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Sample records for aberrant mitotic spindles

  1. Theory of Mitotic Spindle Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank

    2005-03-01

    During unequal cell division the mitotic spindle is positioned away from the center of the cell before cell cleavage. In many biological systems this repositioning is accompanied by oscillatory movements of the spindle. We present a theoretical description for mitotic spindle oscillations. We show that the cooperative attachment and detachment of cortical force generators to astral microtubules leads to spontaneous oscillations beyond a critical number of force generators. This mechanism can quantitatively describe the spindle oscillations observed during unequal division of the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

  2. Mechanisms of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Life depends on cell proliferation and the accurate segregation of chromosomes, which are mediated by the microtubule (MT)-based mitotic spindle and ~200 essential MT-associated proteins. Yet, a mechanistic understanding of how the mitotic spindle is assembled and achieves chromosome segregation is still missing. This is mostly due to the density of MTs in the spindle, which presumably precludes their direct observation. Recent insight has been gained into the molecular building plan of the metaphase spindle using bulk and single-molecule measurements combined with computational modeling. MT nucleation was uncovered as a key principle of spindle assembly, and mechanistic details about MT nucleation pathways and their coordination are starting to be revealed. Lastly, advances in studying spindle assembly can be applied to address the molecular mechanisms of how the spindle segregates chromosomes. PMID:27145846

  3. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  4. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27220038

  5. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  6. Mitotic spindle studied using picosecond laser scissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. M.; Botvinick, E. L.; Shi, Linda; Berns, M. B.; Wu, George

    2006-08-01

    In previous studies we have shown that the second harmonic 532 nm, from a picosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, can cleanly and selectively disrupt spindle fiber microtubules in live cells (Botvinick et al 2004, Biophys. J. 87:4303-4212). In the present study we have ablated different locations and amounts of the metaphase mitotic spindle, and followed the cells in order to observe the fate of the irradiated spindle and the ability of the cell to continue through mitosis. Cells of the rat kangaroo line (PTK2) were stably transfected by ECFP-tubulin and, using fluorescent microscopy and the automated RoboLase microscope, (Botvinick and Berns, 2005, Micros. Res. Tech. 68:65-74) brightly fluorescent individual cells in metaphase were irradiated with 0.2447 nJ/micropulse corresponding to an irradiance of 1.4496*10^7 J/(ps*cm^2) . Upon irradiation the exposed part of the mitotic spindle immediately lost fluorescence and the following events were observed in the cells over time: (1) immediate contraction of the spindle pole towards the cut, (2) recovery of connection between pole and cut microtubule, (3) completion of mitosis. This system should be very useful in studying internal cellular dynamics of the mitotic spindle.

  7. Force and Length in the Mitotic Spindle

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Sophie; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    The mitotic spindle assembles to a steady-state length at metaphase through the integrated action of molecular mechanisms that generate and respond to mechanical forces. While molecular mechanisms that produce force have been described, our understanding of how they integrate with each other, and with the assembly-disassembly mechanisms that regulate length, is poor. We review current understanding of the basic architecture and dynamics of the metaphase spindle, and some of the elementary force producing mechanisms. We then discuss models for force integration, and spindle length determination. We also emphasize key missing data that notably includes absolute values of forces, and how they vary as a function of position, within the spindle. PMID:19906577

  8. Rapid measurement of mitotic spindle orientation in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Decarreau, Justin; Driver, Jonathan; Asbury, Charles; Wordeman, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Factors that influence the orientation of the mitotic spindle are important for the maintenance of stem cell populations and in cancer development. However, screening for these factors requires rapid quantification of alterations of the angle of the mitotic spindle in cultured cell lines. Here we describe a method to image mitotic cells and rapidly score the angle of the mitotic spindle using a simple MATLAB application to analyze a stack of Z-images. PMID:24633791

  9. Axin localizes to mitotic spindles and centrosomes in mitotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Ki-Joon; Kim, Sewoon; Seo, Eunjeong; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2009-04-01

    Wnt signaling plays critical roles in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. In addition, numerous recent studies have shown that various Wnt signaling components are involved in mitosis and chromosomal instability. However, the role of Axin, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, in mitosis has remained unclear. Using monoclonal antibodies against Axin, we found that Axin localizes to the centrosome and along mitotic spindles. This localization was suppressed by siRNA specific for Aurora A kinase and by Aurora kinase inhibitor. Interestingly, Axin over-expression altered the subcellular distribution of Plk1 and of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3{beta}) without producing any notable changes in cellular phenotype. In the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor, Axin over-expression induced the formation of cleavage furrow-like structures and of prominent astral microtubules lacking midbody formation in a subset of cells. Our results suggest that Axin modulates distribution of Axin-associated proteins such as Plk1 and GSK3{beta} in an expression level-dependent manner and these interactions affect the mitotic process, including cytokinesis under certain conditions, such as in the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor.

  10. Suppression of ectopic assembly of centriole proteins ensures mitotic spindle integrity.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Gen; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in maintaining the appropriate number of centrioles could be the origin of genome instability in tumor formation. Recently, we demonstrated that ectopic formation of aberrant centriole-related structures occurs even in the presence of pre-existing centrioles, leading to mitotic spindle defects and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:27308496

  11. Suppression of ectopic assembly of centriole proteins ensures mitotic spindle integrity

    PubMed Central

    Shiratsuchi, Gen; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in maintaining the appropriate number of centrioles could be the origin of genome instability in tumor formation. Recently, we demonstrated that ectopic formation of aberrant centriole-related structures occurs even in the presence of pre-existing centrioles, leading to mitotic spindle defects and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:27308496

  12. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  13. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  14. WD40-repeat protein 62 is a JNK-phosphorylated spindle pole protein required for spindle maintenance and timely mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Bogoyevitch, Marie A.; Yeap, Yvonne Y. C.; Qu, Zhengdong; Ngoei, Kevin R.; Yip, Yan Y.; Zhao, Teresa T.; Heng, Julian I.; Ng, Dominic C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The impact of aberrant centrosomes and/or spindles on asymmetric cell division in embryonic development indicates the tight regulation of bipolar spindle formation and positioning that is required for mitotic progression and cell fate determination. WD40-repeat protein 62 (WDR62) was recently identified as a spindle pole protein linked to the neurodevelopmental defect of microcephaly but its roles in mitosis have not been defined. We report here that the in utero electroporation of neuroprogenitor cells with WDR62 siRNAs induced their cell cycle exit and reduced their proliferative capacity. In cultured cells, we demonstrated cell-cycle-dependent accumulation of WDR62 at the spindle pole during mitotic entry that persisted until metaphase–anaphase transition. Utilizing siRNA depletion, we revealed WDR62 function in stabilizing the mitotic spindle specifically during metaphase. WDR62 loss resulted in spindle orientation defects, decreased the integrity of centrosomes displaced from the spindle pole and delayed mitotic progression. Additionally, we revealed JNK phosphorylation of WDR62 is required for maintaining metaphase spindle organization during mitosis. Our study provides the first functional characterization of WDR62 and has revealed requirements for JNK/WDR62 signaling in mitotic spindle regulation that may be involved in coordinating neurogenesis. PMID:22899712

  15. Brownian dynamics simulation of fission yeast mitotic spindle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmaier, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The mitotic spindle segregates chromosomes during mitosis. The dynamics that establish bipolar spindle formation are not well understood. We have developed a computational model of fission-yeast mitotic spindle formation using Brownian dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Our model includes rigid, dynamic microtubules, a spherical nuclear envelope, spindle pole bodies anchored in the nuclear envelope, and crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins. Crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins attach and detach in a grand canonical ensemble, and exert forces and torques on the attached microtubules. We have modeled increased affinity for crosslinking motor attachment to antiparallel microtubule pairs, and stabilization of microtubules in the interpolar bundle. We study parameters controlling the stability of the interpolar bundle and assembly of a bipolar spindle from initially adjacent spindle-pole bodies.

  16. Rab11-endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 and endosomes in mitosis. Here we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11-depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively-active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization and generates robust spindles. This suggests a fundamental role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes co-contribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  17. Rab11 endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle organization and orientation.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-03-10

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 endosomes in mitosis. Here, we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11 depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization, and generates robust spindles. This suggests a role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes cocontribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  18. A requirement for epsin in mitotic membrane and spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells possess a sophisticated membrane system to facilitate diverse functions. Whereas much is known about the nature of membrane systems in interphase, the organization and function of the mitotic membrane system are less well understood. In this study, we show that epsin, an endocytic adapter protein, regulates mitotic membrane morphology and spindle integrity in HeLa cells. Using epsin that harbors point mutations in the epsin NH2-terminal homology domain and spindle assembly assays in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, we show that epsin-induced membrane curvature is required for proper spindle morphogenesis, independent of its function in endocytosis during interphase. Although several other membrane-interacting proteins, including clathrin, AP2, autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia, and GRASP65, are implicated in the regulation of mitosis, whether they participate through regulation of membrane organization is unclear. Our study of epsin provides evidence that mitotic membrane organization influences spindle integrity. PMID:19704019

  19. Reconstitution of Basic Mitotic Spindles in Spherical Emulsion Droplets.

    PubMed

    Vleugel, Mathijs; Roth, Sophie; Groenendijk, Celebrity F; Dogterom, Marileen

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle assembly, positioning and orientation depend on the combined forces generated by microtubule dynamics, microtubule motor proteins and cross-linkers. Growing microtubules can generate pushing forces, while depolymerizing microtubules can convert the energy from microtubule shrinkage into pulling forces, when attached, for example, to cortical dynein or chromosomes. In addition, motor proteins and diffusible cross-linkers within the spindle contribute to spindle architecture by connecting and sliding anti-parallel microtubules. In vivo, it has proven difficult to unravel the relative contribution of individual players to the overall balance of forces. Here we present the methods that we recently developed in our efforts to reconstitute basic mitotic spindles bottom-up in vitro. Using microfluidic techniques, centrosomes and tubulin are encapsulated in water-in-oil emulsion droplets, leading to the formation of geometrically confined (double) microtubule asters. By additionally introducing cortically anchored dynein, plus-end directed microtubule motors and diffusible cross-linkers, this system is used to reconstitute spindle-like structures. The methods presented here provide a starting point for reconstitution of more complete mitotic spindles, allowing for a detailed study of the contribution of each individual component, and for obtaining an integrated quantitative view of the force-balance within the mitotic spindle. PMID:27584979

  20. Kinetic analysis of mitotic spindle elongation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baskin, T I; Cande, W Z

    1990-09-01

    Studies of mitotic spindle elongation in vitro using populations of diatom spindles visualized with immunofluorescence microscopy have shown that the two interdigitating half-spindles are driven apart by an ATP-dependent process that generates force in the zone of overlap between half-spindles. To characterize further the system responsible for spindle elongation, we observed spindle elongation directly with polarized light or phase-contrast video-microscopy. We report that the kinetics of spindle elongation versus time are linear. A constant rate of spindle elongation occurs despite the continuous decrease in length of the zone of overlap between half-spindles. The average rate of spindle elongation varies as a function of treatment, and rates measured match spindle elongation rates measured in vivo. When spindles elongated in the presence of polymerizing tubulin (from bovine brain), the extent of elongation was greater than the original zone of half-spindle overlap, but the rate of elongation was constant. No component of force due to tubulin polymerization was found. The total elongation observed in the presence of added tubulin could exceed a doubling of original spindle length, matching the elongation in the intact diatom. The linear rate of spindle elongation in vitro suggests that the force transducer for anaphase B is a mechanochemical ATPase, analogous to dynein or myosin, and that the force for spindle elongation does not arise from stored energy, e.g. in an elastic matrix in the midzone. Additionally, on the basis of observations described here, we conclude that the force-transduction system for spindle elongation must be able to remain in the zone of microtubule overlap during the sliding apart of half-spindles, and that the transducer can generate force between microtubules that are not strictly antiparallel. PMID:2258393

  1. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1

    PubMed Central

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning. PMID:26507466

  2. Mechanical design principles of a mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jonathan J; Roque, Hélio; Antony, Claude; Nédélec, François

    2014-01-01

    An organised spindle is crucial to the fidelity of chromosome segregation, but the relationship between spindle structure and function is not well understood in any cell type. The anaphase B spindle in fission yeast has a slender morphology and must elongate against compressive forces. This ‘pushing’ mode of chromosome transport renders the spindle susceptible to breakage, as observed in cells with a variety of defects. Here we perform electron tomographic analyses of the spindle, which suggest that it organises a limited supply of structural components to increase its compressive strength. Structural integrity is maintained throughout the spindle's fourfold elongation by organising microtubules into a rigid transverse array, preserving correct microtubule number and dynamically rescaling microtubule length. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03398.001 PMID:25521247

  3. Spindle Size Scaling Contributes to Robust Silencing of Mitotic Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis hinges on proper assembly of the microtubule spindle that establishes bipolar attachment to each chromosome. Experiments demonstrate allometry of mitotic spindles and a universal scaling relationship between spindle size and cell size across metazoans, which indicates a conserved principle of spindle assembly at play during evolution. However, the nature of this principle is currently unknown. Researchers have focused on deriving the mechanistic underpinning of the size scaling from the mechanical aspects of the spindle assembly process. In this work we take a different standpoint and ask: What is the size scaling for? We address this question from the functional perspectives of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). SAC is the critical surveillance mechanism that prevents premature chromosome segregation in the presence of unattached or misattached chromosomes. The SAC signal gets silenced after and only after the last chromosome-spindle attachment in mitosis. We previously established a model that explains the robustness of SAC silencing based on spindle-mediated spatiotemporal regulation of SAC proteins. Here, we refine the previous model, and find that robust and timely SAC silencing entails proper size scaling of mitotic spindle. This finding provides, to our knowledge, a novel, function-oriented angle toward understanding the observed spindle allometry, and the universal scaling relationship between spindle size and cell size in metazoans. In a broad sense, the functional requirement of robust SAC silencing could have helped shape the spindle assembly mechanism in evolution. PMID:27602734

  4. Towards a quantitative understanding of mitotic spindle assembly and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Craig, Erin

    2010-01-01

    The ‘simple’ view of the mitotic spindle is that it self-assembles as a result of microtubules (MTs) randomly searching for chromosomes, after which the spindle length is maintained by a balance of outward tension exerted by molecular motors on the MTs connecting centrosomes and chromosomes, and compression generated by other motors on the MTs connecting the spindle poles. This picture is being challenged now by mounting evidence indicating that spindle assembly and maintenance rely on much more complex interconnected networks of microtubules, molecular motors, chromosomes and regulatory proteins. From an engineering point of view, three design principles of this molecular machine are especially important: the spindle assembles quickly, it assembles accurately, and it is mechanically robust – yet malleable. How is this design achieved with randomly interacting and impermanent molecular parts? Here, we review recent interdisciplinary studies that have started to shed light on this question. We discuss cooperative mechanisms of spindle self-assembly, error correction and maintenance of its mechanical properties, speculate on analogy between spindle and lamellipodial dynamics, and highlight the role of quantitative approaches in understanding the mitotic spindle design. PMID:20930139

  5. Cep192 and the generation of the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ferreria, Maria Ana; Sharp, David J

    2008-06-01

    The cellular mechanisms used to generate sufficient microtubule polymer mass to drive the assembly and function of the mitotic spindle remain a matter of great interest. As the primary microtubule nucleating structures in somatic animal cells, centrosomes have been assumed to figure prominently in spindle assembly. At the onset of mitosis, centrosomes undergo a dramatic increase in size and microtubule nucleating capacity, termed maturation, which is likely a key event in mitotic spindle formation. Interestingly, however, spindles can still form in the absence of centrosomes calling into question the specific mitotic role of these organelles. Recent work has shown that the human centrosomal protein, Cep192, is required for both centrosome maturation and spindle assembly thus providing a molecular link between these two processes. In this article, we propose that Cep192 does so by forming a scaffolding on which proteins involved in microtubule nucleation are sequestered and become active in mitotic cells. Normally, this activity is largely confined to centrosomes but in their absence continues to function but is dispersed to other sites within the cell. PMID:18469523

  6. Physical Description of Mitotic Spindle Orientation During Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Théry, Manuel; Racine, Victor; Bornens, Michel; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-03-01

    During cell division, the duplicated chromosomes are physically separated by the action of the mitotic spindle. The spindle is a dynamic structure of the cytoskeleton, which consists of two microtubule asters. Its orientation defines the axis along which the cell divides. Recent experiments show that the spindle orientation depends on the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites. Here we show that the experimentally observed spindle orientation can be understood as the result of the action of cortical force generators acting on the spindle. We assume that the local activity of force generators is controlled by the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites determined by the particular geometry of the adhesive substrate. We develop a simple physical description of the spindle mechanics, which allows us to calculate the torque acting on the spindle, as well as the energy profile and the angular distribution of spindle orientation. Our model accounts for the preferred spindle orientation, as well as the full shape of the angular distributions of spindle orientation observed in a large variety of pattern geometries. M. Th'ery, A. Jim'enez-Dalmaroni, et al., Nature 447, 493 (2007).

  7. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization. PMID:25664600

  8. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization. PMID:25664600

  9. The Distribution of Active Force Generators Controls Mitotic Spindle Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2003-07-01

    During unequal cell divisions a mitotic spindle is eccentrically positioned before cell cleavage. To determine the basis of the net force imbalance that causes spindle displacement in one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we fragmented centrosomes with an ultraviolet laser. Analysis of the mean and variance of fragment speeds suggests that the force imbalance is due to a larger number of force generators pulling on astral microtubules of the posterior aster relative to the anterior aster. Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) α subunits is required to generate these astral forces.

  10. Reduced O-GlcNAcase expression promotes mitotic errors and spindle defects.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Chris; Tan, Ee Phie; Zhang, Zhen; Machacek, Miranda; Brinker, Amanda E; Azuma, Mizuki; Slawson, Chad

    2016-05-18

    Alterations in O-GlcNAc cycling, the addition and removal of O-GlcNAc, lead to mitotic defects and increased aneuploidy. Herein, we generated stable O-GlcNAcase (OGA, the enzyme that removes O-GlcNAc) knockdown HeLa cell lines and characterized the effect of the reduction in OGA activity on cell cycle progression. After release from G1/S, the OGA knockdown cells progressed normally through S phase but demonstrated mitotic exit defects. Cyclin A was increased in the knockdown cells while Cyclin B and D expression was reduced. Retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation was also increased in the knockdown compared to control. At M phase, the knockdown cells showed more compact spindle chromatids than control cells and had a greater percentage of cells with multipolar spindles. Furthermore, the timing of the inhibitory tyrosine phosphorylation of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 1 (CDK1) was altered in the OGA knockdown cells. Although expression and localization of the chromosomal passenger protein complex (CPC) was unchanged, histone H3 threonine 3 phosphorylation was decreased in one of the OGA knockdown cell lines. The Ewing Sarcoma Breakpoint Region 1 Protein (EWS) participates in organizing the CPC at the spindle and is a known substrate for O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT, the enzyme that adds O-GlcNAc). EWS O-GlcNAcylation was significantly increased in the OGA knockdown cells promoting uneven localization of the mitotic midzone. Our data suggests that O-GlcNAc cycling is an essential mechanism for proper mitotic signaling and spindle formation, and alterations in the rate of O-GlcNAc cycling produces aberrant spindles and promotes aneuploidy. PMID:27070276

  11. Regulation of mitotic progression by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Equal segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis requires that pairs of kinetochores establish proper attachment to microtubules emanating from opposite poles of the mitotic spindle. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protects against errors in segregation by delaying sister separation in response to improper kinetochore–microtubule interactions, and certain checkpoint proteins help to establish proper attachments. Anaphase entry is inhibited by the checkpoint through assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of the 2 checkpoint proteins, Mad2 and BubR1, bound to Cdc20. The outer kinetochore acts as a catalyst for MCC production through the recruitment and proper positioning of checkpoint proteins and recently there has been remarkable progress in understanding how this is achieved. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore–checkpoint protein interactions and inhibition of the anaphase promoting complex by the MCC. PMID:27308407

  12. Regulation of mitotic spindle orientation: an integrated view.

    PubMed

    di Pietro, Florencia; Echard, Arnaud; Morin, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is essential for cell fate decisions, epithelial maintenance, and tissue morphogenesis. In most animal cell types, the dynein motor complex is anchored at the cell cortex and exerts pulling forces on astral microtubules to position the spindle. Early studies identified the evolutionarily conserved Gαi/LGN/NuMA complex as a key regulator that polarizes cortical force generators. In recent years, a combination of genetics, biochemistry, modeling, and live imaging has contributed to decipher the mechanisms of spindle orientation. Here, we highlight the dynamic nature of the assembly of this complex and discuss the molecular regulation of its localization. Remarkably, a number of LGN-independent mechanisms were described recently, whereas NuMA remains central in most pathways involved in recruiting force generators at the cell cortex. We also describe the emerging role of the actin cortex in spindle orientation and discuss how dynamic astral microtubule formation is involved. We further give an overview on instructive external signals that control spindle orientation in tissues. Finally, we discuss the influence of cell geometry and mechanical forces on spindle orientation. PMID:27432284

  13. UV microbeam irradiations of the mitotic spindle. II. Spindle fiber dynamics and force production

    SciTech Connect

    Spurck, T.P.; Stonington, O.G.; Snyder, J.A.; Pickett-Heaps, J.D.; Bajer, A.; Mole-Bajer, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Metaphase and anaphase spindles in cultured newt and PtK1 cells were irradiated with a UV microbeam (285 nM), creating areas of reduced birefringence (ARBs) in 3 s that selectively either severed a few fibers or cut across the half spindle. In either case, the birefringence at the polewards edge of the ARB rapidly faded polewards, while it remained fairly constant at the other, kinetochore edge. Shorter astral fibers, however, remained present in the enlarged ARB; presumably these had not been cut by the irradiation. After this enlargement of the ARB, metaphase spindles recovered rapidly as the detached pole moved back towards the chromosomes, reestablishing spindle fibers as the ARB closed; this happened when the ARB cut a few fibers or across the entire half spindle. We never detected elongation of the cut kinetochore fibers. Rather, astral fibers growing from the pole appeared to bridge and then close the ARB, just before the movement of the pole toward the chromosomes. When a second irradiation was directed into the closing ARB, the polewards movement again stopped before it restarted. In all metaphase cells, once the pole had reestablished connection with the chromosomes, the unirradiated half spindle then also shortened to create a smaller symmetrical spindle capable of normal anaphase later. Anaphase cells did not recover this way; the severed pole remained detached but the chromosomes continued a modified form of movement, clumping into a telophase-like group. The results are discussed in terms of controls operating on spindle microtubule stability and mechanisms of mitotic force generation.

  14. Genetic depletion of Polo-like kinase 1 leads to embryonic lethality due to mitotic aberrancies.

    PubMed

    Wachowicz, Paulina; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Marugán, Carlos; Escobar, Beatriz; de Cárcer, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase that plays multiple and essential roles during the cell division cycle. Its inhibition in cultured cells leads to severe mitotic aberrancies and cell death. Whereas previous reports suggested that Plk1 depletion in mice leads to a non-mitotic arrest in early embryos, we show here that the bi-allelic Plk1 depletion in mice certainly results in embryonic lethality due to extensive mitotic aberrations at the morula stage, including multi- and mono-polar spindles, impaired chromosome segregation and cytokinesis failure. In addition, the conditional depletion of Plk1 during mid-gestation leads also to severe mitotic aberrancies. Our data also confirms that Plk1 is completely dispensable for mitotic entry in vivo. On the other hand, Plk1 haploinsufficient mice are viable, and Plk1-heterozygous fibroblasts do not harbor any cell cycle alterations. Plk1 is overexpressed in many human tumors, suggesting a therapeutic benefit of inhibiting Plk1, and specific small-molecule inhibitors for this kinase are now being evaluated in clinical trials. Therefore, the different Plk1 mouse models here presented are a valuable tool to reexamine the relevance of the mitotic kinase Plk1 during mammalian development and animal physiology. PMID:27417127

  15. Timely Endocytosis of Cytokinetic Enzymes Prevents Premature Spindle Breakage during Mitotic Exit

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Yeong, Foong May

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis requires the spatio-temporal coordination of membrane deposition and primary septum (PS) formation at the division site to drive acto-myosin ring (AMR) constriction. It has been demonstrated that AMR constriction invariably occurs only after the mitotic spindle disassembly. It has also been established that Chitin Synthase II (Chs2p) neck localization precedes mitotic spindle disassembly during mitotic exit. As AMR constriction depends upon PS formation, the question arises as to how chitin deposition is regulated so as to prevent premature AMR constriction and mitotic spindle breakage. In this study, we propose that cells regulate the coordination between spindle disassembly and AMR constriction via timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes, Chs2p, Chs3p, and Fks1p. Inhibition of endocytosis leads to over accumulation of cytokinetic enzymes during mitotic exit, which accelerates the constriction of the AMR, and causes spindle breakage that eventually could contribute to monopolar spindle formation in the subsequent round of cell division. Intriguingly, the mitotic spindle breakage observed in endocytosis mutants can be rescued either by deleting or inhibiting the activities of, CHS2, CHS3 and FKS1, which are involved in septum formation. The findings from our study highlight the importance of timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes at the division site in safeguarding mitotic spindle integrity during mitotic exit. PMID:27447488

  16. Downregulation of protein 4.1R, a mature centriole protein, disrupts centrosomes, alters cell cycle progression, and perturbs mitotic spindles and anaphase.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Spence, Jeffrey R; Bahmanyar, Shirin; Barth, Angela I M; Go, Minjoung M; Czerwinski, Debra; Meyer, Adam J

    2008-04-01

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase microtubules and are instrumental in mitotic bipolar spindle assembly, ensuring orderly cell cycle progression with accurate chromosome segregation. We report that the multifunctional structural protein 4.1R localizes at centrosomes to distal/subdistal regions of mature centrioles in a cell cycle-dependent pattern. Significantly, 4.1R-specific depletion mediated by RNA interference perturbs subdistal appendage proteins ninein and outer dense fiber 2/cenexin at mature centrosomes and concomitantly reduces interphase microtubule anchoring and organization. 4.1R depletion causes G(1) accumulation in p53-proficient cells, similar to depletion of many other proteins that compromise centrosome integrity. In p53-deficient cells, 4.1R depletion delays S phase, but aberrant ninein distribution is not dependent on the S-phase delay. In 4.1R-depleted mitotic cells, efficient centrosome separation is reduced, resulting in monopolar spindle formation. Multipolar spindles and bipolar spindles with misaligned chromatin are also induced by 4.1R depletion. Notably, all types of defective spindles have mislocalized NuMA (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein), a 4.1R binding partner essential for spindle pole focusing. These disruptions contribute to lagging chromosomes and aberrant microtubule bridges during anaphase/telophase. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makes crucial contributions to the structural integrity of centrosomes and mitotic spindles which normally enable mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinated precision required to avoid pathological events. PMID:18212055

  17. Downregulation of Protein 4.1R, a Mature Centriole Protein, Disrupts Centrosomes, Alters Cell Cycle Progression, and Perturbs Mitotic Spindles and Anaphase▿

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Spence, Jeffrey R.; Bahmanyar, Shirin; Barth, Angela I. M.; Go, Minjoung M.; Czerwinski, Debra; Meyer, Adam J.

    2008-01-01

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase microtubules and are instrumental in mitotic bipolar spindle assembly, ensuring orderly cell cycle progression with accurate chromosome segregation. We report that the multifunctional structural protein 4.1R localizes at centrosomes to distal/subdistal regions of mature centrioles in a cell cycle-dependent pattern. Significantly, 4.1R-specific depletion mediated by RNA interference perturbs subdistal appendage proteins ninein and outer dense fiber 2/cenexin at mature centrosomes and concomitantly reduces interphase microtubule anchoring and organization. 4.1R depletion causes G1 accumulation in p53-proficient cells, similar to depletion of many other proteins that compromise centrosome integrity. In p53-deficient cells, 4.1R depletion delays S phase, but aberrant ninein distribution is not dependent on the S-phase delay. In 4.1R-depleted mitotic cells, efficient centrosome separation is reduced, resulting in monopolar spindle formation. Multipolar spindles and bipolar spindles with misaligned chromatin are also induced by 4.1R depletion. Notably, all types of defective spindles have mislocalized NuMA (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein), a 4.1R binding partner essential for spindle pole focusing. These disruptions contribute to lagging chromosomes and aberrant microtubule bridges during anaphase/telophase. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makes crucial contributions to the structural integrity of centrosomes and mitotic spindles which normally enable mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinated precision required to avoid pathological events. PMID:18212055

  18. RHAMM Promotes Interphase Microtubule Instability and Mitotic Spindle Integrity through MEK1/ERK1/2 Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Tolg, Cornelia; Hamilton, Sara R.; Morningstar, Lyndsey; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, S.; Esguerra, Kenneth V.; Telmer, Patrick G.; Luyt, Len G.; Harrison, Rene; McCarthy, James B.; Turley, Eva A.

    2010-01-01

    An oncogenic form of RHAMM (receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, mouse, amino acids 163–794 termed RHAMMΔ163) is a cell surface hyaluronan receptor and mitotic spindle protein that is highly expressed in aggressive human cancers. Its regulation of mitotic spindle integrity is thought to contribute to tumor progression, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function have not previously been defined. Here, we report that intracellular RHAMMΔ163 modifies the stability of interphase and mitotic spindle microtubules through ERK1/2 activity. RHAMM−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit strongly acetylated interphase microtubules, multi-pole mitotic spindles, aberrant chromosome segregation, and inappropriate cytokinesis during mitosis. These defects are rescued by either expression of RHAMM or mutant active MEK1. Mutational analyses show that RHAMMΔ163 binds to α- and β-tubulin protein via a carboxyl-terminal leucine zipper, but in vitro analyses indicate this interaction does not directly contribute to tubulin polymerization/stability. Co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown assays reveal complexes of RHAMMΔ163, ERK1/2-MEK1, and α- and β-tubulin and demonstrate direct binding of RHAMMΔ163 to ERK1 via a D-site motif. In vitro kinase analyses, expression of mutant RHAMMΔ163 defective in ERK1 binding in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and blocking MEK1 activity collectively confirm that the effect of RHAMMΔ163 on interphase and mitotic spindle microtubules is mediated by ERK1/2 activity. Our results suggest a model wherein intracellular RHAMMΔ163 functions as an adaptor protein to control microtubule polymerization during interphase and mitosis as a result of localizing ERK1/2-MEK1 complexes to their tubulin-associated substrates. PMID:20558733

  19. Physical limits on kinesin-5–mediated chromosome congression in the smallest mitotic spindles

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Kelsey M.; Tubman, Emily S.; Claas, Allison; Tank, Damien; Clancy, Shelly Applen; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Berman, Judith; Odde, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of mitotic spindles is the congression of chromosomes near the spindle equator, a process mediated by dynamic kinetochore microtubules. A major challenge is to understand how precise, submicrometer-scale control of kinetochore micro­tubule dynamics is achieved in the smallest mitotic spindles, where the noisiness of microtubule assembly/disassembly will potentially act to overwhelm the spatial information that controls microtubule plus end–tip positioning to mediate congression. To better understand this fundamental limit, we conducted an integrated live fluorescence, electron microscopy, and modeling analysis of the polymorphic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which contains one of the smallest known mitotic spindles (<1 μm). Previously, ScCin8p (kinesin-5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was shown to mediate chromosome congression by promoting catastrophe of long kinetochore microtubules (kMTs). Using C. albicans yeast and hyphal kinesin-5 (Kip1p) heterozygotes (KIP1/kip1∆), we found that mutant spindles have longer kMTs than wild-type spindles, consistent with a less-organized spindle. By contrast, kinesin-8 heterozygous mutant (KIP3/kip3∆) spindles exhibited the same spindle organization as wild type. Of interest, spindle organization in the yeast and hyphal states was indistinguishable, even though yeast and hyphal cell lengths differ by two- to fivefold, demonstrating that spindle length regulation and chromosome congression are intrinsic to the spindle and largely independent of cell size. Together these results are consistent with a kinesin-5–mediated, length-dependent depolymerase activity that organizes chromosomes at the spindle equator in C. albicans to overcome fundamental noisiness in microtubule self-assembly. More generally, we define a dimensionless number that sets a fundamental physical limit for maintaining congression in small spindles in the face of assembly noise and find that C. albicans operates very close to

  20. Physical limits on kinesin-5-mediated chromosome congression in the smallest mitotic spindles.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Kelsey M; Tubman, Emily S; Claas, Allison; Tank, Damien; Clancy, Shelly Applen; O'Toole, Eileen T; Berman, Judith; Odde, David J

    2015-11-01

    A characteristic feature of mitotic spindles is the congression of chromosomes near the spindle equator, a process mediated by dynamic kinetochore microtubules. A major challenge is to understand how precise, submicrometer-scale control of kinetochore micro-tubule dynamics is achieved in the smallest mitotic spindles, where the noisiness of microtubule assembly/disassembly will potentially act to overwhelm the spatial information that controls microtubule plus end-tip positioning to mediate congression. To better understand this fundamental limit, we conducted an integrated live fluorescence, electron microscopy, and modeling analysis of the polymorphic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which contains one of the smallest known mitotic spindles (<1 μm). Previously, ScCin8p (kinesin-5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was shown to mediate chromosome congression by promoting catastrophe of long kinetochore microtubules (kMTs). Using C. albicans yeast and hyphal kinesin-5 (Kip1p) heterozygotes (KIP1/kip1∆), we found that mutant spindles have longer kMTs than wild-type spindles, consistent with a less-organized spindle. By contrast, kinesin-8 heterozygous mutant (KIP3/kip3∆) spindles exhibited the same spindle organization as wild type. Of interest, spindle organization in the yeast and hyphal states was indistinguishable, even though yeast and hyphal cell lengths differ by two- to fivefold, demonstrating that spindle length regulation and chromosome congression are intrinsic to the spindle and largely independent of cell size. Together these results are consistent with a kinesin-5-mediated, length-dependent depolymerase activity that organizes chromosomes at the spindle equator in C. albicans to overcome fundamental noisiness in microtubule self-assembly. More generally, we define a dimensionless number that sets a fundamental physical limit for maintaining congression in small spindles in the face of assembly noise and find that C. albicans operates very close to this

  1. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Tallada, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  2. Post-slippage multinucleation renders cytotoxic variation in anti-mitotic drugs that target the microtubules or mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanting; Zhou, Yuan; Shi, Jue

    2014-01-01

    One common cancer chemotherapeutic strategy is to perturb cell division with anti-mitotic drugs. Paclitaxel, the classic microtubule-targeting anti-mitotic drug, so far still outperforms the newer, more spindle-specific anti-mitotics in the clinic, but the underlying cellular mechanism is poorly understood. In this study we identified post-slippage multinucleation, which triggered extensive DNA damage and apoptosis after drug-induced mitotic slippage, contributes to the extra cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in comparison to the spindle-targeting drug, Kinesin-5 inhibitor. Based on quantitative single-cell microscopy assays, we showed that attenuation of the degree of post-slippage multinucleation significantly reduced DNA damage and apoptosis in response to paclitaxel, and that post-slippage apoptosis was likely mediated by the p53-dependent DNA damage response pathway. Paclitaxel appeared to act as a double-edge sword, capable of killing proliferating cancer cells both during mitotic arrest and after mitotic slippage by inducing DNA damage. Our results thus suggest that to predict drug response to paclitaxel and anti-mitotics in general, 2 distinct sets of bio-markers, which regulate mitotic and post-slippage cytotoxicity, respectively, may need to be considered. Our findings provide important new insight not only for elucidating the cytotoxic mechanisms of paclitaxel, but also for understanding the variable efficacy of different anti-mitotic chemotherapeutics. PMID:24694730

  3. Tumor Treating Fields Perturb the Localization of Septins and Cause Aberrant Mitotic Exit

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Talia S.; Lee, Sze Xian; Wong, Eric T.; Swanson, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-tumor effects of chemotherapy and radiation are thought to be mediated by triggering G1/S or G2/M cell cycle checkpoints, while spindle poisons, such as paclitaxel, block metaphase exit by initiating the spindle assembly checkpoint. In contrast, we have found that 150 kilohertz (kHz) alternating electric fields, also known as Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields), perturbed cells at the transition from metaphase to anaphase. Cells exposed to the TTFields during mitosis showed normal progression to this point, but exhibited uncontrolled membrane blebbing that coincided with metaphase exit. The ability of such alternating electric fields to affect cellular physiology is likely to be dependent on their interactions with proteins possessing high dipole moments. The mitotic Septin complex consisting of Septin 2, 6 and 7, possesses a high calculated dipole moment of 2711 Debyes (D) and plays a central role in positioning the cytokinetic cleavage furrow, and governing its contraction during ingression. We showed that during anaphase, TTFields inhibited Septin localization to the anaphase spindle midline and cytokinetic furrow, as well as its association with microtubules during cell attachment and spreading on fibronectin. After aberrant metaphase exit as a consequence of TTFields exposure, cells exhibited aberrant nuclear architecture and signs of cellular stress including an overall decrease in cellular proliferation, followed by apoptosis that was strongly influenced by the p53 mutational status. Thus, TTFields are able to diminish cell proliferation by specifically perturbing key proteins involved in cell division, leading to mitotic catastrophe and subsequent cell death. PMID:26010837

  4. Semaphorin-Plexin Signaling Controls Mitotic Spindle Orientation during Epithelial Morphogenesis and Repair.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jingjing; Swiercz, Jakub M; Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Matković, Ivana; Federico, Giuseppina; Sun, Tianliang; Franz, Timo; Brakebusch, Cord H; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Friedel, Roland H; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Offermanns, Stefan; Worzfeld, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Morphogenesis, homeostasis, and regeneration of epithelial tissues rely on the accurate orientation of cell divisions, which is specified by the mitotic spindle axis. To remain in the epithelial plane, symmetrically dividing epithelial cells align their mitotic spindle axis with the plane. Here, we show that this alignment depends on epithelial cell-cell communication via semaphorin-plexin signaling. During kidney morphogenesis and repair, renal tubular epithelial cells lacking the transmembrane receptor Plexin-B2 or its semaphorin ligands fail to correctly orient the mitotic spindle, leading to severe defects in epithelial architecture and function. Analyses of a series of transgenic and knockout mice indicate that Plexin-B2 controls the cell division axis by signaling through its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and Cdc42. Our data uncover semaphorin-plexin signaling as a central regulatory mechanism of mitotic spindle orientation necessary for the alignment of epithelial cell divisions with the epithelial plane. PMID:25892012

  5. Mitotic noncoding RNA processing promotes kinetochore and spindle assembly in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, Andrew W; Heald, Rebecca; Strzelecka, Magdalena

    2016-07-18

    Transcription at the centromere of chromosomes plays an important role in kinetochore assembly in many eukaryotes, and noncoding RNAs contribute to activation of the mitotic kinase Aurora B. However, little is known about how mitotic RNA processing contributes to spindle assembly. We found that inhibition of transcription initiation or RNA splicing, but not translation, leads to spindle defects in Xenopus egg extracts. Spliceosome inhibition resulted in the accumulation of high molecular weight centromeric transcripts, concomitant with decreased recruitment of the centromere and kinetochore proteins CENP-A, CENP-C, and NDC80 to mitotic chromosomes. In addition, blocking transcript synthesis or processing during mitosis caused accumulation of MCAK, a microtubule depolymerase, on the spindle, indicating misregulation of Aurora B. These findings suggest that co-transcriptional recruitment of the RNA processing machinery to nascent mitotic transcripts is an important step in kinetochore and spindle assembly and challenge the idea that RNA processing is globally repressed during mitosis. PMID:27402954

  6. Centrin: Another target of monastrol, an inhibitor of mitotic spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Tong-Qing; Bian, Wei; Liu, Wen; Sun, Yue; Yang, Bin-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Monastrol, a cell-permeable inhibitor, considered to specifically inhibit kinesin Eg5, can cause mitotic arrest and monopolar spindle formation, thus exhibiting antitumor properties. Centrin, a ubiquitous protein associated with centrosome, plays a critical role in centrosome duplication. Moreover, a correlation between centrosome amplification and cancer has been reported. In this study, it is proposed for the first time that centrin may be another target of the anticancer drug monastrol since monastrol can effectively inhibit not only the growth of the transformed Escherichia coli cells in vivo, but also the Lu3+-dependent self-assembly of EoCen in vitro. The two closely related compounds (Compounds 1 and 2) could not take the same effect. Fluorescence titration experiments suggest that four monastrols per protein is the optimum binding pattern, and the binding constants at different temperatures were obtained. Detailed thermodynamic analysis indicates that hydrophobic force is the main acting force between monastrol and centrin, and the extent of monastrol inhibition of centrin self-assembly is highly dependent upon the hydrophobic region of the protein, which is largely exposed by the binding of metal ions.

  7. The STARD9/Kif16a Kinesin Associates With Mitotic Microtubules and Regulates Spindle Pole Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jorge Z.; Summers, Matthew K.; Peterson, David; Brauer, Matthew J.; Lee, James; Senese, Silvia; Gholkar, Ankur A.; Lo, Yu-Chen; Lei, Xingye; Jung, Kenneth; Anderson, David C.; Davis, David P.; Belmont, Lisa; Jackson, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY During cell division cells form the microtubule-based mitotic spindle, a highly specialized and dynamic structure that mediates proper chromosome transmission to daughter cells. Cancer cells can show perturbed mitotic spindles and an approach in cancer treatment has been to trigger cell killing by targeting microtubule dynamics or spindle assembly. To identify and characterize proteins necessary for spindle assembly, and potential antimitotic targets, we performed a proteomic and genetic analysis of 592 mitotic microtubule co-purifying proteins (MMCPs). Screening for regulators that affect both mitosis and apoptosis, we report the identification and characterization of STARD9, a kinesin-3 family member, which localizes to centrosomes and stabilizes the pericentriolar material (PCM). STARD9-depleted cells have fragmented PCM, form multipolar spindles, activate the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), arrest in mitosis, and undergo apoptosis. Interestingly, STARD9-depletion synergizes with the chemotherapeutic agent taxol to increase mitotic death, demonstrating that STARD9 is a mitotic kinesin and a potential anti-mitotic target. PMID:22153075

  8. Novel insights into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly by NEK kinases.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Suzanna L; O'Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M

    2016-05-01

    The mitotic spindle is the apparatus upon which chromosomes are segregated during cell division. We have discovered new roles for two members of the NIMA-related kinase (NEK) family in different molecular processes of spindle assembly. Moreover, loss of these proteins leads to segregation errors that drive cancer progression. PMID:27314078

  9. Novel insights into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly by NEK kinases

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Suzanna L.; O'Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mitotic spindle is the apparatus upon which chromosomes are segregated during cell division. We have discovered new roles for two members of the NIMA-related kinase (NEK) family in different molecular processes of spindle assembly. Moreover, loss of these proteins leads to segregation errors that drive cancer progression. PMID:27314078

  10. MLL5 maintains spindle bipolarity by preventing aberrant cytosolic aggregation of PLK1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Deng, Lih-Wen

    2016-03-28

    Faithful chromosome segregation with bipolar spindle formation is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. Perturbation of this process often leads to severe mitotic failure, contributing to tumorigenesis. MLL5 has been demonstrated to play vital roles in cell cycle progression and the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we identify a novel interaction between MLL5 and PLK1 in the cytosol that is crucial for sustaining spindle bipolarity during mitosis. Knockdown of MLL5 caused aberrant PLK1 aggregation that led to acentrosomal microtubule-organizing center (aMTOC) formation and subsequent spindle multipolarity. Further molecular studies revealed that the polo-box domain (PBD) of PLK1 interacted with a binding motif on MLL5 (Thr887-Ser888-Thr889), and this interaction was essential for spindle bipolarity. Overexpression of wild-type MLL5 was able to rescue PLK1 mislocalization and aMTOC formation in MLL5-KD cells, whereas MLL5 mutants incapable of interacting with the PBD failed to do so. We thus propose that MLL5 preserves spindle bipolarity through maintaining cytosolic PLK1 in a nonaggregated form. PMID:27002166

  11. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin(-/-) mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. PMID:26406118

  12. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin−/− mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09384.001 PMID:26406118

  13. Thirty years of search and capture: The complex simplicity of mitotic spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cell division is enacted by a microtubule-based, self-assembling macromolecular machine known as the mitotic spindle. In 1986, Kirschner and Mitchison proposed that by undergoing dynamic cycles of growth and disassembly, microtubules search for chromosomes. Capture of microtubules by the kinetochores progressively connects chromosomes to the bipolar spindle. 30 years later, “search and capture” remains the cornerstone of spindle assembly. However, a variety of facilitating mechanisms such as regulation of microtubule dynamics by diffusible gradients, spatially selective motor activities, and adaptive changes in chromosome architecture have been discovered. We discuss how these mechanisms ensure that the spindle assembles rapidly and with a minimal number of errors. PMID:26668328

  14. Cell shape impacts on the positioning of the mitotic spindle with respect to the substratum.

    PubMed

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Müsch, Anne

    2015-04-01

    All known mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation rely on astral microtubules. We report that even in the absence of astral microtubules, metaphase spindles in MDCK and HeLa cells are not randomly positioned along their x-z dimension, but preferentially adopt shallow β angles between spindle pole axis and substratum. The nonrandom spindle positioning is due to constraints imposed by the cell cortex in flat cells that drive spindles that are longer and/or wider than the cell's height into a tilted, quasidiagonal x-z position. In rounder cells, which are taller, fewer cortical constraints make the x-z spindle position more random. Reestablishment of astral microtubule-mediated forces align the spindle poles with cortical cues parallel to the substratum in all cells. However, in flat cells, they frequently cause spindle deformations. Similar deformations are apparent when confined spindles rotate from tilted to parallel positions while MDCK cells progress from prometaphase to metaphase. The spindle disruptions cause the engagement of the spindle assembly checkpoint. We propose that cell rounding serves to maintain spindle integrity during its positioning. PMID:25657320

  15. Self-Organization and Forces in the Mitotic Spindle.

    PubMed

    Pavin, Nenad; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-07-01

    At the onset of division, the cell forms a spindle, a precise self-constructed micromachine composed of microtubules and the associated proteins, which divides the chromosomes between the two nascent daughter cells. The spindle arises from self-organization of microtubules and chromosomes, whose different types of motion help them explore the space and eventually approach and interact with each other. Once the interactions between the chromosomes and the microtubules have been established, the chromosomes are moved to the equatorial plane of the spindle and ultimately toward the opposite spindle poles. These transport processes rely on directed forces that are precisely regulated in space and time. In this review, we discuss how microtubule dynamics and their rotational movement drive spindle self-organization, as well as how the forces acting in the spindle are generated, balanced, and regulated. PMID:27145873

  16. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    PubMed

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation. PMID:22960742

  17. Defective control of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1(-/-) fibroblasts after mitotic spindle disruption.

    PubMed

    Halappanavar, Sabina S; Shah, Girish M

    2004-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP), a DNA damage-responsive nuclear enzyme present in higher eukaryotes, is well-known for its roles in protecting the genome after DNA damage. However, even without exogenous DNA damage, PARP may play a role in stabilizing the genome because cells or mice deficient in PARP exhibit various signs of genomic instability, such as tetraploidy, aneuploidy, chromosomal abnormalities and susceptibility to spontaneous carcinogenesis. Normally, cell cycle checkpoints ensure elimination of cells with genomic abnormalities. Therefore, we examined efficiency of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in PARP-/- and PARP+/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts treated with mitotic spindle disrupting agent colcemid. PARP+/+ cells, like most mammalian cells, eventually escaped from spindle disruption-induced mitotic checkpoint arrest by 60 h. In contrast, PARP-/- cells rapidly escaped from mitotic arrest within 24 h by downregulation of cyclin B1/CDK-1 kinase activity. After escaping from mitotic arrest; both the PARP genotypes arrive in G1 tetraploid state, where they face post-mitotic checkpoints which either induce apoptosis or prevent DNA endoreduplication. While all the G1 tetraploid PARP+/+ cells were eliminated by apoptosis, the majority of the G1 tetraploid PARP-/- cells became polyploid by resisting apoptosis and carrying out DNA endoreduplication. Introduction of PARP in PARP-/- fibroblasts partially increased the stringency of mitotic checkpoint arrest and fully restored susceptibility to G1 tetraploidy checkpoint-induced apoptosis; and thus prevented formation of polyploid cells. Our results suggest that PARP may serve as a guardian angel of the genome even without exogenous DNA damage through its role in mitotic and post-mitotic G1 tetraploidy checkpoints. PMID:14726664

  18. The effect of magnesium on mitotic spindle formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Uz, Gulsen; Sarikaya, Aysegul Topal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnesium (Mg2+), an essential ion for cells and biological systems, is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including the formation and breakdown of microtubules. The results of a previous investigation suggested that as cells grow the intracellular Mg2+ concentration falls, thereby stimulating formation of the mitotic spindle. In the present work, we used a Mg2+-deficient Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain GA2, in which two essential membrane Mg2+ transporter genes (homologs of ALR1 and ALR2 in Saccharomyces cerevisae) were deleted, and its parental strain Sp292, to examine the extent to which low Mg2+ concentrations can affect mitotic spindle formation. The two S. pombe strains were transformed with a plasmid carrying a GFP-α2-tubulin construct to fluorescently label microtubules. Using the free Mg2+-specific fluorescent probe mag-fura-2, we confirmed that intracellular free Mg2+ levels were lower in GA2 than in the parental strain. Defects in interphase microtubule organization, a lower percentage of mitotic spindle formation and a reduced mitotic index were also observed in the GA2 strain. Although there was interphase microtubule polymerization, the lower level of mitotic spindle formation in the Mg2+-deficient strain suggested a greater requirement for Mg2+ in this phenomenon than previously thought. PMID:27560651

  19. The effect of magnesium on mitotic spindle formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Uz, Gulsen; Sarikaya, Aysegul Topal

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+), an essential ion for cells and biological systems, is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including the formation and breakdown of microtubules. The results of a previous investigation suggested that as cells grow the intracellular Mg2+ concentration falls, thereby stimulating formation of the mitotic spindle. In the present work, we used a Mg2+-deficient Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain GA2, in which two essential membrane Mg2+ transporter genes (homologs of ALR1 and ALR2 in Saccharomyces cerevisae) were deleted, and its parental strain Sp292, to examine the extent to which low Mg2+ concentrations can affect mitotic spindle formation. The two S. pombe strains were transformed with a plasmid carrying a GFP-α2-tubulin construct to fluorescently label microtubules. Using the free Mg2+-specific fluorescent probe mag-fura-2, we confirmed that intracellular free Mg2+ levels were lower in GA2 than in the parental strain. Defects in interphase microtubule organization, a lower percentage of mitotic spindle formation and a reduced mitotic index were also observed in the GA2 strain. Although there was interphase microtubule polymerization, the lower level of mitotic spindle formation in the Mg2+-deficient strain suggested a greater requirement for Mg2+ in this phenomenon than previously thought. PMID:27560651

  20. Chromosome and mitotic spindle dynamics in fission yeast kinesin-8 mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapo, Ammon M.; Gergley, Zachary R.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Betterton, M. D.

    2014-03-01

    Fission yeast proteins Klp5p and Klp6p are plus-end directed motors of the kinesin-8 family which promote microtubule (MT) depolymerization and also affect chromosome segregation, but the mechanism of these activities is not well understood. Using live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fission yeast wild-type (WT) and klp5/6 mutant strains, we quantify and compare the dynamics of kinetochore motion and mitotic spindle length in 3D. In WT cells, the spindle, once formed, remains a consistent size and chromosomes are correctly organized and segregated. In kinesin-8 mutants, spindles undergo large length fluctuations of several microns. Kinetochore motions are also highly fluctuating, with kinetochores frequently moving away from the spindle rather than toward it. We observe transient pushing of chromosomes away from the spindle by as much as 10 microns in distance.

  1. TPPP/p25 promotes tubulin assemblies and blocks mitotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tirián, L.; Hlavanda, E.; Oláh, J.; Horváth, I.; Orosz, F.; Szabó, B.; Kovács, J.; Szabad, J.; Ovádi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we isolated from bovine brain a protein, TPPP/p25 and identified as p25, a brain-specific protein that induced aberrant tubulin assemblies. The primary sequence of this protein differs from that of other proteins identified so far; however, it shows high homology with p25-like hypothetical proteins sought via blast. Here, we characterized the binding of TPPP/p25 to tubulin by means of surface plasmon resonance; the kinetic parameters are as follows: kon, 2.4 × 104 M–1·s–1; koff, 5.4 × 10–3 s–1; and Kd, 2.3 × 10–7 M. This protein at substoichometric concentration promotes the polymerization of tubulin into double-walled tubules and polymorphic aggregates or bundles paclitaxel-stabilized microtubules as judged by quantitative data of electron and atomic force microscopies. Injection of bovine TPPP/p25 into cleavage Drosophila embryos expressing tubulin–GFP fusion protein reveals that TPPP/p25 inhibits mitotic spindle assembly and nuclear envelope breakdown without affecting other cellular events like centrosome replication and separation, microtubule nucleation by the centrosomes, and nuclear growth. GTP counteracts TPPP/p25 both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:14623963

  2. Aurora at the pole and equator: overlapping functions of Aurora kinases in the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Hochegger, Helfrid; Hégarat, Nadia; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2013-03-01

    The correct assembly and timely disassembly of the mitotic spindle is crucial for the propagation of the genome during cell division. Aurora kinases play a central role in orchestrating bipolar spindle establishment, chromosome alignment and segregation. In most eukaryotes, ranging from amoebas to humans, Aurora activity appears to be required both at the spindle pole and the kinetochore, and these activities are often split between two different Aurora paralogues, termed Aurora A and B. Polar and equatorial functions of Aurora kinases have generally been considered separately, with Aurora A being mostly involved in centrosome dynamics, whereas Aurora B coordinates kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. However, double inactivation of both Aurora A and B results in a dramatic synergy that abolishes chromosome segregation. This suggests that these two activities jointly coordinate mitotic progression. Accordingly, recent evidence suggests that Aurora A and B work together in both spindle assembly in metaphase and disassembly in anaphase. Here, we provide an outlook on these shared functions of the Auroras, discuss the evolution of this family of mitotic kinases and speculate why Aurora kinase activity may be required at both ends of the spindle microtubules. PMID:23516109

  3. Aurora at the pole and equator: overlapping functions of Aurora kinases in the mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Hochegger, Helfrid; Hégarat, Nadia; Pereira-Leal, Jose B.

    2013-01-01

    The correct assembly and timely disassembly of the mitotic spindle is crucial for the propagation of the genome during cell division. Aurora kinases play a central role in orchestrating bipolar spindle establishment, chromosome alignment and segregation. In most eukaryotes, ranging from amoebas to humans, Aurora activity appears to be required both at the spindle pole and the kinetochore, and these activities are often split between two different Aurora paralogues, termed Aurora A and B. Polar and equatorial functions of Aurora kinases have generally been considered separately, with Aurora A being mostly involved in centrosome dynamics, whereas Aurora B coordinates kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. However, double inactivation of both Aurora A and B results in a dramatic synergy that abolishes chromosome segregation. This suggests that these two activities jointly coordinate mitotic progression. Accordingly, recent evidence suggests that Aurora A and B work together in both spindle assembly in metaphase and disassembly in anaphase. Here, we provide an outlook on these shared functions of the Auroras, discuss the evolution of this family of mitotic kinases and speculate why Aurora kinase activity may be required at both ends of the spindle microtubules. PMID:23516109

  4. Mitotic spindle rotation and mode of cell division in the developing telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Haydar, Tarik F; Ang, Eugenius; Rakic, Pasko

    2003-03-01

    The mode of neural stem cell division in the forebrain proliferative zones profoundly influences neocortical growth by regulating the number and diversity of neurons and glia. Long-term time-lapse multiphoton microscopy of embryonic mouse cortex reveals new details of the complex three-dimensional rotation and oscillation of the mitotic spindle before stem cell division. Importantly, the duration and amplitude of spindle movement predicts and specifies the eventual mode of mitotic division. These technological advances have provided dramatic data and insights into the kinetics of neural stem cell division by elucidating the involvement of spindle rotation in selection of the cleavage plane and the mode of neural stem cell division that together determine the size of the mammalian neocortex. PMID:12589023

  5. RGS14 is a mitotic spindle protein essential from the first division of the mammalian zygote.

    PubMed

    Martin-McCaffrey, Luke; Willard, Francis S; Oliveira-dos-Santos, Antonio J; Natale, David R C; Snow, Bryan E; Kimple, Randall J; Pajak, Agnieszka; Watson, Andrew J; Dagnino, Lina; Penninger, Josef M; Siderovski, David P; D'Souza, Sudhir J A

    2004-11-01

    Heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits, RGS proteins, and GoLoco motif proteins have been recently implicated in the control of mitotic spindle dynamics in C. elegans and D. melanogaster. Here we show that "regulator of G protein signaling-14" (RGS14) is expressed by the mouse embryonic genome immediately prior to the first mitosis, where it colocalizes with the anastral mitotic apparatus of the mouse zygote. Loss of Rgs14 expression in the mouse zygote results in cytofragmentation and failure to progress to the 2-cell stage. RGS14 is found in all tissues and segregates to the nucleus in interphase and to the mitotic spindle and centrioles during mitosis. Alteration of RGS14 levels in exponentially proliferating cells leads to cell growth arrest. Our results indicate that RGS14 is one of the earliest essential product of the mammalian embryonic genome yet described and has a general role in mitosis. PMID:15525537

  6. Fission yeast pkl1 is a kinesin-related protein involved in mitotic spindle function.

    PubMed Central

    Pidoux, A L; LeDizet, M; Cande, W Z

    1996-01-01

    We have used anti-peptide antibodies raised against highly conserved regions of the kinesin motor domain to identify kinesin-related proteins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here we report the identification of a new kinesin-related protein, which we have named pkl1. Sequence homology and domain organization place pkl1 in the Kar3/ncd subfamily of kinesin-related proteins. Bacterially expressed pkl1 fusion proteins display microtubule-stimulated ATPase activity, nucleotide-sensitive binding, and bundling of microtubules. Immunofluorescence studies with affinity-purified antibodies indicate that the pkl1 protein localizes to the nucleus and the mitotic spindle. Pkl1 null mutants are viable but have increased sensitivity to microtubule-disrupting drugs. Disruption of pkl1+ suppresses mutations in another kinesin-related protein, cut7, which is known to act in the spindle. Overexpression of pkl1 to very high levels causes a similar phenotype to that seen in cut7 mutants: V-shaped and star-shaped microtubule structures are observed, which we interpret to be spindles with unseparated spindle poles. These observations suggest that pkl1 and cut7 provide opposing forces in the spindle. We propose that pkl1 functions as a microtubule-dependent motor that is involved in microtubule organization in the mitotic spindle. Images PMID:8898367

  7. Microcystin-LR induces mitotic spindle assembly disorders in Vicia faba by protein phosphatase inhibition and not reactive oxygen species induction.

    PubMed

    Garda, Tamás; Kónya, Zoltán; Tándor, Ildikó; Beyer, Dániel; Vasas, Gábor; Erdődi, Ferenc; Vereb, György; Papp, Georgina; Riba, Milán; M-Hamvas, Márta; Máthé, Csaba

    2016-07-20

    We aimed to reveal the mechanisms of mitotic spindle anomalies induced by microcystin-LR (MCY-LR), a cyanobacterial toxin in Vicia faba, a well-known model in plant cell and molecular biology. MCY-LR inhibits type 1 and 2A phosphoserine/threonine specific protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A) and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. The cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of the cyanotoxin during cytopathogenesis. Histochemical-immunohistochemical and biochemical methods were used. A significant number of MCY-LR induced spindle alterations are described for the first time. Disrupted, multipolar spindles and missing kinetochore fibers were detected both in metaphase and anaphase cells. Additional polar microtubule (MT) bundles, hyperbundling of spindle MTs, monopolar spindles, C-S- shaped, additional and asymmetric spindles were detected in metaphase, while midplane kinetochore fibers were detected in anaphase cells only. Several spindle anomalies induced mitotic disorders, i.e. they occurred concomitantly with altered sister chromatid separation. Alterations were dependent on the MCY-LR dose and exposure time. Under long-term (2 and mainly 6 days') exposure they were detected in the concentration range of 0.1-20μgmL(-1) MCY-LR that inhibited PP1 and PP2A significantly without significant ROS induction. Elevated peroxidase/catalase activities indicated that MCY-LR treated V. faba plants showed efficient defense against oxidative stress. Thus, although the elevation of ROS is known to induce cytoskeletal aberrations in general, this study shows that long-term protein phosphatase inhibition is the primary cause of MCY-LR induced spindle disorders. PMID:27186862

  8. Sorting Nexin 9 Recruits Clathrin Heavy Chain to the Mitotic Spindle for Chromosome Alignment and Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Maggie P. C.; Robinson, Phillip J.; Chircop, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) and clathrin heavy chain (CHC) each have roles in mitosis during metaphase. Since the two proteins directly interact for their other cellular function in endocytosis we investigated whether they also interact for metaphase and operate on the same pathway. We report that SNX9 and CHC functionally interact during metaphase in a specific molecular pathway that contributes to stabilization of mitotic spindle kinetochore (K)-fibres for chromosome alignment and segregation. This function is independent of their endocytic role. SNX9 residues in the clathrin-binding low complexity domain are required for CHC association and for targeting both CHC and transforming acidic coiled-coil protein 3 (TACC3) to the mitotic spindle. Mutation of these sites to serine increases the metaphase plate width, indicating inefficient chromosome congression. Therefore SNX9 and CHC function in the same molecular pathway for chromosome alignment and segregation, which is dependent on their direct association. PMID:23861900

  9. Aurora-A-Dependent Control of TACC3 Influences the Rate of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nimesh; Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle; Pfuhl, Mark; Gergely, Fanni; Bayliss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The essential mammalian gene TACC3 is frequently mutated and amplified in cancers and its fusion products exhibit oncogenic activity in glioblastomas. TACC3 functions in mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. In particular, phosphorylation on S558 by the mitotic kinase, Aurora-A, promotes spindle recruitment of TACC3 and triggers the formation of a complex with ch-TOG-clathrin that crosslinks and stabilises kinetochore microtubules. Here we map the Aurora-A-binding interface in TACC3 and show that TACC3 potently activates Aurora-A through a domain centered on F525. Vertebrate cells carrying homozygous F525A mutation in the endogenous TACC3 loci exhibit defects in TACC3 function, namely perturbed localization, reduced phosphorylation and weakened interaction with clathrin. The most striking feature of the F525A cells however is a marked shortening of mitosis, at least in part due to rapid spindle assembly. F525A cells do not exhibit chromosome missegregation, indicating that they undergo fast yet apparently faithful mitosis. By contrast, mutating the phosphorylation site S558 to alanine in TACC3 causes aneuploidy without a significant change in mitotic duration. Our work has therefore defined a regulatory role for the Aurora-A-TACC3 interaction beyond the act of phosphorylation at S558. We propose that the regulatory relationship between Aurora-A and TACC3 enables the transition from the microtubule-polymerase activity of TACC3-ch-TOG to the microtubule-crosslinking activity of TACC3-ch-TOG-clathrin complexes as mitosis progresses. Aurora-A-dependent control of TACC3 could determine the balance between these activities, thereby influencing not only spindle length and stability but also the speed of spindle formation with vital consequences for chromosome alignment and segregation. PMID:26134678

  10. Cytoplasmic flows as signatures for the mechanics of mitotic spindle positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Rahimian, Abtin; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The proper positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for asymmetric cell division and generating cell diversity during development. We use dynamic simulations to study the cytoplasmic flows generated by three possible active forcing mechanisms involved in positioning of the mitotic spindle in the first cell division of C.elegans embryo namely cortical pulling, cortical pushing, and cytoplasmic pulling mechanisms. The numerical platform we have developed for simulating cytoskeletal assemblies is the first to incorporate the interactions between the fibers and other intracellular bodies with the cytoplasmic fluid, while also accounting for their polymerization, and interactions with motor proteins. The hydrodynamic interactions are computed using boundary integral methods in Stokes flow coupled with highly efficient fast summation techniques that reduce the computational cost to scale linearly with the number of fibers and other bodies. We show that although all three force transduction mechanisms predict proper positioning and orientation of the mitotic spindle, each model produces a different signature in its induced cytoplasmic flow and MT conformation. We suggest that cytoplasmic flows and MT conformation can be used to differentiate between these mechanisms.

  11. The Xenopus TACC Homologue, Maskin, Functions in Mitotic Spindle AssemblyD⃞

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Lori L.; Albee, Alison J.; Liu, Lingling; Tao, Wei; Dobrzyn, Pawel; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Wiese, Christiane

    2005-01-01

    Maskin is the Xenopus homolog of the transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC)-family of microtubule and centrosome-interacting proteins. Members of this family share a ∼200 amino acid coiled coil motif at their C-termini, but have only limited homology outside of this domain. In all species examined thus far, perturbations of TACC proteins lead to disruptions of cell cycle progression and/or embryonic lethality. In Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, and humans, these disruptions have been attributed to mitotic spindle assembly defects, and the TACC proteins in these organisms are thought to function as structural components of the spindle. In contrast, cell division failure in early Xenopus embryo blastomeres has been attributed to a role of maskin in regulating the translation of, among others, cyclin B1 mRNA. In this study, we show that maskin, like other TACC proteins, plays a direct role in mitotic spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts and that this role is independent of cyclin B. Maskin immunodepletion and add-back experiments demonstrate that maskin, or a maskin-associated activity, is required for two distinct steps during spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts that can be distinguished by their response to “rescue” experiments. Defects in the “early” step, manifested by greatly reduced aster size during early time points in maskin-depleted extracts, can be rescued by readdition of purified full-length maskin. Moreover, defects in this step can also be rescued by addition of only the TACC-domain of maskin. In contrast, defects in the “late” step during spindle assembly, manifested by abnormal spindles at later time points, cannot be rescued by readdition of maskin. We show that maskin interacts with a number of proteins in egg extracts, including XMAP215, a known modulator of microtubule dynamics, and CPEB, a protein that is involved in translational regulation of important cell cycle regulators. Maskin depletion from egg extracts results

  12. Robust control of mitotic spindle orientation in the developing epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Poulson, Nicholas D.

