are DNA sequence elements that can serve in some cases as barriers to protect a gene against the encroachment of adjacent inactive condensed chromatin. Some insulators also can act as blocking elements to protect against the activating influence of distal enhancers associated with other genes. Although most of the insulators identified so far derive from Drosophila, they also are found in vertebrates. An insulator at the 5′ end of the chicken β-globin locus marks a boundary between an open chromatin domain and a region of constitutively condensed chromatin. Detailed analysis of this element shows that it possesses both enhancer blocking activity and the ability to screen reporter genes against position effects. Enhancer blocking is associated with binding of the protein CTCF; sites that bind CTCF are found at other critical points in the genome. Protection against position effects involves other properties that appear to be associated with control of histone acetylation and methylation. Insulators thus are complex elements that can help to preserve the independent function of genes embedded in a genome in which they are surrounded by regulatory signals they must ignore. PMID:12154228

  16. GENE SILENCING BY PARENTAL RNA INTERFERENCE IN THE GREEN RICE LEAFHOPPER, Nephotettix cincticeps (HEMIPTERA: CICADELLIDAE).

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yukiko; Hattori, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been widely used for investigating gene function in many nonmodel insect species. Parental RNAi causes gene knockdown in the next generation through the administration of double-strand RNA (dsRNA) to the mother generation. In this study, we demonstrate that parental RNAi mediated gene silencing is effective in determining the gene function of the cuticle and the salivary glands in green rice leafhopper (GRH), Nephotettix cincticeps (Uhler). Injection of dsRNA of NcLac2 (9 ng/female) to female parents caused a strong knockdown of laccase-2 gene of first instar nymphs, which eventually led to high mortality rates and depigmentation of side lines on the body. The effects of parental RNAi on the mortality of the nymphs were maintained through 12-14 days after the injections. We also confirmed the effectiveness of parental RNAi induced silencing on the gene expressed in the salivary gland, the gene product of which is passed from instar to instar. The parental RNAi method can be used to examine gene function by phenotyping many offspring nymphs with injection of dsRNA into a small number of parent females, and may be applicable to high-efficiency determination of gene functions in this species.

  17. Analysis of the siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing Process Targeting Three Homologous Genes Controlling Soybean Seed Oil Quality.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sha; Yin, Xiaoyan; Spollen, William; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Dong; Schoelz, James; Bilyeu, Kristin; Zhang, Zhanyuan J

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, RNA silencing has gained significant attention because of its success in genomic scale research and also in the genetic improvement of crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular basis of siRNA processing in association with its target transcript. To reveal this process for improving hpRNA-mediated gene silencing in crop plants, the soybean GmFAD3 gene family was chosen as a test model. We analyzed RNAi mutant soybean lines in which three members of the GmFAD3 gene family were silenced. The silencing levels of FAD3A, FAD3B and FAD3C were correlated with the degrees of sequence homology between the inverted repeat of hpRNA and the GmFAD3 transcripts in the RNAi lines. Strikingly, transgenes in two of the three RNAi lines were heavily methylated, leading to a dramatic reduction of hpRNA-derived siRNAs. Small RNAs corresponding to the loop portion of the hairpin transcript were detected while much lower levels of siRNAs were found outside of the target region. siRNAs generated from the 318-bp inverted repeat were found to be diced much more frequently at stem sequences close to the loop and associated with the inferred cleavage sites on the target transcripts, manifesting "hot spots". The top candidate hpRNA-derived siRNA share certain sequence features with mature miRNA. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study revealing the siRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism in crop plants using gene family GmFAD3 as a test model.

  18. Agrobacterium mediated transient gene silencing (AMTS) in Stevia rebaudiana: insights into steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Praveen; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway has emerged as bifurcation from ent-kaurenoic acid, substrate of methyl erythritol phosphate pathway that also leads to gibberellin biosynthesis. However, the genetic regulation of steviol glycoside biosynthesis has not been studied. So, in present study RNA interference (RNAi) based Agrobacterium mediated transient gene silencing (AMTS) approach was followed. SrKA13H and three SrUGTs (SrUGT85C2, SrUGT74G1 and SrUGT76G1) genes encoding ent-kaurenoic acid-13 hydroxylase and three UDP glycosyltransferases of steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway were silenced in Stevia rebaudiana to understand its molecular mechanism and association with gibberellins. RNAi mediated AMTS of SrKA13H and three SrUGTs has significantly reduced the expression of targeted endogenous genes as well as total steviol glycoside accumulation. While gibberellins (GA3) content was significantly enhanced on AMTS of SrUGT85C2 and SrKA13H. Silencing of SrKA13H and SrUGT85C2 was found to block the metabolite flux of steviol glycoside pathway and shifted it towards GA3 biosynthesis. Further, molecular docking of three SrUGT proteins has documented highest affinity of SrUGT76G1 for the substrates of alternate pathways synthesizing steviol glycosides. This could be a plausible reason for maximum reduction in steviol glycoside content on silencing of SrUGT76G1 than other genes. SrKA13H and SrUGT85C2 were identified as regulatory genes influencing carbon flux between steviol glycoside and gibberellin biosynthesis. This study has also documented the existence of alternate steviol glycoside biosynthesis route.

  19. Agrobacterium Mediated Transient Gene Silencing (AMTS) in Stevia rebaudiana: Insights into Steviol Glycoside Biosynthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guleria, Praveen; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background Steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway has emerged as bifurcation from ent-kaurenoic acid, substrate of methyl erythritol phosphate pathway that also leads to gibberellin biosynthesis. However, the genetic regulation of steviol glycoside biosynthesis has not been studied. So, in present study RNA interference (RNAi) based Agrobacterium mediated transient gene silencing (AMTS) approach was followed. SrKA13H and three SrUGTs (SrUGT85C2, SrUGT74G1 and SrUGT76G1) genes encoding ent-kaurenoic acid-13 hydroxylase and three UDP glycosyltransferases of steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway were silenced in Stevia rebaudiana to understand its molecular mechanism and association with gibberellins. Methodology/Principal Findings RNAi mediated AMTS of SrKA13H and three SrUGTs has significantly reduced the expression of targeted endogenous genes as well as total steviol glycoside accumulation. While gibberellins (GA3) content was significantly enhanced on AMTS of SrUGT85C2 and SrKA13H. Silencing of SrKA13H and SrUGT85C2 was found to block the metabolite flux of steviol glycoside pathway and shifted it towards GA3 biosynthesis. Further, molecular docking of three SrUGT proteins has documented highest affinity of SrUGT76G1 for the substrates of alternate pathways synthesizing steviol glycosides. This could be a plausible reason for maximum reduction in steviol glycoside content on silencing of SrUGT76G1 than other genes. Conclusions SrKA13H and SrUGT85C2 were identified as regulatory genes influencing carbon flux between steviol glycoside and gibberellin biosynthesis. This study has also documented the existence of alternate steviol glycoside biosynthesis route. PMID:24023961

  20. Heat-Induced Release of Epigenetic Silencing Reveals the Concealed Role of an Imprinted Plant Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Diego H.; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms suppress the transcription of transposons and DNA repeats; however, this suppression can be transiently released under prolonged heat stress. Here we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana imprinted gene SDC, which is silent during vegetative growth due to DNA methylation, is activated by heat and contributes to recovery from stress. SDC activation seems to involve epigenetic mechanisms but not canonical heat-shock perception and signaling. The heat-mediated transcriptional induction of SDC occurs particularly in young developing leaves and is proportional to the level of stress. However, this occurs only above a certain window of absolute temperatures and, thus, resembles a thermal-sensing mechanism. In addition, the re-silencing kinetics during recovery can be entrained by repeated heat stress cycles, suggesting that epigenetic regulation in plants may conserve memory of stress experience. We further demonstrate that SDC contributes to the recovery of plant biomass after stress. We propose that transcriptional gene silencing, known to be involved in gene imprinting, is also co-opted in the specific tuning of SDC expression upon heat stress and subsequent recovery. It is therefore possible that dynamic properties of the epigenetic landscape associated with silenced or imprinted genes may contribute to regulation of their expression in response to environmental challenges. PMID:25411840

  1. An siRNA-based method for efficient silencing of gene expression in mature brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Isidor, Marie S.; Winther, Sally; Basse, Astrid L.; Petersen, M. Christine H.; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan; Hansen, Jacob B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Brown adipose tissue is a promising therapeutic target for opposing obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The ability to modulate gene expression in mature brown adipocytes is important to understand brown adipocyte function and delineate novel regulatory mechanisms of non-shivering thermogenesis. The aim of this study was to optimize a lipofection-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection protocol for efficient silencing of gene expression in mature brown adipocytes. We determined that a critical parameter was to deliver the siRNA to mature adipocytes by reverse transfection, i.e. transfection of non-adherent cells. Using this protocol, we effectively knocked down both high- and low-abundance transcripts in a model of mature brown adipocytes (WT-1) as well as in primary mature mouse brown adipocytes. A functional consequence of the knockdown was confirmed by an attenuated increase in uncoupled respiration (thermogenesis) in response to β-adrenergic stimulation of mature WT-1 brown adipocytes transfected with uncoupling protein 1 siRNA. Efficient gene silencing was also obtained in various mouse and human white adipocyte models (3T3-L1, primary mouse white adipocytes, hMADS) with the ability to undergo “browning.” In summary, we report an easy and versatile reverse siRNA transfection protocol to achieve specific silencing of gene expression in various models of mature brown and browning-competent white adipocytes, including primary cells. PMID:27386153

  2. Efficient Gene Silencing in Metastatic Tumor by siRNA Formulated in Surface-modified Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shyh-Dar; Chono, Sumio; Huang, Leaf

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a nanoparticle (NP) formulation for systemically delivering siRNA into metastatic tumors. The NP, composed of nucleic acids, a polycationic peptide and cationic liposome, was prepared in a self-assembling process. The NP was then modified by PEG-lipid containing a targeting ligand, anisamide, and thus was decorated for targeting sigma receptor expressing B16F10 tumor. The activity of the targeted NP was compared with the naked NP (no PEGylation) and non-targeted NP (no ligand). The delivery efficiency of the targeted NP was 4-fold higher than the non-targeted NP and could be competed by excess free ligand. Luciferase siRNA was used to evaluate the gene silencing activity in the B16F10 cells, which were stably transduced with a luciferase gene, in a lung metastasis model. The gene silencing activity of the targeted NP was significantly higher than the other formulations and lasted for 4 days. While confocal microscopy showed the naked NP provided no tissue selectivity and non-targeted NP was ineffective for tumor uptake, the targeted NP effectively penetrated the lung metastasis, but not the liver. It resulted in 70-80% gene silencing in the metastasis model after a single i.v. injection (150 μg siRNA/kg). This effective formulation also showed very little immunotoxicity. PMID:18083264

  3. An siRNA-based method for efficient silencing of gene expression in mature brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Isidor, Marie S; Winther, Sally; Basse, Astrid L; Petersen, M Christine H; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan; Hansen, Jacob B

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is a promising therapeutic target for opposing obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The ability to modulate gene expression in mature brown adipocytes is important to understand brown adipocyte function and delineate novel regulatory mechanisms of non-shivering thermogenesis. The aim of this study was to optimize a lipofection-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection protocol for efficient silencing of gene expression in mature brown adipocytes. We determined that a critical parameter was to deliver the siRNA to mature adipocytes by reverse transfection, i.e. transfection of non-adherent cells. Using this protocol, we effectively knocked down both high- and low-abundance transcripts in a model of mature brown adipocytes (WT-1) as well as in primary mature mouse brown adipocytes. A functional consequence of the knockdown was confirmed by an attenuated increase in uncoupled respiration (thermogenesis) in response to β-adrenergic stimulation of mature WT-1 brown adipocytes transfected with uncoupling protein 1 siRNA. Efficient gene silencing was also obtained in various mouse and human white adipocyte models (3T3-L1, primary mouse white adipocytes, hMADS) with the ability to undergo "browning." In summary, we report an easy and versatile reverse siRNA transfection protocol to achieve specific silencing of gene expression in various models of mature brown and browning-competent white adipocytes, including primary cells.

  4. Intravaginal gene silencing using biodegradable polymer nanoparticles densely loaded with small-interfering RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Kim A.; Cu, Yen; Booth, Carmen J.; Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Wood, Monica J.; Mark Saltzman, W.

    2009-06-01

    Vaginal instillation of small-interfering RNA (siRNA) using liposomes has led to silencing of endogenous genes in the genital tract and protection against challenge from infectious disease. Although siRNA lipoplexes are easily formulated, several of the most effective transfection agents available commercially may be toxic to the mucosal epithelia and none are able to provide controlled or sustained release. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach using nanoparticles composed entirely of FDA-approved materials. To render these materials effective for gene silencing, we developed novel approaches to load them with high amounts of siRNA. A single dose of siRNA-loaded nanoparticles to the mouse female reproductive tract caused efficient and sustained gene silencing. Knockdown of gene expression was observed proximal (in the vaginal lumen) and distal (in the uterine horns) to the site of topical delivery. In addition, nanoparticles penetrated deep into the epithelial tissue. This is the first report demonstrating that biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are effective delivery vehicles for siRNA to the vaginal mucosa.

  5. Gene silencing following siRNA delivery to skin via coated steel microneedles: In vitro and in vivo proof-of-concept.

    PubMed

    Chong, Rosalind H E; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Emilio; Lara, Maria F; Speaker, Tycho J; Contag, Christopher H; Kaspar, Roger L; Coulman, Sion A; Hargest, Rachel; Birchall, James C

    2013-03-28

    The development of siRNA-based gene silencing therapies has significant potential for effectively treating debilitating genetic, hyper-proliferative or malignant skin conditions caused by aberrant gene expression. To be efficacious and widely accepted by physicians and patients, therapeutic siRNAs must access the viable skin layers in a stable and functional form, preferably without painful administration. In this study we explore the use of minimally-invasive steel microneedle devices to effectively deliver siRNA into skin. A simple, yet precise microneedle coating method permitted reproducible loading of siRNA onto individual microneedles. Following recovery from the microneedle surface, lamin A/C siRNA retained full activity, as demonstrated by significant reduction in lamin A/C mRNA levels and reduced lamin A/C protein in HaCaT keratinocyte cells. However, lamin A/C siRNA pre-complexed with a commercial lipid-based transfection reagent (siRNA lipoplex) was less functional following microneedle coating. As Accell-modified "self-delivery" siRNA targeted against CD44 also retained functionality after microneedle coating, this form of siRNA was used in subsequent in vivo studies, where gene silencing was determined in a transgenic reporter mouse skin model. Self-delivery siRNA targeting the reporter (luciferase/GFP) gene was coated onto microneedles and delivered to mouse footpad. Quantification of reporter mRNA and intravital imaging of reporter expression in the outer skin layers confirmed functional in vivo gene silencing following microneedle delivery of siRNA. The use of coated metal microneedles represents a new, simple, minimally-invasive, patient-friendly and potentially self-administrable method for the delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids to the skin.

  6. Virus-induced gene silencing-based functional verification of six genes associated with vernalization in wheat.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ya-Lan; Wang, Ke-Tao; Ma, Chao; Zhao, Yong-Ying; Yin, Jun

    2015-03-20

    Vernalization requirement is an important characteristic in crop breeding. Wheat is a widely grown crop in the world that possesses enormous economic significance. To better understand the gene networks in vernalization process, we performed a high-throughput RNA sequencing analysis comparing the transcriptomes of spring and winter wheat cultivars, with and without vernalization (unpublished data). In this study, we selected six unigenes (CL14010, CL12788, CL176, Unigene 16777, CL8746 and Unigene10196) from our transcriptome analysis based on their expression differences to further characterize their function. Transient silencing of the six unigenes individually were achieved through virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) using BSMV vector. The period from germination to spike differentiation were recorded and compared between plants underwent VIGS silencing and the control. Our result showed that VIGS of the six unigenes significantly shortened the period from seedling to double ridge (DR) stage. Resulting in SD period ranging from 59.8 ± 0.60 to 65.8 ± 0.48 days, compared to 85.0 ± 0.73 days in the control. The results indicated that these six unigenes function as suppressors in vernalization process and silence or down-regulation of these genes promoted flower development in wheat. Further characterization of these six unigenes and their function in vernalization and flowering control is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Silencing of Two Insulin Receptor Genes Disrupts Nymph-Adult Transition of Alate Brown Citrus Aphid

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bi-Yue; Shang, Feng; Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Ying; Yang, Qun; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Insulin receptors play key roles in growth, development, and polymorphism in insects. Here, we report two insulin receptor genes (AcInR1 and AcInR2) from the brown citrus aphid, Aphis (Toxoptera) citricidus. Transcriptional analyses showed that AcInR1 increased during the nymph–adult transition in alate aphids, while AcInR2 had the highest expression level in second instar nymphs. AcInR1 is important in aphid development from fourth instar nymphs to adults as verified by dsRNA feeding mediated RNAi. The silencing of AcInR1 or/and AcInR2 produced a variety of phenotypes including adults with normal wings, malformed wings, under-developed wings, and aphids failing to develop beyond the nymphal stages. Silencing of AcInR1 or AcInR2 alone, and co-silencing of both genes, resulted in 73% or 60%, and 87% of aphids with problems in the transition from nymph to normal adult. The co-silencing of AcInR1 and AcInR2 resulted in 62% dead nymphs, but no mortality occurred by silencing of AcInR1 or AcInR2 alone. Phenotypes of adults in the dsInR1 and dsInR2 were similar. The results demonstrate that AcInR1 and AcInR2 are essential for successful nymph–adult transition in alate aphids and show that RNAi methods may be useful for the management of this pest. PMID:28230772

  8. Tomato Mosaic Virus Replication Protein Suppresses Virus-Targeted Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kenji; Tsuda, Shinya; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2003-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS), a homology-dependent RNA degradation system, has a role in defending against virus infection in plants, but plant viruses encode a suppressor to combat PTGS. Using transgenic tobacco in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is posttranscriptionally silenced, we investigated a tomato mosaic virus (ToMV)-encoded PTGS suppressor. Infection with wild-type ToMV (L strain) interrupted GFP silencing in tobacco, coincident with visible symptoms, whereas some attenuated strains of ToMV (L11 and L11A strains) failed to suppress GFP silencing. Analyses of recombinant viruses containing the L and L11A strains revealed that a single base change in the replicase gene, which causes an amino acid substitution, is responsible for the symptomless and suppressor-defective phenotypes of the attenuated strains. An agroinfiltration assay indicated that the 130K replication protein acts as a PTGS suppressor. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of 21 to 25 nucleotides accumulated during ToMV infection, suggesting that the major target of the ToMV-encoded suppressor is downstream from the production of siRNAs in the PTGS pathway. Analysis with GFP-tagged recombinant viruses revealed that the suppressor inhibits the establishment of the ToMV-targeted PTGS system in the inoculated leaves but does not detectably suppress the activity of the preexisting, sequence-specific PTGS machinery there. Taken together, these results indicate that it is likely that the ToMV-encoded suppressor, the 130K replication protein, blocks the utilization of silencing-associated small RNAs, so that a homology-dependent RNA degradation machinery is not newly formed. PMID:14512550

  9. Requirements for gene silencing mediated by U1 snRNA binding to a target sequence

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Xabi; Vera, Maria; Jung, Stephen P.; Oswald, Evelyn; Romero, Inés; Amin, Vaibhav; Fortes, Puri; Gunderson, Samuel I.