    2010-01-01

    Progenitor cells must balance self-amplification and production of differentiated progeny during development and homeostasis. In the epidermis, progenitors divide symmetrically to increase surface area and asymmetrically to promote stratification. In this study, we show that individual epidermal cells can undergo both types of division, and therefore, the balance is provided by the sum of individual cells’ choices. In addition, we define two control points for determining a cell’s mode of division. First is the expression of the mouse Inscuteable gene, which is sufficient to drive asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, there is robust control of division orientation as excessive ACDs are prevented by a change in the localization of NuMA, an effector of spindle orientation. Finally, we show that p63, a transcriptional regulator of stratification, does not control either of these processes. These data have uncovered two important regulatory points controlling ACD in the epidermis and allow a framework for analysis of how external cues control this important choice. PMID:21098114

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitors disrupt the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint by targeting histone and nonhistone proteins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Brian; Brown, Mellissa

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic effects on cell functions, both in vivo and in vitro. One of the more dramatic effects of these drugs is their ability to disrupt normal mitotic division, which is a significant contributor to the anticancer properties of these drugs. The most important feature of the disrupted mitosis is that drug treatment overcomes the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint and drives mitotic slippage, but in a manner that triggers apoptosis. The mechanism by which histone deacetylase inhibitors affect mitosis is now becoming clearer through the identification of a number of chromatin and nonchromatin protein targets that are critical to the regulation of normal mitotic progression and cell division. These proteins are directly regulated by acetylation and deacetylation, or in some cases indirectly through the acetylation of essential partner proteins. There appears to be little contribution from deacetylase inhibitor-induced transcriptional changes to the mitotic effects of these drugs. The overall mitotic phenotype of drug treatment appears to be the sum of these disrupted mechanisms. PMID:23088867

  14. A mitotic SKAP isoform regulates spindle positioning at astral microtubule plus ends.

    PubMed

    Kern, David M; Nicholls, Peter K; Page, David C; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2016-05-01

    The Astrin/SKAP complex plays important roles in mitotic chromosome alignment and centrosome integrity, but previous work found conflicting results for SKAP function. Here, we demonstrate that SKAP is expressed as two distinct isoforms in mammals: a longer, testis-specific isoform that was used for the previous studies in mitotic cells and a novel, shorter mitotic isoform. Unlike the long isoform, short SKAP rescues SKAP depletion in mitosis and displays robust microtubule plus-end tracking, including localization to astral microtubules. Eliminating SKAP microtubule binding results in severe chromosome segregation defects. In contrast, SKAP mutants specifically defective for plus-end tracking facilitate proper chromosome segregation but display spindle positioning defects. Cells lacking SKAP plus-end tracking have reduced Clasp1 localization at microtubule plus ends and display increased lateral microtubule contacts with the cell cortex, which we propose results in unbalanced dynein-dependent cortical pulling forces. Our work reveals an unappreciated role for the Astrin/SKAP complex as an astral microtubule mediator of mitotic spindle positioning. PMID:27138257

  15. A gene encoding the major beta tubulin of the mitotic spindle in Physarum polycephalum plasmodia

    SciTech Connect

    Burland, T.G.; Paul, E.C.A.; Oetliker, M.; Dove, W.F.

    1988-03-01

    The multinucleate plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is unusual among eucaryotic cells in that it uses tubulins only in mitotic-spindle microtubules; cytoskeletal, flagellar, and centriolar microtubules are absent in this cell type. The authors identified a ..beta..-tubulin cDNA clone, ..beta..105, which is shown to correspond to the transcript of the betC ..beta..-tubulin locus and to encode ..beta..2 tubulin, the ..beta.. tubulin expressed specifically in the plasmodium and used exclusively in the mitotic spindle. Physarum amoebae utilize tubulins in the cytoskeleton, centrioles, and flagella, in addition to the mitotic spindle. Sequence analysis shows that ..beta..2 tubulin is only 83% identical to the two ..beta.. tubulins expressed in amoebae. This compares with 70 to 83% identity between Physarum ..beta..2 tubulin and the ..beta.. tubulins of yeasts, fungi, alga, trypanosome, fruit fly, chicken, and mouse. On the other hand, Physarum ..beta..2 tubulin is no more similar to, for example, Aspergillus ..beta.. tubulins than it is to those of Drosophila melanogaster or mammals. Several eucaryotes express at least one widely diverged ..beta.. tubulin as well as one or more ..beta.. tubulins that conform more closely to a consensus ..beta..-tubulin sequence. The authors suggest that ..beta..-tubulins diverge more when their expression pattern is restricted, especially when this restriction results in their use in fewer functions. This divergence among ..beta.. tubulins could have resulted through neutral drift. For example, exclusive use of Physarum ..beta..2 tubulin in the spindle may have allowed more amino acid substitutions than would be functionally tolerable in the ..beta.. tubulins that are utilized in multiple microtubular organelles. Alternatively, restricted use of ..beta.. tubulins may allow positive selection to operate more freely to refine ..beta..-tubulin function.

  16. Dietary flavonoid fisetin induces a forced exit from mitosis by targeting the mitotic spindle checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Pouwels, Jeroen; Varis, Asta; Kukkonen, Anu M.; Toivonen, Pauliina; Halonen, Pasi K.; Perälä, Merja; Kallioniemi, Olli; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Kallio, Marko J.

    2009-01-01

    Fisetin is a natural flavonol present in edible vegetables, fruits and wine at 2–160 μg/g concentrations and an ingredient in nutritional supplements with much higher concentrations. The compound has been reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects as well as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity via its ability to act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation and free radical scavenger, respectively. Our cell-based high-throughput screen for small molecules that override chemically induced mitotic arrest identified fisetin as an antimitotic compound. Fisetin rapidly compromised microtubule drug-induced mitotic block in a proteasome-dependent manner in several human cell lines. Moreover, in unperturbed human cancer cells fisetin caused premature initiation of chromosome segregation and exit from mitosis without normal cytokinesis. To understand the molecular mechanism behind these mitotic errors, we analyzed the consequences of fisetin treatment on the localization and phoshorylation of several mitotic proteins. Aurora B, Bub1, BubR1 and Cenp-F rapidly lost their kinetochore/centromere localization and others became dephosphorylated upon addition of fisetin to the culture medium. Finally, we identified Aurora B kinase as a novel direct target of fisetin. The activity of Aurora B was significantly reduced by fisetin in vitro and in cells, an effect that can explain the observed forced mitotic exit, failure of cytokinesis and decreased cell viability. In conclusion, our data propose that fisetin perturbs spindle checkpoint signaling, which may contribute to the antiproliferative effects of the compound. PMID:19395653

  17. Mlp1 Acts as a Mitotic Scaffold to Spatially Regulate Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Proteins in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Colin P.; Hashmi, Shahr B.; Nayak, Tania; Oakley, Berl

    2009-01-01

    During open mitosis several nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins have mitotic specific localizations and functions. We find that the Aspergillus nidulans Mlp1 NPC protein has previously unrealized mitotic roles involving spatial regulation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) proteins. In interphase, An-Mlp1 tethers the An-Mad1 and An-Mad2 SAC proteins to NPCs. During a normal mitosis, An-Mlp1, An-Mad1, and An-Mad2 localize similarly on, and around, kinetochores until telophase when they transiently localize near the spindle but not at kinetochores. During SAC activation, An-Mlp1 remains associated with kinetochores in a manner similar to An-Mad1 and An-Mad2. Although An-Mlp1 is not required for An-Mad1 kinetochore localization during early mitosis, it is essential to maintain An-Mad1 in the extended region around kinetochores in early mitosis and near the spindle in telophase. Our data are consistent with An-Mlp1 being part of a mitotic spindle matrix similar to its Drosophila orthologue and demonstrate that this matrix localizes SAC proteins. By maintaining SAC proteins near the mitotic apparatus, An-Mlp1 may help monitor mitotic progression and coordinate efficient mitotic exit. Consistent with this possibility, An-Mad1 and An-Mlp1 redistribute from the telophase matrix and associate with segregated kinetochores when mitotic exit is prevented by expression of nondegradable cyclin B. PMID:19225157

  18. Mitotic control of kinetochore-associated dynein and spindle orientation by human Spindly

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ying Wai; Fava, Luca L.; Uldschmid, Andreas; Schmitz, Michael H.A.; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Nigg, Erich A.

    2009-01-01

    Mitotic spindle formation and chromosome segregation depend critically on kinetochore–microtubule (KT–MT) interactions. A new protein, termed Spindly in Drosophila and SPDL-1 in C. elegans, was recently shown to regulate KT localization of dynein, but depletion phenotypes revealed striking differences, suggesting evolutionarily diverse roles of mitotic dynein. By characterizing the function of Spindly in human cells, we identify specific functions for KT dynein. We show that localization of human Spindly (hSpindly) to KTs is controlled by the Rod/Zw10/Zwilch (RZZ) complex and Aurora B. hSpindly depletion results in reduced inter-KT tension, unstable KT fibers, an extensive prometaphase delay, and severe chromosome misalignment. Moreover, depletion of hSpindly induces a striking spindle rotation, which can be rescued by co-depletion of dynein. However, in contrast to Drosophila, hSpindly depletion does not abolish the removal of MAD2 and ZW10 from KTs. Collectively, our data reveal hSpindly-mediated dynein functions and highlight a critical role of KT dynein in spindle orientation. PMID:19468067

  19. Spindle assembly checkpoint is sufficient for complete Cdc20 sequestering in mitotic control.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Bashar

    2015-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint assembly (SAC) ensures genome fidelity by temporarily delaying anaphase onset, until all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle. The SAC delays mitotic progression by preventing activation of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) or cyclosome; whose activation by Cdc20 is required for sister-chromatid separation marking the transition into anaphase. The mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), which contains Cdc20 as a subunit, binds stably to the APC/C. Compelling evidence by Izawa and Pines (Nature 2014; 10.1038/nature13911) indicates that the MCC can inhibit a second Cdc20 that has already bound and activated the APC/C. Whether or not MCC per se is sufficient to fully sequester Cdc20 and inhibit APC/C remains unclear. Here, a dynamic model for SAC regulation in which the MCC binds a second Cdc20 was constructed. This model is compared to the MCC, and the MCC-and-BubR1 (dual inhibition of APC) core model variants and subsequently validated with experimental data from the literature. By using ordinary nonlinear differential equations and spatial simulations, it is shown that the SAC works sufficiently to fully sequester Cdc20 and completely inhibit APC/C activity. This study highlights the principle that a systems biology approach is vital for molecular biology and could also be used for creating hypotheses to design future experiments. PMID:25977749

  20. Disruption of IFT Complex A Causes Cystic Kidneys without Mitotic Spindle Misorientation

    PubMed Central

    Jonassen, Julie A.; SanAgustin, Jovenal; Baker, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes A and B build and maintain primary cilia. In the mouse, kidney-specific or hypomorphic mutant alleles of IFT complex B genes cause polycystic kidneys, but the influence of IFT complex A proteins on renal development is not well understood. In the present study, we found that HoxB7-Cre–driven deletion of the complex A gene Ift140 from collecting ducts disrupted, but did not completely prevent, cilia assembly. Mutant kidneys developed collecting duct cysts by postnatal day 5, with rapid cystic expansion and renal dysfunction by day 15 and little remaining parenchymal tissue by day 20. In contrast to many models of polycystic kidney disease, precystic Ift140-deleted collecting ducts showed normal centrosomal positioning and no misorientation of the mitotic spindle axis, suggesting that disruption of oriented cell division is not a prerequisite to cyst formation in these kidneys. Precystic collecting ducts had an increased mitotic index, suggesting that cell proliferation may drive cyst expansion even with normal orientation of the mitotic spindle. In addition, we observed significant increases in expression of canonical Wnt pathway genes and mediators of Hedgehog and tissue fibrosis in highly cystic, but not precystic, kidneys. Taken together, these studies indicate that loss of Ift140 causes pronounced renal cystic disease and suggest that abnormalities in several different pathways may influence cyst progression. PMID:22282595

  1. Aurora Kinases Phosphorylate Lgl to Induce Mitotic Spindle Orientation in Drosophila Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graham P.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; Brain, Ruth; Thompson, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) protein was discovered in Drosophila as a tumor suppressor in both neural stem cells (neuroblasts) and epithelia. In neuroblasts, Lgl relocalizes to the cytoplasm at mitosis, an event attributed to phosphorylation by mitotically activated aPKC kinase and thought to promote asymmetric cell division. Here we show that Lgl also relocalizes to the cytoplasm at mitosis in epithelial cells, which divide symmetrically. The Aurora A and B kinases directly phosphorylate Lgl to promote its mitotic relocalization, whereas aPKC kinase activity is required only for polarization of Lgl. A form of Lgl that is a substrate for aPKC, but not Aurora kinases, can restore cell polarity in lgl mutants but reveals defects in mitotic spindle orientation in epithelia. We propose that removal of Lgl from the plasma membrane at mitosis allows Pins/LGN to bind Dlg and thus orient the spindle in the plane of the epithelium. Our findings suggest a revised model for Lgl regulation and function in both symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. PMID:25484300

  2. Spindle assembly checkpoint is sufficient for complete Cdc20 sequestering in mitotic control

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Bashar

    2015-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint assembly (SAC) ensures genome fidelity by temporarily delaying anaphase onset, until all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle. The SAC delays mitotic progression by preventing activation of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) or cyclosome; whose activation by Cdc20 is required for sister-chromatid separation marking the transition into anaphase. The mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), which contains Cdc20 as a subunit, binds stably to the APC/C. Compelling evidence by Izawa and Pines (Nature 2014; 10.1038/nature13911) indicates that the MCC can inhibit a second Cdc20 that has already bound and activated the APC/C. Whether or not MCC per se is sufficient to fully sequester Cdc20 and inhibit APC/C remains unclear. Here, a dynamic model for SAC regulation in which the MCC binds a second Cdc20 was constructed. This model is compared to the MCC, and the MCC-and-BubR1 (dual inhibition of APC) core model variants and subsequently validated with experimental data from the literature. By using ordinary nonlinear differential equations and spatial simulations, it is shown that the SAC works sufficiently to fully sequester Cdc20 and completely inhibit APC/C activity. This study highlights the principle that a systems biology approach is vital for molecular biology and could also be used for creating hypotheses to design future experiments. PMID:25977749

  3. Synergistic role of fission yeast Alp16GCP6 and Mzt1MOZART1 in γ-tubulin complex recruitment to mitotic spindle pole bodies and spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hirohisa; Toda, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    In fission yeast, γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC)-specific components Gfh1(GCP4), Mod21(GCP5), and Alp16(GCP6) are nonessential for cell growth. Of these deletion mutants, only alp16Δ shows synthetic lethality with temperature-sensitive mutants of Mzt1(MOZART1), a component of the γTuRC required for recruitment of the complex to microtubule-organizing centers. γ-Tubulin small complex levels at mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs, the centrosome equivalent in fungi) and microtubule levels for preanaphase spindles are significantly reduced in alp16Δ cells but not in gfh1Δ or mod21Δ cells. Furthermore, alp16Δ cells often form monopolar spindles and frequently lose a minichromosome when the spindle assembly checkpoint is inactivated. Alp16(GCP6) promotes Mzt1-dependent γTuRC recruitment to mitotic SPBs and enhances spindle microtubule assembly in a manner dependent on its expression levels. Gfh1(GCP4) and Mod21(GCP5) are not required for Alp16(GCP6)-dependent γTuRC recruitment. Mzt1 has an additional role in the activation of the γTuRC for spindle microtubule assembly. The ratio of Mzt1 to γTuRC levels for preanaphase spindles is higher than at other stages of the cell cycle. Mzt1 overproduction enhances spindle microtubule assembly without affecting γTuRC levels at mitotic SPBs. We propose that Alp16(GCP6) and Mzt1 act synergistically for efficient bipolar spindle assembly to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. PMID:27053664

  4. Synergistic role of fission yeast Alp16GCP6 and Mzt1MOZART1 in γ-tubulin complex recruitment to mitotic spindle pole bodies and spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Hirohisa; Toda, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    In fission yeast, γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC)–specific components Gfh1GCP4, Mod21GCP5, and Alp16GCP6 are nonessential for cell growth. Of these deletion mutants, only alp16Δ shows synthetic lethality with temperature-sensitive mutants of Mzt1MOZART1, a component of the γTuRC required for recruitment of the complex to microtubule-organizing centers. γ-Tubulin small complex levels at mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs, the centrosome equivalent in fungi) and microtubule levels for preanaphase spindles are significantly reduced in alp16Δ cells but not in gfh1Δ or mod21Δ cells. Furthermore, alp16Δ cells often form monopolar spindles and frequently lose a minichromosome when the spindle assembly checkpoint is inactivated. Alp16GCP6 promotes Mzt1-dependent γTuRC recruitment to mitotic SPBs and enhances spindle microtubule assembly in a manner dependent on its expression levels. Gfh1GCP4 and Mod21GCP5 are not required for Alp16GCP6-dependent γTuRC recruitment. Mzt1 has an additional role in the activation of the γTuRC for spindle microtubule assembly. The ratio of Mzt1 to γTuRC levels for preanaphase spindles is higher than at other stages of the cell cycle. Mzt1 overproduction enhances spindle microtubule assembly without affecting γTuRC levels at mitotic SPBs. We propose that Alp16GCP6 and Mzt1 act synergistically for efficient bipolar spindle assembly to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. PMID:27053664

  5. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinase 2 specifically affects mitotic progression by regulating the basal level, distribution and stability of mitotic spindles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun Yeon; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Do, Mihyang; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    RSK2, also known as RPS6KA3 (ribosomal protein S6 kinase, 90 kDa, polypeptide 3), is a downstream kinase of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which is important in regulating survival, transcription, growth and proliferation. However, its biological role in mitotic progression is not well understood. In this study, we examined the potential involvement of RSK2 in the regulation of mitotic progression. Interestingly, depletion of RSK2, but not RSK1, caused the accumulation of mitotic cells. Time-lapse analysis revealed that mitotic duration, particularly the duration for metaphase-to-anaphase transition was prolonged in RSK2-depleted cells, suggesting activation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Indeed, more BubR1 (Bub1-related kinase) was present on metaphase plate kinetochores in RSK2-depleted cells, and depletion of BubR1 abolished the mitotic accumulation caused by RSK2 depletion, confirming BubR1-dependent SAC activation. Along with the shortening of inter-kinetochore distance, these data suggested that weakening of the tension across sister kinetochores by RSK2 depletion led to the activation of SAC. To test this, we analyzed the RSK2 effects on the stability of kinetochore–microtubule interactions, and found that RSK2-depleted cells formed less kinetochore–microtubule fibers. Moreover, RSK2 depletion resulted in the decrease of basal level of microtubule as well as an irregular distribution of mitotic spindles, which might lead to observed several mitotic progression defects such as increase in unaligned chromosomes, defects in chromosome congression and a decrease in pole-to-pole distance in these cells. Taken together, our data reveal that RSK2 affects mitotic progression by regulating the distribution, basal level and the stability of mitotic spindles. PMID:27491410

  6. Mechanism and regulation of kinesin-5, an essential motor for the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Waitzman, Joshua S; Rice, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic cell division is the most fundamental task of all living cells. Cells have intricate and tightly regulated machinery to ensure that mitosis occurs with appropriate frequency and high fidelity. A core element of this machinery is the kinesin-5 motor protein, which plays essential roles in spindle formation and maintenance. In this review, we discuss how the structural and mechanical properties of kinesin-5 motors uniquely suit them to their mitotic role. We describe some of the small molecule inhibitors and regulatory proteins that act on kinesin-5, and discuss how these regulators may influence the process of cell division. Finally, we touch on some more recently described functions of kinesin-5 motors in non-dividing cells. Throughout, we highlight a number of open questions that impede our understanding of both this motor's function and the potential utility of kinesin-5 inhibitors. PMID:24125467

  7. Mechanism and Regulation of Kinesin-5, an essential motor for the mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Waitzman, Joshua S.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic cell division is the most fundamental task of all living cells. Cells have intricate and tightly regulated machinery to ensure that mitosis occurs with appropriate frequency and high fidelity. A core element of this machinery is the kinesin-5 motor protein, which plays essential roles in spindle formation and maintenance. In this review, we discuss how the structural and mechanical properties of kinesin-5 motors uniquely suit them to their mitotic role. We describe some of the small molecule inhibitors and regulatory proteins that act on kinesin-5, and discuss how these regulators may influence the process of cell division. Finally, we touch on some more recently described functions of kinesin-5 motors in non-dividing cells. Throughout, we highlight a number of open questions that impede our understanding of both this motor's function and the potential utility of kinesin-5 inhibitors. PMID:24125467

  8. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis.

    PubMed

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  9. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L.; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  10. A novel tropomyosin isoform functions at the mitotic spindle and Golgi in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Goins, Lauren M.; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells express multiple isoforms of the actin-binding protein tropomyosin that help construct a variety of cytoskeletal networks. Only one nonmuscle tropomyosin (Tm1A) has previously been described in Drosophila, but developmental defects caused by insertion of P-elements near tropomyosin genes imply the existence of additional, nonmuscle isoforms. Using biochemical and molecular genetic approaches, we identified three tropomyosins expressed in Drosophila S2 cells: Tm1A, Tm1J, and Tm2A. The Tm1A isoform localizes to the cell cortex, lamellar actin networks, and the cleavage furrow of dividing cells—always together with myosin-II. Isoforms Tm1J and Tm2A colocalize around the Golgi apparatus with the formin-family protein Diaphanous, and loss of either isoform perturbs cell cycle progression. During mitosis, Tm1J localizes to the mitotic spindle, where it promotes chromosome segregation. Using chimeras, we identified the determinants of tropomyosin localization near the C-terminus. This work 1) identifies and characterizes previously unknown nonmuscle tropomyosins in Drosophila, 2) reveals a function for tropomyosin in the mitotic spindle, and 3) uncovers sequence elements that specify isoform-specific localizations and functions of tropomyosin. PMID:25971803

  11. Class III β-Tubulin Is a Component of the Mitotic Spindle in Multiple Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Peltonen, Sirkku; Peltonen, Juha

    2008-01-01

    The findings of this study show that Class III β-tubulin is a component of the mitotic spindle in multiple cell types. Class III β-tubulin has been widely used as a neuron-specific marker, but it has been detected also in association with breast and pancreatic cancers. In this study, we describe a novel finding of Class III β-tubulin in a subpopulation of cells in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The findings of this study also show that Class III β-tubulin is expressed by normal mesenchymal and epithelial cells (fibroblasts and keratinocytes), two transitional cell carcinoma cell lines, and neurofibroma Schwann cells, as shown by immunolabeling and Western transfer analysis using two different Tuj-1 antibodies that are specific for Class III β-tubulin. The corresponding mRNA was detected using RT-PCR and whole human genome microarrays. Both antibodies localized Class III β-tubulin to the mitotic spindle and showed a colocalization with α-tubulin. The immunoreaction became visible in early prophase, and the most intense immunoreaction was detected during metaphase and anaphase when microtubules were connected to the kinetochores on chromosomes. Class III β-tubulin–specific immunoreaction lasted to the point when the midbody of cytokinesis became detectable. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:1113–1119, 2008) PMID:18796406

  12. The nuclear scaffold protein SAF-A is required for kinetochore-microtubule attachment and contributes to the targeting of Aurora-A to mitotic spindles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Morimoto, Akihiro; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Urano, Takeshi; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2011-02-01

    Segregation of chromosomes during cell division requires correct formation of mitotic spindles. Here, we show that a scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), also known as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein-U, contributes to the attachment of spindle microtubules (MTs) to kinetochores and spindle organization. During mitosis, SAF-A was localized at the spindles, spindle midzone and cytoplasmic bridge. Depletion of SAF-A by RNA interference induced mitotic delay and defects in chromosome alignment and spindle assembly. We found that SAF-A specifically co-immunoprecipitated with the chromosome peripheral protein nucleolin and the spindle regulators Aurora-A and TPX2, indicating that SAF-A is associated with nucleolin and the Aurora-A-TPX2 complex. SAF-A was colocalized with TPX2 and Aurora-A in spindle poles and MTs. Elimination of TPX2 or Aurora-A from cells abolished the association of SAF-A with the mitotic spindle. Interestingly, SAF-A can bind to MTs and contributes to the targeting of Aurora-A to mitotic spindle MTs. Our finding indicates that SAF-A is a novel spindle regulator that plays an essential role in kinetochore-MT attachment and mitotic spindle organization. PMID:21242313

  13. Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yueyang; Munger, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the Nuclear and Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons. PMID:22748180

  14. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yueyang; Munger, Karl

    2012-10-10

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  15. Polyglutamylated Tubulin Binding Protein C1orf96/CSAP Is Involved in Microtubule Stabilization in Mitotic Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Hamada, Mayako; Sato, Nobuko; Toramoto, Iyo

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome-associated C1orf96/Centriole, Cilia and Spindle-Associated Protein (CSAP) targets polyglutamylated tubulin in mitotic microtubules (MTs). Loss of CSAP causes critical defects in brain development; however, it is unclear how CSAP association with MTs affects mitosis progression. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of CSAP with mitotic spindles. Loss of CSAP caused MT instability in mitotic spindles and resulted in mislocalization of Nuclear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA), with defective MT dynamics. Thus, CSAP overload in the spindles caused extensive MT stabilization and recruitment of NuMA. Moreover, MT stabilization by CSAP led to high levels of polyglutamylation on MTs. MT depolymerization by cold or nocodazole treatment was inhibited by CSAP binding. Live-cell imaging analysis suggested that CSAP-dependent MT-stabilization led to centrosome-free MT aster formation immediately upon nuclear envelope breakdown without γ-tubulin. We therefore propose that CSAP associates with MTs around centrosomes to stabilize MTs during mitosis, ensuring proper bipolar spindle formation and maintenance. PMID:26562023

  16. The SUMO protease SENP1 is required for cohesion maintenance and mitotic arrest following spindle poison treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Era, Saho; Abe, Takuya; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Szakal, Barnabas; Yoshikawa, Yusuke; Motegi, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi; Branzei, Dana

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SENP1 knockout chicken DT40 cells are hypersensitive to spindle poisons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spindle poison treatment of SENP1{sup -/-} cells leads to increased mitotic slippage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic slippage in SENP1{sup -/-} cells associates with apoptosis and endoreplication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SENP1 counteracts sister chromatid separation during mitotic arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plk1-mediated cohesion down-regulation is involved in colcemid cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: SUMO conjugation is a reversible posttranslational modification that regulates protein function. SENP1 is one of the six SUMO-specific proteases present in vertebrate cells and its altered expression is observed in several carcinomas. To characterize SENP1 role in genome integrity, we generated Senp1 knockout chicken DT40 cells. SENP1{sup -/-} cells show normal proliferation, but are sensitive to spindle poisons. This hypersensitivity correlates with increased sister chromatid separation, mitotic slippage, and apoptosis. To test whether the cohesion defect had a causal relationship with the observed mitotic events, we restored the cohesive status of sister chromatids by introducing the TOP2{alpha}{sup +/-} mutation, which leads to increased catenation, or by inhibiting Plk1 and Aurora B kinases that promote cohesin release from chromosomes during prolonged mitotic arrest. Although TOP2{alpha} is SUMOylated during mitosis, the TOP2{alpha}{sup +/-} mutation had no obvious effect. By contrast, inhibition of Plk1 or Aurora B rescued the hypersensitivity of SENP1{sup -/-} cells to colcemid. In conclusion, we identify SENP1 as a novel factor required for mitotic arrest and cohesion maintenance during prolonged mitotic arrest induced by spindle poisons.

  17. Distinct modes of mitotic spindle orientation align cells in the dorsal midline of ascidian embryos.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takefumi; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi

    2015-12-01

    The orientation of cell division can have important consequences on the choice of cell fates adopted by each daughter cell as well as on the architecture of the tissue within which the dividing cell resides. We have studied in detail the oriented cell divisions that take place in the dorsal midline of the ascidian embryo. The dorsal midline cells of the ascidian embryo emerge following an asymmetric cell division oriented along the animal-vegetal (A-V) axis. This division generates the NN (Notochord-Neural) cell at the margin and the E (Endoderm) cell more vegetally. Deviating from the default mode of cell division, these sister cells divide again along the A-V axis to generate a column of four cells. We describe these cell divisions in detail. We show that the NN cell mitotic spindle rotates 90° to align along the A-V axis while the E cell spindle forms directly along the axis following the asymmetric migration of its centrosomes. We combine live imaging, embryo manipulations and pharmacological modulation of cytoskeletal elements to address the mechanisms underlying these distinct subcellular behaviours. Our evidence suggests that, in E cells, aster asymmetry together with the E cell shape contribute to the asymmetric centrosome migration. In NN cells, an intrinsic cytoplasmic polarisation of the cell results in the accumulation of dynein to the animal pole side. Our data support a model in which a dynein-dependent directional cytoplasmic pulling force may be responsible for the NN cell spindle rotation. PMID:26452428

  18. Intracellular hyaluronan in arterial smooth muscle cells: association with microtubules, RHAMM, and the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Evanko, Stephen P; Parks, W Tony; Wight, Thomas N

    2004-12-01

    Although considered a pericellular matrix component, hyaluronan was recently localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of proliferating cells, supporting earlier reports that hyaluronan was present in locations such as the nucleus, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and caveolae. This suggests that it can play roles both inside and outside the cell. Hyaluronan metabolism is coupled to mitosis and cell motility, but it is not clear if intracellular hyaluronan associates with cytoskeletal elements or plays a structural role. Here we report the distribution of intracellular hyaluronan, microtubules, and RHAMM in arterial smooth muscle cells in vitro. The general distribution of intracellular hyaluronan more closely resembled microtubule staining rather than actin filaments. Hyaluronan was abundant in the perinuclear microtubule-rich areas and was present in lysosomes, other vesicular structures, and the nucleolus. Partially fragmented fluorescein-hyaluronan was preferentially translocated to the perinuclear area compared with high-molecular-weight hyaluronan. In the mitotic spindle, hyaluronan colocalized with tubulin and with the hyaladherin RHAMM, a cell surface receptor and microtubule-associated protein that interacts with dynein and maintains spindle pole stability. Internalized fluorescein-hyaluronan was also seen at the spindle. Following telophase, an abundance of hyaluronan near the midbody microtubules at the cleavage furrow was also noted. In permeabilized cells, fluorescein-hyaluronan bound to RHAMM-associated microtubules. These findings suggest novel functions for hyaluronan in cellular physiology. PMID:15557208

  19. Moderate intensity static magnetic fields affect mitotic spindles and increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU and Taxol.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Ji, Xinmiao; Liu, Juanjuan; Li, Zhiyuan; Wang, Wenchao; Chen, Wei; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Microtubules are the fundamental components in mitotic spindle, which plays essential roles in cell division. It was well known that purified microtubules could be affected by static magnetic fields (SMFs) in vitro because of the diamagnetic anisotropy of tubulin. However, whether these effects lead to cell division defects was unknown. Here we find that 1T SMFs induce abnormal mitotic spindles and increase mitotic index. Synchronization experiments show that SMFs delay cell exit from mitosis and cause mitotic arrest. These mimic the cellular effects of a microtubule-targeting drug Paclitaxel (Taxol), which is frequently used in combination with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Cisplatin in cancer treatment. Using four different human cancer cell lines, HeLa, HCT116, CNE-2Z and MCF7, we find that SMFs increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not Cisplatin, which indicates that the SMF-induced combinational effects with chemodrugs are drug-specific. Our study not only reveals the effect of SMFs on microtubules to cause abnormal mitotic spindles and delay cells exit from mitosis, but also implies the potential applications of SMFs in combination with chemotherapy drugs 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not with Cisplatin in cancer treatment. PMID:26775206

  20. Abnormal mitotic spindle assembly and cytokinesis induced by D-Limonene in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Catanzaro, Irene; Naselli, Flores; Sciandrello, Giulia; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    D-Limonene is found widely in citrus and many other plant species; it is a major constituent of many essential oils and is used as a solvent for commercial purposes. With the discovery of its chemotherapeutic properties against cancer, it is important to investigate the biological effects of the exposure to D-Limonene and elucidate its, as yet unknown, mechanism of action. We reported here that D-Limonene is toxic in V79 Chinese hamster cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, to determine the cellular target of D-Limonene, we performed morphological observations and immunocytochemical analysis and we showed that this drug has a direct effect on dividing cells preventing assembly of mitotic spindle microtubules. This affects both chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, resulting in aneuploidy that in turn can lead to cell death or genomic instability. PMID:23913329

  1. EFHC1, a protein mutated in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, associates with the mitotic spindle through its N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Nijs, Laurence de; Lakaye, Bernard; Coumans, Bernard; Leon, Christine; Ikeda, Takashi; Delgado-Escueta, Antonio V.; Chanas, Grazyna . E-mail: G.Chanas@ulg.ac.be

    2006-09-10

    A novel gene, EFHC1, mutated in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) encodes a protein with three DM10 domains of unknown function and one putative EF-hand motif. To study the properties of EFHC1, we expressed EGFP-tagged protein in various cell lines. In interphase cells, the fusion protein was present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus with specific accumulation at the centrosome. During mitosis EGFP-EFHC1 colocalized with the mitotic spindle, especially at spindle poles and with the midbody during cytokinesis. Using a specific antibody, we demonstrated the same distribution of the endogenous protein. Deletion analyses revealed that the N-terminal region of EFHC1 is crucial for the association with the mitotic spindle and the midbody. Our results suggest that EFHC1 could play an important role during cell division.

  2. Use of a Laser-Induced Optical Force Trap to Study Chromosome Movement on the Mitotic Spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, Michael W.; Wright, William H.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Profeta, Glen A.; Andrews, Jeffrey J.; Walter, Robert J.

    1989-06-01

    A laser-induced optical force trap was used to alter the movement of chromosomes in mitotic cells in vitro. The trap was produced by using a 1.06-μ m neodymium YAG (yttrium/aluminum garnet) laser focused through a phase-contrast microscope. The trap was applied to one side of centrophilic chromosomes off the mitotic spindle and to latemoving chromosomes on the mitotic spindle. In both situations, chromosome movement was initiated in the direction opposite to that of the applied force. When the force was applied, chromosomes moved at velocities 10-20 times normal. These studies verify and extend the feasibility of using this new technique to study factors that influence organelle motility.

  3. Proteins related to the spindle and checkpoint mitotic emphasize the different pathogenesis of hypoplastic MDS.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Fabiola Fernandes; de Sousa, Juliana Cordeiro; Ribeiro Junior, Howard Lopes; Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; Magalhaes, Silvia Maria Meira; Pinheiro, Ronald Feitosa

    2014-02-01

    Some studies show that alterations in expression of proteins related to mitotic spindle (AURORAS KINASE A and B) and mitotic checkpoint (CDC20 and MAD2L1) are involved in chromosomal instability and tumor progression in various solid and hematologic malignancies. This study aimed to evaluate these genes in MDS patients. The cytogenetics analysis was carried out by G-banding, AURKA and AURKB amplification was performed using FISH, and AURKA, AURKB, CDC20 and MAD2L1 gene expression was performed by qRT-PCR in 61 samples of bone marrow from MDS patients. AURKA gene amplification was observed in 10% of the cases, which also showed higher expression levels than the control group (p=0.038). Patients with normo/hypercellular BM presented significantly higher expression levels than hypocellular BM patients, but normo and hypercellular BM groups did not differ. After logistic regression analysis, our results showed that HIGH expression levels were associated with increased risk of developing normo/hypercellular MDS. It also indicated that age is associated with AURKA, CDC20 and MAD2L1 HIGH expression levels. The distinct expression of hypocellular patients emphasizes the prognostic importance of cellularity to MDS. The amplification/high expression of AURKA suggests that the increased expression of this gene may be related to the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:24314588

  4. Motor activity and mitotic spindle localization of the Drosophila kinesin-like protein KLP61F.

    PubMed Central

    Barton, N R; Pereira, A J; Goldstein, L S

    1995-01-01

    The KLP61F gene product is essential for Drosophila development. Mutations in KLP61F display a mitotic arrest phenotype caused by a failure in the proper separation of duplicated centrosomes (Heck et al., 1993). Sequence analysis of KLP61F identified it as a member of the bimC family of kinesin-like microtubule motor proteins. Here we report that KLP61F is distinct from KRP130, a kinesin-like protein recently purified from Drosophila embryos and suggested to be the product of the KLP61F gene (Cole et al., 1994). We also characterized recombinant KLP61F and found that it possesses microtubule-stimulated ATPase and microtubule translocation activities in vitro. In addition, we have used an affinity-purified, KLP61F-specific antiserum to localize native KLP61F and an epitope-tagged KLP61F fusion protein during various stages of mitosis in Drosophila syncytial blastoderm embryos. From early prophase through anaphase, KLP61F is coincident with the distribution of tubulin. Together these results confirm the existence of multiple bimC-like kinesins in Drosophila and suggest that KLP61F function is intrinsic to the mitotic spindle. Images PMID:8589456

  5. XCTK2: A Kinesin-related Protein That Promotes Mitotic Spindle Assembly in Xenopus laevis Egg Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Claire E.; Verma, Suzie; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    We used a peptide antibody to a conserved sequence in the motor domain of kinesins to screen a Xenopus ovary cDNA expression library. Among the clones isolated were two that encoded a protein we named XCTK2 for Xenopus COOH-terminal kinesin 2. XCTK2 contains an NH2-terminal globular domain, a central α-helical stalk, and a COOH-terminal motor domain. XCTK2 is similar to CTKs in other organisms and is most homologous to CHO2. Antibodies raised against XCTK2 recognize a 75-kD protein in Xenopus egg extracts that cosediments with microtubules. In Xenopus tissue culture cells, the anti-XCTK2 antibodies stain mitotic spindles as well as a subset of interphase nuclei. To probe the function of XCTK2, we have used an in vitro assay for spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. Addition of antibodies to cytostatic factor- arrested extracts causes a 70% reduction in the percentage of bipolar spindles formed. XCTK2 is not required for maintenance of bipolar spindles, as antibody addition to preformed spindles has no effect. To further evaluate the function of XCTK2, we expressed XCTK2 in insect Sf-9 cells using the baculovirus expression system. When purified (recombinant XCTK2 is added to Xenopus egg extracts at a fivefold excess over endogenous levels) there is a stimulation in both the rate and extent of bipolar spindle formation. XCTK2 exists in a large complex in extracts and can be coimmunoprecipitated with two other proteins from extracts. XCTK2 likely plays an important role in the establishment and structural integrity of mitotic spindles. PMID:9049251

  6. Acrylamide effects on kinesin-related proteins of the mitotic/meiotic spindle

    SciTech Connect

    Sickles, Dale W. . E-mail: dsickles@mcg.edu; Sperry, Ann O. . E-mail: sperrya@ecu.edu; Testino, Angie; Friedman, Marvin

    2007-07-01

    The microtubule (MT) motor protein kinesin is a vital component of cells and organs expressing acrylamide (ACR) toxicity. As a mechanism of its potential carcinogenicity, we determined whether kinesins involved in cell division are inhibited by ACR similar to neuronal kinesin [Sickles, D.W., Brady, S.T., Testino, A.R., Friedman, M.A., and Wrenn, R.A. (1996). Direct effect of the neurotoxicant acrylamide on kinesin-based microtubule motility. Journal of Neuroscience Research 46, 7-17.] Kinesin-related genes were isolated from rat testes [Navolanic, P.M., and Sperry, A.O. (2000). Identification of isoforms of a mitotic motor in mammalian spermatogenesis. Biology of Reproduction 62, 1360-1369.], their kinesin-like proteins expressed in bacteria using recombinant DNA techniques and the effects of ACR, glycidamide (GLY) and propionamide (a non-neurotoxic metabolite) on the function of two of the identified kinesin motors were tested. KIFC5A MT bundling activity, required for mitotic spindle formation, was measured in an MT-binding assay. Both ACR and GLY caused a similar concentration-dependent reduction in the binding of MT; concentrations of 100 {mu}M ACR or GLY reduced its activity by 60%. KRP2 MT disassembling activity was assayed using the quantity of tubulin disassembled from taxol-stabilized MT. Both ACR and GLY inhibited KRP2-induced MT disassembly. GLY was substantially more potent; significant reductions of 60% were achieved by 500 {mu}M, a comparable inhibition by ACR required a 5 mM concentration. Propionamide had no significant effect on either kinesin, except KRP2 at 10 mM. This is the first report of ACR inhibition of a mitotic/meiotic motor protein. ACR (or GLY) inhibition of kinesin may be an alternative mechanism to DNA adduction in the production of cell division defects and potential carcinogenicity. We conclude that ACR may act on multiple kinesin family members and produce toxicities in organs highly dependent on microtubule-based functions.

  7. Fatostatin Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation by Affecting Mitotic Microtubule Spindle Assembly and Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Gholkar, Ankur A; Cheung, Keith; Williams, Kevin J; Lo, Yu-Chen; Hamideh, Shadia A; Nnebe, Chelsea; Khuu, Cindy; Bensinger, Steven J; Torres, Jorge Z

    2016-08-12

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors have become attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition in the treatment of metabolic diseases and cancer. SREBPs are critical for the production and metabolism of lipids and cholesterol, which are essential for cellular homeostasis and cell proliferation. Fatostatin was recently discovered as a specific inhibitor of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which is required for SREBP activation. Fatostatin possesses antitumor properties including the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and it arrests cancer cells in G2/M phase. Although Fatostatin has been viewed as an antitumor agent due to its inhibition of SREBP and its effect on lipid metabolism, we show that Fatostatin's anticancer properties can also be attributed to its inhibition of cell division. We analyzed the effect of SREBP activity inhibitors including Fatostatin, PF-429242, and Betulin on the cell cycle and determined that only Fatostatin possessed antimitotic properties. Fatostatin inhibited tubulin polymerization, arrested cells in mitosis, activated the spindle assembly checkpoint, and triggered mitotic catastrophe and reduced cell viability. Thus Fatostatin's ability to inhibit SREBP activity and cell division could prove beneficial in treating aggressive types of cancers such as glioblastomas that have elevated lipid metabolism and fast proliferation rates and often develop resistance to current anticancer therapies. PMID:27378817

  8. RBM14 prevents assembly of centriolar protein complexes and maintains mitotic spindle integrity

    PubMed Central

    Shiratsuchi, Gen; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Ashikawa, Tomoko; Hamada, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2015-01-01

    Formation of a new centriole adjacent to a pre-existing centriole occurs only once per cell cycle. Despite being crucial for genome integrity, the mechanisms controlling centriole biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we identify RBM14 as a novel suppressor of assembly of centriolar protein complexes. Depletion of RBM14 in human cells induces ectopic formation of centriolar protein complexes through function of the STIL/CPAP complex. Intriguingly, the formation of such structures seems not to require the cartwheel structure that normally acts as a scaffold for centriole formation, whereas they can retain pericentriolar material and microtubule nucleation activity. Moreover, we find that, upon RBM14 depletion, a part of the ectopic centriolar protein complexes in turn assemble into structures more akin to centrioles, presumably by incorporating HsSAS-6, a cartwheel component, and cause multipolar spindle formation. We further demonstrate that such structures assemble in the cytoplasm even in the presence of pre-existing centrioles. This study sheds light on the possibility that ectopic formation of aberrant structures related to centrioles may contribute to genome instability and tumorigenesis. PMID:25385835

  9. 212Pb-radioimmunotherapy potentiates paclitaxel-induced cell killing efficacy by perturbing the mitotic spindle checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Yong, K J; Milenic, D E; Baidoo, K E; Brechbiel, M W

    2013-01-01

    Background: Paclitaxel has recently been reported by this laboratory to potentiate the high-LET radiation therapeutic 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab, which targets HER2. To elucidate mechanisms associated with this therapy, targeted α-particle radiation therapeutic 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab together with paclitaxel was investigated for the treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. Methods: Mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were pre-treated with paclitaxel, followed by treatment with 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared with groups treated with paclitaxel alone, 212Pb-TCMC-HuIgG, 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and 212Pb-TCMC-HuIgG after paclitaxel pre-treatment. Results: 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab with paclitaxel given 24 h earlier induced increased mitotic catastrophe and apoptosis. The combined modality of paclitaxel and 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab markedly reduced DNA content in the S-phase of the cell cycle with a concomitant increase observed in the G2/M-phase. This treatment regimen also diminished phosphorylation of histone H3, accompanied by an increase in multi-micronuclei, or mitotic catastrophe in nuclear profiles and positively stained γH2AX foci. The data suggests, possible effects on the mitotic spindle checkpoint by the paclitaxel and 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment. Consistent with this hypothesis, 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment in response to paclitaxel reduced expression and phosphorylation of BubR1, which is likely attributable to disruption of a functional Aurora B, leading to impairment of the mitotic spindle checkpoint. In addition, the reduction of BubR1 expression may be mediated by the association of a repressive transcription factor, E2F4, on the promoter region of BubR1 gene. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the sensitisation to therapy of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab by paclitaxel may be associated with perturbation of the mitotic spindle checkpoint, leading to increased mitotic catastrophe and cell death. PMID:23632482

  10. Delocalization of the Microtubule Motor Dynein from Mitotic Spindles by the Human Papillomavirus E7 Oncoprotein is Not Sufficient for Induction of Multipolar Mitoses

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Christine L.; McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Münger, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Dynein is a minus-end directed microtubule motor that transports numerous cargoes throughout the cell. During mitosis, dynein motor activity is necessary for the positioning of spindle microtubules and has also been implicated in inactivating the spindle assembly checkpoint. Mutations in dynein motor and/or accessory proteins are associated with human disease, including cancer, and the delocalization of dynein from mitotic spindles has been correlated with an increased incidence of multipolar spindle formation in some cancer cells that contain supernumerary centrosomes. The high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E7 oncoprotein induces centrosome overduplication and has been shown to cause multipolar mitotic spindle formation, a diagnostic hallmark of HPV-associated neoplasias. Here we show that HPV16 E7 expression leads to an increased population of mitotic cells with dynein delocalized from the mitotic spindle. This function maps to sequences of HPV16 E7 that are distinct from the region necessary for centrosome overduplication. However, contrary to previous reports, we provide evidence that dynein delocalization by HPV16 E7 is neither necessary nor sufficient to cause the formation of multipolar mitoses. PMID:18974113

  11. Cell cycle regulation of the activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a human protein kinase implicated in mitotic spindle function.

    PubMed

    Golsteyn, R M; Mundt, K E; Fry, A M; Nigg, E A

    1995-06-01

    Correct assembly and function of the mitotic spindle during cell division is essential for the accurate partitioning of the duplicated genome to daughter cells. Protein phosphorylation has long been implicated in controlling spindle function and chromosome segregation, and genetic studies have identified several protein kinases and phosphatases that are likely to regulate these processes. In particular, mutations in the serine/threonine-specific Drosophila kinase polo, and the structurally related kinase Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisae, result in abnormal mitotic and meiotic divisions. Here, we describe a detailed analysis of the cell cycle-dependent activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a recently identified human protein kinase with extensive sequence similarity to both Drosophila polo and S. cerevisiae Cdc5p. With the aid of recombinant baculoviruses, we have established a reliable in vitro assay for Plk1 kinase activity. We show that the activity of human Plk1 is cell cycle regulated, Plk1 activity being low during interphase but high during mitosis. We further show, by immunofluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy, that human Plk1 binds to components of the mitotic spindle at all stages of mitosis, but undergoes a striking redistribution as cells progress from metaphase to anaphase. Specifically, Plk1 associates with spindle poles up to metaphase, but relocalizes to the equatorial plane, where spindle microtubules overlap (the midzone), as cells go through anaphase. These results indicate that the association of Plk1 with the spindle is highly dynamic and that Plk1 may function at multiple stages of mitotic progression. Taken together, our data strengthen the notion that human Plk1 may represent a functional homolog of polo and Cdc5p, and they suggest that this kinase plays an important role in the dynamic function of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. PMID:7790358

  12. The Chromokinesin, KLP3A, Drives Mitotic Spindle Pole Separation during Prometaphase and Anaphase and Facilitates Chromatid Motility D⃞V⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mijung; Morales-Mulia, Sandra; Brust-Mascher, Ingrid; Rogers, Gregory C.; Sharp, David J.; Scholey, Jonathan M.

    2004-01-01

    Mitosis requires the concerted activities of multiple microtubule (MT)-based motor proteins. Here we examined the contribution of the chromokinesin, KLP3A, to mitotic spindle morphogenesis and chromosome movements in Drosophila embryos and cultured S2 cells. By immunofluorescence, KLP3A associates with nonfibrous punctae that concentrate in nuclei and display MT-dependent associations with spindles. These punctae concentrate in indistinct domains associated with chromosomes and central spindles and form distinct bands associated with telophase midbodies. The functional disruption of KLP3A by antibodies or dominant negative proteins in embryos, or by RNA interference (RNAi) in S2 cells, does not block mitosis but produces defects in mitotic spindles. Time-lapse confocal observations of mitosis in living embryos reveal that KLP3A inhibition disrupts the organization of interpolar (ip) MTs and produces short spindles. Kinetic analysis suggests that KLP3A contributes to spindle pole separation during the prometaphase-to-metaphase transition (when it antagonizes Ncd) and anaphase B, to normal rates of chromatid motility during anaphase A, and to the proper spacing of daughter nuclei during telophase. We propose that KLP3A acts on MTs associated with chromosome arms and the central spindle to organize ipMT bundles, to drive spindle pole separation and to facilitate chromatid motility. PMID:14528012

  13. Self-assembly and sorting of acentrosomal microtubules by TACC3 facilitate kinetochore capture during the mitotic spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wenxiang; Chen, Hao; Wang, Gang; Luo, Jia; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Xin, Guangwei; Xu, Nan; Guo, Xiao; Lei, Jun; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2013-09-17

    Kinetochore capture by dynamic kinetochore microtubule fibers (K fibers) is essential for proper chromosome alignment and accurate distribution of the replicated genome during cell division. Although this capture process has been extensively studied, the mechanisms underlying the initiation of this process and the proper formation of the K fibers remain largely unknown. Here we show that transforming acidic coiled-coil-containing protein 3 (TACC3) is essential for kinetochore capture and proper K-fiber formation in HeLa cells. To observe the assembly of acentrosomal microtubules more clearly, the cells were released from higher concentrations of nocodazole into zero or lower concentrations. We find that small acentrosomal TACC3-microtubule aster formation near the kinetochores and binding of the asters with the kinetochores are the initial steps of the kinetochore capture by the acentrosomal microtubules, and that the sorting of kinetochore-captured acentrosomal microtubules with centrosomal microtubules leads to the capture of kinetochore by centrosomal microtubules from both spindle poles. We demonstrate that the sorting of the TACC3-associated microtubules with the centrosomal microtubules is a crucial process for spindle assembly and chromosome movement. These findings, which are also supported in the unperturbed mitosis without nocodazole, reveal a critical TACC3-dependent acentrosomal microtubule nucleation and sorting process to regulate kinetochore-microtubule connections and provide deep insight into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome alignment. PMID:24003142

  14. Dissociation of gemcitabine chemosensitization by CHK1 inhibition from cell cycle checkpoint abrogation and aberrant mitotic entry.

    PubMed

    Parsels, Leslie A; Tanska, Daria M; Parsels, Joshua D; Zabludoff, Sonya D; Cuneo, Kyle C; Lawrence, Theodore S; Maybaum, Jonathan; Morgan, Meredith A

    2016-03-01

    In order to determine the relative contribution of checkpoint abrogation and subsequent aberrant mitotic entry to gemcitabine chemosensitization by CHK1 inhibition, we established a model utilizing the CDK inhibitors roscovitine or purvalanol A to re-establish cell cycle arrest and prevent aberrant mitotic entry in pancreatic cancer cells treated with gemcitabine and the CHK inhibitor AZD7762. In this study, we report that the extent of aberrant mitotic entry, as determined by flow cytometry for the mitotic marker phospho-Histone H3 (Ser10), did not reflect the relative sensitivities of pancreatic cancer cell lines to gemcitabine chemosensitization by AZD7762. In addition, re-establishing gemcitabine-induced cell cycle arrest either pharmacologically, with roscovitine or purvalanol A, or genetically, with cyclin B1 siRNA, did not inhibit chemosensitization uniformly across the cell lines. Furthermore, we found that AZD7762 augmented high-intensity γH2AX signaling in gemcitabine-treated cells, suggesting the presence of replication stress when CHK1 is inhibited. Finally, the ability of roscovitine to prevent chemosensitization correlated with its ability to inhibit AZD7762-induced high-intensity γH2AX, but not aberrant pHH3, suggesting that the effects of AZD7762 on DNA replication or repair rather than aberrant mitotic entry determine gemcitabine chemosensitization in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:26890478

  15. Assays to Study Mitotic Centrosome and Spindle Pole Assembly and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Joukov, Vladimir; Walter, Johannes C; De Nicolo, Arcangela

    2016-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation during cell division requires proper bipolar spindle assembly and critically depends on spindle pole integrity. In most animal cells, spindle poles form as the result of the concerted action of various factors operating in two independent pathways of microtubule assembly mediated by chromatin/RanGTP and by centrosomes. Mutation or deregulation of a number of spindle pole-organizing proteins has been linked to human diseases, including cancer and microcephaly. Our knowledge on how the spindle pole-organizing factors function at the molecular level and cooperate with one another is still quite limited. As the list of these factors expands, so does the need for the development of experimental approaches to study their function. Cell-free extracts from Xenopus laevis eggs have played an instrumental role in the dissection of the mechanisms of bipolar spindle assembly and have recently allowed the reconstitution of the key steps of the centrosome-driven microtubule nucleation pathway (Joukov et al., Mol Cell 55:578-591, 2014). Here we describe assays to study both centrosome-dependent and centrosome-independent spindle pole formation in Xenopus egg extracts. We also provide experimental procedures for the use of artificial centrosomes, such as microbeads coated with an anti-Aurora A antibody or a recombinant fragment of the Cep192 protein, to model and study centrosome maturation in egg extract. In addition, we detail the protocol for a microtubule regrowth assay that allows assessment of the centrosome-driven spindle microtubule assembly in mammalian cells. PMID:27193852

  16. Spindle

    2013-04-04

    Spindle is software infrastructure that solves file system scalabiltiy problems associated with starting dynamically linked applications in HPC environments. When an HPC applications starts up thousands of pricesses at once, and those processes simultaneously access a shared file system to look for shared libraries, it can cause significant performance problems for both the application and other users. Spindle scalably coordinates the distribution of shared libraries to an application to avoid hammering the shared file system.

  17. Cross-Talk between AURKA and Plk1 in Mitotic Entry and Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Asteriti, Italia Anna; De Mattia, Fabiola; Guarguaglini, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is involved in different aspects of mitotic control, from mitotic entry to cytokinesis. Consistent with its pleiotropic roles, several AURKA interactors are able to modulate its activity, the best characterized being the microtubule-binding protein TPX2, the centrosomal protein Cep192, and Bora. Bora has been described as an essential cofactor of AURKA for phosphorylation-mediated activation of the mitotic kinase polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) at the G2/M transition. A complex AURKA/Plk1 signaling axis is emerging, with multiple involved actors; recent data suggest that this control network is not restricted to mitotic entry only, but operates throughout mitosis. Here, we integrate available data from the literature to depict the complex interplay between AURKA and Plk1 in G2 and mitosis and how it contributes to their mitotic functions. We will particularly focus on how the activity of specifically localized AURKA/Plk1 pools is modulated in time and space by their reciprocal regulation to ensure the timely and coordinated unfolding of downstream mitotic events. PMID:26779436

  18. The Transcriptional Repressor Kaiso Localizes at the Mitotic Spindle and Is a Constituent of the Pericentriolar Material

    PubMed Central

    Soubry, Adelheid; Staes, Katrien; Parthoens, Eef; Noppen, Sam; Stove, Christophe; Bogaert, Pieter; van Hengel, Jolanda; van Roy, Frans

    2010-01-01

    Kaiso is a BTB/POZ zinc finger protein known as a transcriptional repressor. It was originally identified through its in vitro association with the Armadillo protein p120ctn. Subcellular localization of Kaiso in cell lines and in normal and cancerous human tissues revealed that its expression is not restricted to the nucleus. In the present study we monitored Kaiso's subcellular localization during the cell cycle and found the following: (1) during interphase, Kaiso is located not only in the nucleus, but also on microtubular structures, including the centrosome; (2) at metaphase, it is present at the centrosomes and on the spindle microtubules; (3) during telophase, it accumulates at the midbody. We found that Kaiso is a genuine PCM component that belongs to a pericentrin molecular complex. We analyzed the functions of different domains of Kaiso by visualizing the subcellular distribution of GFP-tagged Kaiso fragments throughout the cell cycle. Our results indicate that two domains are responsible for targeting Kaiso to the centrosomes and microtubules. The first domain, designated SA1 for spindle-associated domain 1, is located in the center of the Kaiso protein and localizes at the spindle microtubules and centrosomes; the second domain, SA2, is an evolutionarily conserved domain situated just before the zinc finger domain and might be responsible for localizing Kaiso towards the centrosomal region. Constructs containing both SA domains and Kaiso's aminoterminal BTB/POZ domain triggered the formation of abnormal centrosomes. We also observed that overexpression of longer or full-length Kaiso constructs led to mitotic cell arrest and frequent cell death. Knockdown of Kaiso accelerated cell proliferation. Our data reveal a new target for Kaiso at the centrosomes and spindle microtubules during mitosis. They also strongly imply that Kaiso's function as a transcriptional regulator might be linked to the control of the cell cycle and to cell proliferation in cancer

  19. Variation in sensitivity to. gamma. -ray-induced chromosomal aberrations during the mitotic cycle of the sea urchin egg

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Y.; Nakamura, I.; Shiroya, T.

    1982-11-01

    Sea urchin eggs were irradiated with /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays at various stages of the mitotic cycle, and chromosomal aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis and embryonic abnormalities at later developmental stages were examined. The radiosensitivity of the eggs to both endpoints varied in parallel with the mitotic stage at the time of irradiation, suggesting a possible relationship between chromosomal damage and embryonic abnormalities.

  20. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Verbakel, Werner; Carmeliet, Geert; Engelborghs, Yves

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. {yields} This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. {yields} NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. {yields} The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase Nu

  1. Using Automated Image Analysis Algorithms to Distinguish Normal, Aberrant, and Degenerate Mitotic Figures Induced by Eg5 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Alison L; Klein, Stephanie K; Davies, Barry; Williams, Leigh; Rudmann, Daniel G

    2016-07-01

    Modulation of the cell cycle may underlie the toxicologic or pharmacologic responses of a potential therapeutic agent and contributes to decisions on its preclinical and clinical safety and efficacy. The descriptive and quantitative assessment of normal, aberrant, and degenerate mitotic figures in tissue sections is an important end point characterizing the effect of xenobiotics on the cell cycle. Historically, pathologists used manual counting and special staining visualization techniques such as immunohistochemistry for quantification of normal, aberrant, and degenerate mitotic figures. We designed an automated image analysis algorithm for measuring these mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections. Algorithm validation methods used data generated from a subcutaneous human transitional cell carcinoma xenograft model in nude rats treated with the cell cycle inhibitor Eg5. In these studies, we scanned and digitized H&E-stained xenografts and applied a complex ruleset of sequential mathematical filters and shape discriminators for classification of cell populations demonstrating normal, aberrant, or degenerate mitotic figures. The resultant classification system enabled the representations of three identifiable degrees of morphological change associated with tumor differentiation and compound effects. The numbers of mitotic figure variants and mitotic indices data generated corresponded to a manual assessment by a pathologist and supported automated algorithm verification and application for both efficacy and toxicity studies. PMID:26936079

  2. Growth and lability of Chaetopterus oocyte mitotic spindles isolated in the presence of porcine brain tubulin.

    PubMed

    Inoué, S; Borisy, G G; Kiehart, D P

    1974-07-01

    Purified tubulin solutions stabilized and augmented the birefringence (BR) of isolated Chaetopterus spindles. Tubulin was extracted from pig brain tissue in cold PEG buffer (0.1 M piperazine-N-N'-bis[2-ethane sulfonic acid], 1 mM ethylene bis-[oxyethylenenitrilo]tetraacetate, [EGTA], 2.5 mM guanosine triphosphate, [GTP], pH 6.94, at 25 degrees C), and purified by two cycles of a reversible, temperature-dependent assembly-disassembly procedure. The spindle BR of the meiotic metaphase-arrested oocytes of Chaetopterus decreased linearly at a rate of 1.5 nm/min when perfused with PEG buffer without tubulin. In this hypotonic, calcium-chelating solution, the cell lysed within 1.5 min, and after a brief, transient rise, the BR disappeared in ca. 4 min from the time of buffer application. Cells perfused with tubulin in PEG buffer also showed BR decay at the same rate until cell lysis. Immediately upon cell lysis the spindle BR increased, initially at ca. 2.3 nm/min and then more slowly until the BR attained or exceeded intact cell values. Spindle and asters grew considerably larger than those in intact cells. From the kinetics of the transient BR increase after lysis, we infer that, initially, Chaetopterus cytoplasmic tubulin contributes to increased BR; further augmentation required added pig brain tubulin and most probably reflects the addition and incorporation of heterologous porcine tubulin into the spindle and asters. Isolated, augmented spindles depolymerized rapidly at 6 degrees C. Upon return to 23 degrees C, spindle BR returned slowly in tubulin-PEG. The BR of the isolates also decayed in solutions containing calcium ions 2.5 mM in excess of the EGTA. However, the isolates did not respond, or responded very slowly, to 1 mM colchicine or Colcemid and to dilution of tubulin with PEG solution. Microinjection into Chaetopterus oocytes of tubulin-PEG, but not PEG alone, enhanced spindle and aster BR which reversibly disappeared upon chilling the cell. PMID:4407048

  3. Measurements of forces produced by the mitotic spindle using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Ferraro-Gideon, Jessica; Sheykhani, Rozhan; Zhu, Qingyuan; Duquette, Michelle L; Berns, Michael W; Forer, Arthur

    2013-05-01

    We used a trapping laser to stop chromosome movements in Mesostoma and crane-fly spermatocytes and inward movements of spindle poles after laser cuts across Potorous tridactylus (rat kangaroo) kidney (PtK2) cell half-spindles. Mesostoma spermatocyte kinetochores execute oscillatory movements to and away from the spindle pole for 1-2 h, so we could trap kinetochores multiple times in the same spermatocyte. The trap was focused to a single point using a 63× oil immersion objective. Trap powers of 15-23 mW caused kinetochore oscillations to stop or decrease. Kinetochore oscillations resumed when the trap was released. In crane-fly spermatocytes trap powers of 56-85 mW stopped or slowed poleward chromosome movement. In PtK2 cells 8-mW trap power stopped the spindle pole from moving toward the equator. Forces in the traps were calculated using the equation F = Q'P/c, where P is the laser power and c is the speed of light. Use of appropriate Q' coefficients gave the forces for stopping pole movements as 0.3-2.3 pN and for stopping chromosome movements in Mesostoma spermatocytes and crane-fly spermatocytes as 2-3 and 6-10 pN, respectively. These forces are close to theoretical calculations of forces causing chromosome movements but 100 times lower than the 700 pN measured previously in grasshopper spermatocytes. PMID:23485565

  4. Measurements of forces produced by the mitotic spindle using optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro-Gideon, Jessica; Sheykhani, Rozhan; Zhu, Qingyuan; Duquette, Michelle L.; Berns, Michael W.; Forer, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    We used a trapping laser to stop chromosome movements in Mesostoma and crane-fly spermatocytes and inward movements of spindle poles after laser cuts across Potorous tridactylus (rat kangaroo) kidney (PtK2) cell half-spindles. Mesostoma spermatocyte kinetochores execute oscillatory movements to and away from the spindle pole for 1–2 h, so we could trap kinetochores multiple times in the same spermatocyte. The trap was focused to a single point using a 63× oil immersion objective. Trap powers of 15–23 mW caused kinetochore oscillations to stop or decrease. Kinetochore oscillations resumed when the trap was released. In crane-fly spermatocytes trap powers of 56–85 mW stopped or slowed poleward chromosome movement. In PtK2 cells 8-mW trap power stopped the spindle pole from moving toward the equator. Forces in the traps were calculated using the equation F = Q′P/c, where P is the laser power and c is the speed of light. Use of appropriate Q′ coefficients gave the forces for stopping pole movements as 0.3–2.3 pN and for stopping chromosome movements in Mesostoma spermatocytes and crane-fly spermatocytes as 2–3 and 6–10 pN, respectively. These forces are close to theoretical calculations of forces causing chromosome movements but 100 times lower than the 700 pN measured previously in grasshopper spermatocytes. PMID:23485565

  5. Disabling the mitotic spindle and tumor growth by targeting a cavity-induced allosteric site of survivin

    PubMed Central

    Berezov, A; Cai, Z; Freudenberg, JA; Zhang, H; Cheng, X; Thompson, T; Murali, R; Greene, MI; Wang, Q

    2012-01-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family and has an essential role in mitosis. Survivin is overexpressed in a large variety of human cancers and represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Epidermal growth factor receptor and Her/neu-transformed human tumors in particular exhibit high levels of survivin. The survivin protein forms dimers through a conserved region that is critical for subcellular localization and biological functions of the protein. We identified small molecules that target a specific cavity adjacent to the survivin dimerization surfaces. S12, a lead compound identified in the screen, can bind to the survivin protein at the intended target site. Moreover, S12 alters spindle formation, causing mitotic arrest and cell death, and inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Cell death occurs in premetaphase stage following mitotic arrest and is not a consequence of general toxicity. Thus, the study validates a novel therapeutic target site in the survivin protein and provides a promising strategy to develop a new class of therapeutic small molecules for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:21892210

  6. Synergistic effect of isopropanol on induction of mitotic aberrations in Allium cepa

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, S.; Meier, J.R.; Smith, M.K.; Torsella, J.