    2008-01-01

    U1 interference (U1i) is a novel method to block gene expression. U1i requires expression of a 5′-end-mutated U1 snRNA designed to base pair to the 3′-terminal exon of the target gene's pre-mRNA that leads to inhibition of polyadenylation. Here, we show U1i is robust (≥95%) and a 10-nt target length is sufficient for good silencing. Surprisingly, longer U1 snRNAs, which could increase annealing to the target, fail to improve silencing. Extensive mutagenesis of the 10-bp U1 snRNA:target duplex shows that any single mismatch different from GU at positions 3–8, destroys silencing. However, mismatches within the other positions give partial silencing, suggesting that off-target inhibition could occur. The specificity of U1i may be enhanced, however, by the fact that silencing is impaired by RNA secondary structure or by splicing factors binding nearby, the latter mediated by Arginine-Serine (RS) domains. U1i inhibition can be reconstituted in vivo by tethering of RS domains of U1-70K and U2AF65. These results help to: (i) define good target sites for U1i; (ii) identify and understand natural cellular examples of U1i; (iii) clarify the contribution of hydrogen bonding to U1i and to U1 snRNP binding to 5′ splice sites and (iv) understand the mechanism of U1i. PMID:18299285

  10. Silencing of Two Insulin Receptor Genes Disrupts Nymph-Adult Transition of Alate Brown Citrus Aphid.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bi-Yue; Shang, Feng; Zhang, Qiang; Xiong, Ying; Yang, Qun; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-02-21

    Insulin receptors play key roles in growth, development, and polymorphism in insects. Here, we report two insulin receptor genes (AcInR1 and AcInR2) from the brown citrus aphid, Aphis (Toxoptera) citricidus. Transcriptional analyses showed that AcInR1 increased during the nymph-adult transition in alate aphids, while AcInR2 had the highest expression level in second instar nymphs. AcInR1 is important in aphid development from fourth instar nymphs to adults as verified by dsRNA feeding mediated RNAi. The silencing of AcInR1 or/and AcInR2 produced a variety of phenotypes including adults with normal wings, malformed wings, under-developed wings, and aphids failing to develop beyond the nymphal stages. Silencing of AcInR1 or AcInR2 alone, and co-silencing of both genes, resulted in 73% or 60%, and 87% of aphids with problems in the transition from nymph to normal adult. The co-silencing of AcInR1 and AcInR2 resulted in 62% dead nymphs, but no mortality occurred by silencing of AcInR1 or AcInR2 alone. Phenotypes of adults in the dsInR1 and dsInR2 were similar. The results demonstrate that AcInR1 and AcInR2 are essential for successful nymph-adult transition in alate aphids and show that RNAi methods may be useful for the management of this pest.

  11. Double-stranded RNA made in C. elegans neurons can enter the germline and cause transgenerational gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Devanapally, Sindhuja; Ravikumar, Snusha; Jose, Antony M.

    2015-01-01

    An animal that can transfer gene-regulatory information from somatic cells to germ cells may be able to communicate changes in the soma from one generation to the next. In the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, expression of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in neurons can result in the export of dsRNA-derived mobile RNAs to other distant cells. Here, we show that neuronal mobile RNAs can cause transgenerational silencing of a gene of matching sequence in germ cells. Consistent with neuronal mobile RNAs being forms of dsRNA, silencing of target genes that are expressed either in somatic cells or in the germline requires the dsRNA-selective importer SID-1. In contrast to silencing in somatic cells, which requires dsRNA expression in each generation, silencing in the germline is heritable after a single generation of exposure to neuronal mobile RNAs. Although initiation of inherited silencing within the germline requires SID-1, a primary Argonaute RDE-1, a secondary Argonaute HRDE-1, and an RNase D homolog MUT-7, maintenance of inherited silencing is independent of SID-1 and RDE-1, but requires HRDE-1 and MUT-7. Inherited silencing can persist for >25 generations in the absence of the ancestral source of neuronal dsRNA. Therefore, our results suggest that sequence-specific regulatory information in the form of dsRNA can be transferred from neurons to the germline to cause transgenerational silencing. PMID:25646479

  12. Chromosomal aberrations in tire plant workers and interaction with polymorphisms of biotransformation and DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Musak, Ludovit; Soucek, Pavel; Vodickova, Ludmila; Naccarati, Alessio; Halasova, Erika; Polakova, Veronika; Slyskova, Jana; Susova, Simona; Buchancova, Janka; Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Sedikova, Jana; Klimentova, Gabriela; Osina, Oto; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel

    2008-05-10

    We evaluated chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of 177 workers exposed to xenobiotics in a tire plant and in 172 controls, in relation to their genetic background. Nine polymorphisms in genes encoding biotransformation enzymes and nine polymorphisms in genes involved in main DNA repair pathways were investigated for possible modulation of chromosomal damage. Chromosomal aberration frequencies were the highest among exposed smokers and the lowest in non-smoking unexposed individuals (2.5+/-1.8% vs. 1.7+/-1.2%, respectively). The differences between groups (ANOVA) were borderline significant (F=2.6, P=0.055). Chromosomal aberrations were higher in subjects with GSTT1-null (2.4+/-1.7%) than in those with GSTT1-plus genotype (1.8+/-1.4%; F=7.2, P=0.008). Considering individual groups, this association was significant in smoking exposed workers (F=4.4, P=0.040). Individuals with low activity EPHX1 genotype exhibited significantly higher chromosomal aberrations (2.3+/-1.6%) in comparison with those bearing medium (1.7+/-1.2%) and high activity genotype (1.5+/-1.2%; F=4.7, P=0.010). Both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberration frequencies were mainly affected by exposure and smoking status. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed that frequencies of chromatid-type aberrations were modulated by NBS1 Glu185Gln (OR 4.26, 95%CI 1.38-13.14, P=0.012), and to a moderate extent, by XPD Lys751Gln (OR 0.16, 95%CI 0.02-1.25, P=0.081) polymorphisms. Chromosome-type aberrations were lowest in individuals bearing the EPHX1 genotype conferring the high activity (OR 0.38, 95%CI 0.15-0.98, P=0.045). Present results show that exposed individuals in the tire production, who smoke, exhibit higher chromosomal aberrations frequencies, and the extent of chromosomal damage may additionally be modified by relevant polymorphisms.

  13. MR VIGS: microRNA-based virus-induced gene silencing in plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Zhang, Qi; Kong, Junhua; Hu, Feng; Li, Bin; Wu, Chaoqun; Qin, Cheng; Zhang, Pengcheng; Shi, Nongnong; Hong, Yiguo

    2015-01-01

    In plants, microRNA (miRNA)-based virus-induced gene silencing, dubbed MR VIGS, is a powerful technique to delineate the biological functions of genes. By targeting to a specific sequence, miRNAs can knock down expression of genes with fewer off-target effects. Here, using a modified Cabbage leaf curling virus (CaLCuV) and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) as vectors, we describe two virus-based miRNA expression systems to perform MR VIGS for plant functional genomics assays.

  14. Bidirectional transfer of RNAi between honey bee and Varroa destructor: Varroa gene silencing reduces Varroa population.

    PubMed

    Garbian, Yael; Maori, Eyal; Kalev, Haim; Shafir, Sharoni; Sela, Ilan

    2012-12-01

    The mite Varroa destructor is an obligatory ectoparasite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and is one of the major threats to apiculture worldwide. We previously reported that honey bees fed on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) with a sequence homologous to that of the Israeli acute paralysis virus are protected from the viral disease. Here we show that dsRNA ingested by bees is transferred to the Varroa mite and from mite on to a parasitized bee. This cross-species, reciprocal exchange of dsRNA between bee and Varroa engendered targeted gene silencing in the latter, and resulted in an over 60% decrease in the mite population. Thus, transfer of gene-silencing-triggering molecules between this invertebrate host and its ectoparasite could lead to a conceptually novel approach to Varroa control.

  15. Defined Folate-PEG-siRNA Conjugates for Receptor-specific Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Christian; Fröhlich, Thomas; Lächelt, Ulrich; Röhl, Ingo; Vornlocher, Hans-Peter; Hadwiger, Philipp; Wagner, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    Gene silencing mediated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a novel approach in the development of new cancer therapeutics. Polycations used for nucleic acid delivery still remain heterogeneous compounds, despite continuous progress in polymer synthetic technologies. Here we report the development of a structural defined folic acid polyethylene glycol (PEG) siRNA conjugate accessible via click chemistry yielding a monodisperse ligand-PEG-siRNA conjugate. The folic acid targeting ligand was synthesized by solid phase supported peptide chemistry. The conjugate was shown to be specifically internalized into folic acid receptor expressing cells. When combined with a structurally defined polycation, again synthesized with the precision of solid phase chemistry, efficient receptor specific gene silencing is achieved. PMID:23344624

  16. RNA interference in Entamoeba histolytica: implications for parasite biology and gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanbang; Pompey, Justine M; Singh, Upinder

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a major health threat to people in developing countries, where it causes invasive diarrhea and liver abscesses. The study of this important human pathogen has been hindered by a lack of tools for genetic manipulation. Recently, a number of genetic approaches based on variations of the RNAi method have been successfully developed and cloning of endogenous small-interfering RNAs from E. histolytica revealed an abundant population of small RNAs with an unusual 5′-polyphosphate structure. However, little is known about the implications of these findings to amebic biology or the mechanisms of gene silencing in this organism. In this article we review the literature relevant to RNAi in E. histolytica, discuss its implications for advances in gene silencing in this organism and outline potential future directions towards understanding the repertoire of RNAi and its impact on the biology of this deep-branching eukaryotic parasite. PMID:21162639

  17. [Experiment studies on growth and proliferation of Hep-2 cells by silence of TRF2 gene].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Luyan; Xu, Yong; Tao, Zezhang

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the effect of RNA interference silencing telomere repeat factor 2 by observing Hep-2 cells' proliferation and apoptosis in larynx carcinoma cell line. A recombinant plasmid containing a single shRNA (shTRF2) was constructed. The expression of TRF2 gene was detected by PCR and cell proliferation was examined using CCK-8. Hep-2 cells' apoptosis was detected by flow cytometer (FCM). After treatment with shTRF2, the expression of TRF2 was distinctively depressed, and Hep-2 cells proliferation was obviously inhibited. Compared with control and negative group, cells with treatment of RNAi exhibited significantly more apoptosis. Using RNA interference technique to silence TRF2 gene is effective on inhibiting cancer cells' proliferation and help to induce cancer cells' apoptosis.

  18. Bidirectional Transfer of RNAi between Honey Bee and Varroa destructor: Varroa Gene Silencing Reduces Varroa Population

    PubMed Central

    Kalev, Haim; Shafir, Sharoni; Sela, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    The mite Varroa destructor is an obligatory ectoparasite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and is one of the major threats to apiculture worldwide. We previously reported that honey bees fed on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) with a sequence homologous to that of the Israeli acute paralysis virus are protected from the viral disease. Here we show that dsRNA ingested by bees is transferred to the Varroa mite and from mite on to a parasitized bee. This cross-species, reciprocal exchange of dsRNA between bee and Varroa engendered targeted gene silencing in the latter, and resulted in an over 60% decrease in the mite population. Thus, transfer of gene-silencing-triggering molecules between this invertebrate host and its ectoparasite could lead to a conceptually novel approach to Varroa control. PMID:23308063

  19. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Liscombe, David K.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) plants. Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003–0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the bisindole alkaloids ultimately rely on the isolation and characterization of the genes involved. Several vindoline biosynthetic genes have been isolated, and the cellular and subcellular organization of the corresponding enzymes has been well studied. However, due to the leaf-specific localization of vindoline biosynthesis, and the lack of production of this precursor in cell suspension and hairy root cultures of C. roseus, further elucidation of this pathway demands the development of reverse genetics approaches to assay gene function in planta. The bipartite pTRV vector system is a Tobacco Rattle Virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) platform that has provided efficient and effective means to assay gene function in diverse plant systems. We have developed a VIGS method to investigate gene function in C. roseus plants using the pTRV vector system. The utility of this approach in understanding gene function in C. roseus leaves is demonstrated by silencing known vindoline biosynthetic genes previously characterized in vitro. PMID:21802100

  20. Genome-wide screening for methylation-silenced genes in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Khamas, Ahmed; Ishikawa, Toshiaki; Mogushi, Kaoru; Iida, Satoru; Ishiguro, Megumi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Uetake, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2012-08-01

    Identification of methylation-silenced genes in colorectal cancer (CRC) is of great importance. We employed oligonucleotide microarrays to identify differences in global gene expression of five CRC cell lines (HCT116, RKO, Colo320, SW480 and HT29) that were analyzed before and after treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine. Selected candidates were subjected to methylation-specific PCR and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR using 15 CRC cell lines and 23 paired tumor and normal samples from CRC patients. After 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine treatment, 139 genes were re-expressed in all 5 CRC cell lines collectively with a fold change of more than 1.5 in at least one cell line. These genes include known methylated and silenced genes in CRC. After applying study selection criteria we identified 20 candidates. The GADD45B and THSD1 genes were selected for further analysis. Among 15 colon cancer cell lines, methylation was only identified in THSD1 (27%). THSD1 methylation was subsequently investigated in 23 colorectal tumors and methylation was detected in 9% of the analyzed samples; the observed promoter hypermethylation was cancer-specific. THSD1 mRNA down-regulation was observed in tumor tissues. This genome-wide screening led to the identification of genes putatively affected by methylation in CRC. The THSD1 gene may play a role in the tumorigenesis of CRC.

  1. Enhanced Gene Silencing through Human Serum Albumin-Mediated Delivery of Polyethylenimine-siRNA Polyplexes

    PubMed Central

    Nicolì, Elena; Syga, Marie Isabel; Bosetti, Michela; Shastri, V. Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted therapeutics (STT) offers a compelling alternative to tradition medications for treatment of genetic diseases by providing a means to silence the expression of specific aberrant proteins, through interference at the expression level. The perceived advantage of siRNA therapy is its ability to target, through synthetic antisense oligonucleotides, any part of the genome. Although STT provides a high level of specificity, it is also hindered by poor intracellular uptake, limited blood stability, high degradability and non-specific immune stimulation. Since serum proteins has been considered as useful vehicles for targeting tumors, in this study we investigated the effect of incorporation of human serum albumin (HSA) in branched polyethylenimine (bPEI)-siRNA polyplexes in their internalization in epithelial and endothelial cells. We observed that introduction of HSA preserves the capacity of bPEI to complex with siRNA and protect it against extracellular endonucleases, while affording significantly improved internalization and silencing efficiency, compared to bPEI-siRNA polyplexes in endothelial and metastatic breast cancer epithelial cells. Furthermore, the uptake of the HSA-bPEI-siRNA ternary polyplexes occurred primarily through a caveolae-mediated endocytosis, thus providing evidence for a clear role for HSA in polyplex internalization. These results provide further impetus to explore the role of serum proteins in delivery of siRNA. PMID:25856158

  2. Compromised virus-induced gene silencing in RDR6-deficient plants.

    PubMed

    Vaistij, Fabián E; Jones, Louise

    2009-03-01

    RNA silencing in plants serves as a potent antiviral defense mechanism through the action of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which direct RNA degradation. siRNAs can be derived directly from the viral genome or via the action of host-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs). Plant genomes encode multiple RDRs, and it has been demonstrated that plants defective for RDR6 hyperaccumulate several classes of virus. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) in wild-type and RDR6-deficient Nicotiana benthamiana plants. For the potexvirus Potato virus X (PVX) and the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV), the efficiency of both VIGS and RdDM were compromised in RDR6-defective plants despite accumulating high levels of viral siRNAs similar to infection of wild-type plants. The reduced efficiency of VIGS and RdDM was unrelated to the size class of siRNA produced and, at least for PVX, was not dependent on the presence of the virus-encoded silencing suppressor protein, 25K. We suggest that primary siRNAs produced from PVX and PPV in the absence of RDR6 may not be good effectors of silencing and that RDR6 is required to produce secondary siRNAs that drive a more effective antiviral response.

  3. Plant-mediated gene silencing restricts growth of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Sultana N; Åsman, Anna K M; Corcoran, Pádraic; Fogelqvist, Johan; Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Dixelius, Christina

    2015-05-01

    Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete that causes severe damage to potato, and is well known for its ability to evolve rapidly in order to overcome resistant potato varieties. An RNA silencing strategy was evaluated here to clarify if small interfering RNA homologous to selected genes in P. infestans could be targeted from the plant host to reduce the magnitude of the infection. As a proof-of-concept, a hairpin RNA (hp-RNA) construct using the GFP marker gene was designed and introduced in potato. At 72 hpi, a 55-fold reduction of the signal intensity of a corresponding GFP expressing P. infestans strain on leaf samples of transgenic plants, compared with wild-type potato, was detected. This suggests that an RNA interference construct in the potato host could be processed and target a transcript of the pathogen. Three genes important in the infection process of P. infestans, PiGPB1, PiCESA2, and PiPEC, together with PiGAPDH taking part in basic cell maintenance were subsequently tested using an analogous transgenic strategy. Out of these gene candidates, the hp-PiGPB1 targeting the G protein β-subunit (PiGPB1) important for pathogenicity resulted in most restricted disease progress. Further, Illumina sequencing of inoculated transgenic potato leaves revealed sRNAs of 24/25 nt size homologous to the PiGPB1 gene in the transgenic plants indicating post-transcriptional silencing of the target gene. The work demonstrates that a host-induced gene-silencing approach is functional against P. infestans but is highly dependent on target gene for a successful outcome. This finding broadens the arsenal of control strategies to this important plant disease.

  4. Gene silencing by chemically modified siRNAs.

    PubMed

    Engels, Joachim W

    2013-03-25

    RNA interference (RNAi) has not only already risen as a gold standard for validating gene function in basic science studies, but also holds great promise as a new therapeutic paradigm. Advantages of RNAi-based therapeutics include relatively fast initial screening and the ability to target proteins not yet addressable by traditional drug design strategies. In this review we describe the development of chemically modified small inhibiting siRNAs and their application as potential therapeutics during the past decade. Focus is on proper siRNA design, choice of chemical modification and how to circumvent immunogenicity as well as off-target effects.

  5. X-inactivation and the dynamic maintenance of gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Salstrom, Jennifer L

    2007-01-01

    X-inactivation has long been a topic of fascination for educators, researchers, and clinicians alike. From complex patterns of inheritance to phenotypic variation among females with X-linked traits, a myriad of hypothesis and interpretations exist. Once thought to be random yet complete, X-inactivation has proven itself the poster child of the exception rather than the rule. Indeed, patterns of X-inactivation are all too often non-random, and many X-linked genes are capable of escaping X-inactivation. Similarly, X-inactivation is well-known for being stably maintained for life, but some previously inactivated X-linked genes reactivate with increasing age. Moreover, recent papers illustrate that X-inactivation can be challenged in other ways, thereby rendering the stability of X-inactivation compromised. This review describes factors involved in the maintenance of X-inactivation as we know it and discusses these emerging data that suggest a more dynamic model of the maintenance of X-inactivation may be in order.

  6. Gene Silencing Associated with SWI/SNF Complex Loss During NSCLC Development

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shujie; Walter, Vonn; Karaca, Mehmet; Li, Ying; Bartlett, Christopher S.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.; Serber, Daniel; Sproul, Christopher D.; Plass, Christoph; Zhang, Jiren; Hayes, D. Neil; Zheng, Yanfang; Weissman, Bernard E.