    1995-12-31

    Soil from a site heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and several other organic and inorganic compounds was remediated by treatment with a mobile solvent extraction system. The genotoxicity of the soil, as measured by the induction of anaphase aberrations in Allium cepa root tip cells, increased after the remediation process. This increase appeared to be due to synergism between the residual solvent and genotoxic components not removed by the solvent extraction process. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether isopropanol, at concentrations similar to residual amounts following remediation, induced a synergistic response with the known clastogen, 4-nitroquinoline n-oxide (4-NQO). Bulblets of Allium cepa (common onion) were exposed for 24 h to varying concentrations of isopropanol combined with 0.10 mg/14-NQO in aqueous solution. The root tips were examined for mitotic index (MI), and cells in late anaphase/early telophase were scored for mitotic aberrations (MA, i.e., bridges, fragments, and lagging chromosomes). MI and MA frequencies were transformed by the arcsin square root function prior to statistical analysis (ANOVA). Isopropanol by itself did not induce MA and did not affect the Ml, either alone or in combination with 4-NQO. However, isopropanol enhanced the 4-NQO induced MA response by 1.4 fold at 1.0 mg/ml (p-value = 0.13) and 2.0 fold at 1.2 mg/ml (p-value = 0.006). Lower concentrations of 0.3 and 0.1 mg/ml isopropanol had no effect. The results demonstrate that residual solvents can increase the genotoxicity of soils, presumably as a result of enhancing the bioavailability of genotoxic components.

  7. Synergistic effect of isopropanol on induction of mitotic aberrations in Allium cepa

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, S.; Meier, J.R.; Smith, M.K.

    1995-12-31

    Soil from a site heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and several other organic and inorganic compounds was remediated by treatment with a mobile solvent extraction system. The genotoxicity of the soil, as measured by the induction of anaphase aberrations in Allium cepa root tip cells, increased after the remediation process. This increase appeared to be due to synergism between the residual solvent and genotoxic components not removed by the solvent extraction process. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether isopropanol, at concentrations similar to residual amounts following remediation, induced a synergistic response with the known clastogen, 4-nitroquinoline n-oxide (4-NQO). Bulblets of Allium cepa (common onion) were exposed for 24 h to varying concentrations of isopropanol combined with 0.10 g/l 4-NQO in aqueous solution. The root tips were examined for mitotic index (MI), and cells in late anaphase/early telophase were scored for mitotic aberrations. MI and MA frequencies were transformed by the arcsin square root function prior to statistical analysis (ANOVA). Isopropanol by itself did not induce MA and did not affect the MI, either alone or in combination with 4-NQO. However, isopropanol enhanced the 4-NQO-induced MA response by 1.4 fold at 1.0 mg/ml (p-value = 0.13) and 2.0 fold at 1.2 mg/ml (p-value = 0.006). Lower concentrations of 0.3 and 0.1 mg/ml isopropanol had no effect. The results demonstrate that residual solvents can increase the genotoxicity of soils, presumably as a result of enhancing the bioavailability of genotoxic components.

  8. A splicing alteration of 4.1R pre-mRNA generates 2 protein isoforms with distinct assembly to spindle poles in mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Delhommeau, François; Vasseur-Godbillon, Corinne; Leclerc, Philippe; Schischmanoff, Pierre-Olivier; Croisille, Laure; Rince, Patricia; Morinière, Madeleine; Benz, Edward J; Tchernia, Gil; Tamagnini, Gabriel; Ribeiro, Leticia; Delaunay, Jean; Baklouti, Faouzi

    2002-10-01

    The C-terminal region of erythroid cytoskeletal protein 4.1R, encoded by exons 20 and 21, contains a binding site for nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), a protein needed for the formation and stabilization of the mitotic spindle. We have previously described a splicing mutation of 4.1R that yields 2 isoforms: One, CO.1, lacks most of exon 20-encoded peptide and carries a missense C-terminal sequence. The other, CO.2, lacks exon 20-encoded C-terminal sequence, but retains the normal exon 21-encoded C-terminal sequence. Knowing that both shortened proteins are expressed in red cells and assemble to the membrane skeleton, we asked whether they would ensure 4.1R mitotic function in dividing cells. We show here that CO.2, but not CO.1, assembles to spindle poles, and colocalizes with NuMA in erythroid and lymphoid mutated cells, but none of these isoforms interact with NuMA in vitro. In microtubule-destabilizing conditions, again only CO.2 localizes to the centrosomes. These data suggest that the stability of 4.1R association with centrosomes requires an intact C-terminal end, either for a proper conformation of the protein, for a direct binding to an unknown centrosome-cytoskeletal network, or for both. We also found that 4.1G, a ubiquitous homolog of 4.1R, is present in mutated as well as control cells and that its C-terminal region binds efficiently to NuMA, suggesting that in fact mitotic spindles host a mixture of the two 4.1 family members. These findings led to the postulate that the coexpression at the spindle poles of 2 related proteins, 4.1R and 4.1G, might reflect a functional redundancy in mitotic cells. PMID:12239178

  9. A novel strategy for targeted killing of tumor cells: Induction of multipolar acentrosomal mitotic spindles with a quinazolinone derivative mdivi-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingnan; Li, Jianfeng; Santana-Santos, Lucas; Shuda, Masahiro; Sobol, Robert W; Van Houten, Bennett; Qian, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Traditional antimitotic drugs for cancer chemotherapy often have undesired toxicities to healthy tissues, limiting their clinical application. Developing novel agents that specifically target tumor cell mitosis is needed to minimize the toxicity and improve the efficacy of this class of anticancer drugs. We discovered that mdivi-1 (mitochondrial division inhibitor-1), which was originally reported as an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, specifically disrupts M phase cell cycle progression only in human tumor cells, but not in non-transformed fibroblasts or epithelial cells. The antimitotic effect of mdivi-1 is Drp1 independent, as mdivi-1 induces M phase abnormalities in both Drp1 wild-type and Drp1 knockout SV40-immortalized/transformed MEF cells. We also identified that the tumor transformation process required for the antimitotic effect of mdivi-1 is downstream of SV40 large T and small t antigens, but not hTERT-mediated immortalization. Mdivi-1 induces multipolar mitotic spindles in tumor cells regardless of their centrosome numbers. Acentrosomal spindle poles, which do not contain the bona-fide centrosome components γ-tubulin and centrin-2, were found to contribute to the spindle multipolarity induced by mdivi-1. Gene expression profiling revealed that the genes involved in oocyte meiosis and assembly of acentrosomal microtubules are highly expressed in tumor cells. We further identified that tumor cells have enhanced activity in the nucleation and assembly of acentrosomal kinetochore-attaching microtubules. Mdivi-1 inhibited the integration of acentrosomal microtubule-organizing centers into centrosomal asters, resulting in the development of acentrosomal mitotic spindles preferentially in tumor cells. The formation of multipolar acentrosomal spindles leads to gross genome instability and Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis. Taken together, our studies indicate that inducing multipolar spindles composing of acentrosomal poles in mitosis could achieve

  10. The Catastrophe-promoting Activity of Ectopic Op18/Stathmin Is Required for Disruption of Mitotic Spindles But Not Interphase Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Per; Larsson, Niklas; Segerman, Bo; Howell, Bonnie; Morabito, Justin; Cassimeris, Lynne; Gullberg, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Oncoprotein18/stathmin (Op18) is a microtubule (MT) destabilizing protein that is inactivated during mitosis by phosphorylation at four Ser-residues. Op18 has at least two functions; the N-terminal region is required for catastrophe-promotion (i.e., transition from elongation to shortening), while the C-terminal region is required to inhibit MT-polymerization rate in vitro. We show here that a “pseudophosphorylation” derivative of Op18 (i.e., four Ser- to Glu-substitutions at phosphorylation sites) exhibits a selective loss of catastrophe-promoting activity. This is contrasted to authentic phosphorylation, which efficiently attenuates all activities except tubulin binding. In intact cells, overexpression of pseudophosphorylated Op18, which is not phosphorylated by endogenous kinases, is shown to destabilize interphase MTs but to leave spindle formation untouched. To test if the mitotic spindle is sensitive only to the catastrophe-promoting activity of Op18 and resistant to C-terminally associated activities, N- and C-terminal truncations with defined activity-profiles were employed. The cell-cycle phenotypes of nonphosphorylatable mutants (i.e., four Ser- to Ala-substitutions) of these truncation derivatives demonstrated that catastrophe promotion is required for interference with the mitotic spindle, while the C-terminally associated activities are sufficient to destabilize interphase MTs. These results demonstrate that specific Op18 derivatives with defined activity-profiles can be used as probes to distinguish interphase and mitotic MTs. PMID:11160824

  11. Kid, a novel kinesin-like DNA binding protein, is localized to chromosomes and the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Tokai, N; Fujimoto-Nishiyama, A; Toyoshima, Y; Yonemura, S; Tsukita, S; Inoue, J; Yamamota, T

    1996-02-01

    Microtubule-associated motor proteins are thought to be involved in spindle formation and chromosome movements in mitosis/meiosis. We have molecularly cloned cDNAs for a gene that codes for a novel member of the kinesin family of proteins. Nucleotide sequencing reveals that the predicted gene product is a 73 kDa protein and is related to some extent to the Drosophila node gene product, which is involved in chromosomal segregation during meiosis. A sequence similar to the microtubule binding motor domain of kinesin is present in the N-terminal half of the protein, and its ability to bind to microtubules is demonstrated. Furthermore we show that its C-terminal half contains a putative nuclear localization signal similar to that of Jun and is able to bind to DNA. Accordingly, the protein was termed Kid (kinesin-like DNA binding protein). Indirect immunofluorescence studies show that Kid colocalizes with mitotic chromosomes and that it is enriched in the kinetochore at anaphase. Thus, we propose that Kid might play a role(s) in regulating the chromosomal movement along microtubules during mitosis. PMID:8599929

  12. The mesh is a network of microtubule connectors that stabilizes individual kinetochore fibers of the mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Faye M; Gutiérrez-Caballero, Cristina; Hood, Fiona E; Booth, Daniel G; Prior, Ian A; Royle, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Kinetochore fibers (K-fibers) of the mitotic spindle are force-generating units that power chromosome movement during mitosis. K-fibers are composed of many microtubules that are held together throughout their length. Here, we show, using 3D electron microscopy, that K-fiber microtubules (MTs) are connected by a network of MT connectors. We term this network ‘the mesh’. The K-fiber mesh is made of linked multipolar connectors. Each connector has up to four struts, so that a single connector can link up to four MTs. Molecular manipulation of the mesh by overexpression of TACC3 causes disorganization of the K-fiber MTs. Optimal stabilization of K-fibers by the mesh is required for normal progression through mitosis. We propose that the mesh stabilizes K-fibers by pulling MTs together and thereby maintaining the integrity of the fiber. Our work thus identifies the K-fiber meshwork of linked multipolar connectors as a key integrator and determinant of K-fiber structure and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07635.001 PMID:26090906

  13. Functional interaction between dynein light chain and intermediate chain is required for mitotic spindle positioning

    PubMed Central

    Stuchell-Brereton, Melissa D.; Siglin, Amanda; Li, Jun; Moore, Jeffrey K.; Ahmed, Shubbir; Williams, John C.; Cooper, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a large multisubunit complex involved in retrograde transport and the positioning of various organelles. Dynein light chain (LC) subunits are conserved across species; however, the molecular contribution of LCs to dynein function remains controversial. One model suggests that LCs act as cargo-binding scaffolds. Alternatively, LCs are proposed to stabilize the intermediate chains (ICs) of the dynein complex. To examine the role of LCs in dynein function, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which the sole function of dynein is to position the spindle during mitosis. We report that the LC8 homologue, Dyn2, localizes with the dynein complex at microtubule ends and interacts directly with the yeast IC, Pac11. We identify two Dyn2-binding sites in Pac11 that exert differential effects on Dyn2-binding and dynein function. Mutations disrupting Dyn2 elicit a partial loss-of-dynein phenotype and impair the recruitment of the dynein activator complex, dynactin. Together these results indicate that the dynein-based function of Dyn2 is via its interaction with the dynein IC and that this interaction is important for the interaction of dynein and dynactin. In addition, these data provide the first direct evidence that LC occupancy in the dynein motor complex is important for function. PMID:21633107

  14. Genetic variation in the major mitotic checkpoint genes associated with chromosomal aberrations in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Försti, Asta; Frank, Christoph; Smolkova, Bozena; Kazimirova, Alena; Barancokova, Magdalena; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Kroupa, Michal; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodickova, Ludmila; Buchancova, Janka; Dusinska, Maria; Musak, Ludovit; Vodicka, Pavel; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-10-01

    Non-specific chromosomal aberrations (CAs) are microscopically detected in about 1% of lymphocytes drawn from healthy persons. Causes of CAs in general population are not known but they may be related to risk of cancer. In view of the importance of the mitotic checkpoint machinery on maintaining chromosomal integrity we selected 9 variants in main checkpoint related genes (BUB1B, BUB3, MAD2L1, CENPF, ESPL1/separase, NEK2, PTTG1/securin, ZWILCH and ZWINT) for a genotyping study on samples from healthy individuals (N = 330 to 729) whose lymphocytes had an increased number of CAs compared to persons with a low number of CAs. Genetic variation in individual genes played a minor importance, consistent with the high conservation and selection pressure of the checkpoint system. However, gene pairs were significantly associated with CAs: PTTG1-ZWILCH and PTTG1-ZWINT. MAD2L1 and PTTG1 were the most common partners in any of the two-way interactions. The results suggest that interactions at the level of cohesin (PTTG1) and kinetochore function (ZWINT, ZWILCH and MAD2L1) contribute to the frequency of CAs, suggesting that gene variants at different checkpoint functions appeared to be required for the formation of CAs. PMID:27424524

  15. Identification and characterization of INMAP, a novel interphase nucleus and mitotic apparatus protein that is involved in spindle formation and cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Enzhi; Lei, Yan; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yanbo; Song, Chunqing; Marc, Jan; Wang, Yongchao; Sun, Le; Liang, Qianjin

    2009-04-15

    A novel protein that associates with interphase nucleus and mitotic apparatus (INMAP) was identified by screening HeLa cDNA expression library with an autoimmune serum followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Its complete cDNA sequence of 1.818 kb encodes 343 amino acids with predicted molecular mass of 38.2 kDa and numerous phosphorylation sites. The sequence is identical with nucleotides 1-1800 bp of an unnamed gene (GenBank accession no. (7022388)) and highly homologous with the 3'-terminal sequence of POLR3B. A monoclonal antibody against INMAP reacted with similar proteins in S. cerevisiae, Mel and HeLa cells, suggesting that it is a conserved protein. Confocal microscopy using either GFP-INMAP fusion protein or labeling with the monoclonal antibody revealed that the protein localizes as distinct dots in the interphase nucleus, but during mitosis associates closely with the spindle. Double immunolabeling using specific antibodies showed that the INMAP co-localizes with {alpha}-tubulin, {gamma}-tubulin, and NuMA. INMAP also co-immunoprecipitated with these proteins in their native state. Stable overexpression of INMAP in HeLa cell lines leads to defects in the spindle, mitotic arrest, formation of polycentrosomal and multinuclear cells, inhibition of growth, and apoptosis. We propose that INMAP is a novel protein that plays essential role in spindle formation and cell-cycle progression.

  16. Chemically diverse microtubule stabilizing agents initiate distinct mitotic defects and dysregulated expression of key mitotic kinases.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Cristina C; Peng, Jiangnan; Johnson, Tyler A; Crews, Phillip; Mooberry, Susan L

    2013-04-15

    Microtubule stabilizers are some of the most successful drugs used in the treatment of adult solid tumors and yet the molecular events responsible for their antimitotic actions are not well defined. The mitotic events initiated by three structurally and biologically diverse microtubule stabilizers; taccalonolide AJ, laulimalide/fijianolide B and paclitaxel were studied. These microtubule stabilizers cause the formation of aberrant, but structurally distinct mitotic spindles leading to the hypothesis that they differentially affect mitotic signaling. Each microtubule stabilizer initiated different patterns of expression of key mitotic signaling proteins. Taccalonolide AJ causes centrosome separation and disjunction failure to a much greater extent than paclitaxel or laulimalide, which is consistent with the distinct defects in expression and activation of Plk1 and Eg5 caused by each stabilizer. Localization studies revealed that TPX2 and Aurora A are associated with each spindle aster formed by each stabilizer. This suggests a common mechanism of aster formation. However, taccalonolide AJ also causes pericentrin accumulation on every spindle aster. The presence of pericentrin at every spindle aster initiated by taccalonolide AJ might facilitate the maintenance and stability of the highly focused asters formed by this stabilizer. Laulimalide and paclitaxel cause completely different patterns of expression and activation of these proteins, as well as phenotypically different spindle phenotypes. Delineating how diverse microtubule stabilizers affect mitotic signaling pathways could identify key proteins involved in modulating sensitivity and resistance to the antimitotic actions of these compounds. PMID:23399639

  17. Expression analysis of mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in breast carcinoma: role of NDC80/HEC1 in early breast tumorigenicity, and a two-gene signature for aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aneuploidy and chromosomal instability (CIN) are common abnormalities in human cancer. Alterations of the mitotic spindle checkpoint are likely to contribute to these phenotypes, but little is known about somatic alterations of mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in breast cancer. Methods To obtain further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying aneuploidy in breast cancer, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to quantify the mRNA expression of 76 selected mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in a large panel of breast tumor samples. Results The expression of 49 (64.5%) of the 76 genes was significantly dysregulated in breast tumors compared to normal breast tissues: 40 genes were upregulated and 9 were downregulated. Most of these changes in gene expression during malignant transformation were observed in epithelial cells. Alterations of nine of these genes, and particularly NDC80, were also detected in benign breast tumors, indicating that they may be involved in pre-neoplastic processes. We also identified a two-gene expression signature (PLK1 + AURKA) which discriminated between DNA aneuploid and DNA diploid breast tumor samples. Interestingly, some DNA tetraploid tumor samples failed to cluster with DNA aneuploid breast tumors. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of previously characterized genes and identifies novel candidate genes that could be activated for aneuploidy to occur. Further functional analyses are required to clearly confirm the role of these new identified genes in the molecular mechanisms involved in breast cancer aneuploidy. The novel genes identified here, and/or the two-gene expression signature, might serve as diagnostic or prognostic markers and form the basis for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21352579

  18. Pancreatic cancer cells retain the epithelial-related phenotype and modify mitotic spindle microtubules after the administration of ukrain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, Nicoletta; Volpari, Tatiana; Clerici, Marco; Pettinari, Letizia; Barajon, Isabella; Portinaro, Nicola; Colombo, Graziano; Milzani, Aldo; Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Martinelli, Carla

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the phenotype of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells in relation to the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and determine whether ukrain, an anticancer drug based on the alkaloids extracted from greater celandine, modulates in vitro the malignant behavior of PDAC cells in order to extend our understanding of its therapeutic potential. Three cell lines (HPAF-II, HPAC, and PL45) were treated with ukrain (5, 10, and 20 μmol/l) for 48 h or left untreated (control). Cell proliferation was assessed by growth curves. Apoptosis was determined by Hoechst nuclear staining and by cytochrome c and caspase-8 expressions. The EMT markers E-cadherin, β-catenin, and vimentin, as well as actin and tubulin cytoskeletons, were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Interphase and mitotic microtubules as well as abnormal mitotic figures were studied by fluorescence microscopy after tubulin immunolabeling. Ukrain strongly suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis possibly through an extrinsic pathway as cytochrome c immunoreactivity suggested that the integrity of the mitochondria was not affected. Tubulin expression indicated an antiproliferative effect of ukrain on the basis of alterations in mitotic spindle microtubule dynamics, leading to abnormal mitosis. Membranous E-cadherin/β-catenin immunoreactivity was similarly expressed in control-treated and ukrain-treated cells, although the drug upregulated E-cadherin in cell lysates. Our results suggest that ukrain exerts its chemotherapeutic action on PDAC cells targeting mitotic spindle microtubules, leading to abnormal mitosis and apoptosis, and favoring cell cohesiveness. The differentiated epithelial phenotype of HPAF-II, HPAC, and PL45 cell lines concomitant with a highly invasive potential suggests that further experiments will be necessary to definitively clarify the role of EMT in PDAC progression. PMID:22700003

  19. The chromokinesin Kid is necessary for chromosome arm orientation and oscillation, but not congression, on mitotic spindles

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Aime A.; Compton, Duane A.

    2001-01-01

    Chromokinesins have been postulated to provide the polar ejection force needed for chromosome congression during mitosis. We have evaluated that possibility by monitoring chromosome movement in vertebrate-cultured cells using time-lapse differential interference contrast microscopy after microinjection with antibodies specific for the chromokinesin Kid. 17.5% of cells injected with Kid-specific antibodies have one or more chromosomes that remain closely opposed to a spindle pole and fail to enter anaphase. In contrast, 82.5% of injected cells align chromosomes in metaphase, progress to anaphase, and display chromosome velocities not significantly different from control cells. However, injected cells lack chromosome oscillations, and chromosome orientation is atypical because chromosome arms extend toward spindle poles during both congression and metaphase. Furthermore, chromosomes cluster into a mass and fail to oscillate when Kid is perturbed in cells containing monopolar spindles. These data indicate that Kid generates the polar ejection force that pushes chromosome arms away from spindle poles in vertebrate-cultured cells. This force increases the efficiency with which chromosomes make bipolar spindle attachments and regulates kinetochore activities necessary for chromosome oscillation, but is not essential for chromosome congression. PMID:11564754

  20. Morphogenesis of the mitotic and meiotic spindle: Conclusions obtained from one system are not necessarily applicable to the other

    SciTech Connect

    Rieder, C.L.; Ault, J.G.; Eichenlaub-Ritter, U.; Sluder, G.

    1993-12-31

    Chromosome distribution during both mitosis and meiosis is effected by the {open_quotes}spindle{close_quotes}, a complex ensemble formed from an interaction between chromosomes and microtubules (MTs). One of the most important characteristics of the spindle is its bipolar structure, established as it forms during prometaphase, which ensures that the replicated chromosomes are segregated equivalently to two daughter cells. A major goal of cell division research is to understand the mechanism of spindle morphogenesis and how bipolarity is established. Because they are relatively flat and easily obtained year-round, spermatocytes, especially those from insects, have been a favored material for the study of animal cell division since the process was first described by Flemming in the late 1800`s. Like living cultured cells, spindle formation in spermatocytes can be detailed by all forms of light microscopy (LM), and cells followed in vivo can be fixed and processed for a subsequent analysis with the electron microscope (EM). Unfortunately, with the exception of a few marine organisms, the large size and opaque nature of most oocytes impedes a detailed analysis of their meiosis in vivo. As a result, information regarding spindle formation and function during meiosis in oocytes is typically derived from EM or immunofluorescent (IMF) studies of fixed cells or cell-free oocyte extracts.

  1. From proto-mitosis to mitosis — An alternative hypothesis on the origin and evolution of the mitotic spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, U.-P.

    1984-03-01

    Based on the assumption that the ancestral proto-eukaryote evolved from an ameboid prokarybte I propose the hypothesis that nuclear division of the proto-eukaryote was effected by the same system of contractile filaments it used for ameboid movement and cytosis. When the nuclear membranes evolved from the cell membrane, contractile filaments remained associated with them. The attachment site of the genome in the nuclear envelope was linked to the cell membrane by specialized contractile filaments. During protomitosis, i.e., nuclear and cell division of the proto-eukaryote, these filaments performed segregation of the chromosomes, whereas others constricted and cleaved the nucleus and the mother cell. When microtubules (MTs) had evolved in the cytoplasm, they also became engaged in nuclear division. Initially, an extranuolear bundle of MTs assisted chromosome segregation by establishing a defined axis. The evolutionary tendency then was towards an increasingly important role for MTs. Spindle pole bodies (SPBs) developed from the chromosomal attachment sites in the nuclear envelope and organized an extranuclear central spindle. The chromosomes remained attached to the SPBs during nuclear division. In a subsequent step the spindle became permanently lodged inside the nucleus. Chromosomes detached from the SPBs and acquired kinetochores and kinetochore-MTs. At first, this spindle segregated chromosomes by elongation, the kinetochore-MTs playing the role of static anchors. Later, spindle elongation was supplemented by poleward movement of the chromosomes. When dissolution of the nuclear envelope at the beginning of mitosis became a permanent feature, the open spindle of higher eukaryotes was born.

  2. mini spindles

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, C. Fiona; Deák, Peter; Glover, David M.; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    We describe a new Drosophila gene, mini spindles (msps) identified in a cytological screen for mitotic mutant. Mutation in msps disrupts the structural integrity of the mitotic spindle, resulting in the formation of one or more small additional spindles in diploid cells. Nucleation of microtubules from centrosomes, metaphase alignment of chromosomes, or the focusing of spindle poles appears much less affected. The msps gene encodes a 227-kD protein with high similarity to the vertebrate microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), human TOGp and Xenopus XMAP215, and with limited similarity to the Dis1 and STU2 proteins from fission yeast and budding yeast. Consistent with their sequence similarity, Msps protein also associates with microtubules in vitro. In the embryonic division cycles, Msps protein localizes to centrosomal regions at all mitotic stages, and spreads over the spindles during metaphase and anaphase. The absence of centrosomal staining in interphase of the cellularized embryos suggests that the interactions between Msps protein and microtubules or centrosomes may be regulated during the cell cycle. PMID:10477755

  3. A point mutation to Galphai selectively blocks GoLoco motif binding: direct evidence for Galpha.GoLoco complexes in mitotic spindle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Willard, Francis S; Zheng, Zhen; Guo, Juan; Digby, Gregory J; Kimple, Adam J; Conley, Jason M; Johnston, Christopher A; Bosch, Dustin; Willard, Melinda D; Watts, Val J; Lambert, Nevin A; Ikeda, Stephen R; Du, Quansheng; Siderovski, David P

    2008-12-26

    Heterotrimeric G-protein Galpha subunits and GoLoco motif proteins are key members of a conserved set of regulatory proteins that influence invertebrate asymmetric cell division and vertebrate neuroepithelium and epithelial progenitor differentiation. GoLoco motif proteins bind selectively to the inhibitory subclass (Galphai) of Galpha subunits, and thus it is assumed that a Galphai.GoLoco motif protein complex plays a direct functional role in microtubule dynamics underlying spindle orientation and metaphase chromosomal segregation during cell division. To address this hypothesis directly, we rationally identified a point mutation to Galphai subunits that renders a selective loss-of-function for GoLoco motif binding, namely an asparagine-to-isoleucine substitution in the alphaD-alphaE loop of the Galpha helical domain. This GoLoco-insensitivity ("GLi") mutation prevented Galphai1 association with all human GoLoco motif proteins and abrogated interaction between the Caenorhabditis elegans Galpha subunit GOA-1 and the GPR-1 GoLoco motif. In contrast, the GLi mutation did not perturb any other biochemical or signaling properties of Galphai subunits, including nucleotide binding, intrinsic and RGS protein-accelerated GTP hydrolysis, and interactions with Gbetagamma dimers, adenylyl cyclase, and seven transmembrane-domain receptors. GoLoco insensitivity rendered Galphai subunits unable to recruit GoLoco motif proteins such as GPSM2/LGN and GPSM3 to the plasma membrane, and abrogated the exaggerated mitotic spindle rocking normally seen upon ectopic expression of wild type Galphai subunits in kidney epithelial cells. This GLi mutation should prove valuable in establishing the physiological roles of Galphai.GoLoco motif protein complexes in microtubule dynamics and spindle function during cell division as well as to delineate potential roles for GoLoco motifs in receptor-mediated signal transduction. PMID:18984596

  4. Dose-response of x-ray-induced anaphase aberrations in the mitotic root tip chromosomes of allium

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.H.; Lee, K.H.; Kong, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    A simplified Allium root mitotic chromosome aberration assay by using only the aberrant anaphases (fragments, laggards and bridges) as the end-points were developed by Rank and Nielsen (1993) for screening water soluble chemicals and complex mixtures. A dose-response curve was established by Meir et al., (1994) using a known clastogen, 4-nitroquinolene-N-oxide between the dose range of 0.1-0.5 ug/ml. In order to further validate this assay for clastogen detection, a series of X-ray dose response experiments was carried out. Allium roots were germinated in tapwater for 48 h and treated with a series of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 R (80 Kvp, 5 ma, dose rate 60 R/min) dosages. After an 18 hr recovery time, the root tips were hydrolyzed in 45% acetic and 1 N HC1 acid (9:1 ratio) solution under 50{degrees} C for 5 min and stained with aceto-carmine. Each of the data points were derived from scoring 7-10 slides (15-50 anaphases/slide). The corrrelation coefficient, slope and intercept values of the dose-response curve are: 0.954, 0.515 and 1.155 respectively.

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced mitotic disruption⋆

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, L.M.; Hubbs, A.F.; Young, S.-H.; Kashon, M.L.; Dinu, C.Z.; Salisbury, J.L.; Benkovic, S.A.; Lowry, D.T.; Murray, A.R.; Kisin, E.R.; Siegrist, K.J.; Battelli, L.; Mastovich, J.; Sturgeon, J.L.; Bunker, K.L.; Shvedova, A.A.; Reynolds, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were among the earliest products of nanotechnology and have many potential applications in medicine, electronics, and manufacturing. The low density, small size, and biological persistence of carbon nanotubes create challenges for exposure control and monitoring and make respiratory exposures to workers likely. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to 24, 48 and 96 μg/cm2 single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). To investigate mitotic spindle aberrations at concentrations anticipated in exposed workers, primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells were exposed to SWCNT for 24–72 h at doses equivalent to 20 weeks of exposure at the Permissible Exposure Limit for particulates not otherwise regulated. We have now demonstrated fragmented centrosomes, disrupted mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number at those doses. The data further demonstrated multipolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of the disrupted mitoses. The increased multipolar mitotic spindles were associated with an increased number of cells in the G2 phase of mitosis, indicating a mitotic checkpoint response. Nanotubes were observed in association with mitotic spindle microtubules, the centrosomes and condensed chromatin in cells exposed to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 μg/cm2 SWCNT. Three-dimensional reconstructions showed carbon nanotubes within the centrosome structure. The lower doses did not cause cytotoxicity or reduction in colony formation after 24 h; however, after three days, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the SWCNT-exposed cells. Colony formation assays showed an increased proliferation seven days after exposure. Our results show significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by SWCNT at occupationally relevant doses. The increased proliferation that was observed in carbon nanotube-exposed cells indicates a greater potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter

  6. Live imaging of spindle pole disorganization in docetaxel-treated multicolor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaushi, Shinji . E-mail: ssaka@biochem.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Nishida, Kumi; Minamikawa, Harumi; Fukada, Takashi; Oka, Shigenori; Sugimoto, Kenji

    2007-06-08

    Treatment of cells with docetaxel at low concentrations induces aberrant bipolar spindles of which two centrosomes stay at only one pole, and also induces multipolar spindles. To gain insight into the relations between centrosome impairment and structural defects of the spindle, live-cell imaging was performed on a human MDA Auro/imp/H3 cell line in which centrosomes/mitotic spindles, nuclear membrane and chromatin were simultaneously visualized by fluorescent proteins. In the presence of docetaxel at IC{sub 50} concentration, the centrosomes did not segregate, and multiple aster-like structures ectopically arose around the disappearing nuclear membrane. Those ectopic structures formed an acentrosomal pole opposing to the two-centrosomes-containing pole. In late metaphase, one pole often fragmented into multiple spindle poles, leading multipolar division. These results suggest that spindle pole fragility may be induced by centrosome impairment, and collapse of the pole may contribute to induction of aneuploid daughter cells.

  7. Mutation Is a Sufficient and Robust Predictor of Genetic Variation for Mitotic Spindle Traits in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Farhadifar, Reza; Ponciano, José Miguel; Andersen, Erik C; Needleman, Daniel J; Baer, Charles F

    2016-08-01

    Different types of phenotypic traits consistently exhibit different levels of genetic variation in natural populations. There are two potential explanations: Either mutation produces genetic variation at different rates or natural selection removes or promotes genetic variation at different rates. Whether mutation or selection is of greater general importance is a longstanding unresolved question in evolutionary genetics. We report mutational variances (VM) for 19 traits related to the first mitotic cell division in Caenorhabditis elegans and compare them to the standing genetic variances (VG) for the same suite of traits in a worldwide collection C. elegans Two robust conclusions emerge. First, the mutational process is highly repeatable: The correlation between VM in two independent sets of mutation accumulation lines is ∼0.9. Second, VM for a trait is a good predictor of VG for that trait: The correlation between VM and VG is ∼0.9. This result is predicted for a population at mutation-selection balance; it is not predicted if balancing selection plays a primary role in maintaining genetic variation. PMID:27334268

  8. Chaetophractus villosus as a sentinel organism: Baseline values of mitotic index, chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Luis Francisco; Luaces, Juan Pablo; Browne, Melanie; Chirino, Mónica Gabriela; Merani, María Susana; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2016-01-15

    Sentinel species are useful tools for studying the deleterious effects of xenobiotics on wildlife. The large hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus villosus) is the most abundant and widely distributed mammal in Argentina. It is a long-lived, omnivorous, burrowing species, with fairly restricted home ranges. To evaluate the level of spontaneous genetic damage in this mammal, we determined the baseline values of several genotoxicity biomarkers. The study included 20 C. villosus adults of both sexes from eight pristine localities within its geographic distribution range. Genotoxicity analysis was performed on 72-h lymphocyte cultures, using mitomycin C as positive control. We obtained the baseline values of mitotic index (MI=10.52±0.30 metaphases/total cells, n=20), chromosome aberrations (CA=0.13±0.22, n=20), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE)=6.55±0.26, n=6) and replication index (RI=1.66, n=6). MI and CA did not show significant differences (P>0.05) among localities or between sexes. No significant differences in MI, CA, SCE, and RI (P>0.05) were found between values from the pristine localities and historical data. There were significant differences in CA, SCE, and RI (P<0.05) between lymphocyte cultures from pristine localities and those exposed to mitomycin C. We propose the large hairy armadillo as a sentinel organism for environmental biomonitoring of genotoxic chemicals due to its abundance, easy manipulation, well-known biology, the fact that it is usually exposed to different mixtures and concentrations of environmental contaminants, and the baseline values of genetic damage characterized by MI, CA, SCE and RI as biomarkers. PMID:26778508

  9. The Clathrin-dependent Spindle Proteome.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sushma R; Flores-Rodriguez, Neftali; Page, Scott L; Wong, Chin; Robinson, Phillip J; Chircop, Megan

    2016-08-01

    The mitotic spindle is required for chromosome congression and subsequent equal segregation of sister chromatids. These processes involve a complex network of signaling molecules located at the spindle. The endocytic protein, clathrin, has a "moonlighting" role during mitosis, whereby it stabilizes the mitotic spindle. The signaling pathways that clathrin participates in to achieve mitotic spindle stability are unknown. Here, we assessed the mitotic spindle proteome and phosphoproteome in clathrin-depleted cells using quantitative MS/MS (data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001603). We report a spindle proteome that consists of 3046 proteins and a spindle phosphoproteome consisting of 5157 phosphosites in 1641 phosphoproteins. Of these, 2908 (95.4%) proteins and 1636 (99.7%) phosphoproteins are known or predicted spindle-associated proteins. Clathrin-depletion from spindles resulted in dysregulation of 121 proteins and perturbed signaling to 47 phosphosites. The majority of these proteins increased in mitotic spindle abundance and six of these were validated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Functional pathway analysis confirmed the reported role of clathrin in mitotic spindle stabilization for chromosome alignment and highlighted possible new mechanisms of clathrin action. The data also revealed a novel second mitotic role for clathrin in bipolar spindle formation. PMID:27174698

  10. Structure-Based Design of Orally Bioavailable 1H-Pyrrolo[3,2-c]pyridine Inhibitors of Mitotic Kinase Monopolar Spindle 1 (MPS1)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The protein kinase MPS1 is a crucial component of the spindle assembly checkpoint signal and is aberrantly overexpressed in many human cancers. MPS1 is one of the top 25 genes overexpressed in tumors with chromosomal instability and aneuploidy. PTEN-deficient breast tumor cells are particularly dependent upon MPS1 for their survival, making it a target of significant interest in oncology. We report the discovery and optimization of potent and selective MPS1 inhibitors based on the 1H-pyrrolo[3,2-c]pyridine scaffold, guided by structure-based design and cellular characterization of MPS1 inhibition, leading to 65 (CCT251455). This potent and selective chemical tool stabilizes an inactive conformation of MPS1 with the activation loop ordered in a manner incompatible with ATP and substrate-peptide binding; it displays a favorable oral pharmacokinetic profile, shows dose-dependent inhibition of MPS1 in an HCT116 human tumor xenograft model, and is an attractive tool compound to elucidate further the therapeutic potential of MPS1 inhibition. PMID:24256217

  11. Methyl-CpG Binding Protein 2 (MeCP2) Localizes at the Centrosome and Is Required for Proper Mitotic Spindle Organization*

    PubMed Central

    Bergo, Anna; Strollo, Marta; Gai, Marta; Barbiero, Isabella; Stefanelli, Gilda; Sertic, Sarah; Cobolli Gigli, Clementina; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in MECP2 cause a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders of which Rett syndrome represents the best defined condition. Both neuronal and non-neuronal functions of the methyl-binding protein underlie the related pathologies. Nowadays MeCP2 is recognized as a multifunctional protein that modulates its activity depending on its protein partners and posttranslational modifications. However, we are still missing a comprehensive understanding of all MeCP2 functions and their involvement in the related pathologies. The study of human mutations often offers the possibility of clarifying the functions of a protein. Therefore, we decided to characterize a novel MeCP2 phospho-isoform (Tyr-120) whose relevance was suggested by a Rett syndrome patient carrying a Y120D substitution possibly mimicking a constitutively phosphorylated state. Unexpectedly, we found MeCP2 and its Tyr-120 phospho-isoform enriched at the centrosome both in dividing and postmitotic cells. The molecular and functional connection of MeCP2 to the centrosome was further reinforced through cellular and biochemical approaches. We show that, similar to many centrosomal proteins, MeCP2 deficiency causes aberrant spindle geometry, prolonged mitosis, and defects in microtubule nucleation. Collectively, our data indicate a novel function of MeCP2 that might reconcile previous data regarding the role of MeCP2 in cell growth and cytoskeleton stability and that might be relevant to understand some aspects of MeCP2-related conditions. Furthermore, they link the Tyr-120 residue and its phosphorylation to cell division, prompting future studies on the relevance of Tyr-120 for cortical development. PMID:25527496

  12. The Endocrine Dyscrasia that Accompanies Menopause and Andropause Induces Aberrant Cell Cycle Signaling that Triggers Cell Cycle Reentry of Post-mitotic Neurons, Neurodysfunction, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Craig S.; Bowen, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are the physiological factors that regulate neurogenesis during embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. These hormones support the formation of brain structures such as dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture of information (memories). Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories in animals (e.g. infantile amnesia). In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Since sex hormones control when and how neurons proliferate and differentiate, the endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause is a key signaling event that impacts neurogenesis and the acquisition, processing, storage and recall of memories. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in endocrine signaling with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle with neurite retraction that leads to neuron dysfunction and death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the ratio of LH:sex steroids as driving aberrant mitotic events mediated by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor, amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ, and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and

  13. Interaction between RB protein and NuMA is required for proper alignment of spindle microtubules.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Chiharu; Hattori, Takayuki; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Taya, Yoichi

    2014-02-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) controls cell cycle progression and cell cycle exit through interactions with cellular proteins. Many pRB-binding proteins, which function in gene transcription or modulation of chromatin structure, harbor LXCXE motifs in their binding domain for pRB. In this study, we found that nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), a mitotic spindle organizer, interacts with pRB through LSCEE sequences located in its C-terminal region. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of pRB caused aberrant distribution of NuMA and alignment of spindle microtubules in mitotic cells. Abnormal organization of spindle microtubules was also accompanied by misalignment of an over-expressed NuMA mutant (mut-NuMA) with a defect in pRB binding caused by an LSGEK mutation. The mut-NuMA-over-expressing cells showed lower potency for survival than wild-type NuMA (wt-NuMA)-over-expressing cells during 2 weeks of culture. Interestingly, knockdown of pRB reduced the population of wt-NuMA-over-expressing cells to the same level as mut-NuMA cells after 2 weeks. Taken together, pRB may have a novel function in regulating the mitotic function of NuMA and spindle organization, which are required for proper cell cycle progression. PMID:24350565

  14. Mitotic Stress and Chromosomal Instability in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malumbres, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is a common motif in human cancer, and multiple therapeutic strategies are aimed to prevent tumor cell proliferation. Whereas most current therapies are designed to arrest cell cycle progression either in G1/S or in mitosis, new proposals include targeting the intrinsic chromosomal instability (CIN, an increased rate of gain or losses of chromosomes during cell division) or aneuploidy (a genomic composition that differs from diploid) that many tumor cells display. Why tumors cells are chromosomally unstable or aneuploid and what are the consequences of these alterations are not completely clear at present. Several mitotic regulators are overexpressed as a consequence of oncogenic alterations, and they are likely to alter the proper regulation of chromosome segregation in cancer cells. In this review, we propose the relevance of TPX2, a mitotic regulator involved in the formation of the mitotic spindle, in oncogene-induced mitotic stress. This protein, as well as its partner Aurora-A, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer, and its deregulation may participate not only in chromosome numeric aberrations but also in other forms of genomic instability in cancer cells. PMID:23634259

  15. Inhibition of Bcl-xL sensitizes cells to mitotic blockers, but not mitotic drivers

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Ailsa; Sloss, Olivia; Topham, Caroline; Nelson, Louisa; Tighe, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate in response to an aberrant mitosis is governed by two competing networks: the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. The mechanistic interplay between these two networks is obscured by functional redundancy and the ability of cells to die either in mitosis or in the subsequent interphase. By coupling time-lapse microscopy with selective pharmacological agents, we systematically probe pro-survival Bcl-xL in response to various mitotic perturbations. Concentration matrices show that BH3-mimetic-mediated inhibition of Bcl-xL synergises with perturbations that induce an SAC-mediated mitotic block, including drugs that dampen microtubule dynamics, and inhibitors targeting kinesins and kinases required for spindle assembly. By contrast, Bcl-xL inhibition does not synergize with drugs which drive cells through an aberrant mitosis by overriding the SAC. This differential effect, which is explained by compensatory Mcl-1 function, provides opportunities for patient stratification and combination treatments in the context of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27512141

  16. Determination of genotoxic effects of Imazethapyr herbicide in Allium cepa root cells by mitotic activity, chromosome aberration, and comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep; Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Öztürk, Nur Serap

    2015-02-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is an imidazolinone herbicide that is currently used for broad-spectrum weed control in soybean and other legume crops. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IM were investigated by using mitotic index (MI), mitotic phases, chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) and DNA damage on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC50 value was determined as 20 ppm, and 0.5xEC50, EC50 and 2xEC50 concentrations of IM herbicide were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, 10 mg/L) were used as a negative and positive control, respectively. As A. cepa cell cycle is 24 hours, so, application process was carried out for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. All the applied doses decreased MIs compared to control group and these declines were found to be statistically meaningful. Analysis of the chromosomes showed that 10 ppm IM except for 48 h induced CAs but 40 ppm IM except for 72 h decreased CAs. DNA damage was found significantly higher in 20 and 40 ppm of IM compared to the control in comet assay. These results indicated that IM herbicide exhibits cytotoxic activity but not genotoxic activity (except 10 ppm) and induced DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in A. cepa root meristematic cells. PMID:25752428

  17. Biophysical Aspects of Spindle Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadifar, Reza; Baer, Charlie; Needleman, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    The continual propagation of genetic material from one generation to the next is one of the most basic characteristics of all organisms. In eukaryotes, DNA is segregated into the two daughter cells by a highly dynamic, self-organizing structure called the mitotic spindle. Mitotic spindles can show remarkable variability between tissues and organisms, but there is currently little understanding of the biophysical and evolutionary basis of this diversity. We are studying how spontaneous mutations modify cell division during nematode development. By comparing the mutational variation - the raw material of evolution - with the variation present in nature, we are investigating how the mitotic spindle is shaped over the course of evolution. This combination of quantitative genetics and cellular biophysics gives insight into how the structure and dynamics of the spindle is formed through selection, drift, and biophysical constraints.

  18. Chronic exposure to particulate chromate induces spindle assembly checkpoint bypass in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Xie, Hong; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2006-11-01

    One of the hallmarks of lung cancer is chromosome instability (CIN), particularly a tetraploid phenotype, which is normally prevented by the spindle assembly checkpoint. Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is an established human lung carcinogen, and Cr(VI) induces tumors at lung bifurcation sites where Cr(VI) particles impact and persist. However, the effects of Cr(VI) on the spindle assembly checkpoint are unknown and little is known about prolonged exposure to particulate Cr(VI). Accordingly, we investigated particulate Cr(VI)-induced bypass of the spindle assembly checkpoint after several days of exposure in WHTBF-6 cells. We found that lead chromate indeed induces spindle assembly checkpoint bypass in human lung cells, as 72, 96, and 120 h treatments with 0.5 or 1 microg/cm2 lead chromate induced significant increases in the percentage of cells with aberrant mitotic figures. For example, treatment with 1 microg/cm2 lead chromate for 96 h induced 11, 12.3, and 14% of cells with premature anaphase, centromere spreading and premature centromere division, respectively. In addition, we found a disruption of mitosis with more cells accumulating in anaphase; cells treated for 96 h increased from 18% in controls to 31% in cells treated with lead chromate. To confirm involvement of the spindle assembly checkpoint, Mad2 expression was used as a marker. Mad2 expression was decreased in cells exposed to chronic treatments of lead chromate, consistent with disruption of the checkpoint. We also found concentration- and time-dependent increases in tetraploid cells, which continued to grow and form colonies. When cells were treated with chronic lead alone there was no increase in aberrant mitotic cells or polyploidy; however, chronic exposure to a soluble Cr(VI) showed an increase in aberrant mitotic cells and polyploidy. These data suggest that lead chromate does induce CIN and may be one mechanism in the development of Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer. PMID:17112237

  19. Identification of the CIMP-like subtype and aberrant methylation of members of the chromosomal segregation and spindle assembly pathways in esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Krause, Lutz; Nones, Katia; Loffler, Kelly A; Nancarrow, Derek; Oey, Harald; Tang, Yue Hang; Wayte, Nicola J; Patch, Ann Marie; Patel, Kalpana; Brosda, Sandra; Manning, Suzanne; Lampe, Guy; Clouston, Andrew; Thomas, Janine; Stoye, Jens; Hussey, Damian J; Watson, David I; Lord, Reginald V; Phillips, Wayne A; Gotley, David; Smithers, B Mark; Whiteman, David C; Hayward, Nicholas K; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Barbour, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen significantly over recent decades. Although survival has improved, cure rates remain poor, with <20% of patients surviving 5 years. This is the first study to explore methylome, transcriptome and ENCODE data to characterize the role of methylation in EAC. We investigate the genome-wide methylation profile of 250 samples including 125 EAC, 19 Barrett's esophagus (BE), 85 squamous esophagus and 21 normal stomach. Transcriptome data of 70 samples (48 EAC, 4 BE and 18 squamous esophagus) were used to identify changes in methylation associated with gene expression. BE and EAC showed similar methylation profiles, which differed from squamous tissue. Hypermethylated sites in EAC and BE were mainly located in CpG-rich promoters. A total of 18575 CpG sites associated with 5538 genes were differentially methylated, 63% of these genes showed significant correlation between methylation and mRNA expression levels. Pathways involved in tumorigenesis including cell adhesion, TGF and WNT signaling showed enrichment for genes aberrantly methylated. Genes involved in chromosomal segregation and spindle formation were aberrantly methylated. Given the recent evidence that chromothripsis may be a driver mechanism in EAC, the role of epigenetic perturbation of these pathways should be further investigated. The methylation profiles revealed two EAC subtypes, one associated with widespread CpG island hypermethylation overlapping H3K27me3 marks and binding sites of the Polycomb proteins. These subtypes were supported by an independent set of 89 esophageal cancer samples. The most hypermethylated tumors showed worse patient survival. PMID:26905591

  20. Identification of the CIMP-like subtype and aberrant methylation of members of the chromosomal segregation and spindle assembly pathways in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Lutz; Nones, Katia; Loffler, Kelly A.; Nancarrow, Derek; Oey, Harald; Tang, Yue Hang; Wayte, Nicola J.; Patch, Ann Marie; Patel, Kalpana; Brosda, Sandra; Manning, Suzanne; Lampe, Guy; Clouston, Andrew; Thomas, Janine; Stoye, Jens; Hussey, Damian J.; Watson, David I.; Lord, Reginald V.; Phillips, Wayne A.; Gotley, David; Smithers, B.Mark; Whiteman, David C.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Waddell, Nicola; Barbour, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen significantly over recent decades. Although survival has improved, cure rates remain poor, with <20% of patients surviving 5 years. This is the first study to explore methylome, transcriptome and ENCODE data to characterize the role of methylation in EAC. We investigate the genome-wide methylation profile of 250 samples including 125 EAC, 19 Barrett’s esophagus (BE), 85 squamous esophagus and 21 normal stomach. Transcriptome data of 70 samples (48 EAC, 4 BE and 18 squamous esophagus) were used to identify changes in methylation associated with gene expression. BE and EAC showed similar methylation profiles, which differed from squamous tissue. Hypermethylated sites in EAC and BE were mainly located in CpG-rich promoters. A total of 18575 CpG sites associated with 5538 genes were differentially methylated, 63% of these genes showed significant correlation between methylation and mRNA expression levels. Pathways involved in tumorigenesis including cell adhesion, TGF and WNT signaling showed enrichment for genes aberrantly methylated. Genes involved in chromosomal segregation and spindle formation were aberrantly methylated. Given the recent evidence that chromothripsis may be a driver mechanism in EAC, the role of epigenetic perturbation of these pathways should be further investigated. The methylation profiles revealed two EAC subtypes, one associated with widespread CpG island hypermethylation overlapping H3K27me3 marks and binding sites of the Polycomb proteins. These subtypes were supported by an independent set of 89 esophageal cancer samples. The most hypermethylated tumors showed worse patient survival. PMID:26905591

  1. GSI promotes vincristine-induced apoptosis by enhancing multi-polar spindle formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akannsha; Zapata, Mariana C; Choi, Yong Sung; Yoon, Sun-Ok

    2014-01-01

    Gamma secretase inhibitors (GSI), cell-permeable small-molecule inhibitors of gamma secretase activity, had been originally developed for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. In recent years, it has been exploited in cancer research to inhibit Notch signaling that is aberrantly activated in various cancers. We previously found that GSI could synergize with anti-microtubule agent, vincristine (VCR) in a Notch-independent manner. Here, we delineate the underlying cell cycle-related mechanism using HeLa cells, which have strong mitotic checkpoints. GSI enhanced VCR-induced cell death, although GSI alone did not affect cell viability at all. GSI augmented VCR-induced mitotic arrest in a dose-dependent manner, which was preceded by apoptotic cell death, as shown by an increase in Annexin V-positive and caspase-positive cell population. Furthermore, GSI amplified multi-polar spindle formation triggered by VCR. Altogether, we show the evidence that GSI enhances VCR-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells via multi-polar mitotic spindle formation, independent of Notch signaling. These data suggest that one or more GS substrates, yet to be identified, in a post-GS processed form, may play a role in maintaining functional centrosomes/mitotic spindles. More significantly, the synergistic effect of GSI in combination with VCR could be exploited in clinical setting to improve the efficacy of VCR. PMID:24200971

  2. PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Restall, Ian J; Parolin, Doris A E; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Simard, Manon A; Fitzpatrick, Megan E; Kumar, Ritesh; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a tumor suppressor mechanism where cells enter a permanent growth arrest following cellular stress. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is induced in non-malignant cells following the expression of an oncogene or inactivation of a tumor suppressor. Previously, we have shown that protein kinase C iota (PKCι) depletion induces cellular senescence in glioblastoma cells in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Here we demonstrate that senescent glioblastoma cells exhibit an aberrant centrosome morphology. This was observed in basal levels of senescence, in p21-induced senescence, and in PKCι depletion-induced senescence. In addition, senescent glioblastoma cells are polyploid, Ki-67 negative and arrest at the G1/S checkpoint, as determined by expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. These markers are all consistent with cells that have undergone mitotic slippage. Failure of the spindle assembly checkpoint to function properly can lead to mitotic slippage, resulting in the premature exit of mitotic cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Although in G1, these cells have the replicated DNA and centrosomal phenotype of a cell that has entered mitosis and failed to divide. Overall, we demonstrate that PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of markers of mitotic slippage directly in senescent cells by co-staining for senescence-associated β-galactosidase and immunofluorescence markers in the same cell population. We suggest that markers of mitotic slippage be assessed in future studies of senescence to determine the extent of mitotic slippage in the induction of cellular senescence. PMID:26208522

  3. Regulation of Mitotic Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cytokinesis by Integrin-Linked Kinase in Retinoblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manju; Assi, Kiran; Salh, Baljinder; Cox, Michael E.; Mills, Julia

    2014-01-01

    During cell division integrin-linked kinase (ILK) has been shown to regulate microtubule dynamics and centrosome clustering, processes involved in cell cycle progression, and malignant transformation. In this study, we examine the effects of downregulating ILK on mitotic function in human retinoblastoma cell lines. These retinal cancer cells, caused by the loss of function of two gene alleles (Rb1) that encode the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor, have elevated expression of ILK. Here we show that inhibition of ILK activity results in a concentration-dependent increase in nuclear area and multinucleated cells. Moreover, inhibition of ILK activity and expression increased the accumulation of multinucleated cells over time. In these cells, aberrant cytokinesis and karyokinesis correlate with altered mitotic spindle organization, decreased levels of cortical F-actin and centrosome de-clustering. Centrosome de-clustering, induced by ILK siRNA, was rescued in FLAG-ILK expressing Y79 cells as compared to those expressing FLAG-tag alone. Inhibition of ILK increased the proportion of cells exhibiting mitotic spindles and caused a significant G2/M arrest as early as 24 hours after exposure to QLT-0267. Live cell analysis indicate ILK downregulation causes an increase in multipolar anaphases and failed cytokinesis (bipolar and multipolar) of viable cells. These studies extend those indicating a critical function for ILK in mitotic cytoskeletal organization and describe a novel role for ILK in cytokinesis of Rb deficient cells. PMID:24911651

  4. Regulation of mitotic cytoskeleton dynamics and cytokinesis by integrin-linked kinase in retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sikkema, William K A; Strikwerda, Arend; Sharma, Manju; Assi, Kiran; Salh, Baljinder; Cox, Michael E; Mills, Julia

    2014-01-01

    During cell division integrin-linked kinase (ILK) has been shown to regulate microtubule dynamics and centrosome clustering, processes involved in cell cycle progression, and malignant transformation. In this study, we examine the effects of downregulating ILK on mitotic function in human retinoblastoma cell lines. These retinal cancer cells, caused by the loss of function of two gene alleles (Rb1) that encode the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor, have elevated expression of ILK. Here we show that inhibition of ILK activity results in a concentration-dependent increase in nuclear area and multinucleated cells. Moreover, inhibition of ILK activity and expression increased the accumulation of multinucleated cells over time. In these cells, aberrant cytokinesis and karyokinesis correlate with altered mitotic spindle organization, decreased levels of cortical F-actin and centrosome de-clustering. Centrosome de-clustering, induced by ILK siRNA, was rescued in FLAG-ILK expressing Y79 cells as compared to those expressing FLAG-tag alone. Inhibition of ILK increased the proportion of cells exhibiting mitotic spindles and caused a significant G2/M arrest as early as 24 hours after exposure to QLT-0267. Live cell analysis indicate ILK downregulation causes an increase in multipolar anaphases and failed cytokinesis (bipolar and multipolar) of viable cells. These studies extend those indicating a critical function for ILK in mitotic cytoskeletal organization and describe a novel role for ILK in cytokinesis of Rb deficient cells. PMID:24911651

  5. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J; Mason, Susan M; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N; Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D G; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D

    2015-09-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells. PMID:26299965

  6. Activin Decoy Receptor ActRIIB:Fc Lowers FSH and Therapeutically Restores Oocyte Yield, Prevents Oocyte Chromosome Misalignments and Spindle Aberrations, and Increases Fertility in Midlife Female SAMP8 Mice.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Lori R; Mackenzie, Amelia C L; Lee, Se-Jin; Chaffin, Charles L; Merchenthaler, István

    2016-03-01

    Women of advanced maternal age (AMA) (age ≥ 35) have increased rates of infertility, miscarriages, and trisomic pregnancies. Collectively these conditions are called "egg infertility." A root cause of egg infertility is increased rates of oocyte aneuploidy with age. AMA women often have elevated endogenous FSH. Female senescence-accelerated mouse-prone-8 (SAMP8) has increased rates of oocyte spindle aberrations, diminished fertility, and rising endogenous FSH with age. We hypothesize that elevated FSH during the oocyte's FSH-responsive growth period is a cause of abnormalities in the meiotic spindle. We report that eggs from SAMP8 mice treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) for the period of oocyte growth have increased chromosome and spindle misalignments. Activin is a molecule that raises FSH, and ActRIIB:Fc is an activin decoy receptor that binds and sequesters activin. We report that ActRIIB:Fc treatment of midlife SAMP8 mice for the duration of oocyte growth lowers FSH, prevents egg chromosome and spindle misalignments, and increases litter sizes. AMA patients can also have poor responsiveness to FSH stimulation. We report that although eCG lowers yields of viable oocytes, ActRIIB:Fc increases yields of viable oocytes. ActRIIB:Fc and eCG cotreatment markedly reduces yields of viable oocytes. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevated FSH contributes to egg aneuploidy, declining fertility, and poor ovarian response and that ActRIIB:Fc can prevent egg aneuploidy, increase fertility, and improve ovarian response. Future studies will continue to examine whether ActRIIB:Fc works via FSH and/or other pathways and whether ActRIIB:Fc can prevent aneuploidy, increase fertility, and improve stimulation responsiveness in AMA women. PMID:26713784

  7. The endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause induces aberrant cell cycle signaling that triggers re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle, neurodysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive disease.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Sex hormones are physiological factors that promote neurogenesis during embryonic and fetal development. During childhood and adulthood these hormones support the maintenance of brain structure and function via neurogenesis and the formation of dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture, processing and retrieval of information (memories). Not surprisingly, changes in these reproductive hormones that occur with menopause and during andropause are strongly correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of adult neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories while decreasing neurogenesis after memory formation during infancy mitigated forgetting. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in sex hormone signaling associated with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle that leads to neurite retraction, neuron dysfunction and neuron death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, gonadotropins such as luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the LH:sex steroid ratio as driving aberrant mitotic events. These include the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor; amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ; and

  8. Ska1 cooperates with DDA3 for spindle dynamics and spindle attachment to kinetochore.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Eun; Song, Haiyu; Kwon, Hye Jin; Jang, Chang-Young

    2016-02-12

    Spindle microtubules (MTs) capture kinetochores (KTs) on the centromere sequence of sister chromatids to align at the mitotic equator and segregate toward spindle poles during mitosis. For efficient chromosome capture, KTs initially attach to the lateral surface of a MT, providing a considerably larger contact surface than the MT tip. A sequential change of KT composition upon spindle attachment enables a conversion from lateral to stable end-on attachment. However, the molecular link between spindle dynamics and KT composition is not fully understood. Here, we report that Ska1 and DDA3 act as molecular linkers in the interplay between KTs and spindle dynamics. After recruitment of Kif2a onto the mitotic spindle by DDA3, Ska1 targets Kif2a to the minus-end of spindle MTs and facilitates spindle dynamics. Furthermore, DDA3 targets Ska1 to KTs to stabilize end-on attachment. Thus, our findings identified a definite regulatory mechanism of the search and capture process for stable spindle attachment through cross-talk between spindle dynamics and KT composition mediated by DDA3 and Ska1. PMID:26797278

  9. Aneuploidy generates proteotoxic stress and DNA damage concurrently with p53-mediated post-mitotic apoptosis in SAC-impaired cells.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akihiro; Ohori, Momoko; Iwai, Kenichi; Nakayama, Yusuke; Nambu, Tadahiro; Morishita, Daisuke; Kawamoto, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Maki; Hirayama, Takaharu; Okaniwa, Masanori; Banno, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu; Kandori, Hitoshi; Iwata, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible that determines cell fate after mitotic slippage is unclear. Here we investigate the post-mitotic effects of different mitotic aberrations--misaligned chromosomes produced by CENP-E inhibition and monopolar spindles resulting from Eg5 inhibition. Eg5 inhibition in cells with an impaired spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) induces polyploidy through cytokinesis failure without a strong anti-proliferative effect. In contrast, CENP-E inhibition causes p53-mediated post-mitotic apoptosis triggered by chromosome missegregation. Pharmacological studies reveal that aneuploidy caused by the CENP-E inhibitor, Compound-A, in SAC-attenuated cells causes substantial proteotoxic stress and DNA damage. Polyploidy caused by the Eg5 inhibitor does not produce this effect. Furthermore, p53-mediated post-mitotic apoptosis is accompanied by aneuploidy-associated DNA damage response and unfolded protein response activation. Because Compound-A causes p53 accumulation and antitumour activity in an SAC-impaired xenograft model, CENP-E inhibitors could be potential anticancer drugs effective against SAC-impaired tumours. PMID:26144554

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote glioma cell death by G2 checkpoint abrogation leading to mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Cornago, M; Garcia-Alberich, C; Blasco-Angulo, N; Vall-Llaura, N; Nager, M; Herreros, J; Comella, J X; Sanchis, D; Llovera, M

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is resistant to conventional anti-tumoral treatments due to its infiltrative nature and capability of relapse; therefore, research efforts focus on characterizing gliomagenesis and identifying molecular targets useful on therapy. New therapeutic strategies are being tested in patients, such as Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) either alone or in combination with other therapies. Here two HDACi included in clinical trials have been tested, suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) and valproic acid (VPA), to characterize their effects on glioma cell growth in vitro and to determine the molecular changes that promote cancer cell death. We found that both HDACi reduce glioma cell viability, proliferation and clonogenicity. They have multiple effects, such as inducing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, nevertheless cell death is not prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh. Importantly, we found that HDACi alter cell cycle progression by decreasing the expression of G2 checkpoint kinases Wee1 and checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1). In addition, HDACi reduce the expression of proteins involved in DNA repair (Rad51), mitotic spindle formation (TPX2) and chromosome segregation (Survivin) in glioma cells and in human glioblastoma multiforme primary cultures. Therefore, HDACi treatment causes glioma cell entry into mitosis before DNA damage could be repaired and to the formation of an aberrant mitotic spindle that results in glioma cell death through mitotic catastrophe-induced apoptosis. PMID:25275596

  11. Purification of fluorescently labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Trisha N.

    2016-01-01

    Centrosomes are components of the mitotic spindle responsible for organizing microtubules and establishing a bipolar spindle for accurate chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the centrosome is called the spindle pole body, a highly organized tri-laminar structure embedded in the nuclear envelope. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of fluorescently labeled spindle pole bodes from S. cerevisiae. Spindle pole bodies are purified from yeast using a TAP-tag purification followed by velocity sedimentation. This highly reproducible TAP-tag purification method improves upon previous techniques and expands the scope of in vitro characterization of yeast spindle pole bodies. The genetic flexibility of this technique allows for the study of spindle pole body mutants as well as the study of spindle pole bodies during different stages of the cell cycle. The ease and reproducibility of the technique makes it possible to study spindle pole bodies using a variety of biochemical, biophysical, and microscopic techniques. PMID:27193850

  12. Downregulation of Protein 4.1R impairs centrosome function,bipolar spindle organization and anaphase

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, Jeffrey R.; Go, Minjoung M.; Bahmanyar, S.; Barth,A.I.M.; Krauss, Sharon Wald

    2006-03-17

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase MTs and areinstrumental in the assembly of the mitotic bipolar spindle. Here wereport that two members of the multifunctional protein 4.1 family havedistinct distributions at centrosomes. Protein 4.1R localizes to maturecentrioles whereas 4.1G is a component of the pericentriolar matrixsurrounding centrioles. To selectively probe 4.1R function, we used RNAinterference-mediated depletion of 4.1R without decreasing 4.1Gexpression. 4.1R downregulation reduces MT anchoring and organization atinterphase and impairs centrosome separation during prometaphase.Metaphase chromosomes fail to properly condense/align and spindleorganization is aberrant. Notably 4.1R depletion causes mislocalizationof its binding partner NuMA (Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus Protein),essential for spindle pole focusing, and disrupts ninein. Duringanaphase/telophase, 4.1R-depleted cells have lagging chromosomes andaberrant MT bridges. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makescrucial contributions to centrosome integrity and to mitotic spindlestructure enabling mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinatedprecision required to avoid pathological events.