    2014-01-01

    The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex regulates gene expression and alters chromatin structures in an ATP-dependent manner. Recent sequencing efforts have shown mutations in BRG1 (SMARCA4), one of two mutually exclusive ATPase subunits in the complex, in a significant number of human lung tumor cell lines and primary non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) clinical specimens. To determine how BRG1 loss fuels tumor progression in NSCLC, molecular profiling was performed after restoration of BRG1 expression or treatment with an HDAC inhibitor or a DNMT inhibitor in a BRG1-deficient NSCLC cells. Importantly, validation studies from multiple cell lines revealed that BRG1 re-expression led to substantial changes in the expression of CDH1, CDH3, EHF and RRAD that commonly undergo silencing by other epigenetic mechanisms during NSCLC development. Furthermore, treatment with DNMT inhibitors did not restore expression of these transcripts indicating that this common mechanism of gene silencing did not account for their loss of expression. Collectively, BRG1 loss is an important mechanism for the epigenetic silencing of target genes during NSCLC development. PMID:24445599

  7. Directional gene silencing induced by a complex subtelomeric satellite from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kurenova, E; Champion, L; Biessmann, H; Mason, J M

    1998-11-01

    The telomeric regions in Drosophila cause transcriptional silencing of integrated transgenes. A complex satellite has recently been identified in the subterminal region of the left arm of chromosome 2 that is a good candidate for the source of the observed telomeric silencing, because genetically marked transposable elements that have inserted into this subtelomeric array show repression and variegation of the reporter gene. We asked whether this satellite can also cause transcriptional repression in ectopic chromosomal positions by placing it upstream of a mini-white reporter gene in P element constructs used for germ line transformation. The transgenes are shielded from external influences at the integration site using SU(HW) binding sites at either end. It was found that the satellite represses transcription of the reporter gene in an orientation dependent and an array length dependent manner. The satellite does not, however, induce variegation under the conditions used. The repressed transgenes do not respond to typical modifiers of centromeric position effect variegation, such as Su(var)2055, Su(var)2-11, Su(var)3-11, and Su(var)3-61, or to the addition of a Y chromosome. However, as with the original variegating telomeric insertion, suppression in the transgenes is relieved by Su(z)25, suggesting that suppression induced by the subtelomeric satellite retains aspects of telomeric silencing in ectopic positions.

  8. DNA Elements Reducing Transcriptional Gene Silencing Revealed by a Novel Screening Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Keiichiro; Ohashi, Yuko; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS)–a phenomenon observed in endogenous genes/transgenes in eukaryotes–is a huge hindrance to transgenic technology and occurs mainly when the genes involved share sequence homology in their promoter regions. TGS depends on chromosomal position, suggesting the existence of genomic elements that suppress TGS. However, no systematic approach to identify such DNA elements has yet been reported. Here, we developed a successful novel screening strategy to identify such elements (anti-silencing regions–ASRs), based on their ability to protect a flanked transgene from TGS. A silenced transgenic tobacco plant in which a subsequently introduced transgene undergoes obligatory promoter-homology dependent TGS in trans allowed the ability of DNA elements to prevent TGS to be used as the screening criterion. We also identified ASRs in a genomic library from a different plant species (Lotus japonicus: a perennial legume); the ASRs include portions of Ty1/copia retrotransposon-like and pararetrovirus-like sequences; the retrotransposon-like sequences also showed interspecies anti-TGS activity in a TGS-induction system in Arabidopsis. Anti-TGS elements could provide effective tools to reduce TGS and ensure proper regulation of transgene expression. Furthermore, the screening strategy described here will also facilitate the efficient identification of new classes of anti-TGS elements. PMID:23382937

  9. Dietary and genetic effects on age-related loss of gene silencing reveal epigenetic plasticity of chromatin repression during aging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Du, Guyu; Tobias, Ethan; Wood, Jason G; Whitaker, Rachel; Neretti, Nicola; Helfand, Stephen L

    2013-11-01

    During aging, changes in chromatin state that alter gene transcription have been postulated to result in expression of genes that are normally silenced, leading to deleterious age-related effects on cellular physiology. Despite the prevalence of this hypothesis, it is primarily in yeast that loss of gene silencing with age has been well documented. We use a novel position effect variegation (PEV) reporter in Drosophila melanogaster to show that age-related loss of repressive heterochromatin is associated with loss of gene silencing in metazoans and is affected by Sir2, as it is in yeast. The life span-extending intervention, calorie restriction (CR), delays the age-related loss of gene silencing, indicating that loss of gene silencing is a component of normal aging. Diet switch experiments show that such flies undergo a rapid change in their level of gene silencing, demonstrating the epigenetic plasticity of chromatin during aging and highlighting the potential role of diet and metabolism in chromatin maintenance, Thus, diet and related interventions may be of therapeutic importance for age-related diseases, such as cancer.

  10. Multifunctional nanocarrier based on clay nanotubes for efficient intracellular siRNA delivery and gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Shi, Yinfeng; Huang, Chusen; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Jiahui; Shen, Hebai; Jia, Nengqin

    2014-04-01

    RNA interference-mediated gene silencing relating to disease has recently emerged as a powerful method in gene therapy. Despite the promises, effective transport of siRNA with minimal side effects remains a challenge. Halloysites are cheap and naturally available aluminosilicate clay nanotubes with high mechanical strength and biocompatibility. In this study, a novel multifunctional nanocarrier based on functionalized halloysite nanotubes (f-HNTs) has been developed via electrostatic layer-by-layer assembling approach for loading and intracellular delivery of therapeutic antisurvivin siRNA and simultaneously tracking their intracellular transport, in which PEI-modified HNTs are used as gene vector, antisurvivin siRNA as gene therapeutic agent, and mercaptoacetic acid-capped CdSe quantum dots as fluorescent labeling probes. The successful assembly of the f-HNTs-siRNA complexes was systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible spectrophotometry, Zeta potential measurement, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Confocal microscopy, biological TEM, and flow cytometry studies revealed that the complexes enabled the efficient intracellular delivery of siRNA for cell-specific gene silencing. MTT assays exhibited that the complexes can enhance antitumor activity. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that f-HNTs-mediated siRNA delivery effectively knocked down gene expression of survivin and thereby decreased the levels of target proteins of PANC-1 cells. Therefore, this study suggested that the synthesized f-HNTs were a new effective drug delivery system for potential application in cancer gene therapy.

  11. Elucidation of the Molecular Mechanisms for Aberrant Expression of Breast Cancer Specific Gene 1 in Invasive and Metastatic Breast Carcinomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    cells in mitosis. Mutations in any of these genes result in failure to arrest Keywords: BCSG I: BubRl; mitotic checkpoint; yeast the cell cycle at G2...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0534 TITLE: Elucidation of the Molecular Mechanisms for Aberrant Expression of Breast Cancer Specific Gene 1 in Invasive...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Elucidation of the Molecular Mechanisms for Aberrant DAMD17-02-1-0534 Expression of Breast Cancer Specific Gene 1 in Invasive

  12. Gene silencing in Medicago truncatula roots using RNAi.

    PubMed

    Floss, Daniela S; Schmitz, Alexa M; Starker, Colby G; Gantt, J Stephen; Harrison, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Medicago truncatula is used widely as a model system for studies of root symbioses, interactions with parasitic nematodes and fungal pathogens, as well as studies of development and secondary metabolism. In Medicago truncatula as well as other legumes, RNA interference (RNAi) coupled with Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated root transformation, has been used very successfully for analyses of gene function in roots. One of the major advantages of this approach is the ease and relative speed with which transgenic roots can be generated. There are several methods, both for the generation of the RNAi constructs and the root transformation. Here we provide details of an RNAi and root transformation protocol that has been used successfully in M. truncatula and which can be scaled up to enable the analysis of several hundred constructs.

  13. CRISPR Interference Efficiently Induces Specific and Reversible Gene Silencing in Human iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Mandegar, Mohammad A; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Frolov, Ekaterina B; Shin, Edward; Truong, Annie; Olvera, Michael P; Chan, Amanda H; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Holmes, Kristin; Spencer, C Ian; Judge, Luke M; Gordon, David E; Eskildsen, Tilde V; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Horlbeck, Max A; Gilbert, Luke A; Krogan, Nevan J; Sheikh, Søren P; Weissman, Jonathan S; Qi, Lei S; So, Po-Lin; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-04-07

    Developing technologies for efficient and scalable disruption of gene expression will provide powerful tools for studying gene function, developmental pathways, and disease mechanisms. Here, we develop clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat interference (CRISPRi) to repress gene expression in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). CRISPRi, in which a doxycycline-inducible deactivated Cas9 is fused to a KRAB repression domain, can specifically and reversibly inhibit gene expression in iPSCs and iPSC-derived cardiac progenitors, cardiomyocytes, and T lymphocytes. This gene repression system is tunable and has the potential to silence single alleles. Compared with CRISPR nuclease (CRISPRn), CRISPRi gene repression is more efficient and homogenous across cell populations. The CRISPRi system in iPSCs provides a powerful platform to perform genome-scale screens in a wide range of iPSC-derived cell types, dissect developmental pathways, and model disease.

  14. A virus-induced gene silencing method to study soybean cyst nematode parasitism in Glycine max

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors have been developed and used in soybean for the functional analysis of genes involved in disease resistance to foliar pathogens. However, BPMV-VIGS protocols for studying genes involved in disease resistance or symbiotic associations with root microbes have not been developed. Findings Here we describe a BPMV-VIGS protocol suitable for reverse genetic studies in soybean roots. We use this method for analyzing soybean genes involved in resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN). A detailed SCN screening pipeline is described. Conclusions The VIGS method described here provides a new tool to identify genes involved in soybean-nematode interactions. This method could be adapted to study genes associated with any root pathogenic or symbiotic associations. PMID:23830484

  15. CRISPR Interference Efficiently Induces Specific and Reversible Gene Silencing in Human iPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Mandegar, Mohammad A.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Frolov, Ekaterina B.; Shin, Edward; Truong, Annie; Olvera, Michael P.; Chan, Amanda H.; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Holmes, Kristin; Spencer, C. Ian; Judge, Luke M.; Gordon, David E.; Eskildsen, Tilde V.; Villalta, Jacqueline E.; Horlbeck, Max A.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Sheikh, Søren P.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Qi, Lei S.; So, Po-Lin; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Developing technologies for efficient and scalable disruption of gene expression will provide powerful tools for studying gene function, developmental pathways, and disease mechanisms. Here we develop CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) to repress gene expression in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). CRISPRi, in which a doxycycline-inducible deactivated Cas9 is fused to a KRAB repression domain, can specifically and reversibly inhibit gene expression in iPSCs and iPSC-derived cardiac progenitors, cardiomyocytes, and T lymphocytes. This gene repression system is tunable and has the potential to silence single alleles. Compared with CRISPR nuclease (CRISPRn), CRISPRi gene repression is more efficient and homogenous across cell populations. The CRISPRi system in iPSCs provides a powerful platform to perform genome-scale screens in a wide range of iPSC-derived cell types, and to dissect developmental pathways and model disease. PMID:26971820

  16. The effect of RAFT-derived cationic block copolymer structure on gene silencing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Tracey M; Guerrero-Sanchez, Carlos; Graham, Janease E; Le, Tam; Muir, Benjamin W; Shi, Shuning; Tizard, Mark L V; Gunatillake, Pathiraja A; McLean, Keith M; Thang, San H

    2012-10-01

    In this work a series of ABA tri-block copolymers was prepared from oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA(475)) and N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) to investigate the effect of polymer composition on cell viability, siRNA uptake, serum stability and gene silencing. Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization was used as the method of polymer synthesis as this technique allows the preparation of well-defined block copolymers with low polydispersity. Eight block copolymers were prepared by systematically varying the central cationic block (DMAEMA) length from 38 to 192 monomer units and the outer hydrophilic block (OEGMA(475)) from 7 to 69 units. The polymers were characterized using size exclusion chromatography and (1)H NMR. Chinese Hamster Ovary-GFP and Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells were used to assay cell viability while the efficiency of block copolymers to complex with siRNA was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis. The ability of the polymer-siRNA complexes to enter into cells and to silence the targeted reporter gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was measured by using a CHO-GFP silencing assay. The length of the central cationic block appears to be the key structural parameter that has a significant effect on cell viability and gene silencing efficiency with block lengths of 110-120 monomer units being the optimum. The ABA block copolymer architecture is also critical with the outer hydrophilic blocks contributing to serum stability and overall efficiency of the polymer as a delivery system.

  17. Celastrol overcomes HSP72 gene silencing-mediated muscle atrophy and induces myofiber preservation.

    PubMed

    Gwag, T; Park, K; Park, J; Lee, J-H; Nikawa, T; Choi, I

    2015-04-01

    To elucidate a potential anabolic role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in myofiber preservation, we assessed the effect of HSP70 gene silencing versus its overexpression on skeletal muscle atrophy or rescue. HSP72 gene expression was silenced by pre-treatment with HSP72 siRNA in cultured rat L6 myotubes, and the pro-anabolic effect of HSPs was examined in the absence or presence of the HSP inducer celastrol (CEL). Compared to the negative control (NC), both nuclear accumulation and phosphorylation of heat shock transcription factor 1 remained high under the 6-h treatment of CEL. The HSP72 siRNA treatment significantly decreased HSP72 mRNA and protein expression and myotube diameter. CEL treatment, however, markedly increased the HSP72 expression and rendered the myotube size recovered to the NC level even in the siRNA-treated cells. Moreover, the HSP72 siRNA upregulated forkhead box O3 (FoxO3) expression in the nucleus while CEL increased p-FoxO3 exclusively in the cytoplasm, thus leaving the p-FoxO3/FoxO3 balanced to the NC level by siRNA + CEL treatment. The atrophic effect of HSP72 siRNA was consistent with the upregulation of atrogin-1 and proteasome activity but CEL treatment abrogated such effect by activation of Akt1, ribosomal S6 kinase (S6K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), irrespective of HSP72 silencing. These results suggest that CEL-mediated overexpression of HSP72 overcomes the atrophic effect of HSP72 gene silencing via both enhancement of FoxO3 phosphorylation and activation of Akt1-ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  18. Silencing of homeobox A5 gene in the stratum corneum of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Nobeyama, Yoshimasa; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2017-05-08

    Analysis of psoriatic parakeratotic cells is helpful for understanding the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Methylation analysis can be performed on psoriatic scales, but it is unclear whether genes can be silenced by DNA methylation in psoriatic stratum corneum. The present study was conducted to detect genes silenced in psoriatic stratum corneum. Methylation array analysis with 485 577 probes, quantitative real-time methylation-specific PCR (RT-MSP) and bisulphite sequencing were performed for 30 psoriatic scale samples, 6 fully developed psoriatic skin samples and 12 normal skin samples. Immunohistochemical staining of HOXA5 was performed for 29 psoriatic epidermal samples and 13 normal epidermal samples. The genome-wide methylation array detected two CpG sites within CpG islands (CGIs) located in promoter regions of HOXA5 and LIAS that had methylation levels of >0.6 in at least one of the three psoriatic scale samples and of <0.2 in all three normal skin tissue samples (methylation rate range, 0.0-1.0). RT-MSP for HOXA5CGI, in which the primers were successfully developed, revealed that the average methylation level of 27 psoriasis scales (60.2%) is significantly higher than that of 9 normal skin samples (34.6%) (P=.013). Immunohistochemical staining revealed that HOXA5 protein was not expressed in the stratum corneum of fully developed psoriatic epidermis, but the protein was expressed in the stratum corneum of incompletely developed epidermis and normal epidermis. In conclusion, HOXA5 can be silenced in the stratum corneum of psoriasis. The silenced gene was identified by non-invasive methylation analysis of psoriatic scales. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Structure And Gene Silencing Activities of Monovalent And Pentavalent Cationic Lipid Vectors Complexed With Sirna

    SciTech Connect

    Bouxsein, N.F.; McAllister, C.S.; Ewert, K.K.; Samuel, C.E.; Safinya, C.R.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-07-03

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of 19-25 bp mediate the cleavage of complementary mRNA, leading to post-transcriptional gene silencing. We examined cationic lipid (CL)-mediated delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells and made comparisons to CL-based DNA delivery. The effect of lipid composition and headgroup charge on the biophysical and biological properties of CL-siRNA vectors was determined. X-ray diffraction revealed that CL-siRNA complexes exhibited lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases, qualitatively similar to CL-DNA complexes, but also formed other nonlamellar structures. Surprisingly, optimally formulated inverted hexagonal 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP)/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) CL-siRNA complexes exhibited high toxicity and much lower target-specific gene silencing than lamellar CL-siRNA complexes even though optimally formulated, inverted hexagonal CL-DNA complexes show high transfection efficiency in cell culture. We further found that efficient silencing required cationic lipid/nucleic acid molar charge ratios (chg) nearly an order of magnitude larger than those yielding efficiently transfecting CL-DNA complexes. This second unexpected finding has implications for cell toxicity. Multivalent lipids (MVLs) require a smaller number of cationic lipids at a given chg of the complex. Consistent with this observation, the pentavalent lipid MVL5 exhibited lower toxicity and superior silencing efficiency over a large range in both the lipid composition and chg when compared to monovalent DOTAP. Most importantly, MVL5 achieved much higher total knockdown of the target gene in CL-siRNA complex regimes where toxicity was low. This property of CL-siRNA complexes contrasts to CL-DNA complexes, where the optimized transfection efficiencies of multivalent and monovalent lipids are comparable.

  20. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Harini; Ormsbee, Briana D.; Mallanna, Sunil K.; Rizzino, Angie

    2011-01-01

    The rapid formation of numerous tissues during development is highly dependent on the swift activation of key developmental regulators. Recent studies indicate that many key regulatory genes are repressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), yet poised for rapid activation due to the presence of both activating (H3K4 trimethylation) and repressive (H3K27 trimethylation) histone modifications (bivalent genes). However, little is known about bivalent gene regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of the bivalent gene Sox21, which is activated rapidly when ESCs differentiate in response to increases in Sox2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that prior to differentiation, the Sox21 gene is bound by a complex array of repressive and activating transcriptional machinery. Upon activation, all identified repressive machinery and histone modifications associated with the gene are lost, but the activating modifications and transcriptional machinery are retained. Notably, these changes do not occur when ESCs differentiate in response to retinoic acid. Moreover, ESCs lacking a functional PRC2 complex fail to activate this gene, apparently due to its association with other repressive complexes. Together, these findings suggest that bivalent genes, such as Sox21, are silenced by a complex set of redundant repressive machinery, which exit rapidly in response to appropriate differentiation signals.—Chakravarthy, H., Ormsbee, B. D., Mallanna, S. K., Rizzino, A. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery. PMID:20876214

  1. Gene Targets in Prostate Tumor Cells that Mediate Aberrant Growth and Invasiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Craig A. Hauser , Ph.D. Gabriele Foos, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Burnham Institute La Jolla, California 92037 REPORT DATE: February 2005 TYPE...NUMBERS Gene Targets in Prostate Tumor Cells that Mediate DAMD17-02-1-0019 Aberrant Growth and Invasiveness 6. AUTHOR(S) Craig A. Hauser , Ph.D. Gabriele...REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Foos G, Hauser CA (2004) The role of Ets transcription factors in mediating cellular transformation. In: Handbook of Experimental

  2. [Auto-vaccines: an immunological alternative to gene silencing].