  13. Study of Cell Division Aberrations Induced by Some Silica Dusts in Mammalian Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Béna, F; Danière, M C; Terzetti, F; Poirot, O; Elias, Z

    2000-01-01

    Previously we observed that some crystalline and amorphous (diatomaceous earths) silicas (but not pyrogenic amorphous silica) induced morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. In order to explore the mechanisms of the silica-induced cell transformation, in this study we have examined the possibility that silica may cause genomic changes by interfering with the normal events of mitotic division. The SHE cells were exposed to transforming samples of Min-U-Sil 5 quartz and amorphous diatomite earth (DE) as well as to inactive amorphous synthetic Aerosil 0X50 at concentrations between 9 and 36 μg/cm(2) of culture slide. Effects on the mitotic spindle and on chromosome congression and segregation through the mitotic stages were concurrently examined by differential and indirect immunofluorescence stainings using anti-β-tubulin antibody. Min-U-Sil 5 and DE dusts induced a significant increase in the number of aberrant mitotic cells detected by differential staining. Increased frequencies of monopolar mitoses and scattered chromosomes as well as a small incidence of lagging chromosomes in DE-treated cells were observed. The immunostaining was more efficient in the detection of spindle disturbances. Min-U-Sil induced a significantly concentration-dependent increase of monopolar spindles. At the highest concentration, highly disorganized prophase spindles and prometaphase multipolars were observed. These damages caused a concentration-dependent decrease in metaphase to anaphase transition. DE-induced spindle aberrations did not reach significant levels over control, although increase in monopolar and multipolar spindles were recorded. Exposure to OX50 particles did not disrupt spindle integrity. To determine whether micronuclei (MN) arise from divisional abnormalities induced by the active samples, we performed in SHE and human bronchial epithelial cells kinetochore (K)-specific and centromere (C)-specific staining, respectively. A concentration

  14. Tipping the spindle into the right position.

    PubMed

    Akhmanova, Anna; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-05-01

    The position of the mitotic spindle determines the cleavage plane in animal cells, but what controls spindle positioning? Kern et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201510117) demonstrate that the microtubule plus end-associated SKAP/Astrin complex participates in this process, possibly by affecting dynein-dependent pulling forces exerted on the tips of astral microtubules. PMID:27138251

  15. Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle 20.1 Is Required for Normal Meiotic Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Baixiao; Wang, Liudan; Ren, Ding; Ren, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Cell division requires proper spindle assembly; a surveillance pathway, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), monitors whether the spindle is normal and correctly attached to kinetochores. The SAC proteins regulate mitotic chromosome segregation by affecting CDC20 (Cell Division Cycle 20) function. However, it is unclear whether CDC20 regulates meiotic spindle assembly and proper homolog segregation. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CDC20.1 gene is indispensable for meiosis and male fertility. We demonstrate that cdc20.1 meiotic chromosomes align asynchronously and segregate unequally and the metaphase I spindle has aberrant morphology. Comparison of the distribution of meiotic stages at different time points between the wild type and cdc20.1 reveals a delay of meiotic progression from diakinesis to anaphase I. Furthermore, cdc20.1 meiocytes exhibit an abnormal distribution of a histone H3 phosphorylation mark mediated by the Aurora kinase, providing evidence that CDC20.1 regulates Aurora localization for meiotic chromosome segregation. Further evidence that CDC20.1 and Aurora are functionally related was provided by meiosis-specific knockdown of At-Aurora1 expression, resulting in meiotic chromosome segregation defects similar to those of cdc20.1. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role for CDC20.1 in SAC-dependent meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:26672070

  16. The kinetochore protein Kis1/Eic1/Mis19 ensures the integrity of mitotic spindles through maintenance of kinetochore factors Mis6/CENP-I and CENP-A.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hayato; Arai, Kunio; Kariyazono, Ryo; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sato, Masamitsu

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules play multiple roles in a wide range of cellular phenomena, including cell polarity establishment and chromosome segregation. A number of microtubule regulators have been identified, including microtubule-associated proteins and kinases, and knowledge of these factors has contributed to our molecular understanding of microtubule regulation of each relevant cellular process. The known regulators, however, are insufficient to explain how those processes are linked to one another, underscoring the need to identify additional regulators. To find such novel mechanisms and microtubule regulators, we performed a screen that combined genetics and microscopy for fission yeast mutants defective in microtubule organization. We isolated approximately 900 mutants showing defects in either microtubule organization or the nuclear envelope, and these mutants were classified into 12 categories. We particularly focused on one mutant, kis1, which displayed spindle defects in early mitosis. The kis1 mutant frequently failed to assemble a normal bipolar spindle. The responsible gene encoded a kinetochore protein, Mis19 (also known as Eic1), which localized to the interface of kinetochores and spindle poles. We also found that the inner kinetochore proteins Mis6/CENP-I and Cnp1/CENP-A were delocalized from kinetochores in the kis1 cells and that kinetochore-microtubule attachment was defective. Another mutant, mis6, also displayed similar spindle defects. We conclude that Kis1 is required for inner kinetochore organization, through which Kis1 ensures kinetochore-microtubule attachment and spindle integrity. Thus, we propose an unexpected relationship between inner kinetochore organization and spindle integrity. PMID:25375240

  17. The Kinetochore Protein Kis1/Eic1/Mis19 Ensures the Integrity of Mitotic Spindles through Maintenance of Kinetochore Factors Mis6/CENP-I and CENP-A

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Hayato; Arai, Kunio; Kariyazono, Ryo; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sato, Masamitsu

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules play multiple roles in a wide range of cellular phenomena, including cell polarity establishment and chromosome segregation. A number of microtubule regulators have been identified, including microtubule-associated proteins and kinases, and knowledge of these factors has contributed to our molecular understanding of microtubule regulation of each relevant cellular process. The known regulators, however, are insufficient to explain how those processes are linked to one another, underscoring the need to identify additional regulators. To find such novel mechanisms and microtubule regulators, we performed a screen that combined genetics and microscopy for fission yeast mutants defective in microtubule organization. We isolated approximately 900 mutants showing defects in either microtubule organization or the nuclear envelope, and these mutants were classified into 12 categories. We particularly focused on one mutant, kis1, which displayed spindle defects in early mitosis. The kis1 mutant frequently failed to assemble a normal bipolar spindle. The responsible gene encoded a kinetochore protein, Mis19 (also known as Eic1), which localized to the interface of kinetochores and spindle poles. We also found that the inner kinetochore proteins Mis6/CENP-I and Cnp1/CENP-A were delocalized from kinetochores in the kis1 cells and that kinetochore-microtubule attachment was defective. Another mutant, mis6, also displayed similar spindle defects. We conclude that Kis1 is required for inner kinetochore organization, through which Kis1 ensures kinetochore-microtubule attachment and spindle integrity. Thus, we propose an unexpected relationship between inner kinetochore organization and spindle integrity. PMID:25375240

  18. Mitotic regulation by NIMA-related kinases

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, Laura; Blot, Joelle; Fry, Andrew M

    2007-01-01

    The NIMA-related kinases represent a family of serine/threonine kinases implicated in cell cycle control. The founding member of this family, the NIMA kinase of Aspergillus nidulans, as well as the fission yeast homologue Fin1, contribute to multiple aspects of mitotic progression including the timing of mitotic entry, chromatin condensation, spindle organization and cytokinesis. Mammals contain a large family of eleven NIMA-related kinases, named Nek1 to Nek11. Of these, there is now substantial evidence that Nek2, Nek6, Nek7 and Nek9 also regulate mitotic events. At least three of these kinases, as well as NIMA and Fin1, have been localized to the microtubule organizing centre of their respective species, namely the centrosome or spindle pole body. Here, they have important functions in microtubule organization and mitotic spindle assembly. Other Nek kinases have been proposed to play microtubule-dependent roles in non-dividing cells, most notably in regulating the axonemal microtubules of cilia and flagella. In this review, we discuss the evidence that NIMA-related kinases make a significant contribution to the orchestration of mitotic progression and thereby protect cells from chromosome instability. Furthermore, we highlight their potential as novel chemotherapeutic targets. PMID:17727698

  19. A mutation in PLC1, a candidate phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causes aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W E; Fitzgerald-Hayes, M

    1993-01-01

    We identified a putative Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) gene, PLC1, which encodes a protein most similar to the delta class of PI-PLC enzymes. The PLC1 gene was isolated during a study of yeast strains that exhibit defects in chromosome segregation. plc1-1 cells showed a 10-fold increase in aberrant chromosome segregation compared with the wild type. Molecular analysis revealed that PLC1 encodes a predicted protein of 101 kDa with approximately 50 and 26% identity to the highly conserved X and Y domains of PI-PLC isozymes from humans, bovines, rats, and Drosophila melanogaster. The putative yeast protein also contains a consensus EF-hand domain that is predicted to bind calcium. Interestingly, the temperature-sensitive and chromosome missegregation phenotypes exhibited by plc1-1 cells were partially suppressed by exogenous calcium. Images PMID:8391635

  20. Mechanical stability of bipolar spindle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2016-07-01

    Assembly and stability of mitotic spindle are governed by the interplay of various intra-cellular forces, e.g. the forces generated by motor proteins by sliding overlapping anti-parallel microtubules (MTs) polymerized from the opposite centrosomes, the interaction of kinetochores with MTs, and the interaction of MTs with the chromosome arms. We study the mechanical behavior and stability of spindle assembly within the framework of a minimal model which includes all these effects. For this model, we derive a closed-form analytical expression for the force acting between the centrosomes as a function of their separation distance and we show that an effective potential can be associated with the interactions at play. We obtain the stability diagram of spindle formation in terms of parameters characterizing the strength of motor sliding, repulsive forces generated by polymerizing MTs, and the forces arising out of the interaction of MTs with kinetochores. The stability diagram helps in quantifying the relative effects of the different interactions and elucidates the role of motor proteins in formation and inhibition of spindle structures during mitotic cell division. We also predict a regime of bistability for a certain parameter range, wherein the spindle structure can be stable for two different finite separation distances between centrosomes. This occurrence of bistability also suggests the mechanical versatility of such self-assembled spindle structures.

  1. Spindle microtubule dysfunction and cancer predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Stumpff, Jason; Ghule, Prachi N.; Shimamura, Akiko; Stein, Janet L.; Greenblatt, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and spindle microtubule dynamics are strictly coordinated during cell division in order to preserve genomic integrity. Alterations in the genome that affect microtubule stability and spindle assembly during mitosis may contribute to genomic instability and cancer predisposition, but directly testing this potential link poses a significant challenge. Germ-line mutations in tumor suppressor genes that predispose patients to cancer and alter spindle microtubule dynamics offer unique opportunities to investigate the relationship between spindle dysfunction and carcinogenesis. Mutations in two such tumor suppressors, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS), affect multifunctional proteins that have been well characterized for their roles in Wnt signaling and interphase ribosome assembly, respectively. Less understood, however, is how their shared involvement in stabilizing the microtubules that comprise the mitotic spindle contributes to cancer predisposition. Here, we briefly discuss the potential for mutations in APC and SBDS as informative tools for studying the impact of mitotic spindle dysfunction on cellular transformation. PMID:24905602

  2. Centrosomes and spindles in ascidian embryos and eggs.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Alex; Chenevert, Janet; Pruliere, Gerard; Costache, Vlad; Hebras, Celine; Salez, Gregory; Dumollard, Remi

    2015-01-01

    During embryonic development and maternal meiotic maturation, positioning of the mitotic/meiotic spindle is subject to control mechanisms that meet the needs of the particular cell type. Here we review the methods, molecular tools, and the ascidian model we use to study three different ways in which centrosomes or spindles are positioned in three different cellular contexts. First, we review unequal cleavage in the ascidian germ lineage. In the germ cell precursors, a large macromolecular structure termed the centrosome-attracting body causes three successive rounds of unequal cleavage from the 8- to the 64-cell stage. Next, we discuss spindle positioning underlying the invariant cleavage pattern. Ascidian embryos display an invariant cleavage pattern whereby the mitotic spindle aligns in a predetermined orientation in every blastomere up to the gastrula stage (composed of 112 cells). Finally, we review methods and approaches to study meiotic spindle positioning in eggs. PMID:26175446

  3. Analysis of the mitotic exit control system using locked levels of stable mitotic cyclin.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, Benjamin J; Lu, Ying; Procko, Andrea L; Timney, Benjamin L; Cross, Frederick R

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) both promotes mitotic entry (spindle assembly and anaphase) and inhibits mitotic exit (spindle disassembly and cytokinesis), leading to an elegant quantitative hypothesis that a single cyclin oscillation can function as a ratchet to order these events. This ratchet is at the core of a published ODE model for the yeast cell cycle. However, the ratchet model requires appropriate cyclin dose-response thresholds. Here, we test the inhibition of mitotic exit in budding yeast using graded levels of stable mitotic cyclin (Clb2). In opposition to the ratchet model, stable levels of Clb2 introduced dose-dependent delays, rather than hard thresholds, that varied by mitotic exit event. The ensuing cell cycle was highly abnormal, suggesting a novel reason for cyclin degradation. Cdc14 phosphatase antagonizes Clb2-Cdk, and Cdc14 is released from inhibitory nucleolar sequestration independently of stable Clb2. Thus, Cdc14/Clb2 balance may be the appropriate variable for mitotic regulation. Although our results are inconsistent with the aforementioned ODE model, revision of the model to allow Cdc14/Clb2 balance to control mitotic exit corrects these discrepancies, providing theoretical support for our conclusions. PMID:19920813

  4. A CEP215-HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Pavithra L; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K; Woods, C Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-01-01

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215-HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome-spindle pole interface by the CEP215-HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:26987684

  5. Curcumin-treated cancer cells show mitotic disturbances leading to growth arrest and induction of senescence phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mosieniak, Grażyna; Sliwinska, Małgorzata A; Przybylska, Dorota; Grabowska, Wioleta; Sunderland, Piotr; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Sikora, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Cellular senescence is recognized as a potent anticancer mechanism that inhibits carcinogenesis. Cancer cells can also undergo senescence upon chemo- or radiotherapy. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, shows anticancer properties both in vitro and in vivo. Previously, we have shown that treatment with curcumin leads to senescence of human cancer cells. Now we identified the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We observed a time-dependent accumulation of mitotic cells upon curcumin treatment. The time-lapse analysis proved that those cells progressed through mitosis for a significantly longer period of time. A fraction of cells managed to divide or undergo mitotic slippage and then enter the next phase of the cell cycle. Cells arrested in mitosis had an improperly formed mitotic spindle and were positive for γH2AX, which shows that they acquired DNA damage during prolonged mitosis. Moreover, the DNA damage response pathway was activated upon curcumin treatment and the components of this pathway remained upregulated while cells were undergoing senescence. Inhibition of the DNA damage response decreased the number of senescent cells. Thus, our studies revealed that the induction of cell senescence upon curcumin treatment resulted from aberrant progression through the cell cycle. Moreover, the DNA damage acquired by cancer cells, due to mitotic disturbances, activates an important molecular mechanism that determines the potential anticancer activity of curcumin. PMID:26916504

  6. Nercc1, a mammalian NIMA-family kinase, binds the Ran GTPase and regulates mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Joan; Mikhailov, Alexei; Belham, Christopher; Avruch, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    The protein kinase NIMA is an indispensable pleiotropic regulator of mitotic progression in Aspergillus. Although several mammalian NIMA-like kinases (Neks) are known, none appears to have the broad importance for mitotic regulation attributed to NIMA. Nercc1 is a new NIMA-like kinase that regulates chromosome alignment and segregation in mitosis. Its NIMA-like catalytic domain is followed by a noncatalytic tail containing seven repeats homologous to those of the Ran GEF, RCC1, a Ser/Thr/Pro-rich segment, and a coiled-coil domain. Nercc1 binds to another NIMA-like kinase, Nek6, and also binds specifically to the Ran GTPase through both its catalytic and its RCC1-like domains, preferring RanGDP in vivo. Nercc1 exists as a homooligomer and can autoactivate in vitro by autophosphorylation. Nercc1 is a cytoplasmic protein that is activated during mitosis and is avidly phosphorylated by active p34Cdc2. Microinjection of anti-Nercc1 antibodies in prophase results in spindle abnormalities and/or chromosomal misalignment. In Ptk2 cells the outcome is prometaphase arrest or aberrant chromosome segregation and aneuploidy, whereas in CFPAC-1 cells prolonged arrest in prometaphase is the usual response. Nercc1 and its partner Nek6 represent a new signaling pathway that regulates mitotic progression. PMID:12101123

  7. Micronucleus test and metaphase analyses in mice exposed to known and suspected spindle poisons.

    PubMed

    Marrazzini, A; Betti, C; Bernacchi, F; Barrai, I; Barale, R

    1994-11-01

    Micronucleus (Mn) and metaphase chromosome analyses were performed in mouse bone marrow cells with two known and eight suspected mitotic spindle poisons. Polychromatic (PCEs) and normochromatic (NCEs) erythrocytes were scored for presence of Mn, while structural (CAs) and numerical chromosome aberrations (NCAs), i.e. hyperploid cells, were evaluated by metaphase analysis. CAs were scored in first, and NCAs in the second metaphases, identified by BrdUrd differential staining. Hydroquinone induced Mn, NCAs and CAs; colchicine, vinblastine and, to a lesser extent, chloral hydrate, diazepam and econazole induced both Mn and NCAs; cadmium chloride and thimerosal induced Mn and CAs, while pyrimethamine and thiabendazole induced Mn only. The proposed stepwise protocol allowed satisfactory statistical evaluation of the effects induced with a reduction in the number of animals killed. An acceptable agreement was found between induction of Mn and NCAs, suggesting a possible use of the Mn test for revealing compounds with aneugenic properties. PMID:7854141

  8. Nuclear import mechanism of neurofibromin for localization on the spindle and function in chromosome congression.

    PubMed

    Koliou, Xeni; Fedonidis, Constantinos; Kalpachidou, Theodora; Mangoura, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF-1) is caused by mutations in the tumor suppressor gene NF1; its protein product neurofibromin is a RasGTPase-activating protein, a property that has yet to explain aneuploidy, most often observed in astrocytes in NF-1. Here, we provide a mechanistic model for the regulated nuclear import of neurofibromin during the cell cycle and for a role in chromosome congression. Specifically, we demonstrate that neurofibromin, phosphorylated on Ser2808, a residue adjacent to a nuclear localization signal in the C-terminal domain (CTD), by Protein Kinase C-epsilon (PKC-ε), accumulates in a Ran-dependent manner and through binding to lamin in the nucleus at G2 in glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, we identify CTD as a tubulin-binding domain and show that a phosphomimetic substitution of its Ser2808 results in a predominantly nuclear localization. Confocal analysis shows that endogenous neurofibromin localizes on the centrosomes at interphase, as well as on the mitotic spindle, through direct associations with tubulins, in glioblastoma cells and primary astrocytes. More importantly, analysis of mitotic phenotypes after siRNA-mediated depletion shows that acute loss of this tumor suppressor protein leads to aberrant chromosome congression at the metaphase plate. Therefore, neurofibromin protein abundance and nuclear import are mechanistically linked to an error-free chromosome congression. Concerned with neurofibromin's, a tumor suppressor, mechanism of action, we demonstrate in astrocytic cells that its synthesis, phosphorylation by Protein Kinase C-ε on Ser2808 (a residue adjacent to a nuclear localization sequence), and nuclear import are cell cycle-dependent, being maximal at G2. During mitosis, neurofibromin is an integral part of the spindle, while its depletion leads to aberrant chromosome congression, possibly explaining the development of chromosomal instability in Neurofibromatosis type-1. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page

  9. Cell adhesion molecule control of planar spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Polarized epithelial cells align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet to maintain tissue integrity and to prevent malignant transformation. The orientation of the spindle apparatus is regulated by the immobilization of the astral microtubules at the lateral cortex and depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex which captures microtubule plus ends and generates pulling forces towards the centrosomes. Recent developments indicate that signals derived from intercellular junctions are required for the stable interaction of the dynein-dynactin complex with the cortex. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells and we illustrate how different cell adhesion molecules through distinct and non-overlapping mechanisms instruct the cells to align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet. PMID:26698907

  10. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division. PMID:27230381

  11. CYLD regulates spindle orientation by stabilizing astral microtubules and promoting dishevelled-NuMA-dynein/dynactin complex formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunfan; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Ran, Jie; Gao, Jinmin; Suo, Shaojun; Sun, Shao-Cong; Zhou, Jun

    2014-02-11

    Oriented cell division is critical for cell fate specification, tissue organization, and tissue homeostasis, and relies on proper orientation of the mitotic spindle. The molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of spindle orientation remain largely unknown. Herein, we identify a critical role for cylindromatosis (CYLD), a deubiquitinase and regulator of microtubule dynamics, in the control of spindle orientation. CYLD is highly expressed in mitosis and promotes spindle orientation by stabilizing astral microtubules and deubiquitinating the cortical polarity protein dishevelled. The deubiquitination of dishevelled enhances its interaction with nuclear mitotic apparatus, stimulating the cortical localization of nuclear mitotic apparatus and the dynein/dynactin motor complex, a requirement for generating pulling forces on astral microtubules. These findings uncover CYLD as an important player in the orientation of the mitotic spindle and cell division and have important implications in health and disease. PMID:24469800

  12. Toward a systems-level view of mitotic checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Bashar

    2015-03-01

    Reproduction and natural selection are the key elements of life. In order to reproduce, the genetic material must be doubled, separated and placed into two new daughter cells, each containing a complete set of chromosomes and organelles. In mitosis, transition from one process to the next is guided by intricate surveillance mechanisms, known as the mitotic checkpoints. Dis-regulation of cell division through checkpoint malfunction can lead to developmental defects and contribute to the development or progression of tumors. This review approaches two important mitotic checkpoints, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC). The highly conserved spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) controls the onset of anaphase by preventing premature segregation of the sister chromatids of the duplicated genome, to the spindle poles. In contrast, the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC), in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ensures that during asymmetric cell division mitotic exit does not occur until the spindle is properly aligned with the cell polarity axis. Although there are no known homologs, there is indication that functionally similar checkpoints exist also in animal cells. This review can be regarded as an "executable model", which could be easily translated into various quantitative concrete models like Petri nets, ODEs, PDEs, or stochastic particle simulations. It can also function as a base for developing quantitative models explaining the interplay of the various components and proteins controlling mitosis. PMID:25722206

  13. Direct interaction between centralspindlin and PRC1 reinforces mechanical resilience of the central spindle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kian-Yong; Esmaeili, Behrooz; Zealley, Ben; Mishima, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    During animal cell division, the central spindle, an anti-parallel microtubule bundle structure formed between segregating chromosomes during anaphase, cooperates with astral microtubules to position the cleavage furrow. Because the central spindle is the only structure linking the two halves of the mitotic spindle, it is under mechanical tension from dynein-generated cortical pulling forces, which determine spindle positioning and drive chromosome segregation through spindle elongation. The central spindle should be flexible enough for efficient chromosome segregation while maintaining its structural integrity for reliable cytokinesis. How the cell balances these potentially conflicting requirements is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the central spindle in C. elegans embryos has a resilient mechanism for recovery from perturbations by excess tension derived from cortical pulling forces. This mechanism involves the direct interaction of two different types of conserved microtubule bundlers that are crucial for central spindle formation, PRC1 and centralspindlin. PMID:26088160

  14. Direct interaction between centralspindlin and PRC1 reinforces mechanical resilience of the central spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kian-Yong; Esmaeili, Behrooz; Zealley, Ben; Mishima, Masanori

    2015-06-01

    During animal cell division, the central spindle, an anti-parallel microtubule bundle structure formed between segregating chromosomes during anaphase, cooperates with astral microtubules to position the cleavage furrow. Because the central spindle is the only structure linking the two halves of the mitotic spindle, it is under mechanical tension from dynein-generated cortical pulling forces, which determine spindle positioning and drive chromosome segregation through spindle elongation. The central spindle should be flexible enough for efficient chromosome segregation while maintaining its structural integrity for reliable cytokinesis. How the cell balances these potentially conflicting requirements is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the central spindle in C. elegans embryos has a resilient mechanism for recovery from perturbations by excess tension derived from cortical pulling forces. This mechanism involves the direct interaction of two different types of conserved microtubule bundlers that are crucial for central spindle formation, PRC1 and centralspindlin.

  15. A CEP215–HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Pavithra L.; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R.; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K.; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-01-01

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215–HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome–spindle pole interface by the CEP215–HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:26987684

  16. Mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, M; Yoshioka, T; Saio, M; Banno, Y; Nagaoka, H; Okano, Y

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, which refers to cell death or its prologue triggered by aberrant mitosis, can be induced by a heterogeneous group of stimuli, including chromosome damage or perturbation of the mitotic apparatus. We investigated the mechanism of mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization. We transfected cells harboring wild-type or mutated p53 with siRNAs targeting Aurora A, ninein, TOG, TACC3, γ-tubulin, or pericentriolar material-1, and monitored the effects on cell death. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, TOG, and TACC3 led to cell death, regardless of p53 status. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, and TOG, led to aberrant spindle formation and subsequent cell death, which was accompanied by several features of apoptosis, including nuclear condensation and Annexin V binding in HeLa cells. During this process, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, caspase-3, and caspase-9 was detected, but cleavage of caspase-8 was not. Cell death, monitored by time-lapse imaging, occurred during both interphase and M phase. In cells depleted of a centrosomal protein (Aurora A, ninein, or TOG), the rate of cell death was higher if the cells were cotransfected with siRNA against BubR1 or Mad2 than if they were transfected with siRNA against Bub1 or a control siRNA. These results suggest that metaphase arrest is necessary for the mitotic catastrophe and cell death caused by depletion of centrosomal proteins. Knockdown of centrosomal proteins led to increased phosphorylation of Chk2. Enhanced p-Chk2 localization was also observed at the centrosome in cells arrested in M phase, as well as in the nuclei of dying cells. Cotransfection of siRNAs against Chk2, in combination with depletion of a centrosomal protein, decreased the amount of cell death. Thus, Chk2 activity is indispensable for apoptosis after mitotic catastrophe induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization

  17. Complex Commingling: Nucleoporins and the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Mossaid, Ikram; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of the chromosomes during mitosis is an important process, in which the replicated DNA content is properly allocated into two daughter cells. To ensure their genomic integrity, cells present an essential surveillance mechanism known as the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which monitors the bipolar attachment of the mitotic spindle to chromosomes to prevent errors that would result in chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy. Multiple components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), a gigantic protein complex that forms a channel through the nuclear envelope to allow nucleocytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules, were shown to be critical for faithful cell division and implicated in the regulation of different steps of the mitotic process, including kinetochore and spindle assembly as well as the SAC. In this review, we will describe current knowledge about the interconnection between the NPC and the SAC in an evolutional perspective, which primarily relies on the two mitotic checkpoint regulators, Mad1 and Mad2. We will further discuss the role of NPC constituents, the nucleoporins, in kinetochore and spindle assembly and the formation of the mitotic checkpoint complex during mitosis and interphase. PMID:26540075

  18. SLK-dependent activation of ERMs controls LGN–NuMA localization and spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Machicoane, Mickael; de Frutos, Cristina A.; Fink, Jenny; Rocancourt, Murielle; Lombardi, Yannis; Garel, Sonia; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation relies on a complex dialog between the spindle microtubules and the cell cortex, in which F-actin has been recently implicated. Here, we report that the membrane–actin linkers ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERMs) are strongly and directly activated by the Ste20-like kinase at mitotic entry in mammalian cells. Using microfabricated adhesive substrates to control the axis of cell division, we found that the activation of ERMs plays a key role in guiding the orientation of the mitotic spindle. Accordingly, impairing ERM activation in apical progenitors of the mouse embryonic neocortex severely disturbed spindle orientation in vivo. At the molecular level, ERM activation promotes the polarized association at the mitotic cortex of leucine-glycine-asparagine repeat protein (LGN) and nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein, two essential factors for spindle orientation. We propose that activated ERMs, together with Gαi, are critical for the correct localization of LGN–NuMA force generator complexes and hence for proper spindle orientation. PMID:24958772

  19. EGF Induced Centrosome Separation Promotes Mitotic Progression and Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mardin, Balca R.; Isokane, Mayumi; Cosenza, Marco R.; Krämer, Alwin; Ellenberg, Jan; Fry, Andrew M.; Schiebel, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Timely and accurate assembly of the mitotic spindle is critical for the faithful segregation of chromosomes and centrosome separation is a key step in this process. The timing of centrosome separation varies dramatically between cell types; however, the mechanisms responsible for these differences and its significance are unclear. Here, we show that activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling determines the timing of centrosome separation. Premature separation of centrosomes decreases the requirement for the major mitotic kinesin Eg5 for spindle assembly, accelerates mitosis and decreases the rate of chromosome missegregation. Importantly, EGF stimulation impacts upon centrosome separation and mitotic progression to different degrees in different cell lines. Cells with high EGFR levels fail to arrest in mitosis upon Eg5 inhibition. This has important implications for cancer therapy since cells with high centrosomal response to EGF are more susceptible to combinatorial inhibition of EGFR and Eg5. PMID:23643362

  20. A unique set of centrosome proteins requires pericentrin for spindle-pole localization and spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Ting; Hehnly, Heidi; Yu, Qing; Farkas, Debby; Zheng, Guoqiang; Redick, Sambra D; Hung, Hui-Fang; Samtani, Rajeev; Jurczyk, Agata; Akbarian, Schahram; Wise, Carol; Jackson, Andrew; Bober, Michael; Guo, Yin; Lo, Cecilia; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) is caused by mutations in the centrosome gene pericentrin (PCNT) that lead to severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation. As in MOPDII patients, disruption of pericentrin (Pcnt) in mice caused a number of abnormalities including microcephaly, aberrant hemodynamics analyzed by in utero echocardiography, and cardiovascular anomalies; the latter being associated with mortality, as in the human condition. To identify the mechanisms underlying these defects, we tested for changes in cell and molecular function. All Pcnt(-/-) mouse tissues and cells examined showed spindle misorientation. This mouse phenotype was associated with misdirected ventricular septal growth in the heart, decreased proliferative symmetric divisions in brain neural progenitors, and increased misoriented divisions in fibroblasts; the same phenotype was seen in fibroblasts from three MOPDII individuals. Misoriented spindles were associated with disrupted astral microtubules and near complete loss of a unique set of centrosome proteins from spindle poles (ninein, Cep215, centriolin). All these proteins appear to be crucial for microtubule anchoring and all interacted with Pcnt, suggesting that Pcnt serves as a molecular scaffold for this functionally linked set of spindle pole proteins. Importantly, Pcnt disruption had no detectable effect on localization of proteins involved in the cortical polarity pathway (NuMA, p150(glued), aPKC). Not only do these data reveal a spindle-pole-localized complex for spindle orientation, but they identify key spindle symmetry proteins involved in the pathogenesis of MOPDII. PMID:25220058

  1. Drosophila parthenogenesis: A tool to decipher centrosomal vs acentrosomal spindle assembly pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Riparbelli, Maria Giovanna; Callaini, Giuliano

    2008-04-15

    Development of unfertilized eggs in the parthenogenetic strain K23-O-im of Drosophila mercatorum requires the stochastic interactions of self-assembled centrosomes with the female chromatin. In a portion of the unfertilized eggs that do not assemble centrosomes, microtubules organize a bipolar anastral mitotic spindle around the chromatin like the one formed during the first female meiosis, suggesting that similar pathways may be operative. In the cytoplasm of eggs in which centrosomes do form, monastral and biastral spindles are found. Analysis by laser scanning confocal microscopy suggests that these spindles are derived from the stochastic interaction of astral microtubules directly with kinetochore regions or indirectly with kinetochore microtubules. Our findings are consistent with the idea that mitotic spindle assembly requires both acentrosomal and centrosomal pathways, strengthening the hypothesis that astral microtubules can dictate the organization of the spindle by capturing kinetochore microtubules.

  2. Distinct roles for antiparallel microtubule pairing and overlap during early spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Nazarova, Elena; O'Toole, Eileen; Kaitna, Susi; Francois, Paul; Winey, Mark; Vogel, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    During spindle assembly, microtubules may attach to kinetochores or pair to form antiparallel pairs or interpolar microtubules, which span the two spindle poles and contribute to mitotic pole separation and chromosome segregation. Events in the specification of the interpolar microtubules are poorly understood. Using three-dimensional electron tomography and analysis of spindle dynamical behavior in living cells, we investigated the process of spindle assembly. Unexpectedly, we found that the phosphorylation state of an evolutionarily conserved Cdk1 site (S360) in γ-tubulin is correlated with the number and organization of interpolar microtubules. Mimicking S360 phosphorylation (S360D) results in bipolar spindles with a normal number of microtubules but lacking interpolar microtubules. Inhibiting S360 phosphorylation (S360A) results in spindles with interpolar microtubules and high-angle, antiparallel microtubule pairs. The latter are also detected in wild-type spindles <1 μm in length, suggesting that high-angle microtubule pairing represents an intermediate step in interpolar microtubule formation. Correlation of spindle architecture with dynamical behavior suggests that microtubule pairing is sufficient to separate the spindle poles, whereas interpolar microtubules maintain the velocity of pole displacement during early spindle assembly. Our findings suggest that the number of interpolar microtubules formed during spindle assembly is controlled in part through activities at the spindle poles. PMID:23966467

  3. Partial inhibition of Cdk1 in G2 phase overrides the SAC and decouples mitotic events

    PubMed Central

    McCloy, Rachael A; Rogers, Samuel; Caldon, C Elizabeth; Lorca, Thierry; Castro, Anna; Burgess, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Entry and progression through mitosis has traditionally been linked directly to the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1). In this study we utilized low doses of the Cdk1-specific inhibitor, RO3306 from early G2 phase onwards. Addition of low doses of RO3306 in G2 phase induced minor chromosome congression and segregation defects. In contrast, mild doses of RO3306 during G2 phase resulted in cells entering an aberrant mitosis, with cells fragmenting centrosomes and failing to fully disassemble the nuclear envelope. Cells often underwent cytokinesis and metaphase simultaneously, despite the presence of an active spindle assembly checkpoint, which prevented degradation of cyclin B1 and securin, resulting in the random partitioning of whole chromosomes. This highly aberrant mitosis produced a significant increase in the proportion of viable polyploid cells present up to 3 days post-treatment. Furthermore, cells treated with medium doses of RO3306 were only able to reach the threshold of Cdk1 substrate phosphorylation required to initiate nuclear envelope breakdown, but failed to reach the levels of phosphorylation required to correctly complete pro-metaphase. Treatment with low doses of Okadaic acid, which primarily inhibits PP2A, rescued the mitotic defects and increased the number of cells that completed a normal mitosis. This supports the current model that PP2A is the primary phosphatase that counterbalances the activity of Cdk1 during mitosis. Taken together these results show that continuous and subtle disruption of Cdk1 activity from G2 phase onwards has deleterious consequences on mitotic progression by disrupting the balance between Cdk1 and PP2A. PMID:24626186

  4. Characterization of ring-like F-actin structure as a mechanical partner for spindle positioning in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huan; Zhao, Qun; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Tongge; Xia, Peng; Seffens, William; Aikhionbare, Felix; Wang, Dongmei; Dou, Zhen; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-01-01

    Proper spindle positioning and orientation are essential for accurate mitosis which requires dynamic interactions between microtubule and actin filament (F-actin). Although mounting evidence demonstrates the role of F-actin in cortical cytoskeleton dynamics, it remains elusive as to the structure and function of F-actin-based networks in spindle geometry. Here we showed a ring-like F-actin structure surrounding the mitotic spindle which forms since metaphase and maintains in MG132-arrested metaphase HeLa cells. This cytoplasmic F-actin structure is relatively isotropic and less dynamic. Our computational modeling of spindle position process suggests a possible mechanism by which the ring-like F-actin structure can regulate astral microtubule dynamics and thus mitotic spindle orientation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting Plk1, Mps1 or Myosin, and disruption of microtubules or F-actin polymerization perturbs the formation of the ring-like F-actin structure and alters spindle position and symmetric division. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized but important link between mitotic spindle and ring-like F-actin network in accurate mitosis and enables the development of a method to theoretically illustrate the relationship between mitotic spindle and cytoplasmic F-actin. PMID:25299690

  5. Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jae Sung; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Sun-Jick; Bang, Jiyoung; Kim, Eun-A; Sung, Ki Sa; Yoon, Hyun-Joo; Yoo, Hae Yong; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •NuMA is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •NuMA lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient NuMA induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated NuMA induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that NuMA is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary NuMA acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous NuMA occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of NuMA to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient NuMA mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of NuMA might contribute to NuMA-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis.

  6. Mitotic arrest-associated apoptosis induced by sodium arsenite in A375 melanoma cells is BUBR1-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    McNeely, Samuel C.; Taylor, B. Frazier; States, J. Christopher

    2008-08-15

    A375 human malignant melanoma cells undergo mitotic arrest-associated apoptosis when treated with pharmacological concentrations of sodium arsenite, a chemotherapeutic for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Our previous studies indicated that decreased arsenite sensitivity correlated with reduced mitotic spindle checkpoint function and reduced expression of the checkpoint protein BUBR1. In the current study, arsenite induced securin and cyclin B stabilization, BUBR1 phosphorylation, and spindle checkpoint activation. Arsenite also increased activating cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) Thr{sup 161} phosphorylation but decreased inhibitory Tyr15 phosphorylation. Mitotic arrest resulted in apoptosis as indicated by colocalization of mitotic phospho-Histone H3 with active caspase 3. Apoptosis was associated with BCL-2 Ser70 phosphorylation. Inhibition of CDK1 with roscovitine in arsenite-treated mitotic cells inhibited spindle checkpoint maintenance as inferred from reduced BUBR1 phosphorylation, reduced cyclin B expression, and diminution of mitotic index. Roscovitine also reduced BCL-2 Ser70 phosphorylation and protected against apoptosis, suggesting mitotic arrest caused by hyperactivation of CDK1 directly or indirectly leads to BCL-2 phosphorylation and apoptosis. In addition, suppression of BUBR1 with siRNA prevented arsenite-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of arsenic's chemotherapeutic action and indicate a functional spindle checkpoint may be required for arsenic-sensitivity.

  7. Paratesticular Spindle Cell Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Biswajit; Bharti, Jyotsna Naresh; Dange, Prasad; Desai, Parth Anil; Khurana, Nita; Chander, Jagdish

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare variant of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma that affects young males and most commonly involves the paratesticular region. We report a case of paratesticular spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma in a 14-year-old boy, who presented with a painless scrotal mass. Left inguinal orchidectomy was performed. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination of the mass revealed spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma of the paratesticular region. PMID:26500726

  8. DDA3 targets Cep290 into the centrosome to regulate spindle positioning.

    PubMed

    Song, Haiyu; Park, Ji Eun; Jang, Chang-Young

    The centrosome is an important cellular organelle which nucleates microtubules (MTs) to form the cytoskeleton during interphase and the mitotic spindle during mitosis. The Cep290 is one of the centrosomal proteins and functions in cilia formation. Even-though it is in the centrosome, the function of Cep290 in mitosis had not yet been evaluated. In this study, we report a novel function of Cep290 that is involved in spindle positioning. Cep290 was identified as an interacting partner of DDA3, and we confirmed that Cep290 specifically localizes in the mitotic centrosome. Depletion of Cep290 caused a reduction of the astral spindle, leading to misorientation of the mitotic spindle. MT polymerization also decreased in Cep290-depleted cells, suggesting that Cep290 is involved in spindle nucleation. Furthermore, DDA3 stabilizes and transports Cep290 to the centrosome. Therefore, we concluded that DDA3 controls astral spindle formation and spindle positioning by targeting Cep290 to the centrosome. PMID:25998387

  9. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutradhar, S.; Basu, S.; Paul, R.

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed.

  10. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, S; Basu, S; Paul, R

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed. PMID:26565279

  11. Depletion of pre-mRNA splicing factor Cdc5L inhibits mitotic progression and triggers mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Mu, R; Wang, Y-B; Wu, M; Yang, Y; Song, W; Li, T; Zhang, W-N; Tan, B; Li, A-L; Wang, N; Xia, Q; Gong, W-L; Wang, C-G; Zhou, T; Guo, N; Sang, Z-H; Li, H-Y

    2014-01-01

    Disturbing mitotic progression via targeted anti-mitotic therapy is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Therefore, the exploration and elucidation of molecular targets and pathways in mitosis are critical for the development of anti-mitotic drugs. Here, we show that cell division cycle 5-like (Cdc5L), a pre-mRNA splicing factor, is a regulator of mitotic progression. Depletion of Cdc5L causes dramatic mitotic arrest, chromosome misalignments and sustained activation of spindle assembly checkpoint, eventually leading to mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, these defects result from severe impairment of kinetochore-microtubule attachment and serious DNA damage. Genome-wide gene expression analysis reveals that Cdc5L modulates the expression of a set of genes involved in the mitosis and the DNA damage response. We further found that the pre-mRNA splicing efficiency of these genes were impaired when Cdc5L was knocked down. Interestingly, Cdc5L is highly expressed in cervical tumors and osteosarcoma. Finally, we demonstrate that downregulation of Cdc5L decreases the cell viability of related tumor cells. These results suggest that Cdc5L is a key regulator of mitotic progression and highlight the potential of Cdc5L as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:24675469

  12. Depletion of pre-mRNA splicing factor Cdc5L inhibits mitotic progression and triggers mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Mu, R; Wang, Y-B; Wu, M; Yang, Y; Song, W; Li, T; Zhang, W-N; Tan, B; Li, A-L; Wang, N; Xia, Q; Gong, W-L; Wang, C-G; Zhou, T; Guo, N; Sang, Z-H; Li, H-Y

    2014-01-01

    Disturbing mitotic progression via targeted anti-mitotic therapy is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Therefore, the exploration and elucidation of molecular targets and pathways in mitosis are critical for the development of anti-mitotic drugs. Here, we show that cell division cycle 5-like (Cdc5L), a pre-mRNA splicing factor, is a regulator of mitotic progression. Depletion of Cdc5L causes dramatic mitotic arrest, chromosome misalignments and sustained activation of spindle assembly checkpoint, eventually leading to mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, these defects result from severe impairment of kinetochore-microtubule attachment and serious DNA damage. Genome-wide gene expression analysis reveals that Cdc5L modulates the expression of a set of genes involved in the mitosis and the DNA damage response. We further found that the pre-mRNA splicing efficiency of these genes were impaired when Cdc5L was knocked down. Interestingly, Cdc5L is highly expressed in cervical tumors and osteosarcoma. Finally, we demonstrate that downregulation of Cdc5L decreases the cell viability of related tumor cells. These results suggest that Cdc5L is a key regulator of mitotic progression and highlight the potential of Cdc5L as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:24675469

  13. Self-organization mechanisms in the assembly and maintenance of bipolar spindles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbank, Kendra Stewart

    Anastral, meiotic spindles are thought to be organized differently from astral, mitotic spindles, but the field has lacked basic structural information required to describe and model them, including the location of microtubule nucleating sites and minus ends. How the various components of spindles act together to establish and maintain the dynamic bipolar structure of spindles is not understood. We measure the distributions of oriented microtubules (MTs) in metaphase anastral spindles in Xenopus extracts by fluorescence speckle microscopy and cross-correlation analysis. We localized plus ends by tubulin incorporation and combined this with the orientation data to infer the localization of minus ends. We find that minus ends are localized throughout the spindle, sparsely at the equator and at higher concentrations near the poles. This dads to the surprising conclusion that spindles contained many short MTs, not connected to the spindle poles. Based on these data, we propose a slide-and-cluster model based on four known molecular activities: MT nucleation near chromosomes, the sliding of MTs by a plus-enddirected motor, the clustering of their minus ends by a minus-end-directed motor, and the loss of MTs by dynamic instability. This work demonstrates how the interplay between two types of motors together with continual nucleation of MTs by chromosomes could organize the MTs into spindles. Our model applies to overlapping, nonkinetochore MTs in anastral spindles, and perhaps also to interpolar MTs in astral spindles. We show mathematically that the slide-and-cluster mechanism robustly forms bipolar spindles a stable steady-state length, sometimes with sharp poles. This model accounts for several experimental observations that were difficult to explain with existing models, and is the first self contained model for anastral spindle assembly, MT sliding (known as poleward flux), and spindle bistability. Our experimental results support the slide-and-cluster scenario

  14. A diagnostic algorithm to distinguish desmoplastic from spindle cell melanoma.

    PubMed

    Weissinger, Stephanie E; Keil, Philipp; Silvers, David N; Klaus, Beate M; Möller, Peter; Horst, Basil A; Lennerz, Jochen K

    2014-04-01

    Spindle cell melanoma and desmoplastic melanoma differ clinically in prognosis and therapeutic implications; however, because of partially overlapping histopathological features, diagnostic distinction of spindle cell from desmoplastic melanoma is not always straightforward. A direct comparison of diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers has not been performed. Meta-review of the literature discloses key clinicopathological differences between spindle cell and desmoplastic melanoma, including immunophenotypes. Using 50 biomarkers available in routine diagnostics, we examined 38 archival cases (n=16 spindle, 18 desmoplastic, 4 mixed spindle/desmoplastic melanoma). S100 remains as the most reliable routine marker to reach the diagnosis of melanoma in spindle cell and desmoplastic melanoma. We identified nine distinctly labeling markers with spindle cell melanoma showing positivity for laminin, p75, HMB45, c-kit, and MelanA, and desmoplastic melanoma preferentially labeling with collagen IV, trichrome, CD68, and MDM2. On the basis of comparisons of test performance measures, MelanA and trichrome were used to devise a 94% sensitive diagnostic algorithm for the distinction of desmoplastic from spindle cell melanoma. Gene amplification and expression status was assessed for a set of potentially drugable targets (HER2, EGFR, MET, MDM2, TP53, ALK, MYC, FLI-1, and KIT). Fluorescent in situ hybridizations did not reveal a significant number of gene aberrations/rearrangements; however, protein overexpression for at least one of these markers was identified in 35 of 38 cases (92%). In addition, we found BRAF mutations in 31% of spindle cell and 5% of desmoplastic melanoma, with an overall mutation frequency of 16% (n=6/38). We present the first comprehensive screening study of diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers in spindle cell and desmoplastic melanoma. The devised algorithm allows diagnostic distinction of desmoplastic from spindle cell melanoma when routine histology is not

  15. A comprehensive model to predict mitotic division in budding yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Yadav, Vikas; Sridhar, Shreyas; Sreekumar, Lakshmi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Ghosh, Santanu Kumar; Paul, Raja; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2015-01-01

    High-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division depends on a series of concerted interdependent interactions. Using a systems biology approach, we built a robust minimal computational model to comprehend mitotic events in dividing budding yeasts of two major phyla: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This model accurately reproduces experimental observations related to spindle alignment, nuclear migration, and microtubule (MT) dynamics during cell division in these yeasts. The model converges to the conclusion that biased nucleation of cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) is essential for directional nuclear migration. Two distinct pathways, based on the population of cMTs and cortical dyneins, differentiate nuclear migration and spindle orientation in these two phyla. In addition, the model accurately predicts the contribution of specific classes of MTs in chromosome segregation. Thus we present a model that offers a wider applicability to simulate the effects of perturbation of an event on the concerted process of the mitotic cell division. PMID:26310442

  16. A comparative analysis of spindle morphometrics across metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Marina E.; Strzelecka, Magdalena; Wilbur, Jeremy D.; Good, Matthew C.; von Dassow, George; Heald, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell division in all eukaryotes depends on function of the spindle, a microtubule-based structure that segregates chromosomes to generate daughter cells in mitosis or haploid gametes in meiosis. Spindle size adapts to changes in cell size and shape, which vary dramatically across species and within a multicellular organism, but the nature of scaling events and their underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Cell size variations are most pronounced in early animal development, as egg diameters range from tens of microns up to millimeters across animal phyla, and decrease several orders of magnitude during rapid reductive divisions. During early embryogenesis in the model organisms X. laevis and C. elegans, the spindle scales with cell size [1,2], a phenomenon regulated by molecules that modulate microtubule dynamics [3–6], as well as by limiting cytoplasmic volume [7,8]. However, it is not known to what extent spindle scaling is conserved across organisms and among different cell types. Here we show that in a range of metazoan phyla, mitotic spindle length decreased with cell size across a ~30 fold difference in zygote size. Maximum spindle length varied, but linear spindle scaling occurred similarly in all species once embryonic cell diameter reduced to 140 μm. In contrast, we find that the female meiotic spindle does not scale as closely to egg size, adopting a more uniform size across species that likely reflects its specialized function. Our analysis reveals that spindle morphometrics change abruptly, within one cell cycle, at the transition from meiosis to mitosis in most animals. PMID:26004761

  17. Uncovering the molecular machinery of the human spindle--an integration of wet and dry systems biology.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Ana M; Santamaria, Anna; Malik, Rainer; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Körner, Roman; Morilla, Ian; de Juan, David; Krallinger, Martin; Hansen, Daniel Aaen; Hoffmann, Robert; Lees, Jonathan; Reid, Adam; Yeats, Corin; Wehner, Anja; Elowe, Sabine; Clegg, Andrew B; Brunak, Søren; Nigg, Erich A; Orengo, Christine; Valencia, Alfonso; Ranea, Juan A G

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is an essential molecular machine involved in cell division, whose composition has been studied extensively by detailed cellular biology, high-throughput proteomics, and RNA interference experiments. However, because of its dynamic organization and complex regulation it is difficult to obtain a complete description of its molecular composition. We have implemented an integrated computational approach to characterize novel human spindle components and have analysed in detail the individual candidates predicted to be spindle proteins, as well as the network of predicted relations connecting known and putative spindle proteins. The subsequent experimental validation of a number of predicted novel proteins confirmed not only their association with the spindle apparatus but also their role in mitosis. We found that 75% of our tested proteins are localizing to the spindle apparatus compared to a success rate of 35% when expert knowledge alone was used. We compare our results to the previously published MitoCheck study and see that our approach does validate some findings by this consortium. Further, we predict so-called "hidden spindle hub", proteins whose network of interactions is still poorly characterised by experimental means and which are thought to influence the functionality of the mitotic spindle on a large scale. Our analyses suggest that we are still far from knowing the complete repertoire of functionally important components of the human spindle network. Combining integrated bio-computational approaches and single gene experimental follow-ups could be key to exploring the still hidden regions of the human spindle system. PMID:22427808

  18. Interphase adhesion geometry is transmitted to an internal regulator for spindle orientation via caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shigeru; Kojidani, Tomoko; Kamioka, Yuji; Uchida, Seiichi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Kimura, Akatsuki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Despite theoretical and physical studies implying that cell-extracellular matrix adhesion geometry governs the orientation of the cell division axis, the molecular mechanisms that translate interphase adhesion geometry to the mitotic spindle orientation remain elusive. Here, we show that the cellular edge retraction during mitotic cell rounding correlates with the spindle axis. At the onset of mitotic cell rounding, caveolin-1 is targeted to the retracting cortical region at the proximal end of retraction fibres, where ganglioside GM1-enriched membrane domains with clusters of caveola-like structures are formed in an integrin and RhoA-dependent manner. Furthermore, Gαi1-LGN-NuMA, a well-known regulatory complex of spindle orientation, is targeted to the caveolin-1-enriched cortical region to guide the spindle axis towards the cellular edge retraction. We propose that retraction-induced cortical heterogeneity of caveolin-1 during mitotic cell rounding sets the spindle orientation in the context of adhesion geometry. PMID:27292265

  19. Interphase adhesion geometry is transmitted to an internal regulator for spindle orientation via caveolin-1

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Shigeru; Kojidani, Tomoko; Kamioka, Yuji; Uchida, Seiichi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Kimura, Akatsuki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Despite theoretical and physical studies implying that cell-extracellular matrix adhesion geometry governs the orientation of the cell division axis, the molecular mechanisms that translate interphase adhesion geometry to the mitotic spindle orientation remain elusive. Here, we show that the cellular edge retraction during mitotic cell rounding correlates with the spindle axis. At the onset of mitotic cell rounding, caveolin-1 is targeted to the retracting cortical region at the proximal end of retraction fibres, where ganglioside GM1-enriched membrane domains with clusters of caveola-like structures are formed in an integrin and RhoA-dependent manner. Furthermore, Gαi1–LGN–NuMA, a well-known regulatory complex of spindle orientation, is targeted to the caveolin-1-enriched cortical region to guide the spindle axis towards the cellular edge retraction. We propose that retraction-induced cortical heterogeneity of caveolin-1 during mitotic cell rounding sets the spindle orientation in the context of adhesion geometry. PMID:27292265

  20. Formation of bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in tetraploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu; Seyama, Atsushi

    2012-09-01

    Tetraploid cells with unstable chromosomes frequently arise as an early step in tumorigenesis and lead to the formation of aneuploid cells. The mechanisms responsible for the chromosome instability of polyploid cells are not fully understood, although the supernumerary centrosomes in polyploid cells have been considered the major cause of chromosomal instability. The aim of this study was to examine the integrity of mitotic spindles and centrosomes in proliferative polyploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts. TIG-1 human fibroblasts were treated with demecolcine (DC) for 4 days to induce polyploidy, and the change in DNA content was monitored. Localization of centrosomes and mitotic spindles in polyploid mitotic cells was examined by immunohistochemistry and laser scanning cytometry. TIG-1 cells treated with DC became almost completely tetraploid at 2 weeks after treatment and grew at the same rate as untreated diploid cells. Most mitotic cells with 8C DNA content had only two centrosomes with bipolar spindles in established tetraploid cells, although they had four or more centrosomes with multipolar spindles at 3 days after DC treatment. The frequency of aneuploid cells increased as established tetraploid cells were propagated. These results indicate that tetraploid cells that form bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in mitosis can proliferate as diploid cells. These cells may serve as a useful model for studying the chromosome instability of polyploid cells. PMID:22696268

  1. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes of

  2. Mitotic exit: Determining the PP2A dephosphorylation program.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gislene; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-08-29

    In mitotic exit, proteins that were highly phosphorylated are sequentially targeted by the phosphatase PP2A-B55, but what underlies substrate selection is unclear. In this issue, Cundell et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201606033) identify the determinants of PP2A-B55's dephosphorylation program, thereby influencing spindle disassembly, nuclear envelope reformation, and cytokinesis. PMID:27551057

  3. Developmental Changes in Sleep Spindle Characteristics and Sigma Power across Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Ian J.; Lustenberger, Caroline; Achermann, Peter; Lassonde, Jonathan M.; Kurth, Salome; LeBourgeois, Monique K.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles, a prominent feature of the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), are linked to cognitive abilities. Early childhood is a time of rapid cognitive and neurophysiological maturation; however, little is known about developmental changes in sleep spindles. In this study, we longitudinally examined trajectories of multiple sleep spindle characteristics (i.e., spindle duration, frequency, integrated spindle amplitude, and density) and power in the sigma frequency range (10–16 Hz) across ages 2, 3, and 5 years (n = 8; 3 males). At each time point, nocturnal sleep EEG was recorded in-home after 13-h of prior wakefulness. Spindle duration, integrated spindle amplitude, and sigma power increased with age across all EEG derivations (C3A2, C4A1, O2A1, and O1A2; all ps < 0.05). We also found a developmental decrease in mean spindle frequency (p < 0.05) but no change in spindle density with increasing age. Thus, sleep spindles increased in duration and amplitude but decreased in frequency across early childhood. Our data characterize early developmental changes in sleep spindles, which may advance understanding of thalamocortical brain connectivity and associated lifelong disease processes. These findings also provide unique insights into spindle ontogenesis in early childhood and may help identify electrophysiological features related to healthy and aberrant brain maturation. PMID:27110405

  4. Developmental Changes in Sleep Spindle Characteristics and Sigma Power across Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    McClain, Ian J; Lustenberger, Caroline; Achermann, Peter; Lassonde, Jonathan M; Kurth, Salome; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles, a prominent feature of the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), are linked to cognitive abilities. Early childhood is a time of rapid cognitive and neurophysiological maturation; however, little is known about developmental changes in sleep spindles. In this study, we longitudinally examined trajectories of multiple sleep spindle characteristics (i.e., spindle duration, frequency, integrated spindle amplitude, and density) and power in the sigma frequency range (10-16 Hz) across ages 2, 3, and 5 years (n = 8; 3 males). At each time point, nocturnal sleep EEG was recorded in-home after 13-h of prior wakefulness. Spindle duration, integrated spindle amplitude, and sigma power increased with age across all EEG derivations (C3A2, C4A1, O2A1, and O1A2; all ps < 0.05). We also found a developmental decrease in mean spindle frequency (p < 0.05) but no change in spindle density with increasing age. Thus, sleep spindles increased in duration and amplitude but decreased in frequency across early childhood. Our data characterize early developmental changes in sleep spindles, which may advance understanding of thalamocortical brain connectivity and associated lifelong disease processes. These findings also provide unique insights into spindle ontogenesis in early childhood and may help identify electrophysiological features related to healthy and aberrant brain maturation. PMID:27110405

  5. Self-Organization of Anastral Spindles by Synergy of Dynamic Instability, Autocatalytic Microtubule Production, and a Spatial Signaling Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Thomas; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2007-01-01

    Assembly of the mitotic spindle is a classic example of macromolecular self-organization. During spindle assembly, microtubules (MTs) accumulate around chromatin. In centrosomal spindles, centrosomes at the spindle poles are the dominating source of MT production. However, many systems assemble anastral spindles, i.e., spindles without centrosomes at the poles. How anastral spindles produce and maintain a high concentration of MTs in the absence of centrosome-catalyzed MT production is unknown. With a combined biochemistry-computer simulation approach, we show that the concerted activity of three components can efficiently concentrate microtubules (MTs) at chromatin: (1) an external stimulus in form of a RanGTP gradient centered on chromatin, (2) a feed-back loop where MTs induce production of new MTs, and (3) continuous re-organization of MT structures by dynamic instability. The mechanism proposed here can generate and maintain a dissipative MT super-structure within a RanGTP gradient. PMID:17330139

  6. A Specific Form of Phospho Protein Phosphatase 2 Regulates Anaphase-promoting Complex/Cyclosome Association with Spindle Poles

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    In early mitosis, the END (Emi1/NuMA/Dynein-dynactin) network anchors the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) to the mitotic spindle and poles. Spindle anchoring restricts APC/C activity, thereby limiting the destruction of spindle-associated cyclin B and ensuring maintenance of spindle integrity. Emi1 binds directly to hypophosphorylated APC/C, linking the APC/C to the spindle via NuMA. However, whether the phosphorylation state of the APC/C is important for its association with the spindle and what kinases and phosphatases are necessary for regulating this event remain unknown. Here, we describe the regulation of APC/C-mitotic spindle pole association by phosphorylation. We find that only hypophosphorylated APC/C associates with microtubule asters, suggesting that phosphatases are important. Indeed, a specific form of PPP2 (CA/R1A/R2B) binds APC/C, and PPP2 activity is necessary for Cdc27 dephosphorylation. Screening by RNA interference, we find that inactivation of CA, R1A, or R2B leads to delocalization of APC/C from spindle poles, early mitotic spindle defects, a failure to congress chromosomes, and decreased levels of cyclin B on the spindle. Consistently, inhibition of cyclin B/Cdk1 activity increased APC/C binding to microtubules. Thus, cyclin B/Cdk1 and PPP2 regulate the dynamic association of APC/C with spindle poles in early mitosis, a step necessary for proper spindle formation. PMID:20089842

  7. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT– bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14036.001 PMID:27166637

  8. Actin-based spindle positioning: new insights from female gametes.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Maria; Terret, Marie-Émilie; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2014-02-01

    Asymmetric divisions are essential in metazoan development, where they promote the emergence of cell lineages. The mitotic spindle has astral microtubules that contact the cortex, which act as a sensor of cell geometry and as an integrator to orient cell division. Recent advances in live imaging revealed novel pools and roles of F-actin in somatic cells and in oocytes. In somatic cells, cytoplasmic F-actin is involved in spindle architecture and positioning. In starfish and mouse oocytes, newly discovered meshes of F-actin control chromosome gathering and spindle positioning. Because oocytes lack centrosomes and astral microtubules, F-actin networks are key players in the positioning of spindles by transmitting forces over long distances. Oocytes also achieve highly asymmetric divisions, and thus are excellent models to study the roles of these newly discovered F-actin networks in spindle positioning. Moreover, recent studies in mammalian oocytes provide a further understanding of the organisation of F-actin networks and their biophysical properties. In this Commentary, we present examples of the role of F-actin in spindle positioning and asymmetric divisions, with an emphasis on the most up-to-date studies from mammalian oocytes. We also address specific technical issues in the field, namely live imaging of F-actin networks and stress the need for interdisciplinary approaches. PMID:24413163

  9. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position.

    PubMed

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT- bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position. PMID:27166637

  10. The actin-binding ERM protein Moesin directly regulates spindle assembly and function during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Vilmos, Péter; Kristó, Ildikó; Szikora, Szilárd; Jankovics, Ferenc; Lukácsovich, Tamás; Kari, Beáta; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin proteins are highly conserved, actin-binding cytoskeletal proteins that play an essential role in microvilli formation, T-cell activation, and tumor metastasis by linking actin filaments to the plasma membrane. Recent studies demonstrated that the only Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin protein of Drosophila melanogaster, Moesin, is involved in mitotic spindle function through stabilizing cell shape and microtubules at the cell cortex. We previously observed that Moesin localizes to the mitotic spindle; hence, we tested for the biological significance of this surprising localization and investigated whether it plays a direct role in spindle function. To separate the cortical and spindle functions of Moesin during mitosis we combined cell biological and genetic methods. We used early Drosophila embryos, in which mitosis occurs in the absence of a cell cortex, and found in vivo evidence for the direct requirement of Moesin in mitotic spindle assembly and function. We also found that the accumulation of Moesin precedes the construction of the microtubule spindle, and the fusiform structure formed by Moesin persists even after the microtubules have disassembled. PMID:27006187

  11. The Mitotic Checkpoint Gene, SIL is Regulated by E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Erez, Ayelet; Chaussepied, Marie; Tina, Colaizzo-Anas; Aplan, Peter; Ginsberg, Doron; Izraeli, Shai

    2009-01-01

    The SIL gene expression is increased in multiple cancers and correlates with the expression of mitotic spindle checkpoint genes and with increased metastatic potential. SIL regulates mitotic entry, organization of the mitotic spindle and cell survival. The E2F transcription factors regulate cell cycle progression by controlling the expression of genes mediating the G1/S transition. More recently E2F has been shown to regulate mitotic spindle checkpoint genes as well. As SIL expression correlates with mitotic checkpoint genes we hypothesized that SIL is regulated by E2F. We mined raw data of published experiments and performed new experiments by modification of E2F expression in cell lines, reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Ectopic expression or endogenous activation of E2F induced the expression of SIL, while knockdown of E2F by shRNA, downregulated SIL expression. E2F activated SIL promoter by reporter assay and bound to SIL promoter in-vivo. Taken together these data demonstrate that SIL is regulated by E2F. As SIL is essential for mitotic entry, E2F may regulate G2/M transition through the induction of SIL. Furthermore, as silencing of SIL cause apoptosis in cancer cells, these finding may have therapeutic relevance in tumors with constitutive activation of E2F. PMID:18649360

  12. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication. PMID:21573113

  13. Induction of Aneuploidy, Centrosome Abnormality, Multipolar Spindle, and Multipolar Division in Cultured Mammalian Cells Exposed to an Arsenic Metabolite, Dimethylarsinate.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Toxicological studies of arsenic compounds were conducted in cultured mammalian cells to investigate the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. Dimethylarsinate DMA(V) was not cytotoxic in cells depleted of GSH, but was found to be cytotoxic when GSH was present outside the cells. The results suggested that a reactive form of DMA(V) was generated through interaction with GSH. Dimethylarsine iodide DMI(III) was used as a model compound of DMA(III), and the biological effects were investigated. DMI(III) was about 10000 times more toxic to the cells than DMA(V). Chromosome structural aberrations and numerical changes, such as aneuploidy, were induced by DMI(III). DMA(V) induced multiple foci of the centrosome protein, γ-tubulin, which were colocalized with multipolar spindles in mitotic cells. The multiple foci coalesced into a single dot on disruption of the microtubules (MT). However, reorganization of the MT caused multiple foci of γ-tubulin, suggesting that the induction of centrosome abnormalities by DMA(V) required intact MT. Inhibition of the MT-dependent motor, kinesin, prevented formation of multiple foci of γ-tubulin, which pointed to the involvement of the MT-dependent mitotic motor, kinesin, in the maintenance of centrosome abnormalities. DMI(III) caused abnormal cytokinesis (multipolar division). In addition, DMI(III) caused morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Consideration of the overall process following the centrosome abnormalities caused by DMA(V) suggested a mode of cytotoxicity in which the mitotic centrosome is a critical target. PMID:27252065

  14. NUP98 fusion oncoproteins interact with the APC/C(Cdc20) as a pseudosubstrate and prevent mitotic checkpoint complex binding.

    PubMed

    Salsi, Valentina; Fantini, Sebastian; Zappavigna, Vincenzo

    2016-09-01

    NUP98 is a recurrent partner gene in translocations causing acute myeloid leukemias and myelodisplastic syndrome. The expression of NUP98 fusion oncoproteins has been shown to induce mitotic spindle defects and chromosome missegregation, which correlate with the capability of NUP98 fusions to cause mitotic checkpoint attenuation. We show that NUP98 oncoproteins physically interact with the APC/C(Cdc20) in the absence of the NUP98 partner protein RAE1, and prevent the binding of the mitotic checkpoint complex to the APC/C(Cdc20). NUP98 oncoproteins require the GLEBS-like domain present in their NUP98 moiety to bind the APC/C(Cdc20). We found that NUP98 wild-type is a substrate of APC/C(Cdc20) prior to mitotic entry, and that its binding to APC/C(Cdc20) is controlled via phosphorylation of a PEST sequence located within its C-terminal portion. We identify S606, within the PEST sequence, as a key target site, whose phosphorylation modulates the capability of NUP98 to interact with APC/C(Cdc20). We finally provide evidence for an involvement of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase PIN1 in modulating the possible conformational changes within NUP98 that lead to its dissociation from the APC/C(Cdc20) during mitosis. Our results provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying the aberrant capability of NUP98 oncoproteins to interact with APC/C(Cdc20) and to interfere with its function. PMID:27097363

  15. NuMA-microtubule interactions are critical for spindle orientation and the morphogenesis of diverse epidermal structures.