    PubMed

    Uyttenhove, Catherine; van Snick, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    Auto-vaccination is a procedure that recently attracted the interest of a growing number of investigators as an alternative to gene inactivation for functional studies of cytokines or other mediators. It is based on the observation that autologous cytokines cross-linked to a foreign protein or peptide are recognized by self-reactive B cells that present foreign peptides, and by doing so attract illicit help from helper T cells that recognize the foreign peptide on the self-reactive B cell MHC Class II complex. This leads to the production of antibodies reacting with self-proteins and thus to neutralization of the targeted factor. Here, we summarize the different techniques that were successful in breaking this self-tolerance and provide several examples of the functional consequences of these auto-vaccines. An additional output of auto-vaccination is the production of mouse monoclonal antibodies against mouse factors. Such antibodies have obvious advantages for long-term use in vivo. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  3. Aberrant DNA methylation impacts gene expression and prognosis in breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Győrffy, Balázs; Bottai, Giulia; Fleischer, Thomas; Munkácsy, Gyöngyi; Budczies, Jan; Paladini, Laura; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N; Santarpia, Libero

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation has a substantial impact on gene expression, affecting the prognosis of breast cancer (BC) patients dependent on molecular subtypes. In this study, we investigated the prognostic relevance of the expression of genes reported as aberrantly methylated, and the link between gene expression and DNA methylation in BC subtypes. The prognostic value of the expression of 144 aberrantly methylated genes was evaluated in ER+/HER2-, HER2+, and ER-/HER2- molecular BC subtypes, in a meta-analysis of two large transcriptomic cohorts of BC patients (n = 1,938 and n = 1,640). The correlation between gene expression and DNA methylation in distinct gene regions was also investigated in an independent dataset of 104 BCs. Survival and Pearson correlation analyses were computed for each gene separately. The expression of 48 genes was significantly associated with BC prognosis (p < 0.05), and 32 of these prognostic genes exhibited a direct expression-methylation correlation. The expression of several immune-related genes, including CD3D and HLA-A, was associated with both relapse-free survival (HR = 0.42, p = 3.5E-06; HR = 0.35, p = 1.7E-08) and overall survival (HR = 0.50, p = 5.5E-04; HR = 0.68, p = 4.5E-02) in ER-/HER2- BCs. On the overall, the distribution of both positive and negative expression-methylation correlation in distinct gene regions have different effects on gene expression and prognosis in BC subtypes. This large-scale meta-analysis allowed the identification of several genes consistently associated with prognosis, whose DNA methylation could represent a promising biomarker for prognostication and clinical stratification of patients with distinct BC subtypes.

  4. High capacity nanoporous silicon carrier for systemic delivery of gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianliang; Xu, Rong; Mai, Junhua; Kim, Han-Cheon; Guo, Xiaojing; Qin, Guoting; Yang, Yong; Wolfram, Joy; Mu, Chaofeng; Xia, Xiaojun; Gu, Jianhua; Liu, Xuewu; Mao, Zong-Wan; Ferrari, Mauro; Shen, Haifa

    2013-11-26

    Gene silencing agents such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA offer the promise to modulate expression of almost every gene for the treatment of human diseases including cancer. However, lack of vehicles for effective systemic delivery to the disease organs has greatly limited their in vivo applications. In this study, we developed a high capacity polycation-functionalized nanoporous silicon (PCPS) platform comprised of nanoporous silicon microparticles functionalized with arginine-polyethyleneimine inside the nanopores for effective delivery of gene silencing agents. Incubation of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells with PCPS loaded with STAT3 siRNA (PCPS/STAT3) or GRP78 siRNA (PCPS/GRP78) resulted in 91 and 83% reduction of STAT3 and GRP78 gene expression in vitro. Treatment of cells with a microRNA-18a mimic in PCPS (PCPS/miR-18) knocked down 90% expression of the microRNA-18a target gene ATM. Systemic delivery of PCPS/STAT3 siRNA in murine model of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer enriched particles in tumor tissues and reduced STAT3 expression in cancer cells, causing significant reduction of cancer stem cells in the residual tumor tissue. At the therapeutic dosage, PCPS/STAT3 siRNA did not trigger acute immune response in FVB mice, including changes in serum cytokines, chemokines, and colony-stimulating factors. In addition, weekly dosing of PCPS/STAT3 siRNA for four weeks did not cause signs of subacute toxicity based on changes in body weight, hematology, blood chemistry, and major organ histology. Collectively, the results suggest that we have developed a safe vehicle for effective delivery of gene silencing agents.

  5. Gold Nanoparticle Approach to the Selective Delivery of Gene Silencing in Cancer—The Case for Combined Delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Rita; Fernandes, Alexandra R.; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy arises as a great promise for cancer therapeutics due to its potential to silence genes involved in tumor development. In fact, there are some pivotal gene drivers that suffer critical alterations leading to cell transformation and ultimately to tumor growth. In this vein, gene silencing has been proposed as an active tool to selectively silence these molecular triggers of cancer, thus improving treatment. However, naked nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences are reported to have a short lifetime in the body, promptly degraded by circulating enzymes, which in turn speed up elimination and decrease the therapeutic potential of these drugs. The use of nanoparticles for the effective delivery of these silencers to the specific target locations has allowed researchers to overcome this issue. Particularly, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used as attractive vehicles for the target-specific delivery of gene-silencing moieties, alone or in combination with other drugs. We shall discuss current trends in AuNP-based delivery of gene-silencing tools, considering the promising road ahead without overlooking existing concerns for their translation to clinics. PMID:28257109

  6. Gold Nanoparticle Approach to the Selective Delivery of Gene Silencing in Cancer-The Case for Combined Delivery?

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rita; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro V

    2017-03-02

    Gene therapy arises as a great promise for cancer therapeutics due to its potential to silence genes involved in tumor development. In fact, there are some pivotal gene drivers that suffer critical alterations leading to cell transformation and ultimately to tumor growth. In this vein, gene silencing has been proposed as an active tool to selectively silence these molecular triggers of cancer, thus improving treatment. However, naked nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences are reported to have a short lifetime in the body, promptly degraded by circulating enzymes, which in turn speed up elimination and decrease the therapeutic potential of these drugs. The use of nanoparticles for the effective delivery of these silencers to the specific target locations has allowed researchers to overcome this issue. Particularly, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used as attractive vehicles for the target-specific delivery of gene-silencing moieties, alone or in combination with other drugs. We shall discuss current trends in AuNP-based delivery of gene-silencing tools, considering the promising road ahead without overlooking existing concerns for their translation to clinics.

  7. Host-induced gene silencing inhibits the biotrophic pathogen causing downy mildew of lettuce.

    PubMed

    Govindarajulu, Manjula; Epstein, Lynn; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-09-01

    Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) is an RNA interference-based approach in which small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are produced in the host plant and subsequently move into the pathogen to silence pathogen genes. As a proof-of-concept, we generated stable transgenic lettuce plants expressing siRNAs targeting potentially vital genes of Bremia lactucae, a biotrophic oomycete that causes downy mildew, the most important disease of lettuce worldwide. Transgenic plants, expressing inverted repeats of fragments of either the Highly Abundant Message #34 (HAM34) or Cellulose Synthase (CES1) genes of B. lactucae, specifically suppressed expression of these genes, resulting in greatly reduced growth and inhibition of sporulation of B. lactucae. This demonstrates that HIGS can provide effective control of B. lactucae in lettuce; such control does not rely on ephemeral resistance conferred by major resistance genes and therefore offers new opportunities for durable control of diverse diseases in numerous crops. © 2014 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Method: low-cost delivery of the cotton leaf crumple virus-induced gene silencing system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously developed a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for cotton from the bipartite geminivirusCotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV). The original CLCrV VIGS vector was designed for biolistic delivery by a gene gun. This prerequisite limited the use of the system to labs with access to biolistic equipment. Here we describe the adaptation of this system for delivery by Agrobacterium (Agrobacterium tumefaciens). We also describe the construction of two low-cost particle inflow guns. Results The biolistic CLCrV vector was transferred into two Agrobacterium binary plasmids. Agroinoculation of the binary plasmids into cotton resulted in silencing and GFP expression comparable to the biolistic vector. Two homemade low-cost gene guns were used to successfully inoculate cotton (G. hirsutum) and N. benthamiana with either the CLCrV VIGS vector or the Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) VIGS vector respectively. Conclusions These innovations extend the versatility of CLCrV-based VIGS for analyzing gene function in cotton. The two low-cost gene guns make VIGS experiments affordable for both research and teaching labs by providing a working alternative to expensive commercial gene guns. PMID:22853641

  9. [Study on enhancing sensitivity of SPC-A1 cells to chemotherapy by Livin isoform-specific gene silencing].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianguo; Liao, Rongxia; Chen, Zhengtang; Wang, Zhixin; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Yide

    2007-12-20

    As a new member of inhibitor of apoptosis protein(IAP) family,Livin,especially Livin α,is known to be involved in occurrence and development of lung cancer.Livin is an important mechanism of chemotherapy resistance of lung cancer cell.The aim of this study is to set up Livin isoform(α & β)-specific gene silencing system in SPC-A1 cells by gene transfection and RNA interference(RNAi),and to explore the different functions and value of the isoforms in enhancing chemosensitivity of SPC-A1 cells. Livinα+β,Livinα and Livinβ specific siRNA were expressed stably in SPC-A1 cells,respectively.MTT was performed to study sensitivity of the cells to chemotherapy drugs.In vivo experiment was performed to test sensitivity of mouse bearing tumor to cisplatin after gene silencing of Livin. After silencing of Livinα+β,Livinα and Livinβ genes,sensitivity of SPC-A1 cells to many chemotherapy drugs(including cisplatin,carboplatin,cyclophosphamide and adriblastine) was markedly increased(P < 0.05).Among them,gene silencing of Livinα+β showed the strongest enhancement effect on chemosensitivity of SPC-A1 cells(P < 0.01).Animal experiment showed that tumor inhibition rate of pSilencer-Livinα+β,pSilencer-Livinα and pSilencer-Livinβ groups was 146.1%,130.7% and 110.5%,respectively. The results suggest that Livin isoform,especially Livinα+β is hopeful to be a molecular target for increasing sensitivity of lung cancer cell to chemotherapy.Gene silencing may be a new means of gene therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

  10. Cloning and Characterization of a Human Genomic Sequence that Alleviates Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Miki; Ganmyo, Yuto; Miura, Osamu; Ohyama, Takashi; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR) and a nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) are spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells, and such amplification generates chromosomal homogeneously staining regions (HSRs) or extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs). This method provides a novel, efficient, and rapid way to establish cells that stably produce high levels of recombinant proteins. However, because IR/MAR plasmids are amplified as repeats, they are frequently targeted by repeat-induced gene silencing (RIGS), which silences a variety of repeated sequences in transgenes and the genome. To address this problem, we developed a novel screening system using the IR/MAR plasmid to isolate human genome sequences that alleviate RIGS. The screen identified a 3,271 bp sequence (B-3-31) that elevated transgene expression without affecting the amplification process. Neither non-B structure (i.e., the inverted repeats or bending) nor known epigenetic modifier elements such as MARs, insulators, UCOEs, or STARs could explain the anti-silencing activity of B-3-31. Instead, the activity was distributed throughout the entire B-3-31 sequence, which was extremely A/T-rich and CpG-poor. Because B-3-31 effectively and reproducibly alleviated RIGS of repeated genes, it could be used to increase recombinant protein production.

  11. Cloning and Characterization of a Human Genomic Sequence that Alleviates Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Osamu; Ohyama, Takashi; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR) and a nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) are spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells, and such amplification generates chromosomal homogeneously staining regions (HSRs) or extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs). This method provides a novel, efficient, and rapid way to establish cells that stably produce high levels of recombinant proteins. However, because IR/MAR plasmids are amplified as repeats, they are frequently targeted by repeat-induced gene silencing (RIGS), which silences a variety of repeated sequences in transgenes and the genome. To address this problem, we developed a novel screening system using the IR/MAR plasmid to isolate human genome sequences that alleviate RIGS. The screen identified a 3,271 bp sequence (B-3-31) that elevated transgene expression without affecting the amplification process. Neither non-B structure (i.e., the inverted repeats or bending) nor known epigenetic modifier elements such as MARs, insulators, UCOEs, or STARs could explain the anti-silencing activity of B-3-31. Instead, the activity was distributed throughout the entire B-3-31 sequence, which was extremely A/T-rich and CpG-poor. Because B-3-31 effectively and reproducibly alleviated RIGS of repeated genes, it could be used to increase recombinant protein production. PMID:27078685

  12. Systemic RNAi-mediated Gene Silencing in Nonhuman Primate and Rodent Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Novobrantseva, Tatiana I; Borodovsky, Anna; Wong, Jamie; Klebanov, Boris; Zafari, Mohammad; Yucius, Kristina; Querbes, William; Ge, Pei; Ruda, Vera M; Milstein, Stuart; Speciner, Lauren; Duncan, Rick; Barros, Scott; Basha, Genc; Cullis, Pieter; Akinc, Akin; Donahoe, Jessica S; Narayanannair Jayaprakash, K; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Bogorad, Roman L; Love, Kevin; Whitehead, Katie; Levins, Chris; Manoharan, Muthiah; Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; de Fougerolles, Antonin; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Koteliansky, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Leukocytes are central regulators of inflammation and the target cells of therapies for key diseases, including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and malignant disorders. Efficient in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to immune cells could thus enable novel treatment strategies with broad applicability. In this report, we develop systemic delivery methods of siRNA encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNP) for durable and potent in vivo RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing in myeloid cells. This work provides the first demonstration of siRNA-mediated silencing in myeloid cell types of nonhuman primates (NHPs) and establishes the feasibility of targeting multiple gene targets in rodent myeloid cells. The therapeutic potential of these formulations was demonstrated using siRNA targeting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) which induced substantial attenuation of disease progression comparable to a potent antibody treatment in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In summary, we demonstrate a broadly applicable and therapeutically relevant platform for silencing disease genes in immune cells. PMID:23344621

  13. The C. elegans CSR-1 argonaute pathway counteracts epigenetic silencing to promote germline gene expression.

    PubMed

    Seth, Meetu; Shirayama, Masaki; Gu, Weifeng; Ishidate, Takao; Conte, Darryl; Mello, Craig C

    2013-12-23

    Organisms can develop adaptive sequence-specific immunity by reexpressing pathogen-specific small RNAs that guide gene silencing. For example, the C. elegans PIWI-Argonaute/piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway recruits RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) to foreign sequences to amplify a transgenerational small-RNA-induced epigenetic silencing signal (termed RNAe). Here, we provide evidence that, in addition to an adaptive memory of silenced sequences, C. elegans can also develop an opposing adaptive memory of expressed/self-mRNAs. We refer to this mechanism, which can prevent or reverse RNAe, as RNA-induced epigenetic gene activation (RNAa). We show that CSR-1, which engages RdRP-amplified small RNAs complementary to germline-expressed mRNAs, is required for RNAa. We show that a transgene with RNAa activity also exhibits accumulation of cognate CSR-1 small RNAs. Our findings suggest that C. elegans adaptively acquires and maintains a transgenerational CSR-1 memory that recognizes and protects self-mRNAs, allowing piRNAs to recognize foreign sequences innately, without the need for prior exposure

  14. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase ϵ recruits components of Polycomb repressor complex to mediate epigenetic gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Del Olmo, Iván; López, Juan A; Vázquez, Jesús; Raynaud, Cécile; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A

    2016-07-08

    Arabidopsis ESD7 locus encodes the catalytic subunit of the DNA Pol ϵ involved in the synthesis of the DNA leading strand and is essential for embryo viability. The hypomorphic allele esd7-1 is viable but displays a number of pleiotropic phenotypic alterations including an acceleration of flowering time. Furthermore, Pol ϵ is involved in the epigenetic silencing of the floral integrator genes FT and SOC1, but the molecular nature of the transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms involved remains elusive. Here we reveal that ESD7 interacts with components of the PRC2 such as CLF, EMF2 and MSI1, and that mutations in ESD7 cause a decrease in the levels of the H3K27me3 mark present in the chromatin of FT and SOC1 We also demonstrate that a domain of the C-terminal region of ESD7 mediates the binding to the different PRC2 components and this interaction is necessary for the proper recruitment of PRC2 to FT and SOC1 chromatin. We unveil the existence of interplay between the DNA replication machinery and the PcG complexes in epigenetic transcriptional silencing. These observations provide an insight into the mechanisms ensuring that the epigenetic code at pivotal loci in developmental control is faithfully transmitted to the progeny of eukaryotic cells. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. The protein kinase TOUSLED is required for maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Jun; Xia, Ran; Wang, Junguo; Shen, Jie; Cao, Rui; Hong, Xuhui; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2007-01-01

    TOUSLED-like kinases (TLKs) are highly conserved in plants and animals, but direct evidence linking TLKs and transcriptional gene silencing is lacking. We isolated two new alleles of TOUSLED (TSL). Mutations of TSL in ros1 reactivate the transcriptionally silent 35S-NPTII transgene and the transcriptionally silent endogenous loci TSI (TRANSCRIPTIONAL SILENCING INFORMATION). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis shows that histone H3Lys9 dimethylation is decreased in the reactivated transgene and endogenous TSI loci in the tsl ros1 mutant. However, there is no change in DNA methylation in the affected loci. Western blot and ChIP assay suggest that TSL might not be responsible for histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation. The tsl seedlings were more sensitive to DNA damage reagent methyl methanesulphonate and UV-B light. Our results provide direct evidence for a crucial role of the TOUSLED protein kinase in the maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing in some genomic regions in a DNA-methylation-independent manner in Arabidopsis. PMID:17110953

  16. The protein kinase TOUSLED is required for maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Jun; Xia, Ran; Wang, Junguo; Shen, Jie; Cao, Rui; Hong, Xuhui; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2007-01-01

    TOUSLED-like kinases (TLKs) are highly conserved in plants and animals, but direct evidence linking TLKs and transcriptional gene silencing is lacking. We isolated two new alleles of TOUSLED (TSL). Mutations of TSL in ros1 reactivate the transcriptionally silent 35S-NPTII transgene and the transcriptionally silent endogenous loci TSI (TRANSCRIPTIONAL SILENCING INFORMATION). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis shows that histone H3Lys9 dimethylation is decreased in the reactivated transgene and endogenous TSI loci in the tsl ros1 mutant. However, there is no change in DNA methylation in the affected loci. Western blot and ChIP assay suggest that TSL might not be responsible for histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation. The tsl seedlings were more sensitive to DNA damage reagent methyl methanesulphonate and UV-B light. Our results provide direct evidence for a crucial role of the TOUSLED protein kinase in the maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing in some genomic regions in a DNA-methylation-independent manner in Arabidopsis.