    PubMed

    Seldin, Lindsey; Muroyama, Andrew; Lechler, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is used to generate cell fate diversity and drive proper tissue morphogenesis. A complex of NuMA and dynein/dynactin is required for robust spindle orientation in a number of cell types. Previous research proposed that cortical dynein/dynactin was sufficient to generate forces on astral microtubules (MTs) to orient the spindle, with NuMA acting as a passive tether. In this study, we demonstrate that dynein/dynactin is insufficient for spindle orientation establishment in keratinocytes and that NuMA's MT-binding domain, which targets MT tips, is also required. Loss of NuMA-MT interactions in skin caused defects in spindle orientation and epidermal differentiation, leading to neonatal lethality. In addition, we show that NuMA-MT interactions are also required in adult mice for hair follicle morphogenesis and spindle orientation within the transit-amplifying cells of the matrix. Loss of spindle orientation in matrix cells results in defective differentiation of matrix-derived lineages. Our results reveal an additional and direct function of NuMA during mitotic spindle positioning, as well as a reiterative use of spindle orientation in the skin to build diverse structures. PMID:26765568

  16. NuMA-microtubule interactions are critical for spindle orientation and the morphogenesis of diverse epidermal structures

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Lindsey; Muroyama, Andrew; Lechler, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is used to generate cell fate diversity and drive proper tissue morphogenesis. A complex of NuMA and dynein/dynactin is required for robust spindle orientation in a number of cell types. Previous research proposed that cortical dynein/dynactin was sufficient to generate forces on astral microtubules (MTs) to orient the spindle, with NuMA acting as a passive tether. In this study, we demonstrate that dynein/dynactin is insufficient for spindle orientation establishment in keratinocytes and that NuMA’s MT-binding domain, which targets MT tips, is also required. Loss of NuMA-MT interactions in skin caused defects in spindle orientation and epidermal differentiation, leading to neonatal lethality. In addition, we show that NuMA-MT interactions are also required in adult mice for hair follicle morphogenesis and spindle orientation within the transit-amplifying cells of the matrix. Loss of spindle orientation in matrix cells results in defective differentiation of matrix-derived lineages. Our results reveal an additional and direct function of NuMA during mitotic spindle positioning, as well as a reiterative use of spindle orientation in the skin to build diverse structures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12504.001 PMID:26765568

  17. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  18. Arsenite-induced mitotic death involves stress response and is independent of tubulin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B. Frazier; McNeely, Samuel C.; Miller, Heather L.; States, J. Christopher

    2008-07-15

    Arsenite, a known mitotic disruptor, causes cell cycle arrest and cell death at anaphase. The mechanism causing mitotic arrest is highly disputed. We compared arsenite to the spindle poisons nocodazole and paclitaxel. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in interphase cells demonstrated that, while nocodazole and paclitaxel disrupt microtubule polymerization through destabilization and hyperpolymerization, respectively, microtubules in arsenite-treated cells remain comparable to untreated cells even at supra-therapeutic concentrations. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in mitotic cells showed spindle formation in arsenite- and paclitaxel-treated cells but not in nocodazole-treated cells. Spindle formation in arsenite-treated cells appeared irregular and multi-polar. {gamma}-tubulin staining showed that cells treated with nocodazole and therapeutic concentrations of paclitaxel contained two centrosomes. In contrast, most arsenite-treated mitotic cells contained more than two centrosomes, similar to centrosome abnormalities induced by heat shock. Of the three drugs tested, only arsenite treatment increased expression of the inducible isoform of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i). HSP70 and HSP90 proteins are intimately involved in centrosome regulation and mitotic spindle formation. HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG sensitized cells to arsenite treatment and increased arsenite-induced centrosome abnormalities. Combined treatment of 17-DMAG and arsenite resulted in a supra-additive effect on viability, mitotic arrest, and centrosome abnormalities. Thus, arsenite-induced abnormal centrosome amplification and subsequent mitotic arrest is independent of effects on tubulin polymerization and may be due to specific stresses that are protected against by HSP90 and HSP70.

  19. Noninvasive three-dimensional live imaging methodology for the spindles at meiosis and mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing-gao; Huo, Tiancheng; Tian, Ning; Chen, Tianyuan; Wang, Chengming; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Fengying; Lu, Danyu; Chen, Dieyan; Ma, Wanyun; Sun, Jia-lin; Xue, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The spindle plays a crucial role in normal chromosome alignment and segregation during meiosis and mitosis. Studying spindles in living cells noninvasively is of great value in assisted reproduction technology (ART). Here, we present a novel spindle imaging methodology, full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). Without any dye labeling and fixation, we demonstrate the first successful application of FF-OCT to noninvasive three-dimensional (3-D) live imaging of the meiotic spindles within the mouse living oocytes at metaphase II as well as the mitotic spindles in the living zygotes at metaphase and telophase. By post-processing of the 3-D dataset obtained with FF-OCT, the important morphological and spatial parameters of the spindles, such as short and long axes, spatial localization, and the angle of meiotic spindle deviation from the first polar body in the oocyte were precisely measured with the spatial resolution of 0.7 μm. Our results reveal the potential of FF-OCT as an imaging tool capable of noninvasive 3-D live morphological analysis for spindles, which might be useful to ART related procedures and many other spindle related studies.

  20. Cortical dynein and asymmetric membrane elongation coordinately position the spindle in anaphase

    PubMed Central

    Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Cheeseman, Iain M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitotic spindle position defines the cell cleavage site during cytokinesis. However, the mechanisms that control spindle positioning to generate equal-sized daughter cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that two mechanisms act coordinately to center the spindle during anaphase in symmetrically dividing human cells. First, the spindle is positioned directly by the microtubule-based motor dynein, which we demonstrate is targeted to the cell cortex by two distinct pathways: a Gαi/LGN/NuMA-dependent pathway, and a 4.1G/R and NuMA-dependent anaphase-specific pathway. Second, we find that asymmetric plasma membrane elongation occurs in response to spindle mis-positioning to alter the cellular boundaries relative to the spindle. Asymmetric membrane elongation is promoted by chromosome-derived Ran-GTP signals that locally reduce Anillin at the growing cell cortex. In asymmetrically elongating cells, dynein-dependent spindle anchoring at the stationary cell cortex ensures proper spindle positioning. Our results reveal the anaphase-specific spindle centering systems that achieve equal-sized cell division. PMID:23870127

  1. Integrating high-throughput genetic interaction mapping and high-content screening to explore yeast spindle morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; van Dyk, Nydia; S.Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Cheung, Vincent; Li, Jingjing; Sydorskyy, Yaroslav; Case, Nicolle; Li, Zhijian; Datti, Alessandro; Nislow, Corey; Raught, Brian; Zhang, Zhaolei; Frey, Brendan; Bloom, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    We describe the application of a novel screening approach that combines automated yeast genetics, synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis, and a high-content screening (HCS) system to examine mitotic spindle morphogenesis. We measured numerous spindle and cellular morphological parameters in thousands of single mutants and corresponding sensitized double mutants lacking genes known to be involved in spindle function. We focused on a subset of genes that appear to define a highly conserved mitotic spindle disassembly pathway, which is known to involve Ipl1p, the yeast aurora B kinase, as well as the cell cycle regulatory networks mitotic exit network (MEN) and fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR). We also dissected the function of the kinetochore protein Mcm21p, showing that sumoylation of Mcm21p regulates the enrichment of Ipl1p and other chromosomal passenger proteins to the spindle midzone to mediate spindle disassembly. Although we focused on spindle disassembly in a proof-of-principle study, our integrated HCS-SGA method can be applied to virtually any pathway, making it a powerful means for identifying specific cellular functions. PMID:20065090

  2. Spindle-to-cortex communication in cleaving, polyspermic Xenopus eggs

    PubMed Central

    Field, Christine M.; Groen, Aaron C.; Nguyen, Phuong A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic spindles specify cleavage planes in early embryos by communicating their position and orientation to the cell cortex using microtubule asters that grow out from the spindle poles during anaphase. Chromatin also plays a poorly understood role. Polyspermic fertilization provides a natural experiment in which aster pairs from the same spindle (sister asters) have chromatin between them, whereas asters pairs from different spindles (nonsisters) do not. In frogs, only sister aster pairs induce furrows. We found that only sister asters recruited two conserved furrow-inducing signaling complexes, chromosome passenger complex (CPC) and Centralspindlin, to a plane between them. This explains why only sister pairs induce furrows. We then investigated factors that influenced CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles in intact eggs and a cytokinesis extract system. We found that microtubule stabilization, optimal starting distance between asters, and proximity to chromatin all favored CPC recruitment. We propose a model in which proximity to chromatin biases initial CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles between asters from the same spindle. Next a positive feedback between CPC recruitment and microtubule stabilization promotes lateral growth of a plane of CPC-positive microtubule bundles out to the cortex to position the furrow. PMID:26310438

  3. Spindle-to-cortex communication in cleaving, polyspermic Xenopus eggs.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Groen, Aaron C; Nguyen, Phuong A; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2015-10-15

    Mitotic spindles specify cleavage planes in early embryos by communicating their position and orientation to the cell cortex using microtubule asters that grow out from the spindle poles during anaphase. Chromatin also plays a poorly understood role. Polyspermic fertilization provides a natural experiment in which aster pairs from the same spindle (sister asters) have chromatin between them, whereas asters pairs from different spindles (nonsisters) do not. In frogs, only sister aster pairs induce furrows. We found that only sister asters recruited two conserved furrow-inducing signaling complexes, chromosome passenger complex (CPC) and Centralspindlin, to a plane between them. This explains why only sister pairs induce furrows. We then investigated factors that influenced CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles in intact eggs and a cytokinesis extract system. We found that microtubule stabilization, optimal starting distance between asters, and proximity to chromatin all favored CPC recruitment. We propose a model in which proximity to chromatin biases initial CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles between asters from the same spindle. Next a positive feedback between CPC recruitment and microtubule stabilization promotes lateral growth of a plane of CPC-positive microtubule bundles out to the cortex to position the furrow. PMID:26310438

  4. Chromosome Movement in Mitosis Requires Microtubule Anchorage at Spindle Poles

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael B.; Howard, Louisa; Compton, Duane A.

    2001-01-01

    Anchorage of microtubule minus ends at spindle poles has been proposed to bear the load of poleward forces exerted by kinetochore-associated motors so that chromosomes move toward the poles rather than the poles toward the chromosomes. To test this hypothesis, we monitored chromosome movement during mitosis after perturbation of nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) and the human homologue of the KIN C motor family (HSET), two noncentrosomal proteins involved in spindle pole organization in animal cells. Perturbation of NuMA alone disrupts spindle pole organization and delays anaphase onset, but does not alter the velocity of oscillatory chromosome movement in prometaphase. Perturbation of HSET alone increases the duration of prometaphase, but does not alter the velocity of chromosome movement in prometaphase or anaphase. In contrast, simultaneous perturbation of both HSET and NuMA severely suppresses directed chromosome movement in prometaphase. Chromosomes coalesce near the center of these cells on bi-oriented spindles that lack organized poles. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy verify microtubule attachment to sister kinetochores, but this attachment fails to generate proper tension across sister kinetochores. These results demonstrate that anchorage of microtubule minus ends at spindle poles mediated by overlapping mechanisms involving both NuMA and HSET is essential for chromosome movement during mitosis. PMID:11157972

  5. Antiproliferative Fate of the Tetraploid Formed after Mitotic Slippage and Its Promotion; A Novel Target for Cancer Therapy Based on Microtubule Poisons.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yuji; Inoue, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule poisons inhibit spindle function, leading to activation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and mitotic arrest. Cell death occurring in prolonged mitosis is the first target of microtubule poisons in cancer therapies. However, even in the presence of microtubule poisons, SAC and mitotic arrest are not permanent, and the surviving cells exit the mitosis without cytokinesis (mitotic slippage), becoming tetraploid. Another target of microtubule poisons-based cancer therapy is antiproliferative fate after mitotic slippage. The ultimate goal of both the microtubule poisons-based cancer therapies involves the induction of a mechanism defined as mitotic catastrophe, which is a bona fide intrinsic oncosuppressive mechanism that senses mitotic failure and responds by driving a cell to an irreversible antiproliferative fate of death or senescence. This mechanism of antiproliferative fate after mitotic slippage is not as well understood. We provide an overview of mitotic catastrophe, and explain new insights underscoring a causal association between basal autophagy levels and antiproliferative fate after mitotic slippage, and propose possible improved strategies. Additionally, we discuss nuclear alterations characterizing the mitotic catastrophe (micronuclei, multinuclei) after mitotic slippage, and a possible new type of nuclear alteration (clustered micronuclei). PMID:27213315

  6. Mitotic Exit Control as an Evolved Complex System

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W; Li, R

    2005-04-25

    The exit from mitosis is the last critical decision a cell has to make during a division cycle. A complex regulatory system has evolved to evaluate the success of mitotic events and control this decision. Whereas outstanding genetic work in yeast has led to rapid discovery of a large number of interacting genes involved in the control of mitotic exit, it has also become increasingly difficult to comprehend the logic and mechanistic features embedded in the complex molecular network. Our view is that this difficulty stems in part from the attempt to explain mitotic exit control using concepts from traditional top-down engineering design, and that exciting new results from evolutionary engineering design applied to networks and electronic circuits may lend better insights. We focus on four particularly intriguing features of the mitotic exit control system: the two-stepped release of Cdc14; the self-activating nature of Tem1 GTPase; the spatial sensor associated with the spindle pole body; and the extensive redundancy in the mitotic exit network. We attempt to examine these design features from the perspective of evolutionary design and complex system engineering.

  7. Mechanical control of mitotic progression in single animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cattin, Cedric J.; Düggelin, Marcel; Martinez-Martin, David; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.; Stewart, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of mitotic cell rounding in tissue development and cell proliferation, there remains a paucity of approaches to investigate the mechanical robustness of cell rounding. Here we introduce ion beam-sculpted microcantilevers that enable precise force-feedback–controlled confinement of single cells while characterizing their progression through mitosis. We identify three force regimes according to the cell response: small forces (∼5 nN) that accelerate mitotic progression, intermediate forces where cells resist confinement (50–100 nN), and yield forces (>100 nN) where a significant decline in cell height impinges on microtubule spindle function, thereby inhibiting mitotic progression. Yield forces are coincident with a nonlinear drop in cell height potentiated by persistent blebbing and loss of cortical F-actin homogeneity. Our results suggest that a buildup of actomyosin-dependent cortical tension and intracellular pressure precedes mechanical failure, or herniation, of the cell cortex at the yield force. Thus, we reveal how the mechanical properties of mitotic cells and their response to external forces are linked to mitotic progression under conditions of mechanical confinement. PMID:26305930

  8. The Nuclear Matrix Protein Megator Regulates Stem Cell Asymmetric Division through the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex in Drosophila Testes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Singh, Shree Ram; Zeng, Xiankun; Zhao, Jiangsha; Hou, Steven X

    2015-12-01

    In adult Drosophila testis, asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) is specified by an oriented spindle and cortically localized adenomatous coli tumor suppressor homolog 2 (Apc2). However, the molecular mechanism underlying these events remains unclear. Here we identified Megator (Mtor), a nuclear matrix protein, which regulates GSC maintenance and asymmetric division through the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) complex. Loss of Mtor function results in Apc2 mis-localization, incorrect centrosome orientation, defective mitotic spindle formation, and abnormal chromosome segregation that lead to the eventual GSC loss. Expression of mitotic arrest-deficient-2 (Mad2) and monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) of the SAC complex effectively rescued the GSC loss phenotype associated with loss of Mtor function. Collectively our results define a new role of the nuclear matrix-SAC axis in regulating stem cell maintenance and asymmetric division. PMID:26714316

  9. The Nuclear Matrix Protein Megator Regulates Stem Cell Asymmetric Division through the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex in Drosophila Testes

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiankun; Zhao, Jiangsha; Hou, Steven X.

    2015-01-01

    In adult Drosophila testis, asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) is specified by an oriented spindle and cortically localized adenomatous coli tumor suppressor homolog 2 (Apc2). However, the molecular mechanism underlying these events remains unclear. Here we identified Megator (Mtor), a nuclear matrix protein, which regulates GSC maintenance and asymmetric division through the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) complex. Loss of Mtor function results in Apc2 mis-localization, incorrect centrosome orientation, defective mitotic spindle formation, and abnormal chromosome segregation that lead to the eventual GSC loss. Expression of mitotic arrest-deficient-2 (Mad2) and monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) of the SAC complex effectively rescued the GSC loss phenotype associated with loss of Mtor function. Collectively our results define a new role of the nuclear matrix-SAC axis in regulating stem cell maintenance and asymmetric division. PMID:26714316

  10. The Phosphatase PP4c Controls Spindle Orientation to Maintain Proliferative Symmetric Divisions in the Developing Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunli; Jüschke, Christoph; Esk, Christopher; Hirotsune, Shinji; Knoblich, Juergen A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the developing neocortex, progenitor cells expand through symmetric division before they generate cortical neurons through multiple rounds of asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the orientation of the mitotic spindle plays a crucial role in regulating the transition between those two division modes. We demonstrate that the protein phosphatase PP4c regulates spindle orientation in early cortical progenitor cells. Upon removing PP4c, mitotic spindles fail to orient in parallel to the neuroepithelial surface and progenitors divide with random orientation. As a result, their divisions become asymmetric and neurogenesis starts prematurely. Biochemical and genetic experiments show that PP4c acts by dephosphorylating the microtubule binding protein Ndel1, thereby enabling complex formation with Lis1 to form a functional spindle orientation complex. Our results identify a key regulator of cortical development and demonstrate that changes in the orientation of progenitor division are responsible for the transition between symmetric and asymmetric cell division. PMID:23830831

  11. Mcl-1 dynamics influence mitotic slippage and death in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Sloss, Olivia; Topham, Caroline; Diez, Maria; Taylor, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-binding drugs such as taxol are frontline treatments for a variety of cancers but exactly how they yield patient benefit is unclear. In cell culture, inhibiting microtubule dynamics prevents spindle assembly, leading to mitotic arrest followed by either apoptosis in mitosis or slippage, whereby a cell returns to interphase without dividing. Myeloid cell leukaemia-1 (Mcl-1), a pro-survival member of the Bcl-2 family central to the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, is degraded during a prolonged mitotic arrest and may therefore act as a mitotic death timer. Consistently, we show that blocking proteasome-mediated degradation inhibits taxol-induced mitotic apoptosis in a Mcl-1-dependent manner. However, this degradation does not require the activity of either APC/C-Cdc20, FBW7 or MULE, three separate E3 ubiquitin ligases implicated in targeting Mcl-1 for degradation. This therefore challenges the notion that Mcl-1 undergoes regulated degradation during mitosis. We also show that Mcl-1 is continuously synthesized during mitosis and that blocking protein synthesis accelerates taxol induced death-in-mitosis. Modulating Mcl-1 levels also influences slippage; overexpressing Mcl-1 extends the time from mitotic entry to mitotic exit in the presence of taxol, while inhibiting Mcl-1 accelerates it. We suggest that Mcl-1 competes with Cyclin B1 for binding to components of the proteolysis machinery, thereby slowing down the slow degradation of Cyclin B1 responsible for slippage. Thus, modulating Mcl-1 dynamics influences both death-in-mitosis and slippage. However, because mitotic degradation of Mcl-1 appears not to be under the control of an E3 ligase, we suggest that the notion of network crosstalk is used with caution. PMID:26769847

  12. Emergence of synchronous EEG spindles from asynchronous MEG spindles.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Nima; Cash, Sydney S; Halgren, Eric

    2011-12-01

    Sleep spindles are bursts of rhythmic 10-15 Hz activity, lasting ∼0.5-2 s, that occur during Stage 2 sleep. They are coherent across multiple cortical and thalamic locations in animals, and across scalp EEG sites in humans, suggesting simultaneous generation across the cortical mantle. However, reports of MEG spindles occurring without EEG spindles, and vice versa, are inconsistent with synchronous distributed generation. We objectively determined the frequency of MEG-only, EEG-only, and combined MEG-EEG spindles in high density recordings of natural sleep in humans. About 50% of MEG spindles occur without EEG spindles, but the converse is rare (∼15%). Compared to spindles that occur in MEG only, those that occur in both MEG and EEG have ∼1% more MEG coherence and ∼15% more MEG power, insufficient to account for the ∼55% increase in EEG power. However, these combined spindles involve ∼66% more MEG channels, especially over frontocentral cortex. Furthermore, when both MEG and EEG are involved in a given spindle, the MEG spindle begins ∼150 ms before the EEG spindle and ends ∼250 ms after. Our findings suggest that spindles begin in focal cortical locations which are better recorded with MEG gradiometers than referential EEG due to the biophysics of their propagation. For some spindles, only these regions remain active. For other spindles, these locations may recruit other areas over the next 200 ms, until a critical mass is achieved, including especially frontal cortex, resulting in activation of a diffuse and/or multifocal generator that is best recorded by referential EEG derivations due to their larger leadfields. PMID:21337472

  13. A Role for Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase in the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint in XTC Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Min; Zhai, Ye; Ferrell, James E.

    1997-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents cells whose spindles are defective or chromosomes are misaligned from initiating anaphase and leaving mitosis. Studies of Xenopus egg extracts have implicated the Erk2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) in this checkpoint. Other studies have suggested that MAP kinases might be important for normal mitotic progression. Here we have investigated whether MAP kinase function is required for mitotic progression or the spindle assembly checkpoint in vivo in Xenopus tadpole cells (XTC). We determined that Erk1 and/or Erk2 are present in the mitotic spindle during prometaphase and metaphase, consistent with the idea that MAP kinase might regulate or monitor the status of the spindle. Next, we microinjected purified recombinant XCL100, a Xenopus MAP kinase phosphatase, into XTC cells in various stages of mitosis to interfere with MAP kinase activation. We found that mitotic progression was unaffected by the phosphatase. However, XCL100 rendered the cells unable to remain arrested in mitosis after treatment with nocodazole. Cells injected with phosphatase at prometaphase or metaphase exited mitosis in the presence of nocodazole—the chromosomes decondensed and the nuclear envelope re-formed—whereas cells injected with buffer or a catalytically inactive XCL100 mutant protein remained arrested in mitosis. Coinjection of constitutively active MAP kinase kinase-1, which opposes XCL100's effects on MAP kinase, antagonized the effects of XCL100. Since the only known targets of MAP kinase kinase-1 are Erk1 and Erk2, these findings argue that MAP kinase function is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint in XTC cells. PMID:9128253

  14. Mio depletion links mTOR regulation to Aurora A and Plk1 activation at mitotic centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Porter, Michael; Jeyaprakash, A. Arockia

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of cell growth and proliferation in response to nutrient supply is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. In this study, we report that Mio, a highly conserved member of the SEACAT/GATOR2 complex necessary for the activation of mTORC1 kinase, plays a critical role in mitotic spindle formation and subsequent chromosome segregation by regulating the proper concentration of active key mitotic kinases Plk1 and Aurora A at centrosomes and spindle poles. Mio-depleted cells showed reduced activation of Plk1 and Aurora A kinase at spindle poles and an impaired localization of MCAK and HURP, two key regulators of mitotic spindle formation and known substrates of Aurora A kinase, resulting in spindle assembly and cytokinesis defects. Our results indicate that a major function of Mio in mitosis is to regulate the activation/deactivation of Plk1 and Aurora A, possibly by linking them to mTOR signaling in a pathway to promote faithful mitotic progression. PMID:26124292

  15. Mio depletion links mTOR regulation to Aurora A and Plk1 activation at mitotic centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Platani, Melpomeni; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Porter, Michael; Jeyaprakash, A Arockia; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-07-01

    Coordination of cell growth and proliferation in response to nutrient supply is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. In this study, we report that Mio, a highly conserved member of the SEACAT/GATOR2 complex necessary for the activation of mTORC1 kinase, plays a critical role in mitotic spindle formation and subsequent chromosome segregation by regulating the proper concentration of active key mitotic kinases Plk1 and Aurora A at centrosomes and spindle poles. Mio-depleted cells showed reduced activation of Plk1 and Aurora A kinase at spindle poles and an impaired localization of MCAK and HURP, two key regulators of mitotic spindle formation and known substrates of Aurora A kinase, resulting in spindle assembly and cytokinesis defects. Our results indicate that a major function of Mio in mitosis is to regulate the activation/deactivation of Plk1 and Aurora A, possibly by linking them to mTOR signaling in a pathway to promote faithful mitotic progression. PMID:26124292

  16. PAR-4 and anillin regulate myosin to coordinate spindle and furrow position during asymmetric division

    PubMed Central

    Uhart, Perrine; Tassan, Jean-Pierre; Michaux, Grégoire

    2015-01-01

    During asymmetric cell division, the mitotic spindle and polarized myosin can both determine the position of the cytokinetic furrow. However, how cells coordinate signals from the spindle and myosin to ensure that cleavage occurs through the spindle midzone is unknown. Here, we identify a novel pathway that is essential to inhibit myosin and coordinate furrow and spindle positions during asymmetric division. In Caenorhabditis elegans one-cell embryos, myosin localizes at the anterior cortex whereas the mitotic spindle localizes toward the posterior. We find that PAR-4/LKB1 impinges on myosin via two pathways, an anillin-dependent pathway that also responds to the cullin CUL-5 and an anillin-independent pathway involving the kinase PIG-1/MELK. In the absence of both PIG-1/MELK and the anillin ANI-1, myosin accumulates at the anterior cortex and induces a strong displacement of the furrow toward the anterior, which can lead to DNA segregation defects. Regulation of asymmetrically localized myosin is thus critical to ensure that furrow and spindle midzone positions coincide throughout cytokinesis. PMID:26416962

  17. PAR-4 and anillin regulate myosin to coordinate spindle and furrow position during asymmetric division.

    PubMed

    Pacquelet, Anne; Uhart, Perrine; Tassan, Jean-Pierre; Michaux, Grégoire

    2015-09-28

    During asymmetric cell division, the mitotic spindle and polarized myosin can both determine the position of the cytokinetic furrow. However, how cells coordinate signals from the spindle and myosin to ensure that cleavage occurs through the spindle midzone is unknown. Here, we identify a novel pathway that is essential to inhibit myosin and coordinate furrow and spindle positions during asymmetric division. In Caenorhabditis elegans one-cell embryos, myosin localizes at the anterior cortex whereas the mitotic spindle localizes toward the posterior. We find that PAR-4/LKB1 impinges on myosin via two pathways, an anillin-dependent pathway that also responds to the cullin CUL-5 and an anillin-independent pathway involving the kinase PIG-1/MELK. In the absence of both PIG-1/MELK and the anillin ANI-1, myosin accumulates at the anterior cortex and induces a strong displacement of the furrow toward the anterior, which can lead to DNA segregation defects. Regulation of asymmetrically localized myosin is thus critical to ensure that furrow and spindle midzone positions coincide throughout cytokinesis. PMID:26416962

  18. Adaptive changes in the kinetochore architecture facilitate proper spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Valentin; Paul, Raja; Yang, Nachen; Ault, Jeffrey G.; O’Connell, Christopher B.; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F.; Mogilner, Alex; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic spindle formation relies on the stochastic capture of microtubules at kinetochores. Kinetochore architecture affects the efficiency and fidelity of this process with large kinetochores expected to accelerate assembly at the expense of accuracy, and smaller kinetochores to suppress errors at the expense of efficiency. We demonstrate that upon mitotic entry, kinetochores in cultured human cells form large crescents that subsequently compact into discrete structures on opposite sides of the centromere. This compaction occurs only after the formation of end-on microtubule attachments. Live-cell microscopy reveals that centromere rotation mediated by lateral kinetochore-microtubule interactions precedes formation of end-on attachments and kinetochore compaction. Computational analyses of kinetochore expansion-compaction in the context of lateral interactions correctly predict experimentally-observed spindle assembly times with reasonable error rates. The computational model suggests that larger kinetochores reduce both errors and assembly times, which can explain the robustness of spindle assembly and the functional significance of enlarged kinetochores. PMID:26258631

  19. USP9X stabilizes XIAP to regulate mitotic cell death and chemoresistance in aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Engel, Katharina; Rudelius, Martina; Slawska, Jolanta; Jacobs, Laura; Ahangarian Abhari, Behnaz; Altmann, Bettina; Kurutz, Julia; Rathakrishnan, Abirami; Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; Brunner, Andrä; Targosz, Bianca-Sabrina; Loewecke, Felicia; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Ueffing, Marius; Fulda, Simone; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Trümper, Lorenz; Klapper, Wolfram; Keller, Ulrich; Jost, Philipp J; Rosenwald, Andreas; Peschel, Christian; Bassermann, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintains genome stability and marks an important target for antineoplastic therapies. However, it has remained unclear how cells execute cell fate decisions under conditions of SAC-induced mitotic arrest. Here, we identify USP9X as the mitotic deubiquitinase of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and demonstrate that deubiquitylation and stabilization of XIAP by USP9X lead to increased resistance toward mitotic spindle poisons. We find that primary human aggressive B-cell lymphoma samples exhibit high USP9X expression that correlate with XIAP overexpression. We show that high USP9X/XIAP expression is associated with shorter event-free survival in patients treated with spindle poison-containing chemotherapy. Accordingly, aggressive B-cell lymphoma lines with USP9X and associated XIAP overexpression exhibit increased chemoresistance, reversed by specific inhibition of either USP9X or XIAP. Moreover, knockdown of USP9X or XIAP significantly delays lymphoma development and increases sensitivity to spindle poisons in a murine Eμ-Myc lymphoma model. Together, we specify the USP9X-XIAP axis as a regulator of the mitotic cell fate decision and propose that USP9X and XIAP are potential prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in aggressive B-cell lymphoma. PMID:27317434

  20. Accurate measurement of poleward microtubule flux in the spindle of Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Munzarova, Alina; Popova, Julia; Razuvaeva, Alena; Shloma, Victor; Gatti, Maurizio; Omelyanchuk, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    The spindle microtubule (MT) flux is the continuous translocation of MTs toward the spindle poles caused by MT polymerization at plus ends coupled to depolymerization at minus ends. Poleward flux is observed in both mitotic and meiotic spindles; it is evolutionarily conserved and contributes to the regulation of spindle length and anaphase chromosome movement. MT photobleaching is a tool frequently used to measure poleward flux. Spindles containing fluorescently tagged tubulin are photobleached to generate a non-fluorescent stripe, which moves toward the spindle poles allowing a measure of the flux. However, this method only permits rapid measurements of the flux, because the fluorescence of the bleached stripe recovers rapidly due to the spindle MT turnover. Here, we describe a modification of the current photobleaching-based method for flux measurement. We photobleached two large areas at the opposite sides of the metaphase plate in spindles of Drosophila S2 cells expressing Cherry-tagged tubulin, leaving unbleached only the area near the chromosomes. We then measured the speed with which the fluorescent MTs move toward the poles. We found that this method allows a measure of the flux over a two- to threefold longer time than the "single stripe" method, providing a reliable evaluation of the flux rate. PMID:27317357

  1. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed “mitotic bookmarking.” Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors. PMID:23547918

  2. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition.

  3. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:26727405

  4. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    PubMed Central

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:26727405

  5. Identification of MAC1: A Small Molecule That Rescues Spindle Bipolarity in Monastrol-Treated Cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Mitchison, Timothy J; Crews, Craig M; Mayer, Thomas U

    2016-06-17

    The genetic integrity of each organism is intimately tied to the correct segregation of its genome during mitosis. Insights into the underlying mechanisms are fundamental for both basic research and the development of novel strategies to treat mitosis-relevant diseases such as cancer. Due to their fast mode of action, small molecules are invaluable tools to dissect mitosis. Yet, there is a great demand for novel antimitotic compounds. We performed a chemical genetic suppression screen to identify compounds that restore spindle bipolarity in cells treated with Monastrol, an inhibitor of the mitotic kinesin Eg5. We identified one compound-MAC1-that rescued spindle bipolarity in cells lacking Eg5 activity. Mechanistically, MAC1 induces the formation of additional microtubule nucleation centers, which allows kinesin Kif15-dependent bipolar spindle assembly in the absence of Eg5 activity. Thus, our chemical genetic suppression screen revealed novel unexpected insights into the mechanism of spindle assembly in mammalian cells. PMID:27121275

  6. Aurora A's Functions During Mitotic Exit: The Guess Who Game.

    PubMed

    Reboutier, David; Benaud, Christelle; Prigent, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, the knowledge of Aurora A kinase functions during mitosis was limited to pre-metaphase events, particularly centrosome maturation, G2/M transition, and mitotic spindle assembly. However, an involvement of Aurora A in post-metaphase events was also suspected, but not clearly demonstrated due to the technical difficulty to perform the appropriate experiments. Recent developments of both an analog-specific version of Aurora A and small molecule inhibitors have led to the first demonstration that Aurora A is required for the early steps of cytokinesis. As in pre-metaphase, Aurora A plays diverse functions during anaphase, essentially participating in astral microtubules dynamics and central spindle assembly and functioning. The present review describes the experimental systems used to decipher new functions of Aurora A during late mitosis and situate these functions into the context of cytokinesis mechanisms. PMID:26734572

  7. Active role of lagging chromosomes in spindle collapse as revealed by live phase contrast and tubulin immunostaining in grasshopper spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rebollo, E; Arana, P

    2001-08-01

    Univalents, that is, chromosomes lacking an attached partner at the first meiotic division, show extremely faulty transmission. Most segregational errors stem from amphitelic (mitotic-like) orientation at metaphase I followed by anaphase I lagging. Our studies in living grasshopper spermatocytes show that amphitelic orientation may provoke spindle collapse: spindle elongation and cytokinesis are impaired and an unreduced restitution nucleus is formed. This does not prevent meiotic progression and eventually leads to the production of diploid gametes. The morphology and characteristics of spindle collapse in our material, as revealed by in vivo observation and tubulin immunostaining, indicate an active role of the chromosomes in the whole process. PMID:11534821

  8. PLK1-dependent activation of LRRK1 regulates spindle orientation by phosphorylating CDK5RAP2.

    PubMed

    Hanafusa, Hiroshi; Kedashiro, Shin; Tezuka, Motohiro; Funatsu, Motoki; Usami, Satoshi; Toyoshima, Fumiko; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2015-08-01

    Correct formation of the cell division axis requires the initial precise orientation of the mitotic spindle. Proper spindle orientation depends on centrosome maturation, and Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is known to play a crucial role in this process. However, the molecular mechanisms that function downstream of PLK1 are not well understood. Here we show that LRRK1 is a PLK1 substrate that is phosphorylated on Ser 1790. PLK1 phosphorylation is required for CDK1-mediated activation of LRRK1 at the centrosomes, and this in turn regulates mitotic spindle orientation by nucleating the growth of astral microtubules from the centrosomes. Interestingly, LRRK1 in turn phosphorylates CDK5RAP2(Cep215), a human homologue of Drosophila Centrosomin (Cnn), in its γ-tubulin-binding motif, thus promoting the interaction of CDK5RAP2 with γ-tubulin. LRRK1 phosphorylation of CDK5RAP2 Ser 140 is necessary for CDK5RAP2-dependent microtubule nucleation. Thus, our findings provide evidence that LRRK1 regulates mitotic spindle orientation downstream of PLK1 through CDK5RAP2-dependent centrosome maturation. PMID:26192437

  9. Central Spindle Self-Organization and Cytokinesis in Artificially Activated Sea Urchin Eggs.

    PubMed

    Henson, John H; Buckley, Mary W; Yeterian, Mesrob; Weeks, Richard M; Simerly, Calvin R; Shuster, Charles B

    2016-04-01

    The ability of microtubules of the mitotic apparatus to control the positioning and initiation of the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis was first established from studies on early echinoderm embryos. However, the identity of the microtubule population that imparts cytokinetic signaling is unclear. The two main--and not necessarily mutually exclusive--candidates are the central spindle and the astral rays. In the present study, we examined cytokinesis in ammonia-activated sea urchin eggs, which lack paternally derived centrosomes and undergo mitosis mediated by unusual anastral, bipolar mini-spindles. Live cell imaging and immunolabeling for microtubules and the centralspindlin constituent and kinesin-related protein, MKLP1, demonstrated that furrowing in ammonia-activated eggs was associated with aligned arrays of centralspindlin-linked, opposed bundles of antiparallel microtubules. These autonomous, zipper-like arrays were not associated with a mitotic apparatus, but did possess characteristics similar to the central spindle region of control, fertilized embryos. Our results highlight the self-organizing nature of the central spindle region and its ability to induce cytokinesis-like furrowing, even in the absence of a complete mitotic apparatus. PMID:27132131

  10. Pericentromere tension is self-regulated by spindle structure in metaphase

    PubMed Central

    Chacón, Jeremy M.; Mukherjee, Soumya; Schuster, Breanna M.; Clarke, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    During cell division, a mitotic spindle is built by the cell and acts to align and stretch duplicated sister chromosomes before their ultimate segregation into daughter cells. Stretching of the pericentromeric chromatin during metaphase is thought to generate a tension-based signal that promotes proper chromosome segregation. However, it is not known whether the mitotic spindle actively maintains a set point tension magnitude for properly attached sister chromosomes to facilitate robust mechanochemical checkpoint signaling. By imaging and tracking the thermal movements of pericentromeric fluorescent markers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we measured pericentromere stiffness and then used the stiffness measurements to quantitatively evaluate the tension generated by pericentromere stretch during metaphase in wild-type cells and in mutants with disrupted chromosome structure. We found that pericentromere tension in yeast is substantial (4–6 pN) and is tightly self-regulated by the mitotic spindle: through adjustments in spindle structure, the cell maintains wild-type tension magnitudes even when pericentromere stiffness is disrupted. PMID:24821839

  11. The NOXA-MCL1-BIM axis defines lifespan on extended mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Haschka, Manuel D; Soratroi, Claudia; Kirschnek, Susanne; Häcker, Georg; Hilbe, Richard; Geley, Stephan; Villunger, Andreas; Fava, Luca L

    2015-01-01

    Cell death on extended mitotic arrest is considered arguably most critical for the efficacy of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) in anticancer therapy. While the molecular machinery controlling mitotic arrest on MTA treatment, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), appears well defined, the molecular components executing cell death, as well as factors connecting both networks remain poorly understood. Here we conduct a mini screen exploring systematically the contribution of individual BCL2 family proteins at single cell resolution to death on extended mitotic arrest, and demonstrate that the mitotic phosphorylation of BCL2 and BCLX represent a priming event for apoptosis that is ultimately triggered by NOXA-dependent MCL1 degradation, enabling BIM-dependent cell death. Our findings provide a comprehensive model for the initiation of apoptosis in cells stalled in mitosis and provide a molecular basis for the increased efficacy of combinatorial treatment of cancer cells using MTAs and BH3 mimetics. PMID:25922916

  12. The NOXA–MCL1–BIM axis defines lifespan on extended mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Haschka, Manuel D.; Soratroi, Claudia; Kirschnek, Susanne; Häcker, Georg; Hilbe, Richard; Geley, Stephan; Villunger, Andreas; Fava, Luca L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell death on extended mitotic arrest is considered arguably most critical for the efficacy of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) in anticancer therapy. While the molecular machinery controlling mitotic arrest on MTA treatment, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), appears well defined, the molecular components executing cell death, as well as factors connecting both networks remain poorly understood. Here we conduct a mini screen exploring systematically the contribution of individual BCL2 family proteins at single cell resolution to death on extended mitotic arrest, and demonstrate that the mitotic phosphorylation of BCL2 and BCLX represent a priming event for apoptosis that is ultimately triggered by NOXA-dependent MCL1 degradation, enabling BIM-dependent cell death. Our findings provide a comprehensive model for the initiation of apoptosis in cells stalled in mitosis and provide a molecular basis for the increased efficacy of combinatorial treatment of cancer cells using MTAs and BH3 mimetics. PMID:25922916

  13. Inhibition of a Mitotic Motor Protein: Where, How, and Conformational Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Youwei; Sardana, Vinod; Xu, Bei; Homnick, Carl; Halczenko, Wasyl; Buser, Carolyn A.; Schaber, Michael; Hartman, George D.; Huber, Hans E.; Kuo, Lawrence C.

    2010-11-16

    We report here the first inhibitor-bound structure of a mitotic motor protein. The 1.9 {angstrom} resolution structure of the motor domain of KSP, bound with the small molecule monastrol and Mg{sup 2+} {center_dot} ADP, reveals that monastrol confers inhibition by 'induced-fitting' onto the protein some 12 {angstrom} away from the catalytic center of the enzyme, resulting in the creation of a previously non-existing binding pocket. The structure provides new insights into the biochemical and mechanical mechanisms of the mitotic motor domain. Inhibition of KSP provides a novel mechanism to arrest mitotic spindle formation, a target of several approved and investigative anti-cancer agents. The structural information gleaned from this novel pocket offers a new angle for the design of anti-mitotic agents.

  14. Involvement of CNOT3 in mitotic progression through inhibition of MAD1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akinori; Kikuguchi, Chisato; Morita, Masahiro; Shimodaira, Tetsuhiro; Tokai-Nishizumi, Noriko; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Ohsugi, Miho; Suzuki, Toru; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Cell Signal Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0412

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNOT3 depletion increases the mitotic index. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNOT3 inhibits the expression of MAD1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNOT3 destabilizes the MAD1 mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAD1 knockdown attenuates the CNOT3 depletion-induced mitotic arrest. -- Abstract: The stability of mRNA influences the dynamics of gene expression. The CCR4-NOT complex, the major deadenylase in mammalian cells, shortens the mRNA poly(A) tail and contributes to the destabilization of mRNAs. The CCR4-NOT complex plays pivotal roles in various physiological functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Here, we show that CNOT3, a subunit of the CCR4-NOT complex, is involved in the regulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex also plays a part in the regulation of mitosis. CNOT3 depletion increases the population of mitotic-arrested cells and specifically increases the expression of MAD1 mRNA and its protein product that plays a part in the spindle assembly checkpoint. We showed that CNOT3 depletion stabilizes the MAD1 mRNA, and that MAD1 knockdown attenuates the CNOT3 depletion-induced increase of the mitotic index. Basing on these observations, we propose that CNOT3 is involved in the regulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint through its ability to regulate the stability of MAD1 mRNA.

  15. Chromosomes rein back the spindle pole body during horsetail movement in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Chikashige, Yuji; Yamane, Miho; Okamasa, Kasumi; Mori, Chie; Fukuta, Noriko; Matsuda, Atsushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    In meiosis, pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes are crucial for the correct segregation of chromosomes, and substantial movements of chromosomes are required to achieve homolog pairing. During this process, it is known that telomeres cluster to form a bouquet arrangement of chromosomes. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a striking example of bouquet formation, after which the entire nucleus oscillates between the cell poles (these oscillations are generally called horsetail nuclear movements) while the telomeres remain clustered to the spindle pole body (SPB; a centrosome-equivalent structure in fungi) at the leading edge of the moving nucleus. S. pombe mutants defective in telomere clustering frequently form aberrant spindles, such as monopolar or nonpolar spindles, leading to missegregation of the chromosomes at the subsequent meiotic divisions. Here we demonstrate that such defects in meiotic spindle formation caused by loss of meiotic telomere clustering are rescued when nuclear movement is prevented. On the other hand, stopping nuclear movement does not rescue defects in telomere clustering, nor chromosome missgregation even in cells that have formed a bipolar spindle. These results suggest that movement of the SPB without attachment of telomeres leads to the formation of aberrant spindles, but that recovering bipolar spindles is not sufficient for rescue of chromosome missegregation in mutants lacking telomere clustering. PMID:24954111

  16. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  17. Heat shock protein inhibitors, 17-DMAG and KNK437, enhance arsenic trioxide-induced mitotic apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yichen; Yen Wenyen; Lee, T.-C. Yih, L.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic agent in leukemia because of its ability to induce apoptosis. However, there is no sufficient evidence to support its therapeutic use for other types of cancers. In this study, we investigated if, and how, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG), an antagonist of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), and KNK437, a HSP synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the cytotoxic effect of ATO. Our results showed that cotreatment with ATO and either 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced cell death and apoptosis. siRNA-mediated attenuation of the expression of the inducible isoform of HSP70 (HSP70i) or HSP90{alpha}/{beta} also enhanced ATO-induced apoptosis. In addition, cotreatment with ATO and 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced mitotic arrest and ATO-induced BUBR1 phosphorylation and PDS1 accumulation. Cotreatment also significantly increased the percentage of mitotic cells with abnormal mitotic spindles and promoted metaphase arrest as compared to ATO treatment alone. These results indicated that 17-DMAG or KNK437 may enhance ATO cytotoxicity by potentiating mitotic arrest and mitotic apoptosis possibly through increased activation of the spindle checkpoint.

  18. Mechanisms and Regulation of the Mitotic Inheritance of the Golgi Complex

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Carmen; Colanzi, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Golgi complex is structured in the form of a continuous membranous system composed of stacks connected by tubular bridges: the “Golgi ribbon.” At the onset of mitosis, the Golgi complex undergoes a multi-step fragmentation process that is required for its correct partition into the dividing cells. Importantly, inhibition of Golgi disassembly results in cell-cycle arrest at the G2 stage, which indicates that accurate inheritance of the Golgi complex is monitored by a “Golgi mitotic checkpoint.” Moreover, mitotic Golgi disassembly correlates with the release of a set of Golgi-localized proteins that acquire specific functions during mitosis, such as mitotic spindle formation and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Most of these events are regulated by small GTPases of the Arf and Rab families. Here, we review recent studies that are revealing the fundamental mechanisms, the molecular players, and the biological significance of mitotic inheritance of the Golgi complex in mammalian cells. We also briefly comment on how Golgi partitioning is coordinated with mitotic progression. PMID:26734607

  19. Plk1-dependent recruitment of gamma-tubulin complexes to mitotic centrosomes involves multiple PCM components.

    PubMed

    Haren, Laurence; Stearns, Tim; Lüders, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The nucleation of microtubules requires protein complexes containing gamma-tubulin, which are present in the cytoplasm and associate with the centrosome and with the mitotic spindle. We have previously shown that these interactions require the gamma-tubulin targeting factor GCP-WD/NEDD1, which has an essential role in spindle formation. The recruitment of additional gamma-tubulin to the centrosomes occurs during centrosome maturation at the G2/M transition and is regulated by the mitotic kinase Plk1. However, the molecular details of this important pathway are unknown and a Plk1 substrate that controls gamma-tubulin recruitment has not been identified. Here we show that Plk1 associates with GCP-WD in mitosis and Plk1 activity contributes to phosphorylation of GCP-WD. Plk1 depletion or inhibition prevents accumulation of GCP-WD at mitotic centrosomes, but GCP-WD mutants that are defective in Plk1-binding and -phosphorylation still accumulate at mitotic centrosomes and recruit gamma-tubulin. Moreover, Plk1 also controls the recruitment of other PCM proteins implicated in centrosomal gamma-tubulin attachment (Cep192/hSPD2, pericentrin, Cep215/Cdk5Rap2). Our results support a model in which Plk1-dependent recruitment of gamma-tubulin to mitotic centrosomes is regulated upstream of GCP-WD, involves multiple PCM proteins and therefore potentially multiple Plk1 substrates. PMID:19543530

  20. Focal adhesions control cleavage furrow shape and spindle tilt during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Nilay; Fenix, Aidan M.; Rathbun, Lindsay; Millis, Bryan A.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Hehnly, Heidi; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    The geometry of the cleavage furrow during mitosis is often asymmetric in vivo and plays a critical role in stem cell differentiation and the relative positioning of daughter cells during development. Early observations of adhesive cell lines revealed asymmetry in the shape of the cleavage furrow, where the bottom (i.e., substrate attached side) of the cleavage furrow ingressed less than the top (i.e., unattached side). This data suggested substrate attachment could be regulating furrow ingression. Here we report a population of mitotic focal adhesions (FAs) controls the symmetry of the cleavage furrow. In single HeLa cells, stronger adhesion to the substrate directed less ingression from the bottom of the cell through a pathway including paxillin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vinculin. Cell-cell contacts also direct ingression of the cleavage furrow in coordination with FAs in epithelial cells—MDCK—within monolayers and polarized cysts. In addition, mitotic FAs established 3D orientation of the mitotic spindle and the relative positioning of mother and daughter centrosomes. Therefore, our data reveals mitotic FAs as a key link between mitotic cell shape and spindle orientation, and may have important implications in our understanding stem cell homeostasis and tumorigenesis. PMID:27432211

  1. Spindle picker harvest speed effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gear drive of a modern John Deere Pro 16 picker unit was modified so that spindle speed was reduced without changing the drum speed. Three 1-row picking units were used in the study, one with the standard drive speeds, one with 25% reduction in spindle drive speed, and one with 50% reduction in...

  2. The Spindle Type Cotton Harvester

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spindle type cotton picker was commercialized during the mid 1900’s and is currently produced by two US agricultural equipment manufacturers, John Deere and CaseIH. Picking is the predominate machine harvest method used throughout the US and world. Harvesting efficiency of a spindle type cotton ...

  3. A FRET-based study reveals site-specific regulation of spindle position checkpoint proteins at yeast centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Gryaznova, Yuliya; Koca Caydasi, Ayse; Malengo, Gabriele; Sourjik, Victor; Pereira, Gislene

    2016-01-01

    The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is a spindle pole body (SPB, equivalent of mammalian centrosome) associated surveillance mechanism that halts mitotic exit upon spindle mis-orientation. Here, we monitored the interaction between SPB proteins and the SPOC component Bfa1 by FRET microscopy. We show that Bfa1 binds to the scaffold-protein Nud1 and the γ-tubulin receptor Spc72. Spindle misalignment specifically disrupts Bfa1-Spc72 interaction by a mechanism that requires the 14-3-3-family protein Bmh1 and the MARK/PAR-kinase Kin4. Dissociation of Bfa1 from Spc72 prevents the inhibitory phosphorylation of Bfa1 by the polo-like kinase Cdc5. We propose Spc72 as a regulatory hub that coordinates the activity of Kin4 and Cdc5 towards Bfa1. In addition, analysis of spc72∆ cells shows that a mitotic-exit-promoting dominant signal, which is triggered upon elongation of the spindle into the bud, overrides the SPOC. Our data reinforce the importance of daughter-cell-associated factors and centrosome-based regulations in mitotic exit and SPOC control. PMID:27159239

  4. A FRET-based study reveals site-specific regulation of spindle position checkpoint proteins at yeast centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gryaznova, Yuliya; Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Malengo, Gabriele; Sourjik, Victor; Pereira, Gislene

    2016-01-01

    The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is a spindle pole body (SPB, equivalent of mammalian centrosome) associated surveillance mechanism that halts mitotic exit upon spindle mis-orientation. Here, we monitored the interaction between SPB proteins and the SPOC component Bfa1 by FRET microscopy. We show that Bfa1 binds to the scaffold-protein Nud1 and the γ-tubulin receptor Spc72. Spindle misalignment specifically disrupts Bfa1-Spc72 interaction by a mechanism that requires the 14-3-3-family protein Bmh1 and the MARK/PAR-kinase Kin4. Dissociation of Bfa1 from Spc72 prevents the inhibitory phosphorylation of Bfa1 by the polo-like kinase Cdc5. We propose Spc72 as a regulatory hub that coordinates the activity of Kin4 and Cdc5 towards Bfa1. In addition, analysis of spc72∆ cells shows that a mitotic-exit-promoting dominant signal, which is triggered upon elongation of the spindle into the bud, overrides the SPOC. Our data reinforce the importance of daughter-cell-associated factors and centrosome-based regulations in mitotic exit and SPOC control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14029.001 PMID:27159239

  5. Small Molecule Approach to Study the Function of Mitotic Kinesins.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Kastl, Johanna; Mayer, Thomas U

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic motor proteins of the kinesin superfamily are critical for the faithful segregation of chromosomes and the formation of the two daughter cells during meiotic and mitotic M-phase. Of the 45 human kinesins, roughly a dozen are involved in the assembly of the bipolar spindle, alignment of chromosomes at the spindle equator, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. The functions of kinesins in these processes are highly diverse and include the transport of cargo molecules, sliding and bundling of microtubules, and regulation of microtubule dynamics. In light of this multitude of diverse functions and the complex functional interplay of different kinesins during M-phase, it is not surprising that one of the greatest challenges in cell biology is the functional dissection of individual motor proteins. Reversible and fast acting small molecules are powerful tools to accomplish this challenge. However, the validity of conclusions drawn from small molecule studies strictly depends on compound specificity. In this chapter, we present methods for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of a motor protein of interest. In particular, we focus on a protein-based large throughput screen to identify inhibitors of the ATPase activity of kinesins. Furthermore, we provide protocols and guidelines for secondary screens to validate hits and select for specific inhibitors. PMID:27193856

  6. Polyoma small T antigen triggers cell death via mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Pores Fernando, A T; Andrabi, S; Cizmecioglu, O; Zhu, C; Livingston, D M; Higgins, J M G; Schaffhausen, B S; Roberts, T M

    2015-05-01

    Polyoma small T antigen (PyST), an early gene product of the polyoma virus, has been shown to cause cell death in a number of mammalian cells in a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent manner. In the current study, using a cell line featuring regulated expression of PyST, we found that PyST arrests cells in mitosis. Live-cell and immunofluorescence studies showed that the majority of the PyST expressing cells were arrested in prometaphase with almost no cells progressing beyond metaphase. These cells exhibited defects in chromosomal congression, sister chromatid cohesion and spindle positioning, thereby resulting in the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Prolonged mitotic arrest then led to cell death via mitotic catastrophe. Cell cycle inhibitors that block cells in G1/S prevented PyST-induced death. PyST-induced cell death that occurs during M is not dependent on p53 status. These data suggested, and our results confirmed, that PP2A inhibition could be used to preferentially kill cancer cells with p53 mutations that proliferate normally in the presence of cell cycle inhibitors. PMID:24998850

  7. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A.; Brunner, Michael R.; Davidson, Iain F.; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/CCDC20 activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/CCDC20 activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/CCDC20 activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  8. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A; Brunner, Michael R; Davidson, Iain F; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-05-10

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/C(CDC20) activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/C(CDC20) activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/C(CDC20) activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  9. Inhibitory factors associated with anaphase-promoting complex/cylosome in mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Ilana; Miniowitz, Shirly; Moshe, Yakir; Hershko, Avram

    2007-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system ensures accurate chromosome segregation by preventing anaphase initiation until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. It affects the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets inhibitors of anaphase initiation for degradation. The mechanisms by which this system regulates APC/C remain obscure. Some models propose that the system promotes sequestration of the APC/C activator Cdc20 by binding to the checkpoint proteins Mad2 and BubR1. A different model suggests that a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of BubR1, Bub3, Cdc20, and Mad2 inhibits APC/C in mitotic checkpoint [Sudakin V, Chan GKT, Yen TJ (2001) J Cell Biol 154:925–936]. We examined this problem by using extracts from nocodazole-arrested cells that reproduce some downstream events of the mitotic checkpoint system, such as lag kinetics of the degradation of APC/C substrate. Incubation of extracts with adenosine-5′-(γ-thio)triphosphate (ATP[γS]) stabilized the checkpoint-arrested state, apparently by stable thiophosphorylation of some proteins. By immunoprecipitation of APC/C from stably checkpoint-arrested extracts, followed by elution with increased salt concentration, we isolated inhibitory factors associated with APC/C. A part of the inhibitory material consists of Cdc20 associated with BubR1 and Mad2, and is thus similar to MCC. Contrary to the original MCC hypothesis, we find that MCC disassembles upon exit from the mitotic checkpoint. Thus, the requirement of the mitotic checkpoint system for the binding of Mad2 and BubR1 to Cdc20 may be for the assembly of the inhibitory complex rather than for Cdc20 sequestration. PMID:17360335

  10. Proteomic profiling revealed the functional networks associated with mitotic catastrophe of HepG2 hepatoma cells induced by 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo; Huang Bo; Guan Hua; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi; He Xingpeng; Liu Xiaodan; Wang Yu; Shang Zengfu; Zhou Pingkun

    2011-05-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death resulting from abnormal mitosis, is a cytotoxic death pathway as well as an appealing mechanistic strategy for the development of anti-cancer drugs. In this study, 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde was demonstrated to induce DNA double-strand break, multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We used proteomic profiling to identify the differentially expressed proteins underlying mitotic catastrophe. A total of 137 differentially expressed proteins (76 upregulated and 61 downregulated proteins) were identified. Some of the changed proteins have previously been associated with mitotic catastrophe, such as DNA-PKcs, FoxM1, RCC1, cyclin E, PLK1-pT210, 14-3-3{sigma} and HSP70. Multiple isoforms of 14-3-3, heat-shock proteins and tubulin were upregulated. Analysis of functional significance revealed that the 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the differentially expressed proteins. The modulated proteins were found to be involved in macromolecule complex assembly, cell death, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin and cytoskeletal organization. These findings revealed the overall molecular events and functional signaling networks associated with spindle disruption and mitotic catastrophe. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > 6-bromoisovanillin induced spindle disruption and sustained mitotic arrest, consequently resulted in mitotic catastrophe. > Proteomic profiling identified 137 differentially expressed proteins associated mitotic catastrophe. > The 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the altered proteins. > The macromolecule complex assembly, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin organization were also shown involved in mitotic catastrophe.

  11. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  12. Phosphorylation of Targeting Protein for Xenopus Kinesin-like Protein 2 (TPX2) at Threonine 72 in Spindle Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Su Yeon; de Castro, Ignacio Perez; Neumayer, Gernot; Wang, Jian; Park, Sang Ki; Sanada, Kamon; Nguyen, Minh Dang

    2015-01-01

    The human ortholog of the targeting protein for Xenopus kinesin-like protein 2 (TPX2) is a cytoskeletal protein that plays a major role in spindle assembly and is required for mitosis. During spindle morphogenesis, TPX2 cooperates with Aurora A kinase and Eg5 kinesin to regulate microtubule organization. TPX2 displays over 40 putative phosphorylation sites identified from various high-throughput proteomic screenings. In this study, we characterize the phosphorylation of threonine 72 (Thr72) in human TPX2, a residue highly conserved across species. We find that Cdk1/2 phosphorylate TPX2 in vitro and in vivo. Using homemade antibodies specific for TPX2 phosphorylated at Thr72, we show that this phosphorylation is cell cycle-dependent and peaks at M phase. Endogenous TPX2 phosphorylated at Thr72 does not associate with the mitotic spindle. Furthermore, ectopic GFP-TPX2 T72A preferentially concentrates on the spindle, whereas GFP-TPX2 WT distributes to both spindle and cytosol. The T72A mutant also increases the proportion of cells with multipolar spindles phenotype. This effect is associated with increased Aurora A activity and abnormally elongated spindles, indicative of higher Eg5 activity. In summary, we propose that phosphorylation of Thr72 regulates TPX2 localization and impacts spindle assembly via Aurora A and Eg5. PMID:25688093

  13. Role of fungal dynein in hyphal growth, microtubule organization, spindle pole body motility and nuclear migration.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Turgeon, B G; Yoder, O C; Aist, J R

    1998-06-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule-associated motor protein with several putative subcellular functions. Sequencing of the gene (DHC1) for cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain of the filamentous ascomycete, Nectria haematococca, revealed a 4,349-codon open reading frame (interrupted by two introns) with four highly conserved P-loop motifs, typical of cytoplasmic dynein heavy chains. The predicted amino acid sequence is 78.0% identical to the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain of Neurospora crassa, 70.2% identical to that of Aspergillus nidulans and 24.8% identical to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The genomic copy of DHC1 in N. haematococca wild-type strain T213 was disrupted by inserting a selectable marker into the central motor domain. Mutants grew at 33% of the wild-type rate, forming dense compact colonies composed of spiral and highly branched hyphae. Major cytological phenotypes included (1) absence of aster-like arrays of cytoplasmic microtubules focused at the spindle pole bodies of post-mitotic and interphase nuclei, (2) limited post-mitotic nuclear migration, (3) lack of spindle pole body motility at interphase, (4) failure of spindle pole bodies to anchor interphase nuclei, (5) nonuniform distribution of interphase nuclei and (6) small or ephemeral Spitzenkörper at the apices of hyphal tip cells. Microtubule distribution in the apical region of tip cells of the mutant was essentially normal. The nonuniform distribution of nuclei in hyphae resulted primarily from a lack of both post-mitotic nuclear migration and anchoring of interphase nuclei by the spindle pole bodies. The results support the hypothesis that DHC1 is required for the motility and functions of spindle pole bodies, normal secretory vesicle transport to the hyphal apex and normal hyphal tip cell morphogenesis. PMID:9580563

  14. Spindle Checkpoint Protein Xmad1 Recruits Xmad2 to Unattached Kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rey-Huei; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Murray, Andrew W.