  17. Splicing Factor Spf30 Assists Exosome-Mediated Gene Silencing in Fission Yeast▿

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Pascal; Drogat, Julie; Dheur, Sonia; Genier, Sylvie; Javerzat, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    Heterochromatin assembly in fission yeast relies on the processing of cognate noncoding RNAs by both the RNA interference and the exosome degradation pathways. Recent evidence indicates that splicing factors facilitate the cotranscriptional processing of centromeric transcripts into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). In contrast, how the exosome contributes to heterochromatin assembly and whether it also relies upon splicing factors were unknown. We provide here evidence that fission yeast Spf30 is a splicing factor involved in the exosome pathway of heterochromatin silencing. Spf30 and Dis3, the main exosome RNase, colocalize at centromeric heterochromatin and euchromatic genes. At the centromeres, Dis3 helps recruiting Spf30, whose deficiency phenocopies the dis3-54 mutant: heterochromatin is impaired, as evidenced by reduced silencing and the accumulation of polyadenylated centromeric transcripts, but the production of siRNAs appears to be unaffected. Consistent with a direct role, Spf30 binds centromeric transcripts and locates at the centromeres in an RNA-dependent manner. We propose that Spf30, bound to nascent centromeric transcripts, perhaps with other splicing factors, assists their processing by the exosome. Splicing factor intercession may thus be a common feature of gene silencing pathways. PMID:20028739

  18. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase ϵ recruits components of Polycomb repressor complex to mediate epigenetic gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    del Olmo, Iván; López, Juan A.; Vázquez, Jesús; Raynaud, Cécile; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis ESD7 locus encodes the catalytic subunit of the DNA Pol ϵ involved in the synthesis of the DNA leading strand and is essential for embryo viability. The hypomorphic allele esd7-1 is viable but displays a number of pleiotropic phenotypic alterations including an acceleration of flowering time. Furthermore, Pol ϵ is involved in the epigenetic silencing of the floral integrator genes FT and SOC1, but the molecular nature of the transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms involved remains elusive. Here we reveal that ESD7 interacts with components of the PRC2 such as CLF, EMF2 and MSI1, and that mutations in ESD7 cause a decrease in the levels of the H3K27me3 mark present in the chromatin of FT and SOC1. We also demonstrate that a domain of the C-terminal region of ESD7 mediates the binding to the different PRC2 components and this interaction is necessary for the proper recruitment of PRC2 to FT and SOC1 chromatin. We unveil the existence of interplay between the DNA replication machinery and the PcG complexes in epigenetic transcriptional silencing. These observations provide an insight into the mechanisms ensuring that the epigenetic code at pivotal loci in developmental control is faithfully transmitted to the progeny of eukaryotic cells. PMID:26980282

  19. Bottlenecks in Development of Retinal Therapeutic Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Jack M.; Yau, Edwin H.; Taggart, R. Thomas; Butler, Mark C.; Kolniak, Tiffany A.

    2011-01-01

    Development of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) agents for therapeutic purposes is an immense challenge in modern biology. Established technologies used to knockdown a specific target RNA and its cognate protein: antisense, ribozyme, RNAi, all conditionally depend upon an initial, critical annealing event of the PTGS ligand to a target RNA. In this review we address the nature of the bottlenecks, emphasizing the biocomplexity of target RNA structure, that currently limit PTGS therapeutic development. We briefly review existing and emerging technologies designed to release these constraints to realize the potential of PTGS agents in gene based therapies. PMID:17976683

  20. Efficient transformation and artificial miRNA gene silencing in Lemna minor

    PubMed Central

    Cantó-Pastor, Alex; Mollá-Morales, Almudena; Ernst, Evan; Dahl, William; Zhai, Jixian; Yan, Yiheng; Meyers, Blake; Shanklin, John; Martienssen, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Lack of genetic tools in the Lemnaceae (duckweed) has impeded full implementation of this organism as model for biological research, despite its rapid doubling time, simple architecture and unusual metabolic characteristics. Here we present technologies to facilitate high-throughput genetic studies in duckweed. We developed a fast and efficient method for producing Lemna minor stable transgenic fronds via agrobacterium-mediated transformation and regeneration from tissue culture. Additionally, we engineered an artificial microRNA (amiRNA) gene silencing system. We identified a Lemna gibba endogenous miR166 precursor and used it as a backbone to produce amiRNAs. As a proof of concept we induced the silencing of CH42, a Magnesium Chelatase subunit, using our amiRNA platform. Expression of CH42 in transgenic Lemna minor fronds was significantly reduced, which resulted in reduction of chlorophyll pigmentation. The techniques presented here will enable tackling future challenges in the biology and biotechnology of Lemnaceae. PMID:24989135

  1. Patterning of Virus-Infected Glycine max Seed Coat Is Associated with Suppression of Endogenous Silencing of Chalcone Synthase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Senda, Mineo; Masuta, Chikara; Ohnishi, Shizen; Goto, Kazunori; Kasai, Atsushi; Sano, Teruo; Hong, Jin-Sung; MacFarlane, Stuart

    2004-01-01

    Most commercial Glycine max (soybean) varieties have yellow seeds because of loss of pigmentation in the seed coat. It has been suggested that inhibition of seed coat pigmentation in yellow G. max may be controlled by homology-dependent silencing of chalcone synthase (CHS) genes. Our analysis of CHS mRNA and short-interfering RNAs provide clear evidence that the inhibition of seed coat pigmentation in yellow G. max results from posttranscriptional rather than transcriptional silencing of the CHS genes. Furthermore, we show that mottling symptoms present on the seed coat of G. max plants infected with some viruses can be caused by suppression of CHS posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) by a viral silencing suppressor protein. These results demonstrate that naturally occurring PTGS plays a key role in expression of a distinctive phenotype in plants and present a simple clear example of the elucidation of the molecular mechanism for viral symptom induction. PMID:15037735

  2. Patterning of virus-infected Glycine max seed coat is associated with suppression of endogenous silencing of chalcone synthase genes.

    PubMed

    Senda, Mineo; Masuta, Chikara; Ohnishi, Shizen; Goto, Kazunori; Kasai, Atsushi; Sano, Teruo; Hong, Jin-Sung; MacFarlane, Stuart

    2004-04-01

    Most commercial Glycine max (soybean) varieties have yellow seeds because of loss of pigmentation in the seed coat. It has been suggested that inhibition of seed coat pigmentation in yellow G. max may be controlled by homology-dependent silencing of chalcone synthase (CHS) genes. Our analysis of CHS mRNA and short-interfering RNAs provide clear evidence that the inhibition of seed coat pigmentation in yellow G. max results from posttranscriptional rather than transcriptional silencing of the CHS genes. Furthermore, we show that mottling symptoms present on the seed coat of G. max plants infected with some viruses can be caused by suppression of CHS posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) by a viral silencing suppressor protein. These results demonstrate that naturally occurring PTGS plays a key role in expression of a distinctive phenotype in plants and present a simple clear example of the elucidation of the molecular mechanism for viral symptom induction.

  3. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-mediated functional characterization of two genes involved in lignocellulosic secondary cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shashank K; Nookaraju, Akula; Fujino, Takeshi; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Joshi, Chandrashekhar P

    2016-11-01

    Functional characterization of two tobacco genes, one involved in xylan synthesis and the other, a positive regulator of secondary cell wall formation, is reported. Lignocellulosic secondary cell walls (SCW) provide essential plant materials for the production of second-generation bioethanol. Therefore, thorough understanding of the process of SCW formation in plants is beneficial for efficient bioethanol production. Recently, we provided the first proof-of-concept for using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach for rapid functional characterization of nine genes involved in cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin synthesis during SCW formation. Here, we report VIGS-mediated functional characterization of two tobacco genes involved in SCW formation. Stems of VIGS plants silenced for both selected genes showed increased amount of xylem formation but thinner cell walls than controls. These results were further confirmed by production of stable transgenic tobacco plants manipulated in expression of these genes. Stems of stable transgenic tobacco plants silenced for these two genes showed increased xylem proliferation with thinner walls, whereas transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing these two genes showed increased fiber cell wall thickness but no change in xylem proliferation. These two selected genes were later identified as possible members of DUF579 family involved in xylan synthesis and KNAT7 transcription factor family involved in positive regulation of SCW formation, respectively. Glycome analyses of cell walls showed increased polysaccharide extractability in 1 M KOH extracts of both VIGS-NbDUF579 and VIGS-NbKNAT7 lines suggestive of cell wall loosening. Also, VIGS-NbDUF579 and VIGS-NbKNAT7 lines showed increased saccharification rates (74.5 and 40 % higher than controls, respectively). All these properties are highly desirable for producing higher quantities of bioethanol from lignocellulosic materials of bioenergy plants.

  4. Strategies for altering plant traits using virus-induced gene silencing technologies.

    PubMed

    Lacomme, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The rapid progress in genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis in model and crop plants has made possible the identification of a vast number of genes potentially associated with economically important complex traits. The ultimate goal is to assign functions to these genes by using forward and reverse genetic screens. Plant viruses have been developed for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to generate rapid gene knockdown phenotypes in numerous plant species. To fulfill its potential for high-throughput phenomics, it is of prime importance to ensure that parameters conditioning the VIGS response, i.e., plant-virus interactions and associated loss-of-function screens, are "fit for purpose" and optimized to unequivocally conclude the role of a gene of interest in relation to a given trait. This chapter will review and discuss the different strategies used for the development of VIGS-based phenomics in model and crop species.

  5. Aberrant epigenetic changes and gene expression in cloned cattle dying around birth

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Dingsheng; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2008-01-01

    Background Aberrant reprogramming of donor somatic cell nuclei may result in many severe problems in animal cloning. To assess the extent of abnormal epigenetic modifications and gene expression in clones, we simultaneously examined DNA methylation, histone H4 acetylation and expression of six genes (β-actin, VEGF, oct4, TERT, H19 and Igf2) and a repetitive sequence (art2) in five organs (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) from two cloned cattle groups that had died at different stages. In the ED group (early death, n = 3), the cloned cattle died in the perinatal period. The cattle in the LD group (late death, n = 3) died after the perinatal period. Normally reproduced cattle served as a control group (n = 3). Results Aberrant DNA methylation, histone H4 acetylation and gene expression were observed in both cloned groups. The ED group showed relatively fewer severe DNA methylation abnormalities (p < 0.05) but more abnormal histone H4 acetylations (p < 0.05) and more abnormal expression (p < 0.05) of the selected genes compared to the LD group. However, our data also suggest no widespread gene expression abnormalities in the organs of the dead clones. Conclusion Deaths of clones may be ascribed to abnormal expression of a very limited number of genes. PMID:18261243

  6. Aberrant DNA methylation of microRNA genes in human breast cancer - a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Ulrich

    2014-06-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation of regulatory sequences is a well-documented mechanism of functional deletion of genes with anti-tumourigenic properties including microRNAs. This review discusses the publications describing aberrant methylation of microRNA genes in human breast cancer cells. Among the anti-tumourigenic properties of epigenetically inactivated microRNA genes, the inhibition of proliferation and of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are the best studied. Several studies are conceptually very interesting and present a comprehensive functional characterization of anti-tumorigenic microRNAs. The link between microRNA expression and gene methylation is not addressed directly by all studies and a number of studies are limited in their strength by not including primary breast cancer specimens or by analysing very small sets of primary human specimens. The publications cover a wide range of DNA methylation detection techniques, often making direct comparison of results challenging. Despite the identification and thorough characterization of many interesting candidates and functionally important microRNA genes affected by DNA methylation, the translation of microRNA gene methylation as a new biomarker into the daily routine practice has not yet worked out.

  7. Silencing the livin gene enhances the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs on colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Bo Young; Kim, Kwang Ho; Chung, Soon Sup

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Livin is associated with drug response in several cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silencing the livin gene expression on anticancer drug response in colorectal cancer. Methods siRNA was transfected at different concentrations (0, 10, and 30nM) into HCT116 cells, then cells were treated with either 5-fluorouracil (FU)/leucovorin (LV) or oxaliplatin (L-OHP)/5-FU/LV. Cellular viability and apoptosis were evaluated following silencing of livin gene expression combined with treatment with anticancer drugs. Results Livin gene expression was effectively suppressed by 30nM siRNA compared with control and 10nM siRNA. The 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that proliferation was effectively inhibited in cells treated with a combination of both siRNA and an anticancer drug, compared to cells treated with siRNA-Livin or anticancer drug alone. In particular, the combination of 30nM siRNA and L-OHP/5-FU/LV resulted in a 93.8% and 91.4% decrease, compared to untreated control or L-OHP/5-FU/LV alone, respectively. Cellular proliferation was most effectively suppressed by a combination of 30nM of siRNA and L-OHP/5-FU/LV compared to other combinations. Conclusion siRNA-mediated down-regulation of livin gene expression could significantly suppress colon cancer growth and enhance the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs such as 5-FU and L-OHP. The results of this study suggest that silencing livin gene expression in combination with treatment with anticancer drugs might be a novel cancer therapy for colorectal cancer. PMID:27904848

  8. Polycomb silencing of the Drosophila 4E-BP gene regulates imaginal disc cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Mason-Suares, Heather; Tie, Feng; Yan, Christopher; Harte, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are best known for their role in maintaining stable, mitotically heritable silencing of the homeotic (HOX) genes during development. In addition to loss of homeotic gene silencing, some PcG mutants also have small imaginal discs. These include mutations in E(z), Su(z)12, esc and escl, which encode Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) subunits. The cause of this phenotype is not known, but the human homologs of PRC2 subunits have been shown to play a role in cell proliferation, are over-expressed in many tumors, and appear to be required for tumor proliferation. Here we show that the small imaginal disc phenotype arises, at least in part, from a cell growth defect. In homozygous E(z) mutants, imaginal disc cells are smaller than cells in normally proliferating discs. We show that the Thor gene, which encodes eIF4E-Binding Protein (4E-BP), the evolutionarily conserved inhibitor of cap-dependent translation and potent inhibitor of cell growth, is involved in the development of this phenotype. The Thor promoter region contains DNA binding motifs for transcription factors found in well-characterized Polycomb Response Elements (PREs), including PHO/PHOL, GAGA Factor, and others, suggesting that Thor may be a direct target of Polycomb silencing. We present chromatin immunoprecipitation evidence that PcG proteins are bound to the Thor 5’ region in vivo. The Thor gene is normally repressed in imaginal discs, but Thor mRNA and 4E-BP protein levels are elevated in imaginal discs of PRC2 subunit mutant larvae. Deletion of the Thor gene in E(z) mutants partially restores imaginal disc size toward wild-type and results in an increase in the fraction of larvae that pupariate. These results thus suggest that PcG proteins can directly modulate cell growth in Drosophila, in part by regulating Thor expression. PMID:23523430

  9. RNA-Mediated Silencing in Algae: Biological Roles and Tools for Analysis of Gene Function ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Heriberto; Ma, Xinrong; Msanne, Joseph; Repas, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Algae are a large group of aquatic, typically photosynthetic, eukaryotes that include species from very diverse phylogenetic lineages, from those similar to land plants to those related to protist parasites. The recent sequencing of several algal genomes has provided insights into the great complexity of these organisms. Genomic information has also emphasized our lack of knowledge of the functions of many predicted genes, as well as the gene regulatory mechanisms in algae. Core components of the machinery for RNA-mediated silencing show widespread distribution among algal lineages, but they also seem to have been lost entirely from several species with relatively small nuclear genomes. Complex sets of endogenous small RNAs, including candidate microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, have now been identified by high-throughput sequencing in green, red, and brown algae. However, the natural roles of RNA-mediated silencing in algal biology remain poorly understood. Limited evidence suggests that small RNAs may function, in different algae, in defense mechanisms against transposon mobilization, in responses to nutrient deprivation and, possibly, in the regulation of recently evolved developmental processes. From a practical perspective, RNA interference (RNAi) is becoming a promising tool for assessing gene function by sequence-specific knockdown. Transient gene silencing, triggered with exogenously synthesized nucleic acids, and/or stable gene repression, involving genome-integrated transgenes, have been achieved in green algae, diatoms, yellow-green algae, and euglenoids. The development of RNAi technology in conjunction with system level “omics” approaches may provide the tools needed to advance our understanding of algal physiological and metabolic processes. PMID:21803865

  10. [The interplay of transposon silencing genes in the Drosophila melanogaster germline].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O A; Iakushev, E Iu; Stoliarenko, A D; Mikhaleva, E A; Gvozdev, V A; Klenov, M S

    2011-01-01

    Complexes of Piwi proteins and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) carry out the repression of transposable elements in animal gonads. The Piwi protein clade is represented in D. melanogaster by three members: Piwi, Aub and Ago3. Piwi protein functions in the nuclei of somatic and germinal ovarian cells, whereas Aub and Ago3 are cytoplasmic proteins of germinal cells. Aub and Ago3 interact with each other in the perinuclear nuage organelle to perform piRNA amplification via the ping-pong mechanism. Previously, derepression of several transposable elements as a result of mutations in the piRNA silencing system was shown. Here we quantify the increase in expression level of an enlarged number of retrotransposons due to the mutations in the piwi gene, nuage components coding aub, mael and spn-E genes and the RNA helicase armi gene mutation that impairs Piwi nuclear localization, but not the ping-pong cycle. We reveal that piwi, armi, aub, spn-E and mael genes participate together in the repression of several transposons (HMS-Beagle, Gate and HeT-A), whereas silencing of land G elements requires the same genes except piwi. We suggest that Armi has other functions besides the localizing of Piwi protein in the nuclei. Our data suggest also a role of cytoplasmic Aub, Spn-E and Mael nuage proteins in Piwi-mediated repression of Gate and HMS-Beagle transposons in the germline nuclei. As a whole, our results corroborate the idea that genome stabilization in the germline is realized by different silencing strategies specific for different transposable elements. At the same time, our data suggest the existence of yet unknown mechanisms of interplay between nuclear and cytoplasmic components of the piRNA machinery in the germline.

  11. Silencing of a germin-like gene in Nicotiana attenuata improves performance of native herbivores.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yonggen; Baldwin, Ian T

    2006-03-01

    Germins and germin-like proteins (GLPs) are known to function in pathogen resistance, but their involvement in defense against insect herbivores is poorly understood. In the native tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, attack from the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta or elicitation by adding larval oral secretions (OS) to wounds up-regulates transcripts of a GLP. To understand the function of this gene, which occurs as a single copy, we cloned the full-length NaGLP and silenced its expression in N. attenuata by expressing a 250-bp fragment in an antisense orientation with an Agrobacterium-based transformation system and by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Homozygous lines harboring a single insert and VIGS plants had significantly reduced constitutive (measured in roots) and elicited NaGLP transcript levels (in leaves). Silencing NaGLP improved M. sexta larval performance and Tupiocoris notatus preference, two native herbivores of N. attenuata. Silencing NaGLP also attenuated the OS-induced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), diterpene glycosides, and trypsin proteinase inhibitor responses, which may explain the observed susceptibility of antisense or VIGS plants to herbivore attack and increased nicotine contents, but did not influence the OS-elicited jasmonate and salicylate bursts, or the release of the volatile organic compounds (limonene, cis-alpha-bergamotene, and germacrene-A) that function as an indirect defense. This suggests that NaGLP is involved in H(2)O(2) production and might also be related to ethylene production and/or perception, which in turn influences the defense responses of N. attenuata via H(2)O(2) and ethylene-signaling pathways.

  12. XIST-induced silencing of flanking genes is achieved by additive action of repeat a monomers in human somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Minks, Jakub; Baldry, Sarah El; Yang, Christine; Cotton, Allison M; Brown, Carolyn J

    2013-08-01

    The establishment of facultative heterochromatin by X-chromosome inactivation requires the long non-coding RNA XIST/Xist. However, the molecular mechanism by which the RNA achieves chromosome-wide gene silencing remains unknown. Mouse Xist has been shown to have redundant domains for cis-localization, and requires a series of well-conserved tandem 'A' repeats for silencing. We previously described a human inducible XIST transgene that is capable of cis-localization and suppressing a downstream reporter gene in somatic cells, and have now leveraged these cells to dissect the sequences critical for XIST-dependent gene silencing in humans. We demonstrated that expression of the inducible full-length XIST cDNA was able to suppress expression of two nearby reporter genes as well as endogenous genes up to 3 MB from the integration site. An inducible construct containing the repeat A region of XIST alone could silence the flanking reporter genes but not the more distal endogenous genes. Reporter gene silencing could also be accomplished by a synthetic construct consisting of nine copies of a consensus repeat A sequence, consistent with previous studies in mice. Progressively shorter constructs showed a linear relationship between the repeat number and the silencing capacity of the RNA. Constructs containing only two repeat A units were still able to partially silence the reporter genes and could thus be used for site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that sequences within the two palindromic cores of the repeat are essential for silencing, and that it is likely the first palindrome sequence folds to form a hairpin, consistent with compensatory mutations observed in eutherian sequences. Silencing of adjacent reporter genes can be effected by as little as 94 bp of XIST, including two 'monomers' of the A repeat. This region includes a pair of essential palindromic sequences that are evolutionarily well-conserved and the first of these is likely to form an intra

  13. Silencing of the ACC synthase gene ACACS2 causes delayed flowering in pineapple [Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.].

    PubMed

    Trusov, Yuri; Botella, José Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Flowering is a crucial developmental stage in the plant life cycle. A number of different factors, from environmental to chemical, can trigger flowering. In pineapple, and other bromeliads, it has been proposed that flowering is triggered by a small burst of ethylene production in the meristem in response to environmental cues. A 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACC synthase) gene has been cloned from pineapple (ACACS2), which is induced in the meristem under the same environmental conditions that induce flowering. Two transgenic pineapple lines have been produced containing co-suppression constructs designed to down-regulate the expression of the ACACS2 gene. Northern analysis revealed that the ACACS2 gene was silenced in a number of transgenic plants in both lines. Southern hybridization revealed clear differences in the methylation status of silenced versus non-silenced plants by the inability of a methylation-sensitive enzyme to digest within the ACACS2 DNA extracted from silenced plants, indicating that methylation is the cause of the observed co-suppression of the ACACS2 gene. Flowering characteristics of the transgenic plants were studied under field conditions in South East Queensland, Australia. Flowering dynamics studies revealed significant differences in flowering behaviour, with transgenic plants exhibiting silencing showing a marked delay in flowering when compared with non-silenced transgenic plants and control non-transformed plants. It is argued that the ACACS2 gene is one of the key contributors towards triggering 'natural flowering' in mature pineapples under commercial field conditions.

  14. siRNA mediated gene silencing in Fusarium sp. HKF15 for overproduction of bikaverin.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Radhika; Purohit, Hemant J

    2014-04-01

    Fusarium sp. HKF15 is an isolate from effluent treatment plant which produces bikaverin. Bikaverin is a polyketide having antitumor and antibiotic potential. Acetyl coenzyme A is a common precursor for bikaverin as well as carotenoids and gibberellins. A polyketide synthase gene bik1 is responsible for bikaverin production whereas, hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (hmgR) and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (fpps) are carotenoid and gibberellin pathway genes. Aim of this study was assessing siRNA mediated gene silencing for bikaverin overproduction with down-regulation of carotenoid and gibberellin pathway. HKF15 protoplasts derived from glucose grown culture were treated with 200pmolml(-1)hmgR and fpps siRNAs separately. Along with down-regulation of target genes, there was 2.4-fold increase in bik1 gene expression. The silencing was effective till 48h with a 41% increase in bikaverin production. The study proposes a strategy for manipulation of physiology towards desired secondary metabolite overproduction.

  15. Dendrimers as Carriers for siRNA Delivery and Gene Silencing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weizhe; He, Ziying

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) was first literaturally reported in 1998 and has become rapidly a promising tool for therapeutic applications in gene therapy. In a typical RNAi process, small interfering RNAs (siRNA) are used to specifically downregulate the expression of the targeted gene, known as the term “gene silencing.” One key point for successful gene silencing is to employ a safe and efficient siRNA delivery system. In this context, dendrimers are emerging as potential nonviral vectors to deliver siRNA for RNAi purpose. Dendrimers have attracted intense interest since their emanating research in the 1980s and are extensively studied as efficient DNA delivery vectors in gene transfer applications, due to their unique features based on the well-defined and multivalent structures. Knowing that DNA and RNA possess a similar structure in terms of nucleic acid framework and the electronegative nature, one can also use the excellent DNA delivery properties of dendrimers to develop effective siRNA delivery systems. In this review, the development of dendrimer-based siRNA delivery vectors is summarized, focusing on the vector features (siRNA delivery efficiency, cytotoxicity, etc.) of different types of dendrimers and the related investigations on structure-activity relationship to promote safe and efficient siRNA delivery system. PMID:24288498

  16. Aberrant large tumor suppressor 2 (LATS2) gene expression correlates with EGFR mutation and survival in lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Susan Y.; Sit, Ko-Yung; Sihoe, Alan D.L.; Suen, Wai-Sing; Au, Wing-Kuk; Tang, Ximing; Ma, Edmond S.K.; Chan, Wai-Kong; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Minna, John D.; Tsao, George S.W.; Lam, David C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Large tumor suppressor 2 (LATS2) gene is a putative tumor suppressor gene with potential roles in regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in lung cancer. The aim of this study is to explore the association of aberrant LATS2 expression with EGFR mutation and survival in lung adenocarcinoma (AD), and the effects of LATS2 silencing in both lung AD cell lines. Methods LATS2 mRNA and protein expression in resected lung AD were correlated with demographic characteristics, EGFR mutation and survival. LATS2-specific siRNA was transfected into four EGFR wild-type (WT) and three EGFR mutant AD cell lines and the changes in LATS2 expression and relevant signaling molecules before and after LATS2 knockdown were assayed. Results Fifty resected lung AD were included (M:F = 23:27, smokers:non-smokers = 19:31, EGFR mutant:wild-type = 21:29) with LATS2 mRNA levels showed no significant difference between gender, age, smoking and pathological stages while LATS2 immunohistochemical staining on an independent set of 79 lung AD showed similar trend. LATS2 mRNA level was found to be a significant independent predictor for survival status (disease-free survival RR = 0.217; p = 0.003; Overall survival RR = 0.238; p = 0.036). siRNA-mediated suppression of LATS2 expression resulted in augmentation of ERK phosphorylation in EGFR wild-type AD cell lines with high basal LATS2 expression, discriminatory modulation of Akt signaling between EGFR wild-type and mutant cells, and induction of p53 accumulation in AD cell lines with low baseline p53 levels. Conclusions LATS2 expression level is predictive of survival in patients with resected lung AD. LATS2 may modulate and contribute to tumor growth via different signaling pathways in EGFR mutant and wild-type tumors. PMID:24976335

  17. Chromosome aberrations [dup(1q)] in endometrial cancer: Gene analysis of 54 surgical specimens in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sever, Erman; Döğer, Emek; Kumbasar, Serkan; Şık, Bulat Aytek; Temur, Muzaffer; Yılmaz, Hasan Taylan; Yılmaz, Özgür; Özbay, Pelin Ozun; Yücesoy, İzzet

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and mutations in the k-ras or Her-2/neu genes in surgical specimens of endometrial carcinoma and their association with clinicopathological findings. Fifty-four patients who were treated for endometrial cancer between April 2010 and May 2011 at the Kocaeli University Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Kocaeli, Turkey were enrolled in a prospective study. Clinical and histopathological findings were recorded. Genetic analysis, which included the detection of chromosomal deletions and duplications, as well as k-ras and Her-2/neu mutations, was performed on endometrial samples from surgical specimens. In 70% of cases, tumor size was >2 cm or covered the entire uterine cavity, affecting mostly corpus (76%) and invading less than half of the myometrium (80%). Forty-six cases (86%) had endometrioid-type carcinoma, and early stage (Stage I, 65%) and higher grade (Grade II-III, 66%) tumors were predominant. Lymph node and lymphovascular involvement was positive in 11% and 28% of the patients, respectively. Chromosomal aberrations (deletion or duplication) and Her-2/neu and k-ras mutations were encountered in 44%, 15%, and 13% of surgical specimens, respectively. The most common chromosomal aberration was dup(1q) (n = 16). Oncogenic mutations in Her-2/neu or k-ras had no association with the severity of endometrial cancer, but the presence of chromosomal aberrations, as a whole or dup(1q) alone, were associated with higher tumor size, deeper myometrial invasion, advanced stage or grade, lymphovascular invasion, and lymph node involvement (p < 0.05 for all). Chromosomal aberrations, particularly dup(1q), are related to advanced disease in endometrial cancer. Genetic analysis of cancer tissues may provide important insights in determining disease prognosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Efficient gene silencing mediated by tobacco rattle virus in an emerging model plant physalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Si; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shaohua; He, Chaoying

    2014-01-01

    The fruit of Physalis has a berry and a novelty called inflated calyx syndrome (ICS, also named the 'Chinese lantern'). Elucidation of the underlying developmental mechanisms of fruit diversity demands an efficient gene functional inference platform. Here, we tested the application of the tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated gene-silencing system in Physalis floridana. First, we characterized the putative gene of a phytoene desaturase in P. floridana (PfPDS). Infecting the leaves of the Physalis seedlings with the PfPDS-TRV vector resulted in a bleached plant, including the developing leaves, floral organs, ICS, berry, and seed. These results indicated that a local VIGS treatment can efficiently induce a systemic mutated phenotype. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that the bleaching extent correlated to the mRNA reduction of the endogenous PfPDS. Detailed comparisons of multiple infiltration and growth protocols allowed us to determine the optimal methodologies for VIGS manipulation in Physalis. We subsequently utilized this optimized VIGS methodology to downregulate the expression of two MADS-box genes, MPF2 and MPF3, and compared the resulting effects with gene-downregulation mediated by RNA interference (RNAi) methods. The VIGS-mediated gene knockdown plants were found to resemble the mutated phenotypes of floral calyx, fruiting calyx and pollen maturation of the RNAi transgenic plants for both MPF2 and MPF3. Moreover, the two MADS-box genes were appeared to have a novel role in the pedicel development in P. floridana. The major advantage of VIGS-based gene knockdown lies in practical aspects of saving time and easy manipulation as compared to the RNAi. Despite the lack of heritability and mosaic mutation phenotypes observed in some organs, the TRV-mediated gene silencing system provides an alternative efficient way to infer gene function in various developmental processes in Physalis, thus facilitating understanding of the genetic basis of the evolution and development

  19. Efficient Gene Silencing Mediated by Tobacco Rattle Virus in an Emerging Model Plant Physalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaohua; He, Chaoying

    2014-01-01

    The fruit of Physalis has a berry and a novelty called inflated calyx syndrome (ICS, also named the ‘Chinese lantern’). Elucidation of the underlying developmental mechanisms of fruit diversity demands an efficient gene functional inference platform. Here, we tested the application of the tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated gene-silencing system in Physalis floridana. First, we characterized the putative gene of a phytoene desaturase in P. floridana (PfPDS). Infecting the leaves of the Physalis seedlings with the PfPDS-TRV vector resulted in a bleached plant, including the developing leaves, floral organs, ICS, berry, and seed. These results indicated that a local VIGS treatment can efficiently induce a systemic mutated phenotype. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that the bleaching extent correlated to the mRNA reduction of the endogenous PfPDS. Detailed comparisons of multiple infiltration and growth protocols allowed us to determine the optimal methodologies for VIGS manipulation in Physalis. We subsequently utilized this optimized VIGS methodology to downregulate the expression of two MADS-box genes, MPF2 and MPF3, and compared the resulting effects with gene-downregulation mediated by RNA interference (RNAi) methods. The VIGS-mediated gene knockdown plants were found to resemble the mutated phenotypes of floral calyx, fruiting calyx and pollen maturation of the RNAi transgenic plants for both MPF2 and MPF3. Moreover, the two MADS-box genes were appeared to have a novel role in the pedicel development in P. floridana. The major advantage of VIGS-based gene knockdown lies in practical aspects of saving time and easy manipulation as compared to the RNAi. Despite the lack of heritability and mosaic mutation phenotypes observed in some organs, the TRV-mediated gene silencing system provides an alternative efficient way to infer gene function in various developmental processes in Physalis, thus facilitating understanding of the genetic basis of the evolution and

  20. Seed coat pigmentation in transgenic soybean expressing the silencing suppressor 2b gene of Cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kyoko; Nishizawa, Keito; Hirose, Aya; Kurauchi, Tasuku; Senda, Mineo; Masuta, Chikara; Ishimoto, Masao

    2013-12-01

    Soybean expressing the Cucumber mosaic virus 2b gene manifests seed coat pigmentation due to suppression of endogenous RNA silencing but no other morphological abnormality. This gene may help prevent transgene silencing. RNA silencing is an important mechanism for gene regulation and antiviral defense in plants. It is also responsible for transgene silencing, however, and thus hinders the establishment of transgenic plants. The 2b protein of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) functions as a suppressor of RNA silencing and therefore might prove beneficial for stabilization of transgene expression. We have now generated transgenic soybean that harbors the 2b gene of a CMV-soybean strain under the control of a constitutive promoter to investigate the effects of 2b expression. No growth abnormality was apparent in 2b transgenic plants, although the seed coat was pigmented in several of the transgenic lines. Genes for chalcone synthase (CHS), a key enzyme of the flavonoid pathway, are posttranscriptionally silenced by the inhibitor (I) locus in nonpigmented (yellow) soybean seeds. The levels of CHS mRNA and CHS small interfering RNA in strongly pigmented 2b transgenic seed coats were higher and lower, respectively, than those in the seed coat of a control transgenic line. The expression level of 2b also correlated with the extent of seed coat pigmentation. On the other hand, introduction of the 2b gene together with the DsRed2 gene into somatic embryos prevented the time-dependent decrease in transient DsRed2 expression. Our results indicate that the 2b gene alone is able to suppress RNA silencing of endogenous CHS genes regulated by the I locus, and that 2b is of potential utility for stabilization of transgene expression in soybean without detrimental effects other than seed coat pigmentation.

  1. Silencing of grapevine pectate lyase-like genes VvPLL2 and VvPLL3 confers resistance against Erysiphe necator and differentially modulates gene expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Broad-spectrum resistance against powdery mildew (PM) has been reported by silencing susceptibility genes in the model plant Arabidopsis. Here we used artificial microRNA constructs in PM-susceptible Vitis vinifera cv. Chardonnay to stably silence two pectate lyase-like orthologs (VvPLL2 and VvPLL3)...

  2. Artificial MicroRNA-Based Specific Gene Silencing of Grain Hardness Genes in Polyploid Cereals Appeared to Be Not Stable Over Transgenic Plant Generations

    PubMed Central

    Gasparis, Sebastian; Kała, Maciej; Przyborowski, Mateusz; Orczyk, Waclaw; Nadolska-Orczyk, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Gene silencing by RNA interference is a particularly important tool in the study of gene function in polyploid cereal species for which the collections of natural or induced mutants are very limited. Previously we have been testing small interfering RNA-based approach of gene silencing in wheat and triticale. In this research, artificial microRNAs (amiRs) were studied in the same species and the same target genes to compare effectiveness of both gene silencing pathways. amiR cassettes were designed to silence Puroindoline a (Pina) and Puroindoline b (Pinb) hardness genes in wheat and their orthologues Secaloindoline a (Sina) and Secaloindoline b (Sinb) genes in triticale. Each of the two cassettes contained 21 nt microRNA (miR) precursor derived from conserved regions of Pina/Sina or Pinb/Sinb genes, respectively. Transgenic plants were obtained with high efficiency in two cultivars of wheat and one cultivar of triticale after using the Pinb-derived amiR vector for silencing of Pinb or Sinb, respectively. Lack of transgenic plants in wheat or very low transformation efficiency in triticale was observed using the Pina-derived amiR cassette, despite large numbers of embryos attempted. Silencing of Pinb in wheat and Sinb in triticale was highly efficient in the T1 generation. The transcript level of Pinb in wheat was reduced up to 92% and Sinb in triticale was reduced up to 98%. Moreover, intended silencing of Pinb/Sinb with Pinb-derived amiR cassette was highly correlated with simultaneous silencing of Pina/Sina in the same transgenic plants. High downregulation of Pinb/Pina genes in T1 plants of wheat and Sinb/Sina genes in T1 plants of triticale was associated with strong expression of Pinb-derived amiR. Silencing of the target genes correlated with increased grain hardness in both species. Total protein content in the grains of transgenic wheat was significantly lower. Although, the Pinb-derived amiR cassette was stably inherited in the T2 generation of wheat and

  3. Artificial MicroRNA-Based Specific Gene Silencing of Grain Hardness Genes in Polyploid Cereals Appeared to Be Not Stable Over Transgenic Plant Generations.

    PubMed

    Gasparis, Sebastian; Kała, Maciej; Przyborowski, Mateusz; Orczyk, Waclaw; Nadolska-Orczyk, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Gene silencing by RNA interference is a particularly important tool in the study of gene function in polyploid cereal species for which the collections of natural or induced mutants are very limited. Previously we have been testing small interfering RNA-based approach of gene silencing in wheat and triticale. In this research, artificial microRNAs (amiRs) were studied in the same species and the same target genes to compare effectiveness of both gene silencing pathways. amiR cassettes were designed to silence Puroindoline a (Pina) and Puroindoline b (Pinb) hardness genes in wheat and their orthologues Secaloindoline a (Sina) and Secaloindoline b (Sinb) genes in triticale. Each of the two cassettes contained 21 nt microRNA (miR) precursor derived from conserved regions of Pina/Sina or Pinb/Sinb genes, respectively. Transgenic plants were obtained with high efficiency in two cultivars of wheat and one cultivar of triticale after using the Pinb-derived amiR vector for silencing of Pinb or Sinb, respectively. Lack of transgenic plants in wheat or very low transformation efficiency in triticale was observed using the Pina-derived amiR cassette, despite large numbers of embryos attempted. Silencing of Pinb in wheat and Sinb in triticale was highly efficient in the T1 generation. The transcript level of Pinb in wheat was reduced up to 92% and Sinb in triticale was reduced up to 98%. Moreover, intended silencing of Pinb/Sinb with Pinb-derived amiR cassette was highly correlated with simultaneous silencing of Pina/Sina in the same transgenic plants. High downregulation of Pinb/Pina genes in T1 plants of wheat and Sinb/Sina genes in T1 plants of triticale was associated with strong expression of Pinb-derived amiR. Silencing of the target genes correlated with increased grain hardness in both species. Total protein content in the grains of transgenic wheat was significantly lower. Although, the Pinb-derived amiR cassette was stably inherited in the T2 generation of wheat and

  4. Expression of a large LINE-1-driven antisense RNA is linked to epigenetic silencing of the metastasis suppressor gene TFPI-2 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshanks, Hazel A.; Vafadar-Isfahani, Natasha; Dunican, Donncha S.; Lee, Andy; Sproul, Duncan; Lund, Jonathan N.; Meehan, Richard R.; Tufarelli, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    LINE-1 retrotransposons are abundant repetitive elements of viral origin, which in normal cells are kept quiescent through epigenetic mechanisms. Activation of LINE-1 occurs frequently in cancer and can enable LINE-1 mobilization but also has retrotransposition-independent consequences. We previously reported that in cancer, aberrantly active LINE-1 promoters can drive transcription of flanking unique sequences giving rise to LINE-1 chimeric transcripts (LCTs). Here, we show that one such LCT, LCT13, is a large transcript (>300 kb) running antisense to the metastasis-suppressor gene TFPI-2. We have modelled antisense RNA expression at TFPI-2 in transgenic mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and demonstrate that antisense RNA induces silencing and deposition of repressive histone modifications implying a causal link. Consistent with this, LCT13 expression in breast and colon cancer cell lines is associated with silencing and repressive chromatin at TFPI-2. Furthermore, we detected LCT13 transcripts in 56% of colorectal tumours exhibiting reduced TFPI-2 expression. Our findings implicate activation of LINE-1 elements in subsequent epigenetic remodelling of surrounding genes, thus hinting a novel retrotransposition-independent role for LINE-1 elements in malignancy. PMID:23703216