    1998-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint prevents the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells containing defects in the mitotic spindle or in chromosome attachment to the spindle. When the checkpoint protein Xmad2 is depleted from Xenopus egg extracts, adding Xmad2 to its endogenous concentration fails to restore the checkpoint, suggesting that other checkpoint component(s) were depleted from the extract through their association with Xmad2. Mass spectrometry provided peptide sequences from an 85-kD protein that coimmunoprecipitates with Xmad2 from egg extracts. This information was used to clone XMAD1, which encodes a homologue of the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) checkpoint protein Mad1. Xmad1 is essential for establishing and maintaining the spindle checkpoint in egg extracts. Like Xmad2, Xmad1 localizes to the nuclear envelope and the nucleus during interphase, and to those kinetochores that are not bound to spindle microtubules during mitosis. Adding an anti-Xmad1 antibody to egg extracts inactivates the checkpoint and prevents Xmad2 from localizing to unbound kinetochores. In the presence of excess Xmad2, neither chromosomes nor Xmad1 are required to activate the spindle checkpoint, suggesting that the physiological role of Xmad1 is to recruit Xmad2 to kinetochores that have not bound microtubules. PMID:9786942

  15. Phosphorylation of Plk1 at Ser326 regulates its functions during mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Tang, J; Yang, X; Liu, X

    2009-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), the best characterized member of the mammalian polo-like kinase family, is well regulated throughout the cell cycle at the protein expression level. Moreover, it is known that Plk1 kinase activity is also regulated at the post-translational level through phosphorylation. However, the upstream kinases of Plk1 have not been identified. Although the involvement of the p38 MAP kinase pathway in cellular responses to stress has been well documented, the role of this pathway in normal cell cycle progression is unclear. Here, we show that phosphorylated p38 and MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) are colocalized with Plk1 to the spindle poles during prophase and metaphase. Specific depletion of various members of the p38 MAP kinase pathway by the use of RNA interference revealed that the pathway is required for mitotic progression under normal growth conditions. Furthermore, MK2 directly phosphorylates Ser326 of Plk1. Ectopic expression of Plk1-S326A completely blocked cells at mitosis, likely due to the defect of bipolar spindle formation and subsequent activation of the spindle checkpoint. Only Plk1-S326E, but not the Plk1-S326A, efficiently rescued the p38 or MK2-depletion-induced mitotic defects, further solidifying the requirement of S326 phosphorylation during mitotic progression. PMID:18695677

  16. Kizuna is a novel mitotic substrate for CDC25B phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Yann; Peter, Marion; Mechali, Francisca; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Coux, Olivier; Baldin, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    CDC25 dual-specificity phosphatases play a central role in cell cycle control through the activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases (CDKs). Expression during mitosis of a stabilized CDC25B mutant (CDC25B-DDA), which cannot interact with the F-box protein βTrCP for proteasome-dependent degradation, causes mitotic defects and chromosome segregation errors in mammalian cells. We found, using the same CDC25B mutant, that stabilization and failure to degrade CDC25B during mitosis lead to the appearance of multipolar spindle cells resulting from a fragmentation of pericentriolar material (PCM) and abolish mitotic Plk1-dependent phosphorylation of Kizuna (Kiz), which is essential for the function of Kiz in maintaining spindle pole integrity. Thus, in mitosis Kiz is a new substrate of CDC25B whose dephosphorylation following CDC25B stabilization leads to the formation of multipolar spindles. Furthermore, endogenous Kiz and CDC25B interact only in mitosis, suggesting that Kiz phosphorylation depends on a balance between CDC25B and Plk1 activities. Our data identify a novel mitotic substrate of CDC25B phosphatase that plays a key role in mitosis control. PMID:25558830

  17. ICRF-193, an anticancer topoisomerase II inhibitor, induces arched telophase spindles that snap, leading to a ploidy increase in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Norihiko; Mehrotra, Rajesh; Arakawa, Orie; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-09-01

    ICRF-193 [meso-4,4-(2,3-butanediyl)-bis(2,6-piperazinedione)] is a complex-stabilizing inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II (topo II) that is used as an effective anticancer drug. ICRF-193 inhibits topo II catalytic activity in vitro and blocks nuclear division in vivo. Here, we examined the effects of ICRF-193 treatment on chromatin behavior and spindle dynamics using detailed live mitotic cell analysis in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Time-lapse movie analysis showed that ICRF-193 treatment leads to an elongation of presumed chromatin fibers connected to kinetochores during mid-mitosis. Anaphase spindles begin to arch, and eventually spindle poles come together abruptly, as if the spindle snapped at the point of spindle microtubule overlap in telophase. Segregating chromosomes appeared as elastic clumps and subsequently pulled back and merged. The snapped spindle phenotype was abolished by microtubule destabilization after thiabendazole treatment, accompanied by unequal chromosome segregation or severe defects in spindle extension. Thus, we conclude that ICRF-193-treated, unseparated sister chromatids pulling toward opposite spindle poles produce the arched and snapped telophase spindle. ICRF-193 treatment increased DNA content, suggesting that the failure of sister chromatids to separate properly in anaphase, causes the spindle to break in telophase, resulting in polyploidization. PMID:27458047

  18. Spatial Regulation of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint and Anaphase Promoting Complex in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Edgerton, Heather; Paolillo, Vitoria; Oakley, Berl R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) plays a critical role in preventing mitotic errors by inhibiting anaphase until all kinetochores are correctly attached to spindle microtubules. In spite of the economic and medical importance of filamentous fungi, relatively little is known about the behavior of SAC proteins in these organisms. In our efforts to understand the role of γ-tubulin in cell cycle regulation, we have created functional fluorescent protein fusions of four SAC proteins in Aspergillus nidulans, the homologs of Mad2, Mps1, Bub1/BubR1 and Bub3. Time-lapse imaging reveals that SAC proteins are in distinct compartments of the cell until early mitosis when they co-localize at the spindle pole body. SAC activity is, thus, spatially regulated in A. nidulans. Likewise, Cdc20, an activator of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, is excluded from interphase nuclei, but enters nuclei at mitotic onset and accumulates to a higher level in mitotic nuclei than in the surrounding nucleoplasm before leaving in anaphase/telophase. The activity of this critical cell cycle regulatory complex is likely regulated by the location of Cdc20. Finally, the γ-tubulin mutation mipAD159 causes a nuclear-specific failure of nuclear localization of Mps1 and Bub1/R1 but not of Cdc20, Bub3 or Mad2. PMID:25417844

  19. Cutaneous mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Geok Chin; Yap, Yen Piow; Shiran, Mohd Sidik; Sabariah, Abdul Rahman; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour (MSCP) has been reported in various sites, including skin, lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and spleen. Cutaneous lesions are extremely rare and the differential diagnoses include various spindle cell lesions. Literature review shows that this lesion has preponderance for upper limb involvement and occurs largely in immunosuppressed individuals. We report a case of MSCP of the skin due to atypical mycobacterium and discuss the risk of misdiagnosis as a sarcoma. PMID:21686408

  20. Cutaneous mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour.

    PubMed

    Tan, Geok Chin; Yap, Yen Piow; Shiran, Mohd Sidik; Sabariah, Abdul Rahman; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour (MSCP) has been reported in various sites, including skin, lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and spleen. Cutaneous lesions are extremely rare and the differential diagnoses include various spindle cell lesions. Literature review shows that this lesion has preponderance for upper limb involvement and occurs largely in immunosuppressed individuals. We report a case of MSCP of the skin due to atypical mycobacterium and discuss the risk of misdiagnosis as a sarcoma. PMID:21686408

  1. Kinesin-13 regulates flagellar, interphase, and mitotic microtubule dynamics in Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Scott C; Sagolla, Meredith S; Mancuso, Joel J; Woessner, David J; House, Susan A; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian; Cande, W Zacheus

    2007-12-01

    Microtubule depolymerization dynamics in the spindle are regulated by kinesin-13, a nonprocessive kinesin motor protein that depolymerizes microtubules at the plus and minus ends. Here we show that a single kinesin-13 homolog regulates flagellar length dynamics, as well as other interphase and mitotic dynamics in Giardia intestinalis, a widespread parasitic diplomonad protist. Both green fluorescent protein-tagged kinesin-13 and EB1 (a plus-end tracking protein) localize to the plus ends of mitotic and interphase microtubules, including a novel localization to the eight flagellar tips, cytoplasmic anterior axonemes, and the median body. The ectopic expression of a kinesin-13 (S280N) rigor mutant construct caused significant elongation of the eight flagella with significant decreases in the median body volume and resulted in mitotic defects. Notably, drugs that disrupt normal interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics also affected flagellar length in Giardia. Our study extends recent work on interphase and mitotic kinesin-13 functioning in metazoans to include a role in regulating flagellar length dynamics. We suggest that kinesin-13 universally regulates both mitotic and interphase microtubule dynamics in diverse microbial eukaryotes and propose that axonemal microtubules are subject to the same regulation of microtubule dynamics as other dynamic microtubule arrays. Finally, the present study represents the first use of a dominant-negative strategy to disrupt normal protein function in Giardia and provides important insights into giardial microtubule dynamics with relevance to the development of antigiardial compounds that target critical functions of kinesins in the giardial life cycle. PMID:17766466

  2. Therapeutic potential of mitotic interaction between the nucleoporin Tpr and aurora kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Hashizume, Chieko; Dowaki, Takayuki; Wong, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Spindle poles are defined by centrosomes; therefore, an abnormal number or defective structural organization of centrosomes can lead to loss of spindle bipolarity and genetic integrity. Previously, we showed that Tpr (translocated promoter region), a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), interacts with Mad1 and dynein to promote proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Tpr also associates with p53 to induce autophagy. Here, we report that Tpr depletion induces mitotic catastrophe and enhances the rate of tetraploidy and polyploidy. Mechanistically, Tpr interacts, via its central domain, with Aurora A but not Aurora B kinase. In Tpr-depleted cells, the expression levels, centrosomal localization and phosphorylation of Aurora A were all reduced. Surprisingly, an Aurora A inhibitor, Alisertib (MLN8237), also disrupted centrosomal localization of Tpr and induced mitotic catastrophe and cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Strikingly, over-expression of Aurora A disrupted Tpr centrosomal localization only in cells with supernumerary centrosomes but not in bipolar cells. Our results highlight the mutual regulation between Tpr and Aurora A and further confirm the importance of nucleoporin function in spindle pole organization, bipolar spindle assembly, and mitosis; functions that are beyond the conventional nucleocytoplasmic transport and NPC structural roles of nucleoporins. Furthermore, the central coiled-coil domain of Tpr binds to and sequesters extra Aurora A to safeguard bipolarity. This Tpr domain merits further investigation for its ability to inhibit Aurora kinase and as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer treatment. PMID:25789545

  3. Concomitant binding of Afadin to LGN and F-actin directs planar spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Carminati, Manuel; Gallini, Sara; Pirovano, Laura; Alfieri, Andrea; Bisi, Sara; Mapelli, Marina

    2016-02-01

    Polarized epithelia form by oriented cell divisions in which the mitotic spindle aligns parallel to the epithelial plane. To orient the mitotic spindle, cortical cues trigger the recruitment of NuMA-dynein-based motors, which pull on astral microtubules via the protein LGN. We demonstrate that the junctional protein Afadin is required for spindle orientation and correct epithelial morphogenesis of Caco-2 cysts. Molecularly, Afadin binds directly and concomitantly to F-actin and to LGN. We determined the crystallographic structure of human Afadin in complex with LGN and show that it resembles the LGN-NuMA complex. In mitosis, Afadin is necessary for cortical accumulation of LGN and NuMA above the spindle poles, in an F-actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our results depict Afadin as a molecular hub governing the enrichment of LGN and NuMA at the cortex. To our knowledge, Afadin is the first-described mechanical anchor between dynein and cortical F-actin. PMID:26751642

  4. Nucleolar Separation from Chromosomes during Aspergillus nidulans Mitosis Can Occur Without Spindle Forces

    PubMed Central

    Ukil, Leena; De Souza, Colin P.; Liu, Hui-Lin

    2009-01-01

    How the nucleolus is segregated during mitosis is poorly understood and occurs by very different mechanisms during closed and open mitosis. Here we report a new mechanism of nucleolar segregation involving removal of the nucleolar-organizing regions (NORs) from nucleoli during Aspergillus nidulans mitosis. This involves a double nuclear envelope (NE) restriction which generates three NE-associated structures, two daughter nuclei (containing the NORs), and the nucleolus. Therefore, a remnant nucleolar structure can exist in the cytoplasm without NORs. In G1, this parental cytoplasmic nucleolus undergoes sequential disassembly releasing nucleolar proteins to the cytoplasm as nucleoli concomitantly reform in daughter nuclei. By depolymerizing microtubules and mutating spindle assembly checkpoint function, we demonstrate that a cycle of nucleolar “segregation” can occur without a spindle in a process termed spindle-independent mitosis (SIM). During SIM physical separation of the NOR from the nucleolus occurs, and NE modifications promote expulsion of the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. Subsequently, the cytoplasmic nucleolus is disassembled and rebuilt at a new site around the nuclear NOR. The data demonstrate the existence of a mitotic machinery for nucleolar segregation that is normally integrated with mitotic spindle formation but that can function without it. PMID:19211837

  5. Pten regulates spindle pole movement through Dlg1-mediated recruitment of Eg5 to centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    van Ree, Janine H.; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Kanakkanthara, Arun; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (Pten) suppresses neoplastic growth by negatively regulating PI(3)K signalling through its phosphatase activity1. To gain insight into the actions of non-catalytic Pten domains in normal physiological processes and tumorigenesis2,3, we engineered mice lacking the PDZ-binding domain (PDZ-BD). Here, we show that the PDZ-BD regulates centrosome movement and that its heterozygous or homozygous deletion promotes aneuploidy and tumour formation. We found that Pten is recruited to pre-mitotic centrosomes in a Plk1-dependent fashion to create a docking site for protein complexes containing the PDZ-domain-containing protein Dlg1 (also known as Sap97) and Eg5 (also known as Kif11), a kinesin essential for centrosome movement and bipolar spindle formation4. Docking of Dlg1–Eg5 complexes to Pten depended on Eg5 phosphorylation by the Nek9–Nek6 mitotic kinase cascade and Cdk1. PDZ-BD deletion or Dlg1 ablation impaired loading of Eg5 onto centrosomes and spindle pole motility, yielding asymmetrical spindles that are prone to chromosome missegregation. Collectively, these data demonstrate that Pten, through the Dlg1-binding ability of its PDZ-BD, accumulates phosphorylated Eg5 at duplicated centrosomes to establish symmetrical bipolar spindles that properly segregate chromosomes, and suggest that this function contributes to tumour suppression. PMID:27240320

  6. The flavonoid eupatorin inactivates the mitotic checkpoint leading to polyploidy and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Pouwels, Jeroen; Kukkonen-Macchi, Anu; Waris, Sinikka; Toivonen, Pauliina; Jaakkola, Kimmo; Maeki-Jouppila, Jenni; Kallio, Lila; Kallio, Marko J.

    2012-03-10

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a conserved mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome distribution in mitosis by preventing anaphase onset until the correct bipolar microtubule-kinetochore attachments are formed. Errors in SAC function may contribute to tumorigenesis by inducing numerical chromosome anomalies (aneuploidy). On the other hand, total disruption of SAC can lead to massive genomic imbalance followed by cell death, a phenomena that has therapeutic potency. We performed a cell-based high-throughput screen with a compound library of 2000 bioactives for novel SAC inhibitors and discovered a plant-derived phenolic compound eupatorin (3 Prime ,5-dihydroxy-4 Prime ,6,7-trimethoxyflavone) as an anti-mitotic flavonoid. The premature override of the microtubule drug-imposed mitotic arrest by eupatorin is dependent on microtubule-kinetochore attachments but not interkinetochore tension. Aurora B kinase activity, which is essential for maintenance of normal SAC signaling, is diminished by eupatorin in cells and in vitro providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed forced mitotic exit. Eupatorin likely has additional targets since eupatorin treatment of pre-mitotic cells causes spindle anomalies triggering a transient M phase delay followed by impaired cytokinesis and polyploidy. Finally, eupatorin potently induces apoptosis in multiple cancer cell lines and suppresses cancer cell proliferation in organotypic 3D cell culture model.

  7. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    PubMed Central

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells. PMID:26602832

  8. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement.

    PubMed

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P; Cattin, Cedric J; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells. PMID:26602832

  9. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells.

  10. ARHGEF17 is an essential spindle assembly checkpoint factor that targets Mps1 to kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Isokane, Mayumi; Walter, Thomas; Mahen, Robert; Nijmeijer, Bianca; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Miura, Kota; Maffini, Stefano; Ivanov, Miroslav Penchev; Kitajima, Tomoya S.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-01-01

    To prevent genome instability, mitotic exit is delayed until all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). In this study, we characterized the function of ARHGEF17, identified in a genome-wide RNA interference screen for human mitosis genes. Through a series of quantitative imaging, biochemical, and biophysical experiments, we showed that ARHGEF17 is essential for SAC activity, because it is the major targeting factor that controls localization of the checkpoint kinase Mps1 to the kinetochore. This mitotic function is mediated by direct interaction of the central domain of ARHGEF17 with Mps1, which is autoregulated by the activity of Mps1 kinase, for which ARHGEF17 is a substrate. This mitosis-specific role is independent of ARHGEF17’s RhoGEF activity in interphase. Our study thus assigns a new mitotic function to ARHGEF17 and reveals the molecular mechanism for a key step in SAC establishment. PMID:26953350

  11. NuMA Phosphorylation by Aurora-A Orchestrates Spindle Orientation.

    PubMed

    Gallini, Sara; Carminati, Manuel; De Mattia, Fabiola; Pirovano, Laura; Martini, Emanuele; Oldani, Amanda; Asteriti, Italia Anna; Guarguaglini, Giulia; Mapelli, Marina

    2016-02-22

    Spindle positioning is essential for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. The signaling network synchronizing spindle placement with mitotic progression relies on timely recruitment at the cell cortex of NuMA:LGN:Gαi complexes, in which NuMA acts as a receptor for the microtubule motor Dynein. To study the implication of Aurora-A in spindle orientation, we developed protocols for the partial inhibition of its activity. Under these conditions, in metaphase NuMA and Dynein accumulate abnormally at the spindle poles and do not reach the cortex, while the cortical distribution of LGN remains unperturbed. FRAP experiments revealed that Aurora-A governs the dynamic exchange between the cytoplasmic and the spindle pole-localized pools of NuMA. We show that Aurora-A phosphorylates directly the C terminus of NuMA on three Ser residues, of which Ser1969 determines the dynamic behavior and the spindle orientation functions of NuMA. Most interestingly, we identify a new microtubule-binding domain of NuMA, which does not overlap with the LGN-binding motif. Our study demonstrates that in metaphase the direct phosphorylation of NuMA by Aurora-A controls its cortical enrichment, and that this is the major event underlying the spindle orientation functions of Aurora-A in transformed and non-transformed cells in culture. Phosphorylation of NuMA by Aurora-A does not affect its affinity for microtubules or for LGN but rather determines the mobility of the protein at the spindle poles. The finding that NuMA can associate concomitantly with LGN and microtubules suggests that its microtubule-binding activity contributes to anchor Dynein-loaded microtubule +TIPs at cortical sites with LGN. PMID:26832443

  12. Disturbed mitotic progression and genome segregation are involved in cell transformation mediated by nano-TiO2 long-term exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shing; Chueh Pinju; Lin Yunwei; Shih Tungsheng; Chuang Showmei

    2009-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-particles (< 100 nm in diameter) have been of interest in a wide range of applications, such as in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals because of their low toxicity. However, recent studies have shown that TiO2 nano-particles (nano-TiO2) induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in various lines of cultured cells as well as tumorigenesis in animal models. The biological roles of nano-TiO2 are shown to be controversial and no comprehensive study paradigm has been developed to investigate their molecular mechanisms. In this study, we showed that short-term exposure to nano-TiO2 enhanced cell proliferation, survival, ERK signaling activation and ROS production in cultured fibroblast cells. Moreover, long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 not only increased cell survival and growth on soft agar but also the numbers of multinucleated cells and micronucleus (MN) as suggested in confocal microscopy analysis. Cell cycle phase analysis showed G2/M delay and slower cell division in long-term exposed cells. Most importantly, long-term TiO2 exposure remarkably affected mitotic progression at anaphase and telophase leading to aberrant multipolar spindles and chromatin alignment/segregation. Moreover, PLK1 was demonstrated as the target for nano-TiO2 in the regulation of mitotic progression and exit. Notably, a higher fraction of sub-G1 phase population appeared in TiO2-exposed cells after releasing from G2/M synchronization. Our results demonstrate that long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 disturbs cell cycle progression and duplicated genome segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cell transformation.

  13. Efficient Activation of Apoptotic Signaling during Mitotic Arrest with AK301

    PubMed Central

    Bleiler, Marina; Yeagley, Michelle; Wright, Dennis; Giardina, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic inhibitors are widely utilized chemotherapeutic agents that take advantage of mitotic defects in cancer cells. We have identified a novel class of piperazine-based mitotic inhibitors, of which AK301 is the most potent derivative identified to date (EC50 < 200 nM). Colon cancer cells arrested in mitosis with AK301 readily underwent a p53-dependent apoptosis following compound withdrawal and arrest release. This apoptotic response was significantly higher for AK301 than for other mitotic inhibitors tested (colchicine, vincristine, and BI 2536). AK301-treated cells exhibited a robust mitosis-associated DNA damage response, including ATM activation, γH2AX phosphorylation and p53 stabilization. The association between mitotic signaling and the DNA damage response was supported by the finding that Aurora B inhibition reduced the level of γH2AX staining. Confocal imaging of AK301-treated cells revealed multiple γ-tubulin microtubule organizing centers attached to microtubules, but with limited centrosome migration, raising the possibility that aberrant microtubule pulling may underlie DNA breakage. AK301 selectively targeted APC-mutant colonocytes and promoted TNF-induced apoptosis in p53-mutant colon cancer cells. Our findings indicate that AK301 induces a mitotic arrest state with a highly active DNA damage response. Together with a reversible arrest state, AK301 is a potent promoter of a mitosis-to-apoptosis transition that can target cancer cells with mitotic defects. PMID:27097159

  14. Formin-mediated actin polymerization cooperates with Mushroom body defect (Mud)–Dynein during Frizzled–Dishevelled spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher A.; Manning, Laurina; Lu, Michelle S.; Golub, Ognjen; Doe, Chris Q.; Prehoda, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary To position the mitotic spindle, cytoskeletal components must be coordinated to generate cortical forces on astral microtubules. Although the dynein motor is common to many spindle orientation systems, ‘accessory pathways’ are often also required. In this work, we identified an accessory spindle orientation pathway in Drosophila that functions with Dynein during planar cell polarity, downstream of the Frizzled (Fz) effector Dishevelled (Dsh). Dsh contains a PDZ ligand and a Dynein-recruiting DEP domain that are both required for spindle orientation. The Dsh PDZ ligand recruits Canoe/Afadin and ultimately leads to Rho GTPase signaling mediated through RhoGEF2. The formin Diaphanous (Dia) functions as the Rho effector in this pathway, inducing F-actin enrichment at sites of cortical Dsh. Chimeric protein experiments show that the Dia–actin accessory pathway can be replaced by an independent kinesin (Khc73) accessory pathway for Dsh-mediated spindle orientation. Our results define two ‘modular’ spindle orientation pathways and show an essential role for actin regulation in Dsh-mediated spindle orientation. PMID:23868974

  15. KLP-7 acts through the Ndc80 complex to limit pole number in C. elegans oocyte meiotic spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Amy A.; Sugioka, Kenji; Chuang, Chien-Hui; Lowry, Joshua B.

    2015-01-01

    During oocyte meiotic cell division in many animals, bipolar spindles assemble in the absence of centrosomes, but the mechanisms that restrict pole assembly to a bipolar state are unknown. We show that KLP-7, the single mitotic centromere–associated kinesin (MCAK)/kinesin-13 in Caenorhabditis elegans, is required for bipolar oocyte meiotic spindle assembly. In klp-7(−) mutants, extra microtubules accumulated, extra functional spindle poles assembled, and chromosomes frequently segregated as three distinct masses during meiosis I anaphase. Moreover, reducing KLP-7 function in monopolar klp-18(−) mutants often restored spindle bipolarity and chromosome segregation. MCAKs act at kinetochores to correct improper kinetochore–microtubule (k–MT) attachments, and depletion of the Ndc-80 kinetochore complex, which binds microtubules to mediate kinetochore attachment, restored bipolarity in klp-7(−) mutant oocytes. We propose a model in which KLP-7/MCAK regulates k–MT attachment and spindle tension to promote the coalescence of early spindle pole foci that produces a bipolar structure during the acentrosomal process of oocyte meiotic spindle assembly. PMID:26370499

  16. From meiosis to mitosis - the sperm centrosome defines the kinetics of spindle assembly after fertilization in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, Tommaso; Peset, Isabel; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    Bipolar spindle assembly in the vertebrate oocyte relies on a self-organization chromosome-dependent pathway. Upon fertilization, the male gamete provides a centrosome, and the first and subsequent embryonic divisions occur in the presence of duplicated centrosomes that act as dominant microtubule organizing centres (MTOCs). The transition from meiosis to embryonic mitosis involves a necessary adaptation to integrate the dominant chromosome-dependent pathway with the centrosomes to form the bipolar spindle. Here, we took advantage of the Xenopus laevis egg extract system to mimic in vitro the assembly of the first embryonic spindle and investigate the respective contributions of the centrosome and the chromosome-dependent pathway to the kinetics of the spindle bipolarization. We found that centrosomes control the transition from the meiotic to the mitotic spindle assembly mechanism. By defining the kinetics of spindle bipolarization, the centrosomes ensure their own positioning to each spindle pole and thereby their essential correct inheritance to the two first daughter cells of the embryo for the development of a healthy organism. PMID:27179073

  17. Nek9 regulates spindle organization and cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiosis and its location in early embryo mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shang-Wu; Gao, Chen; Chen, Lei; Song, Ya-Li; Zhu, Jin-Liang; Qi, Shu-Tao; Jiang, Zong-Zhe; Wang, Zhong-Wei; Lin, Fei; Huang, Hao; Xing, Fu-Qi; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Nek9 (also known as Nercc1), a member of the NIMA (never in mitosis A) family of protein kinases, regulates spindle formation, chromosome alignment and segregation in mitosis. Here, we showed that Nek9 protein was expressed from germinal vesicle (GV) to metaphase II (MII) stages in mouse oocytes with no detectable changes. Confocal microscopy identified that Nek9 was localized to the spindle poles at the metaphase stages and associated with the midbody at anaphase or telophase stage in both meiotic oocytes and the first mitotic embyros. Depletion of Nek9 by specific morpholino injection resulted in severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes with significant pro-MI/MI arrest and failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion. Knockdown of Nek9 also impaired the spindle-pole localization of γ-tubulin and resulted in retention of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Bub3 at the kinetochores even after 10 h of culture. Live-cell imaging analysis also confirmed that knockdown of Nek9 resulted in oocyte arrest at the pro-MI/MI stage with abnormal spindles, misaligned chromosomes and failed polar body emission. Taken together, our results suggest that Nek9 may act as a MTOC-associated protein regulating microtubule nucleation, spindle organization and, thus, cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation, fertilization and early embryo cleavage. PMID:23159858

  18. The fission yeast NIMA kinase Fin1p is required for spindle function and nuclear envelope integrity.

    PubMed

    Krien, Michael J E; West, Robert R; John, Ulrik P; Koniaras, Kalli; McIntosh, J Richard; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2002-04-01

    NIMA kinases appear to be the least functionally conserved mitotic regulators, being implicated in chromosome condensation in fungi and in spindle function in metazoans. We demonstrate here that the fission yeast NIMA homologue, Fin1p, can induce profound chromosome condensation in the absence of the condensin and topoisomerase II, indicating that Fin1p-induced condensation differs from mitotic condensation. Fin1p expression is transcriptionally and post-translationally cell cycle-regulated, with Fin1p kinase activity maximal from the metaphase-anaphase transition to G(1). Fin1p is localized to the spindle pole body and fin1Delta cells are hypersensitive to anti-microtubule drugs, synthetically lethal with a number of spindle mutants and require the spindle checkpoint for viability. Moreover, fin1Delta cells show unusual and extensive elaborations of the nuclear envelope. These data support a role for Fin1p in spindle function and nuclear envelope transactions at or after the metaphase-anaphase transition that may be generally applicable to other NIMA-family members. PMID:11927555

  19. MiR-509-3-5p causes aberrant mitosis and anti-proliferative effect by suppression of PLK1 in human lung cancer A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Hui; Lu, Yao; Liang, Jing-Jing; Cao, Ji-Xiang; Jin, Ya-Qiong; An, Guo-Shun; Ni, Ju-Hua; Jia, Hong-Ti; Li, Shu-Yan

    2016-09-16

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and play roles in DNA damage response (DDR). PLK1 is identified as a modulator of DNA damage checkpoint. Although down-regulation of PLK1 by certain microRNAs has been reported, little is known about the interplay between PLK1 and miR-509-3-5p in DDR. Here we have demonstrated that miR-509-3-5p repressed PLK1 expression by targeting PLK1 3'-UTR, thereby causing mitotic aberration and growth arrest of human lung cancer A549 cells. Repression of PLK1 by miR-509-3-5p was further evidenced by over-expression of miR-509-3-5p in A549, HepG2 and HCT116p53(-/-) cancer cells, in which PLK1 protein was suppressed. Consistently, miR-509-3-5p was stimulated, while PLK1 protein was down-regulated in A549 cells exposed to CIS and ADR, suggesting that suppression of PLK1 by miR-509-3-5p is a component of CIS/ADR-induced DDR pathway. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence labeling showed that over-expression of miR-509-3-5p in A549 induced G2/M arrest and aberrant mitosis characterized by abnormal bipolar mitotic spindles, condensed chromosomes, lagging DNA and chromosome bridges. In addition, over-expression of miR-509-3-5p markedly blocked A549 cell proliferation and sensitized the cells to CIS and ADR treatment. Taken together, miR-509-3-5p is a feasible suppressor for cancer by targeting PLK1. Our data may provide aid in potential design of combined chemotherapy and in our better understanding of the roles of microRNAs in response to DNA damage. PMID:27498003

  20. Misato Controls Mitotic Microtubule Generation by Stabilizing the Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Valeria; Pellacani, Claudia; Heesom, Kate J.; Rogala, Kacper B.; Deane, Charlotte M.; Mottier-Pavie, Violaine; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Wakefield, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitotic spindles are primarily composed of microtubules (MTs), generated by polymerization of α- and β-Tubulin hetero-dimers [1, 2]. Tubulins undergo a series of protein folding and post-translational modifications in order to fulfill their functions [3, 4]. Defects in Tubulin polymerization dramatically affect spindle formation and disrupt chromosome segregation. We recently described a role for the product of the conserved misato (mst) gene in regulating mitotic MT generation in flies [5], but the molecular function of Mst remains unknown. Here, we use affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) to identify interacting partners of Mst in the Drosophila embryo. We demonstrate that Mst associates stoichiometrically with the hetero-octameric Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 (TCP-1) complex, with the hetero-hexameric Tubulin Prefoldin complex, and with proteins having conserved roles in generating MT-competent Tubulin. We show that RNAi-mediated in vivo depletion of any TCP-1 subunit phenocopies the effects of mutations in mst or the Prefoldin-encoding gene merry-go-round (mgr), leading to monopolar and disorganized mitotic spindles containing few MTs. Crucially, we demonstrate that Mst, but not Mgr, is required for TCP-1 complex stability and that both the efficiency of Tubulin polymerization and Tubulin stability are drastically compromised in mst mutants. Moreover, our structural bioinformatic analyses indicate that Mst resembles the three-dimensional structure of Tubulin monomers and might therefore occupy the TCP-1 complex central cavity. Collectively, our results suggest that Mst acts as a co-factor of the TCP-1 complex, playing an essential role in the Tubulin-folding processes required for proper assembly of spindle MTs. PMID:26096973

  1. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  2. Pins is not required for spindle orientation in the Drosophila wing disc.

    PubMed

    Bergstralh, Dan T; Lovegrove, Holly E; Kujawiak, Izabela; Dawney, Nicole S; Zhu, Jinwei; Cooper, Samantha; Zhang, Rongguang; St Johnston, Daniel

    2016-07-15

    In animal cells, mitotic spindles are oriented by the dynein/dynactin motor complex, which exerts a pulling force on astral microtubules. Dynein/dynactin localization depends on Mud/NUMA, which is typically recruited to the cortex by Pins/LGN. In Drosophila neuroblasts, the Inscuteable/Baz/Par-6/aPKC complex recruits Pins apically to induce vertical spindle orientation, whereas in epithelial cells Dlg recruits Pins laterally to orient the spindle horizontally. Here we investigate division orientation in the Drosophila imaginal wing disc epithelium. Live imaging reveals that spindle angles vary widely during prometaphase and metaphase, and therefore do not reliably predict division orientation. This finding prompted us to re-examine mutants that have been reported to disrupt division orientation in this tissue. Loss of Mud misorients divisions, but Inscuteable expression and aPKC, dlg and pins mutants have no effect. Furthermore, Mud localizes to the apical-lateral cortex of the wing epithelium independently of both Pins and cell cycle stage. Thus, Pins is not required in the wing disc because there are parallel mechanisms for Mud localization and hence spindle orientation, making it a more robust system than in other epithelia. PMID:27287805

  3. Regulation of a Spindle Positioning Factor at Kinetochores by SUMO-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Schweiggert, Jörg; Stevermann, Lea; Panigada, Davide; Kammerer, Daniel; Liakopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-02-22

    Correct function of the mitotic spindle requires balanced interplay of kinetochore and astral microtubules that mediate chromosome segregation and spindle positioning, respectively. Errors therein can cause severe defects ranging from aneuploidy to developmental disorders. Here, we describe a protein degradation pathway that functionally links astral microtubules to kinetochores via regulation of a microtubule-associated factor. We show that the yeast spindle positioning protein Kar9 localizes not only to astral but also to kinetochore microtubules, where it becomes targeted for proteasomal degradation by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) Slx5-Slx8. Intriguingly, this process does not depend on preceding sumoylation of Kar9 but rather requires SUMO-dependent recruitment of STUbLs to kinetochores. Failure to degrade Kar9 leads to defects in both chromosome segregation and spindle positioning. We propose that kinetochores serve as platforms to recruit STUbLs in a SUMO-dependent manner in order to ensure correct spindle function by regulating levels of microtubule-associated proteins. PMID:26906737

  4. Compartmentalized Toxoplasma EB1 bundles spindle microtubules to secure accurate chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ti; Kelly, Megan; de Leon, Jessica; Nwagbara, Belinda; Ebbert, Patrick; Ferguson, David J. P.; Lowery, Laura Anne; Morrissette, Naomi; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii replicates asexually by a unique internal budding process characterized by interwoven closed mitosis and cytokinesis. Although it is known that the centrosome coordinates these processes, the spatiotemporal organization of mitosis remains poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that centrosome positioning around the nucleus may signal spindle assembly: spindle microtubules (MTs) are first assembled when the centrosome moves to the basal side and become extensively acetylated after the duplicated centrosomes reposition to the apical side. We also tracked the spindle MTs using the MT plus end–binding protein TgEB1. Endowed by a C-terminal NLS, TgEB1 resides in the nucleoplasm in interphase and associates with the spindle MTs during mitosis. TgEB1 also associates with the subpellicular MTs at the growing end of daughter buds toward the completion of karyokinesis. Depletion of TgEB1 results in escalated disintegration of kinetochore clustering. Furthermore, we show that TgEB1’s MT association in Toxoplasma and in a heterologous system (Xenopus) is based on the same principles. Finally, overexpression of a high-MT-affinity TgEB1 mutant promotes the formation of overstabilized MT bundles, resulting in avulsion of otherwise tightly clustered kinetochores. Overall we conclude that centrosome position controls spindle activity and that TgEB1 is critical for mitotic integrity. PMID:26466679

  5. TPX2 phosphorylation maintains metaphase spindle length by regulating microtubule flux

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jingyan; Bian, Minglei; Xin, Guangwei; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Luo, Jia; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Hao; Wang, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A steady-state metaphase spindle maintains constant length, although the microtubules undergo intensive dynamics. Tubulin dimers are incorporated at plus ends of spindle microtubules while they are removed from the minus ends, resulting in poleward movement. Such microtubule flux is regulated by the microtubule rescue factors CLASPs at kinetochores and depolymerizing protein Kif2a at the poles, along with other regulators of microtubule dynamics. How microtubule polymerization and depolymerization are coordinated remains unclear. Here we show that TPX2, a microtubule-bundling protein and activator of Aurora A, plays an important role. TPX2 was phosphorylated by Aurora A during mitosis. Its phospho-null mutant caused short metaphase spindles coupled with low microtubule flux rate. Interestingly, phosphorylation of TPX2 regulated its interaction with CLASP1 but not Kif2a. The effect of its mutant in shortening the spindle could be rescued by codepletion of CLASP1 and Kif2a that abolished microtubule flux. Together we propose that Aurora A–dependent TPX2 phosphorylation controls mitotic spindle length through regulating microtubule flux. PMID:26240182

  6. Pins is not required for spindle orientation in the Drosophila wing disc

    PubMed Central

    Lovegrove, Holly E.; Kujawiak, Izabela; Dawney, Nicole S.; Zhu, Jinwei; Cooper, Samantha; Zhang, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    In animal cells, mitotic spindles are oriented by the dynein/dynactin motor complex, which exerts a pulling force on astral microtubules. Dynein/dynactin localization depends on Mud/NUMA, which is typically recruited to the cortex by Pins/LGN. In Drosophila neuroblasts, the Inscuteable/Baz/Par-6/aPKC complex recruits Pins apically to induce vertical spindle orientation, whereas in epithelial cells Dlg recruits Pins laterally to orient the spindle horizontally. Here we investigate division orientation in the Drosophila imaginal wing disc epithelium. Live imaging reveals that spindle angles vary widely during prometaphase and metaphase, and therefore do not reliably predict division orientation. This finding prompted us to re-examine mutants that have been reported to disrupt division orientation in this tissue. Loss of Mud misorients divisions, but Inscuteable expression and aPKC, dlg and pins mutants have no effect. Furthermore, Mud localizes to the apical-lateral cortex of the wing epithelium independently of both Pins and cell cycle stage. Thus, Pins is not required in the wing disc because there are parallel mechanisms for Mud localization and hence spindle orientation, making it a more robust system than in other epithelia. PMID:27287805

  7. Compartmentalized Toxoplasma EB1 bundles spindle microtubules to secure accurate chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Ti; Kelly, Megan; Leon, Jessica de; Nwagbara, Belinda; Ebbert, Patrick; Ferguson, David J P; Lowery, Laura Anne; Morrissette, Naomi; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2015-12-15

    Toxoplasma gondii replicates asexually by a unique internal budding process characterized by interwoven closed mitosis and cytokinesis. Although it is known that the centrosome coordinates these processes, the spatiotemporal organization of mitosis remains poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that centrosome positioning around the nucleus may signal spindle assembly: spindle microtubules (MTs) are first assembled when the centrosome moves to the basal side and become extensively acetylated after the duplicated centrosomes reposition to the apical side. We also tracked the spindle MTs using the MT plus end-binding protein TgEB1. Endowed by a C-terminal NLS, TgEB1 resides in the nucleoplasm in interphase and associates with the spindle MTs during mitosis. TgEB1 also associates with the subpellicular MTs at the growing end of daughter buds toward the completion of karyokinesis. Depletion of TgEB1 results in escalated disintegration of kinetochore clustering. Furthermore, we show that TgEB1's MT association in Toxoplasma and in a heterologous system (Xenopus) is based on the same principles. Finally, overexpression of a high-MT-affinity TgEB1 mutant promotes the formation of overstabilized MT bundles, resulting in avulsion of otherwise tightly clustered kinetochores. Overall we conclude that centrosome position controls spindle activity and that TgEB1 is critical for mitotic integrity. PMID:26466679

  8. Optimization study of the efficient spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. D.; Chun, D. H.; Kang, M. S.; Kim, H. D.

    2008-09-01

    In the field of yarn dyeing, the most generally employed method is a type of package dyeing which uses a package of cheese stacked on a spindle made of a perforated tube. Spindles up to now, have been designed without considering the characteristics of dyeing liquid, focusing only on the geometric configuration which cause many problems such as lack of level dyeing. To improve the level dyeing and find the appropriate spindle configuration for the most effective dyeing process, this study examines the spindle flow-field in detail, using a computational method. Flow characteristics inside the spindle have been investigated with varying in porosity, porous diameter and the velocity of the flow. The results show that the total pressure of the flow through the spindle is used to overcome body force. The characteristics of the flow from the porous spindle could also be observed. Based on the results from this study, an effective spindle configuration for level-dyeing has been proposed.

  9. Mitotic Exit and Separation of Mother and Daughter Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Productive cell proliferation involves efficient and accurate splitting of the dividing cell into two separate entities. This orderly process reflects coordination of diverse cytological events by regulatory systems that drive the cell from mitosis into G1. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, separation of mother and daughter cells involves coordinated actomyosin ring contraction and septum synthesis, followed by septum destruction. These events occur in precise and rapid sequence once chromosomes are segregated and are linked with spindle organization and mitotic progress by intricate cell cycle control machinery. Additionally, critical parts of the mother/daughter separation process are asymmetric, reflecting a form of fate specification that occurs in every cell division. This chapter describes central events of budding yeast cell separation, as well as the control pathways that integrate them and link them with the cell cycle. PMID:23212898

  10. Ki-67 acts as a biological surfactant to disperse mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Cuylen, Sara; Blaukopf, Claudia; Politi, Antonio Z; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Neumann, Beate; Poser, Ina; Ellenberg, Jan; Hyman, Anthony A; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2016-07-14

    Eukaryotic genomes are partitioned into chromosomes that form compact and spatially well-separated mechanical bodies during mitosis. This enables chromosomes to move independently of each other for segregation of precisely one copy of the genome to each of the nascent daughter cells. Despite insights into the spatial organization of mitotic chromosomes and the discovery of proteins at the chromosome surface, the molecular and biophysical bases of mitotic chromosome structural individuality have remained unclear. Here we report that the proliferation marker protein Ki-67 (encoded by the MKI67 gene), a component of the mitotic chromosome periphery, prevents chromosomes from collapsing into a single chromatin mass after nuclear envelope disassembly, thus enabling independent chromosome motility and efficient interactions with the mitotic spindle. The chromosome separation function of human Ki-67 is not confined within a specific protein domain, but correlates with size and net charge of truncation mutants that apparently lack secondary structure. This suggests that Ki-67 forms a steric and electrostatic charge barrier, similar to surface-active agents (surfactants) that disperse particles or phase-separated liquid droplets in solvents. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy showed a high surface density of Ki-67 and dual-colour labelling of both protein termini revealed an extended molecular conformation, indicating brush-like arrangements that are characteristic of polymeric surfactants. Our study thus elucidates a biomechanical role of the mitotic chromosome periphery in mammalian cells and suggests that natural proteins can function as surfactants in intracellular compartmentalization. PMID:27362226

  11. Nap sleep spindle correlates of intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Ujma, Péter P.; Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Stintzing, Johannes; Konrad, Boris N.; Genzel, Lisa; Steiger, Axel; Dresler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, that play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Several studies with full-night sleep recordings have reported a positive association between sleep spindles and fluid intelligence scores, however more recently it has been shown that only few sleep spindle measures correlate with intelligence in females, and none in males. Sleep spindle regulation underlies a circadian rhythm, however the association between spindles and intelligence has not been investigated in daytime nap sleep so far. In a sample of 86 healthy male human subjects, we investigated the correlation between fluid intelligence and sleep spindle parameters in an afternoon nap of 100 minutes. Mean sleep spindle length, amplitude and density were computed for each subject and for each derivation for both slow and fast spindles. A positive association was found between intelligence and slow spindle duration, but not any other sleep spindle parameter. As a positive correlation between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in full-night polysomnography has only been reported in females but not males, our results suggest that the association between intelligence and sleep spindles is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26607963

  12. SPINDLE SPEED EFFECTS ON COTTON QUALITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cotton varieties were grown under furrow-irrigated conditions in southern New Mexico and harvested at three different spindle speeds (1500, 2000, and 2400 rpm). Stalk losses were significantly greater with a spindle speed of 1500 rpm than with the higher spindle speeds, particularly for the D...

  13. Spindle speed optimization for cotton pickers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes to cotton pickers over the years regarding the operating speed and size of the spindles have resulted in a general decrease in cotton fiber quality, particularly regarding spindle twists, preparation, and neps. Previous research showed that spindle speeds of 3000 and 4000 rpm had more detri...

  14. Functional Characterization of G12, a Gene Required for Mitotic Progression during Gastrulation in Zebrafish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinsch, Sigrid; Conway, Gregory; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a differential RNA display screen we have isolated a zebrafish gene, G12, for which homologs can only be found in DNA databases for vertebrates, but not invertebrates. This suggests that this is a gene required specifically in vertebrates. G12 expression is upregulated at mid-blastula transition (MBT). Morpholino inactivation of this gene by injection into 1-cell embryos results in mitotic defects and apoptosis shortly after MBT. Nuclei in morpholino treated embryos also display segregation defects. We have characterized the localization of this gene as a GFP fusion in live and fixed embryos. Overexpression of G12-GFP is non-toxic. Animals retain GFP expression for at least 7 days with no developmental defects, Interestingly in these animals G12-GFP is never detectable in blood cells though blood is present. In the deep cells of early embryos, G 12GFP is localized to nuclei and cytoskeletal elements in interphase and to the centrosome and spindle apparatus during mitosis. In the EVL, G12-GFP shows additional localization to the cell periphery, especially in mitosis. In the yolk syncytium, G12-GFP again localizes to nuclei and strongly to cytoplasmic microtubules of migrating nuclei at the YSL margin. Morpholinc, injection specifically into the YSL after cellularization blocks epiboly and nuclei of the YSL show mitotic defects while deep cells show no mitotic defects and continue to divide. Rescue experiments in which morpholino and G12-GFP RNA are co-injected indicate partial rescue by the G12-GFP. The rescue is cell autonomous; that is, regions of the embryo with higher G12-GFP expression show fewer mitotic defects. Spot 14, the human bomolog of G12, has been shown to be amplified in aggressive breast tumors. This finding, along with our functional and morphological data suggest that G12 and spot 14 are vertebrate-specific and may function either as mitotic checkpoints or as structural components of the spindle apparatus.

  15. Spectrotemporal receptive fields during spindling and non-spindling epochs in cat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Britvina, T; Eggermont, J J

    2008-07-17

    It was often thought that synchronized rhythmic epochs of spindle waves disconnect thalamo-cortical system from incoming sensory signals. The present study addresses this issue by simultaneous extracellular action potential and local field potential (LFP) recordings from primary auditory cortex of ketamine-anesthetized cats during spindling activity. We compared cortical spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRF) obtained during spindling and non-spindling epochs. The basic spectro-temporal parameters of "spindling" and "non-spindling" STRFs were similar. However, the peak-firing rate at the best frequency was significantly enhanced during spindling epochs. This enhancement was mainly caused by the increased probability of a stimulus to evoke spikes (effectiveness of stimuli) during spindling as compared with non-spindling epochs. Augmented LFPs associated with effective stimuli and increased single-unit pair correlations during spindling epochs suggested higher synchrony of thalamo-cortical inputs during spindling that resulted in increased effectiveness of stimuli presented during spindling activity. The neuronal firing rate, both stimulus-driven and spontaneous, was higher during spindling as compared with non-spindling epochs. Overall, our results suggests that thalamic cells during spindling respond to incoming stimuli-related inputs and, moreover, cause more powerful stimulus-related or spontaneous activation of the cortex. PMID:18515012

  16. Evidence of Selection against Complex Mitotic-Origin Aneuploidy during Preimplantation Development

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Rajiv C.; Demko, Zachary P.; Ryan, Allison; Banjevic, Milena; Hill, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-chromosome imbalances affect over half of early human embryos and are the leading cause of pregnancy loss. While these errors frequently arise in oocyte meiosis, many such whole-chromosome abnormalities affecting cleavage-stage embryos are the result of chromosome missegregation occurring during the initial mitotic cell divisions. The first wave of zygotic genome activation at the 4–8 cell stage results in the arrest of a large proportion of embryos, the vast majority of which contain whole-chromosome abnormalities. Thus, the full spectrum of meiotic and mitotic errors can only be detected by sampling after the initial cell divisions, but prior to this selective filter. Here, we apply 24-chromosome preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) to 28,052 single-cell day-3 blastomere biopsies and 18,387 multi-cell day-5 trophectoderm biopsies from 6,366 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. We precisely characterize the rates and patterns of whole-chromosome abnormalities at each developmental stage and distinguish errors of meiotic and mitotic origin without embryo disaggregation, based on informative chromosomal signatures. We show that mitotic errors frequently involve multiple chromosome losses that are not biased toward maternal or paternal homologs. This outcome is characteristic of spindle abnormalities and chaotic cell division detected in previous studies. In contrast to meiotic errors, our data also show that mitotic errors are not significantly associated with maternal age. PGS patients referred due to previous IVF failure had elevated rates of mitotic error, while patients referred due to recurrent pregnancy loss had elevated rates of meiotic error, controlling for maternal age. These results support the conclusion that mitotic error is the predominant mechanism contributing to pregnancy losses occurring prior to blastocyst formation. This high-resolution view of the full spectrum of whole-chromosome abnormalities affecting early embryos provides insight

  17. Bcl-xL controls a switch between cell death modes during mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bah, N; Maillet, L; Ryan, J; Dubreil, S; Gautier, F; Letai, A; Juin, P; Barillé-Nion, S

    2014-01-01

    Antimitotic agents such as microtubule inhibitors (paclitaxel) are widely used in cancer therapy while new agents blocking mitosis onset are currently in development. All these agents impose a prolonged mitotic arrest in cancer cells that relies on sustained activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint and may lead to subsequent cell death by incompletely understood molecular events. We have investigated the role played by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in the fate of mitotically arrested mammary tumor cells treated with paclitaxel, or depleted in Cdc20, the activator of the anaphase promoting complex. Under these conditions, a weak and delayed mitotic cell death occurs that is caspase- and Bax/Bak-independent. Moreover, BH3 profiling assays indicate that viable cells during mitotic arrest are primed to die by apoptosis and that Bcl-xL is required to maintain mitochondrial integrity. Consistently, Bcl-xL depletion, or treatment with its inhibitor ABT-737 (but not with the specific Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199), during mitotic arrest converts cell response to antimitotics to efficient caspase and Bax-dependent apoptosis. Apoptotic priming under conditions of mitotic arrest relies, at least in part, on the phosphorylation on serine 62 of Bcl-xL, which modulates its interaction with Bax and its sensitivity to ABT-737. The phospho-mimetic S62D-Bcl-xL mutant is indeed less efficient than the corresponding phospho-deficient S62A-Bcl-xL mutant in sequestrating Bax and in protecting cancer cells from mitotic cell death or yeast cells from Bax-induced growth inhibition. Our results provide a rationale for combining Bcl-xL targeting to antimitotic agents to improve clinical efficacy of antimitotic strategy in cancer therapy. PMID:24922075

  18. A time-course study on effects of aluminium on mitotic cell division in Allium sativum.

    PubMed

    Roy, A K; Sharma, A; Talukder, G

    1989-12-01

    Cytotoxic effects of aluminium sulphate on root-tip cells of Allium sativum during a time-course study and during recovery were observed. The endpoints considered were mitotic index and frequencies of aberrant cells and micronuclei induced. Chronic exposure induced mitotic depression and abnormal cells to a degree directly proportional to the concentration used and the period of treatment up to 24 h. A reduction of the early higher level of toxicity was noticed following 48 h of treatment and subsequent recovery in aluminium-free nutrient media in experiments carried out with lower concentrations. PMID:2586548

  19. Fluorinated quinazolinones as potential radiotracers for imaging kinesin spindle protein expression.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jason P; Jones, Michael W; Cohrs, Susan; Schibli, Roger; Fischer, Eliane

    2013-01-15

    Anti-mitotic anti-cancer drugs offer a potential platform for developing new radiotracers for imaging proliferation markers associated with the mitosis-phase of the cell-cycle. One interesting target is kinesin spindle protein (KSP)-an ATP-dependent motor protein that plays a vital role in bipolar spindle formation. In this work we synthesised a range of new fluorinated-quinazolinone compounds based on the structure of the clinical candidate KSP inhibitor, ispinesib, and investigated their properties in vitro as potential anti-mitotic agents targeting KSP expression. Anti-proliferation (MTT and BrdU) assays combined with additional studies including fluorescence-assisted cell sorting (FACS) analysis of cell-cycle arrest confirmed the mechanism and potency of these biphenyl compounds in a range of human cancer cell lines. Additional studies using confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that these compounds induce M-phase arrest via monoaster spindle formation. Structural studies revealed that compound 20-(R) is the most potent fluorinated-quinazolinone inhibitor of KSP and represents a suitable lead candidate for further studies on designing (18)F-radiolabelled agents for positron-emission tomography (PET). PMID:23245569

  20. CDK5RAP2 functions in centrosome to spindle pole attachment and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Barr, Alexis R; Kilmartin, John V; Gergely, Fanni

    2010-04-01

    The centrosomal protein, CDK5RAP2, is mutated in primary microcephaly, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by reduced brain size. The Drosophila melanogaster homologue of CDK5RAP2, centrosomin (Cnn), maintains the pericentriolar matrix (PCM) around centrioles during mitosis. In this study, we demonstrate a similar role for CDK5RAP2 in vertebrate cells. By disrupting two evolutionarily conserved domains of CDK5RAP2, CNN1 and CNN2, in the avian B cell line DT40, we find that both domains are essential for linking centrosomes to mitotic spindle poles. Although structurally intact, centrosomes lacking the CNN1 domain fail to recruit specific PCM components that mediate attachment to spindle poles. Furthermore, we show that the CNN1 domain enforces cohesion between parental centrioles during interphase and promotes efficient DNA damage-induced G2 cell cycle arrest. Because mitotic spindle positioning, asymmetric centrosome inheritance, and DNA damage signaling have all been implicated in cell fate determination during neurogenesis, our findings provide novel insight into how impaired CDK5RAP2 function could cause premature depletion of neural stem cells and thereby microcephaly. PMID:20368616

  1. Transportin acts to regulate mitotic assembly events by target binding rather than Ran sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Bernis, Cyril; Swift-Taylor, Beth; Nord, Matthew; Carmona, Sarah; Chook, Yuh Min; Forbes, Douglass J.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear import receptors importin β and transportin play a different role in mitosis: both act phenotypically as spatial regulators to ensure that mitotic spindle, nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore assembly occur exclusively around chromatin. Importin β is known to act by repressing assembly factors in regions distant from chromatin, whereas RanGTP produced on chromatin frees factors from importin β for localized assembly. The mechanism of transportin regulation was unknown. Diametrically opposed models for transportin action are as follows: 1) indirect action by RanGTP sequestration, thus down-regulating release of assembly factors from importin β, and 2) direct action by transportin binding and inhibiting assembly factors. Experiments in Xenopus assembly extracts with M9M, a superaffinity nuclear localization sequence that displaces cargoes bound by transportin, or TLB, a mutant transportin that can bind cargo and RanGTP simultaneously, support direct inhibition. Consistently, simple addition of M9M to mitotic cytosol induces microtubule aster assembly. ELYS and the nucleoporin 107–160 complex, components of mitotic kinetochores and nuclear pores, are blocked from binding to kinetochores in vitro by transportin, a block reversible by M9M. In vivo, 30% of M9M-transfected cells have spindle/cytokinesis defects. We conclude that the cell contains importin β and transportin “global positioning system”or “GPS” pathways that are mechanistically parallel. PMID:24478460

  2. Dyskerin Localizes to the Mitotic Apparatus and Is Required for Orderly Mitosis in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alawi, Faizan; Lin, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Dyskerin is a highly conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein with established roles in small nuclear ribonucleoprotein biogenesis, telomerase and telomere maintenance and precursor rRNA processing. Telomerase is functional during S phase and the bulk of rRNA maturation occurs during G1 and S phases; both processes are inactivated during mitosis. Yet, we show that during the course of cell cycle progression, human dyskerin expression peaks during G2/M in parallel with the upregulation of pro-mitotic factors. Dyskerin redistributed from the nucleolus in interphase cells to the perichromosomal region during prometaphase, metaphase and anaphase. With continued anaphase progression, dyskerin also localized to the cytoplasm within the mid-pole region. Loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion promoted G2/M accumulation and this was accompanied by an increased mitotic index and activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Live cell imaging further revealed an array of mitotic defects including delayed prometaphase progression, a significantly increased incidence of multi-polar spindles, and anaphase bridges culminating in micronucleus formation. Together, these findings suggest that dyskerin is a highly dynamic protein throughout the cell cycle and increases the repertoire of fundamental cellular processes that are disrupted by absence of its normal function. PMID:24303026

  3. Unconventional Functions of Mitotic Kinases in Kidney Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hascoet, Pauline; Chesnel, Franck; Le Goff, Cathy; Le Goff, Xavier; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Human tumors exhibit a variety of genetic alterations, including point mutations, translocations, gene amplifications and deletions, as well as aneuploid chromosome numbers. For carcinomas, aneuploidy is associated with poor patient outcome for a large variety of tumor types, including breast, colon, and renal cell carcinoma. The Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous carcinoma consisting of different histologic types. The clear renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype and represents 85% of the RCC. Central to the biology of the ccRCC is the loss of function of the Von Hippel–Lindau gene, but is also associated with genetic instability that could be caused by abrogation of the cell cycle mitotic spindle checkpoint and may involve the Aurora kinases, which regulate centrosome maturation. Aneuploidy can also result from the loss of cell–cell adhesion and apical–basal cell polarity that also may be regulated by the mitotic kinases (polo-like kinase 1, casein kinase 2, doublecortin-like kinase 1, and Aurora kinases). In this review, we describe the “non-mitotic” unconventional functions of these kinases in renal tumorigenesis. PMID:26579493

  4. Synchronization and Propagation of Global Sleep Spindles

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Rafael Toledo Fernandes; Gerhardt, Günther Johannes Lewczuk; Schönwald, Suzana Veiga; Rybarczyk-Filho, José Luiz; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles occur thousands of times during normal sleep and can be easily detected by visual inspection of EEG signals. These characteristics make spindles one of the most studied EEG structures in mammalian sleep. In this work we considered global spindles, which are spindles that are observed simultaneously in all EEG channels. We propose a methodology that investigates both the signal envelope and phase/frequency of each global spindle. By analysing the global spindle phase we showed that 90% of spindles synchronize with an average latency time of 0.1 s. We also measured the frequency modulation (chirp) of global spindles and found that global spindle chirp and synchronization are not correlated. By investigating the signal envelopes and implementing a homogeneous and isotropic propagation model, we could estimate both the signal origin and velocity in global spindles. Our results indicate that this simple and non-invasive approach could determine with reasonable precision the spindle origin, and allowed us to estimate a signal speed of 0.12 m/s. Finally, we consider whether synchronization might be useful as a non-invasive diagnostic tool. PMID:26963102

  5. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  6. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  7. Association of Maternal mRNA and Phosphorylated EIF4EBP1 Variants With the Spindle in Mouse Oocytes: Localized Translational Control Supporting Female Meiosis in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Romasko, Edward J.; Amarnath, Dasari; Midic, Uros; Latham, Keith E.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other species, localized maternal mRNAs are not believed to be prominent features of mammalian oocytes. We find by cDNA microarray analysis enrichment for maternal mRNAs encoding spindle and other proteins on the mouse oocyte metaphase II (MII) spindle. We also find that the key translational regulator, EIF4EBP1, undergoes a dynamic and complex spatially regulated pattern of phosphorylation at sites that regulate its association with EIF4E and its ability to repress translation. These phosphorylation variants appear at different positions along the spindle at different stages of meiosis. These results indicate that dynamic spatially restricted patterns of EIF4EBP1 phosphorylation may promote localized mRNA translation to support spindle formation, maintenance, function, and other nearby processes. Regulated EIF4EBP1 phosphorylation at the spindle may help coordinate spindle formation with progression through the cell cycle. The discovery that EIF4EBP1 may be part of an overall mechanism that integrates and couples cell cycle progression to mRNA translation and subsequent spindle formation and function may be relevant to understanding mechanisms leading to diminished oocyte quality, and potential means of avoiding such defects. The localization of maternal mRNAs at the spindle is evolutionarily conserved between mammals and other vertebrates and is also seen in mitotic cells, indicating that EIF4EBP1 control of localized mRNA translation is likely key to correct segregation of genetic material across cell types. PMID:23852387

  8. Phase transition of spindle-associated protein regulate spindle apparatus assembly.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Shusheng; Huang, Yuejia; He, Xiaonan; Cui, Honggang; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-09-24

    Spindle assembly required during mitosis depends on microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved low-complexity protein, BuGZ, undergoes phase transition or coacervation to promote assembly of both spindles and their associated components. BuGZ forms temperature-dependent liquid droplets alone or on microtubules in physiological buffers. Coacervation in vitro or in spindle and spindle matrix depends on hydrophobic residues in BuGZ. BuGZ coacervation and its binding to microtubules and tubulin are required to promote assembly of spindle and spindle matrix in Xenopus egg extract and in mammalian cells. Since several previously identified spindle-associated components also contain low-complexity regions, we propose that coacervating proteins may be a hallmark of proteins that comprise a spindle matrix that functions to promote assembly of spindles by concentrating its building blocks. PMID:26388440

  9. Thioglycolic acid inhibits mouse oocyte maturation and affects chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration.

    PubMed

    Hou, S Y; Zhang, L; Wu, K; Xia, L

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that thioglycolic acid (TGA) leads to potential reproductive toxicology. To clarify the exact effects of this compound on reproduction, mice oocytes were treated with different TGA doses. At the end of the culture period, the nuclear status of mice oocytes was assessed under an inverted microscope. After immunofluorescence staining, the chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration of oocytes were evaluated. The results indicated that TGA decreases the percentage of first polar body formation but does not influence that of germinal vesicle breakdown. TGA induces abnormal chromosomal arrangement and spindle elongation. In conclusion, TGA inhibits in-vitro maturation of mice oocytes and affects chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration. Furthermore, it probably interferes with biochemical changes that occur during meiosis, resulting in aberrant development. PMID:19022875

  10. Nup2 requires a highly divergent partner, NupA, to fulfill functions at nuclear pore complexes and the mitotic chromatin region

    PubMed Central

    Markossian, Sarine; Suresh, Subbulakshmi; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) undergo dramatic changes during mitosis, which in vertebrates and Aspergillus nidulans involves movement of Nup2 from NPCs to the chromatin region to fulfill unknown functions. This transition is shown to require the Cdk1 mitotic kinase and be promoted prematurely by ectopic expression of the NIMA kinase. Nup2 localizes with a copurifying partner termed NupA, a highly divergent yet essential NPC protein. NupA and Nup2 locate throughout the chromatin region during prophase but during anaphase move to surround segregating DNA. NupA function is shown to involve targeting Nup2 to its interphase and mitotic locations. Deletion of either Nup2 or NupA causes identical mitotic defects that initiate a spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC)–dependent mitotic delay and also cause defects in karyokinesis. These mitotic problems are not caused by overall defects in mitotic NPC disassembly–reassembly or general nuclear import. However, without Nup2 or NupA, although the SAC protein Mad1 locates to its mitotic locations, it fails to locate to NPCs normally in G1 after mitosis. Collectively the study provides new insight into the roles of Nup2 and NupA during mitosis and in a surveillance mechanism that regulates nucleokinesis when mitotic defects occur after SAC fulfillment. PMID:25540430

  11. Functional and Spatial Regulation of Mitotic Centromere- Associated Kinesin by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sanhaji, Mourad; Friel, Claire Therese; Kreis, Nina-Naomi; Krämer, Andrea; Martin, Claudia; Howard, Jonathon; Strebhardt, Klaus; Yuan, Juping

    2010-01-01

    Mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) plays an essential role in spindle formation and in correction of improper microtubule-kinetochore attachments. The localization and activity of MCAK at the centromere/kinetochore are controlled by Aurora B kinase. However, MCAK is also abundant in the cytosol and at centrosomes during mitosis, and its regulatory mechanism at these sites is unknown. We show here that cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) phosphorylates T537 in the core domain of MCAK and attenuates its microtubule-destabilizing activity in vitro and in vivo. Phosphorylation of MCAK by Cdk1 promotes the release of MCAK from centrosomes and is required for proper spindle formation. Interfering with the regulation of MCAK by Cdk1 causes dramatic defects in spindle formation and in chromosome positioning. This is the first study demonstrating that Cdk1 regulates the localization and activity of MCAK in mitosis by directly phosphorylating the catalytic core domain of MCAK. PMID:20368358

  12. MEK1act/tubulin interaction is an important determinant of mitotic stability in cultured HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jia-ning; Shafee, Norazizah; Vickery, Larry; Kaluz, Stefan; Ru, Ning; Stanbridge, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the MAPK pathway plays a major role in neoplastic cell transformation. Using a proteomics approach we identified α tubulin and β tubulin as proteins that interact with activated MEK1, a central MAPK regulatory kinase. Confocal analysis revealed spatio-temporal control of MEK1-tubulin co-localization that was most prominent in the mitotic spindle apparatus in variant HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Peptide arrays identified the critical role of positively charged amino acids R108, R113, R160 and K157 on the surface of MEK1 for tubulin interaction. Overexpression of activated MEK1 caused defects in spindle arrangement, chromosome segregation and ploidy. In contrast, chromosome polyploidy was reduced in the presence of an activated MEK1 mutant (R108A, R113A) that disrupted interactions with tubulin. Our findings indicate the importance of signaling by activated MEK1-tubulin in spindle organization and chromosomal instability. PMID:20570892

  13. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Interacting Protein 13 (TRIP13) AAA-ATPase Is a Novel Mitotic Checkpoint-silencing Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kexi; Sturt-Gillespie, Brianne; Hittle, James C.; Macdonald, Dawn; Chan, Gordon K.; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao

    2014-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint (or spindle assembly checkpoint) is a fail-safe mechanism to prevent chromosome missegregation by delaying anaphase onset in the presence of defective kinetochore-microtubule attachment. The target of the checkpoint is the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Once all chromosomes are properly attached and bioriented at the metaphase plate, the checkpoint needs to be silenced. Previously, we and others have reported that TRIP13 AAA-ATPase binds to the mitotic checkpoint-silencing protein p31comet. Here we show that endogenous TRIP13 localizes to kinetochores. TRIP13 knockdown delays metaphase-to-anaphase transition. The delay is caused by prolonged presence of the effector for the checkpoint, the mitotic checkpoint complex, and its association and inhibition of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. These results suggest that TRIP13 is a novel mitotic checkpoint-silencing protein. The ATPase activity of TRIP13 is essential for its checkpoint function, and interference with TRIP13 abolished p31comet-mediated mitotic checkpoint silencing. TRIP13 overexpression is a hallmark of cancer cells showing chromosomal instability, particularly in certain breast cancers with poor prognosis. We suggest that premature mitotic checkpoint silencing triggered by TRIP13 overexpression may promote cancer development. PMID:25012665

  14. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst.

    PubMed

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10-15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches-and their associated spindle bursts-occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  15. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    PubMed Central

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  16. Mahogunin-mediated regulation of Gαi localisation during mitosis and its effect on spindle positioning.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Devika; Mukherjee, Rukmini; Mookherjee, Debdatto; Chakrabarti, Oishee

    2016-08-01

    Mahogunin RING Finger 1 (MGRN1) is a ubiquitin E3 ligase known to affect spindle tilt in mitotic cells by regulating α-tubulin ubiquitination and polymerization. In cell culture systems we have found that expressing truncated mutants of MGRN1 leads to various other mitotic anomalies, such as lateral and angular spindle displacements. This seems to be independent of the MGRN1 ligase activity. Our experiments suggest that MGRN1 regulates the balance between the lower molecular weight monomeric Gαi and larger trimeric G-protein complex, along with its abundance in the ternary complex that regulates spindle positioning. The cytosolic isoforms of MGRN1 lead to the enrichment of monomeric Gαi in the cytosol and its subsequent recruitment at the plasma membrane. Excess Gαi at the cell cortex results in an imbalance in the assembly of the ternary complex regulating spindle positioning during mitosis. These observations seem independent of the ligase activity of MGRN1, although we cannot exclude the involvement of an intermediate player that acts as a substrate for MGRN1, and in turn, regulates Gαi. PMID:27471821

  17. SAPCD2 Controls Spindle Orientation and Asymmetric Divisions by Negatively Regulating the Gαi-LGN-NuMA Ternary Complex.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Catherine W N; Monat, Carine; Robitaille, Mélanie; Lacomme, Marine; Daulat, Avais M; Macleod, Graham; McNeill, Helen; Cayouette, Michel; Angers, Stéphane

    2016-01-11

    Control of cell-division orientation is integral to epithelial morphogenesis and asymmetric cell division. Proper spatiotemporal localization of the evolutionarily conserved Gαi-LGN-NuMA protein complex is critical for mitotic spindle orientation, but how this is achieved remains unclear. Here we identify Suppressor APC domain containing 2 (SAPCD2) as a previously unreported LGN-interacting protein. We show that SAPCD2 is essential to instruct planar mitotic spindle orientation in both epithelial cell cultures and mouse retinal progenitor cells in vivo. Loss of SAPCD2 randomizes spindle orientation, which in turn disrupts cyst morphogenesis in three-dimensional cultures, and triples the number of terminal asymmetric cell divisions in the developing retina. Mechanistically, we show that SAPCD2 negatively regulates the localization of LGN at the cell cortex, likely by competing with NuMA for its binding. These results uncover SAPCD2 as a key regulator of the ternary complex controlling spindle orientation during morphogenesis and asymmetric cell divisions. PMID:26766442

  18. The Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 axis affects spindle assembly checkpoint robustness and sensitivity to antimicrotubule cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Visconti, R; Della Monica, R; Palazzo, L; D'Alessio, F; Raia, M; Improta, S; Villa, M R; Del Vecchio, L; Grieco, D

    2015-09-01

    To grant faithful chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until mitotic spindle assembly. An exceedingly prolonged mitosis, however, promotes cell death and by this means antimicrotubule cancer drugs (AMCDs), that impair spindle assembly, are believed to kill cancer cells. Despite malformed spindles, cancer cells can, however, slip through SAC, exit mitosis prematurely and resist killing. We show here that the Fcp1 phosphatase and Wee1, the cyclin B-dependent kinase (cdk) 1 inhibitory kinase, play a role for this slippage/resistance mechanism. During AMCD-induced prolonged mitosis, Fcp1-dependent Wee1 reactivation lowered cdk1 activity, weakening SAC-dependent mitotic arrest and leading to mitosis exit and survival. Conversely, genetic or chemical Wee1 inhibition strengthened the SAC, further extended mitosis, reduced antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 to a minimum and potentiated killing in several, AMCD-treated cancer cell lines and primary human adult lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Thus, the Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 (FWC) axis affects SAC robustness and AMCDs sensitivity. PMID:25744022

  19. The Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 axis affects spindle assembly checkpoint robustness and sensitivity to antimicrotubule cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, R; Della Monica, R; Palazzo, L; D'Alessio, F; Raia, M; Improta, S; Villa, M R; Del Vecchio, L; Grieco, D

    2015-01-01

    To grant faithful chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until mitotic spindle assembly. An exceedingly prolonged mitosis, however, promotes cell death and by this means antimicrotubule cancer drugs (AMCDs), that impair spindle assembly, are believed to kill cancer cells. Despite malformed spindles, cancer cells can, however, slip through SAC, exit mitosis prematurely and resist killing. We show here that the Fcp1 phosphatase and Wee1, the cyclin B-dependent kinase (cdk) 1 inhibitory kinase, play a role for this slippage/resistance mechanism. During AMCD-induced prolonged mitosis, Fcp1-dependent Wee1 reactivation lowered cdk1 activity, weakening SAC-dependent mitotic arrest and leading to mitosis exit and survival. Conversely, genetic or chemical Wee1 inhibition strengthened the SAC, further extended mitosis, reduced antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 to a minimum and potentiated killing in several, AMCD-treated cancer cell lines and primary human adult lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Thus, the Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 (FWC) axis affects SAC robustness and AMCDs sensitivity. PMID:25744022

  20. Curcumin suppresses the dynamic instability of microtubules, activates the mitotic checkpoint and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Mithu; Singh, Parminder; Panda, Dulal

    2010-08-01

    In this study, curcumin, a potential anticancer agent, was found to dampen the dynamic instability of individual microtubules in living MCF-7 cells. It strongly reduced the rate and extent of shortening states, and modestly reduced the rate and extent of growing states. In addition, curcumin decreased the fraction of time microtubules spent in the growing state and strongly increased the time microtubules spent in the pause state. Brief treatment with curcumin depolymerized mitotic microtubules, perturbed microtubule-kinetochore attachment and disturbed the mitotic spindle structure. Curcumin also perturbed the localization of the kinesin protein Eg5 and induced monopolar spindle formation. Further, curcumin increased the accumulation of Mad2 and BubR1 at the kinetochores, indicating that it activated the mitotic checkpoint. In addition, curcumin treatment increased the metaphase/anaphase ratio, indicating that it can delay mitotic progression from the metaphase to anaphase. We provide evidence suggesting that the affected cells underwent apoptosis via the p53-dependent apoptotic pathway. The results support the idea that kinetic stabilization of microtubule dynamics assists in the nuclear translocation of p53. Curcumin exerted additive effects when combined with vinblastine, a microtubule depolymerizing drug, whereas the combination of curcumin with paclitaxel, a microtubule-stabilizing drug, produced an antagonistic effect on the inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation. The results together suggested that curcumin inhibited MCF-7 cell proliferation by inhibiting the assembly dynamics of microtubules. PMID:20646066

  1. Picropodophyllin causes mitotic arrest and catastrophe by depolymerizing microtubules via Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Waraky, Ahmed; Akopyan, Karen; Parrow, Vendela; Strömberg, Thomas; Axelson, Magnus; Abrahmsén, Lars; Lindqvist, Arne; Larsson, Olle; Aleem, Eiman

    2014-01-01

    Picropodophyllin (PPP) is an anticancer drug undergoing clinical development in NSCLC. PPP has been shown to suppress IGF-1R signaling and to induce a G2/M cell cycle phase arrest but the exact mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study identified an IGF-1-independent mechanism of PPP leading to pro-metaphase arrest. The mitotic block was induced in human cancer cell lines and in an A549 xenograft mouse but did not occur in normal hepatocytes/mouse tissues. Cell cycle arrest by PPP occurred in vitro and in vivo accompanied by prominent CDK1 activation, and was IGF-1R-independent since it occurred also in IGF-1R-depleted and null cells. The tumor cells were not arrested in G2/M but in mitosis. Centrosome separation was prevented during mitotic entry, resulting in a monopolar mitotic spindle with subsequent prometaphase-arrest, independent of Plk1/Aurora A or Eg5, and leading to cell features of mitotic catastrophe. PPP also increased soluble tubulin and decreased spindle-associated tubulin within minutes, indicating that it interfered with microtubule dynamics. These results provide a novel IGF-1R-independent mechanism of antitumor effects of PPP. PMID:25268741

  2. Next generation spindles for micromilling.

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Jay P.; Payne, Scott W. T.; Gill, David Dennis; Ziegert, John C.; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.