  5. Identification of aberrant gene expression associated with aberrant promoter methylation in primordial germ cells between E13 and E16 rat F3 generation vinclozolin lineage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Transgenerational epigenetics (TGE) are currently considered important in disease, but the mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood. TGE abnormalities expected to cause disease are likely to be initiated during development and to be mediated by aberrant gene expression associated with aberrant promoter methylation that is heritable between generations. However, because methylation is removed and then re-established during development, it is not easy to identify promoter methylation abnormalities by comparing normal lineages with those expected to exhibit TGE abnormalities. Methods This study applied the recently proposed principal component analysis (PCA)-based unsupervised feature extraction to previously reported and publically available gene expression/promoter methylation profiles of rat primordial germ cells, between E13 and E16 of the F3 generation vinclozolin lineage that are expected to exhibit TGE abnormalities, to identify multiple genes that exhibited aberrant gene expression/promoter methylation during development. Results The biological feasibility of the identified genes were tested via enrichment analyses of various biological concepts including pathway analysis, gene ontology terms and protein-protein interactions. All validations suggested superiority of the proposed method over three conventional and popular supervised methods that employed t test, limma and significance analysis of microarrays, respectively. The identified genes were globally related to tumors, the prostate, kidney, testis and the immune system and were previously reported to be related to various diseases caused by TGE. Conclusions Among the genes reported by PCA-based unsupervised feature extraction, we propose that chemokine signaling pathways and leucine rich repeat proteins are key factors that initiate transgenerational epigenetic-mediated diseases, because multiple genes included in these two categories were identified in this study. PMID:26677731

  6. Investigations of barley stripe mosaic virus as a gene silencing vector in barley roots and in Brachypodium distachyon and oat

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene silencing vectors based on Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) are used extensively in cereals to study gene function, but nearly all studies have been limited to genes expressed in leaves of barley and wheat. However since many important aspects of plant biology are based on root-expressed genes we wanted to explore the potential of BSMV for silencing genes in root tissues. Furthermore, the newly completed genome sequence of the emerging cereal model species Brachypodium distachyon as well as the increasing amount of EST sequence information available for oat (Avena species) have created a need for tools to study gene function in these species. Results Here we demonstrate the successful BSMV-mediated virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) of three different genes in barley roots, i.e. the barley homologues of the IPS1, PHR1, and PHO2 genes known to participate in Pi uptake and reallocation in Arabidopsis. Attempts to silence two other genes, the Pi transporter gene HvPht1;1 and the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene HvCel1, in barley roots were unsuccessful, probably due to instability of the plant gene inserts in the viral vector. In B. distachyon leaves, significant silencing of the PHYTOENE DESATURASE (BdPDS) gene was obtained as shown by photobleaching as well as quantitative RT-PCR analysis. On the other hand, only very limited silencing of the oat AsPDS gene was observed in both hexaploid (A. sativa) and diploid (A. strigosa) oat. Finally, two modifications of the BSMV vector are presented, allowing ligation-free cloning of DNA fragments into the BSMV-γ component. Conclusions Our results show that BSMV can be used as a vector for gene silencing in barley roots and in B. distachyon leaves and possibly roots, opening up possibilities for using VIGS to study cereal root biology and to exploit the wealth of genome information in the new cereal model plant B. distachyon. On the other hand, the silencing induced by BSMV in oat seemed too weak to be of

  7. Implication of IRF4 aberrant gene expression in the acute leukemias of childhood.

    PubMed

    Adamaki, Maria; Lambrou, George I; Athanasiadou, Anastasia; Tzanoudaki, Marianna; Vlahopoulos, Spiros; Moschovi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The most frequent targets of genetic alterations in human leukemias are transcription factor genes with essential functions in normal blood cell development. The Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) gene encodes a transcription factor important for key developmental stages of hematopoiesis, with known oncogenic implications in multiple myeloma, adult leukemias and lymphomas. Very few studies have reported an association of IRF4 with childhood malignancy, whereas high transcript levels have been observed in the more mature immunophenotype of ALL. Our aim was to investigate the expression levels of IRF4 in the diagnostic samples of pediatric leukemias and compare them to those of healthy controls, in order to determine aberrant gene expression and whether it extends to leukemic subtypes other than the relatively mature ALL subpopulation. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR methodology was used to investigate IRF4 expression in 58 children with acute leukemias, 4 leukemic cell lines and 20 healthy children. We show that aberrant IRF4 gene expression is implicated in a variety of leukemic subtypes; higher transcript levels appear in the more immature B-common ALL subtype and in T-cell than in B-cell leukemias, with the highest expression levels appearing in the AML group. Interestingly, we show that childhood leukemia, irrespective of subtype or cell maturation stage, is characterised by a minimum of approximately twice the amount of IRF4 gene expression encountered in healthy children. A statistically significant correlation also appeared to exist between high IRF4 expression and relapse. Our results show that ectopic expression of IRF4 follows the reverse expression pattern of what is encountered in normal B-cell development and that there might be a dose-dependency of childhood leukemia for aberrantly expressed IRF4, a characteristic that could be explored therapeutically. It is also suggested that high IRF4 expression might be used as an additional prognostic marker of

  8. The clinical value of aberrant epigenetic changes of DNA damage repair genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dan; Herman, James G.; Guo, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    The stability and integrity of the human genome are maintained by the DNA damage repair (DDR) system. Unrepaired DNA damage is a major source of potentially mutagenic lesions that drive carcinogenesis. In addition to gene mutation, DNA methylation occurs more frequently in DDR genes in human cancer. Thus, DNA methylation may play more important roles in DNA damage repair genes to drive carcinogenesis. Aberrant methylation patterns in DNA damage repair genes may serve as predictive, diagnostic, prognostic and chemosensitive markers of human cancer. MGMT methylation is a marker for poor prognosis in human glioma, while, MGMT methylation is a sensitive marker of glioma cells to alkylating agents. Aberrant epigenetic changes in DNA damage repair genes may serve as therapeutic targets. Treatment of MLH1-methylated colon cancer cell lines with the demethylating agent 5′-aza-2′-deoxycytidine induces the expression of MLH1 and sensitizes cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil. Synthetic lethality is a more exciting approach in patients with DDR defects. PARP inhibitors are the most effective anticancer reagents in BRCA-deficient cancer cells. PMID:26967246

  9. Transgene-Induced Silencing of the Zoosporogenesis-Specific NIFC Gene Cluster of Phytophthora infestans Involves Chromatin Alterations▿

    PubMed Central

    Judelson, Howard S.; Tani, Shuji

    2007-01-01

    Clustered within the genome of the oomycete phytopathogen Phytophthora infestans are four genes encoding spore-specific nuclear LIM interactor-interacting factors (NIF proteins, a type of transcriptional regulator) that are moderately conserved in DNA sequence. NIFC1, NIFC2, and NIFC3 are zoosporogenesis-induced and grouped within 4 kb, and 20 kb away resides a sporulation-induced form, NIFS. To test the function of the NIFC family, plasmids expressing full-length hairpin constructs of NIFC1 or NIFC2 were stably transformed into P. infestans. This triggered silencing of the cognate gene in about one-third of transformants, and all three NIFC genes were usually cosilenced. However, NIFS escaped silencing despite its high sequence similarity to the NIFC genes. Silencing of the three NIFC genes impaired zoospore cyst germination by 60% but did not affect other aspects of the life cycle. Silencing was transcriptional based on nuclear run-on assays and associated with tighter chromatin packing based on nuclease accessibility experiments. The chromatin alterations extended a few hundred nucleotides beyond the boundaries of the transcribed region of the NIFC cluster and were not associated with increased DNA methylation. A plasmid expressing a short hairpin RNA having sequence similarity only to NIFC1 silenced both that gene and an adjacent member of the gene cluster, likely due to the expansion of a heterochromatic domain from the targeted locus. These data help illuminate the mechanism of silencing in Phytophthora and suggest that caution should be used when interpreting silencing experiments involving closely spaced genes. PMID:17483289

  10. Transgene-induced silencing of the zoosporogenesis-specific NIFC gene cluster of Phytophthora infestans involves chromatin alterations.

    PubMed

    Judelson, Howard S; Tani, Shuji

    2007-07-01

    Clustered within the genome of the oomycete phytopathogen Phytophthora infestans are four genes encoding spore-specific nuclear LIM interactor-interacting factors (NIF proteins, a type of transcriptional regulator) that are moderately conserved in DNA sequence. NIFC1, NIFC2, and NIFC3 are zoosporogenesis-induced and grouped within 4 kb, and 20 kb away resides a sporulation-induced form, NIFS. To test the function of the NIFC family, plasmids expressing full-length hairpin constructs of NIFC1 or NIFC2 were stably transformed into P. infestans. This triggered silencing of the cognate gene in about one-third of transformants, and all three NIFC genes were usually cosilenced. However, NIFS escaped silencing despite its high sequence similarity to the NIFC genes. Silencing of the three NIFC genes impaired zoospore cyst germination by 60% but did not affect other aspects of the life cycle. Silencing was transcriptional based on nuclear run-on assays and associated with tighter chromatin packing based on nuclease accessibility experiments. The chromatin alterations extended a few hundred nucleotides beyond the boundaries of the transcribed region of the NIFC cluster and were not associated with increased DNA methylation. A plasmid expressing a short hairpin RNA having sequence similarity only to NIFC1 silenced both that gene and an adjacent member of the gene cluster, likely due to the expansion of a heterochromatic domain from the targeted locus. These data help illuminate the mechanism of silencing in Phytophthora and suggest that caution should be used when interpreting silencing experiments involving closely spaced genes.

  11. Increasing the amylose content of durum wheat through silencing of the SBEIIa genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High amylose starch has attracted particular interest because of its correlation with the amount of Resistant Starch (RS) in food. RS plays a role similar to fibre with beneficial effects for human health, providing protection from several diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. Amylose content can be modified by a targeted manipulation of the starch biosynthetic pathway. In particular, the inactivation of the enzymes involved in amylopectin synthesis can lead to the increase of amylose content. In this work, genes encoding starch branching enzymes of class II (SBEIIa) were silenced using the RNA interference (RNAi) technique in two cultivars of durum wheat, using two different methods of transformation (biolistic and Agrobacterium). Expression of RNAi transcripts was targeted to the seed endosperm using a tissue-specific promoter. Results Amylose content was markedly increased in the durum wheat transgenic lines exhibiting SBEIIa gene silencing. Moreover the starch granules in these lines were deformed, possessing an irregular and deflated shape and being smaller than those present in the untransformed controls. Two novel granule bound proteins, identified by SDS-PAGE in SBEIIa RNAi lines, were investigated by mass spectrometry and shown to have strong homologies to the waxy proteins. RVA analysis showed new pasting properties associated with high amylose lines in comparison with untransformed controls. Finally, pleiotropic effects on other starch genes were found by semi-quantitative and Real-Time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Conclusion We have found that the silencing of SBEIIa genes in durum wheat causes obvious alterations in granule morphology and starch composition, leading to high amylose wheat. Results obtained with two different methods of transformation and in two durum wheat cultivars were comparable. PMID:20626919

  12. Involvement of an intracellular vesicular transport process in naked-sgRNA-mediated TRUE gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masato; Kawano, Mitsuoki; Sato, Mari; Nashimoto, Masayuki

    2015-10-01

    tRNase ZL-utilizing efficacious gene silencing (TRUE gene silencing) is an RNA-mediated gene expression control technology with therapeutic potential. Recently, our group demonstrated that a heptamer, mh1 (Bcl‑2), targeting human Bcl-2 mRNA, can be taken up by cells without the use of any transfection reagents and can induce the apoptosis of leukemia cells. However, little is known regarding the mechanism of naked small guide (sg)RNA uptake by cultured cells. Therefore, in the present study the effects of various inhibitors on the induction of apoptosis by naked sgRNA treatment were investigated in order to identify the uptake pathway required for sgRNA function in cultured cells. Addition of the endocytosis inhibitors chlorpromazine, nystatin or methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin together with naked effective sgRNA was unable to diminish the apoptosis‑inducing effects of naked sgRNA or the reduction in target mRNA, suggesting that functional uptake of sgRNA by cells is clathrin‑, caveolae‑ and raft‑independent. Next, chloroquine, an inhibitor of lysosome acidification, and brefeldin A, an inhibitor that blocks protein transport from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum were administered. In the presence of these compounds, the apoptosis‑inducing effects of naked sgRNA were reduced. These results suggest that a vesicular transport process is involved in sgRNA‑mediated TRUE gene silencing. A greater understanding of how naked sgRNAs enter cells and how they reach their target RNAs may aid in the design of more specifically‑targeted and potent sgRNA drugs.

  13. B29 Gene Silencing in Pituitary Cells is Regulated by Its 3′ Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Cindy S.; Kuraishy, Ali I.; Fike, Francesca M.; Loya, Ruchika G.; Mikkili, Minil R.; Teitell, Michael A.; Wall, Randolph

    2007-01-01

    Summary B cell-specific B29 (Igβ, CD79b) genes in rat, mouse, and human are situated between the 5′ growth hormone (GH) locus control region (LCR) and the 3′ GH gene cluster. The entire GH genomic region is DNase1 hypersensitive in GH-expressing pituitary cells, which predicts an “open” chromatin configuration, and yet B29 is not expressed. The B29 promoter and enhancers exhibit histone deacetylation in pituitary cells, but histone deacetylase inhibition failed to activate B29 expression. The B29 promoter and a 3′ enhancer showed local dense DNA methylation in both pituitary and non-lymphoid cells consistent with gene silencing. However, DNA methyltransferase inhibition did not activate B29 expression either. B29 promoter constructs were minimally activated in transfected pituitary cells. Co-transfection of the B cell-specific octamer transcriptional co-activator Bob1 with the B29 promoter construct resulted in high level promoter activity in pituitary cells comparable to B29 promoter activity in transfected B cells. Unexpectedly, inclusion of the B29 3′ enhancer in B29 promoter constructs strongly inhibited B29 transcriptional activity even when pituitary cells were co-transfected with Bob1. Both Oct-1 and Pit-1 bind the B29 3′ enhancer in in vitro EMSA and in in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. These data indicate that the GH locus-embedded, tissue-specific B29 gene is silenced in GH-expressing pituitary cells by epigenetic mechanisms, the lack of a B cell-specific transcription factor, and likely by the B29 3′ enhancer acting as a powerful silencer in a context and tissue-specific manner. PMID:16920149

  14. Effect of base modifications on structure, thermodynamic stability, and gene silencing activity of short interfering RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sipa, Katarzyna; Sochacka, Elzbieta; Kazmierczak-Baranska, Julia; Maszewska, Maria; Janicka, Magdalena; Nowak, Genowefa; Nawrot, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    A series of nucleobase-modified siRNA duplexes containing “rare” nucleosides, 2-thiouridine (s2U), pseudouridine (Ψ), and dihydrouridine (D), were evaluated for their thermodynamic stability and gene silencing activity. The duplexes with modified units at terminal positions exhibited similar stability as the nonmodified reference. Introduction of the s2U or Ψ units into the central part of the antisense strand resulted in duplexes with higher melting temperatures (Tm). In contrary, D unit similarly like wobble base pair led to the less stable duplexes (ΔTm 3.9 and 6.6°C, respectively). Gene-silencing activity of siRNA duplexes directed toward enhanced green fluorescent protein or beta-site APP cleaving enzyme was tested in a dual fluorescence assay. The duplexes with s2U and Ψ units at their 3′-ends and with a D unit at their 5′-ends (with respect to the guide strands) were the most potent gene expression inhibitors. Duplexes with s2U and Ψ units at their 5′-ends were by 50% less active than the nonmodified counterpart. Those containing a D unit or wobble base pair in the central domain had the lowest Tm, disturbed the A-type helical structure, and had more than three times lower activity than their nonmodified congener. Activity of siRNA containing the wobble base pair could be rescued by placing the thio-nucleoside at the position 3′-adjacent to the mutation site. Thermally stable siRNA molecules containing several s2U units in the antisense strand were biologically as potent as their native counterparts. The present results provide a new chemical tool for modulation of siRNA gene-silencing activity. PMID:17585051

  15. Effect of the guide strand 3'-end structure on the gene-silencing potency of asymmetric siRNA.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sun Woo; Park, June Hyun; Yun, Soyeong; Lee, Chang Han; Shin, Chanseok; Lee, Dong-ki

    2014-08-01

    siRNAs are short dsRNAs that mediate efficient target gene silencing in a sequence-specific manner. We previously developed a novel siRNA structure, called asiRNA (asymmetric siRNA), which alleviates the off-target effects associated with conventional siRNA structures without decreasing target gene silencing potency. In the present study, we explored the effect of the guide strand 3'-end structure on the gene silencing potency of asiRNA. Interestingly, asiRNAs with a 21 nt guide strand solely composed of RNA resulted in gene silencing that was more than 6-fold more efficient compared with the corresponding asiRNA guide strand harbouring a dTdT (deoxythymidine dinucleotide) at its 3'-end. We demonstrated that the molecular basis of potency of the asiRNA with a 21 nt guide strand composed solely of RNA was due to the enhanced formation of the RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex) and increased affinity towards hAgo2 (human Argonaute2). Our observations may assist researchers in designing new asiRNAs with high on-target silencing efficiency with low off-target effects, which is critical for applications in both basic research and therapeutic development.

  16. Strong host resistance targeted against a viral suppressor of the plant gene silencing defence mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Li, H W; Lucy, A P; Guo, H S; Li, W X; Ji, L H; Wong, S M; Ding, S W

    1999-01-01

    The 2b protein encoded by cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (Cmv2b) acts as an important virulence determinant by suppressing post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), a natural plant defence mechanism against viruses. We report here that the tomato aspermy cucumovirus 2b protein (Tav2b), when expressed from the unrelated tobacco mosaic tobamovirus (TMV) RNA genome, activates strong host resistance responses to TMV in tobacco which are typical of the gene-for-gene disease resistance mechanism. Domain swapping between Cmv2b, which does not elicit these responses, and Tav2b, revealed functional domains in Tav2b critical for triggering virus resistance and hypersensitive cell death. Furthermore, substitution of two amino acids from Tav2b by those found at the same positions in Cmv2b, Lys21-->Val and Arg28-->Ser, abolished the ability to induce hypersensitive cell death and virus resistance. However, in Nicotiana benthamiana, a species related to tobacco, Tav2b functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses PTGS. Thus, a viral suppressor of the host gene silencing defence mechanism is the target of another independent host resistance mechanism. Our results provide new insights into the complex molecular strategies employed by viruses and their hosts for defence, counter-defence and counter counter-defence. PMID:10329615

  17. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21-24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed.

  18. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P.; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21–24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:25954206

  19. In Vitro Gene Silencing of the Fish Microsporidian Heterosporis saurida by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem; Dkhil, Mohamed A.; El-Matbouli, Mansour; Al-Quraishy, Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Heterosporis saurida, a microsporidian parasite of lizardfish, Saurida undosquamis, causes severe economic losses in marine aquaculture. Among the novel approaches being explored for treatment of parasitic infections in aquaculture is small interfering RNA molecules. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of using siRNA to knock down expression of specific genes of H. saurida in vitro. For this purpose, siRNAs specific for ATP/ADP antiporter 1 and methionine aminopeptidase II genes were designed and tested using a previously developed in vitro cultivation model. Silencing of H. saurida target genes was assessed and the efficacy of using siRNA for inhibition of gene expression was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Silencing of ATP/ADP antiporter 1 or methionine aminopeptidase II by siRNA reduced H. saurida infection levels in EK-1 cells 40% and 60%, respectively, as measured by qRT-PCR and spore counts. Combined siRNA treatment of both ATP/ADP antiporter 1 and methionine aminopeptidase II siRNAs was more effective against H. saurida infection as seen by the 16S rRNA level and spore counts. Our study concluded that siRNA could be used to advance development of novel approaches to inhibit H. saurida and provide an alternative approach to combat microsporidia. PMID:27228357

  20. Tissue-specific gene silencing mediated by a naturally occurring chalcone synthase gene cluster in Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Jigyasa H; Clough, Steven J; Chan, Wan-Ching; Vodkin, Lila O

    2004-04-01

    Chalcone synthase, a key regulatory enzyme in the flavonoid pathway, constitutes an eight-member gene family in Glycine max (soybean). Three of the chalcone synthase (CHS) gene family members are arranged as inverted repeats in a 10-kb region, corresponding to the I locus (inhibitor). Spontaneous mutations of a dominant allele (I or i(i)) to a recessive allele (i) have been shown to delete promoter sequences, paradoxically increasing total CHS transcript levels and resulting in black seed coats. However, it is not known which of the gene family members contribute toward pigmentation and how this locus affects CHS expression in other tissues. We investigated the unusual nature of the I locus using four pairs of isogenic lines differing with respect to alleles of the I locus. RNA gel blots using a generic open reading frame CHS probe detected similar CHS transcript levels in stems, roots, leaves, young pods, and cotyledons of the yellow and black isolines but not in the seed coats, which is consistent with the dominant I and i(i) alleles mediating CHS gene silencing in a tissue-specific manner. Using real-time RT-PCR, a variable pattern of expression of CHS genes in different tissues was demonstrated. However, increase in pigmentation in the black seed coats was associated with release of the silencing effect specifically on CHS7/CHS8, which occurred at all stages of seed coat development. These expression changes were linked to structural changes taking place at the I locus, shown to encompass a much wider region of at least 27 kb, comprising two identical 10.91-kb stretches of CHS gene duplications. The suppressive effect of this 27-kb I locus in a specific tissue of the G. max plant represents a unique endogenous gene silencing mechanism.

  1. Tissue-Specific Gene Silencing Mediated by a Naturally Occurring Chalcone Synthase Gene Cluster in Glycine maxW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Tuteja, Jigyasa H.; Clough, Steven J.; Chan, Wan-Ching; Vodkin, Lila O.

    2004-01-01

    Chalcone synthase, a key regulatory enzyme in the flavonoid pathway, constitutes an eight-member gene family in Glycine max (soybean). Three of the chalcone synthase (CHS) gene family members are arranged as inverted repeats in a 10-kb region, corresponding to the I locus (inhibitor). Spontaneous mutations of a dominant allele (I or ii) to a recessive allele (i) have been shown to delete promoter sequences, paradoxically increasing total CHS transcript levels and resulting in black seed coats. However, it is not known which of the gene family members contribute toward pigmentation and how this locus affects CHS expression in other tissues. We investigated the unusual nature of the I locus using four pairs of isogenic lines differing with respect to alleles of the I locus. RNA gel blots using a generic open reading frame CHS probe detected similar CHS transcript levels in stems, roots, leaves, young pods, and cotyledons of the yellow and black isolines but not in the seed coats, which is consistent with the dominant I and ii alleles mediating CHS gene silencing in a tissue-specific manner. Using real-time RT-PCR, a variable pattern of expression of CHS genes in different tissues was demonstrated. However, increase in pigmentation in the black seed coats was associated with release of the silencing effect specifically on CHS7/CHS8, which occurred at all stages of seed coat development. These expression changes were linked to structural changes taking place at the I locus, shown to encompass a much wider region of at least 27 kb, comprising two identical 10.91-kb stretches of CHS gene duplications. The suppressive effect of this 27-kb I locus in a specific tissue of the G. max plant represents a unique endogenous gene silencing mechanism. PMID:15064367

  2. Sense transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing in tobacco compromises the splicing of endogenous counterpart genes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi-Rae; Natsuume, Masaya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Imai, Misaki; Iijima, Ken; Oka, Shin-Ichiro; Adachi, Eri; Kodama, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Sense transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (S-PTGS) is thought to be a type of RNA silencing in which ARGONAUTE1 directs the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated cleavage of a target mRNA in the cytoplasm. Here, we report that the altered splicing of endogenous counterpart genes is a main cause for the reduction of their mature mRNA levels. After the S-PTGS of a tobacco endoplasmic reticulum ω-3 fatty acid desaturase (NtFAD3) gene, 3'-truncated, polyadenylated endo-NtFAD3 transcripts and 5'-truncated, intron-containing endo-NtFAD3 transcripts were detected in the total RNA fraction. Although transcription proceeded until the last exon of the endogenous NtFAD3 gene, intron-containing NtFAD3 transcripts accumulated in the nucleus of the S-PTGS plants. Several intron-containing NtFAD3 transcripts harboring most of the exon sequences were generated when an endogenous silencing suppressor gene, rgs-CaM, was overexpressed in the S-PTGS plants. These intron-containing NtFAD3 splice variants were generated in the presence of NtFAD3 siRNAs that are homologous to the nucleotide sequences of these splice variants. The results of this study indicate that the inhibition of endo-NtFAD3 gene expression is primarily directed via the alteration of splicing and not by cytoplasmic slicer activity. Our results suggest that the transgene and intron-containing endogenous counterpart genes are differentially suppressed in S-PTGS plants.

  3. Gene expression and epigenetic aberrations in F1-placentas fathered by obese males.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Megan; Strick, Reiner; Strissel, Pamela L; Dittrich, Ralf; McPherson, Nicole O; Lane, Michelle; Pliushch, Galyna; Potabattula, Ramya; Haaf, Thomas; El Hajj, Nady

    2017-02-10

    Gene expression and/or epigenetic deregulation may have consequences for sperm and blastocysts, as well as for the placenta, together potentially contributing to problems observed in offspring. We previously demonstrated specific perturbations of fertilization, blastocyst formation, implantation, as well as aberrant glucose metabolism and adiposity in offspring using a mouse model of paternal obesity. The current investigation analyzed gene expression and methylation of specific CpG residues in F1 placentas of pregnancies fathered by obese and normal-weight male mice, using real-time PCR and bisulfite pyrosequencing. Our aim was to determine if paternal obesity deregulated placental gene expression and DNA methylation when compared to normal-weight males. Gene methylation of sperm DNA was analyzed and compared to placentas to address epigenetic transmission. Of the 10 paternally expressed genes (Pegs), 11 genes important for development and transport of nutrients, and the long-terminal repeat Intracisternal A particle (IAP) elements, derived from a member of the class II endogenous retroviral gene family, we observed a significant effect of paternal diet-induced obesity on deregulated expression of Peg3, Peg9, Peg10, and the nutrient transporter gene Slc38a2, and aberrant DNA methylation of the Peg9 promoter in F1 placental tissue. Epigenetic changes in Peg9 were also found in sperm from obese fathers. We therefore propose that paternal obesity renders changes in gene expression and/or methylation throughout the placental genome, which could contribute to the reproductive problems related to fertility and to the metabolic, long-term health impact on offspring.

  4. Mechanism of Action of 2-Aminobenzamide HDAC Inhibitors in Reversing Gene Silencing in Friedreich's Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Soragni, Elisabetta; Chou, C James; Rusche, James R; Gottesfeld, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    The genetic defect in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is the hyperexpansion of a GAA•TTC triplet in the first intron of the FXN gene, encoding the essential mitochondrial protein frataxin. Histone post-translational modifications near the expanded repeats are consistent with heterochromatin formation and consequent FXN gene silencing. Using a newly developed human neuronal cell model, derived from patient-induced pluripotent stem cells, we find that 2-aminobenzamide histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increase FXN mRNA levels and frataxin protein in FRDA neuronal cells. However, only compounds targeting the class I HDACs 1 and 3 are active in increasing FXN mRNA in these cells. Structural analogs of the active HDAC inhibitors that selectively target either HDAC1 or HDAC3 do not show similar increases in FXN mRNA levels. To understand the mechanism of action of these compounds, we probed the kinetic properties of the active and inactive inhibitors, and found that only compounds that target HDACs 1 and 3 exhibited a slow-on/slow-off mechanism of action for the HDAC enzymes. HDAC1- and HDAC3-selective compounds did not show this activity. Using siRNA methods in the FRDA neuronal cells, we show increases in FXN mRNA upon silencing of either HDACs 1 or 3, suggesting the possibility that inhibition of each of these class I HDACs is necessary for activation of FXN mRNA synthesis, as there appears to be redundancy in the silencing mechanism caused by the GAA•TTC repeats. Moreover, inhibitors must have a long residence time on their target enzymes for this activity. By interrogating microarray data from neuronal cells treated with inhibitors of different specificity, we selected two genes encoding histone macroH2A (H2AFY2) and Polycomb group ring finger 2 (PCGF2) that were specifically down-regulated by the inhibitors targeting HDACs1 and 3 versus the more selective inhibitors for further investigation. Both genes are involved in transcriptional repression and we speculate

  5. Genome-wide unmasking of epigenetically silenced genes in lung adenocarcinoma from smokers and never smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yingling, Christin M.; Liu, Yushi; Tellez, Carmen S.; Van Neste, Leander; Baylin, Stephen S.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer in never smokers (NS) shows striking demographic, clinicopathological and molecular distinctions from the disease in smokers (S). Studies on selected genetic and epigenetic alterations in lung cancer identified that the frequency and profile of some abnormalities significantly differ by smoking status. This study compared the transcriptome of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines derived from S (n = 3) and NS (n = 3) each treated with vehicle (control), histone deacetylation inhibitor (trichostatin A) or DNA methylation inhibitor (5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine). Among 122 genes reexpressed following 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine but not trichostatin A treatment in two or more cell lines (including 32 genes in S-only and 12 NS-only), methylation was validated for 80% (98/122 genes). After methylation analysis of 20 normal tissue samples and 14 additional non–small cell lung cancer cell lines (total 20), 39 genes frequently methylated in normal (>20%, 4/20) and 21 genes rarely methylated in non–small cell lung cancer (≤10%, 2/20) were excluded. The prevalence for methylation of the remaining 38 genes in lung adenocarcinomas from S (n = 97) and NS (n = 75) ranged from 8–89% and significantly differs between S and NS for CPEB1, CST6, EMILIN2, LAYN and MARVELD3 (P < 0.05). Furthermore, methylation of EMILIN2, ROBO3 and IGDCC4 was more prevalent in advanced (Stage II–IV, n = 61) than early (Stage I, n = 110) tumors. Knockdown of MARVELD3, one of the novel epigenetically silenced genes, by small interfering RNA significantly reduced anchorage-independent growth of lung cancer cells (P < 0.001). Collectively, this study has identified multiple, novel, epigenetically silenced genes in lung cancer and provides invaluable resources for the development of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:24398667

  6. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae suppressor of choline sensitivity (SCS2) gene is a multicopy Suppressor of mec1 telomeric silencing defects.

    PubMed Central

    Craven, R J; Petes, T D

    2001-01-01

    Mec1p is a cell cycle checkpoint protein related to the ATM protein kinase family. Certain mec1 mutations or overexpression of Mec1p lead to shortened telomeres and loss of telomeric silencing. We conducted a multicopy suppressor screen for genes that suppress the loss of silencing in strains overexpressing Mec1p. We identified SCS2 (suppressor of choline sensitivity), a gene previously isolated as a suppressor of defects in inositol synthesis. Deletion of SCS2 resulted in decreased telomeric silencing, and the scs2 mutation increased the rate of cellular senescence observed for mec1-21 tel1 double mutant cells. Genetic analysis revealed that Scs2p probably acts through a different telomeric silencing pathway from that affected by Mec1p. PMID:11333225

  7. Gene expression of selenoproteins can be regulated by selenoprotein K silencing in chicken myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruifeng; Yao, Haidong; Zhao, Xia; Cao, Changyu; Yang, Tianshu; Luan, Yilin; Zhang, Ziwei; Xu, Shiwen

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of Selenoprotein K (Selk) silencing on the mRNA expression of 25 selenoproteins in chicken myoblasts. The specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) for Selk gene was designed and transfected into chicken myoblasts. Post-transfection mRNA expression of 25 selenoproteins was determined at various time periods i.e., 24, 48 and 72 h. Moreover, based on the results of expression of 25 selenoproteins, correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) were used for further analysis. The results showed that the designed siRNA effectively inhibited Selk expression (decreased by 20, 29 and 43 % on 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively) and the mRNA expression levels of the 23 selenoproteins were influenced by silencing Selk differently (P < 0.05). Time-dependent pattern of mRNA expression after siRNA treatment in three groups were found similar: one group including Gpx1, Gpx2, Gpx3, Gpx4, Txnrd1, Txnrd2, Txnrd3, Sepw1, Selh, Sepp1, Selo and Sepx1, another group including Sepn1, Sels, Selt, Selm and Sep15 and other group including Dio2 and Dio3. The results of correlation analysis showed that Gpx1, Gpx2, Gpx3, Gpx4, Dio1, Dio3, Sepn1, Sels, Sepw1, Selt, Selh, Sep15, Seli and Selu had a positive correlation with Selk, while Dio2 and Sepp1 had a negative correlation with Selk. PCA data also indicated that Txnrd1, Txnrd2, Dio2, Selpb, Sepp1and Selo may play special roles in response to Selk silencing. In summary, these results indicated that different selenoproteins possess and exhibits distinct responses to silencing of Selk in chicken myoblasts.

  8. Highly efficient gene silencing using perfect complementary artificial miRNA targeting AP1 or heteromeric artificial miRNA targeting AP1 and CAL genes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wonkeun; Zhai, Jixian; Lee, Jung-Youn

    2009-01-01

    Gene silencing is a useful technique for elucidating biological function of genes by knocking down their expression. A recently developed artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) exploits an endogenous gene silencing mechanism that processes natural miRNA precursors to small silencing RNAs that target transcripts for degradation. Based on natural miRNA structures, amiRNAs are commonly designed such that they have a few mismatching nucleotides with respect to their target sites as well as within mature amiRNA duplexes. In this study, we performed an analysis in which the conventional and modified form of an amiRNA was compared side by side. We showed that the amiRNA containing 5′ mismatch with its amiRNA* and perfect complementarity to its target gene acted as a highly potent gene silencing agent against AP1, achieving a desired null mutation effect. In addition, a simultaneous silencing of two independent genes, AP1 and CAL1 wastested by employing a multimeric form of amiRNAs. Advantages and potential disadvantages of using amiRNAs with perfect complementarity to the target gene are discussed. The results presented here should be helpful in designing more specific and effective gene silencing agents. PMID:19066901

  9. Highly efficient gene silencing using perfect complementary artificial miRNA targeting AP1 or heteromeric artificial miRNA targeting AP1 and CAL genes.

    PubMed

    Park, Wonkeun; Zhai, Jixian; Lee, Jung-Youn

    2009-03-01

    Gene silencing is a useful technique for elucidating biological function of genes by knocking down their expression. Recently developed artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) exploit an endogenous gene silencing mechanism that processes natural miRNA precursors to small silencing RNAs that target transcripts for degradation. Based on natural miRNA structures, amiRNAs are commonly designed such that they have a few mismatching nucleotides with respect to their target sites as well as within mature amiRNA duplexes. In this study, we performed an analysis in which the conventional and modified form of an amiRNA was compared side by side. We showed that the amiRNA containing 5' mismatch with its amiRNA* and perfect complementarity to its target gene acted as a highly potent gene silencing agent against AP1, achieving a desired null mutation effect. In addition, a simultaneous silencing of two independent genes, AP1 and CAL1 was tested by employing a multimeric form of amiRNAs. Advantages and potential disadvantages of using amiRNAs with perfect complementarity to the target gene are discussed. The results presented here should be helpful in designing more specific and effective gene silencing agents.

  10. Silencing of β1 integrin regulates airway remodeling by regulating the transcription of SOCE‑associated genes in asthmatic mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chen; Liu, Wenwen; Shi, Fei; Fen, Mengjie; Ren, Lili; Qi, Hui

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of asthma is increasing globally; however, current treatments are only able to cure a certain proportion of patients. There is an urgent need to develop novel therapies. β1 integrin serves a role in the pathophysiology of asthma through the development of airway remodeling. The aim of the present study was to investigate silencing of the β1 integrin gene in pre‑clinical models of allergic asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin through intraperitoneal injection and repeated aerosolized ovalbumin. A short hairpin RNA of the β1 integrin gene was designed and transfected into mouse models of asthma in vivo, in order to evaluate whether silencing of the β1 integrin gene affects airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and inflammation by regulating the mRNA expression of store‑operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE)‑associated genes. Silencing the β1 integrin gene may downregulate β1 integrin mRNA while not statistically decreasing α‑smooth muscle actin gene expression and airway smooth muscle thickness. β1 integrin silencing was able to downregulate the transcription of SOCE‑associated genes to normal levels, including calcium release‑activated calcium modulator 1 and short transient receptor potential channel member 1, but not stromal interaction molecule 1, in asthma. Silencing of the β1 integrin gene additionally maintained nuclear factor of activated T‑cells cytoplasmic 1 gene expression, and inflammatory cytokines interleukin‑4 and interferon‑γ at normal levels. The results of the present study provide evidence to suggest that silencing of the β1 integrin gene may be of therapeutic benefit for patients with asthma.

  11. Multisubunit RNA Polymerases IV and V: Purveyors of Non-Coding RNA for Plant Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2011-08-01

    In all eukaryotes, nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II and III synthesize the myriad RNAs that are essential for life. Remarkably, plants have evolved two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, RNA polymerases IV and V, which orchestrate non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing processes affecting development, transposon taming, antiviral defence and allelic crosstalk. Biochemical details concerning the templates and products of RNA polymerases IV and V are lacking. However, their subunit compositions reveal that they evolved as specialized forms of RNA polymerase II, which provides the unique opportunity to study the functional diversification of a eukaryotic RNA polymerase family.

  12. Nanogyroids Incorporating Multivalent Lipids: Enhanced Membrane Charge Density and Pore Forming Ability for Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Cecília; Ewert, Kai K.; Shirazi, Rahau S.; Bouxsein, Nathan F.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2011-01-01

    The self-assembly of a custom-synthesized pentavalent cationic lipid (MVL5) and glycerol monooleate (GMO) with small interfering RNA (siRNA) results in the formation of a double-gyroid bicontinuous inverted cubic phase with co-localized lipid/siRNA domains as shown by synchrotron X-ray scattering and fluorescence microscopy. The high charge density (due to MVL5) and positive Gaussian modulus of the GMO-containing membranes confer optimal electrostatic and elastic properties for endosomal escape, enabling efficient siRNA delivery and effective, specific gene silencing. PMID:21612245

  13. An efficient method for gene silencing in human primary plasmacytoid dendritic cells: silencing of the TLR7/IRF-7 pathway as a proof of concept

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nikaïa; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Nisole, Sébastien; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are specialized immune cells that produce massive levels of type I interferon in response to pathogens. Unfortunately, pDC are fragile and extremely rare, rendering their functional study a tough challenge. However, because of their central role in numerous pathologies, there is a considerable need for an efficient and reproducible protocol for gene silencing in these cells. In this report, we tested six different methods for siRNA delivery into primary human pDC including viral-based, lipid-based, electroporation, and poly-ethylenimine (PEI) technologies. We show that lipid-based reagent DOTAP was extremely efficient for siRNA delivery into pDC, and did not induce cel