    2004-12-01

    There exists a wide variety of important applications for micro- and meso-scale mechanical systems in the commercial and defense sectors, which require high-strength materials and complex geometries that cannot be produced using current MEMS fabrication technologies. Micromilling has great potential to fill this void in MEMS technology by adding the capability of free form machining of complex 3D shapes from a wide variety and combination of traditional, well-understood engineering alloys, glasses and ceramics. Inefficiencies in micromilling result from the relationships between a cutting tool's breaking strength, the applied cutting force, and the metal removal rate. Because machining times in mesofeatures scale inversely to the part size, a feature 1/10th as large will take 10 times as long to machine. Also, required chip sizes of 1 m or less are cut with tools having edge radius of 2-3 m, the cutting edge effectively has a highly negative rake angle, cutting forces are increased significantly causing chip loads to be further reduced and the machining takes even longer than predicted above. However, cutting forces do not increase with cutting speed, so faster spindles with reduced tool runout are the path to achieve efficient mesoscale milling. This research explored the development of new ultra-high speed micromilling spindles. A novel air-bearing spindle design is discussed that will run at very high speeds (450,000 rpm) and provide very minimal runout allowing the best use of micromilling cutters and reducing overall machining time drastically. Two generations of this spindle design were completed; one with an air bearing supported tool shaft and one with a novel rolling element bearing supported tool shaft. Both designs utilized friction-drive systems that relied on diameter differences between the drive wheel (operating at speeds up to 90,000 rpm) and the tool shaft to achieve high rotational tool speeds. Runout, stiffness, and machining tests were conducted

  3. Aurora A’s Functions During Mitotic Exit: The Guess Who Game

    PubMed Central

    Reboutier, David; Benaud, Christelle; Prigent, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, the knowledge of Aurora A kinase functions during mitosis was limited to pre-metaphase events, particularly centrosome maturation, G2/M transition, and mitotic spindle assembly. However, an involvement of Aurora A in post-metaphase events was also suspected, but not clearly demonstrated due to the technical difficulty to perform the appropriate experiments. Recent developments of both an analog-specific version of Aurora A and small molecule inhibitors have led to the first demonstration that Aurora A is required for the early steps of cytokinesis. As in pre-metaphase, Aurora A plays diverse functions during anaphase, essentially participating in astral microtubules dynamics and central spindle assembly and functioning. The present review describes the experimental systems used to decipher new functions of Aurora A during late mitosis and situate these functions into the context of cytokinesis mechanisms. PMID:26734572

  4. The spindle position checkpoint is coordinated by the Elm1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jeffrey K.; Chudalayandi, Prakash; Heil-Chapdelaine, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    How dividing cells monitor the effective transmission of genomes during mitosis is poorly understood. Budding yeast use a signaling pathway known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPC) to ensure the arrival of one end of the mitotic spindle in the nascent daughter cell. An important question is how SPC activity is coordinated with mother–daughter polarity. We sought to identify factors at the bud neck, the junction between mother and bud, which contribute to checkpoint signaling. In this paper, we show that the protein kinase Elm1 is an obligate regulator of the SPC, and this function requires localization of Elm1 to the bud neck. Furthermore, we show that Elm1 promotes the activity of the checkpoint kinase Kin4. These findings reveal a novel function for Elm1 in the SPC and suggest how checkpoint activity may be linked to cellular organization. PMID:21041444

  5. Spindle Assembly in the Absence of a RanGTP Gradient Requires Localized CPC Activity

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, Thomas J.; Groen, Aaron C.; Gatlin, Jesse C.; Ohi, Ryoma; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Salmon, Edward D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary During animal cell division, a gradient of GTP-bound Ran is generated around mitotic chromatin [1, 2]. It is generally accepted that this RanGTP gradient is essential for organizing the spindle since it locally activates critical spindle assembly factors [3–5]. Here, we show in Xenopus egg extract, where the gradient is best characterized, that spindles can assemble in the absence of a RanGTP gradient. Gradient-free spindle assembly occurred around sperm nuclei but not around chromatin-coated beads and required the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). Artificial enrichment of CPC activity within hybrid bead arrays containing both immobilized chromatin and the CPC supported local microtubule assembly even in the absence of a RanGTP gradient. We conclude that RanGTP and the CPC constitute the two major molecular signals that spatially promote microtubule polymerization around chromatin. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the two signals mainly originate from discreet physical sites on the chromosomes to localize microtubule assembly around chromatin: a RanGTP signal from any chromatin, and a CPC-dependent signal predominantly generated from centromeric chromatin. PMID:19540121

  6. Using Photobleaching to Measure Spindle Microtubule Dynamics in Primary Cultures of Dividing Drosophila Meiotic Spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In dividing animal cells, a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle governs chromosome movement. Current models propose that the spindle facilitates and/or generates translocating forces by regionally depolymerizing the kinetochore fibers (k-fibers) that bind each chromosome. It is unclear how conserved these sites and the resultant chromosome-moving mechanisms are between different dividing cell types because of the technical challenges of quantitatively studying MTs in many specimens. In particular, our knowledge of MT kinetics during the sperm-producing male meiotic divisions remains in its infancy. In this study, I use an easy-to-implement photobleaching-based assay for measuring spindle MT dynamics in primary cultures of meiotic spermatocytes isolated from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. By use of standard scanning confocal microscopy features, fiducial marks were photobleached on fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged MTs. These were followed by time-lapse imaging during different division stages, and their displacement rates were calculated using public domain software. I find that k-fibers continually shorten at their poles during metaphase and anaphase A through the process of MT flux. Anaphase chromosome movement is complemented by Pac-Man, the shortening of the k-fiber at its chromosomal interface. Thus, Drosophila spermatocytes share the sites of spindle dynamism and mechanisms of chromosome movement with mitotic cells. The data reveal the applicability of the photobleaching assay for measuring MT dynamics in primary cultures. This approach can be readily applied to other systems. PMID:25802491

  7. APCFZR1 prevents nondisjunction in mouse oocytes by controlling meiotic spindle assembly timing

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Janet E.; Lane, Simon I. R.; Jennings, Phoebe; García-Higuera, Irene; Moreno, Sergio; Jones, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    FZR1 is an anaphase-promoting complex (APC) activator best known for its role in the mitotic cell cycle at M-phase exit, in G1, and in maintaining genome integrity. Previous studies also established that it prevents meiotic resumption, equivalent to the G2/M transition. Here we report that mouse oocytes lacking FZR1 undergo passage through meiosis I that is accelerated by ∼1 h, and this is due to an earlier onset of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) satisfaction and APCCDC20 activity. However, loss of FZR1 did not compromise SAC functionality; instead, earlier SAC satisfaction was achieved because the bipolar meiotic spindle was assembled more quickly in the absence of FZR1. This novel regulation of spindle assembly by FZR1 led to premature bivalent attachment to microtubules and loss of kinetochore-bound MAD2. Bivalents, however, were observed to congress poorly, leading to nondisjunction rates of 25%. We conclude that in mouse oocytes FZR1 controls the timing of assembly of the bipolar spindle and in so doing the timing of SAC satisfaction and APCCDC20 activity. This study implicates FZR1 as a major regulator of prometaphase whose activity helps to prevent chromosome nondisjunction. PMID:22918942

  8. Microtubule capture by the cleavage apparatus is required for proper spindle positioning in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Justine; Meyer, Anne; Snyder, Michael P; Barral, Yves

    2002-07-01

    Cell division is the result of two major cytoskeletal events: partition of the chromatids by the mitotic spindle and cleavage of the cell by the cytokinetic apparatus. Spatial coordination of these events ensures that each daughter cell inherits a nucleus. Here we show that, in budding yeast, capture and shrinkage of astral microtubules at the bud neck is required to position the spindle relative to the cleavage apparatus. Capture required the septins and the microtubule-associated protein Kar9. Like Kar9-defective cells, cells lacking the septin ring failed to position their spindle correctly and showed an increased frequency of nuclear missegregation. Microtubule attachment at the bud neck was followed by shrinkage and a pulling action on the spindle. Enhancement of microtubule shrinkage at the bud neck required the Par-1-related, septin-dependent kinases (SDK) Hsl1 and Gin4. Neither the formin Bnr1 nor the actomyosin contractile ring was required for either microtubule capture or microtubule shrinkage. Together, our results indicate that septins and septin-dependent kinases may coordinate microtubule and actin functions in cell division. PMID:12101122

  9. Using Photobleaching to Measure Spindle Microtubule Dynamics in Primary Cultures of Dividing Drosophila Meiotic Spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Savoian, Matthew S

    2015-07-01

    In dividing animal cells, a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle governs chromosome movement. Current models propose that the spindle facilitates and/or generates translocating forces by regionally depolymerizing the kinetochore fibers (k-fibers) that bind each chromosome. It is unclear how conserved these sites and the resultant chromosome-moving mechanisms are between different dividing cell types because of the technical challenges of quantitatively studying MTs in many specimens. In particular, our knowledge of MT kinetics during the sperm-producing male meiotic divisions remains in its infancy. In this study, I use an easy-to-implement photobleaching-based assay for measuring spindle MT dynamics in primary cultures of meiotic spermatocytes isolated from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. By use of standard scanning confocal microscopy features, fiducial marks were photobleached on fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged MTs. These were followed by time-lapse imaging during different division stages, and their displacement rates were calculated using public domain software. I find that k-fibers continually shorten at their poles during metaphase and anaphase A through the process of MT flux. Anaphase chromosome movement is complemented by Pac-Man, the shortening of the k-fiber at its chromosomal interface. Thus, Drosophila spermatocytes share the sites of spindle dynamism and mechanisms of chromosome movement with mitotic cells. The data reveal the applicability of the photobleaching assay for measuring MT dynamics in primary cultures. This approach can be readily applied to other systems. PMID:25802491

  10. Recent findings and future directions for interpolar mitotic kinesin inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Stephanie M.; Collins, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The kinesin class of microtubule-associated motor proteins present attractive anti-cancer targets owing to their roles in key functions in dividing cells. Two interpolar mitotic kinesins Eg5 and HSET have opposing motor functions in mitotic spindle assembly with respect to microtubule movement, but both offer opportunities to develop cancer selective therapeutic agents. Here, we summarize the progress to date in developing inhibitors of Eg5 and HSET, with an emphasis on structural biology insights into the binding modes of allosteric inhibitors, compound selectivity and mechanisms of action of different chemical scaffolds. We discuss translation of preclinical studies to clinical experience with Eg5 inhibitors, recent findings on potential resistance mechanisms, and explore the implications for future anticancer drug development against these targets. PMID:26976726

  11. Recent findings and future directions for interpolar mitotic kinesin inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Myers, Stephanie M; Collins, Ian

    2016-03-01

    The kinesin class of microtubule-associated motor proteins present attractive anticancer targets owing to their roles in key functions in dividing cells. Two interpolar mitotic kinesins Eg5 and HSET have opposing motor functions in mitotic spindle assembly with respect to microtubule movement, but both offer opportunities to develop cancer selective therapeutic agents. Here, we summarize the progress to date in developing inhibitors of Eg5 and HSET, with an emphasis on structural biology insights into the binding modes of allosteric inhibitors, compound selectivity and mechanisms of action of different chemical scaffolds. We discuss translation of preclinical studies to clinical experience with Eg5 inhibitors, recent findings on potential resistance mechanisms and explore the implications for future anticancer drug development against these targets. PMID:26976726

  12. ATP is required for the release of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome from inhibition by the mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Teichner, Adar; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Hershko, Avram

    2010-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes by delaying anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. This system acts by inhibiting the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase to target securin for degradation. APC/C is inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of BubR1, Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20. The molecular mechanisms of the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint, including the release of APC/C from inhibition, remain obscure. It has been reported that polyubiquitylation by the APC/C is required for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint [Reddy SK, Rape M, Margansky WA, Kirschner MW (2007) Nature, 446:921–924]. We confirmed the involvement of polyubiquitylation, but found that another process, which requires ATP cleavage at the β–γ position (as opposed to α–β bond scission involved in ubiquitylation), is essential for the release of APC/C from checkpoint inhibition. ATP (β–γ) cleavage is required both for the dissociation of MCC components from APC/C and for the disassembly of free MCC, whereas polyubiquitylation is involved only in the former process. We find that the requirement for ATP (β–γ) cleavage is not due to the involvement of the 26S proteasome and that the phenomena observed are not due to sustained activity of protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B, caused by inhibition of the degradation of cyclin B. Thus, some other energy-consuming process is needed for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint. PMID:20212161

  13. The Spindle Cell Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell neoplasms are defined as neoplasms that consist of spindle-shaped cells in the histopathology. Spindle cell neoplasms can affect the oral cavity. In the oral cavity, the origin of the spindle cell neoplasms may be traced to epithelial, mesenchymal and odontogenic components. This article aims to review the spindle cell neoplasms of the oral cavity with emphasis on histopathology. PMID:26351482

  14. The putative oncogene CEP72 inhibits the mitotic function of BRCA1 and induces chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Lüddecke, S; Ertych, N; Stenzinger, A; Weichert, W; Beissbarth, T; Dyczkowski, J; Gaedcke, J; Valerius, O; Braus, G H; Kschischo, M; Bastians, H

    2016-05-01

    BRCA1 is a tumor-suppressor gene associated with, but not restricted to, breast and ovarian cancer and implicated in various biological functions. During mitosis, BRCA1 and its positive regulator Chk2 are localized at centrosomes and are required for the regulation of microtubule plus end assembly, thereby ensuring faithful mitosis and numerical chromosome stability. However, the function of BRCA1 during mitosis has not been defined mechanistically. To gain insights into the mitotic role of BRCA1 in regulating microtubule assembly, we systematically identified proteins interacting with BRCA1 during mitosis and found the centrosomal protein Cep72 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein. CEP72 is frequently upregulated in colorectal cancer tissues and overexpression of CEP72 mirrors the consequences of BRCA1 loss during mitosis. In detail, the overexpression of CEP72 causes an increase in microtubule plus end assembly, abnormal mitotic spindle formation and the induction of chromosomal instability. Moreover, we show that high levels of Cep72 counteract Chk2 as a positive regulator of BRCA1 to ensure proper mitotic microtubule assembly. Thus, CEP72 represents a putative oncogene in colorectal cancer that might negatively regulate the mitotic function of BRCA1 to ensure chromosomal stability. PMID:26300001

  15. p31comet promotes disassembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex in an ATP-dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Teichner, Adar; Eytan, Esther; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Dumin, Elena; Gromis, Jonathan; Hershko, Avram

    2011-01-01

    Accurate segregation of chromosomes in mitosis is ensured by a surveillance mechanism called the mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint. It prevents sister chromatid separation until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle through their kinetochores. The checkpoint acts by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets for degradation securin, an inhibitor of anaphase initiation. The activity of APC/C is inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), composed of the APC/C activator Cdc20 bound to the checkpoint proteins MAD2, BubR1, and Bub3. When all kinetochores acquire bipolar attachment the checkpoint is inactivated, but the mechanisms of checkpoint inactivation are not understood. We have previously observed that hydrolyzable ATP is required for exit from checkpoint-arrested state. In this investigation we examined the possibility that ATP hydrolysis in exit from checkpoint is linked to the action of the Mad2-binding protein p31comet in this process. It is known that p31comet prevents the formation of a Mad2 dimer that it thought to be important for turning on the mitotic checkpoint. This explains how p31comet blocks the activation of the checkpoint but not how it promotes its inactivation. Using extracts from checkpoint-arrested cells and MCC isolated from such extracts, we now show that p31comet causes the disassembly of MCC and that this process requires β,γ-hydrolyzable ATP. Although p31comet binds to Mad2, it promotes the dissociation of Cdc20 from BubR1 in MCC. PMID:21300909

  16. Spindle Dynamics during Meiosis in Drosophila Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Endow, Sharyn A.; Komma, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    Mature oocytes of Drosophila are arrested in metaphase of meiosis I. Upon activation by ovulation or fertilization, oocytes undergo a series of rapid changes that have not been directly visualized previously. We report here the use of the Nonclaret disjunctional (Ncd) microtubule motor protein fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to monitor changes in the meiotic spindle of live oocytes after activation in vitro. Meiotic spindles of metaphase-arrested oocytes are relatively stable, however, meiotic spindles of in vitro–activated oocytes are highly dynamic: the spindles elongate, rotate around their long axis, and undergo an acute pivoting movement to reorient perpendicular to the oocyte surface. Many oocytes spontaneously complete the meiotic divisions, permitting visualization of progression from meiosis I to II. The movements of the spindle after oocyte activation provide new information about the dynamic changes in the spindle that occur upon re-entry into meiosis and completion of the meiotic divisions. Spindles in live oocytes mutant for a lossof-function ncd allele fused to gfp were also imaged. The genesis of spindle defects in the live mutant oocytes provides new insights into the mechanism of Ncd function in the spindle during the meiotic divisions. PMID:9182665

  17. Xorbit/CLASP links dynamic microtubules to chromosomes in the Xenopus meiotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Hannak, Eva; Heald, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    A family of microtubule (MT)-binding proteins, Orbit/multiple asters/cytoplasmic linker protein–associated protein, has emerged as an important player during mitosis, but their functional mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we used meiotic egg extracts to gain insight into the role of the Xenopus laevis homologue Xorbit in spindle assembly and function. Xorbit immunodepletion or its inhibition by a dominant-negative fragment resulted in chromosome alignment defects and aberrant MT structures, including monopolar and small spindles. Xorbit-depleted extracts failed to nucleate MTs around chromatin-coated beads, indicating its essential requirement for spindle assembly in the absence of centrosomes and kinetochores. Xorbit's MT stabilizing effect was most apparent during anaphase, when spindle MTs depolymerized rapidly upon Xorbit inhibition. Biochemical interaction between a COOH-terminal Xorbit fragment and the kinetochore-associated kinesin centromeric protein E may contribute to Xorbit's role in chromosome congression. We propose that Xorbit tethers dynamic MT plus ends to kinetochores and chromatin, providing a stabilizing activity that is crucial for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. PMID:16390996

  18. An inhibitor of the kinesin spindle protein activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway independently of p53 and de novo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weikang; South, Victoria J; Diehl, Ronald E; Davide, Joseph P; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Fraley, Mark E; Arrington, Kenneth L; Lobell, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    The kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a microtubule motor protein, is essential for the formation of bipolar spindles during mitosis. Inhibition of KSP activates the spindle checkpoint and causes apoptosis. It was shown that prolonged inhibition of KSP activates Bax and caspase-3, which requires a competent spindle checkpoint and couples with mitotic slippage. Here we investigated how Bax is activated by KSP inhibition and the roles of Bax and p53 in KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis. We demonstrate that small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Bax greatly attenuates KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis and that Bax activation is upstream of caspase activation. This indicates that Bax mediates the lethality of KSP inhibitors and that KSP inhibition provokes apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway where Bax activation is prior to caspase activation. Although the BH3-only protein Puma is induced after mitotic slippage, suppression of de novo protein synthesis that abrogates Puma induction does not block activation of Bax or caspase-3, indicating that Bax activation is triggered by a posttranslational event. Comparison of KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis between matched cell lines containing either functional or deficient p53 reveals that inhibition of KSP induces apoptosis independently of p53 and that p53 is dispensable for spindle checkpoint function. Thus, KSP inhibitors should be active in p53-deficient tumors. PMID:17101792

  19. Candida albicans Kinesin Kar3 Depends on a Cik1-Like Regulatory Partner Protein for Its Roles in Mating, Cell Morphogenesis, and Bipolar Spindle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Corey; Joshi, Monika; Delorme, Caroline; Davis, Darlene; Bennett, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen whose virulence is associated with its ability to transition from a budding yeast form to invasive hyphal filaments. The kinesin-14 family member CaKar3 is required for transition between these morphological states, as well as for mitotic progression and karyogamy. While kinesin-14 proteins are ubiquitous, CaKar3 homologs in hemiascomycete fungi are unique because they form heterodimers with noncatalytic kinesin-like proteins. Thus, CaKar3-based motors may represent a novel antifungal drug target. We have identified and examined the roles of a kinesin-like regulator of CaKar3. We show that orf19.306 (dubbed CaCIK1) encodes a protein that forms a heterodimer with CaKar3, localizes CaKar3 to spindle pole bodies, and can bind microtubules and influence CaKar3 mechanochemistry despite lacking an ATPase activity of its own. Similar to CaKar3 depletion, loss of CaCik1 results in cell cycle arrest, filamentation defects, and an inability to undergo karyogamy. Furthermore, an examination of the spindle structure in cells lacking either of these proteins shows that a large proportion have a monopolar spindle or two dissociated half-spindles, a phenotype unique to the C. albicans kinesin-14 homolog. These findings provide new insights into mitotic spindle structure and kinesin motor function in C. albicans and identify a potentially vulnerable target for antifungal drug development. PMID:26024903

  20. A Nonerythroid Isoform of Protein 4.1R Interacts with the Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mattagajasingh, Subhendra N.; Huang, Shu-Ching; Hartenstein, Julia S.; Snyder, Michael; Marchesi, Vincent T.; Benz, Edward J.

    1999-01-01

    Red blood cell protein 4.1 (4.1R) is an 80- kD erythrocyte phosphoprotein that stabilizes the spectrin/actin cytoskeleton. In nonerythroid cells, multiple 4.1R isoforms arise from a single gene by alternative splicing and predominantly code for a 135-kD isoform. This isoform contains a 209 amino acid extension at its NH2 terminus (head piece; HP). Immunoreactive epitopes specific for HP have been detected within the cell nucleus, nuclear matrix, centrosomes, and parts of the mitotic apparatus in dividing cells. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, in vitro binding assays, coimmunolocalization, and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we show that a 135-kD 4.1R isoform specifically interacts with the nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. NuMA and 4.1R partially colocalize in the interphase nucleus of MDCK cells and redistribute to the spindle poles early in mitosis. Protein 4.1R associates with NuMA in the interphase nucleus and forms a complex with spindle pole organizing proteins, NuMA, dynein, and dynactin during cell division. Overexpression of a 135-kD isoform of 4.1R alters the normal distribution of NuMA in the interphase nucleus. The minimal sequence sufficient for this interaction has been mapped to the amino acids encoded by exons 20 and 21 of 4.1R and residues 1788–1810 of NuMA. Our results not only suggest that 4.1R could, possibly, play an important role in organizing the nuclear architecture, mitotic spindle, and spindle poles, but also could define a novel role for its 22–24-kD domain. PMID:10189366

  1. Ionic effects on spindle adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Husmark, I.; Ottoson, D.

    1971-01-01

    1. Effects of changes in ionic environment on the receptor potential were studied in isolated frog spindle. Particular attention was focused on the action of potassium removal on the early adaptive decline of the response. 2. Removal of potassium caused a reduction and final disappearance of the dynamic overshoot of the receptor potential. The static phase of the response was also reduced although to less extent. The repolarization phase of the response following release of phasic or maintained stretch was greatly prolonged. 3. Increased potassium concentration caused a reduction of the response, but did not change its general time course. The amount of reduction was related to the potassium concentration. 4. Removal of sodium caused a marked diminution of the response, the static phase being in general more affected than the dynamic phase. 5. It is suggested that the effects of potassium removal are caused by a delay in sodium inactivation and a partial depolarization of the endings. It is concluded that the greater part of the early adaptation of the spindle proper may be attributed to ionic mechanisms in the transducer membrane. PMID:4256546

  2. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by D-T neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, D.C.; Edwards, A.A.; Prosser, J.S.; Bolton, D.; Sherwin, A.G.

    1984-06-01

    Unstable chromosome aberrations induced by in vitro irradiation with D-T neutrons have been analyzed in human blood lymphocytes. With respect to 250 kVp X rays a maximum limiting RBE at low doses of 4.1 was obtained for dicentric aberrations. Using aberrations as markers in mixed cultures of irradiated and unirradiated cells permits an assessment of interphase death plus mitotic delay. The low-dose RBE for this effect is 2.5. Assuming all unstable aberrations observed at metaphase would lead to cell death by nondisjunction allows an assessment of mitotic death. The low-dose RBE for this effect is 4.5. The data are compared with similar work obtained earlier with /sup 242/Cm ..cap alpha.. particles. The application of the present work to cytogenetic assessment of dose after accidental exposure to D-T neutrons is discussed.

  3. Visualizing the spindle checkpoint in Drosophila spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo, Elena; González, Cayetano

    2000-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint detects defects in spindle structure or in the alignment of the chromosomes on the metaphase plate and delays the onset of anaphase until defects are corrected. Thus far, the evidence regarding the presence of a spindle checkpoint during meiosis in male Drosophila has been indirect and contradictory. On the one hand, chromosomes without pairing partners do not prevent meiosis progression. On the other hand, some conserved components of the spindle checkpoint machinery are expressed in these cells and behave as their homologue proteins do in systems with an active spindle checkpoint. To establish whether the spindle checkpoint is active in Drosophila spermatocytes we have followed meiosis progression by time-lapse microscopy under conditions where the checkpoint is likely to be activated. We have found that the presence of a relatively high number of misaligned chromosomes or a severe disruption of the meiotic spindle results in a significant delay in the time of entry into anaphase. These observations provide the first direct evidence substantiating the activity of a meiotic spindle checkpoint in male Drosophila. PMID:11256627

  4. Microelasticity of Single Mitotic Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael; Eroglu, Sertac; Chatenay, Didier; Marko, John F.; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2000-03-01

    The force-extension behavior of mitotic chromosomes from the newt TVI tumor cell line was studied using micropipette manipulation and force measuring techniques. Reversible, linear elastic response was observed for extensions up to 5 times the native length; the force required to double chromosome length was 1 nanonewton (nN). For further elongations, the linear response teminates at a force plateau of 15 nN and at an extension of 20x. Beyond this extension, the chromosome breaks at elongations between 20x and 70x. These results will be compared to the similar behavior of mitotic chromosomes from explanted newt cells (Poirier, Eroglu, Chatenay and Marko, Mol. Biol. Cell, in press). Also, the effect of biochemical modifications on the elasticity was studied. Ethidium Bromide, which binds to DNA, induces up to a 10 times increase in the Young's modulus. Anti-XCAP-E, which binds to a putative chromosome folding protein, induces up to a 2 times increase in the Young's modulus. Preliminary results on the dynamical relaxation of chromosomes will also be presented. Support of this research through a Biomedical Engineering Research Grant from The Whitaker Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Ewing sarcoma fusion protein EWSR1/FLI1 interacts with EWSR1 leading to mitotic defects in zebrafish embryos and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Embree, Lisa J; Azuma, Mizuki; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2009-05-15

    The mechanism whereby the fusion of EWSR1 with the ETS transcription factor FLI1 contributes to malignant transformation in Ewing sarcoma remains unclear. We show that injection of human or zebrafish EWSR1/FLI1 mRNA into developing zebrafish embryos leads to mitotic defects with multipolar and disorganized mitotic spindles. Expression of human EWSR1/FLI1 in HeLa cells also results in mitotic defects, along with mislocalization of Aurora kinase B, a key regulator of mitotic progression. Because these mitotic abnormalities mimic those observed with the knockdown of EWSR1 in zebrafish embryos and HeLa cells, we investigated whether EWSR1/FLI1 interacts with EWSR1 and interferes with its function. EWSR1 coimmunoprecipitates with EWSR1/FLI1, and overexpression of EWSR1 rescues the mitotic defects in EWSR1/FLI1-transfected HeLa cells. This interaction between EWSR1/FLI1 and EWSR1 in Ewing sarcoma may induce mitotic defects leading to genomic instability and subsequent malignant transformation. PMID:19417137

  6. Building cortical polarity in a cell line: identification of an Aurora-A/PinsLINKER spindle orientation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher A.; Hirono, Keiko; Prehoda, Kenneth E.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Asymmetric cell division is intensely studied because it can generate cellular diversity as well as maintain stem cell populations. Asymmetric cell division requires mitotic spindle alignment with intrinsic or extrinsic polarity cues, but mechanistic detail of this process is lacking. Here we develop a method to construct cortical polarity in a normally unpolarized cell line, and use this method to characterize Partner of Inscuteable (Pins; LGN/AGS3 in mammals)-dependent spindle orientation. We identify a previously unrecognized evolutionarily-conserved Pins domain (PinsLINKER) that requires Aurora-A phosphorylation to recruit Discs large (Dlg; PSD-95/hDlg in mammals) and promote partial spindle orientation. The well-characterized PinsTPR domain has no function alone, but placing the PinsTPR in cis to the PinsLINKER gives dynein-dependent precise spindle orientation. This "induced cortical polarity" assay is suitable for rapid identification of the proteins, domains, and amino acids regulating spindle orientation or cell polarity. PMID:19766567

  7. Spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma of the retroperitoneum: an unusual case developed in a pregnant woman but obscured by pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu; Yang, Shou Jing

    2014-01-01

    Spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an uncommon histiologic variant of RMS that has spindle cell morphology. This tumor occurs almost exclusively in childhood and more rarely in adults. Only a few adult cases, including two retroperitoneal cases in male patients, have been documented previously. We describe a rare case of spindle cell RMS of the retroperitoneum in a 37-year-old woman developed during pregnancy and incidentally discovered after vaginal delivery. Computed tomography showed a huge tumor mass, measured 20 × 20 × 15 cm in size, arising in retroperitoneal space. Histologically, the tumor consisted of spindle cells arranged in a fascicular or herringbone growth pattern, morphologically mimicking adult fibrosarcoma, intermingled with scattered rhabdomyoblasts. Mitotic activity ranged from 20 to 28 mitoses per 10 high-power fields and tumor necrosis was evident. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were stained diffusely positive for muscle specific actin, desmin, and vimentin, scattered positive for myogenin, MyoD1 and myoglobin, with a Ki-67 (MIB-1) proliferative labeling index of 46.11%. This tumor also stains positively for CD99, strong cytoplasmic WT1, and nuclear p53. Other markers such as S100 protein, smooth muscle specific actin, CD34, cytokeratin, and epithelial membrane antigen were all negative in the tumor cells. On the basis of the findings, a spindle cell RMS was diagnosed. The neoplasm was incompletely excised because of encasement of major vessels and invasion to adjacent structures, and additional chemotherapy was given. PMID:25197361

  8. Gem GTPase acts upstream Gmip/RhoA to regulate cortical actin remodeling and spindle positioning during early mitosis.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Quaranta, Muriel; Leprince, Corinne; Cuvillier, Olivier; Hatzoglou, Anastassia

    2014-11-01

    Gem is a small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein within the Ras superfamily, involved in the regulation of voltage-gated calcium channel activity and cytoskeleton reorganization. Gem overexpression leads to stress fiber disruption, actin and cell shape remodeling and neurite elongation in interphase cells. In this study, we show that Gem plays a crucial role in the regulation of cortical actin cytoskeleton that undergoes active remodeling during mitosis. Ectopic expression of Gem leads to cortical actin disruption and spindle mispositioning during metaphase. The regulation of spindle positioning by Gem involves its downstream effector Gmip. Knockdown of Gmip rescued Gem-induced spindle phenotype, although both Gem and Gmip accumulated at the cell cortex. In addition, we implicated RhoA GTPase as an important effector of Gem/Gmip signaling. Inactivation of RhoA by overexpressing dominant-negative mutant prevented normal spindle positioning. Introduction of active RhoA rescued the actin and spindle positioning defects caused by Gem or Gmip overexpression. These findings demonstrate a new role of Gem/Gmip/RhoA signaling in cortical actin regulation during early mitotic stages. PMID:25173885

  9. XMAP215 activity sets spindle length by controlling the total mass of spindle microtubules.

    PubMed

    Reber, Simone B; Baumgart, Johannes; Widlund, Per O; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Howard, Jonathon; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Metaphase spindles are microtubule-based structures that use a multitude of proteins to modulate their morphology and function. Today, we understand many details of microtubule assembly, the role of microtubule-associated proteins, and the action of molecular motors. Ultimately, the challenge remains to understand how the collective behaviour of these nanometre-scale processes gives rise to a properly sized spindle on the micrometre scale. By systematically engineering the enzymatic activity of XMAP215, a processive microtubule polymerase, we show that Xenopus laevis spindle length increases linearly with microtubule growth velocity, whereas other parameters of spindle organization, such as microtubule density, lifetime and spindle shape, remain constant. We further show that mass balance can be used to link the global property of spindle size to individual microtubule dynamic parameters. We propose that spindle length is set by a balance of non-uniform nucleation and global microtubule disassembly in a liquid-crystal-like arrangement of microtubules. PMID:23974040

  10. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenbin; Arnst, Christopher; Tipton, Aaron R; Bekier, Michael E; Taylor, William R; Yen, Tim J; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  11. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Aaron R.; Bekier, Michael E.; Taylor, William R.; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  12. Oral Spindle Cell Lipoma in a Rare Location: A Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Filipe; Capistrano, Hermínia Marques; de Castro, Wagner Henriques; Caldeira, Patrícia Carlos; do Carmo, Maria Auxiliadora Vieira; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; de Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 56 Final Diagnosis: Spindle cell lipoma Symptoms: Asymptomatic Medication: Not applicable Clinical Procedure: Excisional biopsy Specialty: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery • Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Objective: Rare disease Background: Spindle cell lipoma (SCL) is an uncommon and histologically distinct variant of lipoma. It usually occurs as a solitary, subcutaneous, and well-circumscribed lesion in the posterior neck, shoulders, and back of older men. SCL of the oral cavity is rare. We present the clinical-pathologic features of the third case of SCL located on the hard palate and discuss the histological differential diagnosis with other fusiform neoplasms. Case Report: A 56-year-old man was evaluated for an asymptomatic swelling on the right side of the hard palate. The intra-oral examination showed a 25×20 mm sessile and circumscribed tumor, underlying an apparently healthy mucosa of normal color. The lesion revealed a floating consistency during palpation. Excisional biopsy was carried out based on a clinical diagnosis of lipoma or a benign minor salivary gland tumor. The histopathology demonstrated a well-circumscribed but unencapsulated proliferation of bland spindle cells admixed with mature adipocytes in a collagenous/myxoid stroma. The spindle cells were uniform, exhibiting elongated nuclei and narrow cytoplasmic processes without atypia. They were positive to CD34 and negative to factor VIII, alpha-smooth muscle actin, S100, cytokeratin, and actin. Mitotic activity was low, as confirmed by Ki-67 immunostaining. No lipoblastic activity was found. The diagnosis of SCL was therefore established. Conclusions: Oral spindle cell lipoma is a rare benign lipomatous tumor. The histologic picture shows a range of variations and the observation of morphological features is important to distinguish this lesion from other fusiform tumors. Immunohistochemistry should be helpful in this differentiation. PMID:26615969

  13. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  14. Dissecting the roles of human BUB1 in the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Vleugel, Mathijs; Hoek, Tim A; Tromer, Eelco; Sliedrecht, Tale; Groenewold, Vincent; Omerzu, Manja; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-08-15

    Mitotic chromosome segregation is initiated by the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and its co-activator CDC20 (forming APC/C(CDC20)). APC/C(CDC20) is inhibited by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) when chromosomes have not attached to spindle microtubules. Unattached kinetochores catalyze the formation of a diffusible APC/C(CDC20) inhibitor that comprises BUBR1 (also known as BUB1B), BUB3, MAD2 (also known as MAD2L1) and a second molecule of CDC20. Recruitment of these proteins to the kinetochore, as well as SAC activation, rely on the mitotic kinase BUB1, but the molecular mechanism by which BUB1 accomplishes this in human cells is unknown. We show that kinetochore recruitment of BUBR1 and BUB3 by BUB1 is dispensable for SAC activation. Unlike its yeast and nematode orthologs, human BUB1 does not associate stably with the MAD2 activator MAD1 (also known as MAD1L1) and, although required for accelerating the loading of MAD1 onto kinetochores, BUB1 is dispensable for the maintenance of steady-state levels of MAD1 there. Instead, we identify a 50-amino-acid segment that harbors the recently reported ABBA motif close to a KEN box as being crucial for the role of BUB1 in SAC signaling. The presence of this segment correlates with SAC activity and efficient binding of CDC20 but not of MAD1 to kinetochores. PMID:26148513

  15. Mto2 multisite phosphorylation inactivates non-spindle microtubule nucleation complexes during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Borek, Weronika E.; Groocock, Lynda M.; Samejima, Itaru; Zou, Juan; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sawin, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule nucleation is highly regulated during the eukaryotic cell cycle, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. During mitosis in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytoplasmic microtubule nucleation ceases simultaneously with intranuclear mitotic spindle assembly. Cytoplasmic nucleation depends on the Mto1/2 complex, which binds and activates the γ-tubulin complex and also recruits the γ-tubulin complex to both centrosomal (spindle pole body) and non-centrosomal sites. Here we show that the Mto1/2 complex disassembles during mitosis, coincident with hyperphosphorylation of Mto2 protein. By mapping and mutating multiple Mto2 phosphorylation sites, we generate mto2-phosphomutant strains with enhanced Mto1/2 complex stability, interaction with the γ-tubulin complex and microtubule nucleation activity. A mutant with 24 phosphorylation sites mutated to alanine, mto2[24A], retains interphase-like behaviour even in mitotic cells. This provides a molecular-level understanding of how phosphorylation ‘switches off' microtubule nucleation complexes during the cell cycle and, more broadly, illuminates mechanisms regulating non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation. PMID:26243668

  16. Intermediates in the assembly of mitotic checkpoint complexes and their role in the regulation of the anaphase-promoting complex

    PubMed Central

    Kaisari, Sharon; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Hershko, Avram

    2016-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system prevents premature separation of sister chromatids in mitosis and thus ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation. Kinetochores that are not attached properly to the mitotic spindle produce an inhibitory signal that prevents progression into anaphase. The checkpoint system acts on the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase, which targets for degradation inhibitors of anaphase initiation. APC/C is inhibited by the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC), which assembles when the checkpoint is activated. MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins BubR1, Bub3, and Mad2, associated with the APC/C coactivator Cdc20. The intermediary processes in the assembly of MCC are not sufficiently understood. It is also not clear whether or not some subcomplexes of MCC inhibit the APC/C and whether Mad2 is required only for MCC assembly and not for its action on the APC/C. We used purified subcomplexes of mitotic checkpoint proteins to examine these problems. Our results do not support a model in which Mad2 catalytically generates a Mad2-free APC/C inhibitor. We also found that the release of Mad2 from MCC caused a marked (although not complete) decrease in inhibitory action, suggesting a role of Mad2 in MCC for APC/C inhibition. A previously unknown species of MCC, which consists of Mad2, BubR1, and two molecules of Cdc20, contributes to the inhibition of APC/C by the mitotic checkpoint system. PMID:26755599

  17. SIRT2 knockdown increases basal autophagy and prevents postslippage death by abnormally prolonging the mitotic arrest that is induced by microtubule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshiaki; Nakayama, Yuji; Li, Yanze; Matsumori, Haruka; Takahashi, Haruka; Kojima, Hirotada; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Katoh, Motonobu; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2014-06-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death that occurs during mitosis and after mitotic slippage to a tetraploid state, plays important roles in the efficacy of cancer cell killing by microtubule inhibitors (MTIs). Prolonged mitotic arrest by the spindle assembly checkpoint is a well-known requirement for mitotic catastrophe, and thus for conferring sensitivity to MTIs. We previously reported that turning off spindle assembly checkpoint activation after a defined period of time is another requirement for efficient postslippage death from a tetraploid state, and we identified SIRT2, a member of the sirtuin protein family, as a regulator of this process. Here, we investigated whether SIRT2 regulates basal autophagy and whether, in that case, autophagy regulation by SIRT2 is required for postslippage death, by analogy with previous insights into SIRT1 functions in autophagy. We show, by combined knockdown of autophagy genes and SIRT2, that SIRT2 serves this function at least partially by suppressing basal autophagy levels. Notably, increased autophagy induced by rapamycin and mild starvation caused mitotic arrest for an abnormally long period of time in the presence of MTIs, and this was followed by delayed postslippage death, which was also observed in cells with SIRT2 knockdown. These results underscore a causal association among increased autophagy levels, mitotic arrest for an abnormally long period of time after exposure to MTIs, and resistance to MTIs. Although autophagy acts as a tumor suppressor mechanism, this study highlights its negative aspects, as increased autophagy may cause mitotic catastrophe malfunction. Thus, SIRT2 offers a novel target for tumor therapy. PMID:24712640

  18. Chromosome misalignments induce spindle-positioning defects.

    PubMed

    Tame, Mihoko A; Raaijmakers, Jonne A; Afanasyev, Pavel; Medema, René H

    2016-03-01

    Cortical pulling forces on astral microtubules are essential to position the spindle. These forces are generated by cortical dynein, a minus-end directed motor. Previously, another dynein regulator termed Spindly was proposed to regulate dynein-dependent spindle positioning. However, the mechanism of how Spindly regulates spindle positioning has remained elusive. Here, we find that the misalignment of chromosomes caused by Spindly depletion is directly provoking spindle misorientation. Chromosome misalignments induced by CLIP-170 or CENP-E depletion or by noscapine treatment are similarly accompanied by severe spindle-positioning defects. We find that cortical LGN is actively displaced from the cortex when misaligned chromosomes are in close proximity. Preventing the KT recruitment of Plk1 by the depletion of PBIP1 rescues cortical LGN enrichment near misaligned chromosomes and re-establishes proper spindle orientation. Hence, KT-enriched Plk1 is responsible for the negative regulation of cortical LGN localization. In summary, we uncovered a compelling molecular link between chromosome alignment and spindle orientation defects, both of which are implicated in tumorigenesis. PMID:26882550

  19. Loss of BubR1 acetylation causes defects in spindle assembly checkpoint signaling and promotes tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Inai; Lee, Hae-ock; Choi, Eunhee; Lee, Yoo-Kyung; Kwon, Mi-Sun; Min, Jaewon; Park, Pil-Gu; Lee, Seonju; Kong, Young-Yun; Gong, Gyungyub

    2013-01-01

    BubR1 acetylation is essential in mitosis. Mice heterozygous for the acetylation-deficient BubR1 allele (K243R/+) spontaneously developed tumors with massive chromosome missegregations. K243R/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibited a weakened spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) with shortened mitotic timing. The generation of the SAC signal was intact, as Mad2 localization to the unattached kinetochore (KT) was unaltered; however, because of the premature degradation of K243R-BubR1, the mitotic checkpoint complex disassociated prematurely in the nocodazole-treated condition, suggesting that maintenance of the SAC is compromised. BubR1 acetylation was also required to counteract excessive Aurora B activity at the KT for stable chromosome–spindle attachments. The association of acetylation-deficient BubR1 with PP2A-B56α phosphatase was reduced, and the phosphorylated Ndc80 at the KT was elevated in K243R/+ MEFs. In relation, there was a marked increase of micronuclei and p53 mutation was frequently detected in primary tumors of K243R/+ mice. Collectively, the combined effects of failure in chromosome–spindle attachment and weakened SAC cause genetic instability and cancer in K243R/+ mice. PMID:23878276

  20. A screen for dynein synthetic lethals in Aspergillus nidulans identifies spindle assembly checkpoint genes and other genes involved in mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Efimov, V P; Morris, N R

    1998-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a ubiquitously expressed microtubule motor involved in vesicle transport, mitosis, nuclear migration, and spindle orientation. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, inactivation of cytoplasmic dynein, although not lethal, severely impairs nuclear migration. The role of dynein in mitosis and vesicle transport in this organism is unclear. To investigate the complete range of dynein function in A. nidulans, we searched for synthetic lethal mutations that significantly reduced growth in the absence of dynein but had little effect on their own. We isolated 19 sld (synthetic lethality without dynein) mutations in nine different genes. Mutations in two genes exacerbate the nuclear migration defect seen in the absence of dynein. Mutations in six other genes, including sldA and sldB, show a strong synthetic lethal interaction with a mutation in the mitotic kinesin bimC and, thus, are likely to play a role in mitosis. Mutations in sldA and sldB also confer hypersensitivity to the microtubule-destabilizing drug benomyl. sldA and sldB were cloned by complementation of their mutant phenotypes using an A. nidulans autonomously replicating vector. Sequencing revealed homology to the spindle assembly checkpoint genes BUB1 and BUB3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic interaction between dynein and spindle assembly checkpoint genes, as well as other mitotic genes, indicates that A. nidulans dynein plays a role in mitosis. We suggest a model for dynein motor action in A. nidulans that can explain dynein involvement in both mitosis and nuclear distribution. PMID:9584089

  1. Disassembly of mitotic checkpoint complexes by the joint action of the AAA-ATPase TRIP13 and p31comet

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Wang, Kexi; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Kaisari, Sharon; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao; Hershko, Avram

    2014-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system delays anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. When the checkpoint is active, a Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC) assembles and inhibits the ubiquitin ligase Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, and Bub3 associated with the APC/C activator Cdc20. When the checkpoint signal is turned off, MCC is disassembled and the checkpoint is inactivated. The mechanisms of the disassembly of MCC are not sufficiently understood. We have previously observed that ATP hydrolysis is required for the action of the Mad2-binding protein p31comet to disassemble MCC. We now show that HeLa cell extracts contain a factor that promotes ATP- and p31comet-dependent disassembly of a Cdc20–Mad2 subcomplex and identify it as Thyroid Receptor Interacting Protein 13 (TRIP13), an AAA-ATPase known to interact with p31comet. The joint action of TRIP13 and p31comet also promotes the release of Mad2 from MCC, participates in the complete disassembly of MCC and abrogates checkpoint inhibition of APC/C. We propose that TRIP13 plays centrally important roles in the sequence of events leading to MCC disassembly and checkpoint inactivation. PMID:25092294

  2. S-adenosyl-L-methionine counteracts mitotic disturbances and cytostatic effects induced by sodium arsenite in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Tzutzuy; Stopper, Helga; Fischer, Thomas; Hock, Robert; Herrera, Luis A

    2008-01-01

    Aneuploidy represents a serious problem for human health. Toxicological data have shown that aneuploidy can be caused by exposure to chemical agents known as mitotic spindle poisons, since they arrest cell cycle in mitosis through their interaction with tubulin. Among these agents is arsenic. In previous reports, we demonstrated that the aneugenic events induced by sodium arsenite can be abolished by the exogenous addition of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved are still unknown. The aim of the present work was to study the influence of SAM on the mitotic disturbances caused by sodium arsenite. To achieve this goal, we analyzed microtubule (MT) polymerization by immunolocalization and live cell microscopy of mitotic cells. Our findings indicate that sodium arsenite alters the dynamics of MT polymerization, induces centrosome amplification and delays mitosis. Furthermore, SAM reduces the alterations on MT dynamics, as well as centrosome amplification, and therefore diminishes the formation of multipolar spindles in treated HeLa cells. In addition, SAM decreases the progression time through mitosis. Taking these data together, we consider that the mechanism by which SAM reduces the frequency of aneuploid cells must be related to the modulation of the dynamics and organization of MT, suggesting a role of SAM on chromosome segregation, which should be further investigated in primary cells. PMID:17888458

  3. Arabidopsis COPPER MODIFIED RESISTANCE1/PATRONUS1 is essential for growth adaptation to stress and required for mitotic onset control.

    PubMed

    Juraniec, Michal; Heyman, Jefri; Schubert, Veit; Salis, Pietrino; De Veylder, Lieven; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint (MC) guards faithful sister chromatid segregation by monitoring the attachment of spindle microtubules to the kinetochores. When chromosome attachment errors are detected, MC delays the metaphase-to-anaphase transition through the inhibition of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase. In contrast to yeast and mammals, our knowledge on the proteins involved in MC in plants is scarce. Transient synchronization of root tips as well as promoter-reporter gene fusions were performed to analyze temporal and spatial expression of COPPER MODIFIED RESISTANCE1/PATRONUS1 (CMR1/PANS1) in developing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Functional analysis of the gene was carried out, including CYCB1;2 stability in CMR1/PANS1 knockout and overexpressor background as well as metaphase-anaphase chromosome status. CMR1/PANS1 is transcriptionally active during M phase. Its deficiency provokes premature cell cycle exit and in consequence a rapid consumption of the number of meristematic cells in particular under stress conditions that are known to affect spindle microtubules. Root growth impairment is correlated with a failure to delay the onset of anaphase, resulting in anaphase bridges and chromosome missegregation. CMR1/PANS1 overexpression stabilizes the mitotic CYCB1;2 protein. Likely, CMR1/PANS1 coordinates mitotic cell cycle progression by acting as an APC/C inhibitor and plays a key role in growth adaptation to stress. PMID:26261921

  4. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  5. The Bub1–Plk1 kinase complex promotes spindle checkpoint signalling through Cdc20 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Luying; Li, Bing; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint senses unattached kinetochores and inhibits the Cdc20-bound anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C), to delay anaphase, thereby preventing aneuploidy. A critical checkpoint inhibitor of APC/CCdc20 is the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). It is unclear whether MCC suffices to inhibit all cellular APC/C. Here we show that human checkpoint kinase Bub1 not only directly phosphorylates Cdc20, but also scaffolds Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of Cdc20 by Bub1–Plk1 inhibits APC/CCdc20 in vitro and is required for checkpoint signalling in human cells. Bub1–Plk1-dependent Cdc20 phosphorylation is regulated by upstream checkpoint signals and is dispensable for MCC assembly. A phospho-mimicking Cdc20 mutant restores nocodazole-induced mitotic arrest in cells depleted of Mad2 or BubR1. Thus, Bub1–Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc20 constitutes an APC/C-inhibitory mechanism that is parallel, but not redundant, to MCC formation. Both mechanisms are required to sustain mitotic arrest in response to spindle defects. PMID:26912231

  6. Bisphenol A disrupts microtubules and induces multipolar spindles in dividing root tip cells of the gymnosperm Abies cephalonica.

    PubMed

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2016-04-01

    The effects of bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine chemical disruptor extensively used in the plastic and epoxy resin industry, on dividing root tip cells of the gymnosperm Abies cephalonica Loudon were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy after tubulin and endoplasmic reticulum immunolocalization and DNA staining. Microtubule arrays of all mitotic stages were disrupted within a few hours of treatment: preprophase bands exhibited asymmetric width; prometaphase, metaphase and anaphase spindles appeared sharply pointed, sigmoid or multipolar; phragmoplast microtubules were elongated and occasionally bended toward the daughter nuclei. Depending on the mitotic stage, the chromosomes appeared condensed at prophase, as a compact mass at metaphase and anaphase, unsegregated or bridged at telophase. Endoplasmic reticulum patterns were also affected, reflecting those of the respective microtubule arrays. Recovery of the microtubules after oryzalin treatment was more effective in a BPA solution than in water. It is concluded that the plant mitotic apparatus microtubules are very sensitive to BPA, the effect of which depends on the specific cell cycle stage. The formation of multipolar spindles is reminiscent of animal cells and is ascribed to the induction of multiple microtubule nucleation sites, deriving from the centrosomal properties of gymnosperms. PMID:26855225

  7. 2-(3-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4(1H)-one (HKL-1) induces G2/M arrest and mitotic catastrophe in human leukemia HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Mei-Hua; Liu, Chin-Yu; Lin, Chiao-Min; Chen, Yen-Jung; Chen, Chun-Jen; Lin, Yu-Fu; Huang, Li-Jiau; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Kuo, Sheng-Chu

    2012-03-01

    2-(3-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4(1H)-one (HKL-1), a 2-phenyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4-one (2-PN) derivative, was synthesized and evaluated as an effective antimitotic agent in our laboratory. However, the molecular mechanisms are uncertain. In this study, HKL-1 was demonstrated to induce multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human leukemia HL-60 cells. Western blotting showed that HKL-1 induces mitotic catastrophe in HL-60 cells through regulating mitotic phase-specific kinases (down-regulating CDK1, cyclin B1, CENP-E, and aurora B) and regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins (down-regulating Bcl-2 and up-regulating Bax and Bak), followed by caspase-9/-3 cleavage. These findings suggest that HKL-1 appears to exert its cytotoxicity toward HL-60 cells in culture by inducing mitotic catastrophe. Highlights: ► HKL-1 is a potential antimitotic agent against HL-60 cells. ► HKL-1 induces spindle disruption and sustained resulted in mitotic catastrophe. ► CENP-E and aurora B protein expressions significantly reduced. ► Bcl-2 family protein expressions altered and caspase-9/-3 activation. ► HKL-1 is an attractive candidate for possible use as a novel antimitotic agent.

  8. Thyroid spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE): is cytopathological diagnosis possible?

    PubMed

    Kloboves-Prevodnik, Veronika; Jazbec, Janez; Us-Krasovec, Marija; Lamovec, Janez

    2002-05-01

    Spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE) is a rare tumor of the thyroid gland which occurs predominantly in children, adolescents, and young adults. It usually presents as a painless neck or thyroid mass and only exceptionally as a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland, without metastatic disease at diagnosis. We report on the case of 12-yr-old girl who had diffusely enlarged thyroid gland for about 1 yr and was initially treated for thyroiditis. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) was performed 8 mo after the first admission. Cytological examination of smears showed unusual morphological features. FNAB smears were cellular, with dissociated cells, naked oval nuclei, aggregates, and groups. Three main cell types were observed: spindle, epithelioid, and epithelial. These cells were uniform, cytologically bland, with few mitotic figures. The distinction between these cells was not always unequivocal. In the background of the smears abundant red extracellular material in the form of fine, dust-like granules and irregular patches were present. It was also observed in some aggregates and groups of tumor cells. Spindle and epithelioid cells were immunocytochemically diffusely pan-cytokeratin-positive. In the differential diagnosis, medullary thyroid carcinoma and SETTLE were suggested. The final histological diagnosis was SETTLE. In cases of SETTLE presented as a diffuse thyromegaly the correct diagnosis may be delayed because clinically and ultrasonographically thyroiditis is suspected. To avoid such a delay, FNAB should be used preoperatively. It can provide specific cytological diagnosis based on morphological features and certain immunocytochemical characteristics of the tumor. PMID:11992375

  9. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity is required during mitosis for timely satisfaction of the mitotic checkpoint but not for the fidelity of chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyunghee; Kenny, Alison E; Rieder, Conly L

    2010-07-01

    Although p38 activity is reported to be required as cells enter mitosis for proper spindle assembly and checkpoint function, its role during the division process remains controversial in lieu of direct data. We therefore conducted live cell studies to determine the effect on mitosis of inhibiting or depleting p38. We found that in the absence of p38 activity the duration of mitosis is prolonged by approximately 40% in nontransformed human RPE-1, approximately 80% in PtK2 (rat kangaroo), and approximately 25% in mouse cells, and this prolongation leads to an elevated mitotic index. However, under this condition chromatid segregation and cytokinesis are normal. Using Mad2/YFP-expressing cells, we show the prolongation of mitosis in the absence of p38 activity is directly due to a delay in satisfying the mitotic checkpoint. Inhibiting p38 did not affect the rate of chromosome motion; however, it did lead to the formation of significantly (10%) longer metaphase spindles. From these data we conclude that normal p38 activity is required for the timely stable attachment of all kinetochores to spindle microtubules, but not for the fidelity of the mitotic process. We speculate that p38 activity promotes timely checkpoint satisfaction by indirectly influencing those motor proteins (e.g., Klp10, Klp67A) involved in regulating the dynamics of kinetochore microtubule ends. PMID:20462950

  10. Redistribution of the nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) during mitosis and nuclear assembly. Properties of purified NuMA protein.

    PubMed

    Price, C M; Pettijohn, D E

    1986-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and human autoimmune sera specific for the nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA protein) were applied to study the structure of this protein and its intracellular distribution. The NuMA protein was purified using immuno-affinity columns. Studies on this large (250 kD) nuclear protein indicated that it is a highly asymmetric phosphoprotein. It is present in all mammalian cells examined and in those of some non-mammals. Immunofluorescence studies on fixed cells demonstrated that its intracellular distribution is essentially the same in all species at all stages of the cell cycle. Immunoblot (western blot) analysis showed that the size of the NuMA protein varies slightly in different species. At the onset of mitosis the NuMA protein redistributes from the nucleus to two centrosomal structures that later will become part of the mitotic spindle pole. This occurs at the time of nuclear breakdown and eventually leads to an accumulation of the NuMA protein at the polar region of the mitotic spindle. After anaphase the protein redistributes from the spindle polar region into the reforming nucleus and concentrates initially at the site where nuclear lamins and perichomatin have been reported to assemble. Living cells microinjected with fluorescent anti-NuMA antibodies were studied to examine parameters that effect the redistribution of the NuMA protein in vivo. These experiments indicate that microtubule assembly is essential for the NuMA protein to accumulate in the polar region. PMID:3527729

  11. Preventing farnesylation of the dynein adaptor Spindly contributes to the mitotic defects caused by farnesyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Andrew J.; Reis, Rita M.; Niessen, Sherry; Pereira, Cláudia; Andres, Douglas A.; Spielmann, H. Peter; Cleveland, Don W.; Desai, Arshad; Gassmann, Reto

    2015-01-01

    The clinical interest in farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) makes it important to understand how these compounds affect cellular processes involving farnesylated proteins. Mitotic abnormalities observed after treatment with FTIs have so far been attributed to defects in the farnesylation of the outer kinetochore proteins CENP-E and CENP-F, which are involved in chromosome congression and spindle assembly checkpoint signaling. Here we identify the cytoplasmic dynein adaptor Spindly as an additional component of the outer kinetochore that is modified by farnesyltransferase (FTase). We show that farnesylation of Spindly is essential for its localization, and thus for the proper localization of dynein and its cofactor dynactin, to prometaphase kinetochores and that Spindly kinetochore recruitment is more severely affected by FTase inhibition than kinetochore recruitment of CENP-E and CENP-F. Molecular replacement experiments show that both Spindly and CENP-E farnesylation are required for efficient chromosome congression. The identification of Spindly as a new mitotic substrate of FTase provides insight into the causes of the mitotic phenotypes observed with FTase inhibitors. PMID:25808490

  12. Interpolar spindle microtubules in PTK cells.

    PubMed

    Mastronarde, D N; McDonald, K L; Ding, R; McIntosh, J R

    1993-12-01

    Spindle microtubules (MTs) in PtK1 cells, fixed at stages from metaphase to telophase, have been reconstructed using serial sections, electron microscopy, and computer image processing. We have studied the class of MTs that form an interdigitating system connecting the two spindle poles (interpolar MTs or ipMTs) and their relationship to the spindle MTs that attach to kinetochores (kMTs). Viewed in cross section, the ipMTs cluster with antiparallel near neighbors throughout mitosis; this bundling becomes much more pronounced as anaphase proceeds. While the minus ends of most kMTs are near the poles, those of the ipMTs are spread over half of the spindle length, with at least 50% lying > 1.5 microns from the poles. Longitudinal views of the ipMT bundles demonstrate a major rearrangement of their plus ends between mid- and late anaphase B. However, the minus ends of these MTs do not move appreciably farther from the spindle midplane, suggesting that sliding of these MTs contributes little to anaphase B. The minus ends of ipMTs are markedly clustered in the bundles of kMTs throughout anaphase A. These ends lie close to kMTs much more frequently than would be expected by chance, suggesting a specific interaction. As sister kinetochores separate and kMTs shorten, the minus ends of the kMTs remain associated with the spindle poles, but the minus ends of many ipMTs are released from the kMT bundles, allowing the spindle pole and the kMTs to move away from the ipMTs as the spindle elongates. PMID:8253845

  13. Lipoma of the Thumb: Spindle Cell Subtype

    PubMed Central

    El Rayes, Johnny; Bou Sader, Roula; Saliba, Elie

    2016-01-01

    We report hereby the case of a 61-year-old man who presented with a soft-tissue swelling on the palmar aspect of the thumb. A detailed clinical examination followed by ultrasonography and excisional biopsy confirmed a spindle cell lipoma. Lipomas are rare in the hand and exceptional in the fingers, and we report, to our knowledge, the first spindle cell lipoma in the thumb to help in the differential diagnosis of a similar swelling. PMID:27088022

  14. Isolation of Human Mitotic Protein Phosphatase Complexes: Identification of a Complex between Protein Phosphatase 1 and the RNA Helicase Ddx21

    PubMed Central

    De Wever, Veerle; Lloyd, David C.; Nasa, Isha; Nimick, Mhairi; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Gourlay, Robert; Morrice, Nick; Moorhead, Greg B. G.

    2012-01-01

    Metazoan mitosis requires remodelling of sub-cellular structures to ensure proper division of cellular and genetic material. Faults often lead to genomic instability, cell cycle arrests and disease onset. These key structural changes are under tight spatial-temporal and post-translational control, with crucial roles for reversible protein phosphorylation. The phosphoprotein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A are paramount for the timely execution of mitotic entry and exit but their interaction partners and substrates are still largely unresolved. High throughput, mass-spectrometry based studies have limited sensitivity for the detection of low-abundance and transient complexes, a typical feature of many protein phosphatase complexes. Moreover, the limited timeframe during which mitosis takes place reduces the likelihood of identifying mitotic phosphatase complexes in asynchronous cells. Hence, numerous mitotic protein phosphatase complexes still await identification. Here we present a strategy to enrich and identify serine/threonine protein phosphatase complexes at the mitotic spindle. We thus identified a nucleolar RNA helicase, Ddx21/Gu, as a novel, direct PP1 interactor. Furthermore, our results place PP1 within the toposome, a Topoisomerase II alpha (TOPOIIα) containing complex with a key role in mitotic chromatin regulation and cell cycle progression, possibly via regulated protein phosphorylation. This study provides a strategy for the identification of further mitotic PP1 partners and the unravelling of PP1 functions during mitosis. PMID:22761809

  15. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1-Mediated Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 Phosphorylation Acts as a Functional Link Coupling Mitotic Arrest and Apoptosis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Terrano, David T.; Upreti, Meenakshi; Chambers, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    Despite detailed knowledge of the components of the spindle assembly checkpoint, a molecular explanation of how cells die after prolonged spindle checkpoint activation, and thus how microtubule inhibitors and other antimitotic drugs ultimately elicit their lethal effects, has yet to emerge. Mitotically arrested cells typically display extensive phosphorylation of two key antiapoptotic proteins, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2, and evidence suggests that phosphorylation disables their antiapoptotic activity. However, the responsible kinase has remained elusive. In this report, evidence is presented that cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B catalyzes mitotic-arrest-induced Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, we show that CDK1 transiently and incompletely phosphorylates these proteins during normal mitosis. When mitosis is prolonged in the absence of microtubule inhibition, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 become highly phosphorylated. Transient overexpression of nondegradable cyclin B1 caused apoptotic death, which was blocked by a phosphodefective Bcl-xL mutant but not by a phosphomimetic Bcl-xL mutant, confirming Bcl-xL as a key target of proapoptotic CDK1 signaling. These findings suggest a model whereby a switch in the duration of CDK1 activation, from transient during mitosis to sustained during mitotic arrest, dramatically increases the extent of Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 phosphorylation, resulting in inactivation of their antiapoptotic function. Thus, phosphorylation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins acts as a sensor for CDK1 signal duration and as a functional link coupling mitotic arrest to apoptosis. PMID:19917720

  16. RNA interference-mediated silencing of mitotic kinesin KIF14 disrupts cell cycle progression and induces cytokinesis failure.

    PubMed

    Carleton, Michael; Mao, Mao; Biery, Matthew; Warrener, Paul; Kim, Sammy; Buser, Carolyn; Marshall, C Gary; Fernandes, Christine; Annis, James; Linsley, Peter S

    2006-05-01

    KIF14 is a microtubule motor protein whose elevated expression is associated with poor-prognosis breast cancer. Here we demonstrate KIF14 accumulation in mitotic cells, where it associated with developing spindle poles and spindle microtubules. Cells at later stages of mitosis were characterized by the concentration of KIF14 at the midbody. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that strong RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of KIF14 induced cytokinesis failure, causing several rounds of endoreduplication and resulting in multinucleated cells. Additionally, less efficacious KIF14-specific short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) induced multiple phenotypes, all of which resulted in acute apoptosis. Our data demonstrate the ability of siRNA-mediated silencing to generate epiallelic hypomorphs associated with KIF14 depletion. Furthermore, the link we observed between siRNA efficacy and phenotypic outcome indicates that distinct stages during cell cycle progression are disrupted by the differential modulation of KIF14 expression. PMID:16648480

  17. RNA Interference-Mediated Silencing of Mitotic Kinesin KIF14 Disrupts Cell Cycle Progression and Induces Cytokinesis Failure†

    PubMed Central

    Carleton, Michael; Mao, Mao; Biery, Matthew; Warrener, Paul; Kim, Sammy; Buser, Carolyn; Marshall, C. Gary; Fernandes, Christine; Annis, James; Linsley, Peter S.

    2006-01-01

    KIF14 is a microtubule motor protein whose elevated expression is associated with poor-prognosis breast cancer. Here we demonstrate KIF14 accumulation in mitotic cells, where it associated with developing spindle poles and spindle microtubules. Cells at later stages of mitosis were characterized by the concentration of KIF14 at the midbody. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that strong RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of KIF14 induced cytokinesis failure, causing several rounds of endoreduplication and resulting in multinucleated cells. Additionally, less efficacious KIF14-specific short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) induced multiple phenotypes, all of which resulted in acute apoptosis. Our data demonstrate the ability of siRNA-mediated silencing to generate epiallelic hypomorphs associated with KIF14 depletion. Furthermore, the link we observed between siRNA efficacy and phenotypic outcome indicates that distinct stages during cell cycle progression are disrupted by the differential modulation of KIF14 expression. PMID:16648480

  18. Opposing roles for JNK and Aurora A in regulating the association of WDR62 with spindle microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Nicholas R.; Yeap, Yvonne Y. C.; Zhao, Teresa T.; Yip, Yan Y.; Wong, Shu C.; Xu, Dan; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Xu, Zhiheng; Bogoyevitch, Marie A.; Ng, Dominic C. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT WD40-repeat protein 62 (WDR62) is a spindle pole protein required for normal cell division and neuroprogenitor differentiation during brain development. Microcephaly-associated mutations in WDR62 lead to mitotic mislocalization, highlighting a crucial requirement for precise WDR62 spatiotemporal distribution, although the regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the WD40-repeat region of WDR62 is required for microtubule association, whereas the disordered C-terminal region regulates cell-cycle-dependent compartmentalization. In agreement with a functional requirement for the WDR62–JNK1 complex during neurogenesis, WDR62 specifically recruits JNK1 (also known as MAPK8), but not JNK2 (also known as MAPK9), to the spindle pole. However, JNK-mediated phosphorylation of WDR62 T1053 negatively regulated microtubule association, and loss of JNK signaling resulted in constitutive WDR62 localization to microtubules irrespective of cell cycle stage. In contrast, we identified that Aurora A kinase (AURKA) and WDR62 were in complex and that AURKA-mediated phosphorylation was required for the spindle localization of WDR62 during mitosis. Our studies highlight complex regulation of WDR62 localization, with opposing roles for JNK and AURKA in determining its spindle association. PMID:25501809

  19. Nudel/NudE and Lis1 promote dynein and dynactin interaction in the context of spindle morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shusheng; Ketcham, Stephanie A.; Schön, Arne; Goodman, Benjamin; Wang, Yueju; Yates, John; Freire, Ernesto; Schroer, Trina A.; Zheng, Yixian

    2013-01-01

    Lis1, Nudel/NudE, and dynactin are regulators of cytoplasmic dynein, a minus end–directed, microtubule (MT)-based motor required for proper spindle assembly and orientation. In vitro studies have shown that dynactin promotes processive movement of dynein on MTs, whereas Lis1 causes dynein to enter a persistent force-generating state (referred to here as dynein stall). Yet how the activities of Lis1, Nudel/NudE, and dynactin are coordinated to regulate dynein remains poorly understood in vivo. Working in Xenopus egg extracts, we show that Nudel/NudE facilitates the binding of Lis1 to dynein, which enhances the recruitment of dynactin to dynein. We further report a novel Lis1-dependent dynein–dynactin interaction that is essential for the organization of mitotic spindle poles. Finally, using assays for MT gliding and spindle assembly, we demonstrate an antagonistic relationship between Lis1 and dynactin that allows dynactin to relieve Lis1-induced dynein stall on MTs. Our findings suggest the interesting possibility that Lis1 and dynactin could alternately engage with dynein to allow the motor to promote spindle assembly. PMID:24025714

  20. Early Spindle Assembly in Drosophila Embryos: Role of a Force Balance Involving Cytoskeletal Dynamics and Nuclear MechanicsD⃞V⃞

    PubMed Central

    Cytrynbaum, E. N.; Sommi, P.; Brust-Mascher, I.; Scholey, J. M.; Mogilner, A.

    2005-01-01

    Mitotic spindle morphogenesis depends upon the action of microtubules (MTs), motors and the cell cortex. Previously, we proposed that cortical- and MT-based motors acting alone can coordinate early spindle assembly in Drosophila embryos. Here, we tested this model using microscopy of living embryos to analyze spindle pole separation, cortical reorganization, and nuclear dynamics in interphase-prophase of cycles 11-13. We observe that actin caps remain flat as they expand and that furrows do not ingress. As centrosomes separate, they follow a linear trajectory, maintaining a constant pole-to-furrow distance while the nucleus progressively deforms along the elongating pole-pole axis. These observations are incorporated into a model in which outward forces generated by zones of active cortical dynein are balanced by inward forces produced by nuclear elasticity and during cycle 13, by Ncd, which localizes to interpolar MTs. Thus, the force-balance driving early spindle morphogenesis depends upon MT-based motors acting in concert with the cortex and nucleus. PMID:16079179

  1. A rare spindle-cell variant of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Srikant, N; Yinti, Shanmukha Raviteja; Baliga, Mohan; Kini, Hema

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old male farmer presented with a rapidly progressive swelling of the left mandible since 6 months. The swelling was firm to hard, diffuse, nontender, obliterating the vestibule with paresthesia of lower lip. The cone beam computed tomography imaging revealed an ill-defined, moth-eaten radiolucency with destruction of the buccal and lingual cortical plates. The rapid growth and aggressive behavior of the lesion coupled with guidance from the patient's previous reports from the incisional biopsy and fine needle aspiration cytology warranted a mandibular resection. Microscopic examination showed an encapsulated lesion situated in the connective tissue containing a mixture of proliferating spindle-shaped cells arranged in fascicles and round cells infiltrating into the connective tissue stroma and bone. The neoplastic cells exhibited atypical features such as pleomorphism, hyperchromatism and increased mitotic figures with noncleaved nuclei. A working diagnosis of a spindle-cell sarcoma was arrived at with various differentials provided such as fibrosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, Langerhans cell histiocytosis and lymphoma and stating the need for immunohistochemistry to subtype the tumor. The neoplastic cells were negative for Van Gieson's stain and Masson's trichrome. Immunohistochemical analysis performed using desmin, smooth muscle actin, S-100 and CD1a in a bid to determine the phenotype of the tumor and rule out the previously stated differentials were all negative for the lesion. Lymphoid markers such as leukocyte common antigen and CD20 (cluster differentiation marker for B-cells) showed positivity in spindle-shaped cells as well as round cells indicating the tumor to be a lymphoproliferative lesion of B-cell type. A final diagnosis of “spindle-cell variant of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma” was rendered based on the immunohistochemical profile. PMID:27194875

  2. The Aberration Corrected SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, David C.

    2005-09-09

    The performance of the conventional low-energy CD-SEM is limited by the aberrations inherent in the probe forming lens. Multi-pole correctors are now available which can reduce or eliminate these aberrations. An SEM equipped with such a corrector offers higher spatial resolution and more probe current from a given electron source, and other aspects of the optical performance are also improved, but the much higher numerical aperture associated with an aberration corrected lens results in a reduction in imaging depth of field.

  3. A Framework for Image-Based Classification of Mitotic Cells in Asynchronous Populations

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Scott D.; Newberg, Justin Y.; Szafran, Adam T.; Hall, Rebecca M.; Brinkley, Bill R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract High content screening (HCS) has emerged an important tool for drug discovery because it combines rich readouts of cellular responses in a single experiment. Inclusion of cell cycle analysis into HCS is essential to identify clinically suitable anticancer drugs that disrupt the aberrant mitotic activity of cells. One challenge for integration of cell cycle analysis into HCS is that cells must be chemically synchronized to specific phases, adding experimental complexity to high content screens. To address this issue, we have developed a rules-based method that utilizes mitotic phosphoprotein monoclonal 2 (MPM-2) marker and works consistently in different experimental conditions and in asynchronous populations. Further, the performance of the rules-based method is comparable to established machine learning approaches for classifying cell cycle data, indicating the robustness of the features we use in the framework. As such, we suggest the use of MPM-2 analysis and its associated expressive features for integration into HCS approaches. PMID:22084958

  4. Gallic acid induces mitotic catastrophe and inhibits centrosomal clustering in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Si; Guan, Xin; Grün, Christoph; Zhou, Zhiqin; Schepers, Ute; Nick, Peter

    2015-12-25

    Cancer cells divide rapidly, providing medical targets for anticancer agents. The polyphenolic gallic acid (GA) is known to be toxic for certain cancer cells. However, the cellular mode of action has not been elucidated. Therefore, the current study addressed a potential effect of GA on the mitosis of cancer cells. GA inhibited viability of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. We could show, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), that this inhibition was accompanied by elevated frequency of cells arrested at the G2/M transition. This cell-cycle arrest was accompanied by mitotic catastrophe, and formation of cells with multiple nuclei. These aberrations were preceded by impaired centrosomal clustering. We arrive at a model of action, where GA inhibits the progression of the cell cycle at the G2/M phase by impairing centrosomal clustering which will stimulate mitotic catastrophe. Thus, GA has potential as compound against cervical cancer. PMID:26368671

  5. Forced mitotic entry of S-phase cells as a therapeutic strategy induced by inhibition of WEE1.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Marieke; Sharpe, Rachel; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Hurd, Melissa S; Shumway, Stuart D; Toniatti, Carlo; Ashworth, Alan; Turner, Nicholas C

    2012-06-01

    Inhibition of the protein kinase WEE1 synergizes with chemotherapy in preclinical models and WEE1 inhibitors are being explored as potential cancer therapies. Here, we investigate the mechanism that underlies this synergy. We show that WEE1 inhibition forces S-phase-arrested cells directly into mitosis without completing DNA synthesis, resulting in highly abnormal mitoses characterized by dispersed chromosomes and disorganized bipolar spindles, ultimately resulting in mitotic exit with gross micronuclei formation and apoptosis. This mechanism of cell death is shared by CHK1 inhibitors, and combined WEE1 and CHK1 inhibition forces mitotic entry from S-phase in the absence of chemotherapy. We show that p53/p21 inactivation combined with high expression of mitotic cyclins and EZH2 predispose to mitotic entry during S-phase with cells reliant on WEE1 to prevent premature cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)1 activation. These features are characteristic of aggressive breast, and other, cancers for which WEE1 inhibitor combinations represent a promising targeted therapy. PMID:22628408

  6. Paclitaxel targets FOXM1 to regulate KIF20A in mitotic catastrophe and breast cancer paclitaxel resistance.

    PubMed

    Khongkow, P; Gomes, A R; Gong, C; Man, E P S; Tsang, J W-H; Zhao, F; Monteiro, L J; Coombes, R C; Medema, R H; Khoo, U S; Lam, E W-F

    2016-02-25

    FOXM1 has been implicated in taxane resistance, but the molecular mechanism involved remains elusive. In here, we show that FOXM1 depletion can sensitize breast cancer cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts into entering paclitaxel-induced senescence, with the loss of clonogenic ability, and the induction of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and flat cell morphology. We also demonstrate that FOXM1 regulates the expression of the microtubulin-associated kinesin KIF20A at the transcriptional level directly through a Forkhead response element (FHRE) in its promoter. Similar to FOXM1, KIF20A expression is downregulated by paclitaxel in the sensitive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and deregulated in the paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7Tax(R) cells. KIF20A depletion also renders MCF-7 and MCF-7Tax(R) cells more sensitive to paclitaxel-induced cellular senescence. Crucially, resembling paclitaxel treatment, silencing of FOXM1 and KIF20A similarly promotes abnormal mitotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment, which have been shown to induce mitotic catastrophe-dependent senescence. The physiological relevance of the regulation of KIF20A by FOXM1 is further highlighted by the strong and significant correlations between FOXM1 and KIF20A expression in breast cancer patient samples. Statistical analysis reveals that both FOXM1 and KIF20A protein and mRNA expression significantly associates with poor survival, consistent with a role of FOXM1 and KIF20A in paclitaxel action and resistance. Collectively, our findings suggest that paclitaxel targets the FOXM1-KIF20A axis to drive abnormal mitotic spindle formation and mitotic catastrophe and that deregulated FOXM1 and KIF20A expression may confer paclitaxel resistance. These findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance and have implications for the development of predictive biomarkers and novel chemotherapeutic strategies for paclitaxel resistance. PMID:25961928

  7. Paclitaxel targets FOXM1 to regulate KIF20A in mitotic catastrophe and breast cancer paclitaxel resistance

    PubMed Central

    Khongkow, P; Gomes, A R; Gong, C; Man, E P S; Tsang, J W-H; Zhao, F; Monteiro, L J; Coombes, R C; Medema, R H; Khoo, U S; Lam, E W-F

    2016-01-01

    FOXM1 has been implicated in taxane resistance, but the molecular mechanism involved remains elusive. In here, we show that FOXM1 depletion can sensitize breast cancer cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts into entering paclitaxel-induced senescence, with the loss of clonogenic ability, and the induction of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and flat cell morphology. We also demonstrate that FOXM1 regulates the expression of the microtubulin-associated kinesin KIF20A at the transcriptional level directly through a Forkhead response element (FHRE) in its promoter. Similar to FOXM1, KIF20A expression is downregulated by paclitaxel in the sensitive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and deregulated in the paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7TaxR cells. KIF20A depletion also renders MCF-7 and MCF-7TaxR cells more sensitive to paclitaxel-induced cellular senescence. Crucially, resembling paclitaxel treatment, silencing of FOXM1 and KIF20A similarly promotes abnormal mitotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment, which have been shown to induce mitotic catastrophe-dependent senescence. The physiological relevance of the regulation of KIF20A by FOXM1 is further highlighted by the strong and significant correlations between FOXM1 and KIF20A expression in breast cancer patient samples. Statistical analysis reveals that both FOXM1 and KIF20A protein and mRNA expression significantly associates with poor survival, consistent with a role of FOXM1 and KIF20A in paclitaxel action and resistance. Collectively, our findings suggest that paclitaxel targets the FOXM1-KIF20A axis to drive abnormal mitotic spindle formation and mitotic catastrophe and that deregulated FOXM1 and KIF20A expression may confer paclitaxel resistance. These findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance and have implications for the development of predictive biomarkers and novel chemotherapeutic strategies for paclitaxel resistance. PMID:25961928

  8. Roles of different pools of the mitotic checkpoint complex and the mechanisms of their disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Teichner, Adar; Hershko, Avram

    2013-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system prevents premature separation of sister chromatids in mitosis. When the checkpoint is turned on, the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) inhibits the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins BubR1, Bub3, and Mad2 associated with the APC/C activator Cdc20. The mechanisms of the assembly of MCC when the checkpoint is turned on, and of its disassembly when the checkpoint is inactivated, are not sufficiently understood. Previous reports indicated that APC/C-mediated polyubiquitylation of Cdc20 in MCC is required for the dissociation of APC/C-associated MCC, but not of free MCC. The pool of free MCC is disassembled by an ATP-dependent process stimulated by the Mad2-binding protein p31comet. It remained unknown whether free MCC is the precursor or the dissociation product of APC/C-bound MCC. By characterizing the mechanisms of the disassembly of APC/C-bound MCC in a purified system, we find that it cannot be the source of free MCC, because it is bound at high affinity and is released only in ubiquitylated or partially disassembled forms. By the use of a cell-free system from Xenopus eggs that reproduces the mitotic checkpoint, we show that MCC can be assembled in the absence of APC/C in a checkpoint-dependent manner. We propose that when the checkpoint is turned on, free MCC is the precursor of APC/C-bound MCC. When the mitotic checkpoint is extinguished, both APC/C-bound and free MCC pools have to be disassembled to release APC/C from inhibition. PMID:23754430

  9. Characterization of Topographically Specific Sleep Spindles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongwook; Hwang, Eunjin; Lee, Mina; Sung, Hokun; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Sleep spindles in humans have been classified as slow anterior and fast posterior spindles; recent findings indicate that their profiles differ according to pharmacology, pathology, and function. However, little is known about the generation mechanisms within the thalamocortical system for different types of spindles. In this study, we aim to investigate the electrophysiological behaviors of the topographically distinctive spindles within the thalamocortical system by applying high-density EEG and simultaneous thalamic LFP recordings in mice. Design: 32-channel extracranial EEG and 2-channel thalamic LFP were recorded simultaneously in freely behaving mice to acquire spindles during spontaneous sleep. Subjects: Hybrid F1 male mice of C57BL/6J and 129S4/svJae. Measurements and Results: Spindle events in each channel were detected by spindle detection algorithm, and then a cluster analysis was applied to classify the topographically distinctive spindles. All sleep spindles were successfully classified into 3 groups: anterior, posterior, and global spindles. Each spindle type showed distinct thalamocortical activity patterns regarding the extent of similarity, phase synchrony, and time lags between cortical and thalamic areas during spindle oscillation. We also found that sleep slow waves were likely to associate with all types of sleep spindles, but also that the ongoing cortical decruitment/recruitment dynamics before the onset of spindles and their relationship with spindle generation were also variable, depending on the spindle types. Conclusion: Topographically specific sleep spindles show distinctive thalamocortical network behaviors. Citation: Kim D, Hwang E, Lee M, Sung H, Choi JH. Characterization of topographically specific sleep spindles in mice. SLEEP 2015;38(1):85–96. PMID:25325451

  10. Sleep Spindles as Facilitators of Memory Formation and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades important progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of sleep spindle generation. At the same time a physiological role of sleep spindles is starting to be revealed. Behavioural studies in humans and animals have found significant correlations between the recall performance in different learning tasks and the amount of sleep spindles in the intervening sleep. Concomitant neurophysiological experiments showed a close relationship between sleep spindles and other sleep related EEG rhythms as well as a relationship between sleep spindles and synaptic plasticity. Together, there is growing evidence from several disciplines in neuroscience for a participation of sleep spindles in memory formation and learning. PMID:27119026

  11. [Neuromuscular spindles of several amphibia and reptiles].

    PubMed

    Kurkina, E A

    1976-09-01

    The work presents data on the structure and innervation of the nerve-muscle spindles in the soleus of the lake from Rana ridibunda, Bufo bufo, turtle Testudo horsfieldi, lizzard Lacerta agilis. The animals under study were shown to have different structure and innervation of these receptors. The thickness of the spindle connective tissue capsule has certain correlation with the width of the subcapsular space. The innervation apparatus in the muscle spindles of reptiles and turtles are similar in the following: sensory nerve terminations in the equatorial area of the spindle are represented by reticulars, bushes, loops and in the lizzard there appear annulo-spirals with a small amount of coils. The character of motor nerve terminations in polar zones of intrafusal muscle fibres in the spindles of reptiles is similar to that of the extrafusal fibres: in the shape of "bayonets" and end bundles (Endbüuschel). In the muscle fibres of the turtle and lizzard in addition to typical motor plaques there occur trail endings. PMID:136238

  12. Do All Dinoflagellates have an Extranuclear Spindle?

    PubMed

    Moon, Eunyoung; Nam, Seung Won; Shin, Woongghi; Park, Myung Gil; Coats, D Wayne

    2015-11-01

    The syndinean dinoflagellates are a diverse assemblage of alveolate endoparasites that branch basal to the core dinoflagellates. Because of their phylogenetic position, the syndineans are considered key model microorganisms in understanding early evolution in the dinoflagellates. Closed mitosis with an extranuclear spindle that traverses the nucleus in cytoplasmic grooves or tunnels is viewed as one of the morphological features shared by syndinean and core dinoflagellates. Here we describe nuclear morphology and mitosis in the syndinean dinoflagellate Amoebophrya sp. from Akashiwo sanguinea, a member of the A. ceratii complex, as revealed by protargol silver impregnation, DNA specific fluorochromes, and transmission electron microscopy. Our observations show that not all species classified as dinoflagellates have an extranuclear spindle. In Amoebophrya sp. from A. sanguinea, an extranuclear microtubule cylinder located in a depression in the nuclear surface during interphase moves into the nucleoplasm via sequential membrane fusion events and develops into an entirely intranuclear spindle. Results suggest that the intranuclear spindle of Amoebophrya spp. may have evolved from an ancestral extranuclear spindle and indicate the need for taxonomic revision of the Amoebophryidae. PMID:26491972

  13. Induced rates of mitotic crossing over and possible mitotic gene conversion per wing anlage cell in Drosophila melanogaster by X rays and fission neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ayaki, T.; Fujikawa, K.; Ryo, H.; Itoh, T.; Kondo, S. )

    1990-09-01

    As a model for chromosome aberrations, radiation-induced mitotic recombination of mwh and flr genes in Drosophila melanogaster strain (mwh +/+ flr) was quantitatively studied. Fission neutrons were five to six times more effective than X rays per unit dose in producing either crossover-mwh/flr twins and mwh singles-or flr singles, indicating that common processes are involved in the production of crossover and flr singles. The X-ray-induced rate/wing anlage cell/Gy for flr singles was 1 X 10(-5), whereas that of crossover was 2 x 10(-4); the former and the latter rate are of the same order of magnitude as those of gene conversion and crossover in yeast, respectively. Thus, we conclude that proximal-marker flr singles induced in the transheterozygote are gene convertants. Using the model based on yeast that recombination events result from repair of double-strand breaks or gaps, we propose that mitotic recombination in the fly is a secondary result of recombinational DNA repair. Evidence for recombinational misrepair in the fly is given. The relative ratio of radiation-induced mitotic crossover to spontaneous meiotic crossover is one order of magnitude higher in the fly than in yeast and humans.

  14. Rare Case of Spindle Cell Haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Chavva, Sunanda; Garlapati, Komali; Reddy, G. Siva Prasad; Gannepalli, Ashalata

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell haemangioma (SCH) is a benign vascular lesion which usually occurs on distal extremities. It was previously regarded as haemangioendothelioma and was initially perceived to be low grade angiosarcoma.They are characterized by cavernous blood vessels and spindle cell proliferation. It is now considered as a reactive lesion and conservative surgical excision is preferred treatment. Intraoral occurrence is rare; hence we present a case of SCH in a 33-year-old male that presented as a swelling below the tongue. Histopathology showed well circumscribed proliferating spindle cells attached to vessel walls, dilated vascular spaces. The lesion was positive for CD31 and CD34 markers suggesting it to be of endothelial cell origin. PMID:26266229

  15. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    PubMed Central

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-01-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres in mammalian muscle spindles. Images Fig. 7 PMID:2532636

  16. Katanin contributes to interspecies spindle length scaling in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Loughlin, Rose; Wilbur, Jeremy D.; McNally, Francis J.; Nédélec, François J.; Heald, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Bipolar spindles must separate chromosomes by the appropriate distance during cell division, but mechanisms determining spindle length are poorly understood. Based on a 2D model of meiotic spindle assembly, we predicted that higher localized microtubule (MT) depolymerization rates could generate the shorter spindles observed in egg extracts of X. tropicalis compared to X. laevis. We found that katanin-dependent MT severing was increased in X. tropicalis, which lacks an inhibitory phosphorylation site in the p60 catalytic subunit that is present in X. laevis p60. Katanin inhibition lengthened spindles in both species, and kinetochore fibers extended through X. tropicalis spindle poles disrupting them. In both X. tropicalis extracts and the spindle simulation, a threshold number of stable kinetochore fibers could overwhelm MT depolymerization, leading to similar phenotypes. Thus, mechanisms have evolved in different species to scale spindle size and coordinate regulation of multiple MT populations in order to generate a robust steady state structure. PMID:22153081

  17. Dynactin-dependent cortical dynein and spherical spindle shape correlate temporally with meiotic spindle rotation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Marina E; Flynn, Jonathan R; McNally, Karen P; Cortes, Daniel B; Price, Kari L; Kuehnert, Paul A; Panzica, Michelle T; Andaya, Armann; Leary, Julie A; McNally, Francis J

    2015-09-01

    Oocyte meiotic spindles orient with one pole juxtaposed to the cortex to facilitate extrusion of chromosomes into polar bodies. In Caenorhabditis elegans, these acentriolar spindles initially orient parallel to the cortex and then rotate to the perpendicular orientation. To understand the mechanism of spindle rotation, we characterized events that correlated temporally with rotation, including shortening of the spindle in the pole-to pole axis, which resulted in a nearly spherical spindle at rotation. By analyzing large spindles of polyploid C. elegans and a related nematode species, we found that spindle rotation initiated at a defined spherical shape rather than at a defined spindle length. In addition, dynein accumulated on the cortex just before rotation, and microtubules grew from the spindle with plus ends outward during rotation. Dynactin depletion prevented accumulation of dynein on the cortex and prevented spindle rotation independently of effects on spindle shape. These results support a cortical pulling model in which spindle shape might facilitate rotation because a sphere can rotate without deforming the adjacent elastic cytoplasm. We also present evidence that activation of spindle rotation is promoted by dephosphorylation of the basic domain of p150 dynactin. PMID:26133383

  18. Dynactin-dependent cortical dynein and spherical spindle shape correlate temporally with meiotic spindle rotation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Marina E.; Flynn, Jonathan R.; McNally, Karen P.; Cortes, Daniel B.; Price, Kari L.; Kuehnert, Paul A.; Panzica, Michelle T.; Andaya, Armann; Leary, Julie A.; McNally, Francis J.

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte meiotic spindles orient with one pole juxtaposed to the cortex to facilitate extrusion of chromosomes into polar bodies. In Caenorhabditis elegans, these acentriolar spindles initially orient parallel to the cortex and then rotate to the perpendicular orientation. To understand the mechanism of spindle rotation, we characterized events that correlated temporally with rotation, including shortening of the spindle in the pole-to pole axis, which resulted in a nearly spherical spindle at rotation. By analyzing large spindles of polyploid C. elegans and a related nematode species, we found that spindle rotation initiated at a defined spherical shape rather than at a defined spindle length. In addition, dynein accumulated on the cortex just before rotation, and microtubules grew from the spindle with plus ends outward during rotation. Dynactin depletion prevented accumulation of dynein on the cortex and prevented spindle rotation independently of effects on spindle shape. These results support a cortical pulling model in which spindle shape might facilitate rotation because a sphere can rotate without deforming the adjacent elastic cytoplasm. We also present evidence that activation of spindle rotation is promoted by dephosphorylation of the basic domain of p150 dynactin. PMID:26133383

  19. Mitotic catenation is monitored and resolved by a PKCε-regulated pathway.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, Nicola; Pike, Tanya; Zicha, Daniel; Collinson, Lucy; Parker, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Exit from mitosis is controlled by silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). It is important that preceding exit, all sister chromatid pairs are correctly bioriented, and that residual catenation is resolved, permitting complete sister chromatid separation in the ensuing anaphase. Here we determine that the metaphase response to catenation in mammalian cells operates through PKCε. The PKCε-controlled pathway regulates exit from the SAC only when mitotic cells are challenged by retained catenation and this delayed exit is characterized by BubR1-high and Mad2-low kinetochores. In addition, we show that this pathway is necessary to facilitate resolution of retained catenanes in mitosis. When delayed by catenation in mitosis, inhibition of PKCε results in premature entry into anaphase with PICH-positive strands and chromosome bridging. These findings demonstrate the importance of PKCε-mediated regulation in protection from loss of chromosome integrity in cells failing to resolve catenation in G2. PMID:25483024

  20. Mitosis-specific phosphorylation of PML at T409 regulates spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Jin, J; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    During mitosis, Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) change dramatically in morphology and composition, but little is known about function of PML in mitosis. Here, we show that PML is phosphorylated at T409 (PML p409) in a mitosis-specific manner. More importantly, PML p409 contributes to maintain the duration of pro-metaphase and regulates spindle checkpoint. Deficient PML p409 caused a shortening of pro-metaphase and challenged the nocodazole-triggered mitotic arrest. T409A mutation led to a higher frequency of misaligned chromosomes on metaphase plate, and subsequently death in late mitosis. In addition, inhibition of PML p409 repressed growth of tumor cells, suggesting that PML p409 is a potential target for cancer therapy. Collectively, our study demonstrated an important phosphorylated site of PML, which contributed to explore the role of PML in mitosis. PMID:27609478

  1. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Josie K.; Lane, Simon I. R.; Merriman, Julie A.; Jones, Keith T.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule–kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  2. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Collins, Josie K; Lane, Simon I R; Merriman, Julie A; Jones, Keith T

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule-kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  3. Radiosensitivity of chromosomes in two successive mitotic cycles of human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Luchnik, N.V.; Poryadkova, N.A.

    1988-11-01

    A culture of human lymphocytes was irradiated with /gamma/-quanta in a dose of 0.5 Gy with different ratios of cells in first (M1) and second (M2) mitotic cycle and the frequency of aberrations induced at stage G2 was analyzed. With increase in interval of time between the start of culturing and irradiation, total yield of aberrations increased in a regular way. However, if the M1:M2 ratio is considered, then it turns out that in M2 chromosomes are /approximately/1.5 times more sensitive than in M1: within the limits of each cycle, radiosensitivity is constant and does not depend on its duration. It was established in accordance with data of other authors that 5-bromodeoxyuridine (5-BdU) increases radiosensitivity materially.

  4. Spindle speed effects on cotton fiber quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three cotton varieties were grown under furrow-irrigated conditions in southern New Mexico and hand-harvested in a way that kept individual bolls intact. The cotton bolls were conditioned in a controlled atmosphere and then subjected to a single cotton picker spindle operating at a speed of 1000 to...

  5. Spinning Wool with a Hand Spindle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kren, Margo

    1982-01-01

    Describes an eight-week program in which 8- to 14-year-olds learned to spin raw wool into yarn. Students observed wool shearing at a sheep farm, learned to prepare wool for spinning, and spun their own yarn. Detail directions for carding and use of hand spindles are included. (AM)

  6. Mitotic Slippage and Expression of Survivin Are Linked to Differential Sensitivity of Human Cancer Cell-Lines to the Kinesin-5 Inhibitor Monastrol

    PubMed Central

    Hershfinkel, Michal; Gheber, Larisa

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic Kinesin-5 motor proteins crosslink and slide apart antiparallel spindle microtubules, thus performing essential functions in mitotic spindle dynamics. Specific inhibition of their function by monastrol-like small molecules has been examined in clinical trials as anticancer treatment, with only partial success. Thus, strategies that improve the efficiency of monastrol-like anticancer drugs are required. In the current study, we examined the link between sensitivity to monastrol and occurrence of mitotic slippage in several human cell-lines. We found that the rank of sensitivity to monastrol, from most sensitive to least sensitive, is: AGS>HepG2>Lovo>Du145≥HT29. We show correlation between the sensitivity of a particular cell-line to monastrol and the tendency of the same cell-line to undergo mitotic slippage. We also found that in the monastrol resistant HT29 cells, prolonged monastrol treatments increase mRNA and protein levels of the chromosomal passenger protein survivin. In contrast, survivin levels are not increased by this treatment in the monastrol-sensitive AGS cells. We further show that over-expression of survivin in the monastrol-sensitive AGS cells reduces mitotic slippage and increases resistance to monastrol. Finally, we show that during short exposure to monastrol, Si RNA silencing of survivin expression reduces cell viability in both AGS and HT29 cells. Our data suggest that the efficiency of anti-cancer treatment with specific kinesin-5 inhibitors may be improved by modulation of expression levels of survivin. PMID:26035434

  7. Mitotic slippage underlies the relationship between p53 dysfunction and the induction of large micronuclei by colcemid.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kiyohiro; Todo, Takeshi

    2013-07-01

    Micronuclei induced by aneugens are larger than those induced by clastogens in both in vitro and in vivo micronucleus (MN) assays. p53 dysfunction increases the formation of large micronuclei following treatment with aneugens; this study sought to identify the mechanisms responsible for this. Treatment with colcemid, both a mitotic inhibitor and an aneugen, induced MN containing two or more chromosomes more frequently in NH32 cells, in which p53 function is compromised, than in TK6 cells, in which p53 is functional. This indicates that p53 dysfunction enhances aneugen-induced chromosome loss or perturbs apoptosis, resulting in the formation of large MN. To examine the former hypothesis, the incidence of chromosome malsegregation in colcemid-treated TK6 and NH32 cells was compared using the cytokinesis-block MN assay. The incidence of chromosome non-disjunction was higher in NH32 cells than in TK6 cells, whereas the incidence of MN containing two or more chromosomes was similar between the two cell lines. To address the involvement of apoptosis in cell cycle progression, examination of chromosome 8 distribution revealed that more mononuclear NH32 than TK6 cells were tetraploid after prolonged mitotic inhibition, which indicated that the more number of NH32 cells may have bypassed the spindle assembly checkpoint via mitotic slippage and progression into the next interphase. Cells that underwent mitotic slippage were likely to contain lagging chromosomes formed via chromosome malsegregation, resulting in MN separated from the main nucleus. The number of TK6 cells containing large MN following colcemid treatment was increased by treatment with a caspase inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that TK6 cells with MN normally undergo apoptosis. In conclusion, these findings indicate that mitotic slippage and perturbed apoptosis contribute to the induction of large MN in p53-compromised cells following treatment with colcemid. PMID:23702691

  8. v-Src causes delocalization of Mklp1, Aurora B, and INCENP from the spindle midzone during cytokinesis failure

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Shuhei; Nakayama, Yuji; Honda, Takuya; Aoki, Azumi; Tamura, Naoki; Abe, Kohei; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2013-06-10

    Src-family tyrosine kinases are aberrantly activated in cancers, and this activation is associated with malignant tumor progression. v-Src, encoded by the v-src transforming gene of the Rous sarcoma virus, is a mutant variant of the cellular proto-oncogene c-Src. Although investigations with temperature sensitive mutants of v-Src have shown that v-Src induces many oncogenic processes, the effects on cell division are unknown. Here, we show that v-Src inhibits cellular proliferation of HCT116, HeLa S3 and NIH3T3 cells. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that inducible expression of v-Src results in an accumulation of 4N cells. Time-lapse analysis revealed that binucleation is induced through the inhibition of cytokinesis, a final step of cell division. The localization of Mklp1, which is essential for cytokinesis, to the spindle midzone is inhibited in v-Src-expressing cells. Intriguingly, Aurora B, which regulates Mklp1 localization at the midzone, is delocalized from the spindle midzone and the midbody but not from the metaphase chromosomes upon v-Src expression. Mklp2, which is responsible for the relocation of Aurora B from the metaphase chromosomes to the spindle midzone, is also lost from the spindle midzone. These results suggest that v-Src inhibits cytokinesis through the delocalization of Mklp1 and Aurora B from the spindle midzone, resulting in binucleation. -- Highlights: • v-Src inhibits cell proliferation of HCT116, HeLa S3 and NIH3T3 cells. • v-Src induces binucleation together with cytokinesis failure. • v-Src causes delocalization of Mklp1, Aurora B and INCENP from the spindle midzone.

  9. Fbxo30 Regulates Mammopoiesis by Targeting the Bipolar Mitotic Kinesin Eg5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Wang, Yin; Du, Zhanwen; Yan, Xiaoli; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Fbxo30 is an orphan member of the F-box protein family with no known substrate or function. Here we report that, while Fbxo30(-/-) mice exhibit normal development, growth, lifespan, and fertility, the females fail to nurture their offspring as a result of defective mammopoiesis. Mass spectrometry analysis of Fbxo30-associated proteins revealed that Fbxo30 specifically interacts with the bipolar spindle kinesin EG5 (encoded by Kif11). As a result, Fbxo30 targets Eg5 for ubiquitinylation and controls its oscillation during the cell cycle. Correlated with EG5 dysregulation, Fbxo30(-/-) mammary epithelial cells exhibit multiple defects in centrosome homeostasis, mitotic spindle formation, and proliferation. Effects on proliferation, centrosome homeostasis, and mammopoiesis in the Fbxo30(-/-) mice were rescued through normalization of Eg5 activity using shRNA and/or an EG5 inhibitor. Our data reveal the Fbxo30-Eg5 interaction as a critical checkpoint in mammopoiesis and a critical role for ubiquitinylation-regulated Eg5 oscillation in the cell cycle. PMID:27117404

  10. Rho GTPase–independent regulation of mitotic progression by the RhoGEF Net1

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Sarita; Oh, Wonkyung; Carr, Heather S.; Frost, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroepithelial transforming gene 1 (Net1) is a RhoA-subfamily–specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is overexpressed in multiple human cancers and is required for proliferation. Molecular mechanisms underlying its role in cell proliferation are unknown. Here we show that overexpression or knockdown of Net1 causes mitotic defects. Net1 is required for chromosome congression during metaphase and generation of stable kinetochore microtubule attachments. Accordingly, inhibition of Net1 expression results in spindle assembly checkpoint activation. The ability of Net1 to control mitosis is independent of RhoA or RhoB activation, as knockdown of either GTPase does not phenocopy effects of Net1 knockdown on nuclear morphology, and effects of Net1 knockdown are effectively rescued by expression of catalytically inactive Net1. We also observe that Net1 expression is required for centrosomal activation of p21-activated kinase and its downstream kinase Aurora A, which are critical regulators of centrosome maturation and spindle assembly. These results identify Net1 as a novel regulator of mitosis and indicate that altered expression of Net1, as occurs in human cancers, may adversely affect genomic stability. PMID:23864709

  11. Fbxo30 Regulates Mammopoiesis by Targeting the Bipolar Mitotic Kinesin Eg5

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Wang, Yin; Du, Zhanwen; Yan, Xiaoli; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Fbxo30 is an orphan member of the F-box protein family with no known substrate or function. Here, we report that while Fbxo30−/− mice exhibit normal development, growth, life span, and fertility, the females fail to nurture their offspring due to defective mammopoiesis. Mass spectrometry analysis of Fbxo30-associated proteins revealed that Fbxo30 specifically interacts with the bipolar spindle kinesin EG5 (encoded by Kif11). As a result, Fbxo30 targets Eg5 for ubiquitinylation and controls its oscillation during the cell cycle. Correlated with EG5 dysregulation, Fbxo30−/− mammary epithelial cells exhibit multiple defects in centrosome homeostasis, mitotic spindle formation, and proliferation. Effects on proliferation, centrosome homeostasis, and mammopoiesis in the Fbxo30−/− mice were rescued through normalization of Eg5 activity using shRNA and/or an EG5 inhibitor. Our data reveal the Fbxo30-Eg5 interaction as a critical checkpoint in mammopoiesis and a critical role for ubiquitinylation-regulated Eg5 oscillation in the cell cycle. PMID:27117404

  12. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is required for mitotic progression through negative regulation of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jiabin; Erikson, Raymond L.; Liu, Xiaoqi

    2006-01-01

    Although the essential function of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) in DNA damage response has been well established, the role of Chk1 in normal cell cycle progression is unclear. By using RNAi to specifically deplete Chk1, we determined loss-of-function phenotypes in HeLa cells. A vector-based RNAi approach showed that Chk1 is required for normal cell proliferation and survival, inasmuch as a dramatic cell-cycle arrest at G2/M phase and massive apoptosis were observed in Chk1-deficient cells. Coupling of siRNA with cell synchronization further revealed that Chk1 depletion leads to metaphase block, as indicated by various mitotic markers. Neither bipolar spindle formation nor centrosome functions were affected by Chk1 depletion; however, the depleted cells exhibited chromosome misalignment during metaphase, chromosome lagging during anaphase, and kinetochore defects within the regions of misaligned/lagging chromosomes. Moreover, we showed that Chk1 is a negative regulator of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), in either the absence or presence of DNA damage. Finally, Chk1 depletion leads to the activation of the spindle checkpoint because codepletion of spindle checkpoint proteins rescues the Chk1 depletion-induced mitotic arrest. PMID:16873548

  13. Spindle assembly checkpoint inactivation fails to suppress neuroblast tumour formation in aurA mutant Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Caous, Renaud; Pascal, Aude; Romé, Pierre; Richard-Parpaillon, Laurent; Karess, Roger; Giet, Régis

    2015-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires accurate control of cell proliferation, differentiation and chromosome segregation. Drosophila sas-4 and aurA mutants present brain tumours with extra neuroblasts (NBs), defective mitotic spindle assembly and delayed mitosis due to activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Here we inactivate the SAC in aurA and sas-4 mutants to determine whether the generation of aneuploidy compromises NB proliferation. Inactivation of the SAC in the sas-4 mutant impairs NB proliferation and disrupts euploidy. By contrast, disrupting the SAC in the aurA mutant does not prevent NB amplification, tumour formation or chromosome segregation. The monitoring of Mad2 and cyclin B dynamics in live aurA NBs reveals that SAC satisfaction is not coupled to cyclin B degradation. Thus, the NBs of aurA mutants present delayed mitosis, with accurate chromosome segregation occurring in a SAC-independent manner. We report here the existence of an Aurora A-dependent mechanism promoting efficient, timed cyclin B degradation. PMID:26568519

  14. Nud1p, the yeast homolog of Centriolin, regulates spindle pole body inheritance in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Oren; Taxis, Christof; Keller, Philipp J; Benjak, Aleksander; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Simchen, Giora; Knop, Michael

    2006-08-23

    Nud1p, a protein homologous to the mammalian centrosome and midbody component Centriolin, is a component of the budding yeast spindle pole body (SPB), with roles in anchorage of microtubules and regulation of the mitotic exit network during vegetative growth. Here we analyze the function of Nud1p during yeast meiosis. We find that a nud1-2 temperature-sensitive mutant has two meiosis-related defects that reflect genetically distinct functions of Nud1p. First, the mutation affects spore formation due to its late function during spore maturation. Second, and most important, the mutant loses its ability to distinguish between the ages of the four spindle pole bodies, which normally determine which SPB would be preferentially included in the mature spores. This affects the regulation of genome inheritance in starved meiotic cells and leads to the formation of random dyads instead of non-sister dyads under these conditions. Both functions of Nud1p are connected to the ability of Spc72p to bind to the outer plaque and half-bridge (via Kar1p) of the SPB. PMID:16888627

  15. Step by step approach to rare breast lesions containing spindle cells.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Betül; Erdoğan, Gülgün; Karaveli, Fatma Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of spindle cell lesions of breast is challenging for certain reasons. The most important reason is the presence of cytological atypia and mitosis in all three conditions: reactive, benign, and malignant. Patients diagnosed with benign and malignant tumor/tumor-like lesions that had spindle cell components following the histopathological examination were included in the study. The patients' medical records were accessed to obtain the clinical history, follow-up notes, and radiological findings. Following histopathological, immunohistochemical, and clinical evaluations, the patients were diagnosed as follows: pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH), bilateral desmoid-type fibromatosis (FM), adenomyoepithelioma (AME), myofibroblastoma (MFB), malignant phyllodes tumor (MF), high-grade AS, post-chemotherapy osteosarcoma (OS) + Paget's disease, and metaplastic carcinoma (MC). An algorithmic approach should be used in the diagnosis; cellular structure, presence and grade of atypia, growth pattern, mitotic activity, immunohistochemical staining, and clinical and radiological features should be evaluated together. Detection of some molecular changes can be useful in differential diagnosis. PMID:26558181

  16. Mitotic fidelity requires transgenerational action of a testis-restricted HP1

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Mia T; Vander Wende, Helen M; Malik, Harmit S

    2015-01-01

    Sperm-packaged DNA must undergo extensive reorganization to ensure its timely participation in embryonic mitosis. Whereas maternal control over this remodeling is well described, paternal contributions are virtually unknown. In this study, we show that Drosophila melanogaster males lacking Heterochromatin Protein 1E (HP1E) sire inviable embryos that undergo catastrophic mitosis. In these embryos, the paternal genome fails to condense and resolve into sister chromatids in synchrony with the maternal genome. This delay leads to a failure of paternal chromosomes, particularly the heterochromatin-rich sex chromosomes, to separate on the first mitotic spindle. Remarkably, HP1E is not inherited on mature sperm chromatin. Instead, HP1E primes paternal chromosomes during spermatogenesis to ensure faithful segregation post-fertilization. This transgenerational effect suggests that maternal control is necessary but not sufficient for transforming sperm DNA into a mitotically competent pronucleus. Instead, paternal action during spermiogenesis exerts post-fertilization control to ensure faithful chromosome segregation in the embryo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07378.001 PMID:26151671

  17. Truncated form of tenascin-X, XB-S, interacts with mitotic motor kinesin Eg5.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiya; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    XB-S is a protein with an amino-terminal-truncated form of tenascin-X (TNXB). However, the precise roles of XB-S in vivo are unknown. In this study, to determine the role of XB-S in vivo, we screened XB-S-binding proteins. FLAG-tagged XB-S was transiently introduced into 293T cells. Then its associated proteins were purified by immunoprecipitation using an anti-FLAG antibody and its components were identified by mass spectrometric analyses. Mitotic motor kinesin Eg5 was identified in the immunoprecipitates. XB-S and Eg5 proteins were co-localized in the cytoplasm in interphase and mitosis, but XB-S did not localize on mitotic spindle microtubules, on which Eg5 prominently localized in mitosis. As for Eg5 binding to XB-S, glutathione S-transferase-fused XB-S expressed in vitro directly bound to full-length Eg5 translated in reticulocyte lysate, and the XB-S-binding region was located in the motor domain of Eg5. Furthermore, during cell cycle progression XB-S showed a similar expression profile to that of Eg5. These results suggest possible involvement of XB-S in the function of Eg5. PMID:18679583

  18. Microtubule organization by the antagonistic mitotic motors kinesin-5 and kinesin-14

    PubMed Central

    Hentrich, Christian

    2010-01-01

    During cell division, different molecular motors act synergistically to rearrange microtubules. Minus end–directed motors are thought to have a dual role: focusing microtubule ends to poles and establishing together with plus end–directed motors a balance of force between antiparallel microtubules in the spindle. We study here the competing action of Xenopus laevis kinesin-14 and -5 in vitro in situations in which these motors with opposite directionality cross-link and slide microtubules. We find that full-length kinesin-14 can form microtubule asters without additional factors, whereas kinesin-5 does not, likely reflecting an adaptation to mitotic function. A stable balance of force is not established between two antiparallel microtubules with these motors. Instead, directional instability is generated, promoting efficient motor and microtubule sorting. A nonmotor microtubule cross-linker can suppress directional instability but also impedes microtubule sorting, illustrating a conflict between stability and dynamicity of organization. These results establish the basic organizational properties of these antagonistic mitotic motors and a microtubule bundler. PMID:20439998

  19. Changes in distribution of nuclear matrix antigens during the mitotic cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Chaly, N; Bladon, T; Setterfield, G; Little, J E; Kaplan, J G; Brown, D L

    1984-08-01

    We examined the distribution of nonlamin nuclear matrix antigens during the mitotic cell cycle in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. Four monoclonal antibodies produced against isolated nuclear matrices were used to characterize antigens by the immunoblotting of isolated nuclear matrix preparations, and were used to localize the antigens by indirect immunofluorescence. For comparison, lamins and histones were localized using human autoimmune antibodies. At interphase, the monoclonal antibodies recognized non-nucleolar and nonheterochromatin nuclear components. Antibody P1 stained the nuclear periphery homogeneously, with some small invaginations toward the interior of the nucleus. Antibody I1 detected an antigen distributed as fine granules throughout the nuclear interior. Monoclonals PI1 and PI2 stained both the nuclear periphery and interior, with some characteristic differences. During mitosis, P1 and I1 were chromosome-associated, whereas PI1 and PI2 dispersed in the cytoplasm. Antibody P1 heavily stained the periphery of the chromosome mass, and we suggest that the antigen may play a role in maintaining interphase and mitotic chromosome order. With antibody I1, bright granules were distributed along the chromosomes and there was also some diffuse internal staining. The antigen to I1 may be involved in chromatin/chromosome higher-order organization throughout the cell cycle. Antibodies PI1 and PI2 were redistributed independently during prophase, and dispersed into the cytoplasm during prometaphase. Antibody PI2 also detected antigen associated with the spindle poles. PMID:6378926

  20. The RanGTP Pathway: From Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Transport to Spindle Assembly and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Ran regulates the interaction of transport receptors with a number of cellular cargo proteins. The high affinity binding of the GTP-bound form of Ran to import receptors promotes cargo release, whereas its binding to export receptors stabilizes their interaction with the cargo. This basic mechanism linked to the asymmetric distribution of the two nucleotide-bound forms of Ran between the nucleus and the cytoplasm generates a switch like mechanism controlling nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Since 1999, we have known that after nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) Ran and the above transport receptors also provide a local control over the activity of factors driving spindle assembly and regulating other aspects of cell division. The identification and functional characterization of RanGTP mitotic targets is providing novel insights into mechanisms essential for cell division. Here we review our current knowledge on the RanGTP system and its regulation and we focus on the recent advances made through the characterization of its mitotic targets. We then briefly review the novel functions of the pathway that were recently described. Altogether, the RanGTP system has moonlighting functions exerting a spatial control over protein interactions that drive specific functions depending on the cellular context. PMID:26793706

  1. Escape from Mitotic Arrest: An Unexpected Connection Between Microtubule Dynamics and Epigenetic Regulation of Centromeric Chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    George, Anuja A; Walworth, Nancy C

    2015-12-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation is necessary to ensure genomic integrity. Segregation depends on the proper functioning of the centromere, kinetochore, and mitotic spindle microtubules and is monitored by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defects in Dis1, a microtubule-associated protein that influences microtubule dynamics, lead to mitotic arrest as a result of an active SAC and consequent failure to grow at low temperature. In a mutant dis1 background (dis1-288), loss of function of Msc1, a fission yeast homolog of the KDM5 family of proteins, suppresses the growth defect and promotes normal mitosis. Genetic analysis implicates a histone deacetylase (HDAC)-linked pathway in suppression because HDAC mutants clr6-1, clr3∆, and sir2∆, though not hos2∆, also promote normal mitosis in the dis1-288 mutant. Suppression of the dis phenotype through loss of msc1 function requires the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2 and is limited by the presence of the heterochromatin-associated HP1 protein homolog Swi6. We speculate that alterations in histone acetylation promote a centromeric chromatin environment that compensates for compromised dis1 function by allowing for successful kinetochore-microtubule interactions that can satisfy the SAC. In cells arrested in mitosis by mutation of dis1, loss of function of epigenetic determinants such as Msc1 or specific HDACs can promote cell survival. Because the KDM5 family of proteins has been implicated in human cancers, an appreciation of the potential role of this family of proteins in chromosome segregation is warranted. PMID:26510788

  2. Sensitivity to sodium arsenite in human melanoma cells depends upon susceptibility to arsenite-induced mitotic arrest

    SciTech Connect

    McNeely, Samuel C.; Belshoff, Alex C.; Taylor, B. Frazier; Fan, Teresa W-M.; McCabe, Michael J.; Pinhas, Allan R.

    2008-06-01

    Arsenic induces clinical remission in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia and has potential for treatment of other cancers. The current study examines factors influencing sensitivity to arsenic using human malignant melanoma cell lines. A375 and SK-Mel-2 cells were sensitive to clinically achievable concentrations of arsenite, whereas SK-Mel-3 and SK-Mel-28 cells required supratherapeutic levels for toxicity. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) transporter function attenuated arsenite resistance, consistent with studies suggesting that arsenite is extruded from the cell as a glutathione conjugate by MRP-1. However, MRP-1 was not overexpressed in resistant lines and GST-{pi} was only slightly elevated. ICP-MS analysis indicated that arsenite-resistant SK-Mel-28 cells did not accumulate less arsenic than arsenite-sensitive A375 cells, suggesting that resistance was not attributable to reduced arsenic accumulation but rather to intrinsic properties of resistant cell lines. The mode of arsenite-induced cell death was apoptosis. Arsenite-induced apoptosis is associated with cell cycle alterations. Cell cycle analysis revealed arsenite-sensitive cells arrested in mitosis whereas arsenite-resistant cells did not, suggesting that induction of mitotic arrest occurs at lower intracellular arsenic concentrations. Higher intracellular arsenic levels induced cell cycle arrest in the S-phase and G{sub 2}-phase in SK-Mel-3 and SK-Mel-28 cells, respectively. The lack of arsenite-induced mitotic arrest in resistant cell lines was associated with a weakened spindle checkpoint resulting from reduced expression of spindle checkpoint protein BUBR1. These data suggest that arsenite has potential for treatment of solid tumors but a functional spindle checkpoint is a prerequisite for a positive response to its clinical application.

  3. Kalanchoe tubiflora extract inhibits cell proliferation by affecting the mitotic apparatus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Kalanchoe tubiflora (KT) is a succulent plant native to Madagascar, and is commonly used as a medicinal agent in Southern Brazil. The underlying mechanisms of tumor suppression are largely unexplored. Methods Cell viability and wound-healing were analyzed by MTT assay and scratch assay respectively. Cell cycle profiles were analyzed by FACS. Mitotic defects were analyzed by indirect immunofluoresence images. Results An n-Butanol-soluble fraction of KT (KT-NB) was able to inhibit cell proliferation. After a 48 h treatment with 6.75 μg/ml of KT, the cell viability was less than 50% of controls, and was further reduced to less than 10% at higher concentrations. KT-NB also induced an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle as well as an increased level of cells in the subG1 phase. Instead of disrupting the microtubule network of interphase cells, KT-NB reduced cell viability by inducing multipolar spindles and defects in chromosome alignment. KT-NB inhibits cell proliferation and reduces cell viability by two mechanisms that are exclusively involved with cell division: first by inducing multipolarity; second by disrupting chromosome alignment during metaphase. Conclusion KT-NB reduced cell viability by exclusively affecting formation of the proper structure of the mitotic apparatus. This is the main idea of the new generation of anti-mitotic agents. All together, KT-NB has sufficient potential to warrant further investigation as a potential new anticancer agent candidate. PMID:22963191

  4. NuMA localization, stability, and function in spindle orientation involve 4.1 and Cdk1 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Lindsey; Poulson, Nicholas D.; Foote, Henry P.; Lechler, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The epidermis is a multilayered epithelium that requires asymmetric divisions for stratification. A conserved cortical protein complex, including LGN, nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA), and dynein/dynactin, plays a key role in establishing proper spindle orientation during asymmetric divisions. The requirements for the cortical recruitment of these proteins, however, remain unclear. In this work, we show that NuMA is required to recruit dynactin to the cell cortex of keratinocytes. NuMA's cortical recruitment requires LGN; however, LGN interactions are not sufficient for this localization. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that the 4.1-binding domain of NuMA is important for stabilizing its interaction with the cell cortex. This is functionally important, as loss of 4.1/NuMA interaction results in spindle orientation defects, using two distinct assays. Furthermore, we observe an increase in cortical NuMA localization as cells enter anaphase. Inhibition of Cdk1 or mutation of a single residue in NuMA mimics this effect. NuMA's anaphase localization is independent of LGN and 4.1 interactions, revealing two distinct mechanisms responsible for NuMA cortical recruitment at different stages of mitosis. This work highlights the complexity of NuMA localization and reveals the importance of NuMA cortical stability for productive force generation during spindle orientation. PMID:24109598

  5. Dynein Light Intermediate Chain 2 Facilitates the Metaphase to Anaphase Transition by Inactivating the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Sagar P.; Sharma, Amit; Mylavarapu, Sivaram V. S.

    2016-01-01

    The multi-functional molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein performs diverse essential roles during mitosis. The mechanistic importance of the dynein Light Intermediate Chain homologs, LIC1 and LIC2 is unappreciated, especially in the context of mitosis. LIC1 and LIC2 are believed to exist in distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes as obligate subunits. LIC1 had earlier been reported to be required for metaphase to anaphase progression by inactivating the kinetochore-microtubule attachment-sensing arm of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). However, the functional importance of LIC2 during mitosis remains elusive. Here we report prominent novel roles for the LIC2 subunit of cytoplasmic dynein in regulating the spindle assembly checkpoint. LIC2 depletion in mammalian cells led to prolonged metaphase arrest in the presence of an active SAC and also to stretched kinetochores, thus implicating it in SAC inactivation. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy of SAC components revealed accumulation of both attachment- and tension-sensing checkpoint proteins at metaphase kinetochores upon LIC2 depletion. These observations support a stronger and more diverse role in checkpoint inactivation for LIC2 in comparison to its close homolog LIC1. Our study uncovers a novel functional hierarchy during mitotic checkpoint inactivation between the closely related but homologous LIC subunits of cytoplasmic dynein. These subtle functional distinctions between dynein subpopulations could be exploited to study specific aspects of the spindle assembly checkpoint, which is a key mediator of fidelity in eukaryotic cell division. PMID:27441562

  6. Protein phosphatase 4 is phosphorylated and inactivated by Cdk in response to spindle toxins and interacts with γ-tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Martin; Campbell, Kathryn; Saranzewa, Nastja; Campbell, David G; Hastie, C James; Peggie, Mark W; Martin-Granados, Cristina; Prescott, Alan R; Cohen, Patricia TW

    2013-01-01

    Many pharmaceuticals used to treat cancer target the cell cycle or mitotic spindle dynamics, such as the anti-tumor drug, paclitaxel, which stabilizes microtubules. Here we show that, in cells arrested in mitosis with the spindle toxins, nocodazole, or paclitaxel, the endogenous protein phosphatase 4 (Ppp4) complex Ppp4c-R2-R3A is phosphorylated on its regulatory (R) subunits, and its activity is inhibited. The phosphorylations are blocked by roscovitine, indicating that they may be mediated by Cdk1-cyclin B. Endogenous Ppp4c is enriched at the centrosomes in the absence and presence of paclitaxel, nocodazole, or roscovitine, and the activity of endogenous Ppp4c-R2-R3A is inhibited from G1/S to the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Endogenous γ-tubulin and its associated protein, γ-tubulin complex protein 2, both of which are essential for nucleation of microtubules at centrosomes, interact with the Ppp4 complex. Recombinant γ-tubulin can be phosphorylated by Cdk1-cyclin B or Brsk1 and dephosphorylated by Ppp4c-R2-R3A in vitro. The data indicate that Ppp4c-R2-R3A regulates microtubule organization at centrosomes during cell division in response to stress signals such as spindle toxins, paclitaxel, and nocodazole, and that inhibition of the Ppp4 complex may be advantageous for treatment of some cancers. PMID:23966160

  7. CEP215 is involved in the dynein-dependent accumulation of pericentriolar matrix proteins for spindle pole formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongju; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2010-02-15

    CEP 215 is a human orthologue of Drosophila centrosomin which is a core centrosome component for the pericentriolar matrix protein recruitment. Recent investigations revealed that CEP 215 is required for centrosome cohesion, centrosomal attachment of the gamma-TuRC, and microtubule dynamics. However, it remains obscure how CEP 215 functions for recruitment of the centrosomal proteins during the centrosome cycle. Here, we investigated a role of CEP 215 during mitosis. Knockdown of CEP 215 resulted in characteristic mitotic phenotypes, including monopolar spindle formation, a decrease in distance between the spindle pole pair, and detachment of the centrosomes from the spindle poles. We noticed that CEP 215 is critical for centrosomal localization of dynein throughout the cell cycle. As a consequence, the selective centrosomal proteins were not recruited to the centrosome properly. Finally, the centrosomal localization of CEP 215 also depends on the dynein-dynactin complex. Based on the results, we propose that CEP 215 regulates a dynein-dependent transport of the pericentriolar matrix proteins during the centrosome maturation. PMID:20139723

  8. Newly Characterized Region of CP190 Associates with Microtubules and Mediates Proper Spindle Morphology in Drosophila Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Plevock, Karen M.; Galletta, Brian J.; Slep, Kevin C.; Rusan, Nasser M.

    2015-01-01

    CP190 is a large, multi-domain protein, first identified as a centrosome protein with oscillatory localization over the course of the cell cycle. During interphase it has a well-established role within the nucleus as a chromatin insulator. Upon nuclear envelope breakdown, there is a striking redistribution of CP190 to centrosomes and the mitotic spindle, in addition to the population at chromosomes. Here, we investigate CP190 in detail by performing domain analysis in cultured Drosophila S2 cells combined with protein structure determination by X-ray crystallography, in vitro biochemical characterization, and in vivo fixed and live imaging of cp190 mutant flies. Our analysis of CP190 identifies a novel N-terminal centrosome and microtubule (MT) targeting region, sufficient for spindle localization. This region consists of a highly conserved BTB domain and a linker region that serves as the MT binding domain. We present the 2.5 Å resolution structure of the CP190 N-terminal 126 amino acids, which adopts a canonical BTB domain fold and exists as a stable dimer in solution. The ability of the linker region to robustly localize to MTs requires BTB domain-mediated dimerization. Deletion of the linker region using CRISPR significantly alters spindle morphology and leads to DNA segregation errors in the developing Drosophila brain neuroblasts. Collectively, we highlight a multivalent MT-binding architecture in CP190, which confers distinct subcellular cytoskeletal localization and function during mitosis. PMID:26649574

  9. Chromosome aberrations in plants as a monitoring system.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, W F

    1978-01-01

    The potential of higher plants as a first-tier assay system for detecting chemical mutagens is evaluated. The use of plant tissue (primarily root tips and pollen mother cells) for studying the induction of chromosomal aberrations is one of the oldest, simplest, most reliable, and inexpensive methods available. Specific types of abnormalities have been induced by different classes of pesticides. Chromosome clumping, contraction, stickiness, paling, fragmentation, dissolution, chromosome and chromatid bridges, C-mitosis, and endoploidy have been reported in the literature. Examples of cytogenetic studies with pesticides demonstrating the usefulness of higher plants as a monitoring system are reviewed. Pesticides which cause chromosome aberrations in plant cells also produce chromosome aberrations in cultured animal cells. Frequently, the aberrations are identical. For example, studies have shown that compounds which have a C-mitotic effect on plant cells have the same effect on animal cells. It is recommended that plant systems be accepted as a first-tier assay system for the detection of possible genetic damage by environmental chemicals. PMID:367773

  10. Role of phosphorylation of Cdc20 in p31comet-stimulated disassembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex

    PubMed Central

    Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Eytan, Esther; Ganoth, Dvora; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Dumin, Elena; Hershko, Avram

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint system delays anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. When the checkpoint is turned on, it promotes the formation of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), which inhibits the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins BubR1, Bub3, and Mad2 bound to the APC/C activator Cdc20. When the checkpoint is satisfied, MCC is disassembled and APC/C becomes active. Previous studies have shown that the Mad2-binding protein p31comet promotes the dissociation of Cdc20 from BubR1 in MCC in a process that requires ATP. We now show that a part of MCC dissociation is blocked by inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and that purified Cdk1–cyclin B stimulates this process. The mutation of all eight potential Cdk phosphorylation sites of Cdc20 partially prevented its release from BubR1. Furthermore, p31comet stimulated Cdk-catalyzed phosphorylation of Cdc20 in MCC. It is suggested that the binding of p31comet to Mad2 in MCC may trigger a conformational change in Cdc20 that facilitates its phosphorylation by Cdk, and that the latter process may promote its dissociation from BubR1. PMID:22566641

  11. Mitotic Functions for SNAP45, a Subunit of the Small Nuclear RNA-activating Protein Complex SNAPc*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Hernandez, Nouria

    2008-01-01

    The small nuclear RNA-activating protein complex SNAPc is required for transcription of small nuclear RNA genes and binds to a proximal sequence element in their promoters. SNAPc contains five types of subunits stably associated with each other. Here we show that one of these polypeptides, SNAP45, also known as PTF δ, localizes to centrosomes during parts of mitosis, as well as to the spindle midzone during anaphase and the mid-body during telophase. Consistent with localization to these mitotic structures, both down- and up-regulation of SNAP45 lead to a G2/M arrest with cells displaying abnormal mitotic structures. In contrast, down-regulation of SNAP190, another SNAPc subunit, leads to an accumulation of cells with a G0/G1 DNA content. These results are consistent with the proposal that SNAP45 plays two roles in the cell, one as a subunit of the transcription factor SNAPc and another as a factor required for proper mitotic progression. PMID:18356157

  12. CDK1 Phosphorylation of YAP Promotes Mitotic Defects and Cell Motility and Is Essential for Neoplastic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuping; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Miao; Chong, Rong; Ding, Shi-Jian; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2013-01-01

    The Yes-associated protein YAP is a downstream effector of the Hippo pathway of cell cycle control which plays important roles in tumorigenesis. Hippo-mediated phosphorylation YAP, mainly at S127, inactivates YAP function. In this study, we define a mechanism for positive regulation of YAP activity that is critical for its oncogenic function. Specifically, we found that YAP is phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by the cell cycle kinase CDK1 at T119, S289, and S367 during G2/M phase of the cell cycle. We also found that ectopic expression of a phosphomimetic YAP mutant (YAP3D, harboring T119D/S289D/S367D) was sufficient to induce mitotic defects in immortalized epithelial cells, including centrosome amplification, multipolar spindles and chromosome missegregation. Finally, we documented that mitotic phosphorylation of YAP was sufficient to promote cell migration and invasion in a manner essential for neoplastic cell transformation. In support of our findings, CDK1 inhibitors largely suppressed cell motility mediated by activated YAP-S127A but not the phosphomimetic mutant YAP3D. Collectively, our results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism for controlling the activity of YAP that is crucial for its oncogenic function mediated by mitotic dysregulation. PMID:24101